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Sample records for 100-kyr glacial cycle

  1. Spectrum of 100-kyr glacial cycle: orbital inclination, not eccentricity.

    PubMed

    Muller, R A; MacDonald, G J

    1997-08-05

    Spectral analysis of climate data shows a strong narrow peak with period approximately 100 kyr, attributed by the Milankovitch theory to changes in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit. The narrowness of the peak does suggest an astronomical origin; however the shape of the peak is incompatible with both linear and nonlinear models that attribute the cycle to eccentricity or (equivalently) to the envelope of the precession. In contrast, the orbital inclination parameter gives a good match to both the spectrum and bispectrum of the climate data. Extraterrestrial accretion from meteoroids or interplanetary dust is proposed as a mechanism that could link inclination to climate, and experimental tests are described that could prove or disprove this hypothesis.

  2. Spectrum of 100-kyr glacial cycle: Orbital inclination, not eccentricity

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Richard A.; MacDonald, Gordon J.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis of climate data shows a strong narrow peak with period ≈100 kyr, attributed by the Milankovitch theory to changes in the eccentricity of the earth’s orbit. The narrowness of the peak does suggest an astronomical origin; however the shape of the peak is incompatible with both linear and nonlinear models that attribute the cycle to eccentricity or (equivalently) to the envelope of the precession. In contrast, the orbital inclination parameter gives a good match to both the spectrum and bispectrum of the climate data. Extraterrestrial accretion from meteoroids or interplanetary dust is proposed as a mechanism that could link inclination to climate, and experimental tests are described that could prove or disprove this hypothesis. PMID:11607741

  3. Summer solstice solar radiation, the 100 kyr Ice Age cycle, and the next Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledley, Tamara Shapiro

    Modeling studies suggest that the summer solstice solar radiation is more important than the caloric half-year solar radiation in producing glacial/interglacial cycles because it is more representative of the energy available to melt ice during the short melt season. Here it is shown that the correlation between the summer solstice solar radiation and the rate of change of the oxygen isotope record is generally greater than that between the caloric half-year radiation and the rate of change of the oxygen isotope record. These results also suggest that the sawtoothed nature of the 100 kyr cycle may be produced by periods of relatively slow changes in ice volume, punctuated by periods of rapid growth that are initiated at times of extremely low summer solstice radiation; and that it is unlikely that an ice age will begin in the next 70 kyr.

  4. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-kyr cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1993-01-01

    A new time-series analysis technique (called envelope inversion), which is based on multiple taper spectral analysis, is used to address the question of an abrupt versus a gradual onset of the 100-kyr ice-age periodicity in the middle Pleistocene. Three long (greater than 2.6 m.y.) time series from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 607 (midlatitude Atlantic) and Ocean Drilling Program site 677 (equatorial Pacific) were analyzed using delta(O-18) records. Results do not yield compelling evidence for an abrupt change in the 100-kyr delta(O-18) signal. Rather, the results suggest that the 100-kyr delta(O-18) cycle is phase-locked with the 124-kyr eccentricity cycle some 300-400 kyr prior to its late Pleistocene growth in amplitude and phase lock with the 95-kyr eccentricity cycle.

  5. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-kyr cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1993-01-01

    A new time-series analysis technique (called envelope inversion), which is based on multiple taper spectral analysis, is used to address the question of an abrupt versus a gradual onset of the 100-kyr ice-age periodicity in the middle Pleistocene. Three long (greater than 2.6 m.y.) time series from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 607 (midlatitude Atlantic) and Ocean Drilling Program site 677 (equatorial Pacific) were analyzed using delta(O-18) records. Results do not yield compelling evidence for an abrupt change in the 100-kyr delta(O-18) signal. Rather, the results suggest that the 100-kyr delta(O-18) cycle is phase-locked with the 124-kyr eccentricity cycle some 300-400 kyr prior to its late Pleistocene growth in amplitude and phase lock with the 95-kyr eccentricity cycle.

  6. Frequency variations of the earth's obliquity and the 100-kyr ice-age cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the earth's climate are induced by variations in the earth's orbital parameters which modulate the seasonal distribution of solar radiation. Periodicities in the geological climate record with cycles of 100, 41, and 23 kyr have been linked with changes in obliquity, eccentricity, and precession of the equinoxes. The effect of variations of eccentricity during a 100 kyr period is weak relative to the signals from obliquity and precession variations and it may therefore be expected that the 100 kyr signal in the climate record would be of low intensity. However, this signal dominates the climate record and internal nonlinear processes within the climate system have previously been proposed to account for this fact. The author shows that variations in the frequency of the obliquity cycle can give rise to strong 100-kyr forcing of climate.

  7. 100-kyr fluvial fill terrace cycles since the Middle Pleistocene in the southern Central Andes, Toro Basin, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofelde, Stefanie; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Savi, Sara; Pingel, Heiko; Wickert, Andrew D.; Wittmann, Hella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2017-04-01

    Fluvial fill terraces in intermontane basins are valuable sedimentary and geomorphic archives that record tectonic and/or climate- driven changes of river networks and their adjacent hillslopes. However, the rarely complete preservation of such geomorphic features, often combined with large distances from sediment source areas, complicates the identification of causal links between tectonic/climatic forcing mechanisms and landscape response, especially over timescales of 105 to 106 years. The intermontane Quebrada del Toro Basin in the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina contains at least five fluvial terrace-surface remnants that have been sculpted into a succession of several-hundred-meter-thick Quaternary gravel conglomerate. These terraces can be followed over several tens of kilometers and are located in the higher part of the basin, close to the sediment source areas. In this study, we determined the onset of multiple river incision phases by dating the abandonment of the three most extensive and best preserved terrace surfaces with nine cosmogenic 10Be-depth profiles. The timing of terrace-gravel deposition is based on four cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial ages and U-Pb zircon age estimates of three intercalated volcanic ashes in the conglomeratic fill. The 10Be depth profile ages suggest a successive abandonment of these terrace surfaces with a 100-kyr-cyclicity between 487 ± 34 ka and 75 ± 7 ka. Depositional ages of the conglomerates, determined by 26Al/10Be burial samples and U-Pb zircon ages, range from 936 ± 170 ka to 18 ± 141ka. They show a clear overlap with the terrace-surface abandonment ages and thus indicate the existence of multiple cut-and-fill cycles. Although the initial onset of aggradation of the Quaternary gravel conglomerate at ˜1 Ma and the overall net fluvial incision since ˜0.5 Ma can be linked to tectonic processes affecting the narrow basin outlet, the superimposed 100-kyr-cycles of aggradation and incision are best explained by

  8. Noise-Induced Cycle Suppression: a New Mechanism for the Late Quartenary Climate Response at 100 Kyr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Heureux, I.

    2016-12-01

    Climate proxies from the late quaternary exhibit a strong response at a period of about 100 kyr. It is commonly believed that this cycle reflects the variation of the Earth's orbital eccentricity, as a portion of the Milankovitch forcing. However, the direct effect of eccentricity variations is too small to account for such a strong climate response. Amplification mechanisms based on ice sheet dynamics or ocean circulation models have been proposed to explain this paradox. Recently, a non-linear biogeochemical model coupling sea-water alkalinity, dissolved phosphorus, dissolved inorganic carbon and atmospheric carbon dioxide without any orbital forcing has been proposed (K. S. Wallmann, Geochim. and Cosmochim. Acta 132 (2014) 413-439). This model exhibits self-organized periodic solutions with a period that has the correct order of magnitude while remaining larger than 100 kyr. In this contribution, I consider Wallmann's model with the addition of a weak periodic Milankovitch forcing and a stochastic term, in the spirit of stochastic resonance phenomena. It is seen that, as the noise intensity increases, a noise-induced transition occurs, whereby the limit cycle of the deterministic system is suppressed, resulting in a strong persistent signal at the forcing frequency. The phenomenon is distinct from similar noise-induced effects, such as stochastic resonance, stochastic coherence or stochastic synchronization. This approach thus proposes a new amplification mechanism of biogeochemical origin, leading to a strong climatic response under the influence of a weak orbital forcing.

  9. 100 kyr fluvial cut-and-fill terrace cycles since the Middle Pleistocene in the southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofelde, Stefanie; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Savi, Sara; Pingel, Heiko; Wickert, Andrew D.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Wittmann, Hella; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Cottle, John; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2017-09-01

    Fluvial fill terraces in intermontane basins are valuable geomorphic archives that can record tectonically and/or climatically driven changes of the Earth-surface process system. However, often the preservation of fill terrace sequences is incomplete and/or they may form far away from their source areas, complicating the identification of causal links between forcing mechanisms and landscape response, especially over multi-millennial timescales. The intermontane Toro Basin in the southern Central Andes exhibits at least five generations of fluvial terraces that have been sculpted into several-hundred-meter-thick Quaternary valley-fill conglomerates. New surface-exposure dating using nine cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles reveals the successive abandonment of these terraces with a 100 kyr cyclicity between 75 ± 7 and 487 ± 34 ka. Depositional ages of the conglomerates, determined by four 26Al/10Be burial samples and U-Pb zircon ages of three intercalated volcanic ash beds, range from 18 ± 141 to 936 ± 170 ka, indicating that there were multiple cut-and-fill episodes. Although the initial onset of aggradation at ∼1 Ma and the overall net incision since ca. 500 ka can be linked to tectonic processes at the narrow basin outlet, the superimposed 100 kyr cycles of aggradation and incision are best explained by eccentricity-driven climate change. Within these cycles, the onset of river incision can be correlated with global cold periods and enhanced humid phases recorded in paleoclimate archives on the adjacent Bolivian Altiplano, whereas deposition occurred mainly during more arid phases on the Altiplano and global interglacial periods. We suggest that enhanced runoff during global cold phases - due to increased regional precipitation rates, reduced evapotranspiration, or both - resulted in an increased sediment-transport capacity in the Toro Basin, which outweighed any possible increases in upstream sediment supply and thus triggered incision. Compared with two

  10. Simulation and understanding the nature of Quaternary glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Calov, R.

    2012-04-01

    Although it is generally accepted that, as postulated by the Milankovitch theory, Earth's orbital variations play an important role in Quaternary climate dynamics, the mechanism of glacial cycles still remains poorly understood. Among remaining scientific challenges are an understanding of the nature of 100 kyr cycles that dominated global ice volume and climate variability over the late part of Quaternary and the causes of the transition from the "40 kyr world" to the "100 kyr world" around one million years ago. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2, we demonstrate that both strong 100 kyr periodicity in the ice volume variations and the timing of glacial terminations during past 800 kyr can be successfully simulated as direct, strong nonlinear responses of the climate-cryosphere system to orbital forcing alone. We show that the sharp 100 kyr peak in the power spectrum of ice volume results from the phase locking of the long glacial cycles to the corresponding eccentricity cycles. Variations in obliquity and CO2 concentration are not required to simulate strong 100 kyr cyclicity if the atmospheric CO2 concentration stays below its typical interglacial value. The existence of long glacial cycles is primarily attributed to the North American ice sheet and it requires the presence of a large continental area with exposed rocks. In case when the continents are completely covered by a thick sediment layer, for the realistic range of CO2 concentrations (180-300 ppm), the long glacial cycles can not be simulated. In the experiment with fixed CO2 concentration, ice volume variations contain both strong precessional and obliquity cycles, which apparently is in odd with empirical data that suggest complete dominance of the obliquity cycle. However, in the experiments with interactive carbon cycle, simulated obliquity component becomes much stronger, especially, in the deep ocean temperature. This is explained by the direct and indirect (via the

  11. Extraterrestrial accretion and glacial cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the approx. 100-k.y. cycle seen in terrestrial glaciation is due to changes in meteor flux that come from changes in the Earth's orbit. This model can explain a 70-k.y. 'anomalous' period in climate data and the apparent discrepancy between present extraterrestrial fluxes and those in oceanic sediments. It can be tested by measuring Ir densities in sediments and ice during glacials and interglacials.

  12. Robustness of Quaternary glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, Andrei; Brovkin, Victor; Calov, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    In spite of significant progress in paleoclimate reconstructions and modeling some aspects of Quaternary climate cycles are still poorly understood. Among them is the question of whether glacial cycles are deterministic and solely externally forced or, at least partially, they are stochastic. The answer to this question can only be obtained using a comprehensive Earth system models which incorporates all major components of the Earth system - atmosphere, ocean, land surface, northern hemisphere ice sheets, terrestrial biota and soil carbon, aeolian dust and marine biogeochemistry. Here, we used the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2. The model was optimally tuned to reproduce climate, ice volume and CO2 variability for the last 0.8 million years. Using the same model version, we performed a large set of simulations covering the entire Quaternary (3 million years). By starting the model at different times (with the time step of 100,000 years) and using identical initial conditions we run the model for 500,000 years using the Earth's orbital variations as the only prescribed radiative forcing. We show that within less than 100,000 years after the beginning of each experiment the modeling results converge to the same solution which depends only on the orbital forcing and boundary conditions, such as topography and terrestrial sediment thickness for the ice sheets or volcanic CO2 outgassing for the carbon cycle. By using only several sets of the Northern Hemisphere orography and sediment thickness which represent different stages of landscape evolution during Quaternary, we are able to reproduce all major regimes of Quaternary long-term climate variability. Our results thus strongly support the notion that Quaternary glacial cycles are deterministic and externally forced.

  13. A conceptual model for glacial cycles and the middle Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daruka, István; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Milankovitch's astronomical theory of glacial cycles, attributing ice age climate oscillations to orbital changes in Northern-Hemisphere insolation, is challenged by the paleoclimatic record. The climatic response to the variations in insolation is far from trivial. In general the glacial cycles are highly asymmetric in time, with slow cooling from the interglacials to the glacials (inceptions) and very rapid warming from the glacials to the interglacials (terminations). We shall refer to this fast-slow dynamics as the "saw-tooth" shape of the paleoclimatic record. This is non-linearly related to the time-symmetric variations in the orbital forcing. However, the most pronounced challenge to the Milankovitch theory is the middle Pleistocene transition (MPT) occurring about one million years ago. During that event, the prevailing 41 kyr glacial cycles, corresponding to the almost harmonic obliquity cycle were replaced by longer saw-tooth shaped cycles with a time-scale around 100 kyr. The MPT must have been driven by internal changes in climate response, since it does not correspond to any apparent changes in the orbital forcing. In order to identify possible mechanisms causing the observed changes in glacial dynamics, it is relevant to study simplified models with the capability of generating temporal behavior similar to the observed records. We present a simple oscillator type model approach, with two variables, a temperature anomaly and a climatic memory term. The generalization of the ice albedo feedback is included in terms of an effective multiplicative coupling between this latter climatic memory term (representing the internal degrees of freedom) and the external drive. The simple model reproduces the temporal asymmetry of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles and suggests that the MPT can be explained as a regime shift, aided by climatic noise, from a period 1 frequency locking to the obliquity cycle to a period 2-3 frequency locking to the same obliquity

  14. Glacial cycles and astronomical forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; MacDonald, G.J.

    1997-07-11

    Narrow spectral features in ocean sediment records offer strong evidence that the cycles of glaciation were driven by astronomical forces. Two million years ago, the cycles match the 41,000-year period of Earth`s obliquity. This supports the Croll/Milankovitch theory, which attributes the cycles to variations in insolation. But for the past million years, the spectrum is dominated by a single 100,000-year feature and is a poor match to the predictions of insolation models. The spectrum can be accounted for by a theory that derives the cycles of glaciation from variations in the inclination of Earth`s orbital plane.

  15. Understanding the glacial methane cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Kaplan, Jed O.; Beerling, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) varied with climate during the Quaternary, rising from a concentration of 375 p.p.b.v. during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago, to 680 p.p.b.v. at the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the causes of this increase remain unclear; proposed hypotheses rely on fluctuations in either the magnitude of CH4 sources or CH4 atmospheric lifetime, or both. Here we use an Earth System model to provide a comprehensive assessment of these competing hypotheses, including estimates of uncertainty. We show that in this model, the global LGM CH4 source was reduced by 28–46%, and the lifetime increased by 2–8%, with a best-estimate LGM CH4 concentration of 463–480 p.p.b.v. Simulating the observed LGM concentration requires a 46–49% reduction in sources, indicating that we cannot reconcile the observed amplitude. This highlights the need for better understanding of the effects of low CO2 and cooler climate on wetlands and other natural CH4 sources. PMID:28220787

  16. Understanding the glacial methane cycle.

    PubMed

    Hopcroft, Peter O; Valdes, Paul J; O'Connor, Fiona M; Kaplan, Jed O; Beerling, David J

    2017-02-21

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) varied with climate during the Quaternary, rising from a concentration of 375 p.p.b.v. during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago, to 680 p.p.b.v. at the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the causes of this increase remain unclear; proposed hypotheses rely on fluctuations in either the magnitude of CH4 sources or CH4 atmospheric lifetime, or both. Here we use an Earth System model to provide a comprehensive assessment of these competing hypotheses, including estimates of uncertainty. We show that in this model, the global LGM CH4 source was reduced by 28-46%, and the lifetime increased by 2-8%, with a best-estimate LGM CH4 concentration of 463-480 p.p.b.v. Simulating the observed LGM concentration requires a 46-49% reduction in sources, indicating that we cannot reconcile the observed amplitude. This highlights the need for better understanding of the effects of low CO2 and cooler climate on wetlands and other natural CH4 sources.

  17. Understanding the glacial methane cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Kaplan, Jed O.; Beerling, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) varied with climate during the Quaternary, rising from a concentration of 375 p.p.b.v. during the last glacial maximum (LGM) 21,000 years ago, to 680 p.p.b.v. at the beginning of the industrial revolution. However, the causes of this increase remain unclear; proposed hypotheses rely on fluctuations in either the magnitude of CH4 sources or CH4 atmospheric lifetime, or both. Here we use an Earth System model to provide a comprehensive assessment of these competing hypotheses, including estimates of uncertainty. We show that in this model, the global LGM CH4 source was reduced by 28-46%, and the lifetime increased by 2-8%, with a best-estimate LGM CH4 concentration of 463-480 p.p.b.v. Simulating the observed LGM concentration requires a 46-49% reduction in sources, indicating that we cannot reconcile the observed amplitude. This highlights the need for better understanding of the effects of low CO2 and cooler climate on wetlands and other natural CH4 sources.

  18. New mechanism proposed for glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Alan

    Were the ice ages triggered by an influx of extraterrestrial dust or meteoroids hitting Earth's upper atmosphere? A controversial and still unproven new theory recently described by Muller and MacDonald [1995] in Nature links the 100,000 year glacial cycle with changes in Earth's orbital inclination relative to the plane of the solar system. And, say the theory developers, the only logical mechanism they can find for the connection is increasing amounts of extraterrestrial material entering the atmosphere whenever Earth's orbit sweeps through the solar plane. Climate researchers are just beginning to test the model's predictions.

  19. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  20. 100 Kyr Old Desert of Western India: Morhodynamics and Environmental Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Late Quaternary oscillations in sea levels and resultant changes in the coastal environment have remained a popular aspect of study amongst the earthscientists and archaeologists. The Saurashtra peninsula of the western India that lies on the southwestern side of the Thar Desert, has archived a fascinating record of such environmental changes since last interglacial (~120kyr) in the form of a fossil desert exhibiting various aeolian land forms constituted by the sand largely derived from the coastal areas due to an oscillatory sea level change. A variety of dunes viz., coastal transverse, parabolic, longitudinal, barchans, climbing and falling dunes along with valley fills and sand sheets have been mapped. Being biogenic calcium carbonate rich, the sands have been lithified under the influence of an increase in moisture and thus the dune and bed forms are preserved in its best shape. The intense aeolian activities are also evident in the form of desert varnish on rocky outcrops. The sequence comprises smaller climate perturbations in the form of stabilization, erosion and karstification of older dunes and deposition of fluvial sediments in between. The paper deals with the mode of occurrence, response of sediments to wind dynamics and palaeo topography, internal structures, later modifications of sediments and significance of the geochronologically constrained aeolianites in understanding of environmental changes since 100kyr in the region.

  1. Climatic impact of glacial cycle polar motion: Coupled oscillations of ice sheet mass and rotation pole position

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Bruce G.; James, Thomas S.; Mengel, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Precessional motion of Earth's rotation axis relative to its orbit is a well-known source of long-period climatic variation. It is less well appreciated that growth and decay of polar ice sheets perturb the symmetry of the global mass distribution enough that the geographic location of the rotation axis will change by at least 15 km and possibly as much as 100 km during a single glacial cycle. This motion of the pole will change the seasonal and latitudinal pattern of temperatures. We present calculations, based on a diurnal average energy balance, which compare the summer and winter temperature anomalies due to a 1° decrease in obliquity with those due to a 1° motion of the rotation pole toward Hudson Bay. Both effects result in peak temperature perturbations of about 1° Celsius. The obliquity change primarily influences the amplitude of the seasonal cycle, while the polar motion primarily changes the annual mean temperatures. The polar motion induced temperature anomaly is such that it will act as a powerful negative feedback on ice sheet growth. We also explore the evolution of the coupled system composed of ice sheet mass and pole position. Oscillatory solutions result from the conflicting constraints of rotational and thermal stability. A positive mass anomaly on an otherwise featureless Earth is in rotational equilibrium only at the poles or the equator. The two polar equilibria are rotationally unstable, and the equatorial equilibrium, though rotationally stable, is thermally unstable. We find that with a plausible choice for the strength of coupling between the thermal and rotational systems, relatively modest external forcing can produce significant response at periods of 104–106 years, but it strongly attenuates polar motion at longer periods. We suggest that these coupled oscillations may contribute to the observed dominance of 100 kyr glacial cycles since the mid-Pleistocene and will tend to stabilize geographic patterns that are suitable to

  2. Volcanic CO2 Emissions and Glacial Cycles: Coupled Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, J. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Katz, R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the mid-Pleistocene transition, the dominant period of glacial cycles changed from 40 ka to 100 ka. It is broadly accepted that the 40 ka glacial cycles were driven by cyclical changes in obliquity. However, this forcing does not explain the 100 ka glacial cycles. Mechanisms proposed for 100 ka cycles include isostatic bed depression and proglacial lakes destabilising the Laurentide ice sheet, non-linear responses to orbital eccentricity, and Antarctic ice sheets influencing deep-ocean stratification. None of these are universally accepted. Here we investigate the hypothesis that variations in volcanic CO2 emissions can cause 100 ka glacial cycles. Any proposed mechanism for 100 ka glacial cycles must give the Earth's climate system a memory of 10^4 - 10^5years. This timescale is difficult to achieve for surface processes, however it is possible for the solid Earth. Recent work suggests volcanic CO2 emissions change in response to glacial cycles [1] and that there could be a 50 ka delay in that response [2]. Such a lagged response could drive glacial cycles from 40 ka cycles to an integer multiple of the forcing period. Under what conditions could the climate system admit such a response? To address this, we use a simplified climate model modified from Huybers and Tziperman [3]. Our version comprises three component models for energy balance, ice sheet growth and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The model is driven by insolation alone with other components varying according to a system of coupled, differential equations. The model is run for 500 ka to produce several glacial cycles and the resulting changes in global ice volume and atmospheric CO2 concentration.We obtain a switch from 40 ka to 100 ka cycles as the volcanic CO2 response to glacial cycles is increased. These 100 ka cycles are phase-locked to obliquity, lasting 80 or 120 ka. Whilst the MOR response required (in this model) is larger than plausible estimates based on [2], it illustrates the

  3. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L

    2014-04-15

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth's biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this "geothermal glacial refugia" hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species.

  4. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth’s biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this “geothermal glacial refugia” hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  5. Somma-Vesuvius ground deformation over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Vertical ground movements at Somma-Vesuvius during the last glacial cycle have been inferred from micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from boreholes drilled at the archaeological sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii as well as on the apron of the volcano and the adjacent Sebeto and Sarno Valleys. Opposing movements occurred during the periods preceding and following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The uplift began 20 ka ago with marine deposits rising several tens of metres up to 25 m a.s.l., recovering previous subsidence which occurred during the Late glacial period, suggesting a strict connection between volcano-tectonic and glacial cycles. Here we present the analysis of deposits predating the LGM, which confirms subsidence of the Campanian Plain where Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is located, shows variable surface loading effects and highlights the volcano-tectonic stages experienced by the volcano. The self-balancing mechanism of the volcanic system, evolving towards an explosive, subaerial activity 60 ka ago, is testified to by a large ground oscillation in phase with sea level change during the last glacial cycle.

  6. Variations in Glacial Erosion over Multiple Glacial-Interglacial Cycles: A Numerical Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, Rachel M.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2013-04-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. As one of these processes, glacial erosion plays an important role in the development of landscapes by the formation of distinctive topographic features. Glacial landscape evolution models reproduce many observed features at the orogen scale. Detailed comparisons at the scale of individual valleys holds potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in glacial erosion models. Over long timescales (>10,000 yr), glacial erosion has typically been simulated using a modified shallow ice approximation (SIA) approach. In this study, we compare the strengths and weaknesses of shallow ice and high-order, Stokes-flow glacial landscape evolution models. Our emphasis is placed on the patterns and rates of glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. We present a comparison of two different numerical models for glacial erosion. For both approaches, a modified version of the ICE Cascade model is used to develop and evolve topography. This model calculates hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, temporally variable orographic precipitation, and a range of glaciological processes: glacial mass balance, snow avalanching, basal ice superfreezing, and basal water buoyancy feedback in large overdeepenings. Within this framework, we compare the predicted ice-flow field and erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as predictions from a nested, thermally-coupled, Stokes-flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Simulations are conducted for a range of amplitudes and periodicity in surface temperature change between glacial and interglacial periods. We investigate these simulations, as well as the effects of each model for various initial topographies and with a temperature-dependent ice rheology. In general, both models predict visually similar patterns in sliding velocity, and resulting erosion rates, assuming the erosion rate scales with the

  7. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Torres, Mark A; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F; West, A Joshua

    2017-08-15

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean-atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2 Future work on glaciation-weathering-carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  8. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Mark A.; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F.; West, A. Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean–atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2. Future work on glaciation–weathering–carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  9. Modelling last glacial cycle ice dynamics in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Jouvet, Guillaume; Huss, Matthias; Funk, Martin; Preusser, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The European Alps, cradle of pioneer glacial studies, are one of the regions where geological markers of past glaciations are most abundant and well-studied. Such conditions make the region ideal for testing numerical glacier models based on approximated ice flow physics against field-based reconstructions, and vice-versa. Here, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to model the entire last glacial cycle (120-0 ka) in the Alps, with a horizontal resolution of 1 km. Climate forcing is derived using present-day climate data from WorldClim and the ERA-Interim reanalysis, and time-dependent temperature offsets from multiple paleo-climate proxies, among which only the EPICA ice core record yields glacial extent during marine oxygen isotope stages 4 (69-62 ka) and 2 (34-18 ka) in agreement to geological reconstructions. Despite the low variability of this Antarctic-based climate forcing, our simulation depicts a highly dynamic ice cap, showing that alpine glaciers may have advanced many times over the foreland during the last glacial cycle. Cumulative basal sliding, a proxy for glacial erosion, is modelled to be highest in the deep valleys of the western Alps. Finally, the Last Glacial Maximum advance, often considered synchronous, is here modelled as a time-transgressive event, with some glacier lobes reaching their maximum as early as 27 ka, and some as late as 21 ka. Modelled ice thickness is about 900 m higher than observed trimline elevations, yet our simulation predicts little erosion at high elevation due to cold ice conditions.

  10. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Crowley, John W; Katz, Richard F; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-13

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor.

  11. Variations in glacial and interglacial marine conditions over the last two glacial cycles off northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwemark, Ludvig; Chao, Weng-Si; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiu, Pin-Yao; Yang, Tien-Nan; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chuang, Chih-Kai; León Dominguez, Dora Carolina; Jakobsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Five sediment cores from the Lomonosov Ridge and the Morris Jesup Rise north of Greenland show the history of sea-ice coverage and primary productivity over the last two glacial cycles. Variations in Manganese content, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, bioturbation, and trace fossil diversity are interpreted to reflect differences in sea-ice cover and sediment depositional conditions between the identified interglacials. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 and MIS 2 are represented by thin (<<5 cm) sediment units while the preceding interglacial MIS 5 and glacial MIS 6 are characterized by thick (10-20 cm) deposits. Foraminiferal abundances and bioturbation suggest that MIS 1 was generally characterized by severe sea-ice conditions north of Greenland while MIS 5 appears to have been considerably warmer with more open water, higher primary productivity, and higher sedimentation rates. Strengthened flow of Atlantic water along the northern continental shelf of Greenland rather than development of local polynyas is here suggested as a likely cause for the relatively warmer marine conditions during MIS 5 compared to MIS 1. The cores also suggest distinct differences between the glacial intervals MIS 2 and MIS 6. While MIS 6 is distinguished by a relatively thick sediment unit poor in foraminifera and with low Mn values, MIS 2 is practically missing. We speculate that this could be the effect from a paleocrystic sea-ice cover north of Greenland during MIS 2 that prevented sediment delivery from sea ice and icebergs. In contrast, the thick sequence deposited during MIS 6 indicates a longer glacial period with dynamic intervals characterized by huge drifting icebergs delivering ice rafted debris (IRD). A drastic shift from thinner sedimentary cycles where interglacial sediment parameters indicate more severe sea-ice conditions gave way to larger amplitude cycles with more open water indicators was observed around the boundary between MIS 7/8. This shift is in agreement with a

  12. Early Pleistocene glacial cycles and the integrated summer insolation forcing.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter

    2006-07-28

    Long-term variations in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation are generally thought to control glaciation. But the intensity of summer insolation is primarily controlled by 20,000-year cycles in the precession of the equinoxes, whereas early Pleistocene glacial cycles occur at 40,000-year intervals, matching the period of changes in Earth's obliquity. The resolution of this 40,000-year problem is that glaciers are sensitive to insolation integrated over the duration of the summer. The integrated summer insolation is primarily controlled by obliquity and not precession because, by Kepler's second law, the duration of the summer is inversely proportional to Earth's distance from the Sun.

  13. Hemispheric sea ice distribution sets the glacial tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Eun; Shen, Aaron; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Ming, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The proxy record of global temperature shows that the dominant periodicity of the glacial cycle shifts from 40 kyr (obliquity) to 100 kyr (eccentricity) about a million years ago. Using climate model simulations, here we show that the pace of the glacial cycle depends on the pattern of hemispheric sea ice growth. In a cold climate the sea ice grows asymmetrically between two hemispheres under changes to Earth's orbital precession, because sea ice growth potential outside of the Arctic Circle is limited. This difference in hemispheric sea ice growth leads to an asymmetry in absorbed solar energy for the two hemispheres, particularly when eccentricity is high, even if the annual average insolation is similar. In a warmer climate, the hemispheric asymmetry of the sea ice decreases as mean Arctic and Antarctic sea ice decreases, diminishing the precession and eccentricity signals and explaining the dominant obliquity signal (40 kyr) before the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  14. A global climate reconstruction of the past eight glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, A.; Friedrich, T.

    2016-12-01

    Climate variability over the past 8 glacial cycles can be regarded as a superposition of externally forced orbital-scale variations and internally generated centennial/millennial-scale fluctuations. To better understand the nature, timing and pattern of these anomalies in paleo-climate records, we developed a novel paleo-climate hindcast covering the past 8 glacial cycles that captures both types of variability. We blend an externally forced transient earth system model simulation, which responds to orbital forcing, greenhouse gas and ice-sheet changes, with an empirical estimate of the Dansgaard-Oeschger continuum. The latter is obtained as the product of a normalized high-resolution North Atlantic SST record and the millennial-scale regression patterns derived from a transient Dansgaard-Oeschger hindcast simulation. We will demonstrate the skill of this global paleoclimate reconstruction through comparison with a plethora of high-resolution temperature and hydroclimate paleo records and discuss the most prominent patterns atmospheric teleconnection patterns. The global climate reconstruction can be used to force offline paleo-proxy models, ice-sheet models and human migration simulations. It also provides an easy means to synchronize paleo-proxy records from different sites in a physically consistent manner.

  15. Eight glacial cycles from an Antarctic ice core.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Laurent; Barbante, Carlo; Barnes, Piers R F; Barnola, Jean Marc; Bigler, Matthias; Castellano, Emiliano; Cattani, Olivier; Chappellaz, Jerome; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Delmonte, Barbara; Dreyfus, Gabrielle; Durand, Gael; Falourd, Sonia; Fischer, Hubertus; Flückiger, Jacqueline; Hansson, Margareta E; Huybrechts, Philippe; Jugie, Gérard; Johnsen, Sigfus J; Jouzel, Jean; Kaufmann, Patrik; Kipfstuhl, Josef; Lambert, Fabrice; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y; Littot, Geneviève C; Longinelli, Antonio; Lorrain, Reginald; Maggi, Valter; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Miller, Heinz; Mulvaney, Robert; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Orombelli, Giuseppe; Parrenin, Frederic; Peel, David A; Petit, Jean-Robert; Raynaud, Dominique; Ritz, Catherine; Ruth, Urs; Schwander, Jakob; Siegenthaler, Urs; Souchez, Roland; Stauffer, Bernhard; Steffensen, Jorgen Peder; Stenni, Barbara; Stocker, Thomas F; Tabacco, Ignazio E; Udisti, Roberto; Van De Wal, Roderik S W; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Weiss, Jerome; Wilhelms, Frank; Winther, Jan-Gunnar; Wolff, Eric W; Zucchelli, Mario

    2004-06-10

    The Antarctic Vostok ice core provided compelling evidence of the nature of climate, and of climate feedbacks, over the past 420,000 years. Marine records suggest that the amplitude of climate variability was smaller before that time, but such records are often poorly resolved. Moreover, it is not possible to infer the abundance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere from marine records. Here we report the recovery of a deep ice core from Dome C, Antarctica, that provides a climate record for the past 740,000 years. For the four most recent glacial cycles, the data agree well with the record from Vostok. The earlier period, between 740,000 and 430,000 years ago, was characterized by less pronounced warmth in interglacial periods in Antarctica, but a higher proportion of each cycle was spent in the warm mode. The transition from glacial to interglacial conditions about 430,000 years ago (Termination V) resembles the transition into the present interglacial period in terms of the magnitude of change in temperatures and greenhouse gases, but there are significant differences in the patterns of change. The interglacial stage following Termination V was exceptionally long--28,000 years compared to, for example, the 12,000 years recorded so far in the present interglacial period. Given the similarities between this earlier warm period and today, our results may imply that without human intervention, a climate similar to the present one would extend well into the future.

  16. Caribbean Salinity Variation During the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Spero, H. J.; Lea, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    Evaporation exceeds precipitation in the tropical Atlantic, resulting in a net freshwater removal across the Central American Isthmus. Because most of the north Atlantic's subtropical gyre water circulates through the Caribbean before flowing north to sub-polar regions via the Gulf Stream, changes in tropical atmospheric circulation have the potential to affect the salinity and density structure of the entire north Atlantic, thereby influencing glacial-interglacial oscillations in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation. Here, we combine Mg/Ca measurements (a proxy for the temperature of calcification) and δ 18O analyses of shells from the surface-dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber s.s. (white var.) from the western Caribbean Colombian Basin at ODP Site 999A (2827m; 4cm/ka sed. rate) and VM28-122 (3623m; 4-10cm/ka sed. rate) to produce the first continuous record of western tropical Atlantic δ 18OSEAWATER (δ 18OSW) during the last 130ka. In order to generate a record for sea surface salinity (SSS) due to regional hydrological change, we removed the δ 18OSW signal due to glacial ice volume variation and normalized the residual to the modern δ 18OSW value for the Colombian Basin (0.8‰ ). The resulting ice volume-free (Δ δ 18OIVF-SW) record shows that Caribbean Δ δ 18OIVF-SW increased by ˜0.5‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and Marine Isotope Stage 4. Using a modern western Caribbean δ 18OSW:SSS relationship, these enriched δ 18OSW values suggest glacial Caribbean salinities were 2.3 - 2.8‰ higher than modern after removing the influence of ice-volume. Our data supports the hypothesis that the tropics might have been in a state more similar to the modern El Nino mode, characterized by a more southerly position of the ITCZ, during cold phases of the last glacial cycle. Within the resolution of our Δ δ 18OIVF-SW record from VM28-122, elevated glacial Caribbean salinity decreased to modern levels at the onset of the Bolling-Allerod (B

  17. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-24

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past approximately 700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (approximately 40,000 yr; approximately 40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (approximately 100 kyr) and precessional (approximately 20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing.

  18. Paleoclimate of northern Guatemala during the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Brenner, M.; Curtis, J.; Gilli, A.; Mueller, A.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Peten Itza (zmax = 165 m) in northern Guatemala is the deepest lake in the lowlands of Central America. Annual rainfall averages ~1600 mm and is highly seasonal with over 90% occurring in the months from May to October. As part of an ICDP project, we recovered 1327 m of lake sediment at seven sites using the GLAD800 superbarge. Preliminary research has focused on Site PI-6 at a water depth of 71 m. Three holes were drilled and recovered a complete stratigraphic section to a maximum depth of 75.9 mblf. Radiocarbon dates on terrestrial organic matter display a regular increase in age with depth, and indicate a mean sedimentation rate of ~100 cm per 1000 yrs (1mm/yr). The top 10.8 mcd were deposited during the Holocene and consist primarily of gray carbonate clay with abundant charcoal. The Pleistocene/Holocene boundary at 10.8 mcd is marked by a transition to Holocene clay from underlying, interbedded dense gypsum sand and clay deposited during the Late Glacial period from ~17 to 9.3 kyrs. This transition represents a switch to moist climate during the early Holocene from more arid conditions during the Late Glacial. Arid conditions during the Late Glacial period may coincide with episodic delivery of seasonal meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico (Aharon, 2003, Paleoceanography, 18, 1079). In contrast to the Late Glacial period, the earlier Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), from 23 to 17 kyrs, consists of gray carbonate clay that is very similar to Holocene deposits, suggesting high detrital input and high lake level. This finding contradicts previous results suggesting that the LGM was dry in the Peten lowlands. We speculate that a cold, wet LGM may have been caused by increased winter precipitation when the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was at its southernmost extent. The mechanism may have been related to increased frequency of polar outbreaks and "Norte" winds, which occasionally bring rain to the Peten today during the dry season. Similar increases in winter

  19. Global Ice-loading History Reconstructed Over Five Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, F. H.; Grant, K. M.; Tamisiea, M. E.; Rohling, E. J.; Hibbert, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution ice-loading reconstructions are a vital tool not only for palaeoclimate studies, but also for providing a palaeoenvironmental context to human development. Here we present a global ice-loading history developed using the high resolution, Red Sea relative sea-level (RSL) record. (Siddall et al. 2003, Rohling et al. 2009, Grant et al. in submission) We use glacial isostatic adjustment modelling to determine a set of corrections to the Red Sea RSL record, which is then translated into a global mean sea level. This global mean sea level allows us to calculate a global ice volume. Global ice volume is geographically distributed within our ice-loading history according to currently available data regarding ice margins, their timing, and constraints on maximum ice load. Where constraints are sparse we use a combination of ICE-5G (Peltier, 2004) and the de Boer coupled ice sheet model (de Boer et al, 2014) as a template for ice distribution. Although an ice-loading history for the past 5 Myr exists, this is the first time that geographic constraints have been applied to global ice volumes over 5 glacial cycles. Our ice-loading reconstruction is further supported by the high resolution of our source RSL data. Our ice-loading history is tested against a global compilation of coral sea-level indicators (Hibbert et al., in prep.), and compared with ice histories developed from alternate ice volume reconstructions or RSL records, including a global ice history based on that developed by de Boer et al. (2014), the sea-level record of Waelbroeck et al. (2002) and a simple ice history based on the δ18O stack of Lisiecki and Raymo (2005).

  20. The role of heat transfer time scale in the evolution of the subsea permafrost and associated methane hydrates stability zone during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhova, Valentina V.; Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    Climate warming may lead to degradation of the subsea permafrost developed during Pleistocene glaciations and release methane from the hydrates, which are stored in this permafrost. It is important to quantify time scales at which this release is plausible. While, in principle, such time scale might be inferred from paleoarchives, this is hampered by considerable uncertainty associated with paleodata. In the present paper, to reduce such uncertainty, one-dimensional simulations with a model for thermal state of subsea sediments forced by the data obtained from the ice core reconstructions are performed. It is shown that heat propagates in the sediments with a time scale of ∼ 10-20 kyr. This time scale is longer than the present interglacial and is determined by the time needed for heat penetration in the unfrozen part of thick sediments. We highlight also that timings of shelf exposure during oceanic regressions and flooding during transgressions are important for simulating thermal state of the sediments and methane hydrates stability zone (HSZ). These timings should be resolved with respect to the contemporary shelf depth (SD). During glacial cycles, the temperature at the top of the sediments is a major driver for moving the HSZ vertical boundaries irrespective of SD. In turn, pressure due to oceanic water is additionally important for SD ≥ 50 m. Thus, oceanic transgressions and regressions do not instantly determine onsets of HSZ and/or its disappearance. Finally, impact of initial conditions in the subsea sediments is lost after ∼ 100 kyr. Our results are moderately sensitive to intensity of geothermal heat flux.

  1. Impact of Anthropogenic CO2 on the Next Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, C.; García-Olivares, A.; Pelegrí, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    A simple relaxation-type model (García-Olivares and Herrero, 2013) based on an optimization of Paillard and Parrenin (2004), has been used to predict the future evolution of atmospheric CO2, global ice volume and Antarctic ice cover during the next 300 kyr, with and without the atmospheric CO2 perturbation caused by anthropogenic emissions.The initial atmospheric CO2 condition is obtained after a critical data analysis that sets 1300 Gt as the most realistic carbon Ultimate Recoverable Resources, with the help of a global compartmental model to determine the carbon transfer function to the atmosphere. This analysis sets a peak of emissions on year 2037 AD and a maximum CO2 concentration of 519 ppmv in 2300 AD, leading to 20 kyr of abnormally high greenhouse effect. Weathering compensation and emission of methane from clathrates have also been considered as they have relevant effects on the dynamics of the system after the perturbation.The anthropogenic CO2 pulse clearly perturbs the natural cycle for all model variables during the forthcoming 300 kyr. The present interglacial will be lengthen by 25 kyr, as the anthropogenic perturbation will lead to a delay in the future advance of the ice sheet on the Antarctic shelf and a consequent perturbation of the deep ocean stratification, so the relative maximum of boreal insolation 65 kyr AP will not affect the developing glaciation. Instead, it will be the following insolation peak, about 110 kyr AP, which will find an appropriate climatic state to trigger the next deglaciation. The next glacial maximum will take place about 105 kyr AP and the following interglacial will be delayed forward in time by 44 kyr in relation to unperturbed conditions.This study endorses the idea that relaxation type coupled models, despite their simple structure, may retain the principal Earth's climatic interactions, being capable of accounting for the natural evolution of an externally imposed atmospheric CO2 pulse. - Garcia-Olivares, A

  2. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Crowley, J. W.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between the oceans and continents, causing long-wavelength changes of static pressure in the upper mantle. Previous work has shown that subaerial, glaciated volcanoes respond to these changes with variation in eruption rates (Jull & McKenzie 1996, Huybers & Langmuir 2009), and has suggested that the magmatic flux at mid-ocean ridges may vary with changes in sea-level (Huybers & Langmuir 2009, Lund & Asimow 2011). The latter is speculative, however, because previous theory has assumed highly simplified melt transport and neglected the dependence of the ridge thermal structure on spreading rate. Moreover, it remains a challenge to connect model predictions of variations arising from sea-level change with sea-floor observations. Here we present results from a theoretical model of a mid-ocean ridge based on conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and composition for two phases (magma & mantle) and two thermodynamic components (enriched & depleted) (Katz 2008, 2010). The model is driven by imposed variations in the static pressure within the mantle. We consider both the geochemically inferred record of past sea-level variation, as well as simpler harmonic and instantaneous variations. The output of these models is compared with observations of bathymetry at ridges that are undisturbed by off-axis volcanism. The comparison is preliminary but suggests that some abyssal hills on the sea-floor are, at least in part, the result of glacial cycles. To understand the simulation results in more detail, we develop analytical solutions for a reduced-complexity model. This model is derived according to the idea that the melting induced by sea-level changes can be thought of as a small perturbation to a steady-state system. We obtain a Green's function solution for crustal thickness as a function of sea-level change with the associated dependencies on geophysical parameters of the magma/mantle system. We show that this solution captures much of the

  3. Sea-level fluctuations during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddall, M.; Rohling, E. J.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Hemleben, Ch.; Meischner, D.; Schmelzer, I.; Smeed, D. A.

    2003-06-01

    The last glacial cycle was characterized by substantial millennial-scale climate fluctuations, but the extent of any associated changes in global sea level (or, equivalently, ice volume) remains elusive. Highstands of sea level can be reconstructed from dated fossil coral reef terraces, and these data are complemented by a compilation of global sea-level estimates based on deep-sea oxygen isotope ratios at millennial-scale resolution or higher. Records based on oxygen isotopes, however, contain uncertainties in the range of +/-30m, or +/-1°C in deep sea temperature. Here we analyse oxygen isotope records from Red Sea sediment cores to reconstruct the history of water residence times in the Red Sea. We then use a hydraulic model of the water exchange between the Red Sea and the world ocean to derive the sill depth-and hence global sea level-over the past 470,000 years (470kyr). Our reconstruction is accurate to within +/-12m, and gives a centennial-scale resolution from 70 to 25kyr before present. We find that sea-level changes of up to 35m, at rates of up to 2cmyr-1, occurred, coincident with abrupt changes in climate.

  4. Astronomical forcing and mathematical theory of glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    There are three important features of a proxy time series recorded during the Late Pleistocene. They are: 1) 100 000-year cycle as a dominant control of global glacial-interglacials through the late Quaternary, 2) fluctuations with periods of about 40 and 20 thousand years (their contribution to dispersion is no more than 20%), 3) ''Red-noise'' behavior of the time series. Direct influence of the insolation change created by fluctuations of the eccentricity is too weak to cause the observed 100 000-year climate fluctuations. Therefore, other mechanisms of such a rhythm are proposed. On the basis of the equation of the heat budget, the equation describing dynamics of zonally averaged temperature is developed. Various combinations of terms of this equation are discussed. They present a linear response to the Milankovitch periodicity, the Langeven stochastic equation, the equation of delay oscillator, the stochastic equation of spontaneous transitions, and the equation of stochastic resonance. Orbitally-induced changes in the solar energy flux received by the Earth play an important role as a mechanism starting process of climate changes which is supported and intensified by different feedbacks within the climate system. Positive anomalies of solar radiation serve as a mechanism causing reorganization of the climate only in rare cases when inclination of Earth axis of rotation increases and, simultaneously, perihelion takes place during the summer time (for the Northern Hemisphere).

  5. Sea-level variability over five glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Grant, K M; Rohling, E J; Ramsey, C Bronk; Cheng, H; Edwards, R L; Florindo, F; Heslop, D; Marra, F; Roberts, A P; Tamisiea, M E; Williams, F

    2014-09-25

    Research on global ice-volume changes during Pleistocene glacial cycles is hindered by a lack of detailed sea-level records for time intervals older than the last interglacial. Here we present the first robustly dated, continuous and highly resolved records of Red Sea sea level and rates of sea-level change over the last 500,000 years, based on tight synchronization to an Asian monsoon record. We observe maximum 'natural' (pre-anthropogenic forcing) sea-level rise rates below 2 m per century following periods with up to twice present-day ice volumes, and substantially higher rise rates for greater ice volumes. We also find that maximum sea-level rise rates were attained within 2 kyr of the onset of deglaciations, for 85% of such events. Finally, multivariate regressions of orbital parameters, sea-level and monsoon records suggest that major meltwater pulses account for millennial-scale variability and insolation-lagged responses in Asian monsoon records.

  6. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2014-06-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological time scales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes-flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model has a larger impact on the erosion rate, with variations of almost an order of magnitude. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered that are greater than 30%, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long-time scales, these results suggest that consideration of higher-order glacial physics may be necessary, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  7. Ice flow models and glacial erosion over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, R. M.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    Mountain topography is constructed through a variety of interacting processes. Over glaciological timescales, even simple representations of glacial-flow physics can reproduce many of the distinctive features formed through glacial erosion. However, detailed comparisons at orogen time and length scales hold potential for quantifying the influence of glacial physics in landscape evolution models. We present a comparison using two different numerical models for glacial flow over single and multiple glaciations, within a modified version of the ICE-Cascade landscape evolution model. This model calculates not only glaciological processes but also hillslope and fluvial erosion and sediment transport, isostasy, and temporally and spatially variable orographic precipitation. We compare the predicted erosion patterns using a modified SIA as well as a nested, 3-D Stokes flow model calculated using COMSOL Multiphysics. Both glacial-flow models predict different patterns in time-averaged erosion rates. However, these results are sensitive to the climate and the ice temperature. For warmer climates with more sliding, the higher-order model yields erosion rates that vary spatially and by almost an order of magnitude from those of the SIA model. As the erosion influences the basal topography and the ice deformation affects the ice thickness and extent, the higher-order glacial model can lead to variations in total ice-covered area that are greater than 30% those of the SIA model, again with larger differences for temperate ice. Over multiple glaciations and long timescales, these results suggest that higher-order glacial physics should be considered, particularly in temperate, mountainous settings.

  8. Marine carbon cycle sensitivity to background glacial climate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, M. O.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Oka, A.; Ohgaito, R.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheric pCO2 sensitivity to the glacial climate dynamics is investigated using factorial experiments with an offline biogeochemical model. The prescribing glacial climate filed is obtained from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) according to the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 2 protocol. This offline method enables us to evaluate the representation of the glacial climate state simulated by AOGCM. In our experiments, the solubility change is a dominant factor for lowering the glacial pCO2, while the glacial ocean circulation decreases only a 4 ppm of the atmospheric pCO2. The enhancing Antarctic bottom water formation and stratification increases the storing carbon in abyssal ocean. However, since the glacial ocean circulation changes surface DIC and alkalinity simultaneously, these two difference causes surface water to be slightly more basic and consequently yields only a small reduction in atmospheric pCO2. This response is also obtained in the other glacial experiment in which the North Atlantic deep water formation is dominant. The uncertainties in the glacial ocean circulation effect on the atmospheric pCO2 would arise from the simplified treatment of ocean biogeochemical response to climate dynamics change. The changes in sea-ice coverage and solar radiation decrease the atmospheric pCO2 in southern hemisphere through preventing the air-sea interaction and increases in northern hemisphere through inhibiting the solubility. The interaction between ocean circulation state and sea-ice coverage is also a key factor to account for the observed glacial pCO2 drawdown.

  9. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations in glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  10. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations is glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    1989-10-01

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  11. Glacial cycles and the growth and destruction of Alaska volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Calvert, A. T.; Bacon, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers have affected profoundly the growth, collapse, preservation, and possibly, eruptive behavior of Quaternary stratovolcanoes in Alaska. Holocene alpine glaciers have acted as effective agents of erosion on volcanoes north of ~55 °N and especially north of 60 °N. Cook Inlet volcanoes are particularly vulnerable as they sit atop rugged intrusive basement as high as 3000 m asl. Holocene glaciers have swept away or covered most of the deposits and dome lavas of frequently active Redoubt (60.5 °N); carved through the flanks of Spurr's active vent, Crater Peak (61.3 °N); and all but obscured the edifice of Hayes (61.6 °N), whose Holocene eruptive history is known almost exclusively though far-traveled tephra and flowage deposits. Relationships between Pleistocene eruptive histories, determined by high-precision Ar-Ar dating of lava flows, and marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 2-8 (Bassinot et al., 1994, EPSL, v. 126, p. 91­-108) vary with a volcano's latitude, size, and elevation. At Spurr, 26 ages cluster in interglacial periods. At Redoubt, 28 ages show a more continual eruptive pattern from the end of MIS 8 to the present, with a slight apparent increase in output following MIS 6, and almost no preservation before 220 ka. Veniaminof (56.2 °N) and Emmons (55.5°N), large, broad volcanoes with bases near sea level, had voluminous eruptive episodes during the profound deglaciations after MIS 8 and MIS 6. At Akutan (54.1 °N), many late Pleistocene lavas show evidence for ice contact; ongoing dating will be able to pinpoint ice thicknesses. Furthest south and west, away from thick Pleistocene ice on the Alaska Peninsula and mainland, the Tanaga volcanic cluster (51.9 °N) has a relatively continuous eruptive record for the last 200 k.y. that shows no clear-cut correlation with glacial cycles, except a possible hiatus during MIS 6. Finally, significant edifice collapse features have been temporally linked with deglaciations. A ~10-km3 debris

  12. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  13. Modelling of Gas Hydrate Dissociation During The Glacial-Inter-glacial Cycles, Case Study The Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwunmi, P.; Pecher, I. A.; Archer, R.; Moridis, G. J.; Reagan, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor depressions covering an area of >20,000 km2 on the Chatham Rise, south east of New Zealand, have been interpreted as pockmarks which are related to past fluid releases. It is proposed that the seafloor depressions were caused by sudden escape of overpressured gas generated by gas hydrate dissociation during glacial sea-level lowering. We are attempting to simulate the evolution of the gas hydrate system through glacial-interglacial cycles in the study area using TOUGH-Hydrate. The Chatham Rise offers a unique opportunity for studying the effect of depressurization from sealevel lowering to gas hydrate systems because it is a bathymetric barrier preventing the Subtropical Front separating subtropical and subantarctic waters from migrating during glacial-interglacial cycles. Hence, bottom-water temperatures can be assumed to remain constant. Recent results from paleoceanographic studies however, indicate that bottom-temperature may have varied locally. These temperature changes may have a more significant effect on the shallow gas hydrate system in the study area than the relatively gradual decrease of pressure associated with sealevel lowering.

  14. Strong and deep Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the last glacial cycle.

    PubMed

    Böhm, E; Lippold, J; Gutjahr, M; Frank, M; Blaser, P; Antz, B; Fohlmeister, J; Frank, N; Andersen, M B; Deininger, M

    2015-01-01

    Extreme, abrupt Northern Hemisphere climate oscillations during the last glacial cycle (140,000 years ago to present) were modulated by changes in ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing. However, the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which has a role in controlling heat transport from low to high latitudes and in ocean CO2 storage, is still poorly constrained beyond the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we show that a deep and vigorous overturning circulation mode has persisted for most of the last glacial cycle, dominating ocean circulation in the Atlantic, whereas a shallower glacial mode with southern-sourced waters filling the deep western North Atlantic prevailed during glacial maxima. Our results are based on a reconstruction of both the strength and the direction of the AMOC during the last glacial cycle from a highly resolved marine sedimentary record in the deep western North Atlantic. Parallel measurements of two independent chemical water tracers (the isotope ratios of (231)Pa/(230)Th and (143)Nd/(144)Nd), which are not directly affected by changes in the global cycle, reveal consistent responses of the AMOC during the last two glacial terminations. Any significant deviations from this configuration, resulting in slowdowns of the AMOC, were restricted to centennial-scale excursions during catastrophic iceberg discharges of the Heinrich stadials. Severe and multicentennial weakening of North Atlantic Deep Water formation occurred only during Heinrich stadials close to glacial maxima with increased ice coverage, probably as a result of increased fresh-water input. In contrast, the AMOC was relatively insensitive to submillennial meltwater pulses during warmer climate states, and an active AMOC prevailed during Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadials (Greenland warm periods).

  15. Southern Ocean sea-ice extent, productivity and iron flux over the past eight glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Fischer, H.; Fundel, F.; Ruth, U.; Twarloh, B.; Littot, G. C.; Mulvaney, R.; Röthlisberger, R.; de Angelis, M.; Boutron, C. F.; Hansson, M.; Jonsell, U.; Hutterli, M. A.; Lambert, F.; Kaufmann, P.; Stauffer, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Steffensen, J. P.; Bigler, M.; Siggaard-Andersen, M. L.; Udisti, R.; Becagli, S.; Castellano, E.; Severi, M.; Wagenbach, D.; Barbante, C.; Gabrielli, P.; Gaspari, V.

    2006-03-01

    Sea ice and dust flux increased greatly in the Southern Ocean during the last glacial period. Palaeorecords provide contradictory evidence about marine productivity in this region, but beyond one glacial cycle, data were sparse. Here we present continuous chemical proxy data spanning the last eight glacial cycles (740,000 years) from the Dome C Antarctic ice core. These data constrain winter sea-ice extent in the Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean biogenic productivity and Patagonian climatic conditions. We found that maximum sea-ice extent is closely tied to Antarctic temperature on multi-millennial timescales, but less so on shorter timescales. Biological dimethylsulphide emissions south of the polar front seem to have changed little with climate, suggesting that sulphur compounds were not active in climate regulation. We observe large glacial-interglacial contrasts in iron deposition, which we infer reflects strongly changing Patagonian conditions. During glacial terminations, changes in Patagonia apparently preceded sea-ice reduction, indicating that multiple mechanisms may be responsible for different phases of CO2 increase during glacial terminations. We observe no changes in internal climatic feedbacks that could have caused the change in amplitude of Antarctic temperature variations observed 440,000years ago.

  16. Southern Ocean sea-ice extent, productivity and iron flux over the past eight glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Wolff, E W; Fischer, H; Fundel, F; Ruth, U; Twarloh, B; Littot, G C; Mulvaney, R; Röthlisberger, R; de Angelis, M; Boutron, C F; Hansson, M; Jonsell, U; Hutterli, M A; Lambert, F; Kaufmann, P; Stauffer, B; Stocker, T F; Steffensen, J P; Bigler, M; Siggaard-Andersen, M L; Udisti, R; Becagli, S; Castellano, E; Severi, M; Wagenbach, D; Barbante, C; Gabrielli, P; Gaspari, V

    2006-03-23

    Sea ice and dust flux increased greatly in the Southern Ocean during the last glacial period. Palaeorecords provide contradictory evidence about marine productivity in this region, but beyond one glacial cycle, data were sparse. Here we present continuous chemical proxy data spanning the last eight glacial cycles (740,000 years) from the Dome C Antarctic ice core. These data constrain winter sea-ice extent in the Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean biogenic productivity and Patagonian climatic conditions. We found that maximum sea-ice extent is closely tied to Antarctic temperature on multi-millennial timescales, but less so on shorter timescales. Biological dimethylsulphide emissions south of the polar front seem to have changed little with climate, suggesting that sulphur compounds were not active in climate regulation. We observe large glacial-interglacial contrasts in iron deposition, which we infer reflects strongly changing Patagonian conditions. During glacial terminations, changes in Patagonia apparently preceded sea-ice reduction, indicating that multiple mechanisms may be responsible for different phases of CO2 increase during glacial terminations. We observe no changes in internal climatic feedbacks that could have caused the change in amplitude of Antarctic temperature variations observed 440,000 years ago.

  17. Deep Arctic Ocean warming during the last glacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Farmer, J.; Bauch, H.A.; Spielhagen, R.F.; Jakobsson, M.; Nilsson, J.; Briggs, W.M.; Stepanova, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, the cold and relatively fresh water beneath the sea ice is separated from the underlying warmer and saltier Atlantic Layer by a halocline. Ongoing sea ice loss and warming in the Arctic Ocean have demonstrated the instability of the halocline, with implications for further sea ice loss. The stability of the halocline through past climate variations is unclear. Here we estimate intermediate water temperatures over the past 50,000 years from the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca values of ostracods from 31 Arctic sediment cores. From about 50 to 11 kyr ago, the central Arctic Basin from 1,000 to 2,500 m was occupied by a water mass we call Glacial Arctic Intermediate Water. This water mass was 1–2 °C warmer than modern Arctic Intermediate Water, with temperatures peaking during or just before millennial-scale Heinrich cold events and the Younger Dryas cold interval. We use numerical modelling to show that the intermediate depth warming could result from the expected decrease in the flux of fresh water to the Arctic Ocean during glacial conditions, which would cause the halocline to deepen and push the warm Atlantic Layer into intermediate depths. Although not modelled, the reduced formation of cold, deep waters due to the exposure of the Arctic continental shelf could also contribute to the intermediate depth warming.

  18. Insolation-driven 100,000-year glacial cycles and hysteresis of ice-sheet volume.

    PubMed

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Saito, Fuyuki; Kawamura, Kenji; Raymo, Maureen E; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Takahashi, Kunio; Blatter, Heinz

    2013-08-08

    The growth and reduction of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past million years is dominated by an approximately 100,000-year periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests have demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. Yet insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100,000-year cycle, suggesting that internal climatic feedbacks may also be at work. Earlier conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms underpinning the 100,000-year cycle remain unclear. Here we show, using comprehensive climate and ice-sheet models, that insolation and internal feedbacks between the climate, the ice sheets and the lithosphere-asthenosphere system explain the 100,000-year periodicity. The responses of equilibrium states of ice sheets to summer insolation show hysteresis, with the shape and position of the hysteresis loop playing a key part in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that after inception of the ice sheet, its mass balance remains mostly positive through several precession cycles, whose amplitudes decrease towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to make the mass balance negative. Therefore, once a large ice sheet is established, a moderate increase in insolation is sufficient to trigger a negative mass balance, leading to an almost complete retreat of the ice sheet within several thousand years. This fast retreat is governed mainly by rapid ablation due to the lowered surface elevation resulting from delayed isostatic rebound, which is the lithosphere

  19. Causes of atmospheric CO2 variations over the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, K. M.; Holden, P.; Edwards, N.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Friend, A. D.; Wolff, E.

    2013-12-01

    During glacial-interglacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 increases by about 100 ppmv during brief interglacials. Despite years of research, the causes of this change are still not entirely understood. Here we attempt to explain the change in CO2 using, for the first time, an ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations designed to consider the processes that are thought to contribute to variability of atmospheric CO2 on glacial/interglacial timescales. We begin by running the ensemble to equilibrium with Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 kyr BP) forcings. By comparing the simulations with ice core data, we find that a small subset of the ensemble produces plausible atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate. We build emulators of the full model with respect to atmospheric CO2, and perform sensitivity analyses on them to quantify the contributions of atmospheric, sea ice, ocean, and vegetation processes to variability in atmospheric CO2 under glacial forcings. We find that the variability is dominated by a few key parameters. We also use singular vector decomposition to investigate the parameter interactions required for achieving plausible CO2 at the LGM. This work is ongoing, and if plausible states are found, a transient ensemble will be run over the last glacial-interglacial cycle (126 kyr) using the associated parameter sets. This experiment will be the first of its kind as it allows simulated atmospheric CO2 to feedback to the physical climate model in an unconstrained manner.

  20. Interhemispheric controls on deep ocean circulation and carbon chemistry during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David J.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Galy, Albert; Banakar, Virupaxa K.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in ocean circulation structure, together with biological cycling, have been proposed for trapping carbon in the deep ocean during glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, but uncertainty remains in the nature and timing of deep ocean circulation changes through glacial cycles. In this study, we use neodymium (Nd) and carbon isotopes from a deep Indian Ocean sediment core to reconstruct water mass mixing and carbon cycling in Circumpolar Deep Water over the past 250 thousand years, a period encompassing two full glacial cycles and including a range of orbital forcing. Building on recent studies, we use reductive sediment leaching supported by measurements on isolated phases (foraminifera and fish teeth) in order to obtain a robust seawater Nd isotope reconstruction. Neodymium isotopes record a changing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) component in the deep Indian Ocean that bears a striking resemblance to Northern Hemisphere climate records. In particular, we identify both an approximately in-phase link to Northern Hemisphere summer insolation in the precession band and a longer-term reduction of NADW contributions over the course of glacial cycles. The orbital timescale changes may record the influence of insolation forcing, for example via NADW temperature and/or Antarctic sea ice extent, on deep stratification and mixing in the Southern Ocean, leading to isolation of the global deep oceans from an NADW source during times of low Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. That evidence could support an active role for changing deep ocean circulation in carbon storage during glacial inceptions. However, mid-depth water mass mixing and deep ocean carbon storage were largely decoupled within glacial periods, and a return to an interglacial-like circulation state during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6.5 was accompanied by only minor changes in atmospheric CO2. Although a gradual reduction of NADW export through glacial periods may have produced slow climate feedbacks

  1. Hydrographic Response of the East China Sea to the Sea Level Changes Lead by the Glacial/ Interglacial Climatic Cycle Inferred from Radiolarian Data (IODP Exp. 346 Site U1429)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, K. M. R.; Itaki, T.

    2016-12-01

    The East China Sea (ECS) is a marginal sea. In this area warm water of the Kuroshio Current (KC) and discharges of fresh water from the Yangtze River during summer influence the regional hydrography under the control of the East Asian Monsoon. Most parts of this sea lies above a continental shelf. Indeed, 70 % of this sea has a water column shallower than 200 m. Since the end of the Mid Pleistocene Transition spanning from 1200 to 800 kyr, Earth's climate is characterized by 100 kyr interglacial/glacial climatic cycles. To these cycles are associated high amplitude changes in the world wide sea level caused by the increases/decreases in the volume of the polar ice sheets located in both hemispheres. At its maximum a Δ sea level exceeding 100 m is recognized during the glacial Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 2. In this context, because 70% of the ECS show a water depth shallower than 200 m, in this study we are interested in monitoring the response of the ECS hydrography to these high amplitude sea level changes. In summer-autumn 2013, the IODP Expedition 346 could retrieve sediments cores in the northern East China Sea from Site U1428 and U1429. Based on the shipboard preliminary results, these sites likely cover the past 400 kyr continuously. The shipboard preliminarily data also reported that siliceous microfossils such as radiolarians were abundant and well preserved in sediment cores collected from these sites. Radiolarian are widely distributed in the world ocean and they are famous for living from shallow to deep water masses. Therefore, their uses enable to monitor paleoecological changes in the shallow to the deep water layers. In this study based on radiolarian species, which ecology are well-known, we discuss changes in the ECS hydrography throughout the past 400 kyr. We have analyzed changes in radiolarian assemblages over 110 samples collected from Site U1429. As a preliminary result, we identified that during the MIS 2, 6 and 10 because of a globally low

  2. Indonesian Throughflow variability over the last glacial cycle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Xu, J.; Hendrizan, M.; Schröder, J.

    2013-12-01

    The transfer of surface and intermediate waters from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago (Indonesian Throughflow: ITF) strongly influences the heat and freshwater budgets of tropical water masses, in turn affecting global climate. Key areas for monitoring past ITF variations through this critical gateway are the narrow passages through the Makassar Strait and Flores Sea and the main outflow area within the Timor Sea. Here, we integrate high-resolution sea surface temperature and salinity reconstructions (based on paired planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O) with X-ray fluorescence runoff data and benthic isotopes from marine sediment cores retrieved in these regions during several cruises with RV'Sonne' and RV'Marion Dufresne'. Our results show that high latitude climate variability strongly influenced ITF intensity on millennial to centennial timescales as well as on longer glacial-interglacial timescales. Marked declines in ITF strength occurred during Heinrich events and the Younger Dryas, most likely related to slowdown of the global thermohaline circulation during colder northern hemisphere climate spells, when deep water production decreased and the deep ocean became more stratified. Additionally, the surface component of the ITF strongly reflects regional windstress and rainfall patterns, and thus the spatial extent and intensity of the tropical convection over the Indonesian archipelago. Our runoff and salinity estimates reveal that the development of the tropical convection was intricately linked to the latitudinal migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). In particular, our data show that the Australian monsoon intensified during the major deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise through the Younger Dryas and earliest Holocene (12.9-10 ka). This massive intensification of the Australian monsoon coincided with a southward shift of the ITCZ, linked to southern hemisphere warming and enhanced greenhouse forcing

  3. Western tropical Pacific hydroclimate across four glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, K. M.; Carolin, S.; Meckler, A. N.; Adkins, J. F.; Chen, S.; Lund, D. C.; Partin, J. W.; Moerman, J. W.; Orland, I. J.; Hoffmann, S. S.; Emile-Geay, J.; Clark, B.

    2016-12-01

    Long, high-resolution, absolutely-dated records of past hydroclimate provide the unique opportunity to assess the relationships between a rich variety of past climate forcings and hydrological response. Here, we present the latest compilation of well-replicated stalagmite oxygen isotopic (d18O) records from Gunung Mulu Park, in northern Borneo, that stretches over the last 550,000 years. We focus on the timing and structure of stalagmite d18O variability during major climate transitions including glacial-interglacial terminations as well as a wide variety of sub-orbital climate change events noted in paleoclimate records from both the tropics and extratropics. Ultra-high-resolution timeseries of stalagmite d18O from the Holocene as well as 74kybp, across the Toba super-eruption, document appreciable changes in the character of interannual to decadal-scale variability that may contribute to observed stalagmite d18O variations on millennial to orbital timescales. We employ a suite of climate model output, as well as results from modern-day rainfall d18O monitoring, to investigate the dynamical drivers of observed spring/fall precessional insolation forcing control on Borneo stalagmite d18O.

  4. How long do U-shaped valleys last? The lifespan of glacial topography set by tectonics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac; Montgomery, David

    2015-04-01

    More than 10 kyr after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges world-wide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but the transition from a glacial to a fluvial landscape is poorly constrained and it remains unclear how long glacial morphology persists following deglaciation. The longevity of glacial topography influences glacial extent and erosion in subsequent glaciations and hence the cumulative impact of Pleistocene glacial cycles on the evolution of mountain ranges. We tested whether tectonic forcing and erosional response control the timescale over which glacial topography persists into inter-glacial periods in the western Southern Alps of New Zealand and other mountain ranges worldwide, including the syntaxes of the Himalaya and Taiwan. We quantified the degree of glacial imprint by exploiting the conventional interpretation of V-shaped fluvial and U-shaped glacial valleys. Valley cross sections were automatically extracted from digital terrain models and power-laws were fitted to each cross section to quantify the shape of the valley flanks. A power-law exponent of 1 characterizes the straight valley flanks of a V-shaped cross section and greater exponents are indicative of progressively more U-shaped valleys. Our results show that tectonic forcing is a first-order control on landscape evolution and on the persistence of glacial morphology worldwide. In Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges the lifespan of glacial topography is on the order of one interglacial period, preventing the development of a cumulative glacial signal. In contrast, in most alpine landscapes more than 100 kyr are required for the transformation from glacial back to fluvial topography and glacial landforms have not or have only partially been erased during the current interglacial. Thus we suggest, emphasizing the influence of glacially preconditioned topography on glacial extent and erosion, that tectonic forcing

  5. Climate Controls on European Fluvial Denudation over Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Mutz, Sebastian G.

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary climate change between glacial-interglacial cycles is commonly thought to induce variations in catchment denudation rates. However, measurements of temporal variations in fluvial denudation are often lacking. Here we present an integration of existing and new cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from European river terraces with predicted climate change during glacial and interglacial periods derived from a high-resolution (T159, 80x80km) global atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5) . Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations were interpreted from river terraces spanning 12 degrees of latitude in unglaciated, tectonically quiescent settings. 25 analyses of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations provide catchment-wide paleodenudation rates from terraces. From 0.5-2.0 Ma these data indicate low, and constant (< 20 mm/kyr) fluvial paleodenudation rates. Modern cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates are generally higher (20-50 mm/kyr). However, previous higher-fidelity studies of terraces formed since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) suggest a factor of 1.5-3 higher denudation rates during the LGM compared to modern. Results from paleoclimate simulations of the LGM, mid-Holocene, and modern times suggest precipitation rates during the last glacial period were 100-500 mm/yr drier than the modern rates across Europe. Mid-Holocene precipitation rates were 100 mm/yr drier (SW Europe) to 200 mm/yr wetter (central Europe) than modern rates. Predicted LGM temperatures indicate periglacial conditions in some areas. Thus, despite moderate changes in predicted precipitation between glacial and interglacial cycles, there is no clear signal of these cycles in cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates between 0.5-2 Ma. In contrast, catchments with higher-fidelity records since the LGM document higher denudation rates during glacial times. We suggest this temporal difference in denudation rates is driven by periglacial, not fluvial, processes. These results have

  6. Regional and global benthic δ18O stacks for the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Lorraine E.; Stern, Joseph V.

    2016-10-01

    Although detailed age models exist for some marine sediment records of the last glacial cycle (0-150 ka), age models for many cores rely on the stratigraphic correlation of benthic δ18O, which measures ice volume and deep ocean temperature change. The large amount of data available for the last glacial cycle offers the opportunity to improve upon previous benthic δ18O compilations, such as the "LR04" global stack. Not only are the age constraints for the LR04 stack now outdated but a single global alignment target neglects regional differences of several thousand years in the timing of benthic δ18O change during glacial terminations. Here we present regional stacks that characterize mean benthic δ18O change for 8 ocean regions and a volume-weighted global stack of data from 263 cores. Age models for these stacks are based on radiocarbon data from 0 to 40 ka, correlation to a layer-counted Greenland ice core from 40 to 56 ka, and correlation to radiometrically dated speleothems from 56 to 150 ka. The regional δ18O stacks offer better stratigraphic alignment targets than the LR04 global stack and, furthermore, suggest that the LR04 stack is biased 1-2 kyr too young throughout the Pleistocene. Finally, we compare global and regional benthic δ18O responses with sea level estimates for the last glacial cycle.

  7. Exploring the data constrained phase space of the last Antarctic glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavalier, Benoit; Tarasov, Lev

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet over the last two glacial cycles is studied using the Glacial Systems Model (GSM). Glaciological modelling is an effective tool to generate continental-scale reconstructions over glacial cycles, but the models depend on parameterizations to account for the deficiencies (e.g., missing physics, unresolved sub-grid processes, uncertain boundary conditions) inherent in any numerical model. These parameters, considered together, form a parameter phase space from which sets of parameters can be sampled; each set corresponds to an ice sheet reconstruction. The GSM has been updated with a number of recent developments: hybrid SIA-SSA physics, Schoof grounding line parameterization, broadened degrees of freedom in the climate forcing, sub-shelf melt explicitly dependent on ocean temperatures, improved hydrofracturing, cliff failure at the margins, basal topographic uncertainties, impact of basal drag roughness and subgrid statistics, and first order geoidal corrections in the coupled glacial isostatic adjustment component. Parametric uncertainties are defined in the GSM using >36 ensemble parameters. Prior to conducting a full Bayesian calibration, one must first validate the ability of the GSM to simulate a broad range of responses. We attempt this by latin hypercube sampling of the parameter phase space and comparing the model predictions against our constraint database consisting of past elevation, extent and relative sea level observations and the present day geometry. We document the capability of the GSM to envelope the observational constraints given the parametric uncertainties and discuss the implications for the evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  8. Millennial environmental variability on Shirshov Ridge, Bering Sea, during the penultimate and last glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E.; Ovsepyan, E.; Murdmaa, I.; Max, L.; Riethdorf, J.; Nuernberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Alekseeva, T.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in paleoceanographic conditions on Shirshov Ridge, Western Bering Sea, are inferred over the last two glacial cycles from the high-resolution study of planktic and benthic foraminiferal assemblages and IRD from the upper and lower parts of an 18m-long piston core SO201-2-85KL (57°30.30'N, 170°24.79'E, water depth 968 m). Here we present evidence of pronounced glacial-interglacial and millennial-scale variations in surface biological productivity, bottom-water ventilation and ice rafting. Along with strong dominance of siliceous microfossils during MIS 1 and MIS 5.5, the interglacial sediments contain diverse benthic foraminiferal assemblages whereas planktic foraminifers are scarce due to selective dissolution. In contrast, the glacials are characterized by strong terrigenous input, including the IRD transported by sea ice and icebergs, and by moderate productivity with the seasonal pulses indicated by the high content of benthic opportunistic species Alabaminella weddellensis. Factor analyses of the benthic fauna clearly show a remarkable difference between glacial assemblages and interglacial fauna which is strongly dominated by Bolivina seminuda and Bulimina tenuata. These species are known to favor rather stable high-productivity conditions with enhanced supply of organic matter to the sediments and decreased oxygen content. Reduced ventilation during the interglacials is also evidenced by high values of the dysoxic benthic group whereas the oxic group is the most abundant during the last glacial. Low-diversity planktic foraminiferal assemblages dominated by the polar species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sin. indicating a generally cold surface-water layer characterize both glacial-interglacial cycles. However, the intervals with high relative abundance of Globigerina bulloides point to an increase in surface bioproductivity on a millennial scale. In particular, these increases occur at the glacial terminations and are compatible with spikes in

  9. Millennial-scale climate variability in response to changing glacial and orbital boundary conditions during the Mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Drysdale, Russell; Bajo, Petra; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene transition represents perhaps the most important climate transition in the Quaternary period, yet it is one of the most poorly understood. Although the exact timing and mechanism of the onset of the "100 kyr" regime remain a matter of debate, it is well established that the overall periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles changed from a dominant 41 kyr obliquity periodicity prior to ~0.9 Ma to a dominant late Pleistocene 100 kyr variance. This change in the frequency domain was associated with an increase in the amplitude of global ice volume variations that, superimposed on a long-term climatic trend towards more glacial conditions over millions of years, produced some of the most extreme glaciations recorded. This interval of time has often been considered to be important in relation to long-term Milankovitch-scale climate variability. In contrast, here, special emphasis will be placed on assessing the presence and the characteristics of the suborbital-scale variability, and reconstructing the evolution of millennial-scale climate variability as the average climate state evolve toward generally colder conditions with larger ice sheets, and the spectral character of climate variability shifted from dominantly 41 kyr to 100 kyr. Appealing evidence suggests that millennial-scale climate variability is amplified during times of intense forcing changes, but this rapid variability has not been thoroughly explored yet at the time when the major changes in climate periodicity occurred. To address these questions, we have examined the record of climatic conditions from Marine Isotope Stages 25 to 16 (~970-650 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to assess millennial-scale changes in sea-surface and deep-water conditions, the dynamics of thermohaline deep-water circulation

  10. Periodic orbits for a discontinuous vector field arising from a conceptual model of glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, James; Widiasih, Esther; Hahn, Jonathan; McGehee, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual climate models provide an approach to understanding climate processes through a mathematical analysis of an approximation to reality. Recently, these models have also provided interesting examples of nonsmooth dynamical systems. Here we develop a new conceptual model of glacial cycles consisting of a system of three ordinary differential equations defining a discontinuous vector field. Our model provides a dynamical systems framework for a mechanism previously shown to play a crucial role in glacial cycle patterns, namely, an increased ice sheet ablation rate during deglaciations. We use ad hoc singular perturbation techniques to prove the existence of a large periodic orbit crossing the discontinuity boundary, provided the ice sheet edge moves sufficiently slowly relative to changes in the snow line and temperature. Numerical explorations reveal the periodic orbit exists when the time constant for the ice sheet edge has more moderate values.

  11. Temporal evolution of mechanisms controlling ocean carbon uptake during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, Karen E.; Chase, Zanna

    2017-08-01

    Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain the ∼85-90 ppm decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) during the last glacial cycle, between 127,000 and 18,000 yrs ago. When taken together, these mechanisms can, in some models, account for the full glacial-interglacial CO2 drawdown. Most proxy-based evaluations focus on the peak of the Last Glacial Maximum, 24,000-18,000 yrs ago, and little has been done to determine the sequential timing of processes affecting CO2 during the last glacial cycle. Here we use a new compilation of sea-surface temperature records together with time-sequenced records of carbon and Nd isotopes, and other proxies to determine when the most commonly proposed mechanisms could have been important for CO2 drawdown. We find that the initial major drawdown of 35 ppm 115,000 yrs ago was most likely a result of Antarctic sea ice expansion. Importantly, changes in deep ocean circulation and mixing did not play a major role until at least 30,000 yrs after the first CO2 drawdown. The second phase of CO2 drawdown occurred ∼70,000 yrs ago and was also coincident with the first significant influences of enhanced ocean productivity due to dust. Finally, minimum concentrations of atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum resulted from the combination of physical and biological factors, including the barrier effect of expanded Southern Ocean sea ice, slower ventilation of the deep sea, and ocean biological feedbacks.

  12. A Climactic Feedback? Variations in Mid-Ocean Ridge CO2 Emissions Driven by Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, J. M.; Katz, R. F.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in sea level associated with glacial cycles affect the pressure beneath a mid-ocean ridge (MOR) [1,2,3]. Pressure controls the depth of first melting, and therefore the rate of change of pressure controls the rate of change of the depth of first melting. The changing depth of first melting alters the effective rate at which mantle, and thus CO2, enters the melting region. Melt then transports CO2 to the ridge axis, where it enters the climate system. We calculate that the lag between sea level change and consequent variation in MOR CO2 emissions is 40-120 kyrs[4], similar to the timescale of glacial cycles. Could these variations in MOR CO2 emissions feed back on climate and lead to ice-age pacing at a small multiple of the obliquity period? [5]To test this hypothesis we begin with a climate model comprised of a global energy balance and a 1D ice sheet. The ice sheet flows under its own weight, accumulates due to precipitation, and melts in response to the local energy balance[6]. This model broadly replicates Early Pleistocene 40 kyr glacial cycles. We extend the model to include a variable greenhouse effect, according to atmospheric CO2, and variable MOR CO2 emissions driven by sea level. The lag between sea level change and MOR CO2 emissions is controlled by mantle permeability. If this model does not demonstrate MOR CO2 emissions altering glacial cycles, it would suggest this hypothesised feedback mechanism can be rejected. References[1] Huybers & Langmuir 2009; 10.1016/j.epsl.2009.07.014[2] Lund & Asimow 2011; 10.1029/2011GC003693[3] Crowley et al 2015; 10.1126/science.1261508[4] Burley & Katz 2015; 10.1016/j.epsl.2015.06.031[5] Huybers (in prep.)[6] Huybers & Tziperman 2008; 10.1029/2007PA001463

  13. Dust: a diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Yung, Y L; Lee, T; Wang, C H; Shieh, Y T

    1996-02-16

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5 degrees Celsius) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals.

  14. Dust: a diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Lee, T.; Wang, C. H.; Shieh, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5 degrees Celsius) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals.

  15. Dust: A diagnostic of the hydrologic cycle during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk L. Yung; Typhoon Lee; Chung-Ho Wang; Ying-Tzung Shieh

    1996-02-16

    Dust concentrations in ice of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are high in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The magnitude of the enhancements can be explained if the strength of the hydrologic cycle during the LGM was about half of that at present. This notion is consistent with a large decrease (5{degrees}C) in ocean temperature during the LGM, as recently deduced from measurements of strontium and calcium in corals. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  16. North American ice-sheet dynamics and the onset of 100,000-year glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Bintanja, R; van de Wal, R S W

    2008-08-14

    The onset of major glaciations in the Northern Hemisphere about 2.7 million years ago was most probably induced by climate cooling during the late Pliocene epoch. These glaciations, during which the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets successively expanded and retreated, are superimposed on this long-term climate trend, and have been linked to variations in the Earth's orbital parameters. One intriguing problem associated with orbitally driven glacial cycles is the transition from 41,000-year to 100,000-year climatic cycles that occurred without an apparent change in insolation forcing. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the transition, both including and excluding ice-sheet dynamics. Difficulties in finding a conclusive answer to this palaeoclimatic problem are related to the lack of sufficiently long records of ice-sheet volume or sea level. Here we use a comprehensive ice-sheet model and a simple ocean-temperature model to extract three-million-year mutually consistent records of surface air temperature, ice volume and sea level from marine benthic oxygen isotopes. Although these records and their relative phasings are subject to considerable uncertainty owing to limited availability of palaeoclimate constraints, the results suggest that the gradual emergence of the 100,000-year cycles can be attributed to the increased ability of the merged North American ice sheets to survive insolation maxima and reach continental-scale size. The oversized, wet-based ice sheet probably responded to the subsequent insolation maximum by rapid thinning through increased basal-sliding, thereby initiating a glacial termination. Based on our assessment of the temporal changes in air temperature and ice volume during individual glacials, we demonstrate the importance of ice dynamics and ice-climate interactions in establishing the 100,000-year glacial cycles, with enhanced North American ice-sheet growth and the subsequent merging of the ice sheets being key elements.

  17. European contribution to the last glacial dust cycle: how loess sequences were built

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, D.; Chauvel, C.; Sima, A.

    2013-12-01

    When studying the past variations of the dust climate cycle, an important source of uncertainty are the emissions from sources which were active in glacial times (due to lower sea level, dryer and windier climate, reduced vegetation etc), but are not anymore in present day. A better agreement between results from numerical simulations and the available data for the Last Glacial Maximum has recently been obtained by taking into account the contribution of glaciogenic dust sources (i.e., areas following the continental ice-sheet margins, rich in easily deflatable material produced by glacier-related processes). The extent and relative contribution of the different types of dust sources (desert, glaciogenic) have varied during the past glacial cycles, and their relative impact on deposition also varied from one deposition area to another. Thus, when attempting to interpret dust deposition records in terms of climate change, the corresponding dust sources need to be well identified. Here we address the North Atlantic abrupt climate changes ("Greenland stadial-interstadial cycles"), which have largely impacted Europe especially during marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 and 2, from the perspective of European loess deposits. Using geochemical data analyses on loess sequences located along the 50°N latitude, and numerical dust emision simulations at an appropriately high spatial resolution, we identify the main emission sources relevant for the different deposition areas, and mechanisms contributing to the sedimentation rate variations in the European MIS 3 and 2 loess sequences.

  18. Impact of brine-induced stratification on the glacial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttes, N.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    During the cold period of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, about 21 000 years ago) atmospheric CO2 was around 190 ppm (Monnin et al., 2001), much lower than the pre-industrial concentration of 280 ppm. The causes of this substantial drop remain partially unresolved, despite intense research. Understanding the origin of reduced atmospheric CO2 during glacial times is crucial to comprehend the evolution of the different carbon reservoirs within the Earth system (atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere and ocean). In this context, the ocean is believed to play a major role as it can store large amounts of carbon (Sigman and Boyle, 2000), especially in the abyss, which is a carbon reservoir that is thought to have expanded during glacial times. To create this larger reservoir, one possible mechanism is to produce very dense glacial waters, thereby stratifying the deep ocean and reducing the carbon exchange between the deep and surface ocean (Paillard and Parrenin, 2004). The existence of such very dense waters has been inferred in the LGM deep Atlantic from sediment pore water salinity (Adkins et al., 2002). Based on these observations, we study the impact of a brine mechanism on the glacial carbon cycle. This mechanism relies on the formation and rapid sinking of brines, very salty water released during sea ice formation, which brings salty dense water down to the bottom of the ocean. It provides two major features: a direct link from the surface to the deep ocean along with an efficient way of setting a strong stratification. We show with the CLIMBER-2 coupled carbon-climate model (Petoukhov et al., 2000) that such a brine mechanism can account for a significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 and contribute to the glacial-interglacial change. This mechanism can be amplified by low vertical diffusion resulting from the brine-induced stratification. The results obtained substantially improve the modeled glacial distribution of oceanic δ13C as well as the deep ocean salinity in

  19. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  20. Two middle Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles from the Valle Grande, Jemez Mountains, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fawcett, Peter J.; Heikoop, Jeff; Goff, Fraser; Anderson, R. Scott; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, John William; WoldeGabriel, Giday; Allen, Craig D.; Johnson, Catrina M.; Smith, Susan J.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2006-01-01

    A long-lived middle Pleistocene lake formed in the Valle Grande, a large moat valley of the Valles caldera in northern New Mexico, when a post-caldera eruption (South Mountain rhyolite) dammed the drainage out of the caldera. The deposits of this lake were cored in May 2004 (GLAD5 project, hole VC-3) and 81 m of mostly lacustrine silty mud were recovered. A tentative chronology has been established for VC-3 with a basal tephra Ar-Ar date of 552 +/- 3 ka, a correlation of major climatic changes in the core with other long Pleistocene records (deep sea oxygen isotope records and long Antarctic ice core records), and the recognition of two geomagnetic field polarity events in the core which can be correlated with globally recognized events. This record spans a critical interval of the middle Pleistocene from MIS 14 (552 ka) to MIS 10 (~360 ka), at which time the lacustrine sediments filled the available accommodation space in the caldera moat. Multiple analyses, including core sedimentology and stratigraphy, sediment density and rock magnetic properties, organic carbon content and carbon isotope ratios, C/N ratios, and pollen content reveal two glacial/interglacial cycles in the core (MIS 14 to MIS 10). This record includes glacial terminations V and VI and complete sections spanning interglacials MIS 13 and MIS 11. In the VC-3 record, both of these interglacials are relatively long compared with the intervening glacials (MIS 14 and MIS 12), and interglacial MIS 13 is significantly muted in amplitude compared with MIS 11. These features are similar to several other mid-Pleistocene records. The glacial terminations are quite abrupt in this record with notable changes in sedimentation, organic carbon content, C/N ratios and watershed vegetation type. Termination V is the largest climate change evident in this part of the middle Pleistocene. The glacial inceptions tend to be more gradual, on the order of a few thousand years.

  1. Dynamic Hydrological Discharge Modelling for Fully Coupled Paleoclimate Runs of the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; Hagemann, Stefan; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The continually evolving large ice sheets present in the Northern Hemisphere during the last glacial cycle caused significant changes to river pathways both through directly blocking rivers and through glacial isostatic adjustment. These river pathway changes are believed to of had a significant impact on the evolution of ocean circulation through changing the pattern of fresh water discharge into the oceans. A fully coupled ESM simulation of the last glacial cycle thus requires a hydrological discharge model that uses a set of river pathways that evolve with the earth's changing orography while being able to reproduce the known present-day river network given the present-day orography. Here we present a method for dynamically modelling hydrological discharge that meets such requirements by applying relative manual corrections to an evolving fine scale orography (accounting for the changing ice sheets and isostatic rebound) each time the river directions are recalculated. The corrected orography thus produced is then used to create a set of fine scale river pathways and these are then upscaled to a course scale. An existing present-day hydrological discharge model within the JSBACH3 land surface model is run using the course scale river pathways generated. This method will be used in fully coupled paleoclimate runs made using MPI-ESM1 as part of the PalMod project. Tests show this procedure reproduces the known present-day river network to a sufficient degree of accuracy.

  2. Beyond Rayleigh Distillation: Reconstructing Glacial Nutrient Cycles using a Seasonal Model of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemeny, P. C.; Kast, E.; Fawcett, S. E.; Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotope ratios of diatom-bound organic matter recovered from Southern Ocean sediment cores have been used to investigate N cycling and the global carbon cycle over glacial-interglacial transitions. Increases in diatom-bound 15N/14N (δ15N) and decreases in export production have qualitatively been interpreted to reflect elevated nitrate (NO3-) consumption and decreased nutrient supply during glacial intervals; however, studies have yet to quantitatively relate paleoceanographic δ15N records to the surface NO3- concentration of ancient oceans. Furthermore, recent studies of the N and oxygen (O) isotope ratios of seawater NO3- reveal that seasonal processes may impact the isotopic signal of exported organic matter. The connection between diatom-bound δ15N and paleoceanographic NO3- availability is explored using a seasonally-resolved 1-dimension model of the Southern Ocean upper water column. The model parameterizes summer and winter physical and biogeochemical processes in the surface mixed layer and the temperature minimum layer. When calibrated to modern conditions, the model reproduces observed deviations from Rayleigh dynamics in the mixed layer, which result from a combination of summertime remineralization, late-summer N recycling, and wintertime nitrification. In glacial simulations, we observe an increase in diatom-bound δ15N that results dominantly from enhanced summertime NO3- consumption, as opposed to resulting from a rise in the δ15N of wintertime NO3-. Yet wintertime mixed layer (and thus initial spring/summer) NO3- concentration is greatly reduced under ice age conditions, such that export production, which has been observed to be lower during glacial intervals, was nevertheless able to consume almost all of the gross nitrate supply. The model suggests that observed differences in δ15N between centric and pennate diatom assemblages can be explained by the near-complete consumption of NO3- in the ice age summer mixed layer.

  3. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  4. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  5. Terrigenous biomarker record off Morocco over the last five glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostek, Frauke; Bard, Edouard; Nave, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    We present a record of terrigenous biomarkers - long chain n-alkanes - supplied to Moroccan coastal sediments over the past 500 kyr representing the last five glacial-interglacial cycles (MD08-3178, 31°17.09'N/11°29.20'W, 2184 m water depth). The eolian n-alkane supply along the eastern margin off the coast of NW Africa originates mainly from the Atlas Mountain region and the Moroccan coastal plain and partly from the northern Sahara. The new geochemical profiles record changes in vegetation cover, wind strength and fluvial transport from the Atlas Mountains. Marine biological productivity proxies and n-alkane concentrations increase during glacial periods suggesting that stronger winds induce upwelling in the ocean and transport hydrocarbons from the continent. Chain-length distribution of n-alkanes points to variations in the relative input of terrestrial C3 and C4 plants. These variations are clearly paced by glacial cycles due to orbital variations as illustrated by their correlation with the alkenone sea surface temperature record measured on the same core (see companion poster by Nave et al.). The relative abundance of C3 plants is seen to be higher during glacial periods whereas the abundance of C4 plants is higher during warmer interglacial periods. Our results suggest that important vegetation changes have occurred in this part of NW Africa during the last 500 kyr. These changes could be due to latitudinal migrations of vegetation belts, with plants adapted to a more humid Mediterranean climate in the north contrasting with arid Saharan vegetation in the south. In addition, the observed changes may also be related to relative changes of source regions of n-alkanes due to wind strength variations.

  6. From the Last Interglacial to the Anthropocene: Modelling a Complete Glacial Cycle (PalMod)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Latif, Mojib; Claussen, Martin; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We will give a short overview of the national climate modelling initiative (PalMod - Paleo Modelling, www.palmod.de) on the understanding of the climate system dynamics and its variability during the last glacial cycle. PalMod is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and its specific topics are: (i) to identify and quantify the relative contributions of the fundamental processes which determined the Earth's climate trajectory and variability during the last glacial cycle, (ii) to simulate with comprehensive Earth System Models (ESMs) the climate from the peak of the last interglacial - the Eemian warm period - up to the present, including the changes in the spectrum of variability, and (iii) to assess possible future climate trajectories beyond this century during the next millennia with sophisticated ESMs tested in such a way. The research is intended to be conducted over a period of 10 years, but with shorter funding cycles. The envisioned approach is innovative in three respects. First, the consortium aims at simulating a full glacial cycle in transient mode and with comprehensive ESMs which allow full interactions between the physical and biogeochemical components of the Earth system, including ice sheets. Second, we shall address climate variability during the last glacial cycle on a large range of time scales, from interannual to multi-millennial, and attempt to quantify the relative contributions of external forcing and processes internal to the Earth system to climate variability at different time scales. Third, in order to achieve a higher level of understanding of natural climate variability at time scales of millennia, its governing processes and implications for the future climate, we bring together three different research communities: the Earth system modeling community, the proxy data community and the computational science community. The consortium consists of 18 partners including all major modelling centers within

  7. The Emsian - Eifelian (Lower - Middle Devonian) boundary occurs in a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum: A potentially useful secondary marker for the GSSP section (Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, Germany).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Makarona, C.; Linnemann, U.; Königshof, P.; Claeys, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    . We observe a mixed forcing of obliquity and eccentricity-modulated precession. Moreover, the Emsian - Eifelian boundary clearly occurs shortly after a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum. This cyclostratigraphic observation can be used as an additional mean in future long-distance correlations between Emsian - Eifelian boundary sections.

  8. From the Last Interglacial to the Anthropocene: Modelling a Complete Glacial Cycle (PalMod)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Latif, Mojib

    2017-04-01

    We will give a short overview and update on the current status of the national climate modelling initiative PalMod (Paleo Modelling, www.palmod.de). PalMod focuses on the understanding of the climate system dynamics and its variability during the last glacial cycle. The initiative is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and its specific topics are: (i) to identify and quantify the relative contributions of the fundamental processes which determined the Earth's climate trajectory and variability during the last glacial cycle, (ii) to simulate with comprehensive Earth System Models (ESMs) the climate from the peak of the last interglacial - the Eemian warm period - up to the present, including the changes in the spectrum of variability, and (iii) to assess possible future climate trajectories beyond this century during the next millennia with sophisticated ESMs tested in such a way. The research is intended to be conducted over a period of 10 years, but with shorter funding cycles. PalMod kicked off in February 2016. The first phase focuses on the last deglaciation (app. the last 23.000 years). From the ESM perspective PalMod pushes forward model development by coupling ESM with dynamical ice sheet models. Computer scientists work on speeding up climate models using different concepts (like parallelisation in time) and one working group is dedicated to perform a comprehensive data synthesis to validate model performance. The envisioned approach is innovative in three respects. First, the consortium aims at simulating a full glacial cycle in transient mode and with comprehensive ESMs which allow full interactions between the physical and biogeochemical components of the Earth system, including ice sheets. Second, we shall address climate variability during the last glacial cycle on a large range of time scales, from interannual to multi-millennial, and attempt to quantify the relative contributions of external forcing and processes

  9. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Denniston, Rhawn F; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J

    2014-05-02

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  10. Early human-plant interactions based on palaeovegetation simulations of Africa over glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowling, S. A.; Cox, P. M.; Jones, C. D.; Maslin, M. A.; Spall, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    A greater understanding of African palaeovegetation environments over the Pleistocene (1.6 Mya) is important for evaluating potential catalysts underlying the anatomical, social and demographic changes observed in early human populations. We used a state-of-the-art fully-coupled earth system model (HADLEY-GCM3) to simulate typical glacial and interglacial environments likely encountered by late-Pleistocene humans. Our simulations indicate that tropical broadleaf forests of central Africa were not severely restricted by expanding grasslands during the last glacial maximum, although the carbon content of stem and density of leaf components were substantially reduced. We interpret a natural eastern migration corridor between southern Africa and the Rift Valley based on simulations of a no-analogue vegetation assemblage characterised by a unique combination of grass and low density forest. We postulate that early human populations in southern Africa were isolated from northern groups during warm interglacials, and that trans-African migration was facilitated during glacial cycles via a more openly forested eastern corridor.

  11. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Denniston, Rhawn F.; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J.

    2014-05-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  12. Molecular evidence for Pleistocene glacial cycles driving diversification of a North American desert spider, Agelenopsis aperta.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Nadia A; Riechert, Susan E

    2004-11-01

    The influence of historical climatic vs. geological changes on species diversification patterns was investigated in a widely distributed North American desert spider, Agelenopsis aperta (Araneae: Agelenidae), with particular reference to Pleistocene glacial cycles and earlier patterns of mountain building. Levels of sequence divergence obtained from the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome oxidase I, dated to the Pleistocene, eliminating Rocky Mountain orogeny as a cause of diversification, as orogeny ended 4 million years ago. The results of phylogenetic and network analyses showed the presence of three geographically defined clades, which were consistent with the presence of at least three glacial refugia: (i) east of the Rocky Mountains; (ii) between the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevadas; and (iii) west of the Sierra Nevadas. In addition, populations within the Rocky Mountains exhibited significantly lower genetic diversity than populations east of the Rocky Mountains and the haplotypes found within the Rockies were a subset of eastern haplotypes. These patterns suggest that a post-Pleistocene range expansion occurred out of an eastern glacial refugium into the Rocky Mountains. Examination of phylogeographical studies of other North American desert taxa indicated that mountain building explained diversification patterns more effectively for some taxa but Pleistocene climate change was more important for others, including A. aperta.

  13. Coupled Northern Hemisphere permafrost-ice sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willeit, M.; Ganopolski, A.

    2015-02-01

    Permafrost influences a number of processes which are relevant for local and global climate. For example, it is well known that permafrost plays an important role in global carbon and methane cycles. Less is known about the interaction between permafrost and ice sheets. In this study a permafrost module is included in the Earth system model CLIMBER-2 and the coupled Northern Hemisphere (NH) permafrost-ice sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle is explored. The model performs generally well at reproducing present-day permafrost extent and thickness. Modelled permafrost thickness is sensitive to the values of ground porosity, thermal conductivity and geothermal heat flux. Permafrost extent at the last glacial maximum (LGM) agrees well with reconstructions and previous modelling estimates. Present-day permafrost thickness is far from equilibrium over deep permafrost regions. Over Central Siberia and the Arctic Archipelago permafrost is presently up to 200-500 m thicker than it would be at equilibrium. In these areas, present-day permafrost depth strongly depends on the past climate history and simulations indicate that deep permafrost has a memory of surface temperature variations going back to at least 800 kya. Over the last glacial cycle permafrost has a relatively modest impact on simulated NH ice sheet volume except at LGM, when including permafrost increases ice volume by about 15 m sea level equivalent. This is explained by a delayed melting of the ice base from below by the geothermal heat flux when the ice sheet sits on a porous sediment layer and permafrost has to be melted first. Permafrost affects ice sheet dynamics only when ice extends over areas covered by thick sediments, which is the case at LGM.

  14. Coupled Northern Hemisphere permafrost-ice sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost influences a number of processes which are relevant for local and global climate. For example, it is well known that permafrost plays an important role in global carbon and methane cycles. Less is known about the interaction between permafrost and ice sheets. In this study a permafrost module is included in the Earth system model CLIMBER-2 and the coupled Northern Hemisphere (NH) permafrost-ice sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle is explored. The model performs generally well at reproducing present day permafrost extent and thickness. Modeled permafrost thickness is sensitive to the values of ground porosity, thermal conductivity and geothermal heat flux. Permafrost extent at the last glacial maximum (LGM) agrees well with reconstructions and previous modelling estimates. Present-day permafrost thickness is far from equilibrium over deep permafrost regions. Over Central Siberia and the Arctic Archipelago permafrost is presently up to 200-500 m thicker than it would be at equilibrium. In these areas, present day permafrost depth strongly depends on the past climate history and simulations indicate that deep permafrost has a memory of surface temperature variations going back to at least 800 kya (1000 years ago). Over the last glacial cycle permafrost has a relatively modest impact on simulated NH ice sheet volume, except at LGM when including permafrost increases ice volume by about 15 m sea level equivalent. This is explained by a delayed melting of the ice base from below by the geothermal heat flux when the ice sheet sits on a porous sediment layer and permafrost has to be melted first. Permafrost affects ice sheet dynamics only when ice extends over areas covered by thick sediments, which is the case at LGM.

  15. Coupled Northern Hemisphere permafrost-ice-sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willeit, M.; Ganopolski, A.

    2015-09-01

    Permafrost influences a number of processes which are relevant for local and global climate. For example, it is well known that permafrost plays an important role in global carbon and methane cycles. Less is known about the interaction between permafrost and ice sheets. In this study a permafrost module is included in the Earth system model CLIMBER-2, and the coupled Northern Hemisphere (NH) permafrost-ice-sheet evolution over the last glacial cycle is explored. The model performs generally well at reproducing present-day permafrost extent and thickness. Modeled permafrost thickness is sensitive to the values of ground porosity, thermal conductivity and geothermal heat flux. Permafrost extent at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) agrees well with reconstructions and previous modeling estimates. Present-day permafrost thickness is far from equilibrium over deep permafrost regions. Over central Siberia and the Arctic Archipelago permafrost is presently up to 200-500 m thicker than it would be at equilibrium. In these areas, present-day permafrost depth strongly depends on the past climate history and simulations indicate that deep permafrost has a memory of surface temperature variations going back to at least 800 ka. Over the last glacial cycle permafrost has a relatively modest impact on simulated NH ice sheet volume except at LGM, when including permafrost increases ice volume by about 15 m sea level equivalent in our model. This is explained by a delayed melting of the ice base from below by the geothermal heat flux when the ice sheet sits on a porous sediment layer and permafrost has to be melted first. Permafrost affects ice sheet dynamics only when ice extends over areas covered by thick sediments, which is the case at LGM.

  16. Beyond debuttressing: Mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage during repeat glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grämiger, Lorenz M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Gischig, Valentin S.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Cycles of glaciation impose mechanical stresses on underlying bedrock as glaciers advance, erode, and retreat. Fracture initiation and propagation constitute rock mass damage and act as preparatory factors for slope failures; however, the mechanics of paraglacial rock slope damage remain poorly characterized. Using conceptual numerical models closely based on the Aletsch Glacier region of Switzerland, we explore how in situ stress changes associated with fluctuating ice thickness can drive progressive rock mass failure preparing future slope instabilities. Our simulations reveal that glacial cycles as purely mechanical loading and unloading phenomena produce relatively limited new damage. However, ice fluctuations can increase the criticality of fractures in adjacent slopes, which may in turn increase the efficacy of fatigue processes. Bedrock erosion during glaciation promotes significant new damage during first deglaciation. An already weakened rock slope is more susceptible to damage from glacier loading and unloading and may fail completely. We find that damage kinematics are controlled by discontinuity geometry and the relative position of the glacier; ice advance and retreat both generate damage. We correlate model results with mapped landslides around the Great Aletsch Glacier. Our result that most damage occurs during first deglaciation agrees with the relative age of the majority of identified landslides. The kinematics and dimensions of a slope failure produced in our models are also in good agreement with characteristics of instabilities observed in the field. Our results extend simplified assumptions of glacial debuttressing, demonstrating in detail how cycles of ice loading, erosion, and unloading drive paraglacial rock slope damage.

  17. Glacial-Interglacial and Holocene N2O Stable Isotope Changes Constrain Terrestrial N Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Spahni, R.; Bock, M.; Seth, B.; Stocker, B. D.; Ri, X.; Schilt, A.; Brook, E.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Liu, Z.; Prentice, I. C.; Fischer, H.; Joos, F.

    2015-12-01

    The land biosphere contributes most to the natural source of the long-lived greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), with N2O emissions being dependent on the turnover rate of both the terrestrial nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycle. The C:N stoichiometry of vegetation and soil organic matter links the cycles intimately. Sustained plant productivity increase must be supported by biological N fixation. Intensified N cycling in turn enhances N loss and thereby N2O emissions. The temporal and spatial dynamics of terrestrial N and C cycles and related terrestrial N2O emissions are poorly constrained over the glacial-interglacial transition and the Holocene. Here we reconstruct increased terrestrial N2O emissions since the Last Glacial Maximum based on N2O concentration and isotope measurements on several ice cores and show that this N2O increase can be explained by N cycle modelling - provided N fixation is allowed to respond dynamically to increasing N demand and turnover. The Ice core reconstructions suggest a deglacial increase of 1.1 ± 0.4 Tg N/yr in terrestrial and 0.6 ± 0.4 Tg/yr in oceanic N2O emissions, but relatively constant terrestrial emissions over the Holocene. Transient simulations with a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model are shown to represent the climate and CO2 induced changes in terrestrial N2O emission, and suggest a deglacial increase in biological N fixation by 20%, independently of its absolute magnitude. Deciphering the response of biological N fixation during climatic changes is an important factor for our understanding of plant growth and the land carbon sink, alongside anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. New exposure ages for the Last Glacial Cycle in the Sanabria Lake region (northwestern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María Jose; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2013-04-01

    The Sanabria Lake region is located in the Trevinca Massif, a mid-latitude mountain area up to 2128 m asl in the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula (42oN 6oW). An ice cap glaciation took place during the Last Glacial Cycle in this massif, with an equilibrium line altitude of 1687 m for the Tera glacial outlet at its local maximum (Cowton et al., 2009). A well preserved glacial sequence occurs on an area of 45 km2 around the present Sanabria Lake (1000 m asl) and is composed by lateral and end moraines in close relationship with glaciolacustrine deposits. This sequence shows the ice snout oscillations of the former Tera glacier during the Last Glacial Cycle and offers a good opportunity to compare radiocarbon and OSL- based chronological models with new cosmogenic isotope dates. The new dataset of 10Be exposure ages presented here for the Sanabria Lake moraines is based on measurements conducted on 23 boulders and is compared with previous radiocarbon and OSL data conducted on ice related deposits (Pérez-Alberti et al., 2011; Rodríguez-Rodríguez et al., 2011). Our results are coherent with the available deglaciation radiocarbon chronology, and support a last deglaciation origin for the whole set of end moraines that are downstream the Sanabria Lake (19.2 - 15.7 10Be ka). Discrepancies between results of the different dating methods concern the timing of the local glacial maximum, with the cosmogenic exposure method always yielding the youngest minimum ages. As proposed to explain similar observations made elsewhere (Palacios et al., 2012), reconciling the ages from different dating methods would imply the occurrence of two glacial advances close enough in extent to generate an overlapping polygenic moraine. Cowton, T., Hughes, P.D., Gibbard, P.L., 2009. Palaeoglaciation of Parque Natural Lago de Sanabria, northwest Spain. Geomorphology 108, 282-291. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Rico, M.T., Valero-Garcés, B

  19. Environmental evolution in Picos de Europa (Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain) since the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Lopes, Vera; Cruces, Anabela; da Conceição Freitas, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The Western Massif of the Picos de Europa includes some of the highest elevations of the Cantabrian Mountains. The maximum ice expansion in this limestone range during the last glacial cycle preceded the global Last Glacial Maximum. A 5.4 m long sedimentary sequence was collected from Belbín, a depression damned by a moraine in a mid-altitude environment of this massif. Using a combination of several approaches we have reconstructed the environmental stages and intensity of cryogenic processes since that period until today: (1) geomorphological mapping combining field evidences, aerial photographs and topographic maps; (2) lithostratigraphic description of the cores identifying different sedimentary units; (3) Grain-size analyses of the fine fraction by laser diffraction; and (4) quartz grains using Cailleux (1942) analysis with modifications from Mycielska-Dowgiałło and Woronko (1998). The studied accumulative kame terrace has preserved a Late Quaternary record with geomorphological and climatic events, variable accumulation rates, and distinct grain properties resulting from frost and chemical weathering. The basal dating of the sediments of this section shows that the maximum glacial extent occurred prior to 37.2 ka cal BP. The lithostratigraphic analysis of the section shows evidence of four major stages regarding the environmental evolution in the area: (1) from 37.2 to 29 ka there was a phase with intense periglacial activity and deposition of slope deposits; (2) from 29 to 22 ka, the depression of Belbín gradually infilled; (3) from 22 to 8 ka, a paleolake was present in the study site; (4) since 8 ka, the lake became infilled. Besides, human-induced fires started at 4.9 ka probably for grazing purposes. Based on the sediment stratigraphy the data presented, demonstrates that in Belbín area there have been persistent cryogenic conditions since the last glacial cycle until present-day, with different degrees of intensity and type of weathering processes

  20. Seismic characteristics of Pleistocene glacial cycles near shelf edge, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.S.; Schneider, L.; Hilterman, F.

    1987-05-01

    Seismic stratigraphic studies of the shelf edge and the upper slope basins in the southern parts of the South Marsh Island, Eugene Island, Ship Shoal, and Green Canyon areas of the Louisiana outer continental shelf reveal at least four Pleistocene seismic stratigraphic cycles. These apparently reflect cyclic depositional patterns associated with glacially driven highstands and lowstands of sea level during this time. In the upper slope basins, a strong continuous reflector probably of turbiditic origin marks the base of each cycle. This reflector is thought caused by initial slumping occurring as sea level begins to fall. Overlying this reflector is a zone of chaotic-to-hummocky reflectors thought caused by slumping associated with knick-point erosion and channel-cutting during falling sea level. The upper portion of the cycle is largely reflectorless or weakly reflective punctuated with occasional strong, continuous turbidite reflectors. The reflectorless portion of the cycles is thought to represent homogeneous hemipelagic sedimentation during highstands. Shelf reflectors are usually moderately strong and continuous. A strong reflection(s), identified in some instances with gas sands, marks several sea level lowstands. Erosion is locally evident during lowstands. Otherwise, shelf reflectors are relatively uniform and show few characteristics associated with rising, falling, or highstanding parts of the sea level cycle.

  1. Impact of glacial/interglacial sea level change on the ocean nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haojia; Sigman, Daniel M; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F; Chen, Min-Te; Ravelo, Ana Christina; Straub, Marietta; Wong, George T F; Haug, Gerald H

    2017-08-15

    The continental shelves are the most biologically dynamic regions of the ocean, and they are extensive worldwide, especially in the western North Pacific. Their area has varied dramatically over the glacial/interglacial cycles of the last million years, but the effects of this variation on ocean biological and chemical processes remain poorly understood. Conversion of nitrate to N2 by denitrification in sediments accounts for half or more of the removal of biologically available nitrogen ("fixed N") from the ocean. The emergence of continental shelves during ice ages and their flooding during interglacials have been hypothesized to drive changes in sedimentary denitrification. Denitrification leads to the occurrence of phosphorus-bearing, N-depleted surface waters, which encourages N2 fixation, the dominant N input to the ocean. An 860,000-y record of foraminifera shell-bound N isotopes from the South China Sea indicates that N2 fixation covaried with sea level. The N2 fixation changes are best explained as a response to changes in regional excess phosphorus supply due to sea level-driven variations in shallow sediment denitrification associated with the cyclic drowning and emergence of the continental shelves. This hypothesis is consistent with a glacial ocean that hosted globally lower rates of fixed N input and loss and a longer residence time for oceanic fixed N-a "sluggish" ocean N budget during ice ages. In addition, this work provides a clear sign of sea level-driven glacial/interglacial oscillations in biogeochemical fluxes at and near the ocean margins, with implications for coastal organisms and ecosystems.

  2. Glaciological constraints on current ice mass changes from modelling the ice sheets over the glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybrechts, P.

    2003-04-01

    The evolution of continental ice sheets introduces a long time scale in the climate system. Large ice sheets have a memory of millenia, hence the present-day ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are still adjusting to climatic variations extending back to the last glacial period. This trend is separate from the direct response to mass-balance changes on decadal time scales and needs to be correctly accounted for when assessing current and future contributions to sea level. One way to obtain estimates of current ice mass changes is to model the past history of the ice sheets and their underlying beds over the glacial cycles. Such calculations assist to distinguish between the longer-term ice-dynamic evolution and short-term mass-balance changes when interpreting altimetry data, and are helpful to isolate the effects of postglacial rebound from gravity and altimetry trends. The presentation will discuss results obtained from 3-D thermomechanical ice-sheet/lithosphere/bedrock models applied to the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. The simulations are forced by time-dependent boundary conditions derived from sediment and ice core records and are constrained by geomorphological and glacial-geological data of past ice sheet and sea-level stands. Current simulations suggest that the Greenland ice sheet is close to balance, while the Antarctic ice sheet is still losing mass, mainly due to incomplete grounding-line retreat of the West Antarctic ice sheet since the LGM. The results indicate that altimetry trends are likely dominated by ice thickness changes but that the gravitational signal mainly reflects postglacial rebound.

  3. Impact of glacial/interglacial sea level change on the ocean nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haojia; Sigman, Daniel M.; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F.; Chen, Min-Te; Ravelo, Ana Christina; Straub, Marietta; Wong, George T. F.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2017-08-01

    The continental shelves are the most biologically dynamic regions of the ocean, and they are extensive worldwide, especially in the western North Pacific. Their area has varied dramatically over the glacial/interglacial cycles of the last million years, but the effects of this variation on ocean biological and chemical processes remain poorly understood. Conversion of nitrate to N2 by denitrification in sediments accounts for half or more of the removal of biologically available nitrogen (“fixed N”) from the ocean. The emergence of continental shelves during ice ages and their flooding during interglacials have been hypothesized to drive changes in sedimentary denitrification. Denitrification leads to the occurrence of phosphorus-bearing, N-depleted surface waters, which encourages N2 fixation, the dominant N input to the ocean. An 860,000-y record of foraminifera shell-bound N isotopes from the South China Sea indicates that N2 fixation covaried with sea level. The N2 fixation changes are best explained as a response to changes in regional excess phosphorus supply due to sea level-driven variations in shallow sediment denitrification associated with the cyclic drowning and emergence of the continental shelves. This hypothesis is consistent with a glacial ocean that hosted globally lower rates of fixed N input and loss and a longer residence time for oceanic fixed N—a “sluggish” ocean N budget during ice ages. In addition, this work provides a clear sign of sea level-driven glacial/interglacial oscillations in biogeochemical fluxes at and near the ocean margins, with implications for coastal organisms and ecosystems.

  4. Glacial landscape evolution and sediment export: insights from digital topographic analyses and numerical modelling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklehurst, S. H.; MacGregor, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment accumulation rates in the Gulf of Alaska and low-temperature thermochronology from the European Alps, amongst other lines of evidence, indicate accelerated glacial incision and sediment export associated with the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT), ~1 Ma. At this time, the change from symmetrical 40-kyr temperature cycles to larger amplitude, asymmetric 100-kyr cycles would have allowed larger, longer lived glaciers to develop, which is inferred as a key contributor to accelerated glacial erosion. Digital topographic analyses comparing glaciated drainage basins of different sizes in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and Teton Range, western US, amongst others, indicate the importance of scale in glacial landscape development. In smaller drainage basins, or those at the limit of glaciation, landscape modification is primarily restricted to carving characteristic cirques at the heads of valleys. Glaciers may have occasionally spilled from these to carve U-shaped cross-sections downvalley, but without substantial vertical incision. In larger drainage basins with a longer history of glacial occupation, glacial incision has produced shallower downvalley profiles with characteristic glacial steps, presumably accompanied by greater sediment export. A numerical glacial longitudinal profile evolution model, driven by temperature cycles representing either side of the MPT, is used to compare glacial erosion and sediment export from initial Pleistocene glaciations with post-MPT behaviour. The modelled landscape response to the MPT is strongly dependent on the tectonic setting and the behaviour of the fluvial system downstream of the glacier. With no imposed tectonic rock uplift, the major change in the landscape is the carving of cirque forms and glacial longitudinal profiles at the start of the Pleistocene; the MPT would have had little impact on landscape morphology or sediment export. Imposing tectonic as well as isostatic rock uplift, alongside inefficient fluvial

  5. Dual modes of the carbon cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Smith, H J; Fischer, H; Wahlen, M; Mastroianni, D; Deck, B

    1999-07-15

    The most conspicuous feature of the record of past climate contained in polar ice is the rapid warming which occurs after long intervals of gradual cooling. During the last four transitions from glacial to interglacial conditions, over which such abrupt warmings occur, ice records indicate that the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere increased by roughly 80 to 100 parts per million by volume. But the causes of the atmospheric CO2 concentration increases are unclear. Here we present the stable-carbon-isotope composition (delta 13 CO2) of CO2 extracted from air trapped in ice at Taylor Dome, Antarctica, from the Last Glacial Maximum to the onset of Holocene times. The global carbon cycle is shown to have operated in two distinct primary modes on the timescale of thousands of years, one when climate was changing relatively slowly and another when warming was rapid, each with a characteristic average stable-carbon-isotope composition of the net CO2 exchanged by the atmosphere with the land and oceans. delta 13 CO2 increased between 16.5 and 9 thousand years ago by slightly more than would be estimated to be caused by the physical effects of a 5 degrees C rise in global average sea surface temperature driving a CO2 efflux from the ocean, but our data do not allow specific causes to be constrained.

  6. Dual modes of the carbon cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. Jesse; Fischer, H.; Wahlen, M.; Mastroianni, D.; Deck, B.

    1999-07-01

    The most conspicuous feature of the record of past climate contained in polar ice is the rapid warming which occurs after long intervals of gradual cooling. During the last four transitions from glacial to interglacial conditions, over which such abrupt warmings occur, ice records indicate that the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere increased by roughly 80 to 100 parts per million by volume (refs 1-4). But the causes of the atmospheric CO2 concentration increases are unclear. Here we present the stable-carbon-isotope composition (δ13CO2) of CO2 extracted from air trapped in ice at Taylor Dome, Antarctica, from the Last Glacial Maximum to the onset of Holocene times. The global carbon cycle is shown to have operated in two distinct primary modes on the timescale of thousands of years, one when climate was changing relatively slowly and another when warming was rapid, each with a characteristic average stable-carbon-isotope composition of the net CO2 exchanged by the atmosphere with the land and oceans. δ13CO2 increased between 16.5 and 9 thousand years ago by slightly more than would be estimated to be caused by the physical effects of a 5°C rise in global average sea surface temperature driving a CO2 efflux from the ocean, but our data do not allow specific causes to be constrained.

  7. Glacial cycles as an allopatric speciation pump in north-eastern American freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    April, Julien; Hanner, Robert H; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Allopatric speciation may be the principal mechanism generating new species. Yet, it remains difficult to judge the generality of this process because few studies have provided evidence that geographic isolation has triggered the development of reproductive isolation over multiple species of a regional fauna. Here, we first combine results from new empirical data sets (7 taxa) and published literature (9 taxa) to show that the eastern Great Lakes drainage represents a multispecies suture zone for glacial lineages of freshwater fishes with variable levels of genetic divergence. Second, we performed amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses among four pairs of lineages. Results indicate that lineages with relatively deep levels of mtDNA 5' COI (barcode) sequence divergence (>2%) developed strong reproductive barriers, while lineages with lower levels of divergence show weaker reproductive isolation when found in sympatry. This suggests that a threshold of 2% sequence divergence at mtDNA could be used as a first step to flag cryptic species in North American freshwater fishes. By describing different levels of divergence and reproductive isolation in different co-occurring fishes, we offer strong evidence that allopatric speciation has contributed significantly to the diversification of north-eastern American freshwater fishes and confirm that Pleistocene glacial cycles can be viewed as a 'speciation pump' that played a predominant role in generating biodiversity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Initiation age and incision rates of inner gorges: Do they record multiple glacial-interglacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Casagrande, Jan; Schlunegger, Fritz; Akçar, Naki; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-04-01

    gorges over multiple interglacial cycles and a relative preservation of Alpine landscapes during glacial periods.

  9. Rapid changes in the hydrologic cycle of the tropical Atlantic during the last glacial.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L C; Haug, G H; Hughen, K A; Röhl, U

    2000-12-08

    Sedimentary time series of color reflectance and major element chemistry from the anoxic Cariaco Basin off the coast of northern Venezuela record large and abrupt shifts in the hydrologic cycle of the tropical Atlantic during the past 90,000 years. Marine productivity maxima and increased precipitation and riverine discharge from northern South America are closely linked to interstadial (warm) climate events of marine isotope stage 3, as recorded in Greenland ice cores. Increased precipitation at this latitude during interstadials suggests the potential for greater moisture export from the Atlantic to Pacific, which could have affected the salinity balance of the Atlantic and increased thermohaline heat transport to high northern latitudes. This supports the notion that tropical feedbacks played an important role in modulating global climate during the last glacial period.

  10. Impacts of the Last Glacial Cycle on ground surface temperature reconstructions over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Illanes, Lizett; Tarasov, Lev

    2017-01-01

    Borehole temperature profiles provide robust estimates of past ground surface temperature changes, in agreement with meteorological data. Nevertheless, past climatic changes such as the Last Glacial Cycle (LGC) generated thermal effects in the subsurface that affect estimates of recent climatic change from geothermal data. We use an ensemble of ice sheet simulations spanning the last 120 ka to assess the impact of the Laurentide Ice Sheet on recent ground surface temperature histories reconstructed from borehole temperature profiles over North America. When the thermal remnants of the LGC are removed, we find larger amounts of subsurface heat storage (2.8 times) and an increased warming of the ground surface over North America by 0.75 K, both relative to uncorrected borehole estimates.

  11. Lithium isotopes in speleothems: Temperature-controlled variation in silicate weathering during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Vaks, Anton; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Ayalon, Avner; Jacob, Ezekiel; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2017-07-01

    Terrestrial chemical weathering of silicate minerals is a fundamental component of the global cycle of carbon and other elements. Past changes in temperature, rainfall, ice cover, sea-level and physical erosion are thought to affect weathering but the relative impact of these controls through time remains poorly constrained. This problem could be addressed if the nature of past weathering could be constrained at individual sites. In this study, we investigate the use of speleothems as local recorders of the silicate weathering proxy, Li isotopes. We analysed δ7 Li and [Li] in speleothems that formed during the past 200 ka in two well-studied Israeli caves (Soreq and Tzavoa), as well as in the overlying soils and rocks. Leaching and mass balance of these soils and rocks show that Li is dominantly sourced from weathering of the overlying aeolian silicate soils. Speleothem δ7 Li values are ubiquitously higher during glacials (∼23‰) than during interglacials (∼10‰), implying more congruent silicate weathering during interglacials (where ;congruent; means a high ratio of primary mineral dissolution to secondary mineral formation). These records provide information on the processes controlling weathering in Israel. Consideration of possible processes causing this change of weathering congruency indicates a primary role for temperature, with higher temperatures causing more congruent weathering (lower δ7Lispeleo). The strong relationship observed between speleothem δ7 Li and climate at these locations suggests that Li isotopes may be a powerful tool with which to understand the local controls on weathering at other sites, and could be used to assess the distribution of weathering changes accompanying climate change, such as that of Pleistocene glacial cycles.

  12. Modelled Growth and Decay of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet Through the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S. J.; Banwell, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cordilleran Ice Sheet in western North America had an enigmatic evolution during the last glacial cycle, developing out of sync with the larger Laurentide and global glaciation. The geological record suggests that the ice sheet emerged late, ca. 45 ka, growing to be a fully-established ice sheet in isotope stages 3 and 2 and deglaciating late in the glacial cycle. This has been a challenge to model, and is a paleoclimatic curiosity, because the western Cordillera of North America is heavily glacierized today, and one would intuitively expect it to act as an inception centre for the Pleistocene ice sheets. The region receives heavy precipitation, and modest cooling should induce large-scale glacier expansion. Indeed, a Cordilleran Ice Sheet quickly nucleates in isotope substage 5d in most ice sheet modeling studies to date, and is a resilient feature throughout the glaciation. The fact that a full-scale Cordilleran Ice Sheet did not develop until relatively late argues for either: (a) ice sheet models that have been inadequate in resolving the process of alpine-style glaciation, i.e., the coalescence of alpine icefields, or (b) a climatic history in western North America that deviated strongly from the hemispheric-scale cooling which drove the growth of the Laurentide and Scandinavian Ice Sheets, as recorded in Greenland. We argue that reasonable reconstructions of Cordilleran Ice Sheet growth and decay implicate a combination of these two considerations. Sufficient model resolution is required to capture the valley-bottom melt that suppresses icefield coalescence, while early-glacial cooling must have been modest in the Pacific sector of North America. We argue for a persistent warm, dry climate relative to that in eastern North America and the Atlantic sector, likely associated with positive feedbacks between atmospheric circulation and the nascent Laurentide Ice Sheet (i.e., peristent circulation patterns similar to those of 2014-2015). This must have been

  13. The Greenland Ice Sheet-ocean interaction in the past two glacial cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabone, Ilaria; Robinson, Alexander; Álvarez-Solas, Jorge; Montoya, Marisa

    2017-04-01

    Observations suggest that during the last decades the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has lost a huge amount of ice, significantly contributing to current sea level rise. A portion of this intensified ice discharge is connected to the observed acceleration of Greenland's marine-terminating glaciers, which recent studies directly attribute to increasing North Atlantic temperatures, triggering melting of the GrIS outlet glaciers, grounding-line retreat, enhanced ice discharge into the ocean and potentially contributing to current sea level changes. Analysis of the past GrIS evolution is crucial for a better understanding of its current behavior and its sensitivity to future climate variations. Reconstructions suggest that in glacial times the GrIS expanded up to the continental shelf, while warmer interglacial climates led to its rapid retreat, triggering a fast discharge of ice into the ocean. In this work the response of the GrIS to past climate changes, in particular glacial cycles, has been studied using a three-dimensional hybrid ice-sheet/ice-shelf model. The model features the capability to simulate ice sheets, ice shelves and ice streams as it applies both the Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA), in grounded areas of the ice sheet moving under slow, deformational flow, and the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA), in ice shelves and ice streams. This has allowed us to assess the effect of the variation of oceanic temperatures on the GrIS evolution throughout the two last glacial cycles through changes in submarine melting, an aspect that has not been investigated up to now. The results show a very high-sensitivity of the GrIS to the changing oceanic properties, among which oceanic temperature and heat flux variations are found to be the main drivers of the GrIS expansion and retreat throughout the past climates. This work therefore confirms that the ice-ocean interaction is a crucial factor driving Greenland's marine-terminating ice adjustments and highlights the need

  14. Hydroclimatic changes recorded in Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) during the last glacial/interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, O.; Tomonaga, Y.; Stockhecke, M.; Randlett, M.; Bucher, S.; Pickarski, N.; Brennwald, M.; Schubert, C. J.; Kipfer, R.; Anselmetti, F.; Sturm, M.; Haug, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Lake-level fluctuations of terminal lakes are a sensitive indicator of local/regional moisture balance. Here we reconstruct changes in level of Lake Van, eastern Anatolia, Turkey. We combine several approaches (pore water and sediment geochemistry, lithological analysis, modeling, and mapping of lake terraces) and focus on the last ca. 130 ka of Lake Van's history. For the multi-millennial time scales, we use salinity measured in the pore water to calculate the water volume (and the respective lake level) necessary to dilute or concentrate the dissolved salt content of Lake Van. Our results agree with a previous study on lake terraces in the region of Lake Van (Kuzucuoglu et al., 2010) suggesting that during MIS 5 (130-70 ka BP) the lake level was ca. 100 m higher than today. During the last glacial, the water level dropped significantly, but the lake did not dry out completely (compare Landmann et al., 1996). Pollen data support wet interglacial and dry glacial conditions. In order to resolve centennial-to millennial lake level changes we investigated the terrigenous components of the sediment. The accumulation of terrigenous material in Lake Van is a function of a depocenter distance from a river mouth (fluvial input) and exposition of the shelf (eolian input), both of which are dependent on the lake level. Accordingly, high-resolution XRF Al- and K-data, reflecting terrigenous input, reinforced by lithological analysis provide insight into short-term lake-level fluctuations superimposed on the long-term trend. These data show excellent and detailed correlation with the Greenland ice-core isotope signal. We conclude that in eastern Anatolia, the last interglacial was probably more humid than the recent one. Additionally, during the last glacial, the region experienced not only dry and windy spells in concert with Greenland stadials but also abrupt climate melioration as Greenland warmed into interstadials. Lake Van sediments are thus, to our knowledge, the most

  15. Indonesian Throughflow and Australasian Monsoon Variability Over the Last two Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnt, W.; Holbourn, A.; Xu, J.; Nuernberg, D.; Bolliet, T.; Duerkop, A.; Zuraida, R.; Kawamura, H.

    2007-12-01

    The climate and hydrography of the tropical Indian Ocean are strongly influenced by the intensity and vertical profile of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and seasonal changes in wind direction associated with the southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during austral summer. We use a multiproxy approach to reconstruct monsoonal wind and circulation patterns along the NW Australian continental margin as well as changes in the vertical profile of the Indonesian Throughflow on glacial, precessional and suborbital timescales. Our records from the Timor Passage and Timor Sea (Sonne 185 and IMAGES WEPAMA cruises) closely track changes in the structure of the upper water column within one of the main outflow passages of the ITF. We use (1) XRF scanning records to reconstruct continental runoff and eolian dust transport, (2) paleoproductivity proxy data related to vertical mixing of the upper water column by monsoonal winds, (3) SST, SSS and mixed layer thickness estimates from combined oxygen isotope and Mg/Ca analyses of surface and thermocline dwelling planktonic foraminifers. XRF-scanner derived terrigenous flux and paleoproductivity fluctuations over the last 460 ky were strongly influenced by monsoonal wind patterns offshore NW Australia (23 and 19 ky), the position of the ITCZ (southward shift during precession minima) and were also modulated by sea-level related variations in the intensity of the ITF (100 ky). Our results indicate that the intensity of the Australian summer monsoon over the last two glacial cycles was controlled both by summer insolation over NW Australia and by the strength of the boreal winter monsoon, as the southward migration of the ITCZ is closely linked to northern hemisphere cooling. A comparison of water mass properties within the main outflow in the Timor Strait and within the mixing zone between ITF and eastern Indian Ocean waters reveals a higher thermocline temperature gradient between the eastern Indian Ocean

  16. Cosmogenic analysis reveals a blue-ice moraine in Antarctica survived the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugden, D. E.; Fogwill, C. J.; Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    Cosmogenic isotope analysis shows that the ice-cored blue-ice moraine at Patriot Hills has survived for at least 80 kyr, i.e. since before the Last Glacial Maximum. The implication is that a biological refuge may also have survived for as long. Strong winds sweep over the Patriot Hills causing accelerated ablation of the glacier edge at the hill foot. In compensation ice flows towards the hills and compressive flow at the margin brings a folded debris band, dipping at angles of 70-800, to the ice surface. Subglacially-derived clasts emerge at the surface and ablation then concentrates them at the ice margin to form the ice-cored moraine. Cosmogenic isotope analysis reveals exposure ages of zero on stones emerging on the ice surface and a range from a few hundred to 29 kyr on the present ice-cored moraine. Relict moraines are draped across the hillside up to a height of ~ 340 m above the ice margin and mark the thinning of the ice over the last ~16 kyr. These moraines contain a mix of boulder ages ranging from a few thousand to ~ 80 kyr with a few ages as old as 424 kyr. The implication is that the moraine has existed at the ice edge for much of at least the last glacial cycle, but that it has migrated up (?) and down the mountain front as the ice elevation has responded to global sea-level change. If substantiated, this discovery would explain why it is so difficult to date moraines reflecting Holocene thinning in Antarctica. Further, the presence of pre-LGM erratics could be used to argue that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet survived the last interglacial intact.

  17. Changes in CO2 concentration and carbon cycle during the last glacial termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Lee, H. G.; Shin, J.; Brook, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica have revealed that atmospheric CO2 concentration is strongly linked with climate over the past hundreds of thousands years. During the last glacial termination CO2 concentration increased by ~80 ppm and the increase rate changed with abrupt climate events such as Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas. Precise and high-resolution CO2 records during the events may help us better understand climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. However, most of the existing ice core records are severely smoothed by gradual bubble close-off and gas diffusion in the firn layer. Recently, a CO2 record with an unprecedented temporal resolution was obtained from West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core, where glaciological conditions permit a relatively small gas smoothing effect. The WAIS Divide record shows three abrupt CO2 increases of 10-15 ppm in less than 200 years during the last glacial termination. The ancient air extracted from the WAIS Divide ice core was in a form of air hydrates and the results must yet be confirmed with other ice cores. Here we present a new high-resolution atmospheric CO2 record from the Siple Dome ice core, in which air is preserved only in bubbles. Our data cover 11.0-21.0 ka with an average time resolution of 65 yrs. The Siple Dome records show that abrupt CO2 increases of ~ 10 ppm within 100-200 years at 11.7, 14.7, and 16.3 ka, confirming the rapid CO2 increases observed in the WAIS Divide record. We are analyzing the common and uncommon features during the three rapid CO2 increases in order to decipher the control mechanisms. The updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Possible solar origin of the 1,470-year glacial climate cycle demonstrated in a coupled model.

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger; Christl, Marcus; Rahmstorf, Stefan; Ganopolski, Andrey; Mangini, Augusto; Kubatzki, Claudia; Roth, Kurt; Kromer, Bernd

    2005-11-10

    Many palaeoclimate records from the North Atlantic region show a pattern of rapid climate oscillations, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events, with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 1,470 years for the late glacial period. Various hypotheses have been suggested to explain these rapid temperature shifts, including internal oscillations in the climate system and external forcing, possibly from the Sun. But whereas pronounced solar cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years are well known, a approximately 1,470-year solar cycle has not been detected. Here we show that an intermediate-complexity climate model with glacial climate conditions simulates rapid climate shifts similar to the Dansgaard-Oeschger events with a spacing of 1,470 years when forced by periodic freshwater input into the North Atlantic Ocean in cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years. We attribute the robust 1,470-year response time to the superposition of the two shorter cycles, together with strongly nonlinear dynamics and the long characteristic timescale of the thermohaline circulation. For Holocene conditions, similar events do not occur. We conclude that the glacial 1,470-year climate cycles could have been triggered by solar forcing despite the absence of a 1,470-year solar cycle.

  19. Glacial-Interglacial, Orbital and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle at Shackleton Site U1385 based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying Site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated (sub)millennial-scale (~600 year interval) dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from Shackleton Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity/upwelling over the last 152 kyrs. In addition, our approach allows for detailed land-sea correlations, because we also counted assemblages of pollen and spores from higher plants. Dinocyst SST and upwelling proxies, as well as warm/cold pollen proxies from Site U1385 show glacial-interglacial, orbital and stadial-interstadial climate variability and correlate very well to Uk'37, planktic foraminifer δ18O and Ca/Ti proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and Greenland Ice Core δ18O. The palynological proxies capture (almost) all Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial cycle, also before ~70 ka, where millennial-scale variability is overprinted by precession. We compare the performance and results of the palynology of Site U1385 to proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and conclude that palynology strengthens the potential of this site to form a multi-proxy reference section for millennial scale climate variability across the Pleistocene-Holocene. Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down

  20. Leeward vs windward effects on glacial/interglacial periplatform aragonite cycles off Pedro Bank and Jamaica (northern Nicaragua rise)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, K.S.; Droxler, A.W.; Haddad, G.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Fine (< 62 {mu}m) aragonite content in periplatform sediment from the northern (leeward) and southern (windward) slopes of Pedro Bank shows late Quaternary climate-induced cyclic downcore variations. Intervals characterized by high aragonite content correspond to interglacial stages. The aragonite cycles are clearly developed despite significant windward/leeward differences in sediment sources and composition, pelagic productivity( ), and current regime. Interglacial sedimentation rates on the leeward slope (LS) are nearly twice as high as those on the windward slope (WS), and twice as high as LS glacial sedimentation rates. Carbonate values (75-85%) in sediments deposited on the northern slope of Pedro Bank are higher than those (50-70%) on its southern slope. On both slopes, high carbonate values correspond to interglacial intervals. The lowest carbonate values occur during glacial intervals on the southern slope and are explained by an increase of siliciclastic input from Jamaica during sea level lowstands. This siliciclastic increase could compensate for the drop of bank-derived fine aragonite, and thus, could explain the constant glacial/interglacial sedimentation rates found on the southern slope. In addition, high pteropod abundance during glacial stages along the southern slope may also indicate higher glacial pelagic productivity. Winnowing effects are rather conspicuous in one core from the northern slope within Walton basin (600 m water depth) during glacial intervals, when values of the coarse (> 62 {mu}m) fraction are the highest (the opposite is observed in the other cores). In this relatively shallow core, partial cementation during glacial intervals is also observed.

  1. Exploiting multi-proxy analysis of marine sediments in the southeast Atlantic: Intensification of Agulhas leakage tied to the start of the 100ka cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; Marret, Fabienne

    2013-04-01

    The transition in orbital forcing from a 41 ka world to a 100 ka world was a major change in the climate regime over the last 1.5 Ma but its causes and its impacts are still being investigated. Here, we present reconstructions of sea-surface temperature (SST), salinity, and plankton assemblages obtained from a single core, ODP site 1087 (31°28'S, 15°19'E, 1374m water depth) spanning the last 1.5 Ma. Our hypothesis is that the response and position of the Agulhas leakage, which transfers heat and salt to the SE Atlantic region, has shifted as a result of changes in the dominant periodicity of orbital forcing. We draw on evidence from the alkenone (U37K') proxy for SST, dinoflagllate species analysis, and foraminifera oxygen isotopes for salinity and ice volume, to identify changes in the input of the Agulhas leakage to the SE Atlantic. We present the first continuous record of SE Atlantic SSTs reaching to 1.5 Ma which spans both the 41 kyr and 100 kyr glacial cycles. We identify large changes in SST and salinity on glacial-interglacial timescales, but show that there is a consistent pattern of SSTs leading salinity and then global ice volume change, so that deglaciation occurs some 5-10 kyr after the onset of rapid warming in the SE Atlantic during the recent glacials and interglacials. This early warming pattern, which characterizes the most recent cycles, began to develop as early at 900 ka, as the 100 kyr cycles became dominant. Before this time there is little evidence of Agulhas leakage in the ODP1087 record. We also show that over the last 600 ka there has been a strengthening of the Agulhas Leakage which has led to warmer interglacials over this time period. Overall the record shows that the strength and location of the Agulhas leakage is sensitive to changes in the dominant cycles in the climate.

  2. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  3. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Onshore and offshore geomorphological mapping and deglacial chronologies from West Greenland constrain the nature and magnitude of ice advance and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) during the last glacial cycle. Several ice stream troughs are known to have fed ice to the shelf edge during the last glacial cycle. Their offshore expression suggests that many were coalescent systems fed by smaller outlet glaciers and ice streams onshore but their central flow pathways were also controlled by geology and preglacial topography. The bed morphology of these large ice streams shows they operated over soft, deforming beds with drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations and grounding zone wedges marking an offshore transition from predominant areal scour onshore. Records of offshore deglacial chronology remain sparse but the Uummannaq and Disko Bugt ice stream corridors are now well constrained. The Uummannaq ice stream (UIS) completely deglaciated from the continental shelf between 14.8 ka and 11.0 ka in response to rising air temperatures, increasing JJA solar radiation and sea-level rise, but temporary standstills and the asynchronous retreat history of its feeder zones suggest that topography/bathymetry strongly modulated retreat rates as ice became 'locked' back into the coastal fjord system. Initial reconstructions of behaviour UIS discounted an oceanic role in early deglaciation and favoured retreat from the mid-shelf and inner-shelf prior to the Younger Dryas but both these concepts remain under investigation. In Disko Bugt, Jakobshavn Isbrae deglaciated later than the UIS and remained on the outer shelf during the Younger Dyras stadial (12.8 - 11.7 cal. kyrs BP) only reaching in the inner coast fjords at approximately 10.0 ka. The later deglaciation of the Disko system (despite similar external forcing mechanisms) was controlled by regional topographic/bathymetric contrasts in their respective trough morphologies. This hypothesis is supported by recent model

  4. Subsurface geology of Kansai International Airport: sequence related to global glacial - interglacial cycles and island tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, K.; Kitada, N.; Furudoi, T.; Nakaseko, K.

    2007-12-01

    Tectonic sedimentary basins aligned in the central part of Japan during Quaternary . Thick sediments deposited in these basins provide useful records of climatic changes and tectonics throughout Quaternary. The Osaka sedimentary basin including Osaka Bay and area of Kansai International Airport is one of them. The Quaternary Osaka sedimentary basin has developed at an eastern contractional bend of a major transcurrent fault system named the Median Tectonic Line, which divides the southwest Japan arc. The thickness of Pliocene - Pleistocene sediments reaches to ca 3500m at the deepest part. These sequences are called the Osaka Group and are distributed in the Osaka Bay and exposed in the surrounding mountain areas. The Osaka Group is characterized by alternating sequences of marine and nonmarine strata. The subsurface sediments of Kansai International Airport (KIA) is composed mainly of Pliocene - Pleistocene sediments, which is characterized by alternating sequences of marine and nonmarine strata related to glacial - interglacial cycles. . The stratigraphy at KIA was established by micropaleontological, tephrochronological and magnetostratigraphical method. The sedimentary sequence at KIX is divided into two main units (Kukojima and Sennanoki Formations in ascending order) with the uncomformity within two units. Although thick marine clay units are mainly of the subsurface sequence, characteristics of coarser sediment units have an important role of moving of water during construction of the reclaimed land.

  5. Millennial changes in North American wildfire and soil activity over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Bigler, Matthias; Röthlisberger, Regine; Erhardt, Tobias; Stocker, Thomas F.; Mulvaney, Robert; Wolff, Eric W.

    2015-09-01

    Climate changes in the North Atlantic region during the last glacial cycle were dominated by the slow waxing and waning of the North American ice sheet as well as by intermittent, millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations. However, prior to the last deglaciation, the responses of North American vegetation and biomass burning to these climate variations are uncertain. Ammonium in Greenland ice cores, a product from North American soil emissions and biomass burning events, can help to fill this gap. Here we use continuous, high-resolution measurements of ammonium concentrations between 110,000 to 10,000 years ago from the Greenland NGRIP and GRIP ice cores to reconstruct North American wildfire activity and soil ammonium emissions. We find that on orbital timescales soil emissions increased under warmer climate conditions when vegetation expanded northwards into previously ice-covered areas. For millennial-scale interstadial warm periods during Marine Isotope Stage 3, the fire recurrence rate increased in parallel to the rapid warmings, whereas soil emissions rose more slowly, reflecting slow ice shrinkage and delayed ecosystem changes. We conclude that sudden warming events had little impact on soil ammonium emissions and ammonium transport to Greenland, but did result in a substantial increase in the frequency of North American wildfires.

  6. Periodicity in a Conceptual Model of Glacial Cycles in the Absence of Milankovitch Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J.; Walsh, J.; Widiasih, E.; McGehee, R.

    2015-12-01

    Previously, McGehee and Widiasih coupled Budyko's Energy Balance Model with dynamics of a latitudinal ice-line incorporating the albedo feedback effect. They reduced this model to a two-dimensional equation of global mean temperature and a latitudinal ice-line. With this conceptual model, we now include dynamics of the ablation and accumulation of ice, to form a three-dimensional system that partitions the regions of the Earth latitudinally into an accumulation zone, ablation zone, and ice-free zone. Motivated by the findings of Abe-Ouchi et al that the fast retreat of ice-sheets is due to an increased rate of ablation via the effects of delayed isostatic rebound, we incorporate a simple switching mechanism to the model which increases the rate of ablation during periods of glacial retreat. This forms a discontinuous system of the Earth's temperature and ice-volume in which we find a stable periodic orbit. This can be interpreted as a intrinsic cycling of the Earth's climate in the absence of Milankovitch forcing.

  7. Evaluating ice sheet model performance over the last glacial cycle using paleo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alexander; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the past evolution of ice sheets is important for improving our understanding of their role in the Earth system and for quantifying their contribution to sea-level changes. Limited but significant paleo data and proxies are available to give insights into past changes that are valid, at least, on a local scale. Meanwhile, models can be used to provide a mechanistic picture of ice sheet changes. Combined data-model comparisons are therefore useful exercises that allow models to be confronted with real-world information and lead to better understanding of the mechanisms driving changes. In turn, models can potentially be used to validate the data by providing a physical explanation for observed phenomena. Here we focus on the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet through the last glacial cycle to highlight common problems and potential opportunities for data-model comparisons. We will present several examples of how present generation model results are inconsistent with estimates from paleo data, either in terms of the boundary forcing given to the model or the resulting characteristics of the ice sheet. We also propose a set of data-model comparisons as the starting point for developing a more standardized paleo model performance check. Incorporating such a test into modeling efforts could generate new insights in coupled climate - ice sheet modeling.

  8. A comprehensive energy and mass balance firn model for simulations over multiple glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, Michael; Born, Andreas; Stocker, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We present a fast yet physically comprehensive glacier surface mass balance model capable of simulations that cover the entire Northern Hemisphere over several glacial cycles. Fluxes of energy and mass are calculated between the atmosphere and a multilayer snow cover, including internal processes like densification and water percolation as well as snow and ice melt. The model is especially designed to provide upper boundary conditions to force ice sheet models on time scales of up to 106 years. To achieve a high numerical efficiency, the model employs a variable time stepping scheme on the grid point level and a Lagrangian grid attached to the snow mass. The input variables are short wave radiation, air temperature and precipitation with half-weekly or daily time steps. This new surface mass balance model has been tested in extensive ensemble simulations and yields realistic representations of present-day ice sheets. The extent of the intra-annual snow cover on the Northern Hemisphere correlates temporally and spatially well with satellite measurements. Perennial firn aquifers are simulated realistically in Greenland and the simulated densification and snow temperature at two bore hole sites in central Greenland yield promising results.

  9. Polyploid evolution and Pleistocene glacial cycles: A case study from the alpine primrose Primula marginata (Primulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies highlighted the role of Pleistocene climatic cycles in polyploid speciation and of southern Alpine refugia as reservoirs of diversity during glacial maxima. The polyploid Primula marginata, endemic to the southwestern Alps, includes both hexaploid and dodecaploid cytotypes that show no ecological or morphological differences. We used flow cytometry to determine variation and geographic distribution of cytotypes within and between populations and analyses of chloroplast (cp) and nuclear ribosomal (nr) DNA sequences from the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region to infer the evolutionary history of the two cytotypes and the auto- vs. allopolyploid origin of dodecaploid populations. Results We did not detect any intermediate cytotypes or variation of ploidy levels within populations. Hexaploids occur in the western and dodecaploids in the eastern part of the distributional range, respectively. The cpDNA and nrDNA topologies are in conflict, for the former supports shared ancestry between P. marginata and P. latifolia, while the latter implies common origins between at least some ITS clones of P. marginata and P. allionii. Conclusions Our results suggest an initial episode of chloroplast capture involving ancestral lineages of P. latifolia and P. marginata, followed by polyploidization between P. marginata-like and P. allionii-like lineages in a southern refugium of the Maritime Alps. The higher proportion of ITS polymorphisms in dodecaploid than in hexaploid accessions of P. marginata and higher total nucleotide diversity of ITS clones in dodecaploid vs. hexaploid individuals sequences are congruent with the allopolyploid hypothesis of dodecaploid origin. PMID:22530870

  10. Western Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone Variability Over the Last Full Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenzek, N.; Hughen, K.; Sessions, A.; Bice, M.; Eglinton, T.

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation associated with the modern Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the Atlantic Basin is sensitive to fluctuations in both local insolation1 and remote North Atlantic2,3 and equatorial Pacific4 climate. Reconstructing the pattern and timing of precipitation change in regions influenced by the ITCZ may therefore clarify the mechanisms driving Quaternary climate change in, and the teleconnections between, low and high latitudes. In order to establish a record of ITCZ variability in the western tropical Atlantic, we measured the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of individual vascular plant lipids preserved in Cariaco Basin sediments at sub-millennial resolution over the last glacial cycle. High frequency oscillations in the δ13C values of long chain fatty acids during Marine Isotope Stage 3, reflecting changes in the relative proportion of C3 vs C4 vegetation, and hence humidity, in northern South America, appear to coincide with Dansgaard- Oeschger (D-O) variability in high latitude ice cores. Positive (negative) excursions occur during stadial (interstadial) periods, with the largest enrichments associated with Heinrich Events in the North Atlantic. Corresponding D/H ratios also indicate rapid shifts in ambient humidity, although more work is needed to fully constrain the effect of glacial conditions on the isotopic composition of paleoprecipitation. These millennial scale fluctuations are superimposed upon a longer term oscillation with significant power near the 21 kyr spectral band. Together, these data imply that the ITCZ in this region of the tropics responded to both high and low latitude forcing over the late Quaternary. For example, the proportion of C4 plants rapidly increased at the onset of stadial periods in the North Atlantic, suggesting that a southward deflection of the ITCZ gave rise to more arid conditions in northern South America. The converse was true for interstadials. Moreover, the amplitude of these millennial

  11. Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone Shifts During the Last Glacial Cycle Near the Line Islands Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi Sipala, M. A.; Marcantonio, F.

    2015-12-01

    This research focuses on the shift in the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) during the last glacial cycle. Deep sea sediments from the Central Equatorial Pacific (CEP) are used to quantify and isolate the sources and sinks of atmospheric dust. Dust records and influences climate affecting a wide range of process from Earth's Albedo to carbon export. Our aim is to determine the provenance of windblown dust deposited in the CEP near the Line Islands Ridge using radiogenic Nd and Pb isotopes, and to infer the location of the ITCZ and the changes of atmospheric transport through ice-age climate transitions. We focus on three cores from the CEP, along a meridional transect at approximately 160° W --- 0° 28' N (ML1208-17PC), 4° 41' N (ML1208-31BB), and 7 ° 2'N (ML1208-31BB). Radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb) have been successfully used to distinguish between different potential dust sources in the aluminosilicates fractions of Pacific Sediments. Our preliminary data suggest that the equatorial core (17PC) predominantly receives its dust from South America and South American volcanics South America (206Pb/204Pb = 18.62, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.63, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.62; ; ɛNd = ~ -5). The middle core, which more closely reflects the modern position of the ITCZ, has varied dust provenance through time, at times consistent with Asian Loess (average ratios are 206Pb/204Pb = 18.88, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.69, 208Pb/204Pb = 39.06; ɛNd = ~ -7) and Asian Volcanics (ɛNd = ~-1) suggesting a shift in the ITCZ south of 4N before the LGM. Our results for the most northern core are forthcoming. Prior to Holocene time, the changes in Pb isotope ratios in both cores appear to be in anti-phase; the northern core becomes less radiogenic up to the LGM, while the southern core becomes more radiogenic. This is potentially due to a weakening of the ITCZ during glacial times. A secondary aim of this work is to determine if the ITCZ migrated further south than core 17PC during Heinrich stage II.

  12. How the Surface Seawater of the South China Sea Exchanged CO2 with the Atmosphere over the Last Glacial Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, T.; Jian, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 content, changing synchronously with temperature over recent glacial cycles, is considered as one of the most important mechanisms regulating climate change. The ocean is the dominant force driving atmospheric CO2 changes in glacial cycles. The CO2 sink of global coastal seas currently comprise 21% of the net sea-air CO2 flux of the global ocean, therefore coastal seas play important role in adjusting atmospheric CO2. The South China Sea (SCS), one of the largest coastal seas separating Asia from the Pacific, currently acts as a source of atmospheric CO2 due to high seawater temperature and intense vertical mixing bringing CO2 of deep sea to the surface. We measured B/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifers, Globigerinoides ruber and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, from MD05-2896 located in the southern SCS to reconstruct surface water pH (pHsw) and thermocline water pH (pHtw) and then calculate pCO2 of surface water (pCO2sw) and pCO2 of thermocline water (pCO2tw) over the last glacial cycle. Additionally, Mg/Ca ratios and δ18O were measured in G.ruber and P. obliquiloculata to reconstruct seawater temperature and salinity. The difference of pCO2 between surface water and atmosphere (ΔpCO2sw-atm) were positive during Holocene and from MIS5.1 to MIS5.4, implying that the southern SCS was the source of atmospheric CO2. The Holocene result coincides with the modern observation. During the last glacial period, the southern SCS became the sink of atmospheric CO2, indicated from the negative ΔpCO2sw-atm values. We also discovered that ΔpCO2sw-atm, the difference of pCO2 between thermocline and surface water (ΔpCO2tw-sw) and thermocline water temperature (TWT) have similar change trend, presenting obvious 20,000-year precession cycle. Therefore, we regard TWT as one of the dominant elements effecting the SCS to absorb or release CO2. When TWT were lower during glacial time, the mixed layer was able to dissolve more CO2, with larger ΔpCO2tw-sw, and the

  13. A stochastic, evolutionary model for range shifts and richness on tropical elevational gradients under Quaternary glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Robert K; Rangel, Thiago F

    2010-11-27

    Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles repeatedly forced thermal zones up and down the slopes of mountains, at all latitudes. Although no one doubts that these temperature cycles have left their signature on contemporary patterns of geography and phylogeny, the relative roles of ecology and evolution are not well understood, especially for the tropics. To explore key mechanisms and their interactions in the context of chance events, we constructed a geographical range-based, stochastic simulation model that incorporates speciation, anagenetic evolution, niche conservatism, range shifts and extinctions under late Quaternary temperature cycles along tropical elevational gradients. In the model, elevational patterns of species richness arise from the differential survival of founder lineages, consolidated by speciation and the inheritance of thermal niche characteristics. The model yields a surprisingly rich variety of realistic patterns of phylogeny and biogeography, including close matches to a variety of contemporary elevational richness profiles from an elevational transect in Costa Rica. Mountaintop extinctions during interglacials and lowland extinctions at glacial maxima favour mid-elevation lineages, especially under the constraints of niche conservatism. Asymmetry in temperature (greater duration of glacial than of interglacial episodes) and in lateral area (greater land area at low than at high elevations) have opposing effects on lowland extinctions and the elevational pattern of species richness in the model--and perhaps in nature, as well.

  14. A record of the variability of climate transitions between the last four glacial cycles from high-precision speleothem chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Lachniet, M. S.; Lapointe, Z. C.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothem growth in Fort Stanton Cave, central New Mexico in southwestern North America (SWNA), occurred predominantly during glacial periods for the last four glacial cycles, with some, but little growth spilling over into the glacial termination events. Given that lacustrine records show that glacial periods are pluvial periods in SWNA, Fort Stanton Cave speleothem growth seems to be a faithful indicator of periods of greater effective moisture for SWNA. Likewise, Asmerom et al. (2010) provided the first stable isotope record from a Fort Stanton stalagmite (FS-2) and reported an oxygen isotope record between 11.4 and 56 ka that closely mimicked the Greenland ice core oxygen records over much of the last glacial period. The δ18O variation in FS-2 reflected changes in the amount of winter precipitation, which in turn reflected the position of the Polar Jet Stream in response to changes in Northern Hemisphere temperature gradient. In contrast, variations in δ13C primarily reflect changes in the amount and type of vegetation which is linked to changes in local aridity. The stalagmites from this cave have high uranium, high δ234U and low detritus thorium and are thus ideally suited for dating using the uranium-series technique. Here we present a record of climate variability for the previous four ice ages. Based on growth of multiple stalagmites, we define the period from ~60 to 14.5 ka as speleothem-based pluvial 1 (SWNA-P1). Speleothems FS-5, FS-6, TR-2, TR-3 and HH-1 grew during glacial cycles 2-4, which we define as pluvials 2, 3, & 4 (SWNA-P2, P3, and P4) where preliminary results suggest that SWNA-P2 lasted from 170 to 130 ka, SWNA-P3 from 265 to 242 ka, and SWNA-P4 from 352 to 336 ka. Growth hiatuses and the carbon isotope records indicate the timing of pluvial terminations. Overall, SWNA-P3 is more similar to SWNA-P1, showing events that may have been more complex, with both exhibiting stadial- and interstadial-like climatic signals, while SWNA-P2 and P4

  15. Paleoceanographic history of the Lower Bengal Fan during the last glacial cycle - IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Lantzsch, H.; Das, S. K.; Williams, T.; Adhikari, R. R.; Jia, G.; Fox, L. R.; Ge, J.; Manoj, M. C.; Savian, J. F.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Sharma, B.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 drilled a ~320 km long transect of seven sites on the Lower Bengal Fan at 8o N in the Northern Indian Ocean. The sediments cores recovered record a complex relationship between turbiditic and hemipelagic environments. This variability offers a unique opportunity to link our understanding of tectonic and terrestrial processes with climate and oceanography. With the exception the westernmost Site U1454, all sites show a several meter thick, hemipelagic top layer, usually representing Late Quaternary sediment. We present physical, geochemical and stable isotopic properties of this interval to establish a time frame and assess the paleoceanographic development of the region during the last glacial cycle. We sampled Site U1452C-1H continuously for the uppermost 480 cm of hemipelagic sediment in 2-cm increments. Preliminary results indicate the Toba Ash 1 (0.74 ka) is a distinct time marker in all physical properties. Furthermore, wet-bulk density as well as color reflectance b* (the red-green component) and L* (the lightness) show a dominant precession cyclicity. Hence, we are able to provide an insolation-tuned chronology for the last 200 ka (MIS1 - 7) as a preliminary age model. These records agree well with d18O records retrieved from Chinese caves. We will present a preliminary paleoceanographic proxy data to reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS), ice volume, marine biological productivity, nutrient supply, and deep-water circulation. These oceanographic and climate conditions are linked to changes in monsoonal strength and terrestrial input using sedimentary proxies to reconstruct chemical weathering and sediment sources and transport time. This work addresses one of the primary cruise objectives - linking monsoon variability, regional and global climate, and Bay of Bengal sediment deposition.

  16. Variations in mid-ocean ridge magmatism and carbon emissions driven by glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Burley, J. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Crowley, J. W.; Park, S. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferguson, D.; Proistosescu, C.; Boulahanis, B.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial cycles transfer ˜5×10^19 kg of water between the oceans and ice sheets, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Forced with Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge magma/mantle dynamics predict temporal variations up to 10% in melt supply to the base of the crust. Moreover, a transport model for a perfectly incompatible element suggests that CO2 emissions from mid-ocean ridges could vary by a similar proportion, though with a longer time-lag.Bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The mechanism by which variations in the rate of melt supply are expressed in the bathymetry is not understood.The same pressure variations that modulate the melting rate could also modulate the depth of the onset of silicate melting. As ice sheets grow and sea level drops, this onset deepens, causing melting at the base of the silicate melting regime. Excess highly incompatible elements like CO2 enter the melt and begin their journey to the ridge axis. Tens of thousands of years later, this additional CO2 flux is emitted into the climate system. Because of its delay with respect to sea-level change, the predicted variation in CO2 emissions could represent a restoring force on climate (and sea-level) excursions. This mechanism has a response time determined by the time scale of melt transport; it potentially introduces a resonant frequency into the climate system.

  17. Lithic technological responses to Late Pleistocene glacial cycling at Pinnacle Point Site 5-6, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kyle S.; Oestmo, Simen; Pereira, Telmo; Ranhorn, Kathryn L.; Schoville, Benjamin J.; Marean, Curtis W.

    2017-01-01

    There are multiple hypotheses for human responses to glacial cycling in the Late Pleistocene, including changes in population size, interconnectedness, and mobility. Lithic technological analysis informs us of human responses to environmental change because lithic assemblage characteristics are a reflection of raw material transport, reduction, and discard behaviors that depend on hunter-gatherer social and economic decisions. Pinnacle Point Site 5–6 (PP5-6), Western Cape, South Africa is an ideal locality for examining the influence of glacial cycling on early modern human behaviors because it preserves a long sequence spanning marine isotope stages (MIS) 5, 4, and 3 and is associated with robust records of paleoenvironmental change. The analysis presented here addresses the question, what, if any, lithic assemblage traits at PP5-6 represent changing behavioral responses to the MIS 5-4-3 interglacial-glacial cycle? It statistically evaluates changes in 93 traits with no a priori assumptions about which traits may significantly associate with MIS. In contrast to other studies that claim that there is little relationship between broad-scale patterns of climate change and lithic technology, we identified the following characteristics that are associated with MIS 4: increased use of quartz, increased evidence for outcrop sources of quartzite and silcrete, increased evidence for earlier stages of reduction in silcrete, evidence for increased flaking efficiency in all raw material types, and changes in tool types and function for silcrete. Based on these results, we suggest that foragers responded to MIS 4 glacial environmental conditions at PP5-6 with increased population or group sizes, ‘place provisioning’, longer and/or more intense site occupations, and decreased residential mobility. Several other traits, including silcrete frequency, do not exhibit an association with MIS. Backed pieces, once they appear in the PP5-6 record during MIS 4, persist through MIS

  18. Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle along the Iberian Margin based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.; Sangiorgi, F.; Reichart, G. J.; Lourens, L. J.; Sluijs, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated millennial-scale dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from the Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct upwelling, sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity across the last two glacial-interglacial cycles. We quantify the validity of dinocyst-based paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on multivariate statistics on dinocyst assemblages and multi-proxy data from regional core-tops and the last glacial cycle. This allows us to conclude that the strength of the West Iberian Margin upwelling system changed from relatively intense upwelling during the last glacial to upwelling relaxation during the Holocene as a result of reduced (strength of the) Portuguese trade winds. Secondly, SST, productivity/upwelling, strength of Portuguese trade winds and climate on the Iberian Peninsula co-vary on stadial-interstadial timescales and correspond to Greenland stadial-interstadial variability (δ18O). Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down to ~120 ka.

  19. Southern Ocean abyssal oxygenation linked to the air-sea partitioning of carbon throughout the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Galbraith, E. D.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Anderson, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Although no single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric CO2 variability over glacial interglacial cycles, a build-up of biologically-stored carbon in the deep ocean has emerged as a central mechanism for low CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the mechanisms for which this deeply sequestered carbon was released, and the relative importance it played in the history of atmospheric CO2 prior to the LGM, remain subjects of debate. Here, we present new redox-sensitive trace metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide an unprecedented reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our results show that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the northern hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 rose rapidly, due to a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our new records show that the correlation between atmospheric CO2 and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the prior 80 kyrs, consistent with a unifying role of the Southern Ocean through a coupled control on deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization.

  20. Trends in stomatal density and 13C/12C ratios of Pinus flexilis needles during last glacial-interglacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van De Water, Peter K.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Betancourt, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of stomatal density and ?? 13C of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) needles (leaves) preserved in pack rat middens from the Great Basin reveal shifts in plant physiology and leaf morphology during the last 30,000 years. Sites were selected so as to offset glacial to Holocene climatic differences and thus to isolate the effects of changing atmospheric CO2 levels. Stomatal density decreased ~17 percent and ?? 13C decreased ~1.5 per mil during deglaciation from 15,000 to 12,000 years ago, concomitant with a 30 percent increase in atmospheric CO2. Water-use efficiency increased ~15 percent during deglaciation, if temperature and humidity were held constant and the proxy values for CO2 and ?? 13C of past atmospheres are accurate. The ??13C variations may help constrain hypotheses about the redistribution of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  1. Response of marine-based sectors of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasson, Edward; DeConto, Robert; Pollard, David

    2017-04-01

    How the marine-based sectors of the Antarctic ice sheet will respond to climate change is one of the largest sources of uncertainty for future sea level estimates. There are a number of instability mechanisms that have been proposed that could lead to rapid retreat of the Antarctic ice sheet in a warmer world. Here we explore how marine-based sectors of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets responded during the last glacial cycle using simulations with a hybrid SIA-SSA model that has been used extensively for both paleo and future simulations. Of particular interest is how successfully this model can simulate formation and retreat of marine-based ice sheets, such as the Barents Sea ice sheet and the British-Irish ice sheet. We also explore the controversial suggestion that there was expansion of Arctic ice shelves during earlier glacial stages.

  2. Ice stream behaviour in the western sector of the North Sea during the end of the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Evans, David; Clark, Chris; Bateman, Mark; Livingstone, Stephen; Medialdea, Alicia; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Grimoldi, Elena; Callard, Louise; Dove, Dayton; Stewart, Heather; Davies, Bethan; Chiverell, Richard

    2016-04-01

    During the last glacial cycle the East coast of the UK was overrun by the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) flowing eastwards and southwards. In recent years it has become evident that several ice streams including the Tweed, Tyne, and Stainmore Gap ice streams, as well as the late stage North Sea Lobe (NSL), all played a role in shaping the glacial landscape during this period, but understanding the flow phasing of these ice streams during advance and collapse has proved challenging. Here we present new data from the seafloor collected during recent work undertaken by the Britice Chrono and Glanam project teams during cruise JC123 in the North Sea. Sub-bottom seafloor data together with new swath data clearly show that the final phases of the collapse of the NSL were controlled by ice sourced from the Firth of Forth ice stream which deglaciated in a NNW trajectory. Other ice streams being fed from the west (e.g. Stainmore, Tyne, Tweed) were not influential in final phase ice retreat from the southern North Sea. The Forth ice imprint is characterised by several grounding zone/till wedges marking dynamic, oscillatory retreat of the ice as it retreated along an offshore corridor between North Yorkshire and Northumberland. Repeated packages of tills, ice marginal and glaciomarine sediments, which drape glacially scoured bedrock terrain and drumlins along this corridor, point to marine inundation accompanying ice retreat. New TCN ages suggest decoupling of the Tyne Gap ice stream and NSL between 17.8 and 16.5 ka and this coincides with rapid, regional collapse of the NSL between 17.2 and 16.0 ka along the Yorkshire and Durham coasts (new OSL ages; Britice Chrono). Hence, both the central and northern sectors of the BIIS were being strongly influenced by marine margin instability during the latter phases of the last glacial cycle.

  3. The influence of Antarctic subglacial volcanism on the global iron cycle during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, Silvia; Weyrich, Laura S.; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Rivard, Camille; Cooper, Alan

    2017-06-01

    Marine sediment records suggest that episodes of major atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glacial period were linked to iron (Fe) fertilization of subantarctic surface waters. The principal source of this Fe is thought to be dust transported from southern mid-latitude deserts. However, uncertainty exists over contributions to CO2 sequestration from complementary Fe sources, such as the Antarctic ice sheet, due to the difficulty of locating and interrogating suitable archives that have the potential to preserve such information. Here we present petrographic, geochemical and microbial DNA evidence preserved in precisely dated subglacial calcites from close to the East Antarctic Ice-Sheet margin, which together suggest that volcanically-induced drainage of Fe-rich waters during the Last Glacial Maximum could have reached the Southern Ocean. Our results support a significant contribution of Antarctic volcanism to subglacial transport and delivery of nutrients with implications on ocean productivity at peak glacial conditions.

  4. Variability in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation through a glacial-interglacial cycle.

    PubMed

    Tudhope, A W; Chilcott, C P; McCulloch, M T; Cook, E R; Chappell, J; Ellam, R M; Lea, D W; Lough, J M; Shimmield, G B

    2001-02-23

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most potent source of interannual climate variability. Uncertainty surrounding the impact of greenhouse warming on ENSO strength and frequency has stimulated efforts to develop a better understanding of the sensitivity of ENSO to climate change. Here we use annually banded corals from Papua New Guinea to show that ENSO has existed for the past 130,000 years, operating even during "glacial" times of substantially reduced regional and global temperature and changed solar forcing. However, we also find that during the 20th century ENSO has been strong compared with ENSO of previous cool (glacial) and warm (interglacial) times. The observed pattern of change in amplitude may be due to the combined effects of ENSO dampening during cool glacial conditions and ENSO forcing by precessional orbital variations.

  5. The influence of Antarctic subglacial volcanism on the global iron cycle during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Frisia, Silvia; Weyrich, Laura S.; Hellstrom, John; Borsato, Andrea; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Bajo, Petra; Drysdale, Russell N.; Augustinus, Paul C.; Rivard, Camille; Cooper, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Marine sediment records suggest that episodes of major atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glacial period were linked to iron (Fe) fertilization of subantarctic surface waters. The principal source of this Fe is thought to be dust transported from southern mid-latitude deserts. However, uncertainty exists over contributions to CO2 sequestration from complementary Fe sources, such as the Antarctic ice sheet, due to the difficulty of locating and interrogating suitable archives that have the potential to preserve such information. Here we present petrographic, geochemical and microbial DNA evidence preserved in precisely dated subglacial calcites from close to the East Antarctic Ice-Sheet margin, which together suggest that volcanically-induced drainage of Fe-rich waters during the Last Glacial Maximum could have reached the Southern Ocean. Our results support a significant contribution of Antarctic volcanism to subglacial transport and delivery of nutrients with implications on ocean productivity at peak glacial conditions. PMID:28598412

  6. Modelling of glacial isostatic adjustment in the Barents Sea region: Earth rheology inferred from various ice load scenarios for the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriac, Amandine; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Bentley, Michael J.; Patton, Henry; Hubbard, Alun; Lloyd, Jerry M.

    2015-04-01

    The Barents Sea, bordered by Norway to the south, Svalbard to the north and Novaya Zemlya to the east, was covered by ice during the last glacial cycle. The extent and thickness of the marine-based ice sheet as well as timing of glaciation / deglaciation are, however, difficult to constrain, partly due to the few terrestrial areas available. There are various models for the ice load history in this region, but large discrepancies remain between them depending on the dataset used as constraint (e.g. sea-level data, temperature record or geomorphology data). Our aim here is to compare and find the best ice load scenario for this region over the last glacial cycle and solve for the Earth structure in the area. To achieve this, we model the present-day crustal deformation and sea-level variations during the last deglaciation by solving the sea-level equation. We use a wide range of Earth models, where we vary the lithosphere thickness and the upper and lower mantle viscosities, as well as four ice load scenarios. The first three ice load scenarios come from published studies, and include the ICE-5G model as well as models from M. Siegert and J.-O. Näslund, while the last one is currently being developed at the University of Tromsø, Norway. We compare the modelled sea-level predictions to relative sea-level curves at key locations around the Barents Sea using chi square, which enables us to infer the best Earth structure and ice history. We also compare the predicted surface deformation from our best model with GPS observations from stations located around the Barents Sea. The GPS provides a constraint on the present-day evolution of deformation in the area and is complementary to the relative sea-level data, which constrain the long-term deformation. First results show that the published ice load scenarios are not accurate enough to reproduce the sea level curves around the Barents Sea, regardless of the Earth model tried. However, the last model, currently being

  7. Luminescence Dating of Sediments from the Luthern Valley, Central Switzerland, and Implications for the Chronology of the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusser, Frank; Müller, Benjamin U.; Schlüchter, Christian

    2001-03-01

    The advancing glaciers of the last glacial maximum either eroded or deeply buried older sediments in the Swiss Alpine Foreland. However, part of the Swiss Plateau was not covered by ice and is therefore an excellent area for investigating climate and environmental change during the Upper Pleistocene. Repeated fluvial sequences can be studied in several pits along the Luthern Valley. The chronological framework is based on lithostratigraphy, pollen analysis, U/Th dating, and, recently, heavy mineral analysis and luminescence dating. The oldest unit, the Untere Zeller Schotter braided river deposit, represents cold climate conditions and presumably a glaciation prior to the Eemian Interglaciation. The last interglacial period and the very beginning of the last glacial cycle is represented by the Mittlere Zeller Schotter, sediments of a meandering fluvial system. Younger braided river sediments, the Obere Zeller Schotter, seem to correlate with the cold climate of oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 4. Weathering of the top of the Obere Zeller Schotter is likely to represent the OIS 3. The advancing Reuss glacier caused erosion of the recent Luthern Valley, cutting into older sediments, with local loess accumulation during the last glacial maximum as indicated by cover sediments on top of the fluvial sequence.

  8. Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial-interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tracy M.; Wright, James D.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-07-01

    In all aquatic environments, nitrogen cycling within the water column is strongly influenced by oxygen. We hypothesize that the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of organic matter deposited in the sediments is a proxy for the redox state of the water column at the time of deposition. We tested the hypothesis by measuring the bulk sedimentary δ15N values in a drill core from the Black Sea, a basin that alternates between oxic, less saline conditions and anoxic, marine conditions on glacial-interglacial time scales. We reconstructed these changes in Black Sea redox conditions using sedimentary δ15N, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), redox-sensitive metals, and micropaleontological data from a deep-sea core (DSDP Site 380). The sedimentary data reveal that during the transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions, δ15N values increased relative to the preceding and succeeding quasi-steady-state oxic and anoxic periods. The results indicate that the reciprocal transitional states from anoxic to oxic conditions were accompanied by intense denitrification; during the quasi-stable oxic and anoxic states (characterized by glacial fresh water and interglacial marine conditions) nitrification and complete nitrate utilization, respectively, dominate the nitrogen cycle. While other factors may influence the δ15N record, our results support the hypothesis that the variations in nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter are strongly influenced by changes in redox state in the Black Sea subphotic zone on glacial-interglacial time scales, and can be explained by a relatively simple model describing the effects of oxygen on the microbial processes that drive the nitrogen cycle in marine ecosystems. Our model suggests that the nitrogen isotopic composition of marine sediments, on geological time scales, can be used to reconstruct the redox state of the overlying water column.

  9. A stochastic, evolutionary model for range shifts and richness on tropical elevational gradients under Quaternary glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Robert K.; Rangel, Thiago F.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary glacial–interglacial cycles repeatedly forced thermal zones up and down the slopes of mountains, at all latitudes. Although no one doubts that these temperature cycles have left their signature on contemporary patterns of geography and phylogeny, the relative roles of ecology and evolution are not well understood, especially for the tropics. To explore key mechanisms and their interactions in the context of chance events, we constructed a geographical range-based, stochastic simulation model that incorporates speciation, anagenetic evolution, niche conservatism, range shifts and extinctions under late Quaternary temperature cycles along tropical elevational gradients. In the model, elevational patterns of species richness arise from the differential survival of founder lineages, consolidated by speciation and the inheritance of thermal niche characteristics. The model yields a surprisingly rich variety of realistic patterns of phylogeny and biogeography, including close matches to a variety of contemporary elevational richness profiles from an elevational transect in Costa Rica. Mountaintop extinctions during interglacials and lowland extinctions at glacial maxima favour mid-elevation lineages, especially under the constraints of niche conservatism. Asymmetry in temperature (greater duration of glacial than of interglacial episodes) and in lateral area (greater land area at low than at high elevations) have opposing effects on lowland extinctions and the elevational pattern of species richness in the model—and perhaps in nature, as well. PMID:20980317

  10. Addressing glacial cycle uncertainty of the Greenland Ice Sheet: model, constraints, and initial results towards Bayesian calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Lev; Long, Antony; Roberts, Dave; Woodroffe, Sarah; Milne, Glenn; Funder, Svend; Kjeldsen, Kristian; Lecavalier, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Given the ongoing challenge of missing LGM ice, there is a need to build confident bounds on paleo contributions from major ice sheets. For approaches based on glaciological models, such bounds require a model that adequately probes uncertainties in both climate and ice processes along with a methodology for using paleo-observations to constrain this probe. To date, paleo glaciological models of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) have low confidence in their derived bounds. This is due in good part to limited probes of model uncertainties and sole reliance on climate forcings based on glacial indices derived from GRIP or GISPII ice core records. We describe the initial constraint data set (and welcome new data), error model for the data, and model setup in working towards a full Bayesian inversion of the last glacial cycle GrIS chronology. We use the 3D Glacial Systems Model with coupled glacial isostatic adjustment (including a first order gravitational correction) and subgrid hypsometric surface mass balance and ice flow modules. The climate component is distinguished by a weighting of climate representations, including a fully coupled "climate generator" that has no dependence on Greenland ice core records. Calibrated model parameters also account for uncertainties in ice calving and submarine melt, basal drag, deep geothermal heat flux, and earth viscosity structure. The calibration is currently against relative sea level observations, constraints on ice extent from cosmogenic dates, and borehole temperature records from the Greenland ice core sites. Comparison of initial ensemble results against calibration constraints will validate the extent to which the model system potentially "covers reality", a pre-requisite for confident Bayesian inversion.

  11. Numerical studies on the Impact of the Last Glacial Cycle on recent borehole temperature profiles: implications for terrestrial energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; Matharoo, G. S.; Tarasov, L.; Rath, V.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2014-09-01

    Reconstructions of past climatic changes from borehole temperature profiles are important independent estimates of temperature histories over the last millennium. There remain, however, multiple uncertainties in the interpretation of these data as climatic indicators and as estimates of the changes in the heat content of the continental subsurface due to long-term climatic change. One of these uncertainties is associated with the often ignored impact of the last glacial cycle (LGC) on the subsurface energy content, and on the estimate of the background quasi steady-state signal associated with the diffusion of accretionary energy from the Earth's interior. Here, we provide the first estimate of the impact of the development of the Laurentide ice sheet on the estimates of energy and temperature reconstructions from measurements of terrestrial borehole temperatures in North America. We use basal temperature values from the data-calibrated Memorial University of Newfoundland glacial systems model (MUN-GSM) to quantify the extent of the perturbation to estimated steady-state temperature profiles, and to derive spatial maps of the expected impacts on measured profiles over North America. Furthermore, we present quantitative estimates of the potential effects of temperature changes during the last glacial cycle on the borehole reconstructions over the last millennium for North America. The range of these possible impacts is estimated using synthetic basal temperatures for a period covering 120 ka to the present day that include the basal temperature history uncertainties from an ensemble of results from the calibrated numerical model. For all the locations, we find that within the depth ranges that are typical for available boreholes (≈600 m), the induced perturbations to the steady-state temperature profile are on the order of 10 mW m-2, decreasing with greater depths. Results indicate that site-specific heat content estimates over North America can differ by as much

  12. Influence of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles on the genetic structure of the mistletoe cactus Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae) in Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Gómez, Flor

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographical work on cloud forest-adapted species provides inconsistent evidence on cloud forest dynamics during glacial cycles. A study of Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae), a bird-dispersed epiphytic mistletoe cactus, was conducted to investigate genetic variation at sequence data from nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 677 bp] and chloroplast (rpl32-trnL, 1092bp) DNA for 154 individuals across the species range in Mesoamerica to determine if such patterns are consistent with the expansion/contraction model of cloud forest during glacial cycles. We conducted population and spatial genetic analyses as well as gene flow and divergence time estimates between 24 populations comprising the distribution of R. baccifera in Mexico and Guatemala to gain insight of the evolutionary history of these populations, and a complementary species distribution modeling approach to frame information derived from the genetic analyses into an explicit paleoecological context. The results revealed a phylogeographical break at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and high levels of genetic diversity among populations and cloud forest areas. Despite the genetic differentiation of some R. baccifera populations, the widespread ITS ribotypes suggest effective nuclear gene flow via pollen and population differentiation shown by the rpl32-trnL suggests more restricted seed flow. Predictions of species distribution models under past last glacial maximum (LGM) climatic conditions and a significant signal of demographic expansion suggest that R. baccifera populations experienced a range expansion tracking the conditions of the cloud forest distribution and shifted to the lowlands with population connectivity during the LGM. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Stability of the accumulation pattern around Dome C over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavitte, Marie; Parrenin, Frédéric; Ritz, Catherine; Blankenship, Donald; Young, Duncan; Frezzotti, Massimo; Roberts, Jason; van Ommen, Tas

    2017-04-01

    The "Candidate A" region, just to the south of Dome C, is one of the climate community's targets for retrieving "old ice", aiming for an ice core bottom age of 1.5 million-years. The region lies along the divide that separates the Byrd and Totten glacier catchments, and thus its position could be sensitive to differential behavior of those two systems. In the winter of 15/16, the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) collected a detailed airborne radar survey known as OIA (Old Ice A) (Young et al., in review). Seventeen internal radar reflections are mapped through this survey, encompassing both sides of the divide, spanning the last three glacial cycles, from 38 ka and 366 kyrs. Dates are obtained where the internal reflections intersect the EPICA Dome C ice core and the AICC20112 age-depth chronology can be transferred to each individual reflection. These internal reflections are easily traced in the OIA survey for several reasons: (1) Candidate A is a region of relatively stable ice, close to the ice divide, so very little horizontal flow has occurred and the radar reflections exhibit near-horizontal stratigraphy, (2) the gridded geometry of the survey design implies a high number of crossovers which allow regular checks on the accuracy of the reflection mapping, and supports the isochronal character of the reflections. Older airborne UTIG radar surveys in the region augment the dataset to provide constraints further away from the divide, and the same set of isochrones are traced throughout (previously published in Cavitte et al., 2016). We use a 1D inverse model (Parrenin et al., in prep) to reconstruct the patterns of paleo-accumulation through time all the way back to the penultimate interglacial (127 kyr). To do this, we first fit the isochrones' geometries and ages to invert for the steady-state accumulation rate, the basal melting rate and the p exponent in the Lliboutry flow formulation. We then reconstruct paleo-accumulation rates

  14. Distinction of glacial and interglacial cycles in Feni and Gardar drifts, North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.

    1985-02-01

    The Feni and Gardar drifts of the North Atlantic are thought to represent large accumulations of current-deposited material and should record changes through time in direction and intensity of overflows in the Norwegian Sea and Iceland-Faereo Ridge, respectively. Both drifts were drilled by DSDP Leg 94. Initial shipboard examination revealed no visual differences between these sediments and typical pelagic North Atlantic sediments. Fourier shape analysis on quartz silts, augmented by SEM, showed that each sample consists of a mixture of 3 grain populations. One grain type is covered with surface fractures unmodified by subsequent abrasion. Lack of such abrasion and the fact that the abundance of these grains varies independently of other shape types suggest a glacial-ice rafted origin. A second shape family is covered with irregular, platy silica overgrowths, typical of diagenesis in a poorly sorted, clay-rich environment and is likely the production of erosion of submarine lutites. A third grain type, plastered with fine-grained silica, is characterized by protuberences and indentations typical of primary continental source terranes. These last 2 grain types vary inversely with one another, implying that at glacial maxima, bottom currents deposited first-generation continental material, but at glacial minima, they eroded material from the sea bottom and redeposited it as drift sediments.

  15. Chloride, nitrate and sulphate high resolution records for the last two glacial-interglacial cycles from EDC ice core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, A.; Becagli, S.; Benassai, S.; Castellano, E.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2003-04-01

    During the 2001/2002 Antarctic campaign, in field Fast Ion Chromatographic analysis was continued on the EPICA Dome C ice core (EDC) yielding chloride, nitrate and sulphate high-resolution records up to 2160 m depth. This depth interval is supposed to cover the last two glacial/interglacial cycles. Since EDC isotopic measurements are in progress at present, chemical profiles were compared with deuterium profile from Vostok ice core, aiming to study the relationship between climatic and environmental changes. All the components show lower and rather constant background levels over the two interglacial periods (Holocene and Eemian) with respect to glacial ones. Sulphate background profile, perturbed by a large number of volcanic spikes, shows a little sensitivity to glacial/interglacial climatic changes. Since the variations of the sulphate concentration are similar in extent to the estimated snow accumulation changes, this component does not seem to be affected by significant changes in source intensity and transport efficiency during the different climatic periods. Chloride and nitrate concentration profiles exhibit a higher variability along the ice core, with very low and stable interglacial values and high and noisy glacial levels. By comparing the Vostok deuterium profile in the last glacial period, where the temporal resolution of isotopic measurement is particularly high, a good correspondence between chloride maxima and deuterium minima can be observed, even for short-term variations. Both environmental variations and glaciological features can modulate the response of chloride to the temperature changes. Indeed, post-depositional effects through HCl re-emission into the atmosphere heavily affect chloride. Its persistence in the snow layers is therefore related to snow accumulation rate and snow acidity. In cold periods, despite the lower accumulation rate, the higher alkaline dust atmospheric load is able to fix higher chloride snow concentration preventing

  16. Paleoclimate modeling of the Amazonian glacial cycles using the new version of the LMD Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeleine, J.; Forget, F.; Head, J. W.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Colaitis, A.; Montabone, L.; Montmessin, F.; Maattanen, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Our study aims at better understanding the Mars climate system through the modeling of the Amazonian glacial cycles with the LMD Global Climate Model. In recent years, many atmospheric measurements by MRO, MGS and MEx, as well as in-situ measurements by the Phoenix lander have revealed the crucial role of various processes in shaping the current climate, such as the radiative effect of water-ice clouds or the scavenging of dust particles by clouds. In parallel, geological evidence for large-scale glaciations has been discovered, and a lot is still to be learned about the origin of the associated geological features. We have been working on developing a new version of the LMD Mars GCM which includes these processes and allows us to assess their impact on the Mars climate system under present-day and past conditions. The processes that are relevant to paleoclimate modeling are the following: - Interactive aerosols: The scavenging of dust particles is made possible by a semi-interactive dust transport scheme which is coupled to the water cycle scheme. The dust particles serve as condensation nuclei for water-ice cloud formation and can be scavenged. Both dust particles and water-ice crystals can scatter radiation depending on their size. - Near-surface convection: A new parameterization of the convection in the boundary layer has been developed and accounts for the turbulent mixing produced by local thermals. This new parameterization may have an impact on ice stability under paleoclimate conditions. - Ice deposition and surface properties: A new soil conduction model allows us to account for the changes in surface thermal inertia due to ice deposition, meaning that the thermal-inertia feedback is active. Also, the coupling between the dust cycle and the water cycle gives access to the amount of dust which is included in the ice deposits, and thereby provides an assessment of the stratigraphy. During the conference, we will revisit our paleoclimate simulations and

  17. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and insights into the global marine carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Pearse J.; Matear, Richard J.; Lenton, Andrew; Phipps, Steven J.; Chase, Zanna; Etheridge, David M.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean's ability to store large quantities of carbon, combined with the millennial longevity over which this reservoir is overturned, has implicated the ocean as a key driver of glacial-interglacial climates. However, the combination of processes that cause an accumulation of carbon within the ocean during glacial periods is still under debate. Here we present simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using the CSIRO Mk3L-COAL (Carbon-Ocean-Atmosphere-Land) earth system model to test the contribution of physical and biogeochemical processes to ocean carbon storage. For the LGM simulation, we find a significant global cooling of the surface ocean (3.2 °C) and the expansion of both minimum and maximum sea ice cover broadly consistent with proxy reconstructions. The glacial ocean stores an additional 267 Pg C in the deep ocean relative to the pre-industrial (PI) simulation due to stronger Antarctic Bottom Water formation. However, 889 Pg C is lost from the upper ocean via equilibration with a lower atmospheric CO2 concentration and a global decrease in export production, causing a net loss of carbon relative to the PI ocean. The LGM deep ocean also experiences an oxygenation ( > 100 mmol O2 m-3) and deepening of the calcite saturation horizon (exceeds the ocean bottom) at odds with proxy reconstructions. With modifications to key biogeochemical processes, which include an increased export of organic matter due to a simulated release from iron limitation, a deepening of remineralisation and decreased inorganic carbon export driven by cooler temperatures, we find that the carbon content of the glacial ocean can be sufficiently increased (317 Pg C) to explain the reduction in atmospheric and terrestrial carbon at the LGM (194 ± 2 and 330 ± 400 Pg C, respectively). Assuming an LGM-PI difference of 95 ppm pCO2, we find that 55 ppm can be attributed to the biological pump, 28 ppm to circulation changes and the remaining 12 ppm to solubility. The biogeochemical

  18. Sequence and chronology of the Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier (Iberian Central System) during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Rosa M.; Pedraza, Javier; Domínguez-Villar, David; Willenbring, Jane K.; Villa, Javier

    2015-12-01

    The Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier occupies the upper sector of the Cuerpo de Hombre river basin, located on the northwest slope of the Sierra de Béjar Mountains (Iberian Central System). At the stage of the maximum ice extent during the last glacial cycle, this paleoglacier was one of the longest tongues emerging from the Sierra de Béjar plateau glacier. The study of the morphostratigraphic succession and the geometric and genetic relations between the geomorphological indicators of this paleoglacier has revealed its evolutionary sequence during the last glacial cycle. The comparison between this sequence and the one previously established by a regional evolutionary pattern shows that although they both coincide in general terms, some stages/substages of this pattern must be corrected or more clearly defined. The absolute chronology of the different stages was obtained using terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (10Be). The maximum ice extent of Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier has been dated to ∼25.0 ka (MIS2 and concurrent with the LGM). This chronology coincides with date obtained for other paleoglaciers in the Iberian Central System, but is slightly more modern than the regional chronology estimated as most likely for the maximum ice extent in these areas. Subsequent to reaching the maximum extent, the glacier had a retreat (minimum age ∼20.6 ka), followed by another stage of expansion or readvance, after which it stabilised until the start of the deglaciation stage (∼17.8 ka). In all previous work, the deglaciation stages in the Iberian Central System have been described as one continuous recession process. However, in the Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier, all the data point to stabilisations of considerable magnitude, and particularly to another stage of readvance of the glacier. Based on its chronology (minimum age ∼11.1 ka) and its evolutionary significance, this new readvance has been correlated with the Older Dryas stadial. Finally, the evolutionary context

  19. Evidence For The Role of Deep Sea Temperature In Glacial Climate and Carbon Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Archer, D.; Lea, D. W.

    Measurements of benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca from the deep tropical Pacific (cores TR163-31P and 20B, 3.2 km water depth) provide a baseline for evaluating changes in deep sea temperature during the last glacial period. Mg/Ca variations of >50% (1.3 to 0.6 mmol/mol) imply temperature changes of ~4 deg. C. The most extreme and prolonged cold period was at the start of the last glacial (~80,000 BP), with near freezing bottom water temperatures marking the onset of continental glaciation. A second brief but pronounced cooling near ~35,000 BP coincides with the beginning of a second phase of glaciation. Millennial-scale variability in benthic Mg/Ca in the 20,000 year period between the two major episodes of ice growth is direct evidence for millennial-scale oscillations in deep water temperature. Over the last 90,000 years, oscillations in deep sea temperature show a clear correlation with Antarctic air temper- atures and atmospheric CO2. Throughout 5ky-long oscillations evident in Stage III, the paleodata show a relationship between CO2 and deep ocean T of~10 ppm/deg. C, consistent with new ocean GCM CO2 solubility results. However, to explain the full glacial-interglacial CO2 change, we still require external forcing (changes in ocean biology or pH, for example), or alternatively a mechanism to enhance the solubility sensitivity to global mean T in the ocean.

  20. Temporal relationships of carbon cycling and ocean circulation at glacial boundaries.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Alexander M; Goldstein, Steven L; Hemming, Sidney R; Fairbanks, Richard G

    2005-03-25

    Evidence from high-sedimentation-rate South Atlantic deep-sea cores indicates that global and Southern Ocean carbon budget shifts preceded thermohaline circulation changes during the last ice age initiation and termination and that these were preceded by ice-sheet growth and retreat, respectively. No consistent lead-lag relationships are observed during abrupt millennial warming events during the last ice age, allowing for the possibility that ocean circulation triggered some millenial climate changes. At the major glacial-interglacial transitions, the global carbon budget and thermohaline ocean circulation responded sequentially to the climate changes that forced the growth and decline of continental ice sheets.

  1. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and insights into the global carbon cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, P. J.; Matear, R.; Lenton, A.; Phipps, S. J.; Chase, Z.; Etheridge, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean's ability to store large quantities of carbon, combined with the millennial longevity over which this reservoir is overturned, has implicated the ocean as a key driver of glacial-interglacial climates. However, the combination of processes that cause an accumulation of carbon within the ocean during glacial periods is still under debate. Here we present simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using the CSIRO Mk3L-COAL Earth System Model to test the contribution of key biogeochemical processes to ocean carbon storage. For the coupled LGM simulation, we find that significant cooling (3.2 °C), expanded minimum (Northern Hemisphere: 105 %; Southern Hemisphere: 225 %) and maximum (Northern Hemisphere: 145 %; Southern Hemisphere: 120 %) sea ice cover, and a reorganisation of the overturning circulation caused significant changes in ocean biogeochemical fields. The coupled LGM simulation stores an additional 322 Pg C in the deep ocean relative to the Pre-Industrial (PI) simulation. However, 839 Pg C is lost from the upper ocean via equilibration with a lower atmospheric CO2 concentration, causing a net loss of 517 Pg C relative to the PI simulation. The LGM deep ocean also experiences an oxygenation (>100 mmol O2 m-3) and deepening of the aragonite saturation depth (> 2,000 m deeper) at odds with proxy reconstructions. Hence, these physical changes cannot in isolation produce plausible biogeochemistry nor the required drawdown of atmospheric CO2 of 80-100 ppm at the LGM. With modifications to key biogeochemical processes, which include an increased export of organic matter due to a simulated release from iron limitation, a deepening of remineralisation and decreased inorganic carbon export driven by cooler temperatures, we find that the carbon content in the glacial oceanic reservoir can be increased (326 Pg C) to a level that is sufficient to explain the reduction in atmospheric and terrestrial carbon at the LGM (520 ± 400 Pg C). These modifications

  2. Extra-long interglacial in Northern Hemisphere during MISs 15-13 arising from limited extent of Arctic ice sheets in glacial MIS 14.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Guo, Zhengtang

    2015-07-10

    Knowledge of the behavior of Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets over the past million years is crucial for understanding the role of orbitally driven insolation changes on glacial/interglacial cycles. Here, based on the demonstrable link between changes in Chinese loess grain-size and NH ice-sheet extent, we use loess grain-size records to confirm that northern ice-sheets were restricted during marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 14. Thus, an unusually long NH interglacial climate of over 100 kyr persisted during MISs 15-13, much longer than expected from marine oxygen isotope records. Taking a global view of the paleoclimate records, MIS 14 inception seems to be a response to changes in Antarctic ice-sheets rather than to NH cooling. Orbital configuration in the two Polar regions shows that the onset of MIS 14 was forced by austral insolation changes, rather than by boreal summer insolation, as Milankovitch theory proposes. Our analysis of MIS 14 raises the possibility that southern insolation forcing may have played an important role in the inception of several other glacials. We suggest that the extra-long NH interglacial climate during MISs 15-13 provided favorable conditions for the second major dispersal episode of African hominins into Eurasia.

  3. The timing and cause of glacial advances in the southern mid-latitudes during the last glacial cycle based on a synthesis of exposure ages from Patagonia and New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Shulmeister, James

    2016-10-01

    Glacier advances in the southern mid-latitudes during the last glacial cycle (ca. 110-10 ka) were controlled by changes in temperature and precipitation linked to several important ocean-climate systems. As such, the timing of glacial advance and retreat can yield important insights into the mechanisms of Southern Hemisphere climate change. This is particularly important given that several recent studies have demonstrated significant glacial advances prior to the global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) in Patagonia and New Zealand, the cause of which are uncertain. The recent increase in chronological studies in these regions offers the opportunity to compare regional trends in glacial activity. Here, we compile the first consistent 10Be exposure-dating chronologies for Patagonia and New Zealand to highlight the broad pattern of mid-latitude glacial activity over the last glacial cycle. Our results show that advances or still stands culminated at 26-27 ka, 18-19 ka and 13-14 ka in both Patagonia and New Zealand and were broadly synchronous, but with an offset between regions of up to 900 years that cannot be explained by age calculation or physically plausible erosion differences. Furthermore, there is evidence in both regions for glacial advances culminating from at least 45 ka, during the latter half of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. Glacial activity prior to the gLGM differed from the large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, likely due to favourable Southern Hemisphere conditions during late MIS 3: summer insolation reached a minimum, seasonality was reduced, winter duration was increasing, and sea ice had expanded significantly, inducing stratification of the ocean and triggering northward migration of oceanic fronts and the Southern Westerly Winds. Glacial advances in Patagonia and New Zealand during the gLGM were probably primed by underlying orbital parameters. However, the precise timing is likely to have been intrinsically linked to migration of the coupled ocean

  4. Sea level and ground water table depth (WTD): A biogeochemical pacemaker for glacial-interglacial cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowling, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The role that changes in sea level have on potential carbon-climate feedbacks are discussed as a potential contributing mechanism for terminating glacial periods. Focus will be on coastal wetlands because these systems can be substantially altered by changing sea level and ground water table depth (WTD); in addition to being important moderators of the exchange of nutrients and energy between terrestrial and marine ecosystems. A hypothesis is outlined that describes how the release of carbon from formerly anaerobic wetland soils and sediments can influence climate when sea levels begin to decline. As ground WTD deepens and eventually recedes from the surface, coastal wetland basins may become isolated from their belowground source of water. With their primary source of base flow removed, coastal wetlands likely dried up, promoting decomposition of the carbon compounds buried in their sediments. Depending on the timing of basin isolation and the timing of decomposition, glacial sea level lows could have triggered a relatively large positive carbon feedback on climate warming, just at the time when a new interglacial period is about to begin.

  5. A palaeoclimate investigation of the lacustrine sediments from Chew Bahir in Ethiopia spanning multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa; Cohen, Andrew; Deino, Alan; Foerster, Verena; Lamb, Henry; Roberts, Helen; Schäbitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin; Viehberg, Finn

    2017-04-01

    There are few long, continuous, terrestrial Pleistocene records from eastern Africa, therefore it has been difficult to establish the relative influences of different climate forcings on the region's hydroclimate and to understand the climatic conditions at the time of anatomically modern human origin and dispersal out of Africa. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we have cored lake sediments from Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia, close to the site of the oldest-known anatomically modern human fossils at Omo-Kibish. Several dating techniques are being employed and preliminary results suggest that the record covers the past 500-550ka. Several proxy records are being produced; here we use the oxygen and carbon isotope composition of endogenic calcite to reconstruct changes in hydroclimate. The data suggest significant fluctuations in water balance, with seemingly more evaporative conditions during glacial periods and less evaporative conditions during interglacials. The sawtooth structure of the isotope data through glacial-interglacial cycles suggests a strong linkage between high latitude forcing and Ethiopian hydroclimate fluctuations. We make inferences about the possible correlation between climate and the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa.

  6. Greenland ice core reconstruction of millennial changes in North American wildfire and soil activity over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H.; Schuepbach, S.; Gfeller, G.; Bigler, M.; Roethlisberger, R.; Erhardt, T.; Stocker, T. F.; Mulvaney, R.; Wolff, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    Climate changes in the North Atlantic region during the last glacial cycle were dominated by the slow waxing and waning of the North American ice sheet as well as by intermittent Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. However prior to the last deglaciation, little is known about the response of North American vegetation to such rapid climate changes and especially about the response of biomass burning, an important factor for regional changes in radiative forcing. Here we present continuous, high-resolution ammonium (NH4+) records derived from the NGRIP and GRIP ice cores, where background NH4+ concentrations in the ice document North American ammonia emissions from soils while wildfire derived NH4+ peaks superimposed on the background concentrations allow to reconstruct changes in North American wildfire frequency over the last 110,000 yr. Soil emissions increased on orbital timescales with warmer climate, related to the northward expansion of vegetation due to reduced ice-covered areas. During Marine Isotope Stage 3 DO warm events, a significantly higher fire recurrence rate is recorded, while ammonia soil emissions rose only slowly during longer interstadial warm periods, in line with slow ice sheet shrinkage and delayed ecosystem changes. Our results indicate that sudden warming events had little impact on NH4+ aerosol production from soil emissions and on NH4+ aerosol transport to Greenland during the glacial but triggered a significant increase in the frequency of fire occurrence.

  7. Modelling the Eurasian Ice Sheet through a full (Weichselian) glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Martin J.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Hald, Morten; Svendsen, John-Inge

    2001-11-01

    Recently acquired glacial geological and oceanographic datasets provide information on the Weichselian glaciations of Scandinavia and the Eurasian Arctic. A numerical ice-sheet model, forced by global sea level and solar insolation changes, was run to reconstruct ice sheets compatible with these data. A 'maximum' reconstruction assumes that the modern-type temperature distribution across the Eurasian Arctic is reduced by 10 °C at three stages during the Weichselian, which are related to minimum levels of solar insolation. Conversely, a 'minimum' model incorporates a reduction in temperature of only 5 °C in Early and Middle Weichselian time. The 'maximum' reconstruction employs the relatively larger sea-level fall suggested by the δ18O deep-sea record, while the 'minimum' run uses the more conservative sea-level estimate from New Guinea coral reef terraces. The maximum model predicts three major glacial advances in the Weichselian. These compare well to geological evidence for ice-sheet growth during the Early, Middle and Late Weichselian. Geological evidence for the Late Weichselian ice sheet is compatible with either reconstruction if ice growth across the Taymyr Peninsula is curtailed. The models show that ice-sheet advance caused by the interaction of sea level and solar insolation changes yields a time-dependent ice volume function similar to that established from the geological record. Periods of seasonally open water within the seas bordering the Eurasian Arctic generally occur prior to glaciation, and may provide a source of precipitation for ice-sheet growth. In contrast, periods of ice-rafted debris deposition and depletion in surface-ocean δ18O in sea-floor sediments compare well with the model's determination of ice-sheet decay and melting.

  8. Evolution of the Northern Rockweed, Fucus distichus, in a Regime of Glacial Cycling: Implications for Benthic Algal Phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Müller, Kirsten M; Adey, Walter H; Lara, Yannick; Young, Robert; Johnson, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely speciated in the North Atlantic and its tributary seas. Fucus distichus is likely near the ancestral member of this genus, and studies have shown that there are several species/subspecies in this complex (i.e. F. evanescens and F. gardneri). We used phylogenetic and haplotype analyses to test the phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of F. distichus. Our data and subsequent analyses demonstrate that, unlike previous studies that lacked samples from an extensive geographical area of the Arctic and Subarctic, there is a distinct Arctic haplotype that is the source of subspecies in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. Fucus distichus occupies a low tide zone habitat, and in Arctic/Subarctic regions it is adapted to the severe stress of sea ice coverage and disturbance during many months per year. We hypothesize that the very large geographic area of Arctic and Subarctic rocky shores available to this species during interglacials, supported by large Arctic/Subarctic fringe areas as well as unglaciated refugia during glacial cycles, provided a robust population and gene pool (described by the Thermogeographic Model). This gene pool dilutes that of the more fragmented and area-limited Temperate/Boreal area populations when they are brought together during glacial cycles. We suggest that similar subspecies complexes for a variety of Arctic/Subarctic shore biota should be examined further in this context, rather than arbitrarily being split up into numerous species.

  9. Evolution of the Northern Rockweed, Fucus distichus, in a Regime of Glacial Cycling: Implications for Benthic Algal Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Müller, Kirsten M.; Adey, Walter H.; Lara, Yannick; Young, Robert; Johnson, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely speciated in the North Atlantic and its tributary seas. Fucus distichus is likely near the ancestral member of this genus, and studies have shown that there are several species/subspecies in this complex (i.e. F. evanescens and F. gardneri). We used phylogenetic and haplotype analyses to test the phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of F. distichus. Our data and subsequent analyses demonstrate that, unlike previous studies that lacked samples from an extensive geographical area of the Arctic and Subarctic, there is a distinct Arctic haplotype that is the source of subspecies in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. Fucus distichus occupies a low tide zone habitat, and in Arctic/Subarctic regions it is adapted to the severe stress of sea ice coverage and disturbance during many months per year. We hypothesize that the very large geographic area of Arctic and Subarctic rocky shores available to this species during interglacials, supported by large Arctic/Subarctic fringe areas as well as unglaciated refugia during glacial cycles, provided a robust population and gene pool (described by the Thermogeographic Model). This gene pool dilutes that of the more fragmented and area-limited Temperate/Boreal area populations when they are brought together during glacial cycles. We suggest that similar subspecies complexes for a variety of Arctic/Subarctic shore biota should be examined further in this context, rather than arbitrarily being split up into numerous species. PMID:26630571

  10. Responses of the deep ocean carbonate system to carbon reorganization during the Last Glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Rae, James W. B.; Opdyke, Bradley N.; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2013-09-01

    We present new deep water carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) records, reconstructed using Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi B/Ca, for one core from Caribbean Basin (water depth = 3623 m, sill depth = 1.8 km) and three cores located at 2.3-4.3 km water depth from the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the Last Glacial-interglacial cycle. The pattern of deep water [CO32-] in the Caribbean Basin roughly mirrors that of atmospheric CO2, reflecting a dominant influence from preformed [CO32-] in the North Atlantic Ocean. Compared to the amplitude of ˜65 μmol/kg in the deep Caribbean Basin, deep water [CO32-] in the equatorial Pacific Ocean has varied by no more than ˜15 μmol/kg due to effective buffering of CaCO3 on deep-sea pH in the Pacific Ocean. Our results suggest little change in the global mean deep ocean [CO32-] between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Late Holocene. The three records from the Pacific Ocean show long-term increases in [CO32-] by ˜7 μmol/kg from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5c to mid MIS 3, consistent with the response of the deep ocean carbonate system to a decline in neritic carbonate production associated with ˜60 m drop in sea-level (the “coral-reef” hypothesis). Superimposed upon the long-term trend, deep water [CO32-] in the Pacific Ocean displays transient changes, which decouple with δ13C in the same cores, at the start and end of MIS 4. These changes in [CO32-] and δ13C are consistent with what would be expected from vertical nutrient fractionation and carbonate compensation. The observed ˜4 μmol/kg [CO32-] decline in the two Pacific cores at >3.4 km water depth from MIS 3 to the LGM indicate further strengthening of deep ocean stratification, which contributed to the final step of atmospheric CO2 drawdown during the last glaciation. The striking similarity between deep water [CO32-] and 230Th-normalized CaCO3 flux at two adjacent sites from the central equatorial Pacific Ocean provides convincing evidence that deep

  11. The modern and Last Glacial Maximum hydrological cycles of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Levant from a water isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Y.; Polissar, P. J.; Ayalon, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; deMenocal, P. B.; Broecker, W. S.

    2017-01-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation (δP) is one of the most widely used and informative terrestrial paleoclimate proxies. δP integrates a series of hydrological processes; therefore, any interpretation of paleohydrology using δP requires a thorough understanding and quantification of the full hydrological cycle. In this paper, we use modern data to analytically model the full isotopic hydrological cycle of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Southern Levant, including oceanic evaporation, distillation during transport and precipitation over land. This model allows us to determine the important factors controlling this system. The model results underscore the significance of the isotopic distillation process driven by the land-sea temperature gradient as a significant factor controlling the long-term average isotopic composition of precipitation across Israel. Based on the understanding of the processes that govern the modern system, we model the isotopic composition of precipitation from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using published data for speleothem oxygen isotopes in calcite, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in fluid inclusions and clumped isotope values from Soreq Cave and the isotopic composition of East Mediterranean planktonic foraminifera G. ruber. The data and model results indicate two plausible scenarios for the LGM that entail changes in the magnitude of distillation over Israel, in normalized humidity over the Mediterranean and possible shifts of the moisture trajectories over the Mediterranean. The results presented in the paper illustrate the importance of understanding the full local hydrological cycle when reconstructing and interpreting the isotopic composition of precipitation.

  12. Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Supply and Glacial Cycles: Long Time Series Studies of Crustal Thickness and Seafloor Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Han, S.; Aghaei, O.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial loading has been shown to modulate volcanic melt generation in subaerial systems, and recent studies suggest that eustatic sea level fluctuations induced by glacial cycles may influence mantle-melting regimes at mid-ocean ridges. Models predict temporal variation in crustal thickness, and seafloor topography, linked to sea level change. Recent studies of bathymetry as a proxy for crustal thickness show significant spectral energy at periodicities linked to Milankovitch cycles of 23, 41, and 100ka (Crowley et al., 2015; Tolstoy, M., 2015). In this study we investigate climate driven periodicity in mid-ocean ridge magma supply utilizing basement topography and crustal thickness data. We use multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data from two prior studies of the flanks of the Juan de Fuca (JdF) ridge, and 3D MCS data from the Northern East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9°37-57'N. The JdF datasets extend to crustal ages up to 8.78 Ma, and EPR data to ~180 ka. By performing spectral analysis on these data along with dO18 climate records from Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) for the last 5.32ma and Zachos et al. (2001) for earlier times we investigate intervals of similar periodicities in order to identify potential links between climate and magma supply to mid-ocean ridges. Further analysis is undertaken to determine whether depth to basement and crustal thickness are correlated within and across datasets, and whether significant spectral peaks occur in basement and crustal thickness data outside of known climate cycles. Initial results show significant spectral energy in basement depth at the 100ky cycle in the 0-1Ma time series, when eccentricity is understood to have the most impact. Long-term temporal variability is apparent in JdF data, with low relief abyssal hills (~70m on average) present 1-3.2Ma and 6-8.78Ma, but higher relief bathymetry (~200m) from 3.2-6Ma. These subsets align well with previously identified climatic subgroups (Zachos et al., 2001), correlating both

  13. South Pole ice stream temporal and spatial evolution in the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Cavitte, M. G.; Young, D. A.; Carter, S. P.; Gutowski, G.; Bingham, R. G.; Siegert, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    While considered to be the most stable part of the Antarctic continent, recent studies show East Antarctic ice sheet has a high potential for rapid change and significant sea level contribution. Airborne radar sounding has shown that major ice stream tributaries have disrupted ice at the South Pole, portraying a complex evolution for the East Antarctic ice sheet. We confirm the temporal and spatial extent of these flow regime changes through the analysis of dated internal layers observed using airborne sounding data. Layering is time-registered to the local dust record from ICE CUBE boreholes and the SPRESSO core, which constrains ice stream transient penetration between 50 ka and about 10 ka, corresponding to the last glacial maximum. The ice stream margin position has migrated through time, initially at 10 km grid north of the South Pole, and migrated to the grid south by 40km before shutting off. The active portion of the ice sheet has undergone significant melting, bringing ice from the MIS 5e interglacial very close to the bedrock with respect to the inactive portion to the grid north. Shear heating from the ice stream margin migration is consistent with subglacial lakes previously observed in the area (Peters et al, 2008). This ice stream is further evidence for a substantial, rapid sea level contribution from the deep interior of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

  14. Isotopic record of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles in pelagic carbonates: Revisiting historical data from the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    The glacial/interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene were first recognised by variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera from cores in the Caribbean Sea. Since this pioneering work by Emiliani, this proxy has been extensively applied to a variety of carbonate biominerals over the entirety of the Meso-Cenozoic. However, palaeoceanographic studies have overwhelmingly focused on foraminifera compared to other calcifying microorganism fossils, such as the coccoliths. In this study, I revisit coccolith stable isotopic data obtained from the classic P6304-4 core in light of recent developments in the biogeochemistry of coccolithophores. In particular, I show that the coccolith stable isotope record of the last 13 Marine Isotope Stages (∼480 kyrs) is significantly biased by large vital effects. The magnitude of coccolith carbon and oxygen isotope vital effects is not uniform, but shows remarkable co-variance with the Vostok CO2 ice record. During periods of relatively elevated CO2 (interstadials), the expression of the vital effect is relatively small, whereas it can as high as +3‰ for the oxygen isotopes during glacial stadials, which I argue is a result of enhanced CO2 limitation of coccolithophores. Using this paradigm, I propose that coccolithophore vital effects are not a complicating factor, but rather the signal of interest. As the magnitude of the coccolith vital effect is shown to scale with pCO2, coccolith carbon and oxygen isotopes may be used in conjunction with foraminifera data to reconstruct and refine aqueous CO2 concentrations in the past.

  15. Atmospheric gas records from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, reveal ancient ice with ages spanning the entire last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggenstos, Daniel; Bauska, Thomas K.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Lee, James E.; Schaefer, Hinrich; Buizert, Christo; Brook, Edward J.; Shackleton, Sarah; Petrenko, Vasilii V.

    2017-07-01

    Old ice for paleo-environmental studies, traditionally accessed through deep core drilling on domes and ridges on the large ice sheets, can also be retrieved at the surface from ice sheet margins and blue ice areas. The practically unlimited amount of ice available at these sites satisfies a need in the community for studies of trace components requiring large sample volumes. For margin sites to be useful as ancient ice archives, the ice stratigraphy needs to be understood and age models need to be established. We present measurements of trapped gases in ice from Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, to date the ice and assess the completeness of the stratigraphic section. Using δ18O of O2 and methane concentrations, we unambiguously identify ice from the last glacial cycle, covering every climate interval from the early Holocene to the penultimate interglacial. A high-resolution transect reveals the last deglaciation and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in detail. We observe large-scale deformation in the form of folding, but individual stratigraphic layers do not appear to have undergone irregular thinning. Rather, it appears that the entire LGM-deglaciation sequence has been transported from the interior of the ice sheet to the surface of Taylor Glacier relatively undisturbed. We present an age model that builds the foundation for gas studies on Taylor Glacier. A comparison with the Taylor Dome ice core confirms that the section we studied on Taylor Glacier is better suited for paleo-climate reconstructions of the LGM due to higher accumulation rates.

  16. Evidence for non-uniform uplift rates in southern Italy on glacial-cycle timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, F.; Ferranti, L.; Lambeck, K.; Verrubbi, V.

    2003-04-01

    Many studies of sea level change, with accurate positional measurements and precise datings have been published for Italy in the past decade. The use of markers whose formation positions are closely linked to mean sea level allows precise estimates to be made of local sea-level change. If the data is from tectonically active zones then these observations must be corrected for tectonic vertical movements. Examples include the records from Huon Penisula, Barbados and Tahiti. Often the corrections are based on a long term rates estimated from Quaternary data and in the best cases the last integlacial (~125 ka BP) shoreline is used as reference level. Uncertainties in these tectonic corrections may in some instances exceed the accuracy of the age-height measurements of the more recent shorelines. In the Mediterranean tectonically active coastlines occur in many locations, including Crete (Pirazzoli et al., 1982), southwest coast of Greece (Dia et al.,1997, Kershaw et al.,2002) and southern Italy (Miyauchi et al.,1994). Other coastal areas such as south eastern Spain (Zazo et al., 2001), Sardinia (Antonioli et al.,1999) and southern Latium (Hearty and Dai Prà, 1986) appear to be stable on the glacial timescales. We have obtained new Holocenic uplift rate for eastern Sicily and southern Calabria using Holocene and earlier interglacial observational data from Sicily (Taormina and St. Alessio Cape, Stewart et al., 1997, Antonioli et al., in print 2003) and Calabria (Scilla, Antonioli et al., submitted 2002, and Ioppolo, unpublished data) together with new models for the eustatic and glacio-hydro-isostatic contributions to Holocene sea level change where the latter have been calibrated against data from 30 sites in Italy (Lambeck et al.,submitted).For both regions of eastern Sicily and southern Calabria the Holocene uplift rates are greater than the long term average rates based on the position of the last (MIS 5.5) and earlier interglacial shorelines.

  17. Millennial-scale variations in western Sierra Nevada precipitation during the last glacial cycle MIS 4/3 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Jessica L.; Montañez, Isabel P.; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Sharp, Warren D.; Stock, Greg M.; Spero, Howard J.; Tinsley, John; Zachos, James C.

    2014-07-01

    Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles had far-reaching effects on Northern Hemisphere and tropical climate systems during the last glacial period, yet the climatic response to D-O cycles in western North America is controversial, especially prior to 55 ka. We document changes in precipitation along the western slope of the central Sierra Nevada during early Marine Oxygen Isotope Stages (MIS) 3 and 4 (55-67 ka) from a U-series dated speleothem record from McLean's Cave. The timing of our multi-proxy geochemical dataset is coeval with D-O interstadials (15-18) and stadials, including Heinrich Event 6. The McLean's Cave stalagmite indicates warmer and drier conditions during Greenland interstadials (GISs 15-18), signified by elevated δ18O, δ13C, reflectance, and trace element concentrations, and less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr. Our record extends evidence of a strong linkage between high-latitude warming and reduced precipitation in western North America to early MIS 3 and MIS 4. This record shows that the linkage persists in diverse global climate states, and documents the nature of the climatic response in central California to Heinrich Event 6.

  18. Colonization, succession, and extinction of marine floras during a glacial cycle: A case study from the Windmill Islands (east Antarctica) using biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Dominic A.; McMinn, Andrew; Kirkup, Helen; Cremer, Holger; Gore, Damian; Melles, Martin; Roberts, Donna; Montiel, Pedro

    2003-09-01

    With the exception of the diatoms, little is known of the extinction, colonization, and succession of marine floras during glacial cycles. Here we study both morphological and biochemical fossils in two sediment cores from the Antarctic to unravel the sequence of events over a single glacial cycle. The cores, from the nearshore continental shelf off the Windmill Islands (66°S, 110°E), east Antarctica, span the period from Marine Isotope Stage 3 or earlier to the present. New high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry methods were used to study fossil pigments with additional data from siliceous microfossils, lithological analyses, and radiocarbon dates. Results show two response processes. First, there is the large-scale impact of the expanding ice sheet in removing the flora from the inner shelf, primarily through the denial of light, destabilization of the substratum, and elimination of habitats. Second, there are a number of glacial climate interactions that have a surprisingly strong influence on recolonization and succession. These include sea ice extent and the proximity of the ice edge, the annual duration of open water, the stabilization of the substratum first by benthic diatoms and later by macrophyte algae, and relative sea level. A period of warmer climate in the mid-Holocene had a considerable influence on the composition and species diversity of the marine flora. These are the first data on the timing of colonization and succession of marine floras over a glacial cycle based on both morphological and biochemical fossils.

  19. Chronology of glaciations in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Iberia) during the Last Glacial Cycle based on in situ-produced 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Bourlès, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula preserve a valuable record of past glaciations that may help reconstruct past atmospheric circulation patterns in response to cooling events in the North Atlantic Ocean. Available chronologies for the glacial record of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are mainly based on radiocarbon and luminescence dating of glacial-related sediments, suggest that glaciers recorded their Glacial Maximum (GM) during MIS 3 and experienced a later Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) advance. This LGM extent is not established yet, preventing a fair correlation with available Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) based chronologies for the glacial record of the Pyrenees and the Sistema Central. We present a glacial reconstruction and a 10Be CRE chronology for the Porma valley, in the southern slope of the central Cantabrian Mountains. Glacial evidence at the lowest altitudes correspond to erratic boulders and composite moraines whose minimum 10Be CRE age of 113.9 ± 7.1 ka suggests that glaciers were at their maximum extent during MIS 5d, most likely in response to the minima in summertime insolation of the Last Glacial Cycle. Recessional moraines preserved within the glacial maximum limits allow the assessment of subsequent glacier advances or stagnations. The most remarkable advance took place prior to 55.7 ± 4.0 ka (probably at the end of MIS 4), consistently with minimum radiocarbon ages previously reported for lacustrine glacial-related deposits in the Cantabrian Mountains. A limited number of 10Be CRE ages from a composite moraine suggest a possible advance of the Porma glacier coeval with the global LGM; the glacier front attributed to the LGM would be placed within the margins of the previous GM like in the western Pyrenees. Erratic boulders perched on an ice-moulded bedrock surface provided a mean 10Be CRE age of 17.7 ± 1.0 ka, suggesting that part of the recessional moraine sequence corresponds to minor advances or stagnations of the glacier fronts

  20. The Search for Eight Glacial Cycles of Deep-Water Temperatures and Global ice Volume From the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, P.; Elderfield, H.; Greaves, M.; McCave, N.

    2007-12-01

    It has been recently suggested "a substantial portion of the marine 100-ky cycle that has been object of so much attention over the past quarter of a century is, in reality, a deep-water temperature signal and not an ice volume signal" (Shackleton, 2000). There are currently few records available of deep-water temperature variations during the Pleistocene and most of our understanding is inferred from the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of benthic foraminifera from deep-sea sediments. However, variations in benthic δ18O reflect some combination of local to regional changes in water mass properties (largely deep- water temperature) as well as global changes in seawater δ18O (δ18Osw) resulting from the growth and decay of continental ice. Recent studies suggest that benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca may be useful in reconstructing deep-water temperature changes, but the application of this method to benthic species has been hampered by a number of unresolved issues, such as uncertainties related to the calibration for benthic Mg at the coldest temperatures. Here we present deep-sea Mg/Ca and δ18O records for the past eight glacial cycles in benthic foraminiferal ( Uvigerina spp.) calcite from a marine sediment core recovered in the mid Southern latitudes. Ocean Drilling Program Site 1123 was retrieved from Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand in the Southwest Pacific Ocean (3290 m water depth). This site lies under the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) that flows into the Pacific Ocean, and is responsible for most of the deep water in that ocean; DWBC strength is directly related to processes occurring around Antarctica. Temperatures derived via pore fluid modeling of the last glacial maximum are available from Site 1123 and represent an important tool to constrain deep-water temperatures estimates using Mg/Ca. In selected time slices, we measured B/Ca ratios in Uvigerina in order to gain information on the deep-water carbonate saturation state and have data of Mg

  1. Constraints on transient fast flow at South Pole in the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavitte, M. G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Johnson, J. V.; Young, D. A.; Carter, S. P.; Gutowski, G.; Siegert, M. J.; Jackson, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Many parts of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet remain to be explored: in particular the South Pole region, where the lack of satellite data has limited our understanding of a key part of the East Antarctic interior. South Pole has been assumed to be a very stable part of the ice sheet, which drove the siting of the IceCube neutrino detection experiment. However, airborne radar data collected by UTIG between South Pole and the Trans-Antarctic Mountains has revealed a history of fast flow transients as evidenced from the disturbed radar layer record (Bingham et al, 2007). We further constrain the spatial and temporal extent of these perturbations in the ice sheet flow through the tracing and analysis of a set of extensive radar layers. This radio-stratigraphy has been age correlated with the IceCube dust age-depth record and the SPRESSO core timescale; vertical variations in age-depth across the South Pole region indicate enhanced flow at the height of the last glacial maximum, between 50 ka and 10 ka. Dating uncertainties are constrained for each radar layer as a function of the resolution of the radar system and the SNR of the layer record (Cavitte et al., in review). The South Pole radio-stratigraphy shows distinct ice stream margins with an asymmetry suggestive of a complex temporal evolution of the margins. Paleo accumulation rates reconstructed from the radar layers via 1D strain modeling show anomalous linear accumulation features, suggestive of localized enhanced melt rates, consistent with the presence of subglacial lakes in the area (Peters et al, 2008). The dynamic relationship between accumulation rates and melt rates due to ice streaming is used to reconstruct potential ice streaming velocities in the past. We numerically investigate a variety of ice stream geometries as well as the spatial migration of their margins through time, using a transverse 2D flow model, in which we compare and contrast discrete vs. continuous margin evolution, and hypothesize the

  2. Thermocline temperature variability in the Timor Strait over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, E.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2012-12-01

    *Lo Giudice Cappelli, E elgc@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Holbourn, A ah@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Kuhnt, W wk@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Regenberg, M regenberg@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Garbe- Schönberg, D dgs@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Seafloor temperature variations within the path of the Indonesian Throughflow are mainly influenced by the intensity of the cool throughflow and by glacial-interglacial sea-level changes. We present a study based on core 18471 (9°21.987' S, 129°58.983' E, 485m water depth, 13.5m long) and 30 core tops retrieved in the Timor Sea during the R/V Sonne Cruise 185 ("VITAL"). Multicorer core tops were retrieved along two transects between 130 and 2400m water depths, representing a range of present day bottom water temperatures between 2 and 21°C. For the downcore study, we measured Mg/Ca-ratios in ~10 tests of the benthic foraminifera Hoeglundina elegans, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Hyalinea balthica in 10cm intervals (1-2kyr time resolution). The preservation of tests was checked with a scanning electron microscope. Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and H. balthica were used in one interval, where H. elegans was rare. Duplicate samples were analyzed to inter-calibrate the three species. Mg/Ca ratios were converted into temperature using published calibrations and our regional calibration based on Timor Sea core tops. Preliminary results show that Mg/Ca ratios in H. elegans vary between 0.8 and 2.2mmol mol-1 corresponding to a temperature range between 4 and 10.5°C, in contrast to a modern annual average temperature of 7.9°C at 400m. 22-paired analyses in H. elegans give a reproducibility of 0.16mmol mol-1 (standard deviation

  3. Penultimate and last glacial cycles in the western Bering Sea: evidence from micropaleontological and sedimentary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Elena; Murdmaa, Ivar

    2014-05-01

    The short- and long-term variability of sea-surface bioproductivity, intermediate-water oxygenation, sea ice conditions and bottom current velocities are inferred from the high-resolution multi-proxy study based on benthic (BF) and planktonic (PF) foraminiferal assemblages and sedimentary record of the 18m-long Core SO201-2-85KL (western Bering Sea). Early MIS 6 is characterized by a very low seasonal bioproductivity, moderate bottom-water oxygenation, and expanded seasonal sea ice conditions, as documented by the abundant phytodetritus species Alabaminella weddelensis, Islandiella norcrossi and Epistominella arctica, suboxic group of BF, and high accumulation rates of gravel grains, respectively. Middle MIS 6 is represented by intercalation of green diatomaceous ooze and grey clayey silt layers with sharp peaks of BF abundance in green interbeds. These spikes might result either from short-term events of enhanced sea surface bioproductivity or from lateral BF transport by intensified bottom currents, as it is demonstrated by high-amplitude variations of the clay/silt ratio. Rather high seasonal productivity and northward migration of the sea ice margin are reconstructed for the late MIS 6 that is also characterized by a slight increase in the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. Strong dissolution of calcareous microfossils is revealed for MIS 5.5-5.1 when the Bering Strait was open. Dissolution might be caused by an excess of carbon dioxide in the bottom-water due to an abundant organic matter decay and/or to an influence of the old CO2-rich deep water. MIS 4 - early Termination I is characterized by a dominance of glacial benthic foraminiferal assemblages that implies low bioproductivity conditions. A prevalence of suboxic BF group suggests moderate bottom-water oxygenation. Sea ice rafting occurred in the western Bering Sea during MIS 4 - early Termination I but the drifted ice was not so dense as during MIS 6. The well-known productivity spikes at B

  4. Understanding past climatic and hydrological variability in the Mediterranean from Lake Prespa sediment isotope and geochemical record over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bernd; Boehm, Anne; Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos; Vane, Christopher H.; Snelling, Andrea; Haidon, Cheryl; Woodley, Ewan; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Gianni; Baneschi, Ilaria

    2013-04-01

    Here we present stable isotope and geochemical data from Lake Prespa (Macedonia/Albania border) over the Last Glacial cycle (Marine Isotope Stages 5-1) and discuss past lake hydrology and climate (TIC, oxygen and carbon isotopes), as well as responses to climate of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation (TOC, Rock Eval pyrolysis, carbon isotopes, pollen). The Lake Prespa sediments broadly fall into 5 zones based on their sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology and the existing chronology. The Glacial sediments suggest low supply of carbon to the lake, but high summer productivity; intermittent siderite layers suggest that although the lake was likely to have mixed regularly leading to enhanced oxidation of organic matter, there must have been within sediment reducing conditions and methanogenesis. MIS 5 and 1 sediments suggest much more productivity, higher rates of organic material preservation possibly due to more limited mixing with longer periods of oxygen-depleted bottom waters. We also calculated lakewater δ18O from siderite (authigenic/Glacial) and calcite (endogenic/Holocene) and show much lower lakewater δ18O values in the Glacial when compared to the Holocene, suggesting the lake was less evaporative in the Glacial, probably as a consequence of cooler summers and longer winter ice cover. In the Holocene the oxygen isotope data suggests general humidity, with just 2 marked arid phases, features observed in other Eastern and Central Mediterranean lakes.

  5. Extreme events from hundreds years to glacial cycle: insights from Quaternary terraces across the Taiwan mountain belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Chan, Y. C.; Chang, Q. M.; Siame, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Based on different age determinations on Quaternary fluvial terraces distributed across the Taiwan mountain belt, we provide insights on possible and intriguing extreme events, tectonic and/or climate, at different time scales from hundreds years to glacial cycles (i.e., hundreds of thousands years). First in the foreland foothills of western Taiwan, based on Be10 cosmogenic and C14 dating the Puakua tableland reveals a recurrent time of about 100-120 Ka of terrace deposits, which are characterized by 4-5 levels of lateritic terraces, with a long-term uplift rate of 1.5-2 mm/yr in the last 450 Ka. Secondly in the eastern Central Range of the Hsinwulyu River, based on linear tilting model and GPS short-term geodetic rate, it exhibits 8-10 levels of recurrent river terrace deposits occurred about every 5 thousands years in the past 50 Ka or so, under a regional uplift rate of 2-8 mm/yr. Finally in the Longitudinal Valley, a plate suture between the rapid moving Philippine Sea plate and the stable Eurasian plate, based on the C14 dating and abundant geodetic data, including leveling, GPS and creep meter, we infer a recurrent time of about 400-600 years for 8-10 levels of uplifted fluvial terraces on the hanging wall of the Longitudinal Valley fault with an uplift rate of 2-3 cm/yr during the past 5-6 Ka. It is still too early to draw any conclusion on scientific explanations for these three types of possible extreme events at a recurrent time of 0.5 ka, 5 ka and 11 ka, respectively. However, possible scenario and causative mechanisms might be anticipated, for instance the global climate influence such as glacial cycle, or regional tectonic effect such as cluster of mega earthquakes in different areas of the Taiwan mountain belt. On the other hand, comparing the terraces in the three different geological/tectonic setting, we found that the recurrent time of terrace deposits shows an inverse proportional relationship to the uplift rate in the local areas, which requires

  6. Orbital-scale El Niño/Southern Oscillation-Like Variability During the Last Glacial-Interglacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Oba, T.; Shimamune, J.; Ueshima, T.

    2003-12-01

    How have the changes in the Earth's orbit have driven glacial-interglacial climate changes? Recently, a new hypothesis has been proposed that the tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere interactions have a strong influence on global climate changes on an orbital timescale (Cane, 1998; Clement et al., 1999; Lea et al., 2000). Nevertheless, the orbital-scale changes in the tropical interactions are less clear, and their impacts on a global climate have not yet been proven. Our study was aimed at understanding whether or not and how the long-term tropical El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-like variability has a global impact on orbital-scale climate changes. We generated continuous records of the alkenone sea surface temperature (SST) at the western and eastern margins of the mid-latitude North Pacific (MD012421 and ODP1014) during the last 145,000 years. We found that the difference between the SSTs of the NE and NW Pacific margins (Δ SST) reflected an orbital-controlled ENSO-like variability, and the Δ SST can be used as an indication of the long-term ENSO. The variation of Δ SST was large and pronounced at the 23-kyr cycle during 0-60 ka (MIS-1 to MIS-3) and 120-145 ka (MIS-5e to MIS-6), which agreed well with the long-term ENSO behavior predicted by the Zebiak-Cane ENSO model (Clement et al., 1999), as regards both the timing and frequency. In contrast, the variation was relatively small and pronounced at the 41-kyr cycle during 60-120 ka (MIS-4 to MIS-5d), which disagreed with the model prediction. Our observation also demonstrated that a strongly El Niño-like SST pattern prevailed in the mid-latitude North Pacific during the last two deglaciations. The synchronous warming of the Antarctica (Petit et al., 1999) and the tropical Pacific (Lea, 2000; Koutavas et al., 2002; Visser et al., 2003) prevailed within these strongly El Niño-like intervals during deglaciations. These findings are concordant with Cane (1998)'s hypothesis that a long-term El Niño must have

  7. Comment on "Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust".

    PubMed

    Goff, John A

    2015-09-04

    Crowley et al. (Reports, 13 March 2015, p. 1237) propose that abyssal hill topography can be generated by variations in volcanism at mid-ocean ridges modulated by Milankovitch cycle-driven changes in sea level. Published values for abyssal hill characteristic widths versus spreading rate do not generally support this hypothesis. I argue that abyssal hills are primarily fault-generated rather than volcanically generated features.

  8. Mode change of millennial CO2 variability during the last glacial cycle associated with a bipolar marine carbon seesaw.

    PubMed

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Lüthi, Dieter; Siegrist, Michael; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F; Fischer, Hubertus

    2012-06-19

    Important elements of natural climate variations during the last ice age are abrupt temperature increases over Greenland and related warming and cooling periods over Antarctica. Records from Antarctic ice cores have shown that the global carbon cycle also plays a role in these changes. The available data shows that atmospheric CO(2) follows closely temperatures reconstructed from Antarctic ice cores during these variations. Here, we present new high-resolution CO(2) data from Antarctic ice cores, which cover the period between 115,000 and 38,000 y before present. Our measurements show that also smaller Antarctic warming events have an imprint in CO(2) concentrations. Moreover, they indicate that during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, the peak of millennial CO(2) variations lags the onset of Dansgaard/Oeschger warmings by 250 ± 190 y. During MIS 3, this lag increases significantly to 870 ± 90 y. Considerations of the ocean circulation suggest that the millennial variability associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) undergoes a mode change from MIS 5 to MIS 4 and 3. Ocean carbon inventory estimates imply that during MIS 3 additional carbon is derived from an extended mass of carbon-enriched Antarctic Bottom Water. The absence of such a carbon-enriched water mass in the North Atlantic during MIS 5 can explain the smaller amount of carbon released to the atmosphere after the Antarctic temperature maximum and, hence, the shorter lag. Our new data provides further constraints for transient coupled carbon cycle-climate simulations during the entire last glacial cycle.

  9. Mode change of millennial CO2 variability during the last glacial cycle associated with a bipolar marine carbon seesaw

    PubMed Central

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Lüthi, Dieter; Siegrist, Michael; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2012-01-01

    Important elements of natural climate variations during the last ice age are abrupt temperature increases over Greenland and related warming and cooling periods over Antarctica. Records from Antarctic ice cores have shown that the global carbon cycle also plays a role in these changes. The available data shows that atmospheric CO2 follows closely temperatures reconstructed from Antarctic ice cores during these variations. Here, we present new high-resolution CO2 data from Antarctic ice cores, which cover the period between 115,000 and 38,000 y before present. Our measurements show that also smaller Antarctic warming events have an imprint in CO2 concentrations. Moreover, they indicate that during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, the peak of millennial CO2 variations lags the onset of Dansgaard/Oeschger warmings by 250 ± 190 y. During MIS 3, this lag increases significantly to 870 ± 90 y. Considerations of the ocean circulation suggest that the millennial variability associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) undergoes a mode change from MIS 5 to MIS 4 and 3. Ocean carbon inventory estimates imply that during MIS 3 additional carbon is derived from an extended mass of carbon-enriched Antarctic Bottom Water. The absence of such a carbon-enriched water mass in the North Atlantic during MIS 5 can explain the smaller amount of carbon released to the atmosphere after the Antarctic temperature maximum and, hence, the shorter lag. Our new data provides further constraints for transient coupled carbon cycle-climate simulations during the entire last glacial cycle. PMID:22675123

  10. The rock magnetic characteristics of last glacial cycle loess from the island of Susak (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, Ulrich; Duchoslav, Maguerita; Rolf, Christian; Wacha, Lara; Frechen, Manfred; Galovic, Lidija

    2010-05-01

    palaeosols occur at 3 and 5.5 metre depth and two macroscopically visible volcanic tephra layers are intercalated in the upper part of the section. At present, we assume that the sequence represents the entire last glacial cycle (11-130 kyr). The concentration dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. magnetic low field susceptibility, SIRM) do not at all resemble the lithology. Volume susceptibility in unaltered loess exceeds even 1*10-3 SI which is at least 3 times higher compared to loess from the middle Danube basin only a few hundreds of kilometres to the East (Markovic et al. 2009). Grain size dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility, S-ratio, etc.) reveal the relative enhancement of superparamagnetic particles and the formation of high-coercivity minerals in the pedogenetically altered horizons. However, in general the magnetic signal seems to be controlled by the primarily detrital minerals and climatically governed relatively weak alterations occur only in the macroscopically visible pedohorizons. During the last glacial cycle, the sea level of the Adriatic Sea was lowered by several decametres at least. As a consequence, the alluvial plain of the Po River extended far to the Southeast and provided the sand and silt which were blown to the shallow mountain ranges forming today the islands of the Dalmatian archipelago (Cremaschi 1990). Pleistocene and recent floodplain deposits of the Po River in North Italy contain large amounts of heavy minerals from the metamorphic series of the Central Alps. This detritus may control the magnetic properties of the aeolian deposits on the island of Susak. Further petrographical and mineral magnetic studies are necessary to prove our hypothesis.

  11. Delayed CO2 emissions from mid-ocean ridge volcanism as a possible cause of late-Pleistocene glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H.

    2017-01-01

    The coupled 100,000 year variations in ice volume, temperature, and atmospheric CO2 during the late Pleistocene are generally considered to arise from a combination of orbital forcing, ice dynamics, and ocean circulation. Also previously argued is that changes in glaciation influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations through modifying subaerial volcanic eruptions and CO2 emissions. Building on recent evidence that ocean ridge volcanism responds to changes in sea level, here it is suggested that ocean ridges may play an important role in generating late-Pleistocene 100 ky glacial cycles. If all volcanic CO2 emissions responded immediately to changes in pressure, subaerial and ocean-ridge volcanic emissions anomalies would oppose one another. At ocean ridges, however, the egress of CO2 from the mantle is likely to be delayed by tens-of-thousands of years, or longer, owing to ascent time. A simple model involving temperature, ice, and CO2 is presented that oscillates at ∼100 ky time scales when incorporating a delayed CO2 contribution from ocean ridge volcanism, even if the feedback accounts for only a small fraction of total changes in CO2. Oscillations readily become phase-locked with insolation forcing associated with changes in Earth's orbit. Under certain parameterizations, a transition from ∼40 ky to larger ∼100 ky oscillations occurs during the middle Pleistocene in response to modulations in orbital forcing. This novel description of Pleistocene glaciation should be testable through ongoing advances in understanding the circulation of carbon through the solid earth.

  12. Insolation forcing of coccolithophore productivity in the western tropical Indian Ocean over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangunan, Deborah; Baumann, Karl-Heinz; Pätzold, Jürgen; Henrich, Rüdiger; Kucera, Michal; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Groeneveld, Jeroen

    2017-07-01

    We present a new coccolithophore productivity reconstruction spanning the last 300 ka in core GeoB12613-1 retrieved from the western tropical Indian Ocean (IO), an area that mainly derives its warm and oligotrophic surface waters from the eastern IO. Application of a calibrated assemblage-based productivity index indicates a reduction in estimated primary productivity (EPP) from 300 ka to the present, with reconstructed EPP values ranging from 91 to 246 g C/m2/yr. Coccolithophore assemblages and coccolith fraction Sr/Ca indicate three main phases of productivity change, with major changes at 160 and 46 ka. The productivity and water-column stratification records show both dominant precession and obliquity periodicities, which appear to control the paleoproductivity in the study area over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles. Shallowing of the thermocline due to strengthening of the trade winds in response to insolation maxima resulted to peaks in EPP. Comparison with the eastern IO productivity and stratification coccolithophore data reveals good correspondence with our records, indicating a strong tropical Pacific influence in our study area. Both of these records show high productivity from 300 to 160 ka, interpreted to be due to stronger Walker Circulation while the declining productivity from 160 ka to the present day is a consequence of its weakening intensity.

  13. A loess-paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles (~140 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Fosberg, Maynard A.; Mahan, Shannon; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Licciardi, Joseph M.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2011-01-01

    Loess accumulated on a Bull Lake outwash terrace of Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6) age in southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The 9 m section displays eight intervals of loess deposition (Loess 1 to Loess 8, oldest), each followed by soil development. Our age-depth model is constrained by thermoluminescence, meteoric Be-10 accumulation in soils, and cosmogenic Be-10 surface exposure ages. We use particle size, geochemical, mineral-magnetic, and clay mineralogical data to interpret loess sources and pedogenesis. Deposition of MIS 6 loess was followed by a tripartite soil/thin loess complex (Soils 8,7, and 6) apparently reflecting the large climatic oscillations of MIS 5. Soil 8 (MIS 5e) shows the strongest development. Loess 5 accumulated during a glacial interval (similar to 76-69 ka; MIS 4) followed by soil development under conditions wetter and probably colder than present. Deposition of thick Loess 3 (similar to 43-51 ka, MIS 3) was followed by soil development comparable with that observed in Soil 1. Loess 1 (MIS 2) accumulated during the Pinedale glaciation and was followed by development of Soil 1 under a semiarid climate. This record of alternating loess deposition and soil development is compatible with the history of Yellowstone vegetation and the glacial flour record from the Sierra Nevada. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of University of Washington.

  14. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  15. The Taimyr Peninsula and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, Arctic Russia: a synthesis of glacial history and palaeo-environmental change during the Last Glacial cycle (MIS 5e-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Alexanderson, Helena; Funder, Svend; Hjort, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We here suggest a glacial and climate history of the Taimyr Peninsula and Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in arctic Siberia for the last about 150 000 years (ka). Primarily it is based on results from seven field seasons between 1996 and 2012, to a large extent already published in papers referred to in the text - and on data presented by Russian workers from the 1930s to our days and by German colleagues working there since the 1990s. Although glaciations even up here often started in the local mountains, their culminations in this region invariably seems to have centred on the shallow Kara Sea continental shelf - most likely due to expanding marine ice-shelves grounding there, as a combined effect of thickening ice and eustatically lowered sea-levels. The most extensive glaciation so far identified in this region (named the Taz glaciation) took place during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6), i.e. being an equivalent to the late Saale/Illinoian glaciations. It reached c. 400 km southeast of the Kara Sea coast, across and well beyond the Byrranga Mountain range and ended c. 130 ka. It was followed by the MIS 5e (Karginsky/Eemian) interglacial, with an extensive marine transgression to 140 m above present sea level - facilitated by strong isostatic downloading during the preceding glaciation. During the latest (Zyryankan/Weichselian/Wisconsinan) glacial cycle followed a series of major glacial advances. The earliest and most extensive, culminating c. 110-100 ka (MIS 5d-5e), also reached south of the Byrranga mountains and its post-glacial marine limit there was c. 100 m a.s.l. The later glacial phases (around 70-60 ka and 20 ka) terminated at the North Taimyr Ice Marginal Zone (NTZ), along or some distance inland from the present northwest coast of Taimyr. They dammed glacial lakes, which caused the Taimyr River to flow southwards where to-day it flows northwards into the Kara Sea. The c. 20 ka glacial phase, contemporary with the maximum (LGM) glaciation in NW Europe

  16. Climate, pCO2 and terrestrial carbon cycle linkages during late Palaeozoic glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montañez, Isabel P.; McElwain, Jennifer C.; Poulsen, Christopher J.; White, Joseph D.; Dimichele, William A.; Wilson, Jonathan P.; Griggs, Galen; Hren, Michael T.

    2016-11-01

    Earth's last icehouse, 300 million years ago, is considered the longest-lived and most acute of the past half-billion years, characterized by expansive continental ice sheets and possibly tropical low-elevation glaciation. This atypical climate has long been attributed to anomalous radiative forcing promoted by a 3% lower incident solar luminosity and sustained low atmospheric pCO2 (<=300 ppm). Climate models, however, indicate a CO2 sensitivity of ice-sheet distribution and sea-level response that questions this long-standing climate paradigm by revealing major discrepancy between hypothesized ice distribution, pCO2, and geologic records of glacioeustasy. Here we present a high-resolution record of atmospheric pCO2 for 16 million years of the late Palaeozoic, developed using soil carbonate-based and fossil leaf-based proxies, that resolves the climate conundrum. Palaeo-fluctuations on the 105-yr scale occur within the CO2 range predicted for anthropogenic change and co-vary with substantial change in sea level and ice volume. We further document coincidence between pCO2 changes and repeated restructuring of Euramerican tropical forests that, in conjunction with modelled vegetation shifts, indicate a more dynamic carbon sequestration history than previously considered and a major role for terrestrial vegetation-CO2 feedbacks in driving eccentricity-scale climate cycles of the late Palaeozoic icehouse.

  17. The effect of sediment loading in Fennoscandia and the Barents Sea during the last glacial cycle on glacial isostatic adjustment observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; IJpelaar, Thijs

    2017-09-01

    Models for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) routinely include the effects of meltwater redistribution and changes in topography and coastlines. Since the sediment transport related to the dynamics of ice sheets may be comparable to that of sea level rise in terms of surface pressure, the loading effect of sediment deposition could cause measurable ongoing viscous readjustment. Here, we study the loading effect of glacially induced sediment redistribution (GISR) related to the Weichselian ice sheet in Fennoscandia and the Barents Sea. The surface loading effect and its effect on the gravitational potential is modeled by including changes in sediment thickness in the sea level equation following the method of Dalca et al. (2013). Sediment displacement estimates are estimated in two different ways: (i) from a compilation of studies on local features (trough mouth fans, large-scale failures, and basin flux) and (ii) from output of a coupled ice-sediment model. To account for uncertainty in Earth's rheology, three viscosity profiles are used. It is found that sediment transport can lead to changes in relative sea level of up to 2 m in the last 6000 years and larger effects occurring earlier in the deglaciation. This magnitude is below the error level of most of the relative sea level data because those data are sparse and errors increase with length of time before present. The effect on present-day uplift rates reaches a few tenths of millimeters per year in large parts of Norway and Sweden, which is around the measurement error of long-term GNSS (global navigation satellite system) monitoring networks. The maximum effect on present-day gravity rates as measured by the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission is up to tenths of microgal per year, which is larger than the measurement error but below other error sources. Since GISR causes systematic uplift in most of mainland Scandinavia, including GISR in GIA models would improve the

  18. Glacial landscape evolution — Implications for glacial processes, patterns and reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Swift, Darrel A.

    2008-05-01

    This special issue presents a collection of papers that address a wide range of important challenges and exciting advances in the field of glacial landscape evolution. Primarily, these papers reflect persistent uncertainty that surrounds the mechanisms and timescales of glacial landscape evolution. For example, estimates of the duration of glacial occupancy required for the evolution of characteristic glacial valley forms from previously fluvial landscapes range from 100 kyrs for landscapes beneath large ice sheets (Jamieson et al.) to ~ 400-600 kyrs for glaciated alpine terrains (Brook et al.). Further, the mechanisms of glacial erosion are debated through analyses of the importance of ice thickness (Brocklehurst et al.; van der Beek and Bourbon), ice surface steepness (Vieira) and, in the case of large ice sheets, the co-evolution of ice sheet thermal regime, dynamics, and subglacial topography (Kleman et al.; Swift et al.). Debate concerning the potential climatic impacts of landscape evolution in alpine terrains is represented by van der Beek and Bourbon, who infer a significant increase in relief as a direct result of glacial erosion, and by Brocklehurst et al. and Heimsath and McGlynn, who demonstrate respectively that glacial relief production can be surprisingly modest and that rates of glacial erosion may be lower than those for fluvial incision. Further confirmation that valleys beneath large ice sheets evolve through selective linear erosion comes from studies that have combined geomorphological evidence with cosmogenic nuclide (Briner et al.) and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (Swift et al.), and the resulting style of landscape evolution is demonstrated by the antiquity of fjords in East Greenland (Swift et al.) and of deep erosion zones and thick drift covered zones in Fennoscandia (Kleman et al.), although the location of areal scouring zones may be subject to major alteration during single glacial events (Kleman et al.). Another set of papers

  19. Aerosol deposited in East Antarctica over the last glacial cycle: Detailed apportionment of continental and sea-salt contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigler, Matthias; RöThlisberger, Regine; Lambert, Fabrice; Stocker, Thomas F.; Wagenbach, Dietmar

    2006-04-01

    The major ions, sodium (Na+), calcium (Ca2+), and chloride (Cl-), deposited in central Antarctica and preserved in ice cores originate from both marine and continental sources. They provide important proxy records, helping to reconstruct past climatic processes. However, it is difficult to clearly separate the individual contributions from the two sources, particularly the continental one during glacial periods. On the basis of Na+ and Ca2+ records at an unprecedented resolution from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C ice core back to the penultimate glacial period, mean ion mass ratios were deduced for the continental and the sea-salt aerosol body over East Antarctica. The sea-salt ion mass ratios are in the range predicted for both wind-induced bubble bursting of breaking waves on the open ocean and sea ice brine-derived aerosols, respectively, thus allowing no clear decision on the contribution of sea ice to the central Antarctic sea-salt aerosol. The continental ion mass ratios point to a substantial contribution by halide aerosols, which is in agreement with the source properties in southern South America, although these ratios do not rule out the continental shelf exposed during glacial stages as an additional source. While during cold glacial periods continental sources accounted for more than 90% of the total Ca2+ input, this contribution was highly variable during the remaining glacial periods covarying with the Antarctic warm events. During the Holocene it was less than 50%, but it was significantly higher during the last interglacial period. The sea-salt aerosol contribution to the total Na+ input, which was mostly dominant and higher than 90%, was reduced to only two thirds during the last two glacial maxima and the period around 60 ka. Thus the glacial continental Na+ contribution appears to be more important than previously assumed, implying that Na+ records not corrected for continental Na+ do not represent a pure marine

  20. Delayed CO2 emissions from mid-ocean ridge volcanism as a possible cause of late-Pleistocene glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    The coupled variations in ice volume, temperature, and atmospheric CO2 during the late Pleistocene are most often represented as involving some combination of orbital forcing, ice dynamics, and ocean circulation. Also previously argued is that changes in glaciation influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations through modifying subaerial volcanic eruptions and CO2 emissions. Building on recent evidence that ocean ridge volcanism responds to changes in sea level, a conceptual model is presented wherein ocean ridges play an important role in generating late-Pleistocene 100 ky glacial cycles on account of an inherent delay in their feedback response. If all volcanic CO2 emissions responded immediately to changes in pressure, subaerial and ocean-ridge volcanic emissions anomalies would merely oppose one another. At ocean ridges, however, the egress of CO2 from the mantle is delayed by tens-of-thousands of years, or longer, owing to ascent time. The simple model involves temperature, ice, and CO2 and is shown to oscillates at 100 ky time scales when incorporating a delayed CO2 contribution from ocean ridge volcanism, even if the feedback accounts for only a small fraction of total changes in CO2. Features of the model that are consistent with observations include that it readily become phase-locked with insolation forcing associated with changes in Earth's orbit, and that temperature variations lead changes in CO2 by several centuries during deglaciation. Under certain parameterizations, a transition from 41 ky to larger 100 ky oscillations occurs during the middle Pleistocene in response to modulations in orbital forcing. This novel description of Pleistocene glaciation should be testable through ongoing advances in understanding the circulation of carbon through the solid earth.

  1. Impact of the Last Glacial Cycle on Common-Era temperature and energy reconstructions from terrestrial borehole temperatures in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; Matharoo, G. S.; Tarasov, L.; Rath, V.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstructions of past climatic changes from borehole temperature profiles areimportant independent estimates of temperature histories over the lastmillennium. There remain, however, multiple uncertainties in theinterpretation of these data as climatic indicators and as estimates of thechanges in heat content of the continental subsurface due to long-termclimatic change. One of these uncertainties is associated with the oftenignored impact of the last glacial cycle on the subsurface energy content, andthe estimate of the background quasi steady-state signal associated withthe diffusion of accretionary energy from the Earth's interior. Here we providethe first quantification of the impact of the Laurentide ice sheeton energy and surface temperature reconstructions during the Common Era from measurements ofterrestrial borehole temperatures in North America. We use basal temperaturevalues from the data-calibrated Memorial University of Newfoundland GlacialSystems Model to quantify the extent of the perturbation tosteady-state temperature profiles and to derive spatial maps of the expectedimpacts on measured profiles over North America. Furthermore, we presentquantitative estimates of the potential effects of temperature changes duringthe last glacial cycle on Common-Era surface temperature reconstructions for North America. The range of these possible impacts areestimated using synthetic basal temperatures for a period covering 120 ka tothe present day that include the basal temperature history uncertainties froman ensemble of results from the calibrated numerical model. For all thelocations, we find that within the depth ranges that are typical for availableboreholes used to estimate surface temperature changes during the Common era (~600 m), the induced perturbations to the steady-state temperature profile are on the order of 10 mW/m2, decreasingwith greater depths. Results indicate that site-specific heat content estimatesover North America can differ by as much

  2. Interglacial-glacial cycles recorded in the deposit sequence at Kruzhyky on the Dniester River (East Carpathian Foreland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łanczont, Maria; Boguckyj, Aandrij; Mroczek, Przemysław; Zieliński, Paweł; Jacyszyn, Andrij; Pidek, Agnieszka I.; Urban, Danuta; Kulesza, Piotr; Hołub, Beata

    2010-01-01

    of sands with horizontal stratification and silts with horizontal or flaser lamination; single small-scale lithofacies of sands with trough cross-stratification occur in places; single gravel grains are numerous. Two deformation horizons are found: the higher one is characterized by the occurrence of folds and flexure deflections, and the lower one-involution structures and casts of ice wedges/fissures. This complex is probably the result of deposition on the distal part of flat, periodically inundated fluvioglacial fan connected with advancing ice sheet. 4. Ablation complex-sandy or sandy-silty diamicton occurring as isolated inserts, lenses or tongues. Its lower boundary is sharp, erosional and uneven (concave). This complex represents flows of supraglacial tills, which strongly deformed the deposits of the underlying complex 3. 5. Aeolian complex-silty (loess) and sandy-silty (Table 1) deposits with distinct traces of intensive, postsedimentary alterations of pedogenesis of different ages (Tables 1 and 2). It is composed of two soil units separated by thin, primary loess layer: a) older, well-developed paleosol with several pedofeatures very typical of the Sokal (Mazovian) soil; b) younger unit developed as pedocomplex consisting of two mature soils, the upper of which ("modern" neosol) is formed in the top of relict and exhumed paleosol. The described paleosols should be recognized as at least two soils of different ages and of interglacial rank, developed in periglacial loess-like deposits. The Kruzhyky profile is unique in the Dniester River valley. On account of its situation, it supplements the former information about the terrace 5 structure, which has been determined in detail in the Halyč site. And what is most important, it is the only site on the terrace 5 where glacial deposits were found. Lithofacial analysis carried out in the profile enables us to reconstruct the following events reflecting interglacial-glacial cycles: 1. The lowest, gravelly

  3. Reconstructing paleo-ocean silicon chemistry and ecology during Last Glacial Maximum, a biogeochemical cycle modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been established by a number of investigators that opal content and Si-C isotope studies in the marine sediments reveal information about paleooceanography and the impact on silicic acid utilization by marine autotrophes (diatoms, silicoflagellates) and heterotrophes (radiolarians) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Opal, as an amorphous form of SiO2, formed by marine Si-secreting organisms, has been used as a proxy to indicate chemical ocean evolution, paleoproductivity and temperature variations in the paleoenvironment and regional ocean water biogeochemical studies, both on million- and thousand-year scales. Here, we are using a model of the global silicon biogeochemical cycle to understand and reconstruct evolutionary history of the paleobiogeochemical cycle and paleoenvironment since LGM. The model is process-driven, temperature-driven, and land-ocean-sediment coupled with specific marine Si-secreting organisms that represent different trophic levels and physiological mechanisms. Specifically, Si utilization by marine silicoflagellates and radiolarians are each about 5% of that of ubiquitous marine diatoms. Available marine reactive Si is controlled by variation of diatom bioproduction that represents 5% of the total marine primary productivity (Si/C Redfield ratio in the marine organic matter is ~0.13, which is an order of magnitude higher than ratio in land organic matter). River input of Si is controlled by chemical weathering of silicate rocks and biocyling of land plant phytoliths. Decreasing dissolved and particulate Si input from land and less favorable climatic condition into LGM diminished the primary production of marine diatoms. However, because radiolarians favor deep-water habitat, where a higher level of DSi is found and that is less affected by temperature changes, a peak of relative abundance is usually observed in sedimentary record during LGM. Given that opal formation fractionated seawater δ30Si (1‰) and enriched seawater with

  4. Intergrating Numerical Modeling and Field Observations with GIS to Determine the Paleotopography of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet Through the Last Glacial Cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napieralski, J. A.; Hubbard, A.; Harbor, J.; Stroeven, A. P.

    2003-12-01

    Major limitations in the successful use of ice sheet models for climate research arise from limited field data for model calibration. The end results may be unrealistic simulations of ice sheet inception, growth, and decay. There is, however, an abundance of empirical data in Fennoscandia that can be used to verify and refine a model of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) through the last glacial cycle. A high resolution, three-dimensional, thermomechanical model is being used to simulate the FIS through a glacial cycle while field evidence, such as end moraines, ice flow characteristics (e.g., flow orientation and magnitude), and cosmogenic dates, will be compiled into a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database and used to verify the model results. Modeled simulations for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and 1,000 year time slices are being statistically compared against field observations (digitized maps from prior research) using an iterative process in order to determine the "goodness of fit". The end results will be FIS reconfiguration maps illustrating the paleotopography and dynamics of the FIS during the inception, growth, and decay. As a result, the ice dynamics under which the geomorphic landforms were formed will be suggested, as well as a new reconstruction of the timing and dynamics of the advance of the FIS.

  5. Sediment from the Last Two Glacial Periods Amalgamated and Re-Entrained in the Alluvial Piedmont of the North Tian Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, L. C.; Avouac, J. P.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Prancevic, J.; Pan, J.; Chevalier, M. L.; Saint-Carlier, D.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    The history of the planet is recorded in its sedimentary basins where the product of mountain erosion is stored, reflecting climatic and tectonic forcing. Were the sediments and the signal they carry to be immediately deposited in a basin, paleo-reconstructions would be straightforward as the age and nature of a deposit would be a testimony of the source and transfer conditions. The sometime intricate path of clastic material along the sediment routing system complicates greatly the situation. We set here to investigate quantitatively the effect of an alluvial piedmont on the sediment flux that crosses it en route to a basin. We focus on the northern piedmont of the Tian Shan (Xinjiang, China). The piedmont is actively deformed by a fold-and-thrust system and experienced several cycles of incision and aggradation in the Pleistocene. We present new OSL dating of terrace and fan material. These data suggest that the most prominent terraces match three glacial maxima 100 kyr apart; thereby the landscape would primarily react to eccentricity cycles. As a consequence, a significant fraction of sediments produced in that period is temporarily deposited in the piedmont before a later incision phase can deliver it to the basin. The OSL ages of alluvial fan strata exposed and recently eroded by the incising river hint at two aggradation phases during the last two glacial periods. Furthermore lose sediment dated at 300 ka is found to be available along the transport route of the sediments and likely entrained during incision phases. We expect the modern sediment flux entering the basin to contain a significant amount of recycled material as old as 180 ka and a non-negligible amount of recycled material as old as 300 ka that can significantly skew geochemical or provenance studies if ignored.

  6. Gradual and small decrease of glacial sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, Marie; Malaize, Bruno; Bassinot, Franck; Caillon, Nicolas; Degaridel-Thoron, Thibault; Rebaubier, Hélène; Charlier, Karine; Caley, Thibaut; Marieu, Vincent; Beaufort, Luc; Rojas, Virginia; Meynadier, Laure; Valet, Jean Pierre; Reaud, Yvan

    2015-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), between about 1.2 and 0.7 Ma, is characterized by the emergence of asymmetric, high-amplitude 100 ka cycles, which contrast with the low amplitude, 41 kyr cycles that dominate the early Pleistocene climate. Here, we study the sediment core MD12-3409, which spans the last ~ 1.75 Ma, to document hydrographic changes across the MPT in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean. Stratigraphy is based on benthic foraminifera delta18O and we reconstruct Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) using the Mg/Ca ratio of Globigerinoides ruber, a surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera. Our results reveal a progressive cooling of glacial maxima across the MPT but no long-term trend in mean SST over the last 1.75 Ma. The main periodicity of the surface temperature signal shifts from 41 kyr before the MPT, to both 100 kyr and 41 kyr for the post MPT time period. Over the last 800 ka, the strong correlation between core MD12-3409 SST fluctuations and the atmospheric CO2 record suggests a global, greenhouse forcing for the tropical Indian SST over the post-MPT time period. Within the MPT, and for earlier time interval, changes in temperature gradients between our SST record and other temperature records in, or at the edge of, the Pacific Warm Pool, could suggest reorganizations of sea surface circulation and lateral heat exchanges. Since the MPT, the amplification of sea level lowering during glacial periods might have shoaled the Indonesian Through Flow (ITF) gateway, restricting hydrographic exchanges between Pacific and Indian oceans.

  7. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of

  8. Size and shape stasis in late Pleistocene mammals and birds from Rancho La Brea during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Syverson, Valerie J.; Raymond, Kristina R.; Madan, Meena; Molina, Sarah; Fragomeni, Ashley; DeSantis, Sylvana; Sutyagina, Anastasiya; Gage, Gina L.

    2012-11-01

    Conventional neo-Darwinian theory views organisms as infinitely sensitive and responsive to their environments, and considers them able to readily change size or shape when they adapt to selective pressures. Yet since 1863 it has been well known that Pleistocene animals and plants do not show much morphological change or speciation in response to the glacial-interglacial climate cycles. We tested this hypothesis with all of the common birds (condors, golden and bald eagles, turkeys, caracaras) and mammals (dire wolves, saber-toothed cats, giant lions, horses, camels, bison, and ground sloths) from Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, which preserves large samples of many bones from many well-dated pits spanning the 35,000 years of the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle. Pollen evidence showed the climate changed from chaparral/oaks 35,000 years ago to snowy piñon-juniper forests at the peak glacial 20,000 years ago, then back to the modern chaparral since the glacial-interglacial transition. Based on Bergmann's rule, we would expect peak glacial specimens to have larger body sizes, and based on Allen's rule, peak glacial samples should have shorter and more robust limbs. Yet statistical analysis (ANOVA for parametric samples; Kruskal-Wallis test for non-parametric samples) showed that none of the Pleistocene pit samples is statistically distinct from the rest, indicating complete stasis from 35 ka to 9 ka. The sole exception was the Pit 13 sample of dire wolves (16 ka), which was significantly smaller than the rest, but this did not occur in response to climate change. We also performed a time series analysis of the pit samples. None showed directional change; all were either static or showed a random walk. Thus, the data show that birds and mammals at Rancho La Brea show complete stasis and were unresponsive to the major climate change that occurred at 20 ka, consistent with other studies of Pleistocene animals and plants. Most explanations for such

  9. Glacial magnetite dissolution in abyssal NW Pacific sediments - evidence for carbon trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    followed by subsequent interglacial carbon burn-down and CO2 release. Abyssal Northwest Pacific sediments may have served as glacial carbon reservoir in particular since the onset of systematic 100 kyr ice age cycles at the end of the Mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT). Stagnant glacial Antarctic Bottom Water, which expanded primarily into abyssal South Atlantic basins during the MPT interim phase, thereafter seemed to flow preferentially into the deeper and larger abyssal Indo-Pacific basins, where it may have enabled more efficient carbon-trapping. More intensive scavenging of the Northwest Pacific surface ocean by enhanced glacial Asian dust flux is suggested by parallel TOC and quartz contents, enhancing glacial carbon accumulation despite potentially lower export production. The magnetic records also identify numerous partly consistent tephra layers, which can be matched between most records of the core transect.

  10. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution revealed by luminescence thermochronometry (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, P.; Guralnik, B.; Lowick, S.; Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.

    2012-12-01

    variable erosion rates during the late Quaternary, with preferential high-altitude erosion in the eastern part of the Granite Range and localized valley incision to the west. This presents evidence for a bimodal relief evolution in an active mountain range under glacial environment, and demonstrates the potential of luminescence thermochronometry in resolving topographic evolution and surface processes over 100-kyr timescales and high-frequency climate modulations (e.g., glacial-interglacial oscillations). References: - Braun, J., et al. (2012). Quantifying rates of landscape evolution and tectonic processes by thermochronology and numerical modeling of heat transport in the crust using PECUBE. Tectonophysics. - Herman, F., et al. (2010). Uniform erosion rates and relief amplitude during glacial cycles in the Southern Alps of New Zealand, as revealed from OSL-thermochronology. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. - Murray, A.S., Wintle, A.G. (2000). Luminescence dating of quartz using an improved single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol. Radiation Measurements. - Spotila, J.A., Berger, A.L. (2010). Exhumation at orogenic indentor corners under long-term glacial conditions: Example of the St. Elias orogen, Southern Alaska. Tectonophysics.

  11. New chronological data for the timing of the Saalian- and Elsterian glacial cycle in Europe - studies on a key site within the type area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Tobias; Weiß, Marcel; Wansa, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The type area for the Elsterian- and Saalian glacial cycles is located in central Germany (Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia) where the gravel deposits of the rivers Saale- and Elster interfinger with tills and meltwater deposits of both glacial cycles in proximity to the maximum extensions of the Middle-Pleistocene Scandinavian ice-sheets in Central Europe. The Elsterian- and Saalian glacial cycles, including the corresponding interglacial periods are also correlated with first human appearance in the area (see Haidle and Pawlik 2010). Nevertheless, the timing of these glacial cycles is still unclear due to a lack of resilient chronological data on sediments representing the advance- and retreat of the glaciers. The Elsterian is defined to be terminated by the Holsteinian, but for the latter, a correlation to MIS 9 or 11 is still a matter of debate (e. g. Sirocko et al. 2006; Nitychoruk et al. 2007). Consequently, a correlation of the Elsterian to MIS 10 or 12 is possible. Within the last decades, new luminescence dating techniques such as pIRIR-luminescence protocols or infrared-radiofluorescence dating made it possible to extent the datable age range and hence, it is now possible to establish reliable chronologies also for deposits beyond the last glacial-/interglacial cycle. In the present study, we dated the quaternary sequence of Uichteritz (close to the Saale-river near Weissenfels, Saxony-Anhalt) using luminescence and infrared-radiofluorescence dating. The base of the quaternary layers consists of Elsterian sediments pre-dating the first Elsterian ice advance. This is evidenced mainly by the lithology, especially the absence of Nordic components in the composition of the gravel. Additionally, remains of the advancing Saalian ice sheet, represented by fluvial sediments from the Middle-Pleistocene river Saale, as well as till, glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments, cover the Elsterian succession. The upper part of the fluvial Elsterian sediments

  12. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Eiler, John M.; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J. David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K.

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth’s most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6–7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation. PMID:23671087

  13. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L; Eiler, John M; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K

    2013-05-28

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth's most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6-7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation.

  14. The effect of ocean alkalinity and carbon transfer on deep-sea carbonate ion concentration during the past five glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Joanna; Rickaby, Rosalind; Yu, Jimin; Elderfield, Henry; Sadekov, Aleksey Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Glacial-interglacial deep Indo-Pacific carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) changes were mainly driven by two mechanisms that operated on different timescales: 1) a long-term increase during glaciation caused by a carbonate deposition reduction on shelves (i.e., the coral reef hypothesis), and 2) transient carbonate compensation responses to deep ocean carbon storage changes. To investigate these mechanisms, we have used benthic foraminiferal B/Ca to reconstruct deep-water [CO32-] in cores from the deep Indian and Equatorial Pacific Oceans during the past five glacial cycles. Based on our reconstructions, we suggest that the shelf-to-basin shift of carbonate deposition raised deep-water [CO32-], on average, by 7.3 ± 0.5 (SE) μmol/kg during glaciations. Oceanic carbon reorganisations during major climatic transitions caused deep-water [CO32-] deviations away from the long-term trend, and carbonate compensation processes subsequently acted to restore the ocean carbonate system to new steady state conditions. Deep-water [CO32-] showed similar patterns to sediment carbonate content (%CaCO3) records on glacial-interglacial timescales, suggesting that past seafloor %CaCO3 variations were dominated by deep-water carbonate preservation changes at our studied sites.

  15. Periodic isolation of the southern coastal plain of South Africa and the evolution of modern humans over late Quaternary glacial to interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Humans evolved in Africa, but where in Africa and by what mechanisms remain unclear. The evolution of modern humans over the last million years is associated with the onset of major global climate fluctuations, glacial to interglacial cycles, related to the build up and melting of large ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. During interglacial periods, such as today, warm and wet climates favored human expansion but during cold and dry glacial periods conditions were harsh and habitats fragmented. These large climate fluctuations periodically expanded and contracted African ecosystems and led to human migrations to more hospitable glacial refugia. Periodic isolation of relatively small numbers of humans may have allowed for their rapid evolutionary divergence from the rest of Africa. During climate transitions these divergent groups may have then dispersed and interbred with other groups (hybridization). Two areas at the opposite ends of Africa stand out as regions that were periodically isolated from the rest of Africa: North Africa (the Maghreb) and the southern coastal plain (SCP) of South Africa. The Maghreb is isolated by the Sahara Desert which periodically greens and is reconnected to the rest of Africa during the transition from glacial to interglacial periods. The SCP of South Africa is isolated from the rest of Africa by the rugged mountains of the Cape Fold Belt associated with inedible vegetation and dry climates to the north. The SCP is periodically opened when sea level falls by up to 130 m during glacial maxima to expose the present day submerged inner continental shelf. A five-fold expansion of the SCP receiving more rainfall in glacial periods may have served as a refuge to humans and large migratory herds. The expansive glacial SCP habitat abruptly contracts, by as much as one-third in 300 yr, during the rapid rise in sea level associated with glacial terminations. Rapid flooding may have increased population density and competition on the SCP to

  16. High latitude regulation of low latitude thermocline ventilation and planktic foraminifer populations across glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Philip F.; Norris, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    One of the earliest discoveries in palaeoceanography was the observation in 1935 that the (sub)tropical planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii became absent or extremely rare in the Atlantic Ocean during glacials of the late Pleistocene. Yet a mechanistic explanation for G. menardii's extraordinary biogeographic behaviour has eluded palaeoceanographers for 75 years. Here we show that modern G. menardii, along with two other species that also suffer Atlantic population collapses during glacials, track poorly ventilated waters globally in their thermocline habitats. The ventilation states of low latitude thermoclines are 'set', to a first order, by intermediate water masses originating at high latitudes. In the modern Atlantic this control on low latitude thermocline ventilation is exerted by relatively poorly ventilated, southern-sourced Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and sub-Antarctic Mode Water (SAMW). We suggest that the glacial Atlantic foraminifer population collapses were a consequence of a low latitude thermocline that was better ventilated during glacials than it is today, in line with geochemical evidence, and driven primarily by a well-ventilated, northern-sourced intermediate water mass. A ventilation mechanism driving the glacial population collapses is further supported by our new constraints on the precise timing of these species' Atlantic proliferation during the last deglaciation — occurring in parallel with a wholesale, bipolar reorganisation of the Atlantic's thermocline-to-abyssal overturning circulation. Our findings demonstrate that a bipolar seesaw in the formation of high latitude intermediate waters has played an important role in regulating the population dynamics of thermocline-dwelling plankton at lower latitudes.

  17. The Roles of Iron and Vertical Mixing in Regulating Nitrogen and Silicon Cycling in the Southern Ocean over the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Beucher, C.; Horn, M. G.; Bedsole, P.

    2014-12-01

    The air-sea CO2 balance is regulated by both biological and physical mechanisms in the Southern Ocean. Changes in the vertical supply of the major nutrients, nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon, and in the availability of the micronutrient Fe are all thought to play a role in the glacial-interglacial variation in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here we present the most spatially extensive dataset of silicon and nitrogen isotope measurements from diatom frustules to examine the controls on nutrient drawdown during the last glacial period and across the glacial termination. The data confirm existing views that differing silicon and nitrate consumption patterns are likely the result, at least in part, of iron addition during the last glacial maximum. However, earlier in the glacial, a more coordinated response between the two proxy records, with both reflecting enhanced consumption during episodes of increased iron accumulation and export production, implies a different response to iron than observed for the LGM. Extended spatial coverage in the Subantarctic provides evidence for vertical mixing of nutrients directly in this zone. The collapse of the expected equatorward gradient in silicon isotope values and contraction of the nitrogen isotope gradient during the deglaciation suggests that nutrient supply increased not only in the Antarctic Zone, but also in the Subantarctic, perhaps due to enhanced deep mixing locally. Increased vertical supply in both zones of the Southern Ocean may better explain the enhanced nutrient supply to the low latitude thermocline than Antarctic Zone dynamics alone.

  18. Genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane rainforest inferred from a marine pollen record in southern Philippines during the glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical vegetation is the most outstanding and obvious feature of South-East Asia, and it is expected to provide valuable information for the palaeoclmatic conditions. Pollen records from the tropical West Pacific indicate that the tropical vegetation is much sensitive to the environment and climate change, and their good correspondence with palaeocliamte change in glacial/interglacial timescales. It is shown that the range of the tropical montane rainforest was affected by the temperature change during the glacial cycle. But, from some marine core, the genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane pollen record is also distinct during the glacial cycle. In this study, examination of the pollen content of marine core MD06-3075 taken from Davao Gulf in the Southern Philippines reveals a ~116,000 year record of tropical vegetation change as well as the influence of the environment and climate variability on the ecosystem of the tropical area. Chronology was determined by 16 AMS 14C dates and a detailed oxygen isotope record. A high representation of pollen from tropical upper montane rainforest (mainly Podocarpus) (40-60%) during the last glacial period indicates that this forest type extended to lower attitudes. And the genera variations of the tropical mid-upper montane rainforest exist between the Phyllocladus and Podocarpus with the environment and climate changing. The pollen content of Phyllocladus is much high in marine isotope stage (MIS) 5, but Podocarpus is much higher in the glacial period. During the onset of MIS 5a and 5c, the percentage of Phyllocladus pollen declines dramatically. Vegetation investigation in Mindanao, shows that Podocarpus exists in altitude ranging from 1,200-1,700 m, and Phyllocladus appear in altitude range from 1700-2100 m, but is more abundant above the 2,400 m. Thus, Phyllocladus might be more sensitive to the temperature change. Then, in this study, the pollen content of is much high during the interglacial period

  19. All together now? Sensitivity, dynamics, and predictability of planktonic foraminiferal species abundance versus community structure across Plio-Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, P. M.; Norris, R. D.; Sexton, P.

    2012-12-01

    Most studies to date of biospheric sensitivity to global change have focused on understanding the sensitivity of modern species and communities to recent or experimental environmental change. However, it is unclear how to scale these results towards predicting the response of the biosphere to ongoing global change given that i) similar species often respond individualistically the same perturbation, ii) biotic response often scales nonlinearly with the size and/or duration of environmental change, and iii) many terrestrial and marine community types known from the recent past lack modern analogs. In this context, marine microfossils from deep sea sediments hold enormous promise for furthering our understanding of biotic sensitivity as they capture temporally expanded records of paleoceanographic and biotic response across a range climatic regimes (e.g., icehouse versus greenhouse climates), disturbance types (e.g., from background climate oscillations to mass extinctions), and habitats (e.g., low vs. high latitudes, upwelling vs. gyre ecosystems, etc). Here we use the repeated glacial-interglacial cycles and longer term trend of intensifying Northern Hemisphere glaciation from the Pliocene-Pleistocene to examine issues related to the sensitivity of planktonic foraminiferal species and communities to global change in an icehouse world. More specifically, we quantify the sensitivity and predictability of changes in planktonic foraminiferal species abundance (species specific mass accumulation rates) and community structure (dissimilarity indices and community classification) to glacial-interglacial cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene in two Atlantic sites (ODP Sites 999 and 662). We first examine whether the sensitivity of species and communities to glacial-interglacial cycles in the early Pliocene (~5-3 million years ago) is predictive of i) their sensitivity to the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (~3-2 million years ago), or ii) their sensitivity to

  20. Dynamic Drainage Networks and Discharge Histories in North America over the Last Glacial Cycle: Implications for Geomorphic Change and Early Human Settlement Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, A. D.; Anderson, R. S.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Kettner, A. J.; Lee, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    During the last glacial cycle, changing ice masses altered topography, moving drainages and coastlines by hundreds of kilometers or more. These changes had wide-reaching implications for geomorphic evolution and human interactions with the hydrologic system. We present results from the coupling of ice sheet histories, geophysical models, and hydrologic analyses to reconstruct flow and sediment transport as the major ice sheets grew and waned. We show how our model results compare to geological data, and how they can be used to create a predictive model of archaeological site locations as people entered the Americas. We coupled ice sheet histories with a state-of-the-art model of global response to changing surface loads [Kendall et al., 2005] to reconstruct continental-scale drainage networks and coastlines over the last glacial cycle. The combination of changes in global ocean volume, basal pressure gradients under the ice sheets, and geophysical responses to loading-including flexural isostasy, geoid deflection, and true polar wander-caused continental-scale drainage basin reorganization. We then used the model HydroTrend [Kettner and Syvitski, 2008], with ice mass balances, proglacial lake positions, and paleoclimate general circulation model results as inputs, to simulate river water and sediment discharges over the last glacial cycle through each of our reconstructed drainage basins. We compared these results to geologic data from the Mississippi River drainage basin as a case study. Our predicted time-series of water and sediment discharges correlates with the alluvial history of the Upper Mississippi and the transition of the Lower Mississippi from a braided to a meandering system. Our results also place hard numbers on water and sediment discharges to the Gulf of Mexico over the last glacial cycle. We compare these with paleoceanographic data to assess the accuracy of the ice and solid earth models that we use and to understand quantitatively the impacts of

  1. Stratigraphy and palaeoclimatic significance of Late Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequences of the Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Ager, T.A.; Bettis, E. Arthur; McGeehin, J.; Been, J.M.; Beget, J.E.; Pavich, M.J.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stevens, D.A.S.P.

    2003-01-01

    Loess is one of the most widespread subaerial deposits in Alaska and adjacent Yukon Territory and may have a history that goes back 3 Ma. Based on mineralogy and major and trace element chemistry, central Alaskan loess has a composition that is distinctive from other loess bodies of the world, although it is quartz-dominated. Central Alaskan loess was probably derived from a variety of rock types, including granites, metabasalts and schists. Detailed stratigraphic data and pedologic criteria indicate that, contrary to early studies, many palaeosols are present in central Alaskan loess sections. The buried soils indicate that loess sedimentation was episodic, or at least rates of deposition decreased to the point where pedogenesis could keep ahead of aeolian input. As in China, loess deposition and pedogenesis are likely competing processes and neither stops completely during either phase of the loess/soil formation cycle. Loess deposition in central Alaska took place before, and probably during the last interglacial period, during stadials of the mid-Wisconsin period, during the last glacial period and during the Holocene. An unexpected result of our geochronological studies is that only moderate loess deposition took place during the last glacial period. Our studies lead us to conclude that vegetation plays a key role in loess accumulation in Alaska. Factors favouring loess production are enhanced during glacial periods but factors that favour loess accumulation are diminished during glacial periods. The most important of these is vegetation; boreal forest serves as an effective loess trap, but sparsely distributed herb tundra does not. Thus, thick accumulations of loess should not be expected where tundra vegetation was dominant and this is borne out by modern studies near the treeline in central Alaska. Much of the stratigraphic diversity of North American loess, including that found in the Central Lowlands, the Great Plains, and Alaska is explained by a new

  2. Separating the Effects of Northern Hemisphere Ice-Sheets, CO2 Concentrations and Orbital Parameters on Global Precipitation During the Late Pleistocene Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elison Timm, O.; Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Ganopolski, A.

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale changes in the hydrological cycle have been reconstructed in many parts of the world using various archives of proxy information. The signals found in proxies allow us to study the complex response of the global hydrological cycle to the combined forcing and feedback mechanisms. However, it remains a challenge to attribute the observed variations to specific causes, in particular, it is difficult to distinguish CO2 and ice-sheet response in time series. Here, we present new results from a set of transient paleoclimate simulation of the last eight glacial cycles (784,000 years) using accelerated forcing. In order to isolate the ice-sheet forcing from the CO2 -driven response and orbital forcing, we made use of additional transient experiments with varying forcing combinations covering the last 408,000 years: (a) keeping CO2 concentrations constant, (b) keeping the ice-sheet fixed, (c) orbital forcing only. The simulations show that orbital forcing has strongest impact in the tropical and subtropical regions. The northern hemisphere ice-sheets stamp a characteristic spatial footprint on the global precipitation variability. The ice-sheets mainly affect the extratropical northern hemisphere, but the cone of influence extends further into the North African monsoon regions, and to a weaker extent into the Asian monsoon. In an attempt to validate our model-specific results we compared our results with existing hydrological paleo proxy records. Despite the growing number of proxy archives, the aim to identify the ice-sheet influence in spatially limited networks of proxy time series remains as challenge. More records that cover at least two full glacial cycles could significantly increase the signal separation. In conclusion, our results suggest that the northern hemisphere ice-sheets played an important role in modulating the global hydrological cycle.

  3. Numerical modelling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport and its application to the North American ice sheets over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Alexandre; Bell, Trevor; Tarasov, Lev

    2013-05-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. Glacial system models (GSMs), however, cannot address this constraint while lacking appropriate representations of subglacial sediment production and transport. Incorporating these elements in GSMs is also required in order to quantify the impact of a changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards these goals, we present a subglacial process model (hereafter referred to as the sediment model) that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. Bedrock erosion is calculated by both Hallet's and Boulton's abrasion laws separately, and by a novel quarrying law parametrized as a function of subglacial cavity extent. These process-oriented erosion laws are compared against a simple empirical relationship between erosion rate and the work done by basal stress. Sediment entrainment is represented by Philip's law for regelation intrusion and soft-bed deformation is included as a subglacial sediment transport mechanism. The model is driven by the data-calibrated MUN (3D) GSM and a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The sediment model is applied to the last North American glacial cycle and predicts sediment thickness and cumulative erosion patterns. Results are obtained in the context of a sensitivity analysis and are compared against the present-day distribution of glacigenic sediment and geological estimates of Laurentide Ice Sheet erosion. Given plausible ranges for the sensitivity parameters, chosen a priori based on available literature or on heuristic arguments, the calculated erosion depths overlap with the geological estimates of Laurentide erosion. Most of the runs in the sensitivity set produce unrealistically thick and continuous moraines along the eastern, southern and western margins of the North American ice complex, which suggests that the model overestimates sediment entrainment and thus

  4. Evolution of Temperature and Carbon Storage Within the Deep Southeast Atlantic Ocean Across the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle Inferred from a Highly-Resolved Sedimentary Depth Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C. D.; Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Slowey, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Many models show that the relative intensity of stratification is a primary variable governing the sequestration and release of carbon from the ocean over ice ages. The wide-scale observations necessary to test these model-derived hypotheses are not yet sufficient, but sedimentary depth transects represent a promising approach for making progress. Here we present paired stable isotopic (d18O, d13C) and trace metal data (Mg/Ca, B/Ca) from benthic foraminifera collected from a highly vertically-resolved depth transect from the mid-depth and deep SE Atlantic. These observations, which cover Marine Isotope Stages 5e, 5d, 5a, 4, and the Last Glacial Maximum, document the evolution of glacial conditions from the previous interglacial, and provide detailed observations regarding the magnitude and timing of changes in temperature and salinity within the deep ocean at key time points over the last glacial/interglacial cycle. Furthermore, the comparison between purely 'physical' tracers (i.e. Mg/Ca, d18O) and tracers sensitive to the carbon cycle (i.e. d13C and B/Ca) provides critical insight into the relationship between deep/mid-depth stratification and global carbon dynamics. Notably among our observations, the paired stable isotope and trace metal results strongly suggest that much of the ice-age cooling of deep South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5e/5d transition, while the onset of salinity stratification in the mid-depth South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5/4 transition.

  5. The indicative significance of the tropical Pacific precipitation for the evolution of ITCZ over the last four glacial/interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Qi, Yiquan; Li, Tiegang; Chang, Fengming; Yu, Zhoufei

    2017-04-01

    Multiple planktonic foraminiferal calcite Mg/Ca and δ18O were studied to reconstruct the high-resolution records of sea water δ18O in the sediment core KX97322-4, which was recovered from the Ontong-Java Plateau in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP), the core region of the western Pacific warm pool (WPWP). By combining the two proxies together, we obtained the upper water temperature and salinity over the last four glacial/interglacial cycles. We also removed the influence from global ice volume change to salinity to reconstruct the local precipitation history. By comparing SST records of the WEP with the Eastern Equatorial Pacific since MIS 10, we find that the tropical Pacific was more likely in the phase of El Niño-like during Terminations and warming stage in glacial. Meanwhile, the mean position of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) was moving northward and more water vapor and heat were taken to middle and high latitude regions. By comparing precipitation records of multi-position in the WPWP with the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) records, we find that the tropical Pacific hydrological variation was associated with the ITCZ changes and even could impact EASM precipitation. When the isolation became stronger, the globe was warming and evaporation-precipitation ratio in the WEP enhanced, the ITCZ with more moisture shifted from the tropical areas to the temperate latitude, then East Asia precipitation was strengthened. While the situation would reverse when the solar radiation decreased. During the processes, the zonal thermal state would adjust the extent of the ITCZ variation. Our finding provides further evidence for the relationship between the WPWP hydrological status and the EASM precipitation, the tropical Pacific zonal thermal state and the ITCZ change during the last four glacial/interglacial cycles.

  6. Past seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia recorded over several glacial/interglacial cycles in the sediments of Lake Van

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F.; Sturm, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments document besides paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate conditions also paleoseismic activity through various forms of deformation structures. These are especially visible in finely-laminated sediments. Being situated in a tectonically active region, the partly annually-laminated sedimentary sequence of the terminal Lake Van, recovered in 2010 under the context of the ICDP Paleovan project, shows dozens of earthquake-triggered microdeformations that document past seismic events of the last half a million years. Lithological and multiproxy analysis revealed that the Lake Van's depositional conditions varied in correspondence to Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch cycles. Glacial/stadial and interglacial/interstadial conditions were recorded continuously over the last half a million years excluding two discontinuities, which indicate major hydrological and geomorphological changes in Lake Van's early history. Two sites were drilled 10 km apart: A primary drill site, situated on a ridge, covers the entire lake history since its initial transgression in the middle Pleistocene; A secondary drill site, located in a more shallow northern basin, covers the past 90'000 years. Multiple coring at both drill sites allows to establish two almost complete 220 m and 145 m long composite sections, respectively. Observing deformation structures in multiple parallel cores at each site is used as a criteria to distinguish 'true' paleoseismic deformation structures from potential drilling artifacts. Deformation structures consist of i) silt-filled vertical fractures, ii) microfaults with displacements at cm-scale, iii) microfolds, iv) liquefaction structures (mushroom, pseudonodules), iv) disturbed varve laminations and v) mixed layers. While the ridge site records the paleoseismic events as microdeformations, the northern basinal site rather records seismic events through the deposition of seismo-turbidites. In some cases, individual earthquake events can even be identified

  7. Contributions from glacially derived sediment to the global iron (oxyhydr)oxide cycle: Implications for iron delivery to the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiswell, Rob; Tranter, Martyn; Benning, Liane G.; Siegert, Martin; De'ath, Ros; Huybrechts, Philippe; Payne, Tony

    2006-06-01

    Estimates of glacial sediment delivery to the oceans have been derived from fluxes of meltwater runoff and iceberg calving, and their sediment loads. The combined total (2900 Tg yr -1) of the suspended sediment load in meltwaters (1400 Tg yr -1) and the sediment delivered by icebergs (1500 Tg yr -1) are within the range of earlier estimates. High-resolution microscopic observations show that suspended sediments from glacial meltwaters, supraglacial, and proglacial sediments, and sediments in basal ice, from Arctic, Alpine, and Antarctic locations all contain iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanoparticles, which are poorly crystalline, typically ˜5 nm in diameter, and which occur as single grains or aggregates that may be isolated or attached to sediment grains. Nanoparticles with these characteristics are potentially bioavailable. A global model comparing the sources and sinks of iron present as (oxyhydr)oxides indicates that sediment delivered by icebergs is a significant source of iron to the open oceans, beyond the continental shelf. Iceberg delivery of sediment containing iron as (oxyhydr)oxides during the Last Glacial Maximum may have been sufficient to fertilise the increase in oceanic productivity required to drawdown atmospheric CO 2 to the levels observed in ice cores.

  8. Climate-induced changes to the ancestral population size of two Patagonian galaxiids: the influence of glacial cycling.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Walde, Sandra J; Habit, Evelyn M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2011-12-01

    Patagonia is one of the few areas in the Southern Hemisphere to have been directly influenced by Quaternary glaciers. In this study, we evaluate the influence that Quaternary glacial ice had on the genetic diversity of two congeneric fish species, the diadromous Galaxias maculatus and the nondiadromous Galaxias platei, using multilocus estimates of effective population size through time. Mid-Quaternary glaciations had far-reaching consequences for both species. Galaxias maculatus and G. platei each experienced severe genetic bottlenecks during the period when Patagonia ice sheet advance reached its maximum positions c. 1.1-0.6 Ma. Concordant drops in effective size during this time suggest that range sizes were under similar constraints. It is therefore unlikely that coastal (brackish/marine) environments served as a significant refuge for G. maculatus during glacial periods. An earlier onset of population declines for G. platei suggests that this species was vulnerable to modest glacial advances. Declines in effective sizes were continuous for both species and lasted into the late-Pleistocene. However, G. maculatus exhibited a strong population recovery during the late-Quaternary (c. 400,000 bp). Unusually long and warm interglacials associated with the late-Quaternary may have helped to facilitate a strong population rebound in this primarily coastal species. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The changing roles of iron and vertical mixing in regulating nitrogen and silicon cycling in the Southern Ocean over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Beucher, Charlotte P.; Horn, Matthew G. S.; Bedsole, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the air-sea CO2 balance through biological and physical mechanisms. Vertical supply of deep waters returns nutrients and CO2 to the surface and stimulates phytoplankton growth. Photosynthesis in the Southern Ocean is limited by iron and only a fraction of the carbon and nutrients that return to the surface are consumed for potential sequestration in the deep sea. Here we present the most spatially extensive data set of silicon and nitrogen isotope measurements from diatom frustules to date to examine the controls on nutrient drawdown during the last glacial period and across the glacial termination in both the Antarctic and Subantarctic zones. The new data confirm existing views that differing silicon and nitrate consumption patterns in the Antarctic zone are likely the result, at least in part, of iron addition during the last glacial maximum (LGM). However, earlier in the glacial, a more coordinated response in the two proxy records, with both reflecting enhanced consumption during episodes of increased iron accumulation and export production, implies a different system response than observed for the LGM. A collapse of the expected equatorward gradient in silicon isotope values and contraction of the nitrogen isotope gradient during the deglaciation suggests that nutrient supply increased not only in the Antarctic Zone, but also in the Subantarctic, perhaps due to enhanced deep mixing locally. Enhanced deep water ventilation across the Southern Ocean likely increased the nutrient content of mode waters during the deglaciation.

  10. Running hotter, faster, shallower: acceleration of the marine nitrogen cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial, and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biologically-available nitrogen is the primary limiting nutrient in the global ocean. The complex physical-biological interdependencies of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, the source and sink of bioavailable nitrogen, have led to uncertainty over their future trajectories under higher CO2. Sedimentary nitrogen isotope evidence suggests that the global rate of denitrification was on the order of 50% lower during the last glacial maximum, and reveals that significant changes in denitrification have occurred on a decadal-centennial timescale. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemistry models simulate similar changes, through physically-driven changes in anoxia, which then feed back on nitrogen fixation through the availability of phosphorus to diazotrophs. In addition, diazotroph culture experiments suggest that nitrogen fixation was further limited during glacial maxima by low CO2, causing an additional slowdown of the nitrogen cycle. The emergent picture suggests that deglaciation accelerated both sides of the N cycle, with more rapid loss encouraged by expanded shallow anoxia, and more rapid gain encouraged by higher CO2. It will be argued that the net effect on the nitrogen inventory can be approximated by knowing the distribution of surface ocean PO4, given the observed correlation of surface PO4 concentrations on the P:C ratio of exported organic matter.

  11. Glacial/interglacial variations in methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Siple Dome ice core, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, Eric S.; Dioumaeva, Irina; Finley, Brandon D.

    2006-06-01

    Methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Siple Dome ice core is a record of the deposition of biogenic sulfur to the West Antarctic ice sheet covering the past 100 kyr. Siple Dome MSA levels were low during the last glacial maximum, and increased to higher Holocene levels with a several kyr lag relative to the deglacial warming. The positive correlation between MSA and temperature at Siple Dome is similar to that in Greenland ice cores (Renland, GISP2, and GRIP), and stands in contrast to the negative correlation observed at Vostok, East Antarctica. The Siple Dome MSA data suggest that the sign of the high latitude dust/sulfur/climate feedback is negative, at least for the Pacific sector of the high latitude Southern ocean. These results challenge the idea that fertilization by increased dust deposition led to widespread increased DMS emissions from this region of the glacial Southern Ocean.

  12. The Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle (MIS 5-2) re-examined based on long proxy records from central and northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmens, Karin F.

    2014-02-01

    Current multi-proxy studies on a long sediment sequence preserved at Sokli (N Finland), i.e. in the central area of Fennoscandian glaciations, are drastically changing classic ideas of glaciations, vegetation and climate in northern Europe during the Late Pleistocene. The sediments in the Sokli basin have escaped major glacial erosion due to non-typical bedrock conditions. In this review, the Sokli record is compared in great detail with other long proxy records from central, temperate and northern, boreal Europe. These comprise the classic records of La Grande Pile (E France) and Oerel (N Germany) and more recently obtained records from Horoszki Duże (E Poland) and Lake Yamozero (NW Russia). The focus of the review is on pollen, lithology and macrofossil- and insect-based temperature inferences. The long records are further compared with recent proxy data from nearby terrestrial sites as well as with the rapidly accumulating high-resolution proxy data from the ocean realm. The comparison allows a re-examination of the environmental history and climate evolution of the Last Interglacial-Glacial (LI-G) cycle (MIS 5-2). It shows that environmental and climate conditions during MIS 5 (ca 130-70 ka BP) were distinctly different from those during MIS 4-2 (ca 70-15 ka BP). MIS 5 is characterized by three long forested intervals (broadly corresponding to MIS 5e, 5c, 5a), both in temperate and northern boreal Europe. These mild periods were interrupted by two short, relatively cold and dry intervals (MIS 5d and 5b) with mountain-centered glaciation in Fennoscandia. Millennial scale climate events were superimposed upon these longer lasting climate fluctuations. The time interval encompassing MIS 4-2 shows open vegetation. It is characterized by two glacial maxima (MIS 4 and 2) with sub-continental scale glaciation over northern Europe and dry conditions in strongly continental eastern European settings. High amplitude climate oscillations of millennial duration

  13. Multi-Proxy Approach to the Atlantic-Indian Water Interchange Along the Last Three Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Méndez, G.; Zahn, R.; Hall, I.; Rickaby, R.

    2005-12-01

    Multi-centennial mean grainsize (SS), paired planktonic ( G. bulloides) and benthic foraminifera ( C. wuellerstorfi ) stable isotope and trace element records of IMAGES core MD96-2080 are used to document surface and deep interchange of waters between the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The core is from the western slope of the Agulhas Bank, off the southern tip of Africa, within the main gateway of Atlantic-Indian ocean interbasin exchange. At a water depth of 2488 m it is currently located within the southern extension of NADW bounded above and below by Upper and Lower CDW. The records display prominent orbital modulation and faster sub-orbital variability that is linked to climate variability seen in marine records at high southern latitudes, and in Antarctic ice core records. Departures from the orbitally modulated pattern occur in benthic C-13 along MIS 5 suggesting an alternation between water masses with similar C-13 signature. Low C-13 levels during glacial periods point to a substitution of NADW by CDW, while flow speeds are increased as indicated by high values of SS. The pattern mimics that seen at a mid-depth SW Pacific core site (Hall et al., 2001) suggesting a hemisphere-wide significance for the southern hemisphere oceans. The combined benthic C-13 and Cd/Ca patterns are used to discriminate between water masses and to separate preformed from THC-related signals contained in the glacial-interglacial and millennial patterns. The data profiles show significant differences in the rate of change of ice volume (O-18), chemical ventilation (C-13) and physical circulation (SS) during glacial to interglacial transitions and interglacial to glacial transitions that suggest a large inertia of ocean physics but also confirm the significance of Southern Ocean THC water mass formation for changing deep ocean ventilation. Coherency between the planktonic and benthic isotope records points to the existence of a direct connection between Agulhas leakage and deep outflow

  14. Fluvial adjustment to changing base-level and climate over the last glacial-interglacial cycle in sub-tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Jacky; Larsen, Annegret; Thompson, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Continental-margin fluvial systems are often found to be under the influence of both upstream (climate) and downstream (sea level) controls. In Australia, relatively little is known about fluvial adjustment in the upper reaches of large continental drainage systems. In the tectonically-stable setting of eastern Australia, climate is typically seen as the dominant factor governing fluvial response over the timescale of Quaternary glacial/interglacial cycles. This study uses a 30m record of valley alluviation in the lower reaches of Lockyer Creek, a key tributary of the mid-Brisbane River in SEQ, to document (a) the timing of fluvial response to both sea level and climate change, and (b) the nature of the river's response to that change, over the past 230 ka. Chronostratigraphic units within the deep valley fill sequences reveal seven phases of channel incision and aggradation spanning the past 230 ka. The lateral and vertical extent of major valley fill units indicates a switch in depositional style from valley-wide coarse bedload deposition to narrower channel belt, fine-grained aggradation sometime after 120 ka. The preservation of multiple-age channel deposits across the wide valley floor indicates successive channel avulsion over this time-scale. Episodes of channel incision are reasonably aligned with sea level low stands during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7, 6 and 3 where incision to bedrock over depths of 25 to 30 m occurred. However later episodes of channel incision dated to between 27-12 ka either pre-, or post-date the last glacial low stand. The majority of the valley fill in the lower Lockyer consists of fine-grained alluvia which reflect restricted lateral channel mobility due to either, or both, bedrock or fine-grained alluvial confinement. When viewed within the context of past glacial/interglacial Quaternary oscillations, the record confirms a progressively drying continent based on the caliber of bedload material and lateral channel extent.

  15. The behaviour of the Leeuwin Current offshore NW Australia during the last five glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Michelle I.; De Deckker, Patrick; Barrows, Timothy T.; Fifield, L. Keith

    2011-02-01

    The Leeuwin Current is an anomalous eastern boundary current along the western Australian coast. To investigate its behaviour through time, we studied core MD002361 obtained from below the present-day pathway of the Leeuwin Current offshore the NW tip of Western Australia. Planktonic foraminifera assemblages, sea-surface temperature estimates reconstructed from those assemblages, together with the δ 18O and δ 13C signals of near-surface dwelling foraminifera ( Globigerinoides ruber), were used to reconstruct the vertical structure of the water column for the past 500 ka. Our findings indicate that the Leeuwin Current was present along the western coastline of Australia even during glacial periods. During those times, there was a greater influence of South Indian Subtropical Water (STW) and South Indian Central Water (SICW) due to a 3-4° northward migration of the Indonesian Throughflow Water/South Indian Central Water frontal system. This resulted in an overall 6-9 °C decrease in SST, paralleled by a thickening and greater homogeneity of the mixed layer. The increased influence of STW and SICW also suggests that the West Australian Current, which presently sits below the Leeuwin Current, was strengthened during the glacial periods and contributed to a weakening of the Leeuwin Current. Conversely, the Leeuwin Current was 'stronger' during interglacial periods due to a thicker component of Indonesian Throughflow Water sourced from the Indo Pacific Warm Pool. This was particularly the case during marine isotope stage 5.5 (MIS) and the 'super' interglacial MIS 11.

  16. High-Resolution Isotope Records of the Late Ordovician and Late Carboniferous: A Comparative Perspective on Glacial Carbon and Sulfur Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, B. C.; Lyons, T. W.; Saltzman, M. R.

    2005-12-01

    Carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) faithfully tracks the sulfur isotope composition of seawater in both modern and ancient environments. Therefore, analyses of carbonate rocks permit the generation of parallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope data for seawater spanning geologic history. Our previous work in the early and middle Paleozoic has revealed parallel, short-term (1-4 Myrs) carbon and sulfur isotope excursions. The relationship between the two isotope systems seems to change over time, perhaps tracking longer-term evolution of the marine sulfur reservoir and of the primary loci of carbon burial, including increased burial on land. CAS isotope records therefore have the potential to shed essential mechanistic light on the causes (global versus regional) for carbon isotope excursions observed throughout the geological record. Previous work on the Late Carboniferous and Late Ordovician documented the existence of carbon isotope excursions of varying magnitude during these glacial episodes. The Late Carboniferous glaciations classically show evidence for multiple glacial-interglacial cycles with repeated, low magnitude (1 to 3 per mil) carbon isotope excursions. By contrast, the Late Ordovician was characterized by a short-lived glaciation with a corresponding single 4-6 per mil carbon isotope excursion. The modes and rates of carbon cycling reflected in the differing styles of C isotope behavior are the subject of debate, making these time-slices ideal for the CAS isotope approach. Carbon and sulfur isotope data from Pennsylvanian (Missourian Stage) cyclothems exposed in Kansas City, Missouri, show rapid isotope variability. We have preliminarily attributed these rapid changes to local reservoir effects linked to fluctuating sea level and its relationship to black shale deposition within the midcontinent basin and weathering on the basin margin during lowstands. Other work on the cyclic Carboniferous Bird Spring Formation, Nevada, is also

  17. Trends in stomatal density and [sup 13]C/[sup 12]C ratios of Pinus flexilis needles during last glacial-interglacial cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Water, P.K.; Leavitt, S.W. ); Betancourt, J.L. )

    1994-04-08

    Measurements of stomatal density and [sigma][sup 13]C of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) needles (leaves) preserved in pack rat middens from the Great Basin reveal shifts in plant physiology and leaf morphology during the last 30,000 years. Sites were selected so as to offset glacial to Holocene climatic differences and thus to isolate the effects of changing atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels. Stomatal density decreased [approximately]17 percent and [sigma][sup 13]C decreased [approximately]1.5 per mil during deglaciation from 15,000 to 12,000 years ago, concomitant with a 30 percent increase in atmospheric CO[sub 2]. Water-use efficiency increased [approximately]15 percent during deglaciation, if temperature and humidity were held constant and the proxy values for CO[sub 2] and [sigma][sup 13]C of past atmospheres are accurate. The [sigma][sup 13]C variations may help constrain hypotheses about the redistribution of carbon between the atmosphere and the biosphere during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  18. Climatic control of sediment transport from the Himalayas to the proximal NE Bengal Fan during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussain, Ronan; Colin, Christophe; Liu, Zhifei; Meynadier, Laure; Fournier, Léa; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Zaragosi, Sébastien; Schmidt, Frédéric; Rojas, Virginia; Bassinot, Franck

    2016-09-01

    Clay mineralogy, siliciclastic grain-size, major elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and εNd analyses of deep-sea sediments cored in the north-eastern Bay of Bengal are used to reconstruct evolution of detrital sources and sediment transport to the proximal part of the Bengal deep-sea fan during the last climatic cycle. εNd values (-13.3 to -9.7) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.721-0.733) indicate a mixture of sediments originating from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers and the Indo-Burman ranges. Interglacial Marine Isotopic Stages (MIS) 5 and 1 are associated with a higher contribution of sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system than is the case for glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2. Siliciclasitic grain-size combined with Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios indicate coarser glacial sediments with numerous turbidite layers. Glacial turbidite layers display similar clay mineralogical compositions to hemipelagic sediments. Only few of turbidite layers (MIS 6, 4, and 2) are slightly unradiogenic (εNd -13.3), suggesting a higher contribution of Ganges-Brahmaputra river sediments. Independently of changes in the sedimentary sources, the smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio of cores located on the NE Bengal Fan indicates higher inputs of primary minerals (illite and chlorite) from the highlands of the river basins (relief) during glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2 and an increased contribution of pedogenic minerals (smectite and kaolinite) during interglacial MIS 5 and 1. Maximum smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratios during the warm sub-stages of MIS 5 suggest an intensification of summer monsoon rainfall associated with higher rates of physical erosion of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain and/or dominant summer hydrological conditions transporting a higher proportion of sediments deriving from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers to the NE Bengal Fan. In addition, a higher production of smectite in soils of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain during periods of intensification of monsoon rainfall cannot be excluded.

  19. Carbon cycle constraints during the last glacial/interglacial cycle derived from [CO2] and δ13Catm measurements from ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Joos, F.; Fischer, H.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic ice cores represent an invaluable source for understanding the climate of the past. Climatically important gases, including CO2, can be extracted from the ice and measured, thus providing atmospheric records for the past 800 kyr. Research has shown that atmospheric CO2 has varied naturally in conjunction with Antarctic air temperature. Additional knowledge of the variations of the stable carbon isotope of CO2, δ13Catm, can help us better understand the processes involved in these fluctuations. Here, we present a complete δ13Catm record extending from 160 kyrBP to the present. The present record, measured primarily on ice from the EPICA Dome C and Talos Dome ice cores, demonstrates a complex interplay of the ocean, terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere carbon reservoirs. For instance, a long-term increasing trend in δ13Catm, starting at the penultimate glacial maximum, extends well into MIS 4, while CO2 shows major drops already between 115 kyrBP and the MIS 5/4 boundary. In contrast, δ13Catm evolved roughly in antiphase during the MIS 4/3 transition with the atmospheric carbon storage increasing by 50 Gt while δ13Catm decreased by 0.5‰, a signal larger than that observed during the last glacial/interglacial termination. This antiphase relationship suggests that a single natural process or multiple processes acting on similar timescales may be responsible for this change in CO2. Modelling studies have shown that the ocean has the greatest impact on the concentration and stable isotope abundance of this greenhouse gas, in particular due to changes in stratification, upwelling, or marine productivity in the Southern Ocean. Similar to the situation at the onset of the last glacial/interglacial termination (Schmitt et al., 2012), the MIS 4/3 transition is characterized by the occurrence of a Heinrich event in the North Atlantic, presumably related to changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and the upwelling of old carbon enriched

  20. Multiple genetic divergences and population expansions of a Mediterranean sandfly, Phlebotomus ariasi, in Europe during the Pleistocene glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Mahamdallie, S S; Pesson, B; Ready, P D

    2011-01-01

    Phlebotomus ariasi is one of the two sandflies transmitting the causative agent of zoonotic leishmaniasis, Leishmania infantum, in France and Iberia, and provides a rare case study of the postglacial re-colonization of France by a Mediterranean species. Four DNA sequences were analysed—mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b), nuclear elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) and two anonymous nuclear loci—for 14–15 French populations and single populations from northeast Spain, northwest Spain, Portugal and Morocco. The presence of cryptic sibling species was not revealed by phylogenetic analyses and testing for reproductive isolation between sympatric populations defined by the two most divergent cyt b haplogroups. No locus was shown to be under positive directional or balancing selection and, therefore, molecular variation was explained demographically. Each nuclear locus showed shallow isolation by distance from Portugal to the French Pyrenees, but for both cyt b and EF-1α there was then a step change to the upland Massif Central, where leading-edge populations showed low diversity at all loci. Multiple genetic divergences and population expansions were detected by analyses of cyt b and dated to the Pleistocene. Endemicity of one cyt b sub-lineage suggested the presence of a refuge north of the Pyrenees during the last glacial period. Monopolization of the Massif Central by genetically differentiated populations of P. ariasi might possibly hinder the northwards spread of leishmaniasis. PMID:20736970

  1. AGN flickering on 10-100 kyr timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Lia F.; Schawinski, Kevin; Kill, Bill; Maksym, Peter; Koss, Michael; Argo, Megan; Urry, Meg; Wong, Ivy; Lintott, Chris

    2016-08-01

    The study of AGN variability on timescales of 10^4-10^5 years is important in order to understand the BH - host galaxy interaction and coevolution. The discovery of "Hanny's Voorwerp" (HV), an extended emission line region associated with the nearby galaxy IC 2497, provided us with a laboratory to study AGN variability over such timescales. HV was illuminated by a strong quasar in IC 2497, but this quasar significantly shut down in the last 200 kyrs. Thanks to its recent shutdown we can now explore the host galaxy unimpeded by the presence of a quasar dominating the observations, while the Voorwerp preserves the echoes of its past activity. Recent studies on the optical properties of hard X-ray selected AGN suggest that AGN may flicker on and off hundreds or thousands times with each burst lasting ~10^5 yrs. Systems similar to IC 2497 and HV, the so-called Voorwerpjes, allow us to constrain the last stages of the AGN lifecycle. On the other hand, we recently suggested that the switch on phase may be observed in the so-called optically elusive AGN. In this talk I will review both observational evidence and results from simulation work which support this picture, and explain how optically elusive AGN and Voorwerpjes galaxies can help us to understand different phases of the AGN lifecycle. Moreover, I will discuss possible implications for AGN feedback, BH - host galaxy coevolution, and the analogy between AGN and X-ray binaries accretion physics.

  2. Challenge of modelling the climate of the last glacial-interglacial cycle and millennial climate change as a background of evolution of modern Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Chan, Wing-Le; O'ishi, Ryouta; Obrochta, Stephen; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Kondo, Yasuhisa; Yoneda, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    The environment of the evolution of Homo-Sapience is characterized by the climate change of glacial-interglacial cycle (about 125 thousand years in the past), which includes frequent occurrence of abrupt climate change (Dansgaard Oeschger events, = D-O events) of millenial time scale during the marine isotope stage 3. I We will have an overview on our work which we investigate the glacial-interglacial climate change and D-O events and its influence on vegetation of Africa through Eurasia (Europe and Asia). The numerical simulations are based on several model types, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-land GCM, MIROC, developed in Japan as well as ice sheet model IcIES, and a dynamical vegetation model LPJ. The condition that is given and changed for each time period is the following: orbital parameter (so called Milankovitch forcing) which influence the seasonal-latitudinal insolation, atmospheric content such as Carbon dioxide, ice sheet extent, and melt water from the ice sheet, which influence the ocean circulation and induce abrupt climate change. A transient ice sheet model behaviour is analyzed with the ice sheet model with climatic parameterization (Abe-Ouchi et al, 2013, Nature). Several snap shots of experimentsf are obtained both by slab ocean coupled GCM and AOGCM for the stadial - interstadial climate states and high resolution AGCM experiments are used to focus on the regional detail. The factors of climate change important for human evolution is examined and discussed, such as the change of climate, hydrology and vegetation associated with the abrupt climate change of D-O events is investigated.

  3. An investigation of carbon cycle dynamics from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present using an earth system model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. T.; Mysak, L. A.; Matthews, D.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity (v. 2.9) is used in this study to investigate carbon cycle dynamics from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present, with a particular emphasis on recreating the Holocene's carbon cycle from 8000-150 years before present (BP). This particular model's strengths are its comprehensive representation of ocean circulation in an ocean GCM (with 1.8° x 3.6° resolution and 19 levels) as well as its ability to perform transient simulations over the entire period between the LGM and the present. Without the explicit representation of peatlands, coral reefs and land use change, the UVic model's natural Holocene carbon cycle produced a decline of 245-254 ppm from 8000 to 150 BP, in contrast to the increase from 260 ppm to 280 ppm actually seen during this period. The effects of deep-ocean calcite compensation (and corresponding lysocline changes) were only a few (1-2) ppm when compared to simulations that had not experienced an ocean chemistry response to thousands of years of post-glacial vegetation uptake. Our experiments thus suggest that, without the contribution of land use, peatland uptake, and coral reefs, a net decline in atmospheric CO2 would have occurred from the mid-Holocene to the beginning of the Industrial era (instead of the 20 ppm increase), regardless of the winds or initial ocean state. However, these findings were discovered to be highly sensitive to the configuration of land ice shelves near Antarctica, with more extensive land ice leading to deeper vertical circulation in the Southern Ocean and a much higher atmospheric CO2 concentration of 260 ppm at 150 BP. Furthermore, simulations forced to follow the observed CO2 trend indicate that 400 PgC would need to be released into the atmosphere by the Earth System in order to account for the 280 ppm seen by the beginning of the Industrial era. Because this would require an improbable release of terrestrial vegetation, the UVic

  4. Dust Deposition and Migration of the ITCZ through the Last Glacial Cycle in the Central Equatorial Pacific (Line Islands).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi Sipala, M. A.; Marcantonio, F.

    2014-12-01

    weakening of the ITCZ during glacial times. Future work on Nd isotope will shed additional light on subtle differences in dust isotopic composition within the source regions of interest, including the different volcanic zones of South America.

  5. Glacial-interglacial cycles of erosion and sediment transport along the western North American margin constrained by reconciling geologic and climate model data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlaningham, S.; Pisias, N. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Hostetler, S. W.; Wilson, K. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether observed shifts in sediment source (indicated by bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar and Nd isotopic tracers) at a northeast Pacific core site are in response to variations in river basin erosion or transport pathways of terrigenous sediment once it reaches the ocean. We synthesize geologic and climate model data sets to evaluate whether climate model (REGCM2) outputs of precipitation-evaporation (P-E) can be linked to observed changes in erosion and landscape evolution along the western North American margin (core site EW9504-17PC, offshore southern Oregon) over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This site is ideally located to test this new approach as it captures the combined sediment fluxes from coastal N. California/S. Oregon and the interior Cascade Volcanic Ranges, which have drastically different 40Ar-39Ar bedrock ages (130-147 Ma versus 10-30 Ma, respectively) and different climate responses occurring on glacial-interglacial timescales. We perturb a watershed-scale model of bedrock 40Ar-39Ar ages by the P-E changes to reproduce the total range of variability observed in downcore, bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar ages and Nd isotopic values at the core site. We find that climate model percent changes in P-E values cannot reproduce the total range of variability seen in the provenance record before 22 ka without invoking drastic reductions in Klamath Mountain and Eel River sediment sources. A relatively unconstrained variable in the source area at this time is the presence of a large pluvial lake, Lake Modoc. It is possible that discharges from it could carry large volumes of young, Cascade Mountain-derived sediments offshore. Alternatively, an offshore switch in ocean current direction or reduction (relative to present-day) could explain the downcore sedimentological changes, as material discharged from the Eel River (the largest sediment source south of the core site) would not be carried north. To reproduce the observed downcore shift in

  6. Endogenic carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    that is at least 50 yr old, and probably older. Apparently, the microbialite mound also stopped forming aragonite cement sometime after Bear River diversion. Because of reworking of old aragonite, the bulk mineralogy of carbonate in bottom sediments has not changed very much since the diversion. However, the diversion is marked by very distinct changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of the bulk carbonate. After the last glacial interval (LGI), a large amount of endogenic carbonate began to precipitate in Bear Lake when the Pacific moisture that filled the large pluvial lakes of the Great Basin during the LGI diminished, and Bear River apparently abandoned Bear Lake. At first, the carbonate that formed was low-Mg calcite, but ???11,000 years ago, salinity and Mg2+:Ca2+ thresholds must have been crossed because the amount of aragonite gradually increased. Aragonite is the dominant carbonate mineral that has accumulated in the lake for the past 7000 years, with the addition of high-Mg calcite after the diversion of Bear River into the lake at the beginning of the twentieth century. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Eccentricity pacing of eastern equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cycles during the Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Channell, James E. T.; Lyle, Mitch; Shackford, Julia K.; Wilkens, Roy H.; Andersen, Nils

    2016-09-01

    The Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; ~16.9 to 14.7 Ma) provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate climate-carbon cycle dynamics during a geologically recent interval of global warmth. We present benthic stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope records (5-12 kyr time resolution) spanning the late early to middle Miocene interval (18 to 13 Ma) at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1335 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean). The U1335 stable isotope series track the onset and development of the MCO as well as the transitional climatic phase culminating with global cooling and expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet at ~13.8 Ma. We integrate these new data with published stable isotope, geomagnetic polarity, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanner-derived carbonate records from IODP Sites U1335, U1336, U1337, and U1338 on a consistent, astronomically tuned timescale. Benthic isotope and XRF scanner-derived CaCO3 records depict prominent 100 kyr variability with 400 kyr cyclicity additionally imprinted on δ13C and CaCO3 records, pointing to a tight coupling between the marine carbon cycle and climate variations. Our intersite comparison further indicates that the lysocline behaved in highly dynamic manner throughout the MCO, with >75% carbonate loss occurring at paleodepths ranging from ~3.4 to ~4 km in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. Carbonate dissolution maxima coincide with warm phases (δ18O minima) and δ13C decreases, implying that climate-carbon cycle feedbacks fundamentally differed from the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial pattern, where dissolution maxima correspond to δ13C maxima and δ18O minima. Carbonate dissolution cycles during the MCO were, thus, more similar to Paleogene hyperthermal patterns.

  8. Investigating Sea Ice Regimes and Glacial Cycles of the Early Pleistocene in a Sediment Record from the Northwind Ridge, Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipre, G.; Polyak, L. V.; Ortiz, J. D.; Cook, A.; Oti, E.

    2014-12-01

    We are conducting a comprehensive study of a sediment record from the Arctic Ocean in order to improve our understanding of paleoceanographic conditions during the early Pleistocene, a potential paleo-analog for the current and future states of the Arctic. The study deals with a sediment core raised on the HOTRAX 2005 expedition from the Northwind Ridge, western Arctic Ocean. By comparison with an earlier reported stratigraphy (Polyak et al., 2013), the core dates back to estimated ca. 1.5 Ma. A suite of paleobiological, lithological, and geochemical proxies will be utilized to reconstruct paleoceanographic environments in the early Pleistocene part of the record. In contrast to most Arctic Ocean sediment cores, calcareous microfossils occur in abundance to ca. 1.2 Ma. This enables the use of microfaunal assemblages as proxies for sea-ice conditions, which control the seasonal organic production. Physical properties such as sediment density, grain size, and sediment fabric (based on XCT imagery) will be employed to determine the impact of glaciations on sedimentation. By reconstructing sea-ice history and glacial cycles, we will gain insights into poorly understood controls on the Arctic environments during the early Pleistocene and Mid-Pleistocene Transition.

  9. Effects of midlatitude westerlies on the paleoproductivity at the Agulhas Bank slope during the penultimate glacial cycle: Evidence from coccolith Sr/Ca ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Luz Maria; Ziveri, Patrizia; Cagnetti, Marilisa; Bolton, Clara; Zahn, Rainer; Marino, Gianluca; Martinez Mendez, Gema; Stoll, Heather

    2015-04-01

    Because modern primary productivity on the Agulhas Bank, off South Africa, is linked to the mid-latitude westerlies, a paleoproductivity record from this area could be used to investigate past may changes in the westerlies dynamics. Coccolith Sr/Ca is a suitable productivity indicator to explore paleoproductivity from the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle because it is independent of preservation changes that may accompany changes in deepwater circulation. In the Agulhas Bank slope core MD96-2080, the coccolith Sr/Ca record shows that phases of depressed productivity coincided with periods of stratification in the same core, indicated by high relative abundances of the coccolithophore Florisphaera profunda, and with low relative abundances of the upwelling indicator G. bulloides in the Cape Basin. This coherence suggests that upwelling regulated productivity throughout this region. As in the present, we infer that periods of low productivity result from northward positions of the westerlies which block the upwelling-promoting easterlies. Productivity minima also coincide with periods of increased ice-rafted detritus (IRD) deposition on the Agulhas Plateau, which also indicates extreme northward positions of the westerlies. The influence of the westerlies appears to be obliquity-conditioned, as productivity minima occur during low obliquity intervals. The dynamic connection between productivity and the westerlies is supported by coeval salinity changes in the South Indian Gyre that likewise respond sensitively to a poleward contraction of the westerlies.

  10. New Algorithm for Peat Carbon Accumulation Estimation Reveals and Quantifies the Global Importance of Northern Peatlands to the Late Glacial and Early Holocene Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. E.; Peteet, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Northern peatlands are vital to the global carbon cycle. Previous estimates of global peatland carbon accumulation rates were limited to data from peatlands with robust radiocarbon age models spanning the entire Holocene and Late Glacial periods. This stringent data policy eliminated large amounts of otherwise legitimate radiocarbon measurements. We introduce the AccumC algorithm for calculating carbon accumulation rate. This method has been used previously at single sites, but its flexibility allows it to be used to calculate carbon accumulation in multiple sites simultaneously. Using the AccumC algorithm, we are now able to include radiocarbon measurements from any peat, regardless of how many measurements were made from the same site. Our full dataset includes radiocarbon measurements from Loisel et al., 2014 (L-14), the Neotoma Paleoecology Database, the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), and other published sources. With our expanded dataset, we have extended our record of northern peatland accumulation rates back to 22 ka, including the important deglacial period. We also now have sufficient data to divide carbon accumulation geographically into several peat-forming regions. The Holocene portion of the global record reinforces previous estimates, but the increased temporal resolution has uncovered new details, such as a previously unreported increase from 7 to 5 ka. We have also identified high rates of carbon accumulation during the Allerød warm interval and even a relative increase during the mystery interval (17.5 - 14.5 ka).

  11. Coherent millennial-scale patterns in U37k‧ and TEX86H temperature records during the penultimate interglacial-to-glacial cycle in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Carme; Martrat, Belen; Grimalt, Joan O.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The TEX86H temperature proxy is a relatively new proxy based on crenarchaeotal lipids and has rarely been applied together with other temperature proxies. In this study, we applied the TEX86H on a sediment core from the Alboran Sea (western Mediterranean, core ODP-977A) covering the penultimate climate cycle, that is, from 244 to 130 ka, and compared this with previously published sea surface temperatures derived from the U37k' of alkenones of haptophyta and Mg/Ca records of planktonic foraminifera. The TEX86H temperature record shows remarkably similar stadial-interstadial patterns and abrupt temperature changes to those observed with the U37k' palaeothermometer. Absolute TEX86H temperature estimates are generally higher than those of U37k', though this difference (<3°C in 81% of the data points) is mainly within the temperature calibration error for both proxies, suggesting that crenarchaeota and haptophyta experienced similar temperature variations. During occasional events (<5% of the analyzed time span), however, the TEX86H exhibits considerably higher absolute temperature estimates than the U37k'. Comparison with Mg/Ca records of planktonic foraminifera as well as other Mediterranean TEX86 and U37k' records suggests that part of this divergence may be attributed to seasonal differences, that is, with TEX86H reflecting mainly the warm summer season while U37k' would show annual mean. Biases in the global calibration of both proxies or specific biases in the Mediterranean are an alternative, though less likely, explanation. Despite differences between absolute TEX86H and U37k' temperatures, the correlation between the two proxies (r2 = 0.59, 95% significance) provides support for the occurrence of abrupt temperature variations in the western Mediterranean during the penultimate interglacial-to-glacial cycle.

  12. Dust transport from Patagonia to Antarctica - A new stratigraphic approach from the Scotia Sea and its implications for the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Kuhn, G.; Sprenk, D.; Rolf, C.; Ohlwein, C.; Ricken, W.

    2012-03-01

    We studied two deep-sea cores from the Scotia Sea to reconstruct past atmospheric circulation in the southern hemisphere and to resolve a long-standing debate on the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility (MS) records in Southern Ocean (SO) sediment. High-sedimentation sites MD07-3134 (0.2-1.2 m/kyr) and MD07-3133 (0.3-2.1 m/kyr) cover the last 92.5 kyr and 36 kyr, respectively. Both exhibit a one-to-one coupling of the MS and Ca2+ signal to the non-sea salt (nss) Ca2+ signal of the EDML ice core, clearly identifying atmospheric circulation as means of distribution. Comparison of additional proxies also excludes major influence by volcanic sources, sea-ice, icebergs, or oceanic current transport. The close resemblance of the dust proxies over the last glacial cycle, in turn, allows for the establishment of an age model of unprecedented resolution and precision for SO deep-sea sediment because atmospheric transport involves no major leads or lags. This is of particular importance because MS is routinely measured on deep-sea cores in the SO but the sediments usually lack biogenic carbonate and therefore had only limited stratigraphic control so far. Southern South America (SSA) is the likely source of eolian material because Site MD07-3133, located closer to the continent, has slightly higher MS values than Site MD07-3134, and also the MS record of Patagonian Site SALSA shows comparable variability. Patagonia was the dust source for both the Scotia Sea and East Antarctica. Dust fluxes were several times higher during glacial times, when atmospheric circulation was either stronger or shifted in latitude, sea level was lowered, shelf surfaces were exposed, and environmental conditions in SSA were dominated by glaciers and extended outwash plains. Hence, MS records of SO deep-sea sediment are reliable tracers of atmospheric circulation, allowing for chronologically-constrained reconstructions of the circum Antarctic paleoclimate history.

  13. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  14. Impact of glacial/interglacial changes in water column geochemistry on the diagenetic cycling of barium in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Henkel, S.; Mogollón, J. M.; Nöthen, K.; Franke, C.; Bogus, K.; Robin, E.; Bahr, A.; Blumenberg, M.; Pape, T.; Seifert, R.; Marz, C.; De Lange, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in depositional conditions and redox environment over time affect biogeochemical processes in the seabed and in this way control the variable and selective preservation, alteration and formation of various sediment constituents and attributes - including particulate organic matter, mineral assemblages and magnetic properties. As many of these solid-phase compounds are used as paleo-environmental tracers or stratigraphic tools an assessment of diagenetic influences on the sedimentary record is crucial for accurate environmental reconstructions. We present an integrated approach of pore-water and solid-phase geochemistry as well as transport reaction modeling for sediments of the Black Sea to assess the biogeochemical history of these deposits with particular emphasis on post-depositional redistribution of barium as a consequence of changes in water column geochemistry and redox (Henkel et al., 2012). High-resolution sedimentary records of major and minor elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Sr, Ti), total organic carbon (TOC), and profiles of pore-water constituents (SO42-, CH4, Ca2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, alkalinity) were obtained for two gravity cores (core 755, 501 m water depth and core 214, 1686 m water depth) from the northwestern Black Sea. The records were examined in order to gain insight into the cycling of Ba in anoxic marine sediments characterized by a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT) as well as the applicability of barite as a primary productivity proxy in such a setting. The Ba records are strongly overprinted by diagenetic barite (BaSO4) remobilization and precipitation; authigenic Ba enrichments were found at both sites at and slightly above the current SMT. Transport reaction modeling was applied to simulate the migration of the SMT during the changing geochemical conditions after the Holocene seawater intrusion into the Black Sea. Based on this, sediment intervals affected by diagenetic Ba redistribution were identified. Results reveal that the intense

  15. Low-high latitude interaction forcing on the evolution of the 400 kyr cycle in East Asian winter monsoon records during the last 2.8 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Meixun; Tian, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Variability of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM), stronger during glacials and weaker during interglacials, has been tightly linked to the wax and wane of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHIS) via the Siberian High over the last 2.8 million years (Myr). However, the long eccentricity cycle (ca. 400 kyr) in the EAWM record from the late Pliocene to early-Pleistocene (2.8-1.2 Ma) could not be linked to NHIS changes, which lacked the long eccentricity cycle in the Pleistocene. Here, we present the first low latitude EAWM record of the last 2.8 Myr using surface and subsurface temperature difference from the northern South China Sea to evaluate interactions between tropical ocean and EAWM changes. The results show that the EAWM variability displayed significant 400 kyr cycle between 2.8 Ma and 1.2 Ma, with weak (strong) EAWM during high (low) earth orbital eccentricity state. A super El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) proxy record, calculated using west-east equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature differences, revealed 400 kyr cycles throughout the last 2.8 Myr with warm phase during high eccentricity state. Thus, we propose that super ENSO mean state strongly modulated the EAWM strength through remote forcing to generate the 400 kyr cycle between 2.8 Ma and 1.2 Ma, while low NHIS volume was not sufficient to dominate the EAWM variation as it did over the last 0.9 Myr with 100 kyr cycles in dominance.

  16. Post-glacial inflation-deflation cycles, tilting, and faulting in the Yellowstone Caldera based on Yellowstone Lake shorelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Cannon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Grant A.; Trebesch, Matthew J.; Watts, Raymond D.

    2002-01-01

    by a ~5 m rise in lake level to S2. The lowest generally recognizable shoreline is S2. It is ~5 m above datum (3 m above S1) and is ~8 ka, as dated on both sides of the outlet. Yellowstone Lake and the river near Fishing Bridge were 5-6 m below their present level about 3-4 ka, as indicated by 14C ages from submerged beach deposits, drowned valleys, and submerged Yellowstone River gravels. Thus, the lake in the outlet region has been below or near its present level for about half the time since a 1 km-thick icecap melted from the Yellowstone Lake basin about 16 ka. The amplitude of two rises in lake and river level can be estimated based on the altitude of Le Hardys Rapids, indicators of former lake and river levels, and reconstruction of the river gradient from the outlet to Le Hardys Rapids. Both between ~9.5 ka and ~8.5 ka, and after ~3 ka, Le Hardys Rapids (LHR) was uplifted about 8 meters above the outlet, suggesting a cyclic deformation process. Older possible rises in lake level are suggested by locations where the ~10.7 ka S4 truncates older shorelines, and valleys truncated by the ~12.6 ka S5 shoreline. Using these controls, a plot of lake level through time shows 5-7 millennial-scale oscillations since 14.5 ka. Major cycles of inflation and deflation are thousands of years long. Le Hardys Rapids has twice been uplifted ~8 m relative to the lake outlet. These two locations span only the central 25% of the historic caldera doming, so that if we use historic doming as a model, total projected uplift would be ~32 m. This ?heavy breathing? of the central part of the Yellowstone caldera may reflect a combination of several possible processes: magmatic inflation, tectonic stretching and deflation, and hydrothermal fluid sealing and inflation followed by cracking of the seal, pressure release, and deflation. Over the entire postglacial period, subsidence has balanced or slightly exceeded uplift as shown by older shorelines that descend towards the caldera axis. We

  17. Effects of midlatitude westerlies on the paleoproductivity at the Agulhas Bank slope during the penultimate glacial cycle: Evidence from coccolith Sr/Ca ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Luz María.; Ziveri, Patrizia; Cagnetti, Marilisa; Bolton, Clara; Zahn, Rainer; Marino, Gianluca; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Stoll, Heather

    2014-07-01

    Modern primary productivity on the Agulhas Bank, off South Africa, has been proposed to be linked to the midlatitude westerlies. A paleoproductivity record from this area may therefore resolve temporal changes in the westerly dynamics. Accordingly, we produced a coccolith Sr/Ca-based paleoproductivity record from core MD96-2080 (Agulhas Bank slope) during the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle. Deriving the productivity signal from Sr/Ca requires a correction for a temperature effect, here constrained using Mg/Ca sea surface temperatures from the foraminifer Globigerina bulloides from core MD96-2080. Phases of depressed productivity coincided with periods of stratification in the same core, indicated by high relative abundances of the coccolithophore Florisphaera profunda and with low relative abundances of the upwelling indicator G. bulloides in the nearby Cape Basin. These observations collectively suggest that productivity was regulated by upwelling throughout this region. We infer that, as in the present, periods of low productivity result from a more northerly position of the westerlies, potentially accompanied by subtropical front displacements, and blockage of upwelling promoting easterlies. Productivity minima also coincide with periods of increased ice-rafted detritus (IRD) deposition on the Agulhas Plateau, which also indicates extreme northward positions of the westerlies. The influence of the westerlies appears to be obliquity conditioned, as productivity minima (and IRD maxima) occur during low-obliquity intervals. The dynamic connection between productivity and the westerlies is supported by coeval salinity changes in the South Indian Gyre that likewise respond sensitively to a poleward contraction of the westerlies.

  18. Responses of ocean circulation and carbon cycle to changes in the position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies at Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Völker, Christoph; Köhler, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We explore the impact of a latitudinal shift in the westerly wind belt over the Southern Ocean on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and on the carbon cycle for Last Glacial Maximum background conditions using a state-of-the-art ocean general circulation model. We find that a southward (northward) shift in the westerly winds leads to an intensification (weakening) of no more than 10% of the AMOC. This response of the ocean physics to shifting winds agrees with other studies starting from preindustrial background climate, but the responsible processes are different. In our setup changes in AMOC seemed to be more pulled by upwelling in the south than pushed by downwelling in the north, opposite to what previous studies with different background climate are suggesting. The net effects of the changes in ocean circulation lead to a rise in atmospheric pCO2 of less than 10 μatm for both northward and southward shift in the winds. For northward shifted winds the zone of upwelling of carbon- and nutrient-rich waters in the Southern Ocean is expanded, leading to more CO2outgassing to the atmosphere but also to an enhanced biological pump in the subpolar region. For southward shifted winds the upwelling region contracts around Antarctica, leading to less nutrient export northward and thus a weakening of the biological pump. These model results do not support the idea that shifts in the westerly wind belt play a dominant role in coupling atmospheric CO2 rise and Antarctic temperature during deglaciation suggested by the ice core data.

  19. Responses of ocean circulation and carbon cycle to changes in the position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies at Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Christoph; Köhler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We explore the impact of a latitudinal shift in the westerly wind belt over the Southern Ocean on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and on the carbon cycle for Last Glacial Maximum background conditions using a state-of-the-art ocean general circulation model. We find that a southward (northward) shift in the westerly winds leads to an intensification (weakening) of no more than 10% of the AMOC. This response of the ocean physics to shifting winds agrees with other studies starting from preindustrial background climate, but the responsible processes are different. In our setup changes in AMOC seemed to be more pulled by upwelling in the south than pushed by downwelling in the north, opposite to what previous studies with different background climate are suggesting. The net effects of the changes in ocean circulation lead to a rise in atmospheric pCO2 of less than 10 μatm for both northward and southward shift in the winds. For northward shifted winds the zone of upwelling of carbon- and nutrient-rich waters in the Southern Ocean is expanded, leading to more CO2outgassing to the atmosphere but also to an enhanced biological pump in the subpolar region. For southward shifted winds the upwelling region contracts around Antarctica, leading to less nutrient export northward and thus a weakening of the biological pump. These model results do not support the idea that shifts in the westerly wind belt play a dominant role in coupling atmospheric CO2 rise and Antarctic temperature during deglaciation suggested by the ice core data. PMID:26074663

  20. Vegetation and climate changes in the South Eastern Mediterranean during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle (86 ka): new marine pollen record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langgut, D.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Weinstein-Evron, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean, located at the meeting between the Mediterranean vegetation of the Eurasian continent and the desert vegetation of the Saharan-Arabian desert belt, is ideal for tracking changes in regional vegetation as function of climate changes. Reconstruction of these changes in the South Eastern Mediterranean during the last 86 ka is based on a palynological record, from deep-sea core 9509, taken by R/V Marion Dufresne, off the southern Israeli coast. The chronological framework is based on the correlation of δ 18O records of planktonic foraminifera with the high resolution, well-dated U-Th speleothem record from the Soreq Cave, Israel and the occurrence of sapropel layers. Several cycles of humid/dry periods were documented during the last 86 ka. The record starts with the moderate humid and warm sapropel S3 marking the end of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. The climate during the Last Glacial period (75.5-16.2 ka) was cold and dry, with low Arboreal Pollen (AP) levels, and high values of semi-desert and desert vegetation (e.g. Artemisia - sagebrush). The driest and coldest period during the last 86 ka corresponds to MIS 2 (27.1-16.2 ka), characterized by the lowest tree cover along the sequence and the dominance of steppe vegetation. Some slightly more humid fluctuations were identified during the period of 56.3 and 43.5 ka with its peak between 56.0 and 54.4 ka. The most pronounced climate change started at the beginning of the Deglaciation (16.2-10 ka) and continued throughout the Holocene (last 10 ka), notwithstanding some short fluctuations. High AP levels were dominated by Quercus callipprinos (evergreen oak), suggesting that the Mediterranean forest was more extensive in the area and the climate was wet. Sapropels S3 and S1 were clearly recognized here by the high concentrations and good state of preservation of pollen because of the development of anoxia in the bottom water that may be related to more extensive Nile discharge coinciding with

  1. Glacial and marine chronology of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Natasha; Knight, Christine

    1992-01-01

    A summary is given of the glacial and marine chronology of Mars. Hydrological models of oceans and ice sheets, the cratering record, hydrological cycling, and episodic glaciation are discussed. Evidence for a Noachian ocean is evaluated.

  2. Chronology of Late Quaternary Glacial Cycles in the Bering Trough, Gulf of Alaska: Constraints from Core-Log-Seismic Integration across the Continental Shelf and Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, W. A.; Worthington, L. L.; Daigle, H.; Slagle, A. L.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2016-12-01

    Sediments offshore Southern Alaska offer a natural laboratory to study glacial erosion, sediment deposition, and orogenesis. A major goal of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341 was investigation of interrelationships among tectonic processes, paleoclimate, and glacial activity. Here, we focus on core-log-seismic integration of IODP Sites U1420 and U1421 on the shallow shelf and slope near the Bering Trough, a glacially derived shelf-crossing landform. These sites sample glacial and marine sediments that record a history of sedimentation following the onset of glacial intensification near the mid-Pleistocene transition (1.2 Ma) and Yakutat microplate convergence with North America. Ocean drilling provides important stratigraphic, physical properties, and age data in depth which support development of a stratigraphic model that can be extended across the shelf if carefully calibrated to local and regional seismic surveys. We use high resolution multichannel seismic, core, and logging data to develop a time-depth relationship (TDR) and update the developing chronostratigraphic model based on correlation of seismic sequence boundaries and drilling-related data, including biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic age controls. We calibrate, combine, and interpolate core and logging data at each site to minimize gaps in physical property information and generate synthetic seismic traces. At Site U1421, vertical seismic profiling further constrains the TDR, and provides input for the initial velocity model during the tie. Finally, we match reflectors in the synthetic trace with events in nearby seismic reflection data to establish a TDR at each site. We can use this relationship to better interpret the development of the Bering Trough, a recurring and favored path for ice streams and glacial advance. Initial results suggest late Pleistocene sedimentation rates of at least 1 km/m.y. on average, and variable sedimentation rates which are possibly correlated

  3. Carbon Dioxide Weathering Flux Since the Last Glacial Maximum to the Present, its Control of River Water Composition, and its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerman, A.; Wu, L.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2006-12-01

    A weathering potential ψ = (net CO2 consumed)/(HCO3- produced) describes the consumption of CO2 in mineral weathering reactions. Based on the reaction stoichiometry, ψ = 0.5 for pure carbonates and 1.0 for the crystalline silicate continental crust, with intermediate values for mixed- mineralogy rocks. Carbon dioxide is the main driver of mineral weathering reactions as an acid derived from the atmosphere and(or) remineralization of organic matter in soil, and it is supplemented by small, but perhaps regionally important, amounts of H2SO4 forming in the oxidation of pyrite. The projected anthropogenic emissions of SO2 to the atmosphere may provide H2SO4 to the continental surface at a rate that is 3 to 5 times greater than its natural production by the oxidation of sedimentary pyrite. The higher H2SO4 input may increase the main ionic concentrations in rivers by ~13%, without significantly affecting the CO2 weathering consumption. Sulfuric acid produces HCO3- or CO2 by reactions with the carbonates. In the global carbon cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present, the CO2 uptake in the weathering layer is comparable to other major fluxes in the atmosphere-land-ocean system. The weathering layer thickness depends on the mineral dissolution rates, reactive mineral surface area, particle size, and rock porosity, not all of which are generally well known. In an average world river, the mass proportions of the main cations and anions differ from those in the weathering source consisting of the sediments and part of the continental crust, because of the differences in mineral solubilities and dissolution rates. A dissolution model of a weathering source (63 weight % average sediment and 37% upper continental crust) gives an average river water composition that agrees very well with the composition ranges of other investigators. This dissolution model gives an average CO2 consumption potential of ψ = 0.72 and a sequence of relative stability or persistence in

  4. Glacial Seismology.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard; Winberry, Paul

    2017-08-07

    Seismic source and wave propagation studies contribute to understanding structure, transport, fracture mechanics, mass balance, and other processes within glaciers and their surrounding environments. Glaciogenic seismic waves readily couple with the bulk Earth, and can be recorded by seismographs deployed at local to global ranges. Although the fracturing, ablating, melting, and/or highly irregular environment of active glaciers can be highly unstable and hazardous, informative seismic measurements can commonly be made at stable proximal ice or rock sites. Seismology also contributes more broadly to emerging studies of elastic and gravity wave coupling between the atmosphere, oceans, solid Earth, and cryosphere, and recent scientific and technical advances have produced glaciological/seismological collaborations across a broad range of scales and processes. This importantly includes improved insight into the responses of cryospheric systems to changing climate and other environmental conditions. Here, we review relevant fundamental physics and glaciology, and provide a broad review of the current state of glacial seismology and its rapidly evolving future directions. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Vegetation, climate and fire-dynamics in East Africa inferred from the Maundi crater pollen record from Mt Kilimanjaro during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Lisa; Hemp, Andreas; Zech, Wolfgang; Behling, Hermann

    2012-04-01

    The pollen, charcoal and sedimentological record from the Maundi crater, located at 2780 m elevation on the south-eastern slope of Mt Kilimanjaro, is one of the longest terrestrial records in equatorial East Africa, giving an interesting insight into the vegetation and climate dynamics back to the early last Glacial period. Our sediment record has a reliable chronology until 42 ka BP. An extrapolation of the age-depth model, as well as matching with other palaeo-records from tropical East Africa, suggest a total age of about 90 ka BP at the bottom of the record. During the last Glacial the distribution as well as the composition of the vegetation belts classified as colline savanna, submontane woodland, montane forest, ericaceous belt, and alpine vegetation changed. The early last Glacial is characterized by high amounts of Poaceae and Asteraceae pollen suggesting a climatically dry but stable phase. Based on the absence of pollen grains in samples deposited around 70 ka BP, we assume the occurrence of distinct drought periods. During the pre-LGM (Last Glacial Maximum) a higher taxa diversity of the ericaceous and montane zone is recorded and suggests a spread of forest and shrub vegetation, thus indicating a more humid period. The taxa diversity increases steadily during the recorded time span. The decent of vegetation zones indicate dry and cold conditions during the LGM and seem to have been detrimental for many taxa, especially those of the forest vegetation; however, the early last Glacial seems to have been markedly drier than the LGM. The reappearance of most of the taxa (most importantly Alchemilla, Araliaceae, Dodonea, Hagenia, Ilex, Myrsine, Moraceae, Piperaceae) during the deglacial and Holocene period suggest a shift into humid conditions. An increase in ferns and the decrease in grasses during the Holocene also indicate increasing humidity. Fire played an important role in controlling the development and elevation of the ericaceous zone and the tree

  6. Glacial-Interglacial changes in silicon cycling in the subarctic North Pacific: Insights from diatom δ30Si over Termination 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevenell, A.; Emerson, S. R.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Swann, G.; Jaccard, S.

    2009-12-01

    Subarctic North Pacific Ocean paleoceanographic records reveal a breakdown of glacial surface and deepwater stratification and an increase in biogenic opal flux during each of the large deglaciations since the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (2.7 Ma). The North Pacific oceanographic and biogenic changes are similar to those observed in the Southern Ocean, suggesting a potential role for the North Pacific in regulating glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. To better understand the role of North Pacific ventilation and biological productivity in glacial-interglacial climate variability, we generated a detailed silicon isotope (δ30Si; a proxy for the extent of dissolved silicon depletion in surface waters) record from biogenic opal across Termination 1 (20-9 ka) at ODP Site 882 in the western North Pacific (50°21’N, 167°35’E; water depth: 3244 m). At present, Site 882 is situated in an iron limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyl region of the North Pacific. The δ30Si data range between 0.04-1.54‰ with the lowest isotopic values occurring between 25 and 15 ka, when opal accumulation rates are relatively low. A 1‰ increase in δ30Si occurs between 15.3 and 14.3 ka, coincident with an increase in opal accumulation rates and the arrival of more oxygenated deep waters to Site 882. However, the increase in δ30Si begins 1500 years before the abrupt increase in opal accumulation associated with the onset of the Bolling/Allerod (B/A). Elevated δ30Si values characterize the deglacial interval between 14.4 and 10.3 ka, but decline progressively after reaching a peak value (1.54‰) at 13 ka. Holocene δ30Si values are ~1‰. Our results may reflect an increase in the percent drawdown of available silicic acid during the last glacial maximum resulting from stratification of regional surface waters and/or the addition of iron-rich dust. Low glacial δ30Si values at Site 882 and the abrupt increase at the B/A may relate to a change in regional source

  7. Core-seismic investigation of Surveyor Channel tributaries: Glacial history of the southern Alaskan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somchat, K.; Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Asahi, H.; Mix, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    deposition and has implications for how glacial ice at high latitude margins can shape continental margins on a 100 kyr timescale.

  8. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial-interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere. There is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial-interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil

  9. Extinction and recolonization of maritime Antarctica in the limpet Nacella concinna (Strebel, 1908) during the last glacial cycle: toward a model of Quaternary biogeography in shallow Antarctic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    González-Wevar, C A; Saucède, T; Morley, S A; Chown, S L; Poulin, E

    2013-10-01

    Quaternary glaciations in Antarctica drastically modified geographical ranges and population sizes of marine benthic invertebrates and thus affected the amount and distribution of intraspecific genetic variation. Here, we present new genetic information in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna, a dominant Antarctic benthic species along shallow ice-free rocky ecosystems. We examined the patterns of genetic diversity and structure in this broadcast spawner along maritime Antarctica and from the peri-Antarctic island of South Georgia. Genetic analyses showed that N. concinna represents a single panmictic unit in maritime Antarctic. Low levels of genetic diversity characterized this population; its median-joining haplotype network revealed a typical star-like topology with a short genealogy and a dominant haplotype broadly distributed. As previously reported with nuclear markers, we detected significant genetic differentiation between South Georgia Island and maritime Antarctica populations. Higher levels of genetic diversity, a more expanded genealogy and the presence of more private haplotypes support the hypothesis of glacial persistence in this peri-Antarctic island. Bayesian Skyline plot and mismatch distribution analyses recognized an older demographic history in South Georgia. Approximate Bayesian computations did not support the persistence of N. concinna along maritime Antarctica during the last glacial period, but indicated the resilience of the species in peri-Antarctic refugia (South Georgia Island). We proposed a model of Quaternary Biogeography for Antarctic marine benthic invertebrates with shallow and narrow bathymetric ranges including (i) extinction of maritime Antarctic populations during glacial periods; (ii) persistence of populations in peri-Antarctic refugia; and (iii) recolonization of maritime Antarctica following the deglaciation process.

  10. Post-Glacial Climate Forcing of Surface Processes in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Basin and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, C. J.; Galy, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Galy, A.; Kudrass, H. R.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.

    2016-12-01

    Silicate weathering coupled with carbonate precipitation and organic carbon (OC) burial in marine sediments are the primary mechanisms sequestering atmospheric CO2 over a range of timescales. The efficiency of both processes has long been mechanistically linked to climate: increased atmospheric CO2 sequestration under warm/wet conditions acts as a negative feedback, thereby contributing to global climate regulation. Over glacial-interglacial timescales, climate has been proposed to control the export rate of terrestrial silicate weathering products and terrestrial OC to river-dominated margins, as well as the rates of chemical weathering (i.e., the efficiency of carbon sequestration). Focused on the Ganges-Brahmaputra drainage basin, this study quantifies the relative role of climate change in the efficiency of silicate weathering and OC burial following the last glacial maximum. Stable hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ13C) isotopic compositions of terrestrial plant wax compounds preserved in the Bengal Fan channel-levee system capture variations in the strength of the Indian summer monsoon and vegetation dynamics. Specifically, a 40‰ shift in δD and a 4‰ shift in both bulk OC and plant wax δ13C values between the late glacial and mid-Holocene, followed by a return to more intermediate values during the late Holocene, correlate well with regional post-glacial paleoclimate records. Sediment provenance proxies (Sr, Nd isotopic compositions) reveal that these changes coincided with a focusing of erosion on the southern flank of the Himalayan range during periods of greater monsoon strength and enhanced sediment discharge. However, OC loading, and thus carbon burial efficiency, in the Bengal Fan remained constant through time, demonstrating the primacy of physical erosion and climate-driven sediment export in marine OC sequestration. In contrast, a gradual increase in K/Si* and Ca/Si, and decrease in H2O+/Si*, throughout the study period may demonstrate the

  11. The cold climate geomorphology of the Eastern Cape Drakensberg: A reevaluation of past climatic conditions during the last glacial cycle in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S. C.; Barrows, T. T.; Telfer, M. W.; Fifield, L. K.

    2017-02-01

    Southern Africa is located in a unique setting for investigating past cold climate geomorphology over glacial-interglacial timescales. It lies at the junction of three of the world's major oceans and is affected by subtropical and temperate circulation systems, therefore recording changes in Southern Hemisphere circulation patterns. Cold climate landforms are very sensitive to changes in climate and thus provide an opportunity to investigate past changes in this region. The proposed existence of glaciers in the high Eastern Cape Drakensberg mountains, together with possible rock glaciers, has led to the suggestion that temperatures in this region were as much as 10-17 °C lower than present. Such large temperature depressions are inconsistent with many other palaeoclimatic proxies in Southern Africa. This paper presents new field observations and cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages from putative cold climate landforms. We discuss alternative interpretations for the formation of the landforms and confirm that glaciers were absent in the Eastern Cape Drakensberg during the last glaciation. However, we find widespread evidence for periglacial activity down to an elevation of 1700 m asl, as illustrated by extensive solifluction deposits, blockstreams, and stone garlands. These periglacial deposits suggest that the climate was significantly colder ( 6 °C) during the Last Glacial Maximum, in keeping with other climate proxy records from the region, but not cold enough to initiate or sustain glaciers or rock glaciers.

  12. Orbital forcing of glacial/interglacial variations in chemical weathering and silicon cycling within the upper White Nile basin, East Africa: Stable-isotope and biomarker evidence from Lakes Victoria and Edward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerton, Helen E.; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Barker, Philip A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Ficken, Katherine J.

    2015-12-01

    On Quaternary time scales, the global biogeochemical cycle of silicon is interlocked with the carbon cycle through biotic enhancement of silicate weathering and uptake of dissolved silica by vascular plants and aquatic microalgae (notably diatoms, for which Si is an essential nutrient). Large tropical river systems dominate the export of Si from the continents to the oceans. Here, we investigate variations in Si cycling in the upper White Nile basin over the last 15 ka, using sediment cores from Lakes Victoria and Edward. Coupled measurements of stable O and Si isotopes on diatom separates were used to reconstruct past changes in lake hydrology and Si cycling, while the abundances of lipid biomarkers characteristic of terrestrial/emergent higher plants, submerged/floating aquatic macrophytes and freshwater algae document past ecosystem changes. During the late-glacial to mid-Holocene, 15-5.5 ka BP, orbital forcing greatly enhanced monsoon rainfall, forest cover and chemical weathering. Riverine inputs of dissolved silica from the lake catchments exceeded aquatic demand and may also have had lower Si-isotope values. Since 5.5 ka BP, increasingly dry climates and more open vegetation, reinforced by the spread of agricultural cropland over the last 3-4 ka, have reduced dissolved silica inputs into the lakes. Centennial-to millennial-scale dry episodes are also evident in the isotopic records and merit further investigation.

  13. Holocene glacial fluctuations in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhout, S.; Sagredo, E. A.; Kaplan, M. R.; Aravena, J. C.; Martini, M. A.; Strelin, J. A.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the timing and magnitude of former glacier fluctuations is critical to decipher long-term climatic trends and to unravel both natural cycles and human impact on the current glacial behavior. Despite more than seven decades of research efforts, a unifying model of Holocene glacial fluctuations in Southern South America remains elusive. Here, we present the state-of-the-art regarding the timing of Holocene glacial fluctuation in southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego, with a focus on a new generation of high-resolution radiocarbon and 10Be surface exposure dating chronologies. Recently acquired evidence suggest that after receding from advanced Late Glacial positions, Patagonian glaciers were for the most part close to, or even behind, present ice margins during the Early Holocene. On the other hand, emerging chronologies indicate that in some areas there were extensive expansions (century scale?) that punctuated the warm interval. Subsequently, we have evidence of multiple millennial timescale glacial advances starting in the middle Holocene. Several glacial maxima are defined by moraines and other landforms from 7000 years ago to the 19th century, with a gap sometime between 4,500 and 2,500 years ago. The last set of advances began around 800-600 years ago. Although glacial activity is documented in Patagonia at the same time as the European Little Ice Age, the extent of these glacial events are less prominent than those of the mid-Holocene. The causes that may explain these glacial fluctuations remain elusive. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to better define the timing and extent of Holocene glaciations in southern South America, and to establish the basis to test competing hypothesis of regional Holocene climate variability.

  14. The silicon isotope composition of Ethmodiscus rex laminated diatom mats from the tropical West Pacific: Implications for silicate cycling during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhifang; Li, Tiegang; Algeo, Thomas; Doering, Kristin; Frank, Martin; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Chang, Fengming; Opfergelt, Sophie; Crosta, Xavier; Jiang, Fuqing; Wan, Shiming; Zhai, Bin

    2015-07-01

    The cause of massive blooms of Ethmodiscus rex laminated diatom mats (LDMs) in the eastern Philippine Sea (EPS) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) remains uncertain. In order to better understand the mechanism of formation of E. rex LDMs from the perspective of dissolved silicon (DSi) utilization, we determined the silicon isotopic composition of single E. rex diatom frustules (δ30SiE. rex) from two sediment cores in the Parece Vela Basin of the EPS. In the study cores, δ30SiE. rex varies from -1.23‰ to -0.83‰ (average -1.04‰), a range that is atypical of marine diatom δ30Si and that corresponds to the lower limit of reported diatom δ30Si values of any age. A binary mixing model (upwelled silicon versus eolian silicon) accounting for silicon isotopic fractionation during DSi uptake by diatoms was constructed. The binary mixing model demonstrates that E. rex dominantly utilized DSi from eolian sources (i.e., Asian dust) with only minor contributions from upwelled seawater sources (i.e., advected from Subantarctic Mode Water, Antarctic Intermediate Water, or North Pacific Intermediate Water). E. rex utilized only ~24% of available DSi, indicating that surface waters of the EPS were eutrophic with respect to silicon during the LGM. Our results suggest that giant diatoms did not always use a buoyancy strategy to obtain nutrients from the deep nutrient pool, thus revising previously proposed models for the formation of E. rex LDMs.

  15. Nutrient Dynamics in the Glacial Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, J. C.; Filippelli, G. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) was likely a key contributor to glacial/interglacial climate change resulting from variability either in biogeochemical cycles or ocean stratification and CO2 degassing. Many of the hypotheses to explain the interglacial to glacial difference in atmospheric CO2 suggest that higher glacial dust fluxes led to Fe fertilization of surface waters and increased export production in the SO because the modern-day Southern Ocean is co-limited by both Fe and light availability. Documented Fe sources include upwelled Upper Circumpolar Deep Water, eolian deposition, and melting sea-ice. However, the influence of these sources is variable with latitude and position relative to major frontal zones. Presumably these same Fe sources were important during glacial times albeit at potentially different rates and magnitudes. To examine this effect, we have compared sedimentary Fe fluxes with records of dust deposition. We have found that Fe fluxes are higher than can be explained by eolian deposition, supporting an additional hemipelagic source of Fe to the deep ocean during glacial intervals. Furthermore, different proxies used to evaluate export production and nutrient utilization during glacial intervals yield different and seemingly contradictory results-for example, different studies have concluded that net productivity increased, decreased, and/or remained constant in the SO. Results from phosphorus geochemistry suggest that maxima in export production actually occur at terminations rather than either full glacial or interglacial conditions adding yet another possibility. The focus here will be to try to reconcile the nutrient, export production, and Fe data into a coherent view of nutrient utilization and export production in the glacial SO.

  16. Climatic vs. tectonic control on glacial relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasicek, Günther; Herman, Frederic; Robl, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The limiting effect of a climatically-induced glacial buzz-saw on the height of mountain ranges has been extensively discussed in the geosciences. The buzz-saw concept assumes that solely climate controls the amount of topography present above the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), while the rock uplift rate plays no relevant role. This view is supported by analyses of hypsometric patterns in orogens worldwide. Furthermore, numerical landscape evolution models show that glacial erosion modifies the hypsometry and reduces the overall relief of mountain landscapes. However, such models often do not incorporate tectonic uplift and can only simulate glacial erosion over a limited amount of time, typically one or several glacial cycles. Constraints on glacial end-member landscapes from analytical, time-independent models are widely lacking. Here we present a steady-state solution for a glacier equilibrium profile in an active orogen modified from the mathematical conception presented by Headley et al. (2012). Our approach combines a glacial erosion law with the shallow ice approximation, specifically the formulations of ice sliding and deformation velocities and ice flux, to calculate ice surface and bed topography from prescribed specific mass balance and rock uplift rate. This solution allows the application of both linear and non-linear erosion laws and can be iteratively fitted to a predefined gradient of specific mass balance with elevation. We tested the influence of climate (fixed rock uplift rate, different ELAs) and tectonic forcing (fixed ELA, different rock uplift rates) on steady-state relief. Our results show that, similar to fluvial orogens, both climate and rock uplift rate exert a strong influence on glacial relief and that the relation among rock uplift rate and relief is governed by the glacial erosion law. This finding can provide an explanation for the presence of high relief in high latitudes. Headley, R.M., Roe, G., Hallet, B., 2012. Glacier

  17. Glacial refugia and reticulate evolution: the case of the Tasmanian eucalypts.

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Gay E; Jordan, Gregory J; Vaillancourt, René E; Steane, Dorothy A; Potts, Brad M

    2004-01-01

    Tasmania is a natural laboratory for investigating the evolutionary processes of the Quaternary. It is a large island lying 40-44 degrees S, which was repeatedly glaciated and linked to southeastern continental Australia during the Quaternary. Climate change promoted both the isolation of species in glacial refugia, and an exchange between Tasmanian and mainland floras. Eucalyptus is a complex and diverse genus, which has increased in abundance in Australia over the past 100 kyr, probably in response to higher fire frequency. Morphological evidence suggests that gene flow may have occurred between many eucalypt species after changes in their distribution during the Quaternary. This paper summarizes recent genetic evidence for migration and introgressive hybridization in Tasmanian Eucalyptus. Maternally inherited chloroplast DNA reveals a long-term persistence of eucalypts in southeastern Tasmanian refugia, coupled with introgressive hybridization involving many species. Detailed analysis of the widespread species Eucalyptus globulus suggests that migration from mainland Australia was followed by introgression involving a rare Tasmanian endemic. The data support the hypothesis that changes in distribution of interfertile species during the Quaternary have promoted reticulate evolution in Eucalyptus. PMID:15101583

  18. Evolution of salt diapir and karst morphology during the last glacial cycle: Effects of sea-level oscillation, diapir and regional uplift, and erosion (Persian Gulf, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Zare, Mohammad; Churáčková, Zdenka; Asadi, Naser; Fuchs, Markus; Adamovič, Jiří

    2010-09-01

    Marine, fluvial and cave sediments, and karst phenomena were studied and dated by 14C, U-series, and OSL methods to determine the evolution of the Namakdan diapir and the world's longest salt cave (3N Cave) during the Holocene and the Last Glacial. Sea-level oscillations, the uplift rate of the diapir and its surroundings, and erosion are the main factors influencing the diapir morphology. Although the diapir uplift rate has been constant for the last 50 kyr (˜ 4 mm/yr at a distance 600 m from the diapir edge), the uplift rate decreases with the distance from the diapir center. Drag-induced host rock deformation extends for ˜ 300 m from the outside edge of the diapir, and host rocks in this zone have an uplift rate of 0.4-0.6 mm/yr, which is 2-3 times greater than the regional uplift rate. Based on known sea-level oscillations, radiometric dating, and geological evidence, the Namakdan diapir was repeatedly flooded by sea water between 130 and 80 kyr BP. Submarine residuum composed mainly of gypsum and dolomite formed cap rock on the diapir. After ˜ 80 kyr BP, surficial drainage network and karst development started. Blind valleys and their corresponding cave systems evolved continuously for ˜ 20-30 kyr. Between 9 and 6 cal kyr BP the rate of sea-level rise exceeded the Namakdan diapir uplift rate by the factor of 3. As a consequence upward incision of cave streams (paragenetic trend) occurred, and blind valleys near the seashore were filled with gravels. Cave passages now accessible on the Namakdan and Hormoz diapirs started to form 3-6 cal kyr BP when sea level stabilized and downward stream incision began. Older cave levels are still preserved but are filled with sediments and salt precipitates. A comparison of the Namakdan diapir evolution with data from the Hormoz and Larak diapirs shows that the evolution of diapir morphology is strongly affected by the differences in uplift rates and geological settings. The general scheme of the evolution of the Namakdan

  19. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle.

  20. Concurrent and opposed environmental trends during the last glacial cycle between the Carpathian Basin and the Black Sea coast: evidence from high resolution enviromagnetic loess records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, Ulrich; Zeeden, Christian; Veres, Daniel; Obreht, Igor; Bösken, Janina; Marković, Slobodan B.; Eckmeier, Eileen; Fischer, Peter; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Danube Basin near to the Black Sea (Urluia quarry, Dobrogea, Romania). In order to investigate the potential of Danubian loess in recording millennial-scale palaeoclimate variability, a 22 m deep drill-core from the Titel loess plateau and a more than 15 metres thick LPSS from the Urluia quarry were contiguously sampled. Both sides provide improved insight into past climate evolution of the regions down to MIS 6. The presentation will focus on the down-core/down-section variability of χ and χfd as environmental proxy parameters. Based on these mineral magnetic proxies we can already draw the following conclusions: 1) The dust accumulation rates in both regions were relatively constant over the past c. 130 kyrs, even during full interglacial conditions. 2) In the studied sections, the pedo-complex S1 represents ± the Eemian and not the entire MIS 5, as previously assumed. 3) There are a lot of similarities between the mineral magnetic records of the Titel-Plateau (Vojvodina, South Carpathian Basin) and the Urluia quarry (Dobrogea, Lower Danube Basin) and also between these records and those from the Chinese Loess Plateau, but also fundamental differences. 4) During the early glacial (end of MIS5) we find no evidence for soil formation in the South Carpathian Basin whereas in the Dobrogea near to the Black Sea coast embryonic soils developed. On the contrary, during the younger part of MIS 3 (≤ 40 ka) near to the Black Sea coast soil humidity sharply decreased towards the LGM whereas in the South Carpathian Basin the mineral magnetic proxies indicate a relative maximum in pedogenesis/soil humidity. Sedimentological, geochemical, geochronological and palaeomagnetic investigations are in progress. They will provide further high quality data sets leading to an improved understanding of the Late Pleistocene environmental evolution in the Danube Basin.

  1. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE PAGES

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere. Theremore » is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression

  2. Glacial integrative modelling.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, Andrey

    2003-09-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of past climate changes requires modelling of the complex interaction between all major components of the Earth system: atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. This paper reviews attempts at such an integrative approach to modelling climate changes during the glacial age. In particular, the roles of different factors in shaping glacial climate are compared based on the results of simulations with an Earth-system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2. It is shown that ice sheets, changes in atmospheric compositions, vegetation cover, and reorganization of the ocean thermohaline circulation play important roles in glacial climate changes. Another example of this approach is the modelling of two major types of abrupt glacial climate changes: Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Our results corroborate some of the early proposed mechanisms, which relate abrupt climate changes to the internal instability of the ocean thermohaline circulation and ice sheets. At the same time, it is shown that realistic representation of the temporal evolution of the palaeoclimatic background is crucial to simulate observed features of the glacial abrupt climate changes.

  3. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  4. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-03-16

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  5. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Peter; Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-04-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H˜0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H˜1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. Ref: Zhi-Gang Shao and Peter Ditlevsen, Nature Comm. 7, 10951, 2016

  6. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age."…

  7. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age."…

  8. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the oldest glacial successions in the Himalayan orogen: Ladakh Range, northern India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Caffee, M.W.; Bovard, K.R.; Finkel, R.C.; Sharma, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and alluvial fan sediments define the timing of five glacial advances over at least the last five glacial cycles in the Ladakh Range of the Transhimalaya. The glacial stages that have been identified are: the Indus Valley glacial stage, dated at older than 430 ka; the Leh glacial stage occurring in the penultimate glacial cycle or older; the Karglacial stage, occurring during the early part of the last glacial cycle; the Bazgo glacial stage, at its maximum during the middle of the last glacial cycle; and the early Holocene Khalling glacial stage. The exposure ages of the Indus Valley moraines are the oldest observed to date throughout the Himalayan orogen. We observe a pattern of progressively more restricted glaciation during the last five glacial cycles, likely indicating a progressive reduction in the moisture supply necessary to sustain glaciation. A possible explanation is that uplift of Himalayan ranges to the south and/or of the Karakoram Mountains to the west of the region may have effectively blocked moisture supply by the south Asian summer monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies, respectively. Alternatively, this pattern of glaciation may reflect a trend of progressively less extensive glaciation in mountain regions that has been observed globally throughout the Pleistocene. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  9. Astronomical pacing of the global silica cycle recorded in Mesozoic bedded cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2017-06-01

    The global silica cycle is an important component of the long-term climate system, yet its controlling factors are largely uncertain due to poorly constrained proxy records. Here we present a ~70 Myr-long record of early Mesozoic biogenic silica (BSi) flux from radiolarian chert in Japan. Average low-mid-latitude BSi burial flux in the superocean Panthalassa is ~90% of that of the modern global ocean and relative amplitude varied by ~20-50% over the 100 kyr to 30 Myr orbital cycles during the early Mesozoic. We hypothesize that BSi in chert was a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (DSi), with fluctuations proportional to DSi input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi (<~100 Kyr). Chemical weathering rates estimated by the GEOCARBSULFvolc model support these hypotheses, excluding the volcanism-driven oceanic anoxic events of the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian that exceed model limits. We propose that the Mega monsoon of the supercontinent Pangea nonlinearly amplified the orbitally paced chemical weathering that drove BSi burial during the early Mesozoic greenhouse world.

  10. PALEOCLIMATE: Glacial Climate Instability.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, L

    2000-12-08

    Throughout the last glacial period, rapid climatic changes called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. As Labeyrie discusses in his Perspective, these events are ideal targets for testing our understanding of climate change and developing climatic change models. Important steps toward understanding D-O events, particularly regarding the role of the low latitudes, are now reported by Hughen et al. and Peterson et al.

  11. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  12. Rapid Environmental Fluctuations Recorded over the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle in the Sediments from Borehole PRGL1-4 (Gulf of Lions; Western Mediterranean) using Radiogenic Isotopes (Sr & Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizou, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of sediments deposited and preserved in oceanic basins unable us to examine how terrigenous sediment supply varied through time in relation to paleoenvironmental and climatic changes on land. The geochemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediment are used to unravel its provenance, and provide information about its formation. Providing that the paleoclimatic frame is known, such data give an insight into the rock-source location and allow us to decipher between genetic processes of mechanical erosion and chemical alteration. Borehole PRGL1-4 (European project PROMESS), located in the Gulf of Lions (W Mediterranean) at 300 mwd, was investigated geochemically at high-temporal resolution over the last glacial/interglacial cycle (i.e. 130 ka) to study sediment-source variations during rapid climate changes. Besides, sediments originating from the Rhône's and the Pyreneo-Languedocian's catchment areas have been analyzed to measure the isotopic composition of five source end-members that are the Alps, the Higher Rhône valley, the Lower Rhône valley, the Languedoc and the Pyrenees. Epsilon Nd and 87Sr/86Sr were measured on 60 samples encompassing 4 marine isotopic stages with an emphasis on Heinrich events. The epsilon Nd values of PRGL1-4 lean towards the Lower Rhône valley unradiogenic end-member during cold stadial intervals, and towards the Alpine radiogenic end-member during warm interstadials. The presence of an ice cap over the crystalline Alpine watershed during cold phases could prevent the sediments originating from this region from reaching the Gulf of Lions. The same pattern is observed during the time of Heinrich events. An influence of the sea level variations on the sedimentation at the borehole site during the Heinrich events is unlikely since they are only 10 to 15 m in amplitude. Furthermore, a major isotopic shift in epsilon Nd mean values is displayed around 40 ka that coincides with the connection of the Durance to the Rhône River

  13. Glacial influence on caldera-forming eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Adelina; Bindeman, Ilya

    2011-04-01

    It has been suggested that deglaciations have influenced volcanism in several areas around the world increasing productivity of mantle melting and eruptions from crustal magma chambers. However, the connection between glaciations and increased volcanism is not straightforward. Investigation of Ar-Ar, U-Pb, and 14C ages of caldera-forming eruptions for the past million years in the glaciated arc of Kamchatka has lead to the observation that the majority of large-volume ignimbrites, which are associated with the morphologically preserved calderas, correspond in time with "maximum glacial" conditions for the past several glacial cycles. In the field, the main proof is related to the fact that glaciated multi-caldera volcanoes hosted thick glacial ice caps. Additional evidence comes from clustering Kamchatka-derived marine ash layers with glacial moraines in DSDP cores. Here we present a set of new results from numerical modelling using the Finite Element Method that investigate how the glacial load dynamic may affect the conditions for ring-fault formation in such glaciated multi-caldera volcanoes. Different scenarios were simulated by varying: (1) the thickness and asymmetric distribution of the existing ice cap, (2) the depth and size of the magmatic reservoir responsible for the subsequent collapse event, (3) the thickness and mechanical properties of the roof rock due to the alteration by hydrothermal fluids, (4) the existence of a deeper and wider magmatic reservoir and (5) possible gravitational failure triggered, in part, by subglacial rock mass build up and hydrothermal alteration. The results obtained indicate that: (1) Any ice cap plays against ring fault formation; (2) Asymmetric distribution of ice may favour the initiation of trap-door type collapse calderas; (3) Glacial erosion of part of volcanic edifice or interglacial edifice failure may facilitate subsequent ring fault formation; (4) hydrothermal system under an ice cap may lead to a quite effective

  14. Geological constraints on Earth system sensitivity to CO2 during glacial and non-glacial times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Park, J. J.; Pagani, M.; Beerling, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Earth system climate sensitivity (ESS) is the long-term (>103 yr) response of global surface temperature to doubled CO2 that integrates fast and slow climate feedbacks. ESS has energy policy implications because global temperatures are not expected to decline appreciably for many centuries, even if anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions drop to zero. We report ESS estimates for the last 420 Myr of Earth history of 3 °C or higher during many non-glacial times and ~6-8 °C during glacial times. Analyses include both direct comparison of CO2 and temperature records, and fitting Berner's long-term carbon cycle model GEOCARBSULFvolc to proxy CO2 records while using ESS as a tunable parameter (Park & Royer, 2011, American Journal of Science 311: 1-26). Our ESS estimates are generally higher than climate sensitivities simulated from global climate models for the same ancient periods (~3 °C). Our two-fold amplification during glacial times is probably caused by long-term continental ice-sheet dynamics, a mechanism consistent with other studies. Even for non-glacial times, climate models do not capture the full suite of positive climate feedbacks. These absent feedbacks may be related to clouds, trace greenhouse gases, seasonal snow cover, and/or vegetation, especially in polar regions. Better characterization and quantification of these feedbacks is a priority given the current accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases.

  15. The glacial history of the Dinaric Alps, Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. D.; Woodward, J. C.; van Calsteren, P. C.; Thomas, L. E.

    2011-11-01

    Large areas of Montenegro were glaciated during the Pleistocene. This paper presents evidence from the massifs of central Montenegro, including Durmitor and Sinjajevina, Moračke Planine, Maganik, Prekornica and Vojnik. Glacial deposits have been subdivided on the basis of morphostratigraphy and soil weathering and 31 U-series ages from cemented tills provided a geochronological framework. The largest glaciation occurred before 350 ka when a series of conjoined ice caps over the massifs of central Montenegro covered a total area of nearly 1500 km 2. These formed during MIS 12 and correspond with the largest Skamnellian Stage glaciations in Greece to the south. Later Middle Pleistocene glaciations occurred during the penultimate glacial cycle correlating with the Vlasian Stage in Greece (MIS 6) when ice caps covered an area of 720 km 2 over central Montenegro. There is also geochronological evidence of glacial deposits dating from the interval between MIS 12 and MIS 6, before the interglacial complex of MIS 7. This glaciation appears to have been very similar in extent to that which occurred during MIS 6. The last glacial cycle in central Montenegro was characterised by valley and cirque glaciers covering a total area of 49 km 2. It is very likely that glaciers have been present in the mountains of central Montenegro during every glacial cycle since a small glacier still survives today. The smaller glaciers of the last glacial cycle are likely to have been associated with summer temperatures that were warmer than those of earlier cold stages. The striking contrast in the extent and thickness of ice cover during the cold stages of the Pleistocene has an important bearing on the geomorphological and biological evolution of the Balkans.

  16. Deepwater carbonate deposition in response to re-flooding of carbonate bank and atoll-tops at glacial terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorry, Stéphan J.; Droxler, André W.; Francis, Jason M.

    2010-08-01

    The late Quaternary has experienced large glacial/interglacial climatic variations and related 10's to 100 meters high-amplitude sea level fluctuations at Milankovich frequencies from 10's to 100 kyr during which carbonate platform tops have been exposed and re-flooded in many occasions. This study focuses on the accumulation of calci-turbidites, the aragonite onset/sharp increase in fine sediments and their timing in deep basins adjacent to carbonate platforms. A particular emphasis is developed on the occurrence of the first gravity flow event and aragonite onset/sharp increase and their linkage to the initial re-flooding of the platform tops during deglaciations. Three basins adjacent to isolated platforms in the Bahamas, the Northern Nicaragua Rise, and the Gulf of Papua, were selected to represent pure carbonate versus mixed systems, in quiescent versus tectonically active settings, and various carbonate bank top morphologies, ranging from atoll to relatively deeply and narrowly flooded flat top banks. In spite of these differences, each record illustrates a clear relationship between the timing of platform top re-flooding and initiation of significant carbonate export by gravity flows and low-density plumes into the surrounding basins. The concept of "re-flooding window" is introduced to characterize the prolific period of time during which bank and atoll-tops are flooded enough to produce large export of bank-derived aragonite and of calci-turbidites in adjacent basins. According to our datasets, the main re-flooding windows have occurred mainly on the last part of the sea level rise at each glacial termination (T), those periods being marked by some of the highest rates of sea level rise. The analysis of a long-piston core from the earthquakes-prone Walton Basin (Northern Nicaragua Rise) demonstrates that sea level, not seismic activities, played a major role as trigger mechanism for the initiation of gravity flows since the last four glacial

  17. Glacial Meltwater as a Source of Amorphous Silica on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Horgan, B.; Havig, J. R.; Rampe, E. B.; Scudder, N. A.; Hamilton, T. L.

    2017-10-01

    Cold-climate silica cycling on mafic volcanics due to glacial meltwater alteration is a significant terrestrial weathering process. Amorphous silica deposits on Mars could be interpreted as mineralogical evidence for past ice sheet melt.

  18. What caused the glacial to interglacial CO sub 2 change

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S. . Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Peng, Tsung-Hung )

    1991-12-01

    Scenarios put forward to explain the 80 {mu}atm glacial to interglacial change in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content are evaluated. The conclusion is that no single mechanism is adequate. Rather, contributions from temperature, sea ice, biologic pumping, nutrient deepening, and CaCO{sub 3} cycling must be called upon. The observation that the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio for Antarctic foraminifera was 0.9 {plus minus} 0.1% lower during glacial than during interglacial time constitutes a huge fly in the ointment for all scenarios proposed to date.

  19. The last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  20. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter

  1. Modeling glacial climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Crowley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical climate modelling has matured as a discipline to the point that it is useful in paleoclimatology. As an example a new two dimensional energy balance model is described and applied to several problems of current interest. The model includes the seasonal cycle and the detailed land-sea geographical distribution. By examining the changes in the seasonal cycle when external perturbations are forced upon the climate system it is possible to construct hypotheses about the origin of midlatitude ice sheets and polar ice caps. In particular the model predicts a rather sudden potential for glaciation over large areas when the Earth's orbital elements are only slightly altered. Similarly, the drift of continents or the change of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geological time induces radical changes in continental ice cover. With the advance of computer technology and improved understanding of the individual components of the climate system, these ideas will be tested in far more realistic models in the near future.

  2. Glacial marine sedimentation: Paleoclimatic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B.; Ashley, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    This publication resulted from a symposium held during the 1988 Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America. Many, but not all, contributors to the symposium have papers in this volume. This Special Paper consists of 14 chapters and a Subject/Geographic index. Each chapter has is own list of references. The papers cover a wide range of modem climate/ ocean environments, including papers on glacial marine sediments from Antarctica, the fiords of Alaska, and sediments from the Canadian High Arctic. In addition, three papers discuss [open quote]old[close quotes] glacial marine records (i.e., pre-Tertiary), and one paper discusses the Yakataga Formation of the Gulf of Alaska which is a Miocene-to-late-Pleistocene sequence. The last chapter in the book includes a survey and summary of the evidence for the paleoclimatic significance of glacial marine sediments by the two editors, John Anderson and Gail Ashley. It is worth noting that Anderson and Domack state in the Foreword that there is a considerable variation in terminology; hence they employ a series of definitions which they urge the other authors to employ. They define and explain what they mean by [open quotes]polar ice cap,[close quotes] [open quote]polar tundra (subpolar),[close quotes] and [open quotes]temperate oceanic and boreal[close quotes] in terms of the dominant glacial and glacial marine processes. Although one might quarrel with the terminology, the broad differences between these three glaciological regimes are indeed fundamental and need to be sought in the geological record. The flavor of the volume can be judged by some of the chapter titles. Contributions on Antarctica include a paper by Anderson and other entitled [open quote]Sedimentary facies associated with Antarctica's floating ice masses[close quotes] and a companion paper by Anderson and Domack which deals with the extremely complex glacial marine facies (13 facies are delimited) in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

  3. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  4. Earth's glacial record and its tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.

    1993-09-01

    Glaciations have occurred episodically at different time intervals and for different durations in Earth's history. Ice covers have formed in a wide range of plate tectonic and structural settings but the bulk of Earth's glacial record can be shown to have been deposited and preserved in basins within extensional settings. In such basins, source area uplift and basin subsidence fulfill the tectonic preconditions for the initiation of glaciation and the accomodation and preservation of glaciclastic sediments. Tectonic setting, in particular subsidence rates, also dictates the type of glaciclastic facies and facies successions that are deposited. Many pre-Pleistocene glaciated basins commonly contain well-defined tectonostratigraphic successions recording the interplay of tectonics and sedimentation; traditional climatostratigraphic approaches involving interpretation in terms of either ice advance/retreat cycles or glacio-eustatic sea-level change require revision. The direct record of continental glaciation in Earth history, in the form of classically-recognised continental glacial landforms and "tillites", is meagre; it is probable that more than 95% of the volume of preserved "glacial" strata are glacially-influenced marine deposits that record delivery of large amounts of glaciclastic sediment to offshore basins. This flux has been partially or completely reworked by "normal" sedimentary processes such that the record of glaciation and climate change is recorded in marine successions and is difficult to decipher. The dominant "glacial" facies in the rock record are subaqueous debris flow diamictites and turbidites recording the selective preservation of poorly-sorted glaciclastic sediment deposited in deep water basins by sediment gravity flows. However, these facies are also typical of many non-glacial settings, especially volcanically-influenced environments; numerous Archean and Proterozoic diamictites, described in the older literature as tillites, have no

  5. Tectonic stress feedback loop explains U-shaped glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the shadow of the Matterhorn, the broad form of the Matter Valley—like so many throughout the Alps—is interrupted by a deep U-shaped glacial trough. Carved into a landscape reflecting millennia of tectonic uplift and river erosion, growing evidence suggests the 100-meter-deep U-shaped groove was produced shortly after a shift toward major cycles of Alpine glaciation almost a million years ago. Subsequent glaciations may have therefore had little effect on the landscape.

  6. Weathering and the mobility of phosphorus in the catchments and forefields of the Rhône and Oberaar glaciers, central Switzerland: Implications for the global phosphorus cycle on glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl B.; Hosein, Rachel; Arn, Kaspar; Steinmann, Philipp

    2009-04-01

    indentations on grains acting as sites of preferential dissolution. We also measured iron-bound, organic and detrital P concentrations in the chronosequence and show that organic and iron-bound P has almost completely replaced detrital P in the top layers of the YD profiles. Detrital P weathering rates are calculated as 310 and 280 kg km -2 yr -1 for LIA moraines and 10 kg km -2 yr -1 for YD tills. During the first 300 years of glacial sediment exposure P dissolution rates are shown to be approximately 70 times higher than the mean global dissolved P flux from ice-free continents. After 11.6 kyr the flux is 2.5 times the global mean. These data strengthen the argument for substantial changes in the global dissolved P flux on glacial-interglacial timescales. A crude extrapolation from the data described here suggests that the global dissolved P flux may increase by 40-45% during the first few hundred years of a deglaciation phase.

  7. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  8. Glacial interglacial carbonate preservation records in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmke, Jan P.; Bauch, Henning A.

    2002-06-01

    A combination of weight and reflectance measurements as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses on planktic foraminiferal tests from two sites in the Nordic Seas were used to investigate the pelagic carbonate preservation during the last five glacial-interglacial cycles. In general, a pattern showing good preservation during glacial times and enhanced corrosion during interglacial times can be observed. Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS 11) reveals the strongest corrosional features with an estimated 45% total loss of the foraminiferal carbonate before shell fragmentation. One reason for the enhanced interglacial corrosion may be a high regional surface productivity during these intervals, which led to increased dissolution rates in the deep sea driven by metabolic carbon dioxide. However, the carbonate preservation changes may also be linked to global changes in the marine carbonate system. Although the reason for the observed dissolution pattern in the Nordic Seas remains speculative, it seems to be in phase with the rhythm of glacial-interglacial carbonate preservation in the Pacific Ocean but out of phase with the rest of the Atlantic. The data further support the hypothesis that much of the glacial decrease in the atmospheric CO 2 may be attributed to the changes in the alkalinity of the oceans.

  9. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  10. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, C J; Turney, C S M; Hutchinson, D K; Taschetto, A S; England, M H

    2015-06-26

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65 °N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5 °C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  11. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  12. Architecture of Late Ordovician glacial valleys in the Tassili N'Ajjer area (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Rémy; Eschard, Rémi; Roussé, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    The architecture of three Late Ordovician glacial valleys was studied in detail in the Tassili N'Ajjer (SE Algeria) outcrops. The valleys are oriented south-north, 2 to 5 km wide, and up to 250 m deep. The valley-fills revealed a very complex sedimentary architecture with significant lateral facies changes. Several glacial cycles induced the formation of Glacial Erosion Surfaces (GES) at the base and within the glacial valleys. The first type of GES shows a sharp and steep-angled contact without striations or associated syn-sedimentary deformation, suggesting that subglacial meltwater was the dominant erosive agent. A second type associated with the deformation of pre-glacial and syn-glacial sediment, suggests that ice was in contact with the valley floor. Four facies associations are proposed: FA1: subglacial tillite; FA2: Sub-to pro-glacial ice contact fans; FA3: Proglacial sub-aqueous gravity flows; and FA4: outwash fans. The stratigraphic architecture of three of the main valleys reveals a complex polyphase infill. At least two main cycles of ice-sheet advance and retreat can be interpreted from the sedimentary succession of each valley. Minor glacial cycles by ice oscillations also occur locally. GES morphology and the facies sequence suggest that the Iherir valleys were initiated by meltwater erosion in subglacial channels, whereas the Dider and Ouarsissen valleys were part of a large ice stream pathway. Above the valley-fill and the interfluves, a sand-rich unit of stacked lobes and channels is interpreted as submarine outwash fans deposited during final ice retreat. A glacial sequence found between two GES comprises fluvio-glacial or ice-contact fan deposits, fluvio-glacial eskers and tills. These sediments were deposited subglacially or at the glacier front during the ice maximum phase and/or the early ice retreat phase. During the ice retreat, interbedded subaqueous gravity flow deposits and diamictites filled the glacially cut topography as the sea

  13. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  14. Negligible glacial-interglacial variation in continental chemical weathering rates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Gavin L; Vance, Derek

    2006-12-14

    Chemical weathering of the continents is central to the regulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and hence global climate. On million-year timescales silicate weathering leads to the draw-down of carbon dioxide, and on millennial timescales chemical weathering affects the calcium carbonate saturation state of the oceans and hence their uptake of carbon dioxide. However, variations in chemical weathering rates over glacial-interglacial cycles remain uncertain. During glacial periods, cold and dry conditions reduce the rate of chemical weathering, but intense physical weathering and the exposure of carbonates on continental shelves due to low sea levels may increase this rate. Here we present high-resolution records of the lead isotope composition of ferromanganese crusts from the North Atlantic Ocean that cover the past 550,000 years. Combining these records with a simple quantitative model of changes in the lead isotope composition of the deep North Atlantic Ocean in response to chemical weathering, we find that chemical weathering rates were two to three times lower in the glaciated interior of the North Atlantic Region during glacial periods than during the intervening interglacial periods. This decrease roughly balances the increase in chemical weathering caused by the exposure of continental shelves, indicating that chemical weathering rates remained relatively constant on glacial-interglacial timescales. On timescales of more than a million years, however, we suggest that enhanced weathering of silicate glacial sediments during interglacial periods results in a net draw-down of atmospheric carbon dioxide, creating a positive feedback on global climate that, once initiated, promotes cooling and further glaciation.

  15. Microbial formation of labile organic carbon in Antarctic glacial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. J.; Foster, R. A.; McKnight, D. M.; Lisle, J. T.; Littmann, S.; Kuypers, M. M. M.; Foreman, C. M.

    2017-04-01

    Roughly six petagrams of organic carbon are stored within ice worldwide. This organic carbon is thought to be of old age and highly bioavailable. Along with storage of ancient and new atmospherically deposited organic carbon, microorganisms may contribute substantially to the glacial organic carbon pool. Models of glacial microbial carbon cycling vary from net respiration to net carbon fixation. Supraglacial streams have not been considered in models although they are amongst the largest ecosystems on most glaciers and are inhabited by diverse microbial communities. Here we investigate the biogeochemical sequence of organic carbon production and uptake in an Antarctic supraglacial stream in the McMurdo Dry Valleys using nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, stable isotope analysis and incubation experiments. We find that heterotrophic production relies on highly labile organic carbon freshly derived from photosynthetic bacteria rather than legacy organic carbon. Exudates from primary production were utilized by heterotrophs within 24 h, and supported bacterial growth demands. The tight coupling of microbially released organic carbon and rapid uptake by heterotrophs suggests a dynamic local carbon cycle. Moreover, as temperatures increase there is the potential for positive feedback between glacial melt and microbial transformations of organic carbon.

  16. Enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands: A sink for atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shiming; Clift, Peter D.; Zhao, Debo; Hovius, Niels; Munhoven, Guy; France-Lanord, Christian; Wang, Yinxi; Xiong, Zhifang; Huang, Jie; Yu, Zhaojie; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Guoliang; Li, Anchun; Li, Tiegang

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and global climate are closely coupled. Since 800 ka CO2 concentrations have been up to 50% higher during interglacial compared to glacial periods. Because of its dependence on temperature, humidity, and erosion rates, chemical weathering of exposed silicate minerals was suggested to have dampened these cyclic variations of atmospheric composition. Cooler and drier conditions and lower non-glacial erosion rates suppressed in situ chemical weathering rates during glacial periods. However, using systematic variations in major element geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes and clay mineral records from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1143 and 1144 in the South China Sea spanning the last 1.1 Ma, we show that sediment deposited during glacial periods was more weathered than sediment delivered during interglacials. We attribute this to subaerial exposure and weathering of unconsolidated shelf sediments during glacial sealevel lowstands. Our estimates suggest that enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands can account for ∼9% of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere during the glacial and thus represent a significant part of the observed glacial-interglacial variation of ∼80 ppmv. As a result, if similar magnitudes can be identified in other tropical shelf-slope systems, the effects of increased sediment exposure and subsequent silicate weathering during lowstands could have potentially enhanced the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 during cold stages of the Quaternary. This in turn would have caused an intensification of glacial cycles.

  17. Glacial to postglacial transformation of organic input pathways in Arctic Ocean basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Mark B.; MacDonald, Robie W.; Snowdon, Lloyd R.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is undergoing rapid loss in ice cover with yet unknown consequences for the cycling of organic material. Here we examine persistent terrigenous (land-based) alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with vascular plant, combustion, and petrogenic sources in seven cores collected from all major basins of the Arctic Ocean for insight as to how organic cycling at the Last Glacial Maximum compares to the present day. We find only modest changes between the glacial and postglacial sediments for atmospherically transported hydrocarbon biomarkers, demonstrating that glacial sea ice was not a barrier to atmospheric inputs. In stark contrast, particle-associated biomarkers were captured strongly at basin edges during the glacial period and much more evenly transported across basins during the postglacial period. Evidently the capture of organic matter shifted from the slopes to the shelves as the latter flooded during the Holocene, and the Transpolar Drift and Beaufort Gyre evolved from minor carriers of plant detritus from the glacial ocean margins to major modern transporters of shelf sediment to the basins. This suggests that changes in organic transport currently accompanying the loss of sea ice are likely to be very different from those that occurred at the end of the last glacial period.

  18. Intermittent glacial sliding velocities explain variations in long-timescale denudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanites, Brian J.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying controls on glacial erosion over geologic timescales is central to understanding the role of Cenozoic climate change on the development of modern mountain belts, yet the mechanisms that produce the distinct relief and topography visible in glaciated regions remain poorly constrained. We test the hypothesis that commonly assumed glacial sliding parameterizations control denudation rates over geologic timescales. We do this by modeling glacier dynamics over a glacial-interglacial cycle and compare with a dense dataset of (U-Th)/He thermochronometer derived denudation rates from the southern Coast Mountains, BC. Results indicate zones of rapid Quaternary erosion correspond to locations where the model predicts the highest averaged sliding velocities. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that sliding influences the rate of glacial erosion. Regression between sliding predicted by the model and erosion rates shows a statistically significant correlation (r2 = 0.6). The coefficient of the regression (10-5) is smaller than previous estimates based on data from much shorter timescales. The model results also reveal that for a specific location, active subglacial sliding, and hence erosion, occurs for only ∼10-20% of a glacial-interglacial cycle, suggesting high temporal variations in erosion rates. This intermittency of erosion requires instantaneous erosion rates to be greater than long term averages, explaining how timescale averaging can impact estimates of glacial erosion rates.

  19. Glacial History of Southernmost South America and Implications for Movement of the Westerlies and Antarctic Frontal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, M. R.; Fogwill, C. J.; Hulton, N. R.; Sugden, D. E.; Peter, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    The ~1 Myr glacial geologic record in southern South American is one of the few available terrestrial paleoclimate proxies at orbital and suborbital time scales in the middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Presently, southernmost Patagonia lies about 3\\deg north of the Antarctic frontal zone and within the middle latitude westerlies and the climate is controlled by the surrounding maritime conditions. Thus, the long-term glacial record provides insight into the history of climatic boundaries over the middle and high latitude southern ocean, including the upwind SE Pacific Ocean, tectonic-glacial evolution of the Andes, and global climate. To date, cosmogenic nuclide and 14C dating have focused on glacial fluctuations between 51 and 53\\deg S (Torres del Paine to northern Tierra del Fuego) during the last glacial cycle, including the late glacial period. At least 4 advances occurred between ca. 25 and 17 ka, with the maximum expansion of ice ca. 25-24 ka. Major deglaciation commenced after ca. 17.5 ka, which was interrupted by a major glacial-climate event ca. 14-12 ka. Modelling experiments suggest that the ice mass needed to form the glacial maximum moraines required about a 6\\deg cooling and a slight drying relative to the present. Such a fundamental temperature reduction, despite high summer isolation, strongly suggests northward movement of the westerlies and the polar front on millennial timescales. The Patagonian record also indicates that on orbital timescales equatorward movement of climate boundaries and glacial growth was in phase with major Northern Hemisphere ice volume change, despite high local summer insolation. At suborbital timescales, the picture is more complex. While major facets of the last glacial maximum appear to be in phase between the hemispheres, at least some late glacial events may be in step with Antarctic climate change. Present and future research will further constrain the timing of glacial events over the last 1 Myr and

  20. Deglaciation and glacial erosion: A joint control on magma productivity by continental unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Caricchi, Luca; Castelltort, Sébastien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles affect the processes through which water and rocks are redistributed across the Earth's surface, thereby linking the solid Earth and climate dynamics. Regional and global scale studies suggest that continental lithospheric unloading due to ice melting during the transition to interglacials leads to increased continental magmatic, volcanic, and degassing activity. Such a climatic forcing on the melting of the Earth's interior, however, has always been evaluated regardless of continental unloading by glacial erosion, albeit the density of rock exceeds that of ice by approximately 3 times. Here we present and discuss numerical results involving synthetic but realistic topographies, ice caps, and glacial erosion rates suggesting that erosion may be as important as deglaciation in affecting continental unloading. Our study represents an additional step toward a more general understanding of the links between a changing climate, glacial processes, and the melting of the solid Earth.

  1. Requirements for extracting mantle viscosity from glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Extracting mantle viscosity from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) data is challenging because it requires a correctly posed rheological model, an accurate description of the ice and water load redistributions that occurred over at least the last glacial cycle, and the ability to interact model predictions with a large amount of observational data. To address sealevel changes, models must be based on an appropriate rheology. Daly focused attention on this critical issue 78 years ago with his down-punching hypothesis. Observing the sympathetic uplift behavior of areas peripheral to continental glacial loads, he suggested a thick lithosphere was required to force this behavior on asthenosphere flow. At the same time Haskell pointed out that deep flow in a constant viscosity Newtonian mantle would produce the observed peripheral bulge behavior without a thick lithosphere. This debate is important today because sealevel changes are particularly impacted by deep mantle viscosity and mantle rheology. Lithosphere and asthenosphere properties are another much discussed topic. The commonly observed substantial short wavelength response requires both a thin (~40 km thick) lithosphere and an asthenosphere ~25 times more fluid than the mantle. Because the manner of local ice removal can affect rebound calculations greatly, it is critical to have accurate ice and water load redistributions. Load redistributions must include changes in the levels of large lakes. Recent studies indicate how important it is to take into account sediment redistribution over the last glacial cycle. Finally, evaluation of the calculated emergence requires the comparison to large amounts of accurate (or at least critically vetted) sea level, emergence, GPS, and other kinds of data. These issues will be discussed and illustrated with some recent calculations.

  2. Spawning distribution of sockeye salmon in a glacially influenced watershed: The importance of glacial habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Daniel B.; Woody, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The spawning distribution of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka was compared between clear and glacially turbid habitats in Lake Clark, Alaska, with the use of radiotelemetry. Tracking of 241 adult sockeye salmon to 27 spawning locations revealed both essential habitats and the relationship between spawn timing and seasonal turbidity cycles. Sixty-six percent of radio-tagged sockeye salmon spawned in turbid waters (???5 nephelometric turbidity units) where visual observation was difficult. Spawning in turbid habitats coincided with seasonal temperature declines and associated declines in turbidity and suspended sediment concentration. Because spawn timing is heritable and influenced by temperature, the observed behavior suggests an adaptive response to glacier-fed habitats, as it would reduce embryonic exposure to the adverse effects of fine sediments. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  3. Simulated Last Glacial Maximum Δ14CATM and the Deep Glacial Ocean Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, V.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.; Bouttes, N.; Bopp, L.

    2012-12-01

    Δ14Catm has been estimated at 420 ± 80‰ (INTCAL09) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to preindustrial times (0‰), but mechanisms explaining this difference are not yet resolved. Δ14Catm is a function of cosmogenic production in high atmosphere and of carbon cycling in the Earth system (through carbon exchange with the superficial reservoirs, ocean and continental biosphere). 10Be-based reconstructions show a contribution of the cosmogenic production term of only 200 ± 200‰ at the LGM. The remaining 220‰ of Δ14Catm variation between the LGM and preindustrial times have thus to be explained by changes in the carbon cycle. Recently, Bouttes et al. (2010) proposed to explain most of the difference in atmospheric pCO2 between glacial and interglacial times by brine-induced ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean. This mechanism involves the formation of very saline water masses that can store Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in the deep ocean. During glacial times, the sinking of brines is enhanced and more DIC is stored in the deep ocean, lowering atmospheric pCO2. Such an isolated ocean reservoir would be characterized by a low Δ14C signature. Evidence of such 14C-depleted deep waters during the LGM has recently been found in the Southern Ocean (Skinner et al., 2010). The degassing of this carbon with low Δ14C would then reduce Δ14Catm throughout the deglaciation. We have further developed the CLIMBER-2 model to include a cosmogenic production of 14C as well as an interactive atmospheric 14C reservoir. We investigate the role of both sinking of brines and cosmogenic production, alongside iron and vertical diffusion mechanisms to explain changes in Δ14Catm during the last deglaciation. In our simulations, not only the sinking of brine mechanism is consistent with past Δ14C data but also it explains most of the differences in atmospheric pCO2 and Δ14C between LGM and preindustrial times.

  4. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    PubMed Central

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean–atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink. PMID:26923945

  5. Microbial Succession in Glacial Foreland Soils of the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, S.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian arctic has experienced increasing temperatures over the past century leading to heightened rate of glacial retreat. Glacial retreat leads to subsequent exposure of foreland soils to atmospheric conditions, thus creating a sequence of change in these ecosystems. Microbes are critical for soil development and nutrient dynamics in glacial systems as they are the primary colonizers of these soils and have been demonstrated to play a role in geochemical weathering and nutrient cycling beneath the glacier. Although viable microbial communities exist beneath glaciers and are known to be important for the glacial ecosystem, the impact of glacial retreat on these communities and development of the resulting foreland ecosystem is not well understood. Here, we investigate how microbial communities respond to changing conditions brought on by glacial retreat and whether a pattern of succession, such as those found in well characterized plant systems, occurs along a soil foreland in these microbial communities. We hypothesis that time since deglaciation is the major determinant of structure and composition of microbial assemblages. To test this, soil samples were collected along two glacier forelands, Trapridge Glacier and Duke River Glacier, located in Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory. Chronosequence dating of satellite images using geographic information system software revealed sampling sites have been ice-free from ~30 years to over 60 years. Soil chemistry analysis of major nutrients revealed no change in chemical parameters along the chronosequence, suggesting that presence of microbes after exposure from subglacial environments does not significantly alter soil characteristics in the timeframe observed. Furthermore, next-generation IonTorrentTM sequencing performed on soil samples revealed over five million sequencing reads, suggesting prominent microbial presence within these soils. Further analysis on sequencing data is needed to establish the

  6. Differences in Bacterial Diversity and Communities Between Glacial Snow and Glacial Soil on the Chongce Ice Cap, West Kunlun Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang Li; Hou, Shu Gui; Le Baoge, Ri; Li, Zhi Guo; Xu, Hao; Liu, Ya Ping; Du, Wen Tao; Liu, Yong Qin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of microbial ecology in different supraglacial habitats is important due to the unprecedented speed of glacier retreat. Differences in bacterial diversity and community structure between glacial snow and glacial soil on the Chongce Ice Cap were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. Based on rarefaction curves, Chao1, ACE, and Shannon indices, we found that bacterial diversity in glacial snow was lower than that in glacial soil. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and heatmap analysis indicated that there were major differences in bacterial communities between glacial snow and glacial soil. Most bacteria were different between the two habitats; however, there were some common bacteria shared between glacial snow and glacial soil. Some rare or functional bacterial resources were also present in the Chongce Ice Cap. These findings provide a preliminary understanding of the shifts in bacterial diversity and communities from glacial snow to glacial soil after the melting and inflow of glacial snow into glacial soil. PMID:27811967

  7. Differences in Bacterial Diversity and Communities Between Glacial Snow and Glacial Soil on the Chongce Ice Cap, West Kunlun Mountains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang Li; Hou, Shu Gui; Le Baoge, Ri; Li, Zhi Guo; Xu, Hao; Liu, Ya Ping; Du, Wen Tao; Liu, Yong Qin

    2016-11-04

    A detailed understanding of microbial ecology in different supraglacial habitats is important due to the unprecedented speed of glacier retreat. Differences in bacterial diversity and community structure between glacial snow and glacial soil on the Chongce Ice Cap were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. Based on rarefaction curves, Chao1, ACE, and Shannon indices, we found that bacterial diversity in glacial snow was lower than that in glacial soil. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and heatmap analysis indicated that there were major differences in bacterial communities between glacial snow and glacial soil. Most bacteria were different between the two habitats; however, there were some common bacteria shared between glacial snow and glacial soil. Some rare or functional bacterial resources were also present in the Chongce Ice Cap. These findings provide a preliminary understanding of the shifts in bacterial diversity and communities from glacial snow to glacial soil after the melting and inflow of glacial snow into glacial soil.

  8. Speleothem Paleoclimatology of the Last Glacial Maximum and Deglaciation in Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, C. L.; Hodell, D. A.; Curtis, J. H.; Brenner, M.; Gallup, C.; Endsley, E.

    2006-12-01

    Two speleothems were collected in August 2005 from Columnas Cave near Tzucacab, Yucatan, Mexico. Both stalagmites have basal ages placing the initial growth during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The first sample, Hobo 3, has a basal U/Th age of 21,089 +/- 221 years and the second sample, Hobo 4, has a basal U/Th age of 21,823 +/- 261 years. Oxygen isotopes were measured on calcite samples drilled every 0.5mm along the growth axis of these speleothems. Oxygen isotope values are relatively low at the base of both Hobo 3 and 4 during the LGM, and increase during the period inferred to represent the Late Glacial. Lower oxygen isotopic values during the LGM suggest a cold, wet climate in Yucatan followed by more arid conditions during the Late Glacial. This interpretation is consistent with recent findings from sediment cores from Lake Peten Itza, Guatemala (Hodell et al., 2006). We speculate that a cold, wet LGM may have been caused by increased winter precipitation related to polar outbreaks and "Norte" winds, which bring rain to Yucatan today during the dry season. Arid conditions during the Late Glacial may coincide with delivery of glacial meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River. Although additional U/Th dates are needed to constrain the chronology, our preliminary results suggest that Hobo 3 and 4 stalagmites will provide a detailed history of climate change for the northern Yucatan Peninsula during the last glacial cycle.

  9. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-07-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time.

  10. Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Peters, John W; Skidmore, Mark L; Boyd, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Geologic, chemical and isotopic evidence indicate that Earth has experienced numerous intervals of widespread glaciation throughout its history, with roughly 11% of present day Earth's land surface covered in ice. Despite the pervasive nature of glacial ice both today and in Earth's past and the potential contribution of these systems to global biogeochemical cycles, the composition and phylogenetic structure of an active microbial community in subglacial systems has yet to be described. Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0–1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada. Patterns in the phylogenetic structure and composition of subglacial sediment small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) assemblages indicate greater diversity and evenness than in glacial surface environments, possibly due to facilitative or competitive interactions among populations in the subglacial environment. The combination of phylogenetically more even and more diverse assemblages in the subglacial environment suggests minimal niche overlap and optimization to capture a wider spectrum of the limited nutrients and chemical energy made available from weathering of bedrock minerals. The prevalence of SSU rRNA affiliated with lithoautotrophic bacteria, autotrophic methane producing archaea and heterotrophic eukarya in the subglacial environment is consistent with this hypothesis and suggests an active contribution to the global carbon cycle. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that subglacial environments harbor endogenous active ecosystems that have the potential to impact global biogeochemical cycles over extended periods of time. PMID:23486249

  11. Tentative correlation of midcontinent glacial sequence with marine chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    A tentative glacial-interglacial 3-million-year chronology is synthesized by regional correlation of Midcontinent tills and paleosols to marine paleotemperature/eustatic cycles and oxygen isotope stages. The paleotemperature curves of Beard et al. (1982), based on planktonic foraminiferal abundances, correspond directly with eustatic cycles during the last 3 Ma. These generalized curves are shown to correlate reasonably well with standard oxygen isotope stages at least for the past 900 ka. This indicates that paleotemperature and Vail-type eustatic cycles have been glacially induced during the last 3 Ma. The chronology developed here utilizes both paleotemperature and oxygen isotope stages; however, below the Jaramillo magnetic subchron, isotope curves are more variable and only paleotemperature stages are used. Tills and paleosols at type localities in the Midcontinent area of the US are correlated to the SPECMAP oxygen isotope time scale. Because mid-Brunhes events are poorly constrained by radiometric dates, alternative correlations are possible. The oldest known Midcontinent tills correlate to the first Plio-Pleistocene cold paleotemperature stage and drop in sea level at 2.4 Ma. This Late Pliocene event also corresponds to the first major isotopic enrichment and the onset of late Cenozoic ice-rafting in the North Atlantic region.

  12. Systematically enhanced subarctic Pacific stratification and nutrient utilization during glacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, K. P.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The modern subarctic North Pacific is characterized as a high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area, but evidence for increased nutrient utilization during the last glacial indicates that this region is highly dynamic. As such, this HNLC area is of particular interest in regard to understanding changes in the biological pump and carbon sequestration and predicting how biogeochemical processes will influence, or be influenced by, future climate change. While it has been suggested that changes in iron supply and/or ocean stratification could explain fluctuations in nutrient utilization and productivity in the subarctic Pacific, short records of nutrient utilization have previously hindered the evaluation of these potential mechanisms over long timescales. Here we present new, high-resolution records of bulk sediment δ15N from 0-1.2 Ma from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Exp. 323 Site U1342, which are used to calculate Δδ15N (U1342 δ15Nbulk - ODP Site 1012 δ15Nbulk) as a nitrate utilization proxy. The unprecedented length and resolution of this new record allows us, for the first time, to determine orbital-scale systematic behavior in subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization over many glacial/interglacial cycles. Spectral analyses demonstrate that enhanced nutrient utilization was paced by climate on Milankovitch orbital cycles since the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; ~800 ka). Nitrate utilization maxima is statistically correlated with glacial maxima and enhanced dust/iron availability (represented by existing records of EPICA ice core dust, Southern Pacific Ocean sediment iron, and China loess) but shows low correlation to primary productivity, suggesting that stratification has systematically exerted an important control on subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization since the MPT. These findings imply that the presence of iron helped to change the region into a nitrate-limited, rather than iron-limited, region during glacials and that stratification, which

  13. Evidence of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous hypotheses have addressed glacial-interglacial climatic dynamics, but none of them explain the sharp 25C temperature increase in Greenland in the last deglaciation (Cuffey et al. 1995; Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). These robust data were obtained through analyzing the temperature profile in the Greenland ice sheet where cold from the last glaciation is preserved in the depth of the glacial sheet. We suggest that during glaciations the ocean accumulated energy: interior ocean water heated up to ~20-30C and during deglaciation this energy is released. In the analogy with reconstructing the ice sheet temperature profiles, the most reliable proof of ocean interior warming during the last glaciation is the heat flux profiles in the bottom sediments. In the final reports based on temperature measurements conducted during the DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) it is stated that heat flux in the bottom sediments doesn't vary with depth and consequently there were no substantial temperature changes in the ocean interior during the last glacial cycle, and heat flux on the surface of the ocean bottom is the geothermal heat flux (Erickson et al., 1975, Hyndman et al., 1987). However, we have critically investigated data in all initial reports of all deep sea drilling projects and have noticed that all temperature data show that heat flow decreases strongly with depth (a minimum of 40 mW/m2), i.e. most of the heat flux detected on the surface of the ocean floor is not the geothermal heat flux but remaining heat that bottom sediments release. Sharp shifts in heat flow are seen within boreholes at depths crossing gas hydrate bottom. All this means that during the last glacial period interior water temperature was on 25-30C degrees warmer. Conversely, in isolated seas heat flow in the sediments shows little change with depth.

  14. EPICA Dome C record of glacial and interglacial intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Stenni, B.; Pol, K.; Braconnot, P.; Cattani, O.; Falourd, S.; Kageyama, M.; Jouzel, J.; Landais, A.; Minster, B.; Barnola, J. M.; Chappellaz, J.; Krinner, G.; Johnsen, S.; Röthlisberger, R.; Hansen, J.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Otto-Bliesner, B.

    2010-01-01

    Climate models show strong links between Antarctic and global temperature both in future and in glacial climate simulations. Past Antarctic temperatures can be estimated from measurements of water stable isotopes along the EPICA Dome C ice core over the past 800 000 years. Here we focus on the reliability of the relative intensities of glacial and interglacial periods derived from the stable isotope profile. The consistency between stable isotope-derived temperature and other environmental and climatic proxies measured along the EDC ice core is analysed at the orbital scale and compared with estimates of global ice volume. MIS 2, 12 and 16 appear as the strongest glacial maxima, while MIS 5.5 and 11 appear as the warmest interglacial maxima. The links between EDC temperature, global temperature, local and global radiative forcings are analysed. We show: (i) a strong but changing link between EDC temperature and greenhouse gas global radiative forcing in the first and second part of the record; (ii) a large residual signature of obliquity in EDC temperature with a 5 ky lag; (iii) the exceptional character of temperature variations within interglacial periods. Focusing on MIS 5.5, the warmest interglacial of EDC record, we show that orbitally forced coupled climate models only simulate a precession-induced shift of the Antarctic seasonal cycle of temperature. While they do capture annually persistent Greenland warmth, models fail to capture the warming indicated by Antarctic ice core δD. We suggest that the model-data mismatch may result from the lack of feedbacks between ice sheets and climate including both local Antarctic effects due to changes in ice sheet topography and global effects due to meltwater-thermohaline circulation interplays. An MIS 5.5 sensitivity study conducted with interactive Greenland melt indeed induces a slight Antarctic warming. We suggest that interglacial EDC optima are caused by transient heat transport redistribution comparable with

  15. Exploring biological constraints on the glacial history of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convey, Peter; Stevens, Mark I.; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Smellie, John L.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Barnes, David K. A.; Clarke, Andrew; Pugh, Philip J. A.; Linse, Katrin; Cary, S. Craig

    2009-12-01

    The evolutionary and biogeographic history of the contemporary Antarctic terrestrial and marine biotas reveals many components of ancient origin. For large elements of the terrestrial biota, long-term isolation over timescales from hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years, and thus persistence through multiple glacial cycles, now appears to be the norm rather than the exception. For the marine biota there are some parallels with benthic communities also including ancient components, together with an incidence of species-level endemism indicating long-term isolation on the Antarctic continental shelf. Although it has long been known that a few ice-free terrestrial locations have existed in Antarctica for up to 10-12 million years, particularly in the Dry Valleys of Victoria Land along with certain nunataks and higher regions of large mountain ranges, these do not provide potential refugia for the majority of terrestrial biota, which occur mainly in coastal and/or low-lying locations and exhibit considerable biogeographic regionalisation within the continent. Current glacial models and reconstructions do not have the spatial resolution to detect unequivocally either the number or geographical distribution of these glacial refugia, or areas of the continental shelf that have remained periodically free from ice scouring, but do provide limits for their maximum spatial extent. Recent work on the evolution of the terrestrial biota indicates that refugia were much more widespread than has been recognised and it is now clear that terrestrial biology provides novel constraints for reconstructing the past glacial history of Antarctica, and new marine biological investigations of the Antarctic shelf are starting to do likewise.

  16. Sedimentary architecture of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from pre-glacial to glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Larter, Robert; Nitsche, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Studies of the sedimentary architecture and characteristics of Antarctic shelves provide clues of past ice sheet advance-retreat cycles and help improve constraints for paleo-ice dynamic models since early glacial periods. A first seismostratigraphic analysis of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf and slope of West Antarctica reveals insights into the structural architecture of the continental margin and shows stages of sediment deposition, erosion and transport history from pre-glacial times to early glaciation and to the most recent glacial periods. The shelf geometry consists of a large pre- and syn-rift basin in the middle shelf region between outcropping basement of the inner shelf and basement ridges and highs beneath the outer shelf. A middle shelf sub-basin exists which may have formed as a result of motion along an early West Antarctic Rift System branch. At least 4 km of pre-glacial strata has been eroded from the present inner shelf and coastal hinterland by ice sheet advances since the onset of glaciation. Some of the eroded sediments were deposited as a progradational wedge extending the outer shelf by 25 to 65 km oceanward of the pre-glacial shelf-break. Comparing the observed seismic characteristics with those of other Antarctic shelf sequences, we assign an Early Cretaceous age for bottom sedimentary unit ASS-1, a Late Cretaceous to Oligocene age for unit ASS-2, an Early to Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-3, a Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-4, a Late Miocene to Early Pliocene age for unit ASS-5, and a Pliocene to Pleistocene age for the top unit ASS-6. The survival of buried grounding zone wedges in the upper part of unit ASS-5 of the outer shelf is consistent with the onset of a long warming phase and a retreated ice sheet in the early Pliocene as observed for the Ross Sea shelf and reconstructed from paleo-ice sheet models. Our data also reveal that the paleo-ice flow paths of the central Pine Island Trough system have remained stationary across the

  17. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  18. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  19. Evolution of the floor of Hellas Basin, Mars: Implications for regional glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-12-01

    Geologic features on Mars show clear evidence of modification by water and water ice. Studies have suggested that ice remains just below the martian surface today buried beneath tens of centimeters of soil. Past obliquity variations have been theorized to have promoted the formation and stability of ground ice near the equator, possibly promoting the accumulation of glaciers and the subsequent formation of periglacial terrain. Potential glacial and periglacial features have also been observed on the rim and floor of Hellas Basin; these include esker-like ridges, drumlin-like hills, grooved terrain (possible glacial scour), moraine-like deposits, lacustrine deposits, lobate debris aprons, and hourglass craters containing flow features. These potential glacial features could indicate present-day near-surface ice, with implications for global hydrologic cycle modeling, astrobiology studies, and the search for resources in the Solar System. We assess the geologically recent effects of ice on the evolution of the surface of this region of Mars by evaluating the spatial distribution of glacial features within and surrounding Hellas Basin. An in-depth survey of visible images and new nighttime infrared images from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey and visible images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is undertaken in order to extend high quality coverage of the basin floor and its features. Initial findings confirm widespread morphologic evidence for glacial and periglacial processes on the basin floor, including moraine deposits, flow features and sublimation terrain. Preliminary analyses reveal correlations between glacial features and fluvial and lacustrine deposits, providing insights into the past hydrologic cycle of the region. We quantitatively model the depth to present-day, near-surface ice at glacial and periglacial feature locations throughout the region using

  20. Southern Ocean buoyancy forcing of ocean ventilation and glacial atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Andrew J.; Vallis, Geoffrey K.; Nikurashin, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles closely correspond to Antarctic temperature patterns. These are distinct from temperature variations in the mid to northern latitudes, so this suggests that the Southern Ocean is pivotal in controlling natural CO2 concentrations. Here we assess the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 concentrations to glacial-interglacial changes in the ocean's meridional overturning circulation using a circulation model for upwelling and eddy transport in the Southern Ocean coupled with a simple biogeochemical description. Under glacial conditions, a broader region of surface buoyancy loss results in upwelling farther to the north, relative to interglacials. The northern location of upwelling results in reduced CO2 outgassing and stronger carbon sequestration in the deep ocean: we calculate that the shift to this glacial-style circulation can draw down 30 to 60 ppm of atmospheric CO2. We therefore suggest that the direct effect of temperatures on Southern Ocean buoyancy forcing, and hence the residual overturning circulation, explains much of the strong correlation between Antarctic temperature variations and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles.

  1. High-resolution mapping of glacial landforms in the North Alpine Foreland, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard C.; Hinsch, Ralph; Wagreich, Michael

    2010-10-01

    In this study results from traditional field mapping were merged with precise elevation information from airborne LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) surveys. Morphological and sedimentological data provide new results from the Austrian (eastern) part of the Salzach piedmont glacier during times of and shortly after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The variations in meltwater discharge had a major impact on the development of glacial landforms. In areas with high meltwater supply erosional or debris reworking processes play a major role, represented by drainage channels, drumlins and kettled, low relief hummocky moraine with low slope angles. Low discharge areas are associated with distinct depositional forms such as high relief end moraines (up to 30 m) and hummocky moraine (averaging 20 m) with high slope angles. Isolated conical kames may reach heights up to 45 m. Fluvial activity is supposed to rise towards the end of the glacial cycle causing high melting rates and comprehensive debris reworking. The formation of terminal lakes and associated widespread, inorganic lake clays are the last deposits within the study area before the Salzach Glacier completely receded to its main valley. The survey of glacial landforms through the combination of field mapping and high-resolution DEM derived from airborne LiDAR missions gives precise information on transport and deposition during the last glacial cycle of the eastern Salzach Glacier piedmont lobe.

  2. Lithologic composition and rock weathering potential of forested, glacial-till soils

    Treesearch

    Scott W. Bailey; James W. Hornbeck; James W. Hornbeck

    1992-01-01

    Describes methods for predicting lithologies present in soils developed on glacial till, and the potential weathering contributions from rock particles >2 mm in diameter. The methods are not quantitative in terms of providing weathering rates, but provide information that can further the understanding of forest nutrient cycles, and possibly assist with decisions...

  3. Timing the last interglacial-glacial transition in glacial sedimentary sequences of the Hudson Bay lowlands (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Allard, G.; Ghaleb, B.; Lamothe, M.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate records (oxygen isotopes and speleothems) indicate that the onset of the last glacial cycle was characterized by rapid and large-scale growth of continental ice sheets. The timing of the inception of the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) and its subsequent evolution (extent) remain, however, largely unconstrained. The depositional record of the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is of particular interest to these issues because this region is located near the former geographic center of the LIS. The presence of nonglacial deposits in HBL glacial sedimentary sequences thus implies drastic changes in ice sheet configuration, but constraining these ice volume changes through absolute dating of nonglacial sediments has been so far inconclusive. Here we use radiocarbon, U-series, and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) methods to constrain the age of an extensive nonglacial unit containing abundant wood fragments enclosed in compacted clay lying below several meters of glacial deposits along the Nottaway River, in the southeastern sector of the HBL. This region is particularly interesting because it lies near one of the inception centers of the LIS. Radiocarbon dating of a wood fragment yielded a nonfinite 14C age of >55.2 ka, in agreement with similar dating attempts throughout the HBL. Measurements of U and Th concentrations and isotope ratios on fossil wood samples revealed consistent 230Th/U ages, indicating that the wood fragments were subject to a single episode of uranium uptake, with apparently no subsequent disturbance of the geochemical system. Despite mechanical cleaning of the wood outer surfaces, non-authigenic 230Th was found in most samples and correction for this detrital contamination yielded an isochron age of 106.8 (+12.3, -10.3) ka, which represents a minimum age for this unit. The 230Th/U age constraint is nonetheless supported by a series of OSL ages obtained for the overlying fluvial sands, thereby assigning the Nottaway nonglacial unit to the end

  4. The Glacial-Interglacial Monsoon Recorded by Speleothems from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, A. K.; Gagan, M. K.; Dunbar, G. B.; Krause, C.; Hantoro, W. S.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Shen, C. C.; Sun, H.; Cai, B.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Rifai, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool is a primary source of heat and moisture to the global atmosphere and a key player in tropical and global climate variability. There is mounting evidence that atmospheric convection and oceanic processes in the tropics can modulate global climate on orbital and sub-orbital timescales. Glacial-interglacial cycles represent the largest natural climate changes over the last 800 kyr with each cycle terminated by rapid global warming and sea level rise. Our understanding of the role and response of tropical atmospheric convection during these periods of dramatic warming is limited. We present the first speleothem paleomonsoon record for southwest Sulawesi (5ºS, 119ºE), spanning two glacial-interglacial cycles, including glacial termination IV (~340 kyr BP) and both phases of termination III (~248 and ~220 kyr BP). This unique record is constructed from multiple stalagmites from two separate caves and is based on a multi-proxy approach (δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) that provides insight into the mechanisms controlling Australian-Indonesian summer monsoon variability. Speleothem δ18O and trace element data indicate a rapid increase in rainfall at glacial terminations and wet interglacials. Terminations IV, III, and I are each characterized by an abrupt 3‰ decrease in δ18O. Variability in δ18O leading-in to glacial terminations is also similar, and corresponds to October insolation. Prior to deglaciation, there is a distinct shift to higher δ18O that is synchronized with weak monsoon intervals in Chinese speleothem records. The remarkably consistent pattern among terminations implies that the response of tropical convection to changing background climates is well regulated. Furthermore, we find that speleothem δ13C leads δ18O by ~5 kyr during glacial terminations. The early decrease in speleothem δ13C may reflect the response of tropical vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 and temperature, rather than regional changes in rainfall.

  5. Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, Virgil; Sansjofre, Pierre; Rabineau, Marina; Revillon, Sidonie; Houghton, Jennifer; Fike, David A.

    2017-06-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes to the Earth’s surface environment, including the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Such inferences assume that individual δ34S records reflect temporal changes in the global sulfur cycle; this assumption may be well grounded for sulfate-bearing minerals but is less well established for pyrite-based records. Here, we investigate alternative controls on the sedimentary sulfur isotopic composition of marine pyrite by examining a 300-m drill core of Mediterranean sediments deposited over the past 500,000 y and spanning the last five glacial-interglacial periods. Because this interval is far shorter than the residence time of marine sulfate, any change in the sulfur isotopic record preserved in pyrite (δ34Spyr) necessarily corresponds to local environmental changes. The stratigraphic variations (>76‰) in the isotopic data reported here are among the largest ever observed in pyrite, and are in phase with glacial-interglacial sea level and temperature changes. In this case, the dominant control appears to be glacial-interglacial variations in sedimentation rates. These results suggest that there exist important but previously overlooked depositional controls on sedimentary sulfur isotope records, especially associated with intervals of substantial sea level change. This work provides an important perspective on the origin of variability in such records and suggests meaningful paleoenvironmental information can be derived from pyrite δ34S records.

  6. Record of glacial Lake Missoula floods in glacial Lake Columbia, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Clague, John J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2), outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula deposited diagnostic sediments within glacial Lake Columbia. Two dominant outburst flood lithofacies are present within glacial Lake Columbia deposits: a flood expansion bar facies and a finer-grained hyperpycnite facies. We conclude that the flood sediments have a glacial Lake Missoula source because: (1) current indicators indicate westward flow through the lake, and upvalley flow followed by downvalley flow in tributary valleys; (2) no flood sediments are found north of a certain point; (3) there is a dominance of Belt-Purcell Supergroup clasts in a flood expansion bar; and (4) some of the finer-grained beds have a pink colour, reflective of glacial Lake Missoula lake-bottom sediments. A new radiocarbon age of 13,400 ± 100 14C BP on plant detritus found below 37 flood beds helps constrain the timing of outburst flooding from glacial Lake Missoula.

  7. Meltwater input to the southern ocean during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A.; Burckle, L.H.; Hays, J.D.

    1994-12-02

    Three records of oxygen isotopes in biogenic silica from deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean reveal the presence of isotopically depleted diatomaceous opal in sediment from the last glacial maximum. This depletion is attributed to the presence of lids of meltwater that mixed with surface water along certain trajectories in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the drainage from Antarctica or extensive northward transport of icebergs are among the main mechanisms that could have produced the increase in meltwater input to the glacial Southern Ocean. Similar isotopic trends were observed in older climatic cycles at the same cores.

  8. What caused the glacial to interglacial CO{sub 2} change?

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Peng, Tsung-Hung

    1991-12-01

    Scenarios put forward to explain the 80 {mu}atm glacial to interglacial change in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content are evaluated. The conclusion is that no single mechanism is adequate. Rather, contributions from temperature, sea ice, biologic pumping, nutrient deepening, and CaCO{sub 3} cycling must be called upon. The observation that the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio for Antarctic foraminifera was 0.9 {plus_minus} 0.1% lower during glacial than during interglacial time constitutes a huge fly in the ointment for all scenarios proposed to date.

  9. A fresh look at glacial foods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has become clear that ice ages are characterized by glacial as well as climatic instability on millennial time scales. In his Perspective, Colman highlights two recent papers investigating the role of glacial meltwater and continental drainage in this instability. The results suggest a fundamental instability feedback between ocean circulation and ice sheet dynamics and provides an explanation for why instability was greatest at times of intermediate ice volume.

  10. Analysis of recent glacial earthquakes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Nettles, M.

    2015-12-01

    Large calving events at Greenland's outlet glaciers produce teleseismically detectable glacial earthquakes. These events are observed in the seismic record for the past 22 years, but the complete catalog of glacial earthquakes still numbers only ~300. The annual occurrence of these long-period events has increased over time, which makes recent years especially valuable in expanding the global dataset. Glacial earthquakes from 1993- 2010 have been analyzed systematically (Tsai and Ekström, 2007; Veitch and Nettles, 2012). Here, we analyze more recent events using the same centroid—single-force (CSF) approach as previous authors, focusing initially on data from 2013. In addition, we perform a focused study of selected events from 2009-2010 to assess the reliability of the force azimuths obtained from such inversions. Recent spatial and temporal patterns of glacial earthquakes in Greenland differ from those in previous years. In 2013, three times as many events occurred on the west coast as on the east, and these events originated predominantly from two glaciers: Jakobshavn Glacier on the west coast and Helheim Glacier on the east. Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, on the east coast, produced no glacial earthquakes in 2013, though it produced many events in earlier years. Previous CSF results for glacial earthquakes show force azimuths perpendicular to the glacier front during a calving event, with force plunges near horizontal. However, some azimuths indicate forces initially oriented upglacier, while others are oriented downglacier (seaward). We perform a set of experiments on events from 2009 and 2010 and find two acceptable solutions for each glacial earthquake, oriented 180° apart with plunges of opposite sign and centroid times differing by approximately one half of the assumed duration of the earthquake time function. These results suggest the need for a more complex time function to model glacial earthquakes more accurately.

  11. Neoproterozoic Glacial Extremes: How Plausible is the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    The suggestion that the glaciation events of the Neoproterozoic could have been global in extent, so-called "snowball" glaciations, during which the oceans were entirely covered by sea ice and the continents by massive continental ice sheets, is an idea tha is recurrent in the geological and climate dynamics literature. It is an idea that haa both critics and defenders but concensus concerning it's plausiblity has yet to emerge. Previous work on this problem has led to the suggestion that a more likely scenario than the "hard snowball" is one in which open water continues to persist at the equator, thus enabling biological evolution into the Cambrian to proceed, perhaps stimulated by the transition from the cold conditions of the Neoproterozoic to the warm condition of the Cambrian, thus leading to the Cambrian "explosion of life". We will discuss recent extensions of our previous efforts to model the extreme climate of the Neoproterozoic, using both the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model and the NCAR Community Climate System Model. With an appropriate choice for the albedo of sea ice, the former model conntinues to deliver hysteresis in the surface temperature vs. CO2 concentration space when solar luminosity is reduced by 6% below modern, and thus continues to suggest the existence of the previously hypothesized "CO2 attractor". We argue here that the system could be locked onto this attractor by the strong "out of equilibrium" effects of the carbon cycle recently discussed by Rothman et al. (PNAS, 2003). The open water solution is confirmed as the preferred mode of the system by the detailed CCSM integrations that we have performed.

  12. Mapping Glacial Lakes on the Tibetan Plateau with Landsat TM/ETM+ Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Sheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    With a pronounced temperature rise of 0.16oC per decade, the Tibetan plateau is one of the world’s most vulnerable areas responding to global change. Glaciers and glacial lakes serve as sensitive indicators to these regional climate and water cycle variations. Recent study shows that glaciers on the plateau have retreated dramatically, leading to the expansion of the existing glacial lakes and the emergence ofnew glacial lakes. The existence of these lakes increases the possibility of outburst floods to the downstream areas during the ice melting season. Mapping and monitoring these glacial lakes will facilitate our understanding of the glacier-related hazards and regional climate changes. However, rigorous field surveys of glacial lake dynamics are prohibitive in high-mountainous areas on the plateau due to their low accessibility. Satellite remote sensing provides an efficient and objective tool to analyze the status and variations of glacial lakes. Theoretically, lakes and other surface open water bodies are readily identified in satellite images owing to their very low reflectance in near-infrared (NIR) channels of Landsat sensors. In the mountain regions where glacial lakes are located, cloud shadows, mountain shadows, melting glaciers or even lakes under different conditions (e.g., ice lakes, salt lakes, turbid lakes) could become disturbing factors and create problems to glacial lake delineation. We use normalized difference water index (NDWI), the normalized ratio index between the green and near infrared spectral bands, to differentiate water bodies from other land features. As lake features are on the relatively flat areas, topographic features such as terrain slope and hill shades derived from digital elevation model (DEM) are also used to remove the shadows from lakes. Based on NDWI and topographic characteristics, We have developed an automated hierarchical method to monitor glacial lakes using Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery. Firstly, lakes are roughly

  13. Terrigenous Fe input and biogenic sedimentation in the glacial and interglacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.W.; Leinen, M.; Knowlton, C.W.

    1995-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship of particulate iron from land erosion to the accumulation of biogenic matter in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Sediment cores representing the last six glacial-interglacial cycles and previously published mineralogic records were used as data input. Total iron, terrigenous, and biogenic components were determined for three sediment cores. The study determined that there is no relationship between terrigenous iron input and sedimentary carbon sequestering. This is based on chemical, spectral, and stratigraphic anlyses which showed: (1) no consistent pattern of terrigenous input during glacial or interglacial periods, (2) a close relationshipe between the accumulation of particulate iron and the accumulation of terrigenous matter, (3) no coherent spectral correlations between glacial periodicity and iron input, (4) an inverse correlation of iron input and calcium carbonate, and (5) no spectral or linear relationship between iron accumulation and calcium carbonate, organic carbon, or opal. 55 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Analyzing Glacial-Interglacial Ocean Biogeochemical States in the MPI-Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, M.; Ilyina, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is still little consensus about the mechanisms causing the glacial - interglacial variationsin atmospheric CO2 concentrations of around 100 ppm. Some of those mechanisms aredriven by alterations in ocean biogeochemical cycles. Hence, it is crucial to understand oceanbiogeochemistry dynamics during glacial-interglacial transitions. Within the German nationalclimate modeling initiative PalMod, aiming at simulating a full glacial cycle (135k - today) intransient mode with a state-of-the-art Earth System Model (ESM), we address the oceanbiogeochemistry cycles using a comprehensive modeling approach. In order to set up themodel we start with ocean only simulations, which are based on the 3-D ocean generalcirculation model MPIOM coupled to the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC.Atmospheric forcing data is derived from a fully coupled LGM simulation including theatmosphere general circulation model ECHAM6. This setup provides us a sophisticatedrepresentation of the ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM without using any kind of datarestoring,to be consistent with the biological, chemical and physical dynamics of the model.We analyze alterations in ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM in comparison to a preindustrialcontrol climate. We discuss and quantify the changes in ocean biogeochemicalcycles between these two states, as well as possible implications for carbon transfer due tochanges in ocean dynamics. In the next steps we will use the ocean biogeochemistry model aspart of the fully coupled MPI-ESM. Our results aim at improving the understanding of glacial- interglacial changes in atmospheric CO2, especially in terms of marine carbon sequestrationand release. The presented work contributes to developing comprehensive ESMs, which arecapable of simulating the climate evolution and the variability during the last glacial cycle.

  15. Geomorphical and Geochronological Constrains of the Last Glacial Period in Southern Patagonia, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S. A.; Hein, A.; Gómez, G. N.; Ferrada, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the outer limits of the former Patagonian ice sheet (PIS, ~38-55S) having been extensively mapped, it remains unknown if the Patagonian glaciers fluctuated synchronously or asynchronously during the last glacial period. Previous work has revealed asynchronous spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice-margins at the end of the last glaciation but it is not well understood if the northern and southern parts of the PIS reached concurrent maximum glaciation during the last glacial cycle. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass involving the southern westerly wind belt latitudinal range, which is thought to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the cause of glaciations in Patagonia and the role of the westerlies in climate change. Here, we discuss paleoglaciological and paleoclimatological implications of new 10Be and 14C data obtained from moraines and strategically selected mires in two contiguous glacially molded basins of south Patagonia (48-55S): Torres del Paine (51S) and Última Esperanza (52S). In this region, we focused our 10Be cosmogenic-dating efforts in the previously undated outer moraines deposited (supposedly) during the last glacial cycle. In order to crosscheck cosmogenic data we collected boulders embedded in moraines and cobbles from the main glaciofluvial plains grading from the outermost moraines. Geomorphic and cosmogenic dating affords evidence for glacial maximum conditions occurring between 40-50 ka (ka = thousand of years before present) in southern Patagonia, which is different from other chronologies within southern South America. We obtained 14C basal ages from sites located within moraine depressions and on former paleolake shorelines and thus these may provide key data on deglaciation and debated regional paleolake history.

  16. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, A; Winkelmann, R; Schellnhuber, H J

    2016-01-14

    The past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated warm and stable climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes. Yet such summer insolation is near to its minimum at present, and there are no signs of a new ice age. This challenges our understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception. Here we propose a critical functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and might anticipate future periods of glacial inception. Using an ensemble of simulations generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by palaeoclimatic data, we suggest that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The missed inception can be accounted for by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentrations and the low orbital eccentricity of the Earth. Additionally, our analysis suggests that even in the absence of human perturbations no substantial build-up of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would probably last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1,000 to 1,500 gigatonnes of carbon will postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years. Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to remain in the present delicately balanced interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time.

  17. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Winkelmann, R.; Schellnhuber, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    The past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated warm and stable climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes. Yet such summer insolation is near to its minimum at present, and there are no signs of a new ice age. This challenges our understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception. Here we propose a critical functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and might anticipate future periods of glacial inception. Using an ensemble of simulations generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by palaeoclimatic data, we suggest that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The missed inception can be accounted for by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentrations and the low orbital eccentricity of the Earth. Additionally, our analysis suggests that even in the absence of human perturbations no substantial build-up of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would probably last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1,000 to 1,500 gigatonnes of carbon will postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years. Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to remain in the present delicately balanced interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time.

  18. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, Andrey; Winkelmann, Ricarda; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated rather stable and warm climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes (Milanković , 1941; Hays et al., 1976, Paillard, 1998). Yet pertinent summer insolation is near to its minimum at present (Berger and Loutre, 2002), and there are no signs of a new ice age (Kemp et al., 2011). This challenges our scientific understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception (Masson-Delmotte et al., 2013). Here we propose a fundamental functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global CO2 concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and can anticipate future periods when glacial inception may occur again. Using a simulations ensemble generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by paleoclimatic data, we show that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. This can be explained by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentration and low orbital eccentricity of the Earth (Loutre and Berger, 2003). Additionally, our analysis shows that even in the absence of human perturbations no significant buildup of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would likely last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1000 to 1500 GtC may already postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years (Archer and Ganopolski, 2005; Paillard, 2006). Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to stay in the delicate interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time.

  19. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  20. Paleodust variability since the Last Glacial Maximum and implications for iron inputs to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Murphy, L. N.; Raiswell, R.; Moore, J. K.; Anderson, R. F.; McGee, D.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Delmonte, B.; Hesse, P. P.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. In this study we use observationally constrained model reconstructions of the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum, combined with different simplified assumptions of atmospheric and sea ice processing of dust-borne iron, to provide estimates of soluble iron deposition to the oceans. For different climate conditions, we discuss uncertainties in model-based estimates of atmospheric processing and dust deposition to key oceanic regions, highlighting the large degree of uncertainty of this important variable for ocean biogeochemistry and the global carbon cycle. We also show the role of sea ice acting as a time buffer and processing agent, which results in a delayed and pulse-like soluble iron release into the ocean during the melting season, with monthly peaks up to ~17 Gg/month released into the Southern Oceans during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

  1. Reconstruction of North American drainage basins and river discharge since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Over the last glacial cycle, ice sheets and the resultant glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) rearranged river systems. As these riverine threads that tied the ice sheets to the sea were stretched, severed, and restructured, they also shrank and swelled with the pulse of meltwater inputs and time-varying drainage basin areas, and sometimes delivered enough meltwater to the oceans in the right places to influence global climate. Here I present a general method to compute past river flow paths, drainage basin geometries, and river discharges, by combining models of past ice sheets, glacial isostatic adjustment, and climate. The result is a time series of synthetic paleohydrographs and drainage basin maps from the Last Glacial Maximum to present for nine major drainage basins - the Mississippi, Rio Grande, Colorado, Columbia, Mackenzie, Hudson Bay, Saint Lawrence, Hudson, and Susquehanna/Chesapeake Bay. These are based on five published reconstructions of the North American ice sheets. I compare these maps with drainage reconstructions and discharge histories based on a review of observational evidence, including river deposits and terraces, isotopic records, mineral provenance markers, glacial moraine histories, and evidence of ice stream and tunnel valley flow directions. The sharp boundaries of the reconstructed past drainage basins complement the flexurally smoothed GIA signal that is more often used to validate ice-sheet reconstructions, and provide a complementary framework to reduce nonuniqueness in model reconstructions of the North American ice-sheet complex.

  2. Role of Stationary wave feedback in shaping the glacial ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Takahashi, K.; Saito, F.; Blatter, H.

    2015-12-01

    The large northern hemisphere ice sheets significantly affected the atmospheric circulation and in return, their evolution and geographical pattern is influenced by the changed atmospheric circulation. In this work, we suggest that the atmospheric stationary planetary wave feedback leads to the contrasting asymmetrical evolution of ice sheet in the Northern Hemisphere during the glacial cycles. Model results suggest that the stationary wave induced by the glacial ice sheet topography suppresses the cooling of the land in the central Asia and prevents the ice sheet growth of the east-southern part of the Fennoscandian ice sheet and enables its faster retreat at the ice age termination. Because of the smaller eccentricity during the last 120 ka compared to the penultimate glacial during 230 to 130 ka, the Laurentide ice sheet grew to a larger size at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) than the Penultimate Glacial Maximum (PGM). This, in turn, resulted in the Fennoscandian ice sheet to be smaller in LGM than PGM through the stationary wave feedback mechanism.

  3. Quaternary fluvial response to climate change in glacially influenced river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Stéphane; Adamson, Kathryn; Delmas, Magali; Calvet, Marc; Harmand, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Over the last few decades, many studies in Europe and other continents have focused on the fluvial response to climate forcing in unglaciated basins. However, glacial activity may have a profound impact on the behaviour of the fluvial systems located downstream. In comparison to ice-free basins, these systems are characterised by distinctive hydrological and sediment supply regimes. Over Quaternary timescales, the fluvial records are influenced by periglacial (in non-glaciated areas), proglacial, and paraglacial processes. Understanding the impacts of these processes on the formation and preservation of the Quaternary geomorphological and sedimentary archives is key for our understanding of glacial-fluvial interactions. We investigate the impact of Quaternary glacial activity on fluvial sediment transfer, deposition, and preservation. Using existing studies from across Europe, we create a database of glaciofluvial geomorphology, sedimentology, and geochronology. This is used to examine how glacial forcing of fluvial systems varies spatially in different basin settings, and temporally over successive Milankovitch cycles. In particular, we focus on the ways in which the primary glacial-fluvial depositional signal could be distinguished from periglacial and paraglacial reworking and redeposition.

  4. Causes of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation period, the strongest climate changes occurred across the North Atlantic regions. Analyses of borehole temperatures from the Greenland ice sheet have yielded air temperature change estimates of 25°C over the deglaciation period (Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). Such huge temperature changes cannot currently be explained in the frames of modern knowledge about climate. We propose that glacial-interglacial cycles are connected with gradual warming of ocean interior waters over the course of glaciations and quick transport of accumulated heat from ocean to the atmosphere during the deglaciation periods. Modern day ocean circulation is dominated by thermal convection with cold waters subsiding in the Northern Atlantic and filling up the ocean interior with cold and heavy water. However during the glaciation thermal circulation stopped and ocean circulation was driven by 'haline pumps' -Red and Mediterranean seas connected with ocean with only narrow but deep straights acts as evaporative basins, separating ocean water into fresh water which returns to the ocean surface (precipitation) and warm but salty, and therefore heavy, water which flows down to the ocean floor. This haline pump is stratifying the ocean, allowing warmer water locate under the colder water and thus stopping thermal convection in the ocean. Additional ocean interior warming is driven by geothermal heat flux and decomposition of organic rain. To test the hypothesis we present simple ocean box model that describes thermohaline circulation in the World Ocean. The first box is the Red and Mediterranean sea, the second is united high-latitude seas, the third is the ocean surface, and the fourth the ocean interior. The volume of these water masses and straight cross-sections are taken to be close to real values. We have accepted that the exchange of water between boxes is proportional to the difference in water density in these boxes, Sun energy inputs to the ocean and sea surface

  5. Geochemical Weathering in Glacial and Proglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranter, M.

    2003-12-01

    It seems counterintuitive that chemical erosion in glaciated regions proceeds at rates comparable to those of temperate catchments with comparable specific runoff (Anderson et al., 1997). All the usual factors that are associated with elevated rates of chemical weathering ( Drever, 1988, 1994), such as water, soil, and vegetation, are either entirely absent or absent for much of the year. For example, glaciated regions are largely frozen for significant periods each year, the residence time of liquid water in the catchment is low ( Knight, 1999), there are thin, skeletal soils at best, and vegetation is either absent or limited ( French, 1997). Other chapters in this volume have highlighted how these factors are important in other, more temperate and tropical environments. Even so, chemical erosion rates in glaciated terrain are usually near to or greater than the continental average ( Sharp et al., 1995; Wadham et al., 1997; Hodson et al., 2000). This is because glaciated catchments usually have high specific runoff, there are high concentrations of freshly comminuted rock flour, which is typically silt sized and coated with microparticles, and adsorbed organic matter or surface precipitates that may hinder water-rock interactions are largely absent ( Tranter, 1982). In short, the rapid flow of water over fine-grained, recently crushed, reactive mineral surfaces maximizes both the potential rates of chemical weathering and chemical erosion.A range of both lab- and field-based studies of glacial chemical weathering have been undertaken, mainly on the smaller glaciers of Continental Europe (e.g., Brown et al., 1993a, b), Svalbard (e.g., Hodson et al., 2002), and North America (e.g., Anderson et al., 2000). The field-based studies typically generate hydrographs of glacier runoff, which show a characteristic diurnal cycle during summer in low latitudes ( Figure 1), and more subdued diurnal cycles at high latitudes (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The concentration of ions in

  6. Humid glacials, arid interglacials? Results from a multiproxy study of the loess-paleosol sequence Crvenka, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.; Zech, M.; Markovic, S.; Huang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The loess-paleosol sequences in the Carpathian Basin, southeast Europe, are up to tens of meters thick and provide valuable archives for paleoenvironmental and -climate change over several glacial-interglacial cycles. The Crvenka section spans the full last glacial cycle and is used in this multi-proxy study to reconstruct past climate conditions. Crvenka features the characteristic pattern in terms of grain size and weathering intensity, i.e. finer grain sizes and more intensive weathering in the paleosols compared to the glacial loess units. The analysis of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes as molecular biomarkers for past vegetation indicates the presence of trees during glacials, which is consistent with other e.g. macrofossil findings and the notion that parts of southeast Europe served as tree-refugia. However, virtually tree-less grass steppes are reconstructed for the Eemian, the last interglacial. More humid conditions during glacials and more arid conditions during interglacials would be in good agreement with lake-level reconstructions from the Dead Sea, but they seem to be at odds with traditional interpretations of pollen and stable isotope records for the Mediterranean region. In order to further contribute to this issue, we performed compound-specific D/H analyses on the most abundant alkanes C29 and C31, which should mainly record past changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation. The absence of a clear signal towards more depleted values during glacials shows that the temperature-effect is not dominant and probably offset by a strong source-effect, namely the enrichment of the Mediterranean sea water during glacials. This very same source effect may generally need to be taken into account when interpreting terrestrial isotope records in the Mediterranean, which implies that more positive values during glacials may not necessarily indicate an amount-effect and more arid conditions.

  7. Origin of glacial dust in four East Antarctica ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmonte, B.; Petit, J. R.; Basile-Doelsh, I.; Jagoutz, E.; Michard, A.; Maggi, V.; Revel-Rolland, M.

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the geographic origin of mineral aerosol (dust) windblown from the Southern Hemisphere continents and preserved in four East Antarctica ices cores using 87Sr/86Sr -143Nd/144Nd isotopic systems. For the equivalent size range (diameter < 5 micron) the isotope composition is compared to the signature of Potential Source Areas (PSAs) of the Southern Hemisphere. Our initial collection of PSA samples was recently documented by new samples of loesses, fluvial and sands deposits from South America, South Africa, New Zealand and the Antarctic Dry Valleys. In addition, the isotopic fingerprint was measured on ice core from glacial climate (corresponding to even number of marine isotopic stages) for four different ice cores from the East Antarctic Plateau: EPICA-Dome C (75^o06'S, 123^o 24'E; Stage 2,4,6), Vostok (78^o S, 106^o E; Stage 6), Dome B (77^o05' S, 94^o 55' E; Stage 2) and Komsomolskaia (74^o 05' S, 97^o 29' E, Stage 2). The Sr-Nd signature of dust from the four sites appear very close from each other, and confirm the previous results from Basile (1997) from the Vostok ice core. Altogether, they define a restricted isotopic field, and suggest provenance from the same source(s). The comparison with the isotopic signature from the PSAs allows to exclude South Africa as possible candidate, but a partial overlap arises among Southern South America (Chile, Argentina), New Zealand and the Antarctic Dry Valleys. A possible contribution from all these three sources cannot be excluded. However New Zealand and Antarctic source and contribution to Antarctic ice seem quite negligible, an hypothesis as also supported by the absence of volcanic ashes from these area in the Vostok ice core. for the last four glacial/interglacial cycles. Our data confirm previous studies (Grousset et al., 1992, Basile et al., 1997) suggesting South America as the dominant source for dust in East Antarctica in glacial times.

  8. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales.

  9. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  10. Last Glacial loess in the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettis, E. Arthur; Muhs, Daniel R.; Roberts, Helen M.; Wintle, Ann G.

    2003-01-01

    The conterminous United States contains an extensive and generally well-studied record of Last Glacial loess. The loess occurs in diverse physiographic provinces, and under a wide range of climatic and ecological conditions. Both glacial and non-glacia lloess sources are present, and many properties of the loess vary systematically with distance from loess sources. United States' mid-continent Last Glacial loess is probably the thickest in the world, and our calculated mass accumulation rates (MARs) are as high as 17,500 g/m2/yr at the Bignell Hill locality in Nebraska, and many near-source localities have MARs greater than 1500 g/m2/yr. These MARs are high relative to rates calculated in other loess provinces around the world. Recent models of LastGlacial dust sources fail to predict the extent and magnitude of dust flux from the mid-continent of the United States. A better understanding of linkages between climate, ice sheet behaviour, routing of glacial meltwater, land surface processes beyond the ice margin, and vegetation is needed to improve the predictive capabilities of models simulating dust flux from this region.

  11. Sources of glacial moisture in Mesoamerica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Paleoclimatic records from Mesoamerica document the interplay between Atlantic and Pacific sources of precipitation during the last glacial stage and Holocene. Today, and throughout much of the Holocene, the entire region receives its principal moisture in the summer from an interaction of easterly trade winds with the equatorial calms. Glacial records from sites east of 95?? W in Guatemala, Florida, northern Venezuela and Colombia record dry conditions before 12 ka, however. West of 95?? W, glacial conditions were moister than in the Holocene. For example, pollen and diatom data show that Lake Pa??tzcuaro in the central Mexican highlands was cool, deep and fresh during this time and fossil pinyon needles in packrat middens in Chihuahua, Sonora, Arizona, and Texas indicate cooler glacial climates with increased winter precipitation. Cold Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperatures and reduced strength of the equatorial calms can explain arid full and late glacial environments east of 95?? W whereas an intensified pattern of winter, westerly air flow dominated hydrologic balances as far south as 20?? N. Overall cooler temperatures may have increased effective moisture levels during dry summer months in both areas. ?? 1997 INQUA/ Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  13. Deglaciation and glacial erosion: a joint control on magma productivity by continental unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Caricchi, Luca; Castelltort, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles affect the processes through which water and rocks are redistributed across the Earth's surface, thereby linking solid-Earth and climate dynamics. Regional and global scale studies suggest that continental lithospheric unloading due to ice melting during the transition to interglacials leads to increased continental magmatic, volcanic and degassing activity. Such a climatic forcing on the melting of the Earth's interior, however, has always been evaluated without considering the additional continental unloading associated with erosion. Current datasets relating to the evolution of erosion rates are typically limited by temporal resolutions that are too low or span too short time intervals to allow for direct comparisons between the contributions from ice melting and erosion to continental unloading at the timescale of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles. Yet, they provide a fundamental observational basis on which to calibrate numerical predictions. Here, we present and discuss numerical results involving synthetic but realistic topographies, ice caps and glacial erosion rates suggesting that erosion may be as important as deglaciation in affecting continental unloading, sub-continental decompression melting and magma productivity. Thus, the timing and magnitude of deglaciation and erosion must be characterized if the forcing of climate change on the continental magmatic/volcanic activity is to be extracted from the remnants of eroded volcanic centers. Our study represents an additional step towards a more general understanding of the links between a changing climate, glacial processes and the melting of the solid Earth.

  14. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Metivier, L.; Rouby, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our first results indicate that compared to the Maxwell models, the Burgers models involve a larger lower mantle viscosity and thicker ice over Fennoscandia and Canada.

  15. Global peatland dynamics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zicheng; Loisel, Julie; Brosseau, Daniel P.; Beilman, David W.; Hunt, Stephanie J.

    2010-07-01

    Here we present a new data synthesis of global peatland ages, area changes, and carbon (C) pool changes since the Last Glacial Maximum, along with a new peatland map and total C pool estimates. The data show different controls of peatland expansion and C accumulation in different regions. We estimate that northern peatlands have accumulated 547 (473-621) GtC, showing maximum accumulation in the early Holocene in response to high summer insolation and strong summer - winter climate seasonality. Tropical peatlands have accumulated 50 (44-55) GtC, with rapid rates about 8000-4000 years ago affected by a high and more stable sea level, a strong summer monsoon, and before the intensification of El Niño. Southern peatlands, mostly in Patagonia, South America, have accumulated 15 (13-18) GtC, with rapid accumulation during the Antarctic Thermal Maximum in the late glacial, and during the mid-Holocene thermal maximum. This is the first comparison of peatland dynamics among these global regions. Our analysis shows that a diversity of drivers at different times have significantly impacted the global C cycle, through the contribution of peatlands to atmospheric CH4 budgets and the history of peatland CO2 exchange with the atmosphere.

  16. Glacial stages and post-glacial environmental evolution in the Upper Garonne valley, Central Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M; Oliva, M; Palma, P; Ruiz-Fernández, J; Lopes, L

    2017-04-15

    The maximum glacial extent in the Central Pyrenees during the Last Glaciation is known to have occurred before the global Last Glacial Maximum, but the succession of cold events afterwards and their impact on the landscape are still relatively unknown. This study focuses on the environmental evolution in the upper valley of the Garonne River since the Last Glaciation. Geomorphological mapping allows analysis of the spatial distribution of inherited and current processes and landforms in the study area. The distribution of glacial records (moraines, till, erratic boulders, glacial thresholds) suggests the existence of four glacial stages, from the maximum expansion to the end of the glaciation. GIS modeling allows quantification of the Equilibrium Line Altitude, extent, thickness and volume of ice in each glacial stage. During the first stage, the Garonne glacier reached 460m in the Loures-Barousse-Barbazan basin, where it formed a piedmont glacier 88km from the head and extended over 960km(2). At a second stage of glacier stabilization during the deglaciation process, the valley glaciers were 12-23km from the head until elevations of 1000-1850m, covering an area of 157km(2). Glaciers during stage three remained isolated in the upper parts of the valley, at heights of 2050-2200m and 2.6-4.5km from the head, with a glacial surface of 16km(2). In stage four, cirque glaciers were formed between 2260m and 2590m, with a length of 0.4-2km and a glacial area of 5.7km(2). Also, the wide range of periglacial, slope, nival and alluvial landforms existing in the formerly glaciated environments allows reconstruction of the post-glacial environmental dynamics in the upper Garonne basin. Today, the highest lands are organized following three elevation belts: subnival (1500-1900m), nival (1900-2300m) and periglacial/cryonival (2300-2800m). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Global silica cycle paced by astronomical cycles recorded in the Mesozoic bedded chert: Implications for early Mesozoic extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Ozaki, K.; Tada, R.

    2016-12-01

    The early Mesozoic was a period of severe crisis for the world's biota and biogeochemical cycles with Permian-Triassic, Triassic-Jurassic, and Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic) extinctions. Here, we present an 70-Myr-long record of high-resolution biogenic silica (BSi) burial flux in the early Mesozoic deep-sea bedded chert in Japan, which record astronomical cycles of tens of thousands- to multimillion-year periodicity as the rhythmical bedding. The estimated global Bio-Si burial flux is 140% (40-500%) of that in the modern global ocean, assuming the records are representative of low-middle latitude superocean Panthalassa. This suggests that bedded chert was a major sink for dissolved silica (DSi) in the ocean, and that the BSi burial flux was proportional to the DSi input from chemical weathering over timescales longer than the oceanic residence time of DSi (< 100 kyr). This hypothesis is supported by similarity between BSi burial flux and chemical weathering rates calculated by GEOCARBSULFvolc model, except for massive volcanic events during the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian. These exceptions would result in underestimate for silicate weathering by GEOCARBSULFvolc due to the assumption of relatively stable degassing rate on multimillion year-scale. The positive correlation between the organic carbon burial and silicate weathering observed during these periods would be explained by the increased volcanic degassing flux and enhanced organic carbon burial due to increased nutrient supply by enhanced silicate weathering, which would result in coupling of the silicate weathering and organic carbon burial. We propose the BSi burial flux reconstructed from bedded chert can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of the global chemical weathering intensity to understand the impact of volcanism on biogeochemical cycle dynamics during the mass extinction events.

  18. Glacial sequence stratigraphy reveal the Weichselian glacial history of the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Matti

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructions of the last Weichselian glacial cycle 117,000-11,700 years (kyr) ago propose that S Finland, adjacent Russia and the Baltic countries in the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet (EIS), were glaciated during the Middle Weichselian time [marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, 71-57 kyr ago] and that this glaciation was preceded in S Finland by an Early Weichselian interstadial (MIS 5c, 105-93 kyr ago) with pine forest. Here glacial sequence stratigraphy (Powell and Cooper 2002) is applied to isolated Late Pleistocene onshore outcrop sections in S Finland. The analysed sedimentary records have traditionally been investigated, interpreted and published separately by different authors without an attempt to a methodologically more systematic survey. By putting new field data and old observations into a regional sequence stratigraphic framework it is shown how previously unnoticed regularities can be found in the lithofacies and fossil successions. It is shown that the proposed Middle Weichselian glaciation or the pine dominated interstadial did not take place at all (Räsänen et al. 2015). The one Late Weichselian glaciation (MIS 2, 29-11 kyr ago) at the SE sector of EIS was preceded in S Finland by a nearly 90 kyr long still poorly known non-glacial period, featuring tundra with permafrost and probably birch forest. The new Middle Weichselian paleoenvironmental scenario revises the configuration and hydrology of the S part of EIS and gives new setting for the evolution of Scandinavian biota. References Powell, R. D., and Cooper, J. M., 2002, A glacial sequence stratigraphic model for temperate, glaciated continental shelves, in Dowdeswell, J. A., and Cofaig, C. Ó. eds., Glacier-Influenced Sedimentation on High-Latitude Continental Margins: The Geological Society of London, London, Geological Society London, Special Publication v. 203, p. 215-244. Räsänen, M.E., Huitti, J.V., Bhattarai, S. Harvey, J. and Huttunen, S. 2015, The SE sector of the Middle

  19. The million-year evolution of the glacial trimline in the southernmost Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugden, David E.; Hein, Andrew S.; Woodward, John; Marrero, Shasta M.; Rodés, Ángel; Dunning, Stuart A.; Stuart, Finlay M.; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Winter, Kate; Westoby, Matthew J.

    2017-07-01

    An elevated erosional trimline in the heart of West Antarctica in the Ellsworth Mountains tells of thicker ice in the past and represents an important yet ambiguous stage in the evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Here we analyse the geomorphology of massifs in the southernmost Heritage Range where the surfaces associated with the trimline are overlain by surficial deposits that have the potential to be dated through cosmogenic nuclide analysis. Analysis of 100 rock samples reveals that some clasts have been exposed on glacially moulded surfaces for 1.4 Ma and perhaps more than 3.5 Ma, while others reflect fluctuations in thickness during Quaternary glacial cycles. Modelling the age of the glacially moulded bedrock surface based on cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al and 21Ne concentrations from a depth-profile indicates a minimum exposure age of 2.1-2.6 Ma. We conclude that the glacially eroded surfaces adjacent to the trimline predate the Last Glacial Maximum and indeed the Quaternary. Since erosion was by warm-based ice near an ice-sheet upper margin, we suggest it first occurred during the early glaciations of Antarctica before the stepped cooling of the mid-Miocene at ∼14 Ma. This was a time when the interior Antarctic continent had summers warm enough for tundra vegetation to grow and for mountain glaciers to consist of ice at the pressure melting point. During these milder conditions, and subsequently, erosion of glacial troughs is likely to have lowered the ice-sheet surface in relation to the mountains. This means that the range of orbitally induced cyclic fluctuations in ice thickness have progressively been confined to lower elevations.

  20. Friis Hills glacial history: an international collaboration to examine Miocene climate in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halberstadt, A. R. W.; Kowalewski, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Friis Hills, Antarctica (western McMurdo Dry Valleys) contain unique, well-preserved records of Miocene climate. These terrestrial deposits hold geomorphic clues for deciphering the glacial history in a region directly adjacent to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Stacked till sheets, interbedded with lake sediments and non-glacial deposits, reveal a complex history of ice flow and erosion throughout multiple glacial-interglacial cycles (Lewis and Ashworth, 2015). Fossiliferous beds containing Nothofagus, diatoms, algal cells, pollen, insects, and mosses provide past climatological constraints. The Friis Hills sustained multiple alpine glaciations as well as full ice-sheet development, recording glacial drainage reorganization and evidence of previous ice configurations that possibly overrode the Transantarctic Mountains (Lewis and Ashworth, 2015) exposing only scattered nunataks (i.e. a portion of Friis Hills). Lack of chronological control has previously hindered efforts to link the Friis Hills glacial history with regional context; a tephra deposit at the base of the glacial drifts currently provides a single age constraint within the drift deposits. To build upon previous studies, an international collaboration between the USAP, Antarctic New Zealand, and the Italian Antarctic community proposes to core a paleo-lake in the center of the Friis Hills in November 2016, thereby acquiring one of the oldest continuous sedimentological records within the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Here we report discoveries from this year's fieldwork, and reconstruct paleoenvironment at the periphery of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet for the mid-early Miocene, a critical time when marine isotopic records indicate dramatic ice fluctuations. Ash within the sediment core stratigraphy will provide a more robust chronology for the region, and will also suggest possible outcrop locations of corresponding ash deposits to pursue while in the field. We anticipate that the Friis Hills stratigraphy will

  1. Ice Age Reboot: Thermohaline Circulation Crisis during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, L.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) marked a fundamental change in glacial-interglacial periodicity, when it increased from ~41- to 100-kyr cycles and developed higher amplitude climate variability. Because it took place without significant changes in the Milankovitch forcing, this fundamental change must reflect either non-linear responses of the climate system to these external forcings, or internal changes in the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system that led to longer periodicities and more intense glacial periods. We document using Nd isotopes a major disruption of the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) system during the MPT between MIS 25-21 at ~950-860 ka, which effectively marks the first 100-kyr cycle, including an exceptional weakening through critical interglacial MIS 23 at ~900 ka. The data are from ODP Sites 1088 (41°8.163'S, 13°33.77'E, 2082m) and 1090 (42°54.82'S, 8°53.98E', 3702m) in the SE Atlantic Subantarctic Zone, near the upper and lower boundaries of NADW and Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Given evidence for nearly stable NADW and North Pacific Water (NPW) ɛNd-values over the last 2 Ma, we interpret the ɛNd variations to reflect changes in the NADW:NPW mixing fractions. During the studied pre-MPT 41-kyr world (MIS 31-25, 1,100-950 ka), at both sites the differences in glacial and interglacial ɛNd-values are small, indicating strong glacial as well as interglacial export of NADW. A major weakening of NADW export occurred during MIS 24-22, including MIS 23, which is unique as the only known interglacial in which the THC did not strengthen, and thus can be considered as a 'trans-glacial' period. The recovery into the post-MPT 100-kyr world is characterized by continued weak glacial THC. We conclude that the MPT ocean circulation crisis 'rebooted' the pacing and intensity of ice ages and facilitated the coeval drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and high latitude ice sheet growth, generating the conditions that stabilized 100-kyr cycles.

  2. Across the southern Andes on fin: glacial refugia, drainage reversals and a secondary contact zone revealed by the phylogeographical signal of Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Habit, Evelyn M; Walde, Sandra J; Battini, Miguel A; Adams, Emily D M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    We employed DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (control region, COI) regions from 212 individuals of Galaxias platei (Pisces, Galaxiidae) collected throughout Patagonia (25 lakes/rivers) to examine how Andean orogeny and the climatic cycles throughout the Quaternary affected the genetic diversity and phylogeography of this species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed four deep genealogical lineages which likely represent the initial division of G. platei into eastern and western lineages by Andean uplift, followed by further subdivision of each lineage into separate glacial refugia by repeated Pleistocene glacial cycles. West of the Andes, refugia were likely restricted to the northern region of Patagonia with small relicts in the south, whereas eastern refugia appear to have been much larger and widespread, consisting of separate northern and southern regions that collectively spanned most of Argentinean Patagonia. The retreat of glacial ice following the last glacial maximum allowed re-colonization of central Chile from nonlocal refugia from the north and east, representing a region of secondary contact between all four glacial lineages. Northwestern glacial relicts likely followed pro-glacial lakes into central Chilean Patagonia, whereas catastrophic changes in drainage direction (Atlantic --> Pacific) for several eastern palaeolakes were the likely avenues for invasions from the east. These mechanisms, combined with evidence for recent, rapid and widespread population growth could explain the extensive contemporary distribution of G. platei throughout Patagonia.

  3. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of <10 ppm in atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  4. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  5. Central Michigan University's Glacial Park: Instruction through Landscaping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Bruce; Francek, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the creation of a glacial park on a university campus. Suggests that the park is a useful instructional resource that helps students relate classroom material to outdoor phenomena by visualizing and identifying glacial landforms, recognizing their spatial relationships, and understanding how glacial features originated. Offers advice for…

  6. Glacial Lake Lind, Wisconsin and Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.D.; Addis, K.L.; Ferber, L.R.; Hemstad, C.B.; Meyer, G.N.; Komai, L.T.

    1999-01-01

    Glacial Lake Lind developed in the pre-late Wisconsinan St. Croix River valley, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and lasted more than 1000 yr during the retreat of the Superior lobe at the end of the Wisconsinan glaciation. Lake Lind sediment consists primarily of red varved silt and clay, but also includes mud-flow deposits, nearshore silt (penecontemporaneously deformed in places), nearshore rippled sand, and deltaic sand. Lake Lind varved red clay is not part of glacial Lake Grantsburg, as suggested by earlier authors, because the red varves are separated from overlying glacial Lake Grantsburg silt and clay by a unit of deltaic and fluvial sand. Furthermore, varve correlations indicate that the base of the red varves is younger to the north, showing that the basin expanded as the Superior lobe retreated and was not a lake basin dammed to the southwest by the advancing Grantsburg sublobe. Varve correlations indicate that the Superior lobe retreated at a rate of about 200 m/yr. Uniform winter-clay thickness throughout most of the varve couplets suggests thermal stratification in the lake with clay trapped in the epilimnion; some clay would exit the lake at the outlet prior to winter freeze. Zones of thicker winter-clay layers, in places associated with mud-flow layers, indicate outlet incision, lake-level fall, and shoreline erosion and resuspension of lake clay. The most likely outlet for glacial Lake Lind was in the southwest part of the lake near the present site of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Nearshore sediment indicates that the lake level of glacial Lake Lind was around 280 m. The elevation of the base of the Lake Lind sediments indicates water depth was 20 to 55 m. Evidence in the southern part of the lake basin suggests that the Superior lobe readvanced at least once during the early stages of glacial Lake Lind. Lake Lind ended not by drainage but by being filled in by prograding deltas and outwash plains composed of sand derived from the retreating Superior lobe. It

  7. Glacial history of a mid-altitude mountain massif: cartography and dating in the Chablais area (France, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, A.; Reynard, E.; Delannoy, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The Chablais area, considered as one of the cradles of glaciology (de Charpentier, 1841; Morlot, 1859), has been studied for a long time but several questions still remain unresolved. This study aims to reconstruct the glacial history of the massif, in order to explain the glacial landforms, which constitute an important part of the local geomorphology. The study focuses on the last glacial cycle (OIS 5 - OIS 2). The area is primarily associated with the the Valais glacier, by several local glacial flows and, to a lesser extent, by the Giffre glacier. Its position at the interface of the important Valais glacial flow and less powerful local flows is a specificity of the study area, which implies several bifurcations, penetration of the main glacier into laterals valleys, damming situations, and different responses of the various ice bodies to climatic changes. The study is divided in four steps. (1) The first step was to carry out a wide bibliographic survey to identify the state of knowledge, especially in relation to areas previously poorly studied and areas that needed to be reconsidered given developments in dating methods. (2) Field surveys allowed us to complete observations and prepare local geomorphological maps (of glacial landforms and associated phenomena). (3) The third step was to assemble heterogeneous data (old and new maps, Digital Terrain Models, aerial photographies) in a GIS to establish maps of glacial stages. (4) Finally, the absolute and relative chronology of deglaciation (Guitter, 2003) was completed by cosmogenic nuclide dating. Results have allowed us to address the conditions of glacial landform deposition and evolution in a mid-altitude mountain range, and show the need to be prudent in comparing results of different dating methods. Our results suggest that the ages obtained are overall too young in regard to 10Be ages on the northern alpine foreland (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004) and are in conflict with 14C dates obtained in the area

  8. Glacial/Interglacial changes of southwest Pacific intermediate- and deep-water circulation over the last 350,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronge, Thomas; Tiedemann, Ralf; Prange, Matthias; Merkel, Ute; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lamy, Frank

    2015-04-01

    On glacial/interglacial timescales, Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange is considered to be an important factor, driving the variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. To understand the role of oceanic variability in the global carbon cycle, it is necessary to reconstruct changes in deep- and intermediate-water circulation and chemistry of Southern Ocean water masses. In this context, our study aims on the reconstruction of glacial/interglacial changes in the vertical expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water. For our study, we compared isotope records (δ13C and δ18O) measured on the epibenthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi from the Antarctic Intermediate Water and the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (943 - 2066 m water depth) off New Zealand. We used two sediment cores from the Tasman Sea (MD06-2990 and MD06-2986), retrieved during R/V Marion Dufresne cruise MD152, and three sediment cores from the Bounty Trough east of New Zealand (MD97-2120, SO 213-82-1 and SO 213-84-1). Comparing these records, we can monitor changes in southwest Pacific water mass circulation over the past 350,000 years. Over this time period, we record a significant shoaling of the boundary between Antarctic Intermediate Water and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water during all glacial stages. We propose that freshwater input by melting sea ice into the glacial intermediate-water increased the buoyancy difference to underlying deep-waters, thus hampering the downward expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water during glacials. This interpretation is consistent with our modeling results, based on the Community Climate System model version 3, which also indicate a shoaling of glacial intermediate waters due to the input of meltwater. The glacial upward displacement of the water mass boundary significantly increased the vertical extent of circumpolar deep-waters, consequently extending the volume of the proposed glacial deep-water carbon pool.

  9. Glacial-marine and glacial-lacustrine sedimentation in Sebago Lake, Maine: Locating the marine limit

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.A.; Kelley, J.T. ); Belknap, D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The marine limit in Maine marks a sea-level highstand at approximately 13 ka. It was inferred to cross Sebago Lake near Frye Island by Thompson and Borns (1985) on the Surficial Geological Map of Maine, dividing the lake into a northern glacial-lacustrine basin and a southern glacial-marine basin. This study examined the accuracy of the mapped marine limit in the lake and the nature of glacial-lacustrine and glacial-marine facies in Maine. Recognition of the marine limit is usually based on mapped shorelines, glacial-marine deltas, and contacts with glacial-marine sediments. This study, in Maine's second largest lake, collected 100 kilometers of side-scan sonar images, 100 kilometers of seismic reflection profiles, and one core. Side-scan sonar records show coarse sand and gravel and extensive boulder fields at an inferred grounding-line position near Frye Island, where the marine limit was drawn. ORE Geopulse seismic reflection profiles reveal a basal draping unit similar to glacial-marine units identified offshore. Later channels cut more than 30 m into the basal stratified unit. In addition, till and a possible glacial-tectonic grounding-line feature were identified. Slumps and possible spring disruptions are found in several locations. The top unit is an onlapping ponded Holocene lacustrine unit. Total sediment is much thicker in the southern basin; the northern basin, >97 m deep, north of the marine limit appears to have been occupied by an ice block. Retrieved sediments include 12 meters of rhythmites. Microfossil identifications and dating will resolve the environments and time of deposition in this core.

  10. Landscape imprints of changing glacial regimes during ice sheet build-up and decay: A study from Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landvik, J. Y.; Alexanderson, H.; Henriksen, M.; Ingolfsson, O.

    2013-12-01

    Ice sheet behavior and their geologic imprints in fjord regions are often multifaceted. Fjords, which were temporarily occupied by fast flowing outlet glaciers or ice streams during major glaciations, and inter-fjord areas, which were covered by less active ice, show different signatures of past glaciations. The land and marine records of glaciations over the western Svalbard fjord region have been extensively studied during the last few decades. We have re-examined ice flow records from stratigraphic and geomorphic settings, and propose a succession of ice flow styles that occurred repeatedly over the glacial cycles: the maximum, the transitional, and the local flow style. The different topographically constrained segments of the ice sheet switched behavior as glacial dynamics changed during each glacial cycle. These segments, as well as the different flow styles, are reflected differently in the offshore stratigraphic record. We propose that the glacial geomorphological signatures in the inter ice-stream areas mostly developed under warm-based conditions during a late phase of the glaciations, and that the overall glacial imprints in the landscape are strongly biased towards the youngest events.

  11. Was the Late-glacial advance at ~14.0 ka B.P. in Torres del Paine (Patagonia, 51S) the most extensive glacial pulse of Oxygen Isotope Stage 2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Schaefer, J. M.; Vega, R. M.; Schwartz, R.; Finkel, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    Uncovering the timing and spatial extent of glaciers and associated climate changes in the southern hemisphere provide key foundations in the understanding of the origin and termination of ice ages and new insights regarding the Milankovitch model of ice ages. Here, we discuss paleoclimatological implications from our preliminary 10Be-dating program of moraines in Torres del Paine National Park (TDP), in southern Chilean Patagonia (51S). Four main moraine belts (TDP I-IV, from outer to inner) expose geomorphological evidence for ice extent and fluctuations during the last glacial cycle in Torres del Paine. We collected 24 boulders embedded in the outer two moraines (TDP I-II moraines) for 10Be cosmogenic-exposure dating to reconstruct the Quaternary glacial and climate history. The 10Be exposure data show that the mean ages of TDP I moraine, at least in Laguna Azul basin, is about 40 ka BP (n=5) (ka BP= 1,000 years before present) and TDP II is about 14 ka BP. Although most of the 10Be glacial records in Patagonia have documented that the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) occurred between 25-17.5 ka BP, in Torres del Paine the maximum extent of the Southern Patagonian Icefield during the last glacial cycle may have occurred as early as ~40 ka BP. This is one of the first lines of (moraine-based) evidence that suggests the existence of an early LGM in Patagonia. The apparent age of the TDP II moraine dating to the late-glacial seems to imply that there are no distinct moraines in Torres del Paine dating to the time of the global LGM, a unique case revealed here. Scattered boulders from TDP II moraine dates to the late LGM and seems to suggest that late-glacial ice overrode the LGM moraines in Torres del Paine. Both glacial pulses at 40 ka BP and 14 ka BP in Torres del Paine occurred during stadial phases in West Antarctica suggesting the existing of an Antarctic climate control on southern Patagonian during the last glacial cycle. Physical mechanisms allowing climate

  12. Glacial refugia, recolonization patterns and diversification forces in Alpine-endemic Megabunus harvestmen.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Gregor A; Papadopoulou, Anna; Muster, Christoph; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Knowles, L Lacey; Steiner, Florian M; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C

    2016-06-01

    The Pleistocene climatic fluctuations had a huge impact on all life forms, and various hypotheses regarding the survival of organisms during glacial periods have been postulated. In the European Alps, evidence has been found in support of refugia outside the ice shield (massifs de refuge) acting as sources for postglacial recolonization of inner-Alpine areas. In contrast, evidence for survival on nunataks, ice-free areas above the glacier, remains scarce. Here, we combine multivariate genetic analyses with ecological niche models (ENMs) through multiple timescales to elucidate the history of Alpine Megabunus harvestmen throughout the ice ages, a genus that comprises eight high-altitude endemics. ENMs suggest two types of refugia throughout the last glacial maximum, inner-Alpine survival on nunataks for four species and peripheral refugia for further four species. In some geographic regions, the patterns of genetic variation are consistent with long-distance dispersal out of massifs de refuge, repeatedly coupled with geographic parthenogenesis. In other regions, long-term persistence in nunataks may dominate the patterns of genetic divergence. Overall, our results suggest that glacial cycles contributed to allopatric diversification in Alpine Megabunus, both within and at the margins of the ice shield. These findings exemplify the power of ENM projections coupled with genetic analyses to identify hypotheses about the position and the number of glacial refugia and thus to evaluate the role of Pleistocene glaciations in driving species-specific responses of recolonization or persistence that may have contributed to observed patterns of biodiversity.

  13. Variable sea ice contributions to seawater δ18O on glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, C. E.; Weaver, A. J.; Eby, M.; Meissner, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of seawater varies in time, mainly based on the amount of (depleted) ice stored on continents. Oxygen isotope records derived from ocean sediment cores serve as indicators of changes in both seawater temperature and continental ice volume. Seawater δ18O may contain a variable signature of sea ice production, especially at high latitudes. Sea ice growth produces isotopically enriched ice and depleted brine. Over glacial-interglacial cycles, changes in the sites and rates of sea ice production (and by extension sea ice meltwater and brine export) hold the potential to shift local to regional seawater isotopic chemistry. Neglecting variability in sea ice production may therefore superimpose error upon reconstructions employing high latitude δ18O records. We examine the effects of variability in sea ice production between glacial and interglacial climate states on seawater δ18O in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model. Oxygen isotopes are implemented in all components (ocean, atmosphere, land surface, and sea ice) of the coupled model. The role of glacial-interglacial sea ice variability is investigated in a set of model experiments. Here we isolate the seawater δ18O field due only to sea ice in the model. By contrasting the seawater δ18O fields due to sea ice resulting from the glacial and interglacial climates, we investigate the potential for variable sea ice formation to shift seawater δ18O.

  14. Estuarine removal of glacial iron and implications for iron fluxes to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, Andrew W.; Crusius, John; Hoyer, Ian; Campbell, Robert

    2014-06-01

    While recent work demonstrates that glacial meltwater provides a substantial and relatively labile flux of the micronutrient iron to oceans, the role of high-latitude estuary environments as a potential sink of glacial iron is unknown. Here we present the first quantitative description of iron removal in a meltwater-dominated estuary. We find that 85% of "dissolved" Fe is removed in the low-salinity region of the estuary along with 41% of "total dissolvable" iron associated with glacial flour. We couple these findings with hydrologic and geochemical data from Gulf of Alaska (GoA) glacierized catchments to calculate meltwater-derived fluxes of size and species partitioned Fe to the GoA. Iron flux data indicate that labile iron in the glacial flour and associated Fe minerals dominate the meltwater contribution to the Fe budget of the GoA. As such, GoA nutrient cycles and related ecosystems could be strongly influenced by continued ice loss in its watershed.

  15. Estuarine removal of glacial iron and implications for iron fluxes to the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, Andrew W.; Crusius, John; Hoyer, Ian; Campbell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    While recent work demonstrates that glacial meltwater provides a substantial and relatively labile flux of the micronutrient iron to oceans, the role of high-latitude estuary environments as a potential sink of glacial iron is unknown. Here we present the first quantitative description of iron removal in a meltwater-dominated estuary. We find that 85% of “dissolved” Fe is removed in the low-salinity region of the estuary along with 41% of “total dissolvable” iron associated with glacial flour. We couple these findings with hydrologic and geochemical data from Gulf of Alaska (GoA) glacierized catchments to calculate meltwater-derived fluxes of size and species partitioned Fe to the GoA. Iron flux data indicate that labile iron in the glacial flour and associated Fe minerals dominate the meltwater contribution to the Fe budget of the GoA. As such, GoA nutrient cycles and related ecosystems could be strongly influenced by continued ice loss in its watershed.

  16. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Conway, T M; Wolff, E W; Röthlisberger, R; Mulvaney, R; Elderfield, H E

    2015-07-23

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m(-2) per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  17. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, T. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m-2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been >=10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  18. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  19. Glacial--interglacial stability of ocean pH inferred from foraminifer dissolution rates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M; Archer, David

    2002-03-07

    The pH of the ocean is controlled by the chemistry of calcium carbonate. This system in turn plays a large role in regulating the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere on timescales of thousands of years and longer. Reconstructions of ocean pH and carbonate-ion concentration are therefore needed to understand the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the pH of the whole ocean is thought to have been significantly more basic, as inferred from the isotopic composition of boron incorporated into calcium carbonate shells, which would partially explain the lower atmospheric CO2 concentration at that time. Here we reconstruct carbonate-ion concentration--and hence pH--of the glacial oceans, using the extent of calcium carbonate dissolution observed in foraminifer faunal assemblages as compiled in the extensive global CLIMAP data set. We observe decreased carbonate-ion concentrations in the glacial Atlantic Ocean, by roughly 20 micromolkg-1, while little change occurred in the Indian and Pacific oceans relative to today. In the Pacific Ocean, a small (5 micromolkg-1) increase occurred below 3,000m. This rearrangement of ocean pH may be due to changing ocean circulation from glacial to present times, but overall we see no evidence for a shift in the whole-ocean pH as previously inferred from boron isotopes.

  20. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-03

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  1. Relative timing of last glacial maximum and late-glacial events in the central tropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Winckler, Gisela; Hall, Brenda L.; Todd, Claire E.; Rademaker, Kurt M.

    2009-11-01

    Whether or not tropical climate fluctuated in synchrony with global events during the Late Pleistocene is a key problem in climate research. However, the timing of past climate changes in the tropics remains controversial, with a number of recent studies reporting that tropical ice age climate is out of phase with global events. Here, we present geomorphic evidence and an in-situ cosmogenic 3He surface-exposure chronology from Nevado Coropuna, southern Peru, showing that glaciers underwent at least two significant advances during the Late Pleistocene prior to Holocene warming. Comparison of our glacial-geomorphic map at Nevado Coropuna to mid-latitude reconstructions yields a striking similarity between Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Late-Glacial sequences in tropical and temperate regions. Exposure ages constraining the maximum and end of the older advance at Nevado Coropuna range between 24.5 and 25.3 ka, and between 16.7 and 21.1 ka, respectively, depending on the cosmogenic production rate scaling model used. Similarly, the mean age of the younger event ranges from 10 to 13 ka. This implies that (1) the LGM and the onset of deglaciation in southern Peru occurred no earlier than at higher latitudes and (2) that a significant Late-Glacial event occurred, most likely prior to the Holocene, coherent with the glacial record from mid and high latitudes. The time elapsed between the end of the LGM and the Late-Glacial event at Nevado Coropuna is independent of scaling model and matches the period between the LGM termination and Late-Glacial reversal in classic mid-latitude records, suggesting that these events in both tropical and temperate regions were in phase.

  2. Glacial-Interglacial Climate Changes Recorded by Debris Flow Grain Size, Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Roda Boluda, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties remain about the sensitivity of eroding landscapes to climate changes over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Numerical models suggest that simple catchment-fan systems should be responsive to glacial-interglacial climate cycles, recording them in both sediment flux and the grain size distribution of their deposits. However these models are largely untested and the propagation of climatic signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological data from 8 debris flow fans in Owens Valley, eastern California. These fans have an exceptionally well-constrained depositional record spanning the last 120 ka, which we use to examine how sediment export has varied as a function of high-amplitude climate changes. We find a strong and sustained relationship between debris flow grain size and paleoclimate proxies over an entire glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits correlated with warm and dry conditions. Our data suggest these systems are highly reactive to climate forcing, with a short response timescale of <10 ka and no evidence of signal buffering, which we interpret to be driven by rapid sediment transfer from source to sink. We demonstrate that debris flow grain size follows an exponential relationship with temperature, coarsening at a rate of ~10 % per °C. Using this observation, and a known relationship between temperature and storm intensity, we propose that the climate signal recorded in these fan deposits captures changing storm intensity during the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This study offers a direct test of existing models of catchment-fan systems, confirming that glacial-interglacial climate changes can be clearly expressed in their grain size records. Our results also suggest that these debris flow deposits contain a high-resolution, testable record of past storm intensity, and that storminess is the primary control on their sedimentological

  3. Glacial curvilineations: gradual or catastrophic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Livingstone, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Glacial curvilineations (GCLs) are enigmatic landforms that have recently been discovered in Poland (Lesemann et al., 2010, 2014). They comprise parallel sets of sinuous ridges separated by troughs that are found in tunnel valleys and replicate the morphology and pattern of the valley sides. The sedimentology for some has been reported to indicate that the sediment composition relates to a pre-GCL phase. So far just one theory for their formation exists - erosion by longitudinal-vortices within high-energy subglacial meltwater flows (Lesemann et al., 2010). Here, we provide an alternative hypothesis for their formation developed from observations of GCLs found along the southern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In all cases GCLs were found associated with tunnel valley widenings or hollows and occur as distinct parallel sets that mimic each other in terms of nicks and cusps. Using analogies from tree-rings and coral growth we take such mimicry as indicating either incremental growth or development from a template over time. Although without a strong physical explanation we find it much less likely that a series of parallel water channels would maintain such strong mimicry. We instead suggest that subglacial thawing of frozen ground in association with discrete water bodies (tunnel valleys or subglacial lakes) resulted in retrogressive bank failure, possibly along a glide plane provided by a frozen surface. References: Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2010. "Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sediment. Geol. 312, 1-18.

  4. Glacial bed forms at Findelengletscher, Zermatt, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madella, Andrea; Nyffenegger, Franziska; Schlüchter, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The current glacier meltdown is increasingly unveiling the glacial bed forms produced by the most recent glacial advance of the 1980ies, such as flutes, mega-flutes and drumlins. This is a challenging opportunity to study these morphologies and the processes involved in their formation; in addition, our observation suggests a new question to be answered: why can't any of these features in units belonging to previous glacial advances be recognised? Similar forms could either have been washed away already, or never been built during LGM and since. The most beautiful and evident of the forms under investigation are the flutes and mega-flutes: elongated streamlined ridges of sediments either starting from an obstacle or just sticking out of the basal lodgement till. The way flutes have been initiated and then evolve is still partially unknown, due to their variety in shape, size and material. The glacial forefield at Findelengletscher under investigation deglaciated over the past two years, offers a well-preserved variety of such forms at all scales. Their material (basal lodgement till) is homogeneous and consistent all over the site, as well as their fabric. In addition, this silty sand shows a low plasticity index. These preliminary results support the idea that flutes build up very quickly during repeated seasonal advances in thin ice conditions with retreating trend (Coray, 2007), and that they could be equally easily and rapidly washed away. References: Coray Sandro (2007): Genesis and significance of flutes at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.

  5. Are glacials "dry" - and in what sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheff, J.; Seager, R.; Coats, S.; Liu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Glacial maxima during the Pleistocene are generally thought to be arid on land, with a few regional exceptions. Recent work on future climate change, however, has found that different wetness-related variables have opposite-signed responses over large portions of the continents, belying simple ideas of local "drying" or "wetting" with global temperature change in models. Here, we show that this behavior extends to simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum as well: the continents are modeled to have generally wetter topsoils and higher values of standard climate-wetness metrics in the LGM than in the preindustrial, as well as generally lower precipitation and ubiquitously lower photosynthesis (likely driven by the low CO2), with the streamflow response falling in between. Is this model-derived view of the LGM an accurate one? Using a large community pollen and plant-fossil compilation, we confirm that LGM grasslands and open woodlands grew at many sites of present potential forest, seasonal or dry forests at many sites of present potential rain- or seasonal forests, and so forth, while changes in the opposite sense were extremely few and spatially confined. We show that this strongly resembles the simulated photosynthesis changes, but not the simulated streamflow or soil moisture changes. Meanwhile, published LGM lake-level estimates resemble the simulated streamflow changes, but not the photosynthesis changes. Thus, the last glacial does not appear to be systematically "dry" outside the high latitudes, but merely carbon-starved. Similarly, local findings of reduced or more open vegetation at the LGM (e.g. from pollen, carbon isotopes, or dustiness) do not indicate local "aridity" unless corroborating hydrological proxies are also found. Finally, this work suggests that glacial-era evidence of open vegetation with high lake levels (as in the eastern Mediterranean) is not odd or paradoxical, but entirely consistent with climate model output.

  6. A high-resolution benthic stable-isotope record for the South Atlantic: Implications for orbital-scale changes in Late Paleocene-Early Eocene climate and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littler, Kate; Röhl, Ursula; Westerhold, Thomas; Zachos, James C.

    2014-09-01

    The Late Paleocene and Early Eocene were characterized by warm greenhouse climates, punctuated by a series of rapid warming and ocean acidification events known as “hyperthermals”, thought to have been paced or triggered by orbital cycles. While these hyperthermals, such as the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), have been studied in great detail, the background low-amplitude cycles seen in carbon and oxygen-isotope records throughout the Paleocene-Eocene have hitherto not been resolved. Here we present a 7.7 million year (myr) long, high-resolution, orbitally-tuned, benthic foraminiferal stable-isotope record spanning the late Paleocene and early Eocene interval (∼52.5-60.5 Ma) from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1262, South Atlantic. This high resolution (∼2-4 kyr) record allows the changing character and phasing of orbitally-modulated cycles to be studied in unprecedented detail as it reflects the long-term trend in carbon cycle and climate over this interval. The main pacemaker in the benthic oxygen-isotope (δ18O) and carbon-isotope (δ13C) records from ODP Site 1262, are the long (405 kyr) and short (100 kyr) eccentricity cycles, and precession (21 kyr). Obliquity (41 kyr) is almost absent throughout the section except for a few brief intervals where it has a relatively weak influence. During the course of the Early Paleogene record, and particularly in the latest Paleocene, eccentricity-paced negative carbon-isotope excursions (δ13C, CIEs) and coeval negative oxygen-isotope (δ18O) excursions correspond to low carbonate (CaCO3) and coarse fraction (%CF) values due to increased carbonate dissolution, suggesting shoaling of the lysocline and accompanied changes in the global exogenic carbon cycle. These negative CIEs and δ18O events coincide with maxima in eccentricity, with changes in δ18O leading changes in δ13C by ∼6 (±5) kyr in the 405-kyr band and by ∼3 (±1) kyr in the higher frequency 100-kyr band on average. However, these

  7. Late Glacial ice advances in southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, Stefan; Graf, Angela A.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Kubik, Peter W.; Baur, Heinrich; Schlüchter, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    The sensitivity of Tibetan glacial systems to North Atlantic climate forcing is a major issue in palaeoclimatology. In this study, we present surface exposure ages of erratic boulders from a valley system in the Hengduan Mountains, southeastern Tibet, showing evidence of an ice advance during Heinrich event 1. Cosmogenic nuclide analyses ( 10Be and 21Ne) revealed consistent exposure ages, indicating no major periods of burial or pre-exposure. Erosion-corrected (3 mm/ka) 10Be exposure ages range from 13.4 to 16.3 ka. This is in agreement with recalculated exposure ages from the same valley system by [Tschudi, S., Schäfer, J.M., Zhao, Z., Wu, X., Ivy-Ochs, S., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., 2003. Glacial advances in Tibet during the Younger Dryas? Evidence from cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 22, 301-306.]. Thus this indicates that local glaciers advanced in the investigated area as a response to Heinrich event 1 cooling and that periglacial surface adjustments during the Younger Dryas overprinted the glacial morphology, leading to deceptively young exposure ages of certain erratic boulders.

  8. Constraints on the glacial erosion rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that glaciers erode their underlying bedrock mainly through abrasion and quarrying. Theories predict erosion to be proportional to ice-sliding velocity raised to some power: ˙e = Kguls (1) where ė is the erosion rate, and Kg a proportionality constant and l an exponent. By implementing such a rule in numerical models, it has been possible to reproduce typical glacial landscape features, such as U-shape valleys, hanging valleys, glacial cirques or fjords. Although there have been great advances in the level of sophistication of these models, for example through the inclusion of high-order ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology, the proportionality constant, and the exponent have remained poorly constrained parameters. Recently, two independent studies in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonian Andes (Koppes et al., 2015) and the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand (Herman et al., 2015) simultaneously collected erosion rate and ice velocity data to find that erosion depends non-linearly on sliding velocity, and that the exponent on velocity is about 2. Such a nonlinear rule is appealing because it may, in part, explain the observed variations in erosion rates globally. Furthermore, an exponent about 2 closely matches theoretical predictions for abrasion. Although it is tempting to argue that abrasion is the dominant process for fast flowing glaciers like the Franz Josef Glacier, there is a clear need for more data and better quantification for the role of quarrying. Both studies also led to very similar values for the proportionality constant Kg. These new results therefore imply that glacial erosion processes might be better constrained than previously thought. Given that glacial velocity can nowadays be measured and modeled at an unprecedented resolution, it may potentially become possible to use glacial erosion models in a predictive manner. Herman, F. et al. "Erosion by an Alpine glacier." Science 350.6257 (2015): 193-195. Koppes, M. et al. "Observed

  9. Radiocarbon constraints on the glacial ocean circulation and its impact on atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Skinner, L C; Primeau, F; Freeman, E; de la Fuente, M; Goodwin, P A; Gottschalk, J; Huang, E; McCave, I N; Noble, T L; Scrivner, A E

    2017-07-13

    While the ocean's large-scale overturning circulation is thought to have been significantly different under the climatic conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the exact nature of the glacial circulation and its implications for global carbon cycling continue to be debated. Here we use a global array of ocean-atmosphere radiocarbon disequilibrium estimates to demonstrate a ∼689±53 (14)C-yr increase in the average residence time of carbon in the deep ocean at the LGM. A predominantly southern-sourced abyssal overturning limb that was more isolated from its shallower northern counterparts is interpreted to have extended from the Southern Ocean, producing a widespread radiocarbon age maximum at mid-depths and depriving the deep ocean of a fast escape route for accumulating respired carbon. While the exact magnitude of the resulting carbon cycle impacts remains to be confirmed, the radiocarbon data suggest an increase in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump that could have accounted for as much as half of the glacial-interglacial CO2 change.

  10. Radiocarbon constraints on the glacial ocean circulation and its impact on atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, L. C.; Primeau, F.; Freeman, E.; de La Fuente, M.; Goodwin, P. A.; Gottschalk, J.; Huang, E.; McCave, I. N.; Noble, T. L.; Scrivner, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    While the ocean's large-scale overturning circulation is thought to have been significantly different under the climatic conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the exact nature of the glacial circulation and its implications for global carbon cycling continue to be debated. Here we use a global array of ocean-atmosphere radiocarbon disequilibrium estimates to demonstrate a ~689+/-53 14C-yr increase in the average residence time of carbon in the deep ocean at the LGM. A predominantly southern-sourced abyssal overturning limb that was more isolated from its shallower northern counterparts is interpreted to have extended from the Southern Ocean, producing a widespread radiocarbon age maximum at mid-depths and depriving the deep ocean of a fast escape route for accumulating respired carbon. While the exact magnitude of the resulting carbon cycle impacts remains to be confirmed, the radiocarbon data suggest an increase in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump that could have accounted for as much as half of the glacial-interglacial CO2 change.

  11. Glacial Retreat and Associated Glacial Lake Hazards in the High Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies have identified glacial retreat throughout the greater Himalayan region over the past few decades, but the Karakorum region remains an anomaly with large stagnating or advancing glaciers. The glacial behavior in the Tien Shan is still unclear, as few studies have investigated mass balances in the region. This study focuses on the highest peaks of the Tien Shan mountain range, in the region of Jengish Chokusu along the Kyrgyzstan-China-Kazakhstan border. In a first step, a 30-year time series of Landsat imagery (n=27) and ASTER imagery (n=10) was developed to track glacial growth and retreat in the region. Using a combination of spectral and topographic information, glacial outlines are automatically delineated. As several important glaciers in the study region contain medium to high levels of debris cover, our algorithm also improves upon current methods of detecting debris-covered glaciers by using topography, distance weighting methods, river networks, and additional spectral data. Linked to glacial retreat are glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) that have become increasingly common in High Mountain Asia over the last few decades. As glaciers retreat, their melt water is often trapped by weakly bonded moraines. These moraines have been known to fail due to overtopping caused by surge waves created by avalanches, rockslides, or glacial calving. A suite of studies throughout High Mountain Asia have used remotely-sensed data to monitor the formation and growth of glacial lakes. In a second step of the work, lake-area changes over the past 15 years were tracked monthly and seasonally using dense Landsat/ASTER coverage (n=30) with an automatic procedure based on spectral and topographic information. Previous work has identified GLOFs as a significant process for infrastructural damage in the southern Tien Shan/northern Pamir, as well as in the better studied Himalaya region. Lake identification and quantification of lake-growth rates is a valuable

  12. Glacial and periglacial geomorphology and its paleoclimatological significance in three North Ethiopian Mountains, including a detailed geomorphological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Hanne; Jacob, Miro; Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Geomorphological investigations and detailed mapping of past and present (peri)glacial landforms are required in order to understand the impact of climatic anomalies. The Ethiopian Highlands show a great variety in past and contemporary climate, and therefore, in the occurrence of glacial and periglacial landforms. However, only a few mountain areas have been studied, and detailed geomorphological understanding is lacking. In order to allow a fine reconstruction of the impact of the past glacial cycle on the geomorphology, vegetation complexes, and temperature anomalies, a detailed geomorphological map of three mountain areas (Mt. Ferrah Amba, 12°51‧N 39°29‧E; Mt. Lib Amba, 12°04‧N 39°22‧; and Mt. Abuna Yosef, 12°08‧N 39°11‧E) was produced. In all three study areas, inactive solifluction lobes, presumably from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were found. In the highest study area of Abuna Yosef, three sites were discovered bearing morainic material from small late Pleistocene glaciers. These marginal glaciers occurred below the modeled snowline and existed because of local topo-climatic conditions. Evidence of such Pleistocene avalanche-fed glaciers in Ethiopia (and Africa) has not been produced earlier. Current frost action is limited to frost cracks and small-scale patterned ground phenomena. The depression of the altitudinal belts of periglacial and glacial processes during the last cold period was assessed through periglacial and glacial landform mapping and comparisons with data from other mountain areas taking latitude into account. The depression of glacial and periglacial belts of approximately 600 m implies a temperature drop around 6 °C in the last cold period. This cooling is in line with temperature depressions elsewhere in East Africa during the LGM. This study serves as a case study for all the intermediate mountains (3500-4200 m) of the North Ethiopian highlands.

  13. A Model for Interpreting 10Be Basin-Wide Erosion Rates in Post-Glacial Environments, Northwest Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fame, M. L.; Owen, L. A.; Balco, G.; Spotila, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful interpretation of in-situ cosmogenic 10Be basin-wide erosion rates in slowly eroding postglacial catchments is complicated because 10Be is inherited through shifts between glacial and fluvial regimes and ice shielding prevents 10Be production. Such environments do not attain isotopic and landscape steady state, conditions necessary for the current method of calculating basin-wide erosion rates. We propose an alternate set of assumptions, specific to postglacial regions, which make it possible to calculate basin-wide erosion rates in the post-glacial Highlands of NW Scotland. From 20 Scottish basins basin-wide 10Be concentrations range from 2.129 x 104 to 4.870 x 104 atoms/g qtz. Average 10Be concentrations from shallow till and bank deposits within the basins are 2.856 x 104 atoms/g qtz, similar to the basin-wide concentrations, whereas average bedrock concentrations in the basins are 1.747 x 105 atoms/g qtz. This suggests that during the postglacial time most active sediment is derived from reworked deposits rather then sub-aerially eroded bedrock. Therefore, we make the simplifying assumption that most bedrock erosion occurs during glaciation. A deeply buried till that has experienced no nuclide production since deglaciation has a 10Be concentration of 6.810 x 103 atoms/g qtz and allows us to estimate how much of the 10Be in basin-wide samples was produced since deglaciation. A glacial ice thickness of only 2 m would shield all 10Be production; therefore we assume that no 10Be production occurred during glacial periods and that all production occurs during interglacial periods. Using 100 ka as the approximate duration of a Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycle, comprised of a 15 ka interglacial period and an 85 ka glacial period, and the aforementioned assumptions we have derived a numerical model to calculate basin-wide glacial erosion rates in NW Scotland.

  14. Glacial Atlantic Overturning in CMIP/PMIP models controlled by the Southern and Northern high latitude changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Ohgaito, R.; Takahashi, K.; Chikamoto, M. O.; Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Oka, A.; Hargreaves, J. C.; Timmermann, A.; Yoshimori, M.

    2014-12-01

    Deep Ocean circulation indicated by geochemical tracers varied during the ice age cycle with climate and the Milankovitch cycle. Multiple tracer evidence at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) particularly show that the water originated from the North Atlantic (NADW) was shoaler than the present day ocean and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) may have been weaker. Athough it is expected to be a good test for the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (GCM) which are used for future climate projection, many models forced with glacial condition, however, fail to simulate the glacial AMOC, which is an obstacle to understand the response of ocean to climatic forcings. Here we analyse multi-climate models including the latest CMIP5/PMIP experiments and show that most of the climate models show a stronger and deeper AMOC associated with the insufficient cooling in the LGM Southern ocean. We further show that the models which fail to have shoeler glacial AMOC is even strengthened because of the feedback between the AMOC, sea ice and wind stress in the north Atlantic. Our additional study using MIROC AOGCM show that by eliminating the warm bias at southern ocean, which most of the climate models suffer from, the sufficiently vigorous Antarctic bottom water formation under glacial condition and proxies (MARGO and delta 13C) can be simulated. We suggest that the improvement of cloud scheme in GCM atmosphere-ocean-ice processes in the high latitude region and sufficient calculation to obtain the equilibrium state especially around Antarctica is crucial for more appropriate AMOC simulation both for the glacial and future climate change.

  15. The movement of pre-adapted cool taxa in north-central Amazonia during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apolito, Carlos; Absy, Maria Lúcia; Latrubesse, Edgardo M.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of climate change on the lowland vegetation of Amazonia during the last glacial cycle are partially known for the middle and late Pleniglacial intervals (late MIS 3, 59-24 ka and MIS 2, 24-11 ka), but are still unclear for older stages of the last glacial and during the last interglacial. It is known that a more seasonal dry-wet climate caused marginal forest retraction and together with cooling rearranged forest composition to some extent. This is observed in pollen records across Amazonia depicting presence of taxa at glacial times in localities where they do not live presently. The understanding of taxa migration is hindered by the lack of continuous interglacial-glacial lowland records. We present new data from a known locality in NW Amazonia (Six Lakes Hill), showing a vegetation record that probably started during MIS 5 (130-71 ka) and lasted until the onset of the Holocene. The vegetation record unravels a novel pattern in tree taxa migration: (1) from the beginning of this cycle Podocarpus and Myrsine are recorded and (2) only later do Hedyosmum and Alnus appear. The latter group is largely restricted to montane biomes or more distant locations outside Amazonia, whereas the first is found in lowlands close to the study site on sandy soils. These findings imply that Podocarpus and Myrsine responded to environmental changes equally and this reflects their concomitant niche use in NW Amazonia. Temperature drop is not discarded as a trigger of internal forest composition change, but its effects are clearer later in the Pleniglacial rather than the Early Glacial. Therefore early climatic/environmental changes had a first order effect on vegetation that invoke alternative explanations. We claim last glacial climate-induced modifications on forest composition favoured the expansion of geomorphologic-soil related processes that initiated forest rearrangement.

  16. Relationships of Palearctic and Nearctic 'glacial relict' Myoxocephalus sculpins from mitochondrial DNA data.

    PubMed

    Kontula, Tytti; Väinölä, Risto

    2003-11-01

    The relationships among Myoxocephalus quadricornis complex fish from Arctic coastal waters and from 'glacial relict' populations in Nearctic and Palearctic postglacial lakes were assessed using mtDNA sequence data (1978 bp). A principal phylogeographical split separated the North American continental deepwater sculpin (M. q. thompsonii) from a lineage of the Arctic marine and North European landlocked populations of the fourhorn sculpin (M. q. quadricornis). The North American continental invasion took place several glaciat