Science.gov

Sample records for 100-ns rise time

  1. Dynamics of high-speed micro-drop impact: numerical simulations and experiments at frame-to-frame times below 100 ns.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Wildeman, Sander; Mettin, Robert; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Technologies including (3D-) (bio-)printing, diesel engines, laser-induced forward transfer, and spray cleaning require optimization and therefore understanding of micrometer-sized droplets impacting at velocities beyond 10 m s(-1). However, as yet, this regime has hardly been addressed. Here we present the first time-resolved experimental investigation of microdroplet impact at velocities up to V0 = 50 m s(-1), on hydrophilic and -phobic surfaces at frame rates exceeding 10(7) frames per second. A novel method to determine the 3D-droplet profile at sub-micron resolution at the same frame rates is presented, using the fringe pattern observed from a bottom view. A numerical model, which is validated by the side- and bottom-view measurements, is employed to study the viscous boundary layer inside the droplet and the development of the rim. The spreading dynamics, the maximal spreading diameter, the boundary layer thickness, the rim formation, and the air bubble entrainment are compared to theory and previous experiments. In general, the impact dynamics are equal to millimeter-sized droplet impact for equal Reynolds-, Weber- and Stokes numbers (Re, We, and St, respectively). Using our numerical model, effective scaling laws for the progression of the boundary layer thickness and the rim diameter are provided. The dimensionless boundary layer thickness develops in time (t) according to δBL ~ D0/√Re(t/τ)0.45, and the diameter of the rim develops as DRim ~ D0/√We(t/τ)0.68, with drop diameter D0 and inertial time scale τ = D0/V0. These scalings differ from previously assumed, but never validated, values. Finally, no splash is observed, at variance with many predictions but in agreement with models including the influence of the surrounding gas. This confirms that the ambient gas properties are key ingredients for splash threshold predictions.

  2. Dynamics of high-speed micro-drop impact: numerical simulations and experiments at frame-to-frame times below 100 ns.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Wildeman, Sander; Mettin, Robert; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Technologies including (3D-) (bio-)printing, diesel engines, laser-induced forward transfer, and spray cleaning require optimization and therefore understanding of micrometer-sized droplets impacting at velocities beyond 10 m s(-1). However, as yet, this regime has hardly been addressed. Here we present the first time-resolved experimental investigation of microdroplet impact at velocities up to V0 = 50 m s(-1), on hydrophilic and -phobic surfaces at frame rates exceeding 10(7) frames per second. A novel method to determine the 3D-droplet profile at sub-micron resolution at the same frame rates is presented, using the fringe pattern observed from a bottom view. A numerical model, which is validated by the side- and bottom-view measurements, is employed to study the viscous boundary layer inside the droplet and the development of the rim. The spreading dynamics, the maximal spreading diameter, the boundary layer thickness, the rim formation, and the air bubble entrainment are compared to theory and previous experiments. In general, the impact dynamics are equal to millimeter-sized droplet impact for equal Reynolds-, Weber- and Stokes numbers (Re, We, and St, respectively). Using our numerical model, effective scaling laws for the progression of the boundary layer thickness and the rim diameter are provided. The dimensionless boundary layer thickness develops in time (t) according to δBL ~ D0/√Re(t/τ)0.45, and the diameter of the rim develops as DRim ~ D0/√We(t/τ)0.68, with drop diameter D0 and inertial time scale τ = D0/V0. These scalings differ from previously assumed, but never validated, values. Finally, no splash is observed, at variance with many predictions but in agreement with models including the influence of the surrounding gas. This confirms that the ambient gas properties are key ingredients for splash threshold predictions. PMID:25607820

  3. Plasma Density and Magnetic Field Evolution in a 100-ns Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, A.; Maron, Y.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Weber, B. V.; Commisso, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    The electron density and magnetic field evolution in a 100-ns, 170-kA POS are investigated using emission spectroscopy. The plasma is doped by various elements using laser evaporation in order to obtain spatially resolved measurements. The prefilled plasma density, determined from Stark broadening and ionization times, is 1-2× 10^14 cm-3. The opening time was observed to depend on the prefilled plasma azimuthal uniformity. During the pulse, the plasma density drops substantially during 10-20 ns. The drop propagates mainly axially from the plasma generator side to the load side at a velocity of ≈ 2 × 10^8 cm/s. The drop is accompanied by penetration of the magnetic field, determined from the Zeeman effect. A mapping of the density and the magnetic field distributions in the r-z plane will be presented. Proton motion is probably important, but the axial velocities of heavy ions are low (≈ 10^6 cm/s << V_Alfven). These results will be compared with previous results obtained on Gamble I(B. V. Weber et. al.), Appl. Physc. Lett. 45, 1043, (1984).

  4. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  5. Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Fuller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.

  6. Aluminum and tungsten X-pinch experiments on 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Sun Tieping; Wu Gang; Wang Liangping; Han Juanjuan; Li Mo; Cong Peitian; Qiu Aici; Lv Min

    2011-05-15

    X-pinch experiments have been carried out on a 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage recently built up. The X-pinches exhibited a source size of about 10 {mu}m, a pulse duration of 3 ns, 3-5 keV radiation energy of 3.9 mJ, and a burst time jitter of tens of nanosecond with the 2-wire 8 {mu}m W X-pinch load. The generator output current and the X-pinch characteristics depended on the X-pinch wire materials in the tests. X-ray backlighting images from the insects showed the significant phase-contrast effect.

  7. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  8. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  9. RISE/FALL TIME ENHANCEMENT OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC LEBT CHOPPER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Saethre, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) chopper system provides fast chopping of the H- ion beam in the LEBT structure. Four identical pulsed power supplies (pulsers) create a series of 2.5 kV pulses to the four deflection electrodes floating on the focusing voltage of -50 kV. Each pulser is connected to the electrode through the network which consists of high voltage (HV) cables, a blocking capacitor, HV feed-through connectors, current-limiting resistors and transient voltage suppressors. Effective beam chopping requires minimal rise/fall time of the rectangular HV pulses on the load. In the present configuration these values are approximately 100 ns. Methods of reducing rise/fall time on the LEBT electrodes are discussed. Results of simulation and comparative measurements of the original and upgraded system on the test stand are presented. Furthermore, the effect of these changes on reliability degradation caused by arcing in the LEBT structure is discussed.

  10. Rugged calorimeter with a fast rise time

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtry, W.M.; Dolce, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    An intrinsic 1-mil-thick gold foil calorimeter has been developed which rises to 95% of the energy deposited in less than 2 microseconds. This calorimeter is very rugged, and can withstand rough handling without damage. The time constant is long, in the millisecond range, because of its unique construction. Use of this calorimeter has produced 100% data recovery, and agreement with true deposition to less than 10%.

  11. Fast rise-time, fiber optic pin

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1998-05-12

    A reliable, simple fast-rise-time diagnostic has been developed for measuring the breakout time of the detonation wave in a detonating high explosive. The intrinsic rise time of the signals generated is less than one nanosecond. The technique, called FAT (Fiber Arrival Time), consists of an optical fiber with one end coated with ~1500 Å Aluminum. The coated end is placed in intimate contact with the surface of the explosive. The detonation wave interacting with the Al surface causes a prompt flash of light which is recorded at the output end of the fiber. The active area of the FAT probe end is 100 µm in diameter and centered to within ±10 µm also giving excellent spatial precision. When used in this mode, FAT overcomes difficulties of electronic and past fiber optic pins. When looking at a flyer plate arrival the time response appears to be a function of the metal plate velocity.

  12. Mapping Rise Time Information with Down-Shift Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T. W., Machorro, E. A., Diaz, A. B.

    2011-11-01

    These viewgraphs summarize the application of recent developments in digital down-shift (DDS) analysis of up converted PDV data to map out how well the PDV diagnostic would capture rise time information (mid point and rise time) in short rise time (<1 ns) shock events. The mapping supports a PDV vs VISAR challenge. The analysis concepts are new (~September FY 2011), simple, and run quickly, which makes them good tools to map out (with ~1 million Monte Carlo simulations) how well PDV captures rise time information as function of baseline velocity, rise time, velocity jump, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  13. Fast rise times and the physical mechanism of deep earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, H.; Williams, Q.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic global survey of the rise times and stress drops of deep and intermediate earthquakes is reported. When the rise times are scaled to the seismic moment release of the events, their average is nearly twice as fast for events deeper than about 450 km as for shallower events.

  14. Detection of Sound Rise Time by Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamalainen, J.; Leppanen, P.H.T.; Torppa, M.; Muller, K.; Lyytinen, H.

    2005-01-01

    Low sensitivity to amplitude modulated (AM) sounds is reported to be associated with dyslexia. An important aspect of amplitude modulation cycles are the rise and fall times within the sound. In this study, simplified stimuli equivalent to just one cycle were used and sensitivity to varying rise times was explored. Adult participants with dyslexia…

  15. Thermoreflectance imaging of sub 100 ns pulsed cooling in high-speed thermoelectric microcoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Bjorn; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Christofferson, James; Shakouri, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Miniaturized thin film thermoelectric coolers have received considerable attention as potential means to locally address hot spots in microprocessors. Given the highly dynamic workload in complex integrated circuits, the need arises for a thorough understanding of the high-speed thermal behavior of microcoolers. Although some prior work on transient Peltier cooling in pulsed operation is available, these studies mostly focus on theoretical modeling and typically deal with relatively large modules with time constants well into the millisecond range. In this paper, we present an extensive experimental characterization of 30×30 μm2 high-speed coplanar SiGe superlattice microcoolers subjected to 300 ns wide current pulses at ≈ 300 kHz repetition rate. Using thermoreflectance imaging microscopy, we obtain 2D maps of the transient surface temperature and constituent Peltier and Joule components over the 50-750 ns time range with submicron spatial and 50 ns temporal resolutions. Net cooling of 1 K-1.5 K is achieved within 100-300 ns, well over an order of magnitude faster compared to previous reports on microcoolers in high-speed operation. We also point out ambiguities in separating Peltier and Joule signals during the device turn-off. Overall, our measurements provide substantial insight into ultrafast turn-on and turn-off dynamics in thin film thermoelectrics.

  16. An evaluation of rise time characterization and prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Leick D.

    1994-01-01

    One common method of extrapolating sonic boom waveforms from aircraft to ground is to calculate the nonlinear distortion, and then add a rise time to each shock by a simple empirical rule. One common rule is the '3 over P' rule which calculates the rise time in milliseconds as three divided by the shock amplitude in psf. This rule was compared with the results of ZEPHYRUS, a comprehensive algorithm which calculates sonic boom propagation and extrapolation with the combined effects of nonlinearity, attenuation, dispersion, geometric spreading, and refraction in a stratified atmosphere. It is shown there that the simple empirical rule considerably overestimates the rise time estimate. In addition, the empirical rule does not account for variations in the rise time due to humidity variation or propagation history. It is also demonstrated that the rise time is only an approximate indicator of perceived loudness. Three waveforms with identical characteristics (shock placement, amplitude, and rise time), but with different shock shapes, are shown to give different calculated loudness. This paper is based in part on work performed at the Applied Research Laboratories, the University of Texas at Austin, and supported by NASA Langley.

  17. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  18. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  19. Functional Domain Motions in Proteins on the 1 100 ns Timescale: Comparison of Neutron Spin-Echo Spectroscopy of Phosphoglycerate Kinase with Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smolin, Nikolai; Biehl, R; Kneller, Gerald; Richter, Dieter O; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Protein function often requires large-scale domain motion. An exciting new development in the experimental characterization of domain motions in proteins is the application of neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). NSE directly probes coherent (i.e., pair correlated) scattering on the 1 100 ns timescale. Here, we report on all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation of a protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, from which we calculate small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and NSE scattering properties. The simulation-derived and experimental-solution SANS results are in excellent agreement. The contributions of translational and rotational whole-molecule diffusion to the simulation-derived NSE and potential problems in their estimation are examined. Principal component analysis identifies types of domain motion that dominate the internal motion's contribution to the NSE signal, with the largest being classic hinge bending. The associated free-energy profiles are quasiharmonic and the frictional properties correspond to highly overdamped motion. The amplitudes of the motions derived by MD are smaller than those derived from the experimental analysis, and possible reasons for this difference are discussed. The MD results confirm that a significant component of the NSE arises from internal dynamics. They also demonstrate that the combination of NSE with MD is potentially useful for determining the forms, potentials of mean force, and time dependence of functional domain motions in proteins.

  20. The Rise Time of Normal and Subluminous Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Conley, A.; Bianco, F. B.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Perrett, K.; Carlberg, R.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Fouchez, D.; Fourmanoit, N.; Graham, M. L.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Lidman, C.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the average stretch-corrected rise time of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Supernova Legacy Survey. We use the aggregate light curves of spectroscopic and photometrically identified SNe Ia to fit the rising part of the light curve with a simple quadratic model. We obtain a light curve shape corrected, i.e., stretch-corrected, fiducial rise time of 17.02+0.18 - 0.28 (stat) days. The measured rise time differs from an earlier finding by the SNLS (Conley et al.) due to the use of different SN Ia templates. We compare it to nearby samples using the same methods and find no evolution in the early part of the light curve of SNe Ia up to z = 1. We search for variations among different populations, particularly subluminous objects, by dividing the sample in stretch. Bright and slow decliners (s > 1.0) have consistent stretch-corrected rise times compared to fainter and faster decliners (0.8 < s <= 1.0); they are shorter by 0.57+0.47 - 0.50 (stat) days. Subluminous SNe Ia (here defined as objects with s <= 0.8), although less constrained, are also consistent, with a rise time of 18.03+0.81 - 1.37 (stat) days. We study several systematic biases and find that the use of different fiducial templates may affect the average rise time but not the intrinsic differences between populations. Based on our results, we estimate that subluminous SNe Ia are powered by 0.05-0.35 M ⊙ of 56Ni synthesized in the explosion. Our conclusions are the same for the single-stretch and two-stretch parameterizations of the light curve. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada

  1. SNLS: Supernova Rise Times from the SNLS Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, A.; Howell, D. A.; Howes, A.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Lusset, V.; Ripoche, P.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Tao, C.

    2005-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) provide the most direct evidence for the acceleration of the Universe. This evidence relies on a comparison between the luminosities of distant and nearby SNe Ia, and hence is potentially sensitive to any evolution in the mean lightcurve properties between these two samples. One method for testing for the presence of such effects is to measure and compare the rise time, which is the time between explosion and maximum luminosity, of the two samples. The Supernova Legacy Survey provides an excellent data sample for the analysis of this issue, since it's 'rolling search' nature yields lightcurves which are well sampled prior to maximum light. Here we discuss measurements of the rise time from SNLS data and what they can tell us about evolutionary effects.

  2. A note on some statistical properties of rise time parameters used in muon arrival time measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwalt, D. J.; Devilliers, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most investigations of the muon arrival time distribution in EAS during the past decade made use of parameters which can collectively be called rise time parameters. The rise time parameter T sub A/B is defined as the time taken for the integrated pulse from a detector to rise from A% to B% of its full amplitude. The use of these parameters are usually restricted to the determination of the radial dependence thereof. This radial dependence of the rise time parameters are usually taken as a signature of the particle interaction characteristics in the shower. As these parameters have a stochastic nature, it seems reasonable that one should also take notice of this aspect of the rise time parameters. A statistical approach to rise time parameters is presented.

  3. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Peter, Varghese; Kalashnikova, Marina; Burnham, Denis

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate how children with dyslexia weight amplitude rise time (ART) and formant rise time (FRT) cues in phonetic discrimination. Passive mismatch responses (MMR) were recorded for a/ba/-/wa/contrast in a multiple deviant odd-ball paradigm to identify the neural response to cue weighting in 17 children with dyslexia and 17 age-matched control children. The deviant stimuli had either partial or full ART or FRT cues. The results showed that ART did not generate an MMR in either group, whereas both partial and full FRT cues generated MMR in control children while only full FRT cues generated MMR in children with dyslexia. These findings suggest that children, both controls and those with dyslexia, discriminate speech based on FRT cues and not ART cues. However, control children have greater sensitivity to FRT cues in speech compared to children with dyslexia.

  4. Rise-Time Distortion of Signal without Carrying Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhman, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with one-dimensional problem of rise-time distortion signal without carrying signal, that appears in the starting point intermittently, that is signal distortion at front edge or one of its derivative. The authors show that front edge of signal isn't distorted in case of propagation in unrestricted (including absorbing) area (amplitude of starting signal step or of one of its derivatives doesn't change) and move with the accuracy of vacuum light speed. The paper proves that it is the time interval shortage that causes signal loss with the route extension, but not the reduction of its starting amplitude, during which front edge of signal retains its starting value. The research presents new values for this time interval.

  5. Fast rise time IR detectors for lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, A.; Bini, S.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; Marcelli, A.; Pace, E.

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostics is a fundamental issue for accelerators whose demands are continuously increasing. In particular bunch-by-bunch diagnostics is a key challenge for the latest generation of lepton colliders and storage rings. The Frascati Φ-factory, DAΦNE, colliding at 1.02 GeV in the centre of mass, hosts in the main rings few synchrotron radiation beamlines and two of them collect the synchrotron radiation infrared emission: SINBAD from the electron ring and 3+L from the positron ring. At DAΦNE each bucket is 2.7 ns long and particles are gathered in bunches emitting pulsed IR radiation, whose intensity in the long wavelength regime is directly proportional to the accumulated particles. Compact uncooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors have been tested in both beamlines using dedicated optical layouts. Actually, the fast rise time of HgCdTe semiconductors give us the chance to test bunch-by-bunch devices for both longitudinal and transverse diagnostics. For the longitudinal case, single pixel detectors have been used, while for the transverse diagnostics, multi-pixel array detectors, with special custom design, are under test. This contribution will briefly describe the status of the research on fast IR detectors at DAΦNE, the results obtained and possible foreseen developments.

  6. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Qi, Jianmin; Chu, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The linear-transformer-driver (LTD) is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z -pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z -pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%-90%) can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32 cm /μ s when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%-30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  7. Effect of Current Rise-time on the Formation of Precursor Structures and Mass Ablation Rate in Cylindrical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, S. C.; Eshaq, Y.; Ueda, U.; Haas, D. M.; Beg, F. N.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B.; Greenly, J.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Douglass, J. D.; Bell, K.; Knapp, P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki, F. A.

    2009-01-21

    We present the first study to directly compare the mass ablation rates of cylindrical wire arrays as a function of the current rise-rate. Formation of the precursor column is investigated on both the MAPGIE (1 MA, 250 ns) and COBRA (1 MA, 100 ns) generators, and results are used to infer the change in the mass ablation rate induced by the rise-rate of the drive current. Laser shadowography, gated XUV imaging and x-ray diodes are used to compare the dynamical behavior both generators, and x-pinch radiography and XUV spectroscopy and provide density evolution and temperature measurements respectively. Results are compared to predictions from an analytical scaling model based on a fixed ablation rate, and the close correlation achieved suggests that the effective ablation velocity is not a strong function of the current rise rate.

  8. Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Zhao, Guannan; Hunsader, Eric; Qi, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas; Meng, Jing; Tivnan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds' of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena. PMID:24022120

  9. U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... 161792.html U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years March of Dimes' report finds ... United States increased in 2015 for the first time in eight years, and rates are especially high ...

  10. Coefficient of restitution dependence of intruder rise time in two-dimensional Brazil-nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesuma, T.; Aji, D. P. Purwa; Viridi, S.; Suprijadi

    2016-04-01

    Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is a granular material phenomenon, where larger grains (usually known as intruder) rise to the top when the granular system vibrated. We observe a single intruder rise time of BNE phenomenon in a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of hard spheres collision scheme. Some experiments have shown that some granular properties, such as size and density ratio, play an important role to determine the rise time. However, other property, such as coefficients of restitution, is considered not to have a measurable impact. We explore the intruder inelasticity dependence of the rise time by varying its coefficient of restitution. We found that the intruder rise time tends to be flat for relatively high coefficient of restitution and increases exponentially below a certain deflecting point for low coefficient of restitution. This holds for specific mass ratio.

  11. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  12. Implosion dynamics and radiation features of planar, compact cylindrical, and nested wire arrays on 1 MA, 100 ns z-pinch generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Greenly, J. B.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Rudakov, L. I.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2007-11-01

    Plasma formation and implosion features of planar wire arrays (PWA), compact cylindrical wire arrays (CWA), and low-wire number nested wire arrays (NWA) of the small size (6-15 mm) were studied on the 1 MA, 100 ns UNR Zebra and Cornell COBRA generators. The powers and yields were maximum for Mo double PWA, followed by W compact CWA and PWA, Mo single PWA and compact CWA, stainless steel (SS304) and Al compact CWAs, and Al/SS304 and SS304/SS304 NWAs. Despite different implosion dynamics of PWAs and compact CWAs they formed plasma that radiated similar yields and powers. The possibility of radiation pulse shaping by varying geometry and materials of PWAs and NWAs will be discussed. Simulations with Wire Dynamics Model and 2D MHD model with enhanced resistivity will be presented. Work was supported by DOE/NNSA under Coop. Agr. DE-FC52-06NA27586, DE-FC52-06NA27588, DE-F03-02NA00057, and in part by DE-FC52 06NA27616.

  13. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns-55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach-Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  14. Dependence of current rise time on laser-triggered discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soowon; Kamohara, Takashi; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Katsuki, Sunao

    2016-07-01

    A powerful, stable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source is the most important component for EUV lithography and EUV mask inspection. Here, we investigate the characteristics of laser-triggered discharge plasma at three different current rise times, fast, middle and slow. A height-adjustable coaxial birdcage was used to change circuit inductance. The rise time was varied between 30 ns–55 ns with peak current of 10 kA. The time-integrated EUV (at 13.5 nm in 2% bandwidth) intensity for the fast rise time was found to be 55% stronger than that of the slow rise time despite its lower energy. A high-speed Mach–Zehnder interferogram and visible imaging of the pinch plasma were employed to discuss plasma compression processes qualitatively and quantitatively. Also discharge produced debris was investigated using a silicon-crystal witness plate. The fast rise current was found to have advantages such as lower debris, higher EUV intensity, and possibility of suppressing instability in comparison with the slow rise time. As expected, total debris amounts lessened proportionally to the primary charged energy, as found from a comparison of fast and slow rise currents.

  15. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-15

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  16. Responses of inferior collicular neurones of bats to tone bursts with different rise times

    PubMed Central

    Suga, N.

    1971-01-01

    1. A study was made of the responses of single neurones in the inferior colliculus of bats to tone bursts with different rise times (or with different rates of amplitude increase) in order to determine whether the neurones were specialized for analysis of amplitude-modulated sound, especially the rising phase in amplitude. 2. The response patterns of neurones which showed phasic on-responses usually did not change with rise time, although the response patterns of some neurones changed from phasic on-responses to inhibitory responses. 3. The thresholds of responses to tone bursts increased when the rise time was lengthened. The amount of increase greatly differed from neurone to neurone. For the excitation of neurones which showed a large increase in threshold, the stimulus amplitude should quickly increase in amplitude. For tone bursts with a short rise time, some neurones showed an upper-threshold above which the sounds failed to excite them. The upper-threshold usually disappeared when the rise time was lengthened. For the excitation of neurones which showed an upper-threshold, the rate of amplitude increase and its extent were very important parameters. 4. Lengthening the rise time of a tone burst from 0·5 to 98 msec caused various types of change in the excitatory area. In some cases, there was a diminution of the area and, in others, there was an expansion of the area. Neurones showing these changes may be considered to be specialized for responding to tone bursts with either a rapid or slow increase in amplitude. 5. Changes with rise time occurred not only in the excitatory area, but also in the inhibitory area. The change in the inhibitory area of a given neurone, however, was not necessarily the same as that in the excitatory area. 6. The latency of response usually changed as a function of stimulus amplitude and rise time. In 26% of the neurones studied, however, the latency was relatively constant regardless of stimulus amplitude and rise time. Some of

  17. CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE THROUGH RISE TIMES AND PEAK LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the diversity in the wind density, supernova ejecta energy, and ejecta mass in Type IIn supernovae based on their rise times and peak luminosities. We show that the wind density and supernova ejecta properties can be estimated independently if both the rise time and peak luminosity are observed. The peak luminosity is mostly determined by the supernova properties and the rise time can be used to estimate the wind density. We find that the ejecta energies of Type IIn supernovae need to vary by factors of 0.2-5 from the average if their ejecta masses are similar. The diversity in the observed rise times indicates that their wind densities vary by factors of 0.2-2 from the average. We show that Type IIn superluminous supernovae should have not only large wind density but also large ejecta energy and/or small ejecta mass to explain their large luminosities and the rise times at the same time. We also note that shock breakout does not necessarily occur in the wind even if it is optically thick, except for the case of superluminous supernovae, and we analyze the observational data both with and without assuming that the shock breakout occurs in the dense wind of Type IIn supernovae.

  18. Rise Time of the Simulated VERITAS 12 m Davies-Cotton Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard J.

    2005-02-21

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) will utilise Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) based on a Davies-Cotton design with f-number f/1.0 to detect cosmic gamma-rays. Unlike a parabolic reflector, light from the Davies-Cotton does not arrive isochronously at the camera. Here the effect of the telescope geometry on signal rise-time is examined. An almost square-pulse arrival time profile with a rise time of 1.7 ns is found analytically and confirmed through simulation.

  19. Rise Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W.

    The rise time test (along with the settleometer procedure) is used to monitor sludge behavior in the secondary clarifier of an activated sludge system. The test monitors the effect of the nitrification/denitrification process and aids the operator in determining optimum clarifier sludge detention time and, to some extent, optimum degree of…

  20. Transistorized Marx bank pulse circuit provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Base-triggered avalanche transistor circuit used in a Marx bank pulser configuration provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time. The avalanche-mode transistors replace conventional spark gaps in the Marx bank. The delay time from an input signal to the output signal to the output is typically 6 nanoseconds.

  1. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalps of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time), inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes were analyzed. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise time but was unaffected by changes in fall time. Increases in stimulus duration, and therefore in loudness, resulted in a systematic increase in latency. This was probably due to response recovery processes, since the effect was eliminated with increases in stimulus off-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise and fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It was concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  2. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  3. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; Audia, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetition rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.

  4. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) evoked responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalp of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time) inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes are reported and evaluated. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise-time but was unaffected by changes in fall-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise-and-fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It is concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  5. Rise Time Perception in Children with Reading and Combined Reading and Language Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Rachel L.; Manis, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Using a non-speech-specific measure of prosody, rise time perception, Goswami and her colleagues have found that individuals with dyslexia perform significantly worse than nonimpaired readers. Studies have also found that children and adults with specific language impairment were impaired on these tasks. Despite the high comorbidity of these…

  6. Rise Time Perception and Detection of Syllable Stress in Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Victoria; Hamalainen, Jarmo; Soltesz, Fruzsina; Goswami, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The perception of syllable stress has not been widely studied in developmental dyslexia, despite strong evidence for auditory rhythmic perceptual difficulties. Here we investigate the hypothesis that perception of sound rise time is related to the perception of syllable stress in adults with developmental dyslexia. Methods: A…

  7. DOI Determination by Rise Time Discrimination in Single-Ended Readout for TOF PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R.I.; Surti, S.; Karp, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical TOF PET systems achieve detection efficiency using thick crystals, typically of thickness 2–3cm. The resulting dispersion in interaction depths degrades spatial resolution for increasing radial positions due to parallax error. Furthermore, interaction depth dispersion results in time pickoff dispersion and thus in degraded timing resolution, and is therefore of added concern in TOF scanners. Using fast signal digitization, we characterize the timing performance, pulse shape and light output of LaBr3:Ce, CeBr3 and LYSO. Coincidence timing resolution is shown to degrade by ~50ps/cm for scintillator pixels of constant cross section and increasing length. By controlling irradiation depth in a scintillator pixel, we show that DOI-dependence of time pickoff is a significant factor in the loss of timing performance in thick detectors. Using the correlated DOI-dependence of time pickoff and charge collection, we apply a charge-based correction to the time pickoff, obtaining improved coincidence timing resolution of <200ps for a uniform 4×4×30mm3 LaBr3 pixel. In order to obtain both DOI identification and improved timing resolution, we design a two layer LaBr3[5%Ce]/LaBr3[30%Ce] detector of total size 4×4×30mm3, exploiting the dependence of scintillator rise time on [Ce] in LaBr3:Ce. Using signal rise time to determine interaction layer, excellent interaction layer discrimination is achieved, while maintaining coincidence timing resolution of <250ps and energy resolution <7% using a R4998 PMT. Excellent layer separation and timing performance is measured with several other commercially-available TOF photodetectors, demonstrating the practicality of this design. These results indicate the feasibility of rise time discrimination as a technique for measuring event DOI while maintaining sensitivity, timing and energy performance, in a well-known detector architecture. PMID:24403611

  8. Timing of follicular phase events and the postovulatory progesterone rise following synchronisation of oestrus in cows.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, G R; Gutierrez, C G; Peters, A R; Mann, G E

    2006-07-01

    In cows the timing of both ovulation and the subsequent postovulatory progesterone rise are critical to successful fertilisation and early embryo development. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of variability in the timing of ovulation relative to other follicular phase events and to determine how variations in the timing of follicular phase events contribute to the timing of the postovulatory progesterone rise. Plasma concentrations of progesterone, oestradiol and luteinising hormone (LH) and the timing of oestrus and ovulation were determined following induction of luteolysis were determined in 18 mature, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Four cows were excluded on the basis of abnormal reproductive function. In the remaining 14 cows oestrus occurred at 57.4+/-4.3h and the LH surge at 54.6+/-4.0h following luteolysis (progesterone <1ngmL(-1)) followed by a fall in circulating oestradiol concentration at 64.6+/-4.4h. Cows ovulated at 88.0+/-4.7h with the postovulatory progesterone rise (to >1ngmL(-1)) occurring 159+/-7.2h after luteolysis. There was considerable variation in the timing of ovulation following luteolysis (range 64-136h) onset of oestrus (range 24-40h) and onset of the LH surge (range 24-44h). Cows were then split on the basis of interval from progesterone fall to progesterone rise giving groups (n=7 per group) with intervals of 180.6+/-6.7 and 138.3+/-5.7h (P<0.001). Between groups, both the intervals from luteolysis to ovulation (98.3+/-6.9 vs 77.7+/-3.4h; P<0.05) and ovulation to progesterone rise (82.3+/-4.2 vs. 60.6+/-5.5h; P<0.01) were longer in late rise cows. There was no difference between groups in the interval from oestrus or LH surge to ovulation. In conclusion the results of this study further highlight the high variability that exists in the timing and interrelationships of follicular phase events in the modern dairy cow, reemphasising the challenges that exist in optimising mating strategies. However, the data do

  9. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  10. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  11. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  12. Rise time of voltage pulses in NbN superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, K. V.; Divochiy, A. V.; Vakhtomin, Yu. B.; Sidorova, M. V.; Karpova, U. V.; Morozov, P. V.; Seleznev, V. A.; Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We have found experimentally that the rise time of voltage pulse in NbN superconducting single photon detectors increases nonlinearly with increasing the length of the detector L. The effect is connected with dependence of resistance of the detector Rn, which appears after photon absorption, on its kinetic inductance Lk and, hence, on the length of the detector. This conclusion is confirmed by our calculations in the framework of two temperature model.

  13. Extremum seeking-based optimization of high voltage converter modulator rise-time

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Bland, Michael; Krstic, Miroslav; Audia, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    We digitally implement an extremum seeking (ES) algorithm, which optimizes the rise time of the output voltage of a high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) HVCM test stand by iteratively, simultaneously tuning the first 8 switching edges of each of the three phase drive waveforms (24 variables total). We achieve a 50 μs rise time, which is reduction in half compared to the 100 μs achieved at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Considering that HVCMs typically operate with an output voltage of 100 kV, with a 60Hz repetitionmore » rate, the 50 μs rise time reduction will result in very significant energy savings. The ES algorithm will prove successful, despite the noisy measurements and cost calculations, confirming the theoretical results that the algorithm is not affected by noise whose frequency components are independent of the perturbing frequencies.« less

  14. Effect of stratification and geometrical spreading on sonic boom rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.; Hamilton, Mark F.; Blackstock, David T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation is to determine the effect of unsteadiness (not associated with turbulence) on rise time. The unsteadiness considered here is due to (1) geometrical spreading, (2) stratification, which includes variation in density, temperature, and relative humidity, and (3) N shaped waveform. A very general Burgers equation, which includes all these effects, is the propagation model for our study. The equation is solved by a new computational algorithm in which all the calculations are done in the time domain. The present paper is a progress report in which some of the factors contributing to unsteadiness are studied, namely geometrical spreading and variation in relative humidity. The work of Pierce and Kang, which motivated our study, is first reviewed. We proceed with a discussion of the Burgers equation model and the algorithm for solving the equation. Some comparison tests to establish the validity of the algorithm are presented. The algorithm is then used to determine the distance required for a steady-state shock, on encountering an abrupt change in relative humidity, to reach a new steady state based on the new humidity. It is found that the transition distance for plane shocks of amplitude 70 Pa is about 4 km when the change in relative humidity is 10 percent. Shocks of amplitude 140 Pa require less distance. The effect of spherical and cylindrical spreading is also considered. We demonstrate that a spreading shock wave never reaches steady state and that its rise time will be less than the equivalent steady state shock. Finally we show that an N wave has a slightly shorter rise time than a step shock of the same amplitude.

  15. Rise Times of Solar Energetic Particle Events and Speeds of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S.; Reames, D.

    2002-12-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are assumed to be produced in coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These fast CMEs are decelerated as they move through the slower ambient solar wind. However, the Alfven speed is decreasing with increasing distance. Faster CMEs may therefore continue to drive strong shocks for longer characteristic times than do the slower CMEs, such that shock production and injection of SEPs of a given energy will also continue longer with the faster CMEs. We test this proposition observationally by comparing the times to maxima of 20 MeV SEP events with the observed speeds of associated CMEs. The SEP/CME events are sorted by solar longitude to factor out the longitudinal dependence of the SEP rise times. A preliminary analysis comparing 20 MeV protons from the GSFC EPACT detector on the Wind satellite with CMEs observed by the LASCO coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft showed a correlation between SEP rise times and CME speeds. We expand the database to include the 1996-2001 period for a more definitive test of the correlation. The implications of the results will be discussed.

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  17. Subjective response to sonic booms having different shapes, rise times, and durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify the subjective response of people to simulated outdoor sonic booms having different pressure signatures. The specific objectives of the experiments were to compare subjective response to sonic booms when described in terms of 'loudness' and 'annoyance'; to determine the ability of various noise metrics to predict subjective response to sonic booms; to determine the effects on subjective response of rise time, duration, and level; and to compare the subjective response to 'N-wave' sonic boom signatures with the subjective response to 'minimized' sonic boom signatures. The experiments were conducted in a computer-controlled, man-rated sonic boom simulator capable of reproducing user-specified pressure signatures for a wide range of sonic boom parameters. One hundred and fifty sonic booms representing different combinations of two wave shapes, four rise times, seven durations, and three peak overpressures were presented to 36 test subjects in each experiment. The test subjects in the first experiment made judgments of 'loudness' while the test subjects in the second experiment judged 'annoyance.' Subjective response to sonic booms was the same whether expressed in terms of loudness or in terms of annoyance. Analyses of several different noise metrics indicated that A-weighted sound exposure level and Perceived Level were the best predictors of subjective response. Further analyses indicated that, of these two noise metrics, only Perceived Level completely accounted for the effects of wave shape, rise time, and peak overpressure. Neither metric fully accounted for the effect of duration. However, the magnitude of the duration effect was small over the very wide range of durations considered.

  18. Rise time in 20-32 keV impulsive X-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.; Takakura, T.

    1974-01-01

    A new property of the X-ray impulsive component observed in solar flares is discussed, giving attention to the relation between the slope of the electron power spectrum and the rise time in the 20-32 keV X-ray spike. This particular energy range was chosen because it offered the greatest number of impulsive events while being sufficiently high to avoid contamination by soft X radiation. It is found for the thin-target model that the electron spectrum tends to be softer when the acceleration rate is smaller.

  19. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time.

  20. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time.

  1. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of <3 ns and the maximum peak current up to 200 A (into 50 Ω). The jitter of the pulse generator system is less than 1 ns. The maximum pulse repetition rate is set at 10 Hz that limited only by the gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time. PMID:22852729

  2. Rise time of inverted triangular prism intruder in vibrating granular bed: Experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Adriani, I. K.; Baladram, M. S.; Viridi, S.

    2012-05-01

    Experiment results and a qualitative model of the phenomenon called Brazil nut effect (BNE) with inverted triangular prism are reported in this work. The model is constructed by considering some forces (earth gravitational force, buoyant force, and fluid viscous force) and using Newton's second law of motion. The rise time of BNE T is defined as time needed for the intruder to be on granular surface with all of his parts (no part is still immersed in the granular bed). One side of the triangular base of the intruder l is varied from 1.5 to 5 cm with other two sides are kept in constant values (1 and 3 cm). It has been observed in experiment that l with value 3-4 cm gives the smaller rise time. Plot of T versus l has the form of concave up parabolic curve with minimum lies at l between 3-4 cm. This observation has been confirmed by the proposed model with the same order of magnitude and similar curve trend.

  3. Rise time and response measurements on a LiSOCl2 cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, Caroline; Lecomte, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic impedance tests were performed on a 180 Ah LiSOCl2 cell in the frame of a short term work contract awarded by Aerospatiale as part of the Hermes Space Plane development work. These tests consisted of rise time and response measurements. The rise time test was performed to show the ability to deliver 4 KW, in the nominal voltage range (75-115 V), within less than 100 microseconds, and after a period at rest of 13 days. The response measurements test consisted of step response and frequency response tests. The frequency response test was performed to characterize the response of the LiSOCl2 cell to a positive or negative load step of 10 A starting from various currents. The test was performed for various depths of discharge and various temperatures. The test results were used to build a mathematical, electrical model of the LiSOCl2 cell which are also presented. The test description, test results, electrical modelization description, and conclusions are presented.

  4. Individual differences in processing pitch contour and rise time in adults: A behavioral and electrophysiological study of Cantonese tone merging.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jinghua; Law, Sam-Po

    2016-06-01

    One way to understand the relationship between speech perception and production is to examine cases where the two dissociate. This study investigates the hypothesis that perceptual acuity reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs) to rise time of sound amplitude envelope and pitch contour [reflected in the mismatch negativity (MMN)] may associate with individual differences in production among speakers with otherwise comparable perceptual abilities. To test this hypothesis, advantage was taken of an on-going sound change-tone merging in Cantonese, and compared the ERPs between two groups of typically developed native speakers who could discriminate the high rising and low rising tones with equivalent accuracy but differed in the distinctiveness of their production of these tones. Using a passive oddball paradigm, early positive-going EEG components to rise time and MMN to pitch contour were elicited during perception of the two tones. Significant group differences were found in neural responses to rise time rather than pitch contour. More importantly, individual differences in efficiency of tone discrimination in response latency and magnitude of neural responses to rise time were correlated with acoustic measures of F0 offset and rise time differences in productions of the two rising tones.

  5. Individual differences in processing pitch contour and rise time in adults: A behavioral and electrophysiological study of Cantonese tone merging.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jinghua; Law, Sam-Po

    2016-06-01

    One way to understand the relationship between speech perception and production is to examine cases where the two dissociate. This study investigates the hypothesis that perceptual acuity reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs) to rise time of sound amplitude envelope and pitch contour [reflected in the mismatch negativity (MMN)] may associate with individual differences in production among speakers with otherwise comparable perceptual abilities. To test this hypothesis, advantage was taken of an on-going sound change-tone merging in Cantonese, and compared the ERPs between two groups of typically developed native speakers who could discriminate the high rising and low rising tones with equivalent accuracy but differed in the distinctiveness of their production of these tones. Using a passive oddball paradigm, early positive-going EEG components to rise time and MMN to pitch contour were elicited during perception of the two tones. Significant group differences were found in neural responses to rise time rather than pitch contour. More importantly, individual differences in efficiency of tone discrimination in response latency and magnitude of neural responses to rise time were correlated with acoustic measures of F0 offset and rise time differences in productions of the two rising tones. PMID:27369146

  6. High-Voltage Power Supply With Fast Rise and Fall Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearden, Douglas B.; Acker, Richard M.; Kapuslka, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    A special-purpose high-voltage power supply can be electronically switched on and off with fast rise and fall times, respectively. The output potential is programmable from 20 to 1,250 V. An output current of 50 A can be sustained at 1,250 V. The power supply was designed specifically for electronically shuttering a microchannel plate in an x-ray detector that must operate with exposure times as short as 1 ms. The basic design of the power supply is also adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for rapid slewing of high voltages. The power-supply circuitry (see figure) includes a preregulator, which is used to program the output at 1/30 of the desired output potential. After the desired voltage has been set, the outputs of a pulse width modulator (PWM) are enabled and used to amplify the preregulator output potential by 30. The amplification is achieved by use of two voltage doublers with a transformer that has two primary and two secondary windings. A resistor is used to limit the current by controlling the drive voltage of two field-effect transistors (FETs) during turn-on of the PWM. A pulse transformer is used to turn on four FETs to short-circuit four output capacitors when the outputs of the PWM have been disabled. The most notable aspects of the performance of the power supply are a rise time of only 80 s and a fall time of only 60 s at a load current of 50 A or less. Another notable aspect is that the application of a 0-to-5-V square wave to a shutdown pin of the PWM causes the production of a 0-to-1,250-V square wave at the output terminals.

  7. The Rise Time of Type Ia Supernovae from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, A.; Howell, D. A.; Howes, A.; Sullivan, M.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Aubourg, E.; Bronder, J.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Filiol, M.; Le Borgne, D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.

    2006-10-01

    We compare the rise times of nearby and distant Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a test for evolution using 73 high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia from the first 2 years of the 5 year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and published observations of nearby SNe. Because of the ``rolling'' search nature of the SNLS, our measurement is approximately 6 times more precise than previous studies, allowing for a more sensitive test of evolution between nearby and distant SNe. Adopting a simple t2 early-time model (as in previous studies), we find that the rest-frame B rise times for a fiducial SN Ia at high and low redshift are consistent, with values 19.10+0.18-0.17(stat)+/-0.2(syst) and 19.58+0.22-0.19 days, respectively; the statistical significance of this difference is only 1.4 σ. The errors represent the uncertainty in the mean rather than any variation between individual SNe. We also compare subsets of our high-redshift data set based on decline rate, host galaxy star formation rate, and redshift, finding no substantive evidence for any subsample dependence. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at CFHT, which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the CFHT Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS.

  8. Moon Rise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station in May 2012, Expedition 31 astronaut Don Pettit opened the shutters covering the cupola observation windows in time to watch the moon rise. The time-lapse sce...

  9. Diffusion of fast rising strong magnetic fields into conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labetskaya, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Kuskova, N. I.; Rud, A. D.

    2014-11-01

    The basic processes occurring in a conductor exploding in a current skinning mode are the propagation of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in the conductor and the formation of low-temperature plasma at its surface. An experimental study of the phenomenon of nonlinear magnetic diffusion into conductors in magnetic fields of induction rising at a rate up to 3·109 T/s was carried out on the MIG generator capable of producing a peak current up to 2.5 MA within a rise time of 100 ns. It has been found experimentally that the average velocity of a nonlinear magnetic diffusion wave in an aluminum conductor placed in a strong magnetic field (up to 300 T) rising at a high rate (on average, 3·109 T/s) is (2.7÷3.3)·105 cm/s. This is comparable to the velocity of sound in aluminum under normal conditions and reasonably agrees with predictions of numerical simulations.

  10. Temporal features of spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: effects of stimulus duration and rise time.

    PubMed

    Gans, Donald; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Peterson, Diana Coomes; Wenstrup, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    This report examines temporal features of facilitation and suppression that underlie spectrally integrative responses to complex vocal signals. Auditory responses were recorded from 160 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of awake mustached bats. Sixty-two neurons showed combination-sensitive facilitation: responses to best frequency (BF) signals were facilitated by well-timed signals at least an octave lower in frequency, in the range 16-31 kHz. Temporal features and strength of facilitation were generally unaffected by changes in duration of facilitating signals from 4 to 31 ms. Changes in stimulus rise time from 0.5 to 5.0 ms had little effect on facilitatory strength. These results suggest that low frequency facilitating inputs to high BF neurons have phasic-on temporal patterns and are responsive to stimulus rise times over the tested range. We also recorded from 98 neurons showing low-frequency (11-32 kHz) suppression of higher BF responses. Effects of changing duration were related to the frequency of suppressive signals. Signals<23 kHz usually evoked suppression sustained throughout signal duration. This and other features of such suppression are consistent with a cochlear origin that results in masking of responses to higher, near-BF signal frequencies. Signals in the 23- to 30-kHz range-frequencies in the first sonar harmonic-generally evoked phasic suppression of BF responses. This may result from neural inhibitory interactions within and below IC. In many neurons, we observed two or more forms of the spectral interactions described here. Thus IC neurons display temporally and spectrally complex responses to sound that result from multiple spectral interactions at different levels of the ascending auditory pathway.

  11. Digital Rise-Time Discrimination of Pulses from the Tigress Integrated Plunger Silicon PIN Diode Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, P.; Henderson, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Chester, A.; Cross, D. S.; Drake, T. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Ketelhut, S.; Krücken, R.; Miller, D.; Rajabali, M. M.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E.; Unsworth, C.; Wang, Z.-M.

    Electromagnetic transition rate measurements play an important role in characterizing the evolution of nuclear structure with increasing proton-neutron asymmetry. At TRIUMF, the TIGRESS Integrated Plunger device and its suite of ancillary detector systems have been implemented for charged-particle tagging and light-ion identification in coincidence with gamma-ray spectroscopy for Doppler-shift lifetime studies and low-energy Coulomb excitation measurements. Digital pulse-shape analysis of signals from these ancillary detectors for particle identification improves the signal-to-noise ratio of gamma-ray energy spectra. Here, we illustrate the reaction-channel selectivity achieved by utilizing digital rise-time discrimination of waveforms from alpha particles and carbon ions detected with silicon PIN diodes, thereby enhancing gamma-ray line-shape signatures for precision lifetime studies.

  12. Men's career development and marriage timing during a period of rising inequality.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, V K; Kalmijn, M; Lim, N

    1997-08-01

    Based on data from 1979-1990 NLSY interviews, we investigate the implications of rising economic inequality for young men's marriage timing. Our approach is to relate marriage formation to the ease or difficulty of the career-entry process and to show that large race/schooling differences in career development lead to substantial variations in marriage timing. We develop measures of current career "maturity" and of long-term labor-market position. Employing discrete-time event-history methods, we show that these variables have a substantial impact on marriage formation for both blacks and whites. Applying our regression results to models based on observed race/schooling patterns of career development, we then estimate cumulative proportions ever married in a difficult versus an easy career-entry process. We find major differences in the pace of marriage formation, depending on the difficulty of the career transition. We also find considerable differences in these marriage timing patterns across race/schooling groups corresponding to the large observed differences in the speed and difficulty of career transition between and within these groups. PMID:9275242

  13. A hybrid model for simulation of secondary electron emission in plasma immersion ion implantation under different pulse rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Navab Safa, N. Ghomi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A hybrid fluid Particle in Cell–Monte Carlo Collision (PiC–MCC) model is presented to study the effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma immersion ion implantation process under different pulse rise time. The model describes the temporal evolution of various parameters of plasma such as ion density, ion velocity, secondary electron density, and secondary electron current for different rise times. A 3D–3 V PiC–MCC model is developed to simulate the secondary electrons which are emitted from the sample surface while the plasma ions and electrons are treated using a 1D fluid model. The simulation results indicate that the secondary electron density and secondary electron current increase as the rise time decreases. The main differences between the results for different rise times are found during the initial phase of the pulse. The results are explained through studying the fundamental parameters of plasma.

  14. Rapid rise time pulsed magnetic field circuit for pump-probe field effect studies.

    PubMed

    Salaoru, T A; Woodward, Jonathan R

    2007-03-01

    Here we describe an electronic circuit capable of producing rapidly switched dc magnetic fields of up to 20 mT with a rise time of 10 ns and a pulse length variable from 50 ns to more than 10 micros, suitable for use in the study of magnetic field effects on radical pair (RP) reactions. This corresponds to switching the field on a time scale short relative to the lifetime of typical RPs and maintaining it well beyond their lifetimes. Previous experiments have involved discharging a capacitor through a low inductance coil for a limited time using a switching circuit. These suffer from decaying field strength over the duration of the pulse given primarily by the ratio of the pulse width to the RC constant of the circuit. We describe here a simple yet elegant solution that completely eliminates this difficulty by employing a feedback loop. This allows a constant field to be maintained over the entire length of the pulse. PMID:17411229

  15. Magnitude and timing of episodic sea-level rise during the last deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locker, S.D.; Hine, A.C.; Tedesco, L.P.; Shinn, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A succession of elevated ridge deposits on the south Florida margin was mapped using high-resolution seismic and side-scan sonar imaging in water depths ranging from 50 to 124 m. The ridges are interpreted to be subtidal shoal complexes and paleoshorelines (eolian dune or beach) formed during the last sea-level transgression. Oolitic and skeletal grainstones and mixed skeletal-peloidal-ooid packstones were recovered using a research submersible. All of the grains are of shallow-water or intertidal origin, and both marine and nonmarine cements were identified. Formation and preservation of these features are attributed to episodic and rapid changes in the rate of the deglacial sea-level rise at the onset of the termination 1A ??18O excursion. This high-resolution record of sea-level change appears to be related to deglacial processes operating on submillennial time scales and supports increasing evidence of rapid episodic fluctuations in ice volume, climate, and ocean-circulation patterns during glacialinterglacial transitions.

  16. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, N.C.; Coleman, M.D.; Ramrus, A.; Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos national Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70 ns pulses via four Blumieins. Each Blumiein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumiein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  17. Diversity of Decline-Rate-Corrected Type 1a Supernova Rise times:One Mode or Two?

    SciTech Connect

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-05-01

    B-band light-curve rise times for eight unusually well-observed nearby Type Ia supernova (SNe) are fitted by a newly developed template-building algorithm, using light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. From the available literature, photometric BVRI data collected over many months, including the earliest points, are reconciled, combined, and fitted to a unique time of explosion for each SN. On average, after they are corrected for light-curve decline rate, three SNe rise in 18.81 {+-} 0.36 days, while five SNe rise in 16.64 {+-} 0.21 days. If all eight SNe are sampled from a single parent population (a hypothesis not favored by statistical tests), the rms intrinsic scatter of the decline-rate-corrected SN rise time is 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.52} days--a first measurement of this dispersion. The corresponding global mean rise time is 17.44 {+-} 0.39 days, where the uncertainty is dominated by intrinsic variance. This value is {approx}2 days shorter than two published averages that nominally are twice as precise, though also based on small samples. When comparing high-z to low-z SN luminosities for determining cosmological parameters, bias can be introduced by use of a light-curve template with an unrealistic rise time. If the period over which light curves are sampled depends on z in a manner typical of current search and measurement strategies, a two-day discrepancy in template rise time can bias the luminosity comparison by {approx}0.03 magnitudes.

  18. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke; Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fujio

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  19. MOSFET solid state switching circuit improves the 0 to 99% rise time for framing camera deflection electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, A.T.; Thomas, S.

    1996-09-01

    We have improved the 0 to 99% rise time voltage on our 2 frame deflection plates from 160 to 65 nS with the addition of a peaking circuit that works in conjunction with our primary 2 frame deflection circuitry. Our peaking technique has applications to other HV pulsers including those which must drive 51 ohm loads. Generally, rise time voltages are measured between 10 and 90%. To minimize the camera image blur resulting from the dynamic influence of deflection plate potentials acting on photocathode electrons, it was necessary to design a circuit that would rise from 0 to the 99% voltage level in under 100nS. Once this voltage was reached, it was necessary to stay within 1% of the attained voltage level for a duration of 1 uS. This was accomplished with the use of MOSFET solid state switching.

  20. Turbulence Scales, Rise Times, Caustics, and the Simulation of Sonic Boom Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Allan D.

    1996-01-01

    The general topic of atmospheric turbulence effects on sonic boom propagation is addressed with especial emphasis on taking proper and efficient account of the contributions of the portion oi the turbulence that is associated with extremely high wavenumber components. The recent work reported by Bart Lipkens in his doctoral thesis is reexamined to determine whether the good agreement between his measured rise times with the 1971 theory of the author is fortuitous. It is argued that Lipken's estimate of the distance to the first caustic was a gross overestimate because of the use of a sound speed correlation function shaped like a gaussian curve. In particular, it is argued that the expected distance to the first caustic varies with the kinematic viscosity nu and the energy epsilon dissipated per unit mass per unit time, and the sound speed c as : d(sub first caustic) = nu(exp 7/12) c(exp 2/3)/ epsilon(exp 5/12)(nu x epsilon/c(exp 4))(exp a), where the exponent a is greater than -7/12 and can be argued to be either O or 1/24. In any event, the surprising aspect of the relationship is that it actually goes to zero as the viscosity goes to zero with s held constant. It is argued that the apparent overabundance of caustics can be grossly reduced by a general computational and analytical perspective that partitions the turbulence into two parts, divided by a wavenumber k(sub c). Wavenumbers higher than kc correspond to small-scale turbulence, and the associated turbulence can be taken into account by a renormalization of the ambient sound speed so that the result has a small frequency dependence that results from a spatial averaging over of the smaller-scale turbulent fluctuations. Selection of k(sub c). can be made so large that only a very small number of caustics are encountered if one adopts the premise that the frequency dispersion of pulses is caused by that part of the turbulence spectrum which lies in the inertial range originally predicted by Kolmogoroff. The

  1. Learning Novel Phonological Representations in Developmental Dyslexia: Associations with Basic Auditory Processing of Rise Time and Phonological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia are known to have impaired lexical phonological representations. Here, we explore associations between learning new phonological representations, phonological awareness, and sensitivity to amplitude envelope onsets (rise time). We show that individual differences in learning novel phonological…

  2. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  3. Early to Rise? The Effect of Daily Start Times on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Finley

    2012-01-01

    Local school districts often stagger daily start times for their schools in order to reduce busing costs. This paper uses data on all middle school students in Wake County, NC from 1999 to 2006 to identify the causal effect of daily start times on academic performance. Using variation in start times within schools over time, the effect is a two…

  4. Spark-Timing Control Based on Correlation of Maximum-Economy Spark Timing, Flame-front Travel, and Cylinder-Pressure Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Harvey A; Heinicke, Orville H; Haynie, William H

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a full-scale air-cooled cylinder in order to establish an effective means of maintaining maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. Variable fuel-air-ratio runs were conducted in which relations were determined between the spark travel, and cylinder-pressure rise. An instrument for controlling spark timing was developed that automatically maintained maximum-economy spark timing with varying engine operating conditions. The instrument also indicated the occurrence of preignition.

  5. Latency of tone-burst-evoked auditory brain stem responses and otoacoustic emissions: Level, frequency, and rise-time effects

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Argenyi, Michael; Neely, Stephen T.; Kopun, Judy G.; Gorga, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of auditory brain stem response (ABR) and otoacoustic emission (OAE) delays may provide insights into effects of level, frequency, and stimulus rise-time on cochlear delay. Tone-burst-evoked ABRs and OAEs (TBOAEs) were measured simultaneously in normal-hearing human subjects. Stimuli included a wide range of frequencies (0.5–8 kHz), levels (20–90 dB SPL), and tone-burst rise times. ABR latencies have orderly dependence on these three parameters, similar to previously reported data by Gorga et al. [J. Speech Hear. Res. 31, 87–97 (1988)]. Level dependence of ABR and TBOAE latencies was similar across a wide range of stimulus conditions. At mid-frequencies, frequency dependence of ABR and TBOAE latencies were similar. The dependence of ABR latency on both rise time and level was significant; however, the interaction was not significant, suggesting independent effects. Comparison between ABR and TBOAE latencies reveals that the ratio of TBOAE latency to ABR forward latency (the level-dependent component of ABR total latency) is close to one below 1.5 kHz, but greater than two above 1.5 kHz. Despite the fact that the current experiment was designed to test compatibility with models of reverse-wave propagation, existing models do not completely explain the current data. PMID:23654387

  6. Timing of volcanism along the northern East Pacific Rise based on paleointensity experiments on basaltic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, J.; Cormier, M.-H.; Kent, D. V.; Donnelly, K. E.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2004-04-01

    Samples from two adjacent and contrasting ridge segments along the East Pacific Rise were measured for their magnetic paleointensity in order to further explore the possibilities of dating very young volcanic samples using secular variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The ridge segment north of the Orozco transform fault (15°22'-16°20'N) is the shallowest and broadest along more than 5000 km of the East Pacific Rise, whereas the adjacent segment to the north (16°16'-18°N) has a "typical" morphology for its intermediate spreading rate. Both ridge segments were densely sampled during the PANR01MV cruise and 36 samples of axial lava flows, consisting mainly of glasses from the rims of the flows and some fragments of lobate basalts, were selected from this collection for paleointensity experiments. The Coe version of the Thellier double-heating procedure (in air) was used. Twenty-seven units provide internally consistent paleointensity estimates leading to precise estimates of the paleofield, which range between 8 μT and 57 μT. Comparisons with reference paleointensity curves compiled from subaerial flows, archeomagnetic data and sedimentary records projected to the sampling site coordinates show that the measured values can be used to constrain the volcanic history of the ridge segments over the past few thousand years. A good agreement was found between apparent "freshness" of the glasses, the geochemistry of the lavas, and their magnetic paleointensity values. The inflated southern segment seems characterized by recent activities as indicated by numerous flows with paleointensities clustering around today's value (39 μT) or around the high values typical of 2000-3000 years ago (˜55 μT). We interpret this distribution to indicate the flooding by effusive lava flows of the entire axial plateau some 2000-3000 years ago, followed by a volcanic phase producing smaller volume lava flows confined to the innermost 200 m of the ridge axis. The northern ridge

  7. The Fall and Rise of the Faculty: Product Development in Lean Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Arthur E.; Horton, Marshall J.

    1997-01-01

    Part-time faculty are critical in providing a sense of the marketplace to guide curriculum improvement. If adjuncts are not given a greater role, market forces will dictate curriculum change, albeit slowly and inefficiently. (SK)

  8. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity νDDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (ν0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (νf) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ν0 to ν0 + νf. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ν0 < νDDS < ν0 + νf. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  9. The rise of global warming skepticism: exploring affective image associations in the United States over time.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    This article explores how affective image associations to global warming have changed over time. Four nationally representative surveys of the American public were conducted between 2002 and 2010 to assess public global warming risk perceptions, policy preferences, and behavior. Affective images (positive or negative feelings and cognitive representations) were collected and content analyzed. The results demonstrate a large increase in "naysayer" associations, indicating extreme skepticism about the issue of climate change. Multiple regression analyses found that holistic affect and "naysayer" associations were more significant predictors of global warming risk perceptions than cultural worldviews or sociodemographic variables, including political party and ideology. The results demonstrate the important role affective imagery plays in judgment and decision-making processes, how these variables change over time, and how global warming is currently perceived by the American public.

  10. Simple scaling laws for influenza A rise time, duration, and severity.

    PubMed

    Chang, David B; Young, Carl S

    2007-06-21

    Simple scaling laws are developed for the severity and characteristic time scales of influenza A infection in man. The scaling laws are based on a model of the infection described by six coupled ordinary differential equations that describe the time courses of the numbers of infectious viral particles, activated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, interferon molecules, infected cells, uninfected cells, and the subset of uninfected cells that are protected by interferon from viral infection. Computer simulations show that the disease can be regarded approximately as a two-stage process. In the first stage, the growth in the number of infected cells is determined primarily by the interferon-enhanced limitation in the available number of target cells. In the second stage, the bulk of the duration of the infection is determined mainly by the destruction of the infected cells by the cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. The severity and characteristic times of the infection are found to depend simply on the logarithm of the initial number of viruses. PMID:17379249

  11. Rise-time response of nickel-foil-on-Kapton-substrate, hot-film, shear-stress sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1991-01-01

    An existing nickel-foil-on-Kapton-substrate sensor design was modified by including two heated elements in an attempt to minimize or reduce substrate conduction effects. The rise-time responses of the original and modified sensors were then investigated in unsteady flows of 0.5-1-s duration, consistent with flows encountered in wind-energy applications. The results obtained indicate a measurable degradation in transient performance due to the activation of the dynamic guard heater. Transient heat conduction within the substrate remains the limiting factor in such applications.

  12. Modification of water in a nanosecond diffuse discharge with fast electron preionization at a short voltage rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskii, Victor M.; Panarin, Victor A.; Shulepov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper studies the dynamics of a nanosecond diffuse discharge with no additional preionization at a voltage rise time of less than 1 ns and its effect on drinking and distilled water. It is shown that the diffuse discharge is formed due to avalanche charge multiplication initiated by fast electrons and is sustained by secondary breakdown waves through ionized gas channels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that repeated exposure to the discharge changes the absorption spectra of drinking and distilled water such that the stretching vibration band of OH groups broadens and lacks clearly defined peaks. The water conductivity after irradiation increases. Probably, this is due to cluster rearrangement of water molecules.

  13. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  14. A metacalibrated time-tree documents the early rise of flowering plant phylogenetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Magallón, Susana; Gómez-Acevedo, Sandra; Sánchez-Reyes, Luna L; Hernández-Hernández, Tania

    2015-07-01

    The establishment of modern terrestrial life is indissociable from angiosperm evolution. While available molecular clock estimates of angiosperm age range from the Paleozoic to the Late Cretaceous, the fossil record is consistent with angiosperm diversification in the Early Cretaceous. The time-frame of angiosperm evolution is here estimated using a sample representing 87% of families and sequences of five plastid and nuclear markers, implementing penalized likelihood and Bayesian relaxed clocks. A literature-based review of the palaeontological record yielded calibrations for 137 phylogenetic nodes. The angiosperm crown age was bound within a confidence interval calculated with a method that considers the fossil record of the group. An Early Cretaceous crown angiosperm age was estimated with high confidence. Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae and Eudicotyledoneae diversified synchronously 135-130 million yr ago (Ma); Pentapetalae is 126-121 Ma; and Rosidae (123-115 Ma) preceded Asteridae (119-110 Ma). Family stem ages are continuously distributed between c. 140 and 20 Ma. This time-frame documents an early phylogenetic proliferation that led to the establishment of major angiosperm lineages, and the origin of over half of extant families, in the Cretaceous. While substantial amounts of angiosperm morphological and functional diversity have deep evolutionary roots, extant species richness was probably acquired later. PMID:25615647

  15. Composition and timing of carbonate vein precipitation within the igneous basement of the Early Cretaceous Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Li, S.; Hauff, F. F.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.; Yu, S.; Zhao, S.; Rausch, S.

    2013-12-01

    Shatsky Rise is an Early Cretaceous large igneous province located in the NW Pacific ca. 1500 km east of Japan and is the third-largest oceanic plateau on Earth (after Ontong Java and Kerguelen). Numerous calcium carbonate veins were recovered from the igneous basement of Shatsky Rise during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 324 (Sager et al., 2010). The chemical (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca) and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, δ18O, δ13C) compositions of these veins were determined to constrain the timing of vein formation and to provide valuable data for the reconstruction of past seawater composition. A dominant control of seawater chemistry on calcite composition is evident for most investigated vein samples with varying compositional contribution from the basaltic basement. The Sr/Ca ratio of the vein calcite is positively correlated with Mg/Ca and with δ18O, indicating warmer/colder precipitation temperatures with decreasing/increasing Sr/Ca (and Mg/Ca) ratios, respectively. Distinctly higher formation temperatures (as inferred from oxygen isotope ratios) indicative of hydrothermal vein formation are only observed at one site (Site U1350, drilled into the central part of Shatsky Rise). The highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios (least basement influence) of vein samples at each drill site range form 0.707264 to 0.707550 and are believed to best reflect contemporaneous Early Cretaceous seawater composition. In principle, age information can be deduced by correlating these ratios with the global seawater Sr isotope evolution. Since the Sr isotopic composition of seawater has fluctuated three times between the early and mid Cretaceous (McArthur et al., 2001) no unambiguous precipitation ages can be constrained by this method and vein precipitation could have occurred at any time between ˜80 and 140 Ma. However, based on combined chemical and isotopic data and correlations of vein composition with formation depth and inferred temperature, we argue for a rather early

  16. TIME EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING THE RISE OF A SOLAR PROMINENCE INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Díaz, A. J.

    2014-04-10

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ∼36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (∼9-12 km s{sup –1}) and large Doppler widths (∼10 km s{sup –1}) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  17. Characterizing and minimizing the effects of noise in tide gauge time series: relative and geocentric sea level rise around Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, Reed J.; Watson, Christopher S.; Church, John A.; White, Neil J.; Tregoning, Paul; Coleman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We quantify the rate of sea level rise around the Australian continent from an analysis of tide gauge and Global Positioning System (GPS) data sets. To estimate the underlying linear rates of sea level change in the presence of significant interannual and decadal variability (treated here as noise), we adopt and extend a novel network adjustment approach. We simultaneously estimate time-correlated noise as well as linear model parameters and realistic uncertainties from sea level time series at individual gauges, as well as from time-series differences computed between pairs of gauges. The noise content at individual gauges is consistent with a combination of white and time-correlated noise. We find that the noise in time series from the western coast of Australia is best described by a first-order Gauss-Markov model, whereas east coast stations generally exhibit lower levels of time-correlated noise that is better described by a power-law process. These findings suggest several decades of monthly tide gauge data are needed to reduce rate uncertainties to <0.5 mm yr-1 for undifferenced single site time series with typical noise characteristics. Our subsequent adjustment strategy exploits the more precise differential rates estimated from differenced time series from pairs of tide gauges to estimate rates among the network of 43 tide gauges that passed a stability analysis. We estimate relative sea level rates over three temporal windows (1900-2011, 1966-2011 and 1993-2011), accounting for covariance between time series. The resultant adjustment reduces the rate uncertainty across individual gauges, and partially mitigates the need for century-scale time series at all sites in the network. Our adjustment reveals a spatially coherent pattern of sea level rise around the coastline, with the highest rates in northern Australia. Over the time periods beginning in 1900, 1966 and 1993, we find weighted average rates of sea level rise of 1.4 ± 0.6, 1.7 ± 0.6 and 4.6 ± 0

  18. Electrophysiological aspects of the middle ear muscle reflex in the rat: latency, rise time and effect on sound transmission.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, H; Kingma, H; Kluge, C; Marres, E H

    1990-10-01

    The latency, the rise time and the influence of the acoustic reflex on sound transmission were investigated in the adult rat during ketamin anesthesia. This was done by recordings of the cochlear microphonics (CM) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the reflex responses of the tensor tympani muscle. The acoustic reflex was elicited by contralateral acoustic stimuli of which the intensity and frequency was varied. Ipsilaterally, the effect on sound transmission was determined by estimating the change in amplitude of the CM's of ipsilateral administered subliminal stimuli. It was shown that both the tensor tympani muscle and the stapedius muscle contribute in the reflex. The latency as well as the rise time of the reflex determined by CM recordings showed to be short (minimal values: 12 and 7 ms respectively). The mean latency of the tensor tympani muscle reflex, measured by EMG, was about 7 ms. The attenuation of 0.25-8 kHz tone bursts upto 115 dB SPL is limited to a mean maximum of 15 dB SPL. The maximal attenuation was shown to occur at 1 kHz. Frequencies above 2 kHz appeared to be the best elicitor of the middle ear muscle reflex.

  19. Time variant cross correlation to assess residence time of water and implication for hydraulics of a sink-rise karst system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly-Comte, V.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Screaton, E. J.

    2011-05-01

    Transport rates and residence time in the subsurface are critical parameters for understanding water-rock interactions for efficient contaminant remediation. This paper presents a methodology for assessing flow and transit time of water through hydrological systems, with specific applications to karst systems and implication for hydraulics of a conduit system surrounded by a porous and permeable intergranular matrix. A time variant cross-correlation function analysis is applied to bivariate time series that characterize mass transfer, assuming a stationary system using sliding windows of various sizes. We apply the method to 1 year long temperature records in the Santa Fe River (north central Florida) measured at (1) the River Sink, where all the incoming surface water drains into a sinkhole, (2) Sweetwater Lake, where the river resurges into a 500 m long karst window, and (3) the River Rise, where the water discharges from a first-magnitude karst spring. Results are compared with those obtained using specific conductivity. Estimated residence time ranges from less than 1 day during floods to more than 15 days during base flow within the 8000 m flow path between the River Sink and the River Rise. Results are used to characterize geometric, hydraulic, and hydrodynamic properties of this sink-rise system with strong matrix-conduit interactions. These properties are critical to the chemical and physical behavior of surface water-groundwater mixing. Our results also have direct implications for sampling strategies and hydrograph separation of many karst systems with different degrees and types of matrix porosity and permeability.

  20. RISE TIME DELAY DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1959-09-29

    A pulse-height discriminator for generating an output pulse when the accepted input pulse is approximately at its maximum value is described. A gating tube and a negative bias generator responsive to the derivative of the input pulse and means for impressing the output of the bias generator to at least one control electrode of the gating tube are included.

  1. Investigation on F layer height rise and equatorial spread F onset time: Signature of standing large-scale wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Balwada, S.; Pant, T. K.; Sumod, S. G.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial spread F observations have been categorized into three categories based on ionograms recorded over Sriharikota. First category comprised cases where the onset of equatorial spread F (ESF) was concurrent with the peak h'F time. Second and third categories comprised cases where the onset of ESF happened with a delay of 30 min and more than 30 min, respectively, with reference to the peak h'F time. Average peak h'F in the first category was more than 35 km higher than that in the second and third categories. Also, the peak vertical (upward) plasma drift was higher in the first category. Assuming the genesis of F region irregularity to have happened at or before the time of F layer attaining the peak height, late onset of ESF indicates the genesis of irregularities to have happened westward of Sriharikota. The fact that the peak h'F values were remarkably different in the three categories indicates a zonal variation of eastward electric field and postsunset height rise of F layer. The relative magnitude of the F layer height rise in the three different categories over Sriharikota has also been found to be significantly different than that over Thumba, an equatorial (magnetic) station located ~360 km westward of Sriharikota longitude. This scenario points toward the existence of a large-scale zonal standing wave in the F layer and its important role in F region instability process. Results presented in the manuscript have been discussed in the light of current understanding on the large-scale wave structure.

  2. High-voltage isolation transformer for sub-nanosecond rise time pulses constructed with annular parallel-strip transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Homma, Akira

    2011-07-01

    A novel annular parallel-strip transmission line was devised to construct high-voltage high-speed pulse isolation transformers. The transmission lines can easily realize stable high-voltage operation and good impedance matching between primary and secondary circuits. The time constant for the step response of the transformer was calculated by introducing a simple low-frequency equivalent circuit model. Results show that the relation between the time constant and low-cut-off frequency of the transformer conforms to the theory of the general first-order linear time-invariant system. Results also show that the test transformer composed of the new transmission lines can transmit about 600 ps rise time pulses across the dc potential difference of more than 150 kV with insertion loss of -2.5 dB. The measured effective time constant of 12 ns agreed exactly with the theoretically predicted value. For practical applications involving the delivery of synchronized trigger signals to a dc high-voltage electron gun station, the transformer described in this paper exhibited advantages over methods using fiber optic cables for the signal transfer system. This transformer has no jitter or breakdown problems that invariably occur in active circuit components.

  3. Development of a novel voltage divider for measurement of sub-nanosecond rise time high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Sharma, Archana

    2016-02-01

    This paper is about the development of a copper sulphate based aqueous-electrolytic voltage divider for the measurement of high voltage pulses, 100 kV, with pulse widths of 1-2 ns and rise time <1 ns. Novel features are incorporated in the design of the divider, to meet the performance requirements for the application. Analytical calculations to justify design are described. Structural simulation of the divider is carried out using field wave simulation software to verify the effectiveness. A calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the divider. Results obtained during calibration are subjected to statistical analysis to determine the confidence of measurement. Details of design, analysis, and simulation are described in this paper.

  4. A TRANSIT TIMING ANALYSIS OF NINE RISE LIGHT CURVES OF THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM TrES-3

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, N. P.; Pollacco, D.; Simpson, E. K.; Barros, S.; Joshi, Y. C.; Todd, I.; Keenan, F. P.; Skillen, I.; Benn, C.; Christian, D.; Hrudkova, M.; Steele, I. A.

    2009-08-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be R{sub p} /R {sub *} = 0.1664{sup +0.0011} {sub -0.0018} and i = 81.73{sup +0.13} {sub -0.04}, respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving {chi}{sup 2} = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a constant period either have relatively little out-of-transit coverage or have clear systematics. A new ephemeris was calculated using the transit times and was found to be T{sub c} (0) = 2454632.62610 {+-} 0.00006 HJD and P = 1.3061864 {+-} 0.0000005 days. The transit times were then used to place upper mass limits as a function of the period ratio of a potential perturbing planet, showing that our data are sufficiently sensitive to have probed sub-Earth mass planets in both interior and exterior 2:1 resonances, assuming that the additional planet is in an initially circular orbit.

  5. Copernicus Rising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Michael A.

    2007-08-01

    Copernicus Rising began as a historical biography when it was first conceived, but as the writing progressed it quickly became a rather absurd play that took historical research and twisted it through the lens of my own wit, philosophy and personal affection for the characters. When working with historical figures--characters who existed in a very tangible way in our own history--the playwriting process opens a dialogue between different points in time and space. The difficulty lies in finding a unique and clear voice amongst the discordant personalities involved in this time and space overlap, both in the writing and production processes, in order to get to the heart of what the play is really all about. This thesis follows the journey of the play from its historical roots through the creation of an absurd journey both insides and outside time, space and the human mind. The first part of the thesis explains the beginnings of the concept and outlines much of the research and development that went into the play. The next part outlines the process of production and integrating the world on paper with that of moving bodies on stage. In the final part, post-production discussions and audience feedback sessions shape the play into the draft included in this thesis.

  6. Distinct Effect of Impact Rise Times on Immediate and Early Neuropathology After Brain Injury in Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Archana; Pfister, Bryan J.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can occur from physical trauma from a wide spectrum of insults ranging from explosions to falls. The biomechanics of the trauma can vary in key features, including the rate and magnitude of the insult. Although the effect of peak injury pressure on neurological outcome has been examined in the fluid percussion injury (FPI) model, it is unknown whether differences in rate of rise of the injury waveform modify cellular and physiological changes after TBI. Using a programmable FPI device, we examined juvenile rats subjected to a constant peak pressure at two rates of injury: a standard FPI rate of rise and a faster rate of rise to the same peak pressure. Immediate postinjury assessment identified fewer seizures and relatively brief loss of consciousness after fast-rise injuries than after standard-rise injuries at similar peak pressures. Compared with rats injured at standard rise, fewer silver-stained injured neuronal profiles and degenerating hilar neurons were observed 4-6 hr after fast-rise FPI. However, 1 week postinjury, both fast- and standard-rise FPI resulted in hilar cell loss and enhanced perforant path-evoked granule cell field excitability compared with sham controls. Notably, the extent of neuronal loss and increase in dentate excitability were not different between rats injured at fast and standard rates of rise to peak pressure. Our data indicate that reduced cellular damage and improved immediate neurological outcome after fast rising primary concussive injuries mask the severity of the subsequent cellular and neurophysiological pathology and may be unreliable as a predictor of prognosis. PMID:24799156

  7. Green`s function for a switched plasma medium and a perturbation technique for the study of wave propagation in a transient plasma with a small rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    The main effect of switching a medium (creating a temporal discontinuity in the properties of a medium) is the splitting of the source (incident) wave into new waves whose frequencies are different. Lightning induced effects in the ionosphere cause a temporary enhancement of ionization. Such transient plasmas have a time-varying plasma frequency {omega}{sub p} (t) with a rise time T{sub r}. If the period t{sub 0} of a source wave existing before the transient effect begins is much larger than the rise time, the ionization change may be idealized as a sudden switching of the medium. The solution to this initial value problem with a step-change in the electron density profile is known and this profile will be considered as a reference profile. The topic of this paper is the solution of the initial value problem when t{sub 0} is comparable to the rise time T{sub r}. The initial motivation for investigating the problem is given below. There is considerable interest in the ionospheric physics community to investigate the recently discovered Sprites phenomenon which are red emissions in the lower D region induced by the lightning discharges from a cloud to the ground. The preliminary indications are that the Sprite is a plasma with electron density enhanced by about 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 3}/cc in a rise time of about 100 {micro}s.

  8. Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

  9. From RISING to the DESPEC fast-timing project within NUSTAR at FAIR: sub-nanosecond nuclear timing spectroscopy with LaBr3 scintillators.

    PubMed

    Regan, P H

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarises a presentation given at the IRRMA8 conference in June 2011 which reviewed briefly the topic of current research studies in the evolution of nuclear structure with changing proton and neutron numbers. A short review of relevant contemporary spectroscopic studies of the structure of nuclei with highly exotic N/Z ratios using projectile fragmentation and fission reactions is given, together with an overview of some of the physics research aims to be attacked using the proposed Decay Spectroscopy (DESPEC) LaBr3 Fast-Timing gamma-ray array for the NUSTAR project at the upcoming Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR). Examples of recent results using both 'isomer' and β--delayed gamma-ray decay measurements with the Stopped RISING hyper-pure germanium array at GSI are summarised and used to highlight some of the fundamental physics studies which are expected to become available in this area of research in the coming decade. Examples of the performance of cerium-doped LaBr3 detectors from 'in-beam' test experiments are presented together with initial plans for the geometry of the planned multi-detector LaBr3(Ce) array for DESPEC. PMID:22285659

  10. Note: A rectangular pulse generator for 50 kV voltage, 0.8 ns rise time, and 10 ns pulse width based on polymer-film switch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Cong, Peitian; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we describe a rectangular pulse generator, consisting of a polymer-film switch, a tri-plate transmission line, and parallel post-shaped ceramic resistor load, for 50-kV voltage, 0.8-ns rise time, and 10-ns width. The switch and resistors are arranged in atmospheric air and the transmission line can work in atmospheric air or in transformer oil to change the pulse width from 6.7 ns to 10 ns. The fast switching and low-inductance characteristics of the polymer-film switch ensure the fast rising wavefront of <1 ns. This generator can be applied in the calibration of nanosecond voltage dividers and used for electromagnetic pulse tests as a fast-rising current injection source. PMID:26521006

  11. Ciguatera Incidence in the US Virgin Islands Has Not Increased over a 30-Year Time Period Despite Rising Seawater Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Elizabeth G.; Grattan, Lynn M.; Cook, Robert L.; Smith, Tyler B.; Anderson, Donald M.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most common marine food poisoning worldwide. It has been hypothesized that increasing seawater temperature will result in increasing ciguatera incidence. In St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, we performed an island-wide telephone survey (N = 807) and a medical record review of diagnosed ciguatera cases at the emergency department of the sole hospital and compared these data with comparable data sources collected in 1980. Annual incidence from both recent data sources remained high (12 per 1,000 among adults in the telephone survey). However, the combined data sources suggest that incidence has declined by 20% or more or remained stable over 30 years, whereas seawater temperatures were increasing. Illness was associated with lower education levels, higher levels of fish consumption, and having previous episodes of ciguatera; population shifts from 1980 to 2010 in these factors could explain an incidence decline of approximately 3 per 1,000, obscuring effects from rising seawater temperature. PMID:23400575

  12. "Their Rising Voices": A Study of Civil Rights, Social Movements, and Advertising in the "New York Times."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Susan Dente

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on social movements, the strategic use of advertising, and journalism by documenting strategic use of advertising in the "New York Times" by the civil rights movement between 1955 and 1961. Finds that the ads framed the civil rights movement to prime the audience to receive radical messages from marginalized speakers.…

  13. Extended Time as a Testing Accommodation for Students with Reading Disabilities: Does a Rising Tide Lift All Ships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.; Lovett, Benjamin J.; Rogers, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    Testing accommodations have become a common component of services for students with disabilities at all levels of education. This study examined the effect of a common testing accommodation--extended time--on the reading comprehension test performance of high school students. Sixty-four students, half of whom had learning disabilities (LDs) in the…

  14. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  15. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    PubMed

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  16. Fault plane orientations of small earthquakes of the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) seismic sequence from P-wave polarities and rise times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippucci, Marilena; de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Boschi, Enzo

    2006-07-01

    A two-step technique has been developed with the aim of retrieving the fault plane orientation of a small-magnitude earthquake. The technique uses a set of non-linear equations, which relate the rise times of first P waves to source parameters (source dimension L, dip δ and strike φ of the fault) and intrinsic Qp. At the first step of the technique, the inversion of P polarities provides two fault plane orientations for each focal mechanism solution. At the second step, the inversion of rise times is carried out to retrieve L and Qp by fixing δ and φ to the values of the fault plane orientation inferred at the first step. A robust analysis, based on the random deviates technique, allows us to evaluate if one fault plane exists which systematically better fits data and can be considered the `true' fault plane. A parameter is introduced to quantify the level of resolution of the `true' fault plane. A probabilistic approach, based on the assumption that errors on data are Gaussian distributed, allows us to a posteriori validate or reject the `true' fault plane. The technique has been applied to 47 small earthquakes (1.3 < ML < 3.9) occurred below the town of Sellano, during the 1997 Umbria-Marche (Central Italy) seismic crisis. The strike of the inferred fault planes is generally along the Apennine direction. Fault plane solutions can be mainly subdivided into two groups: a first group of SW-dipping faults and a second group of NE-dipping faults. These results agree with the present day knowledge of the fault systems in the area. An average Qp equal to 354 +/- 63 has been estimated, in agreement with previous attenuation studies.

  17. Development of the N1–P2 auditory evoked response to amplitude rise time and rate of formant transition of speech sounds

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Allen L.; Shahin, Antoine J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the development of weighting strategies for acoustic cues by examining the morphology of the N1–P2 auditory evoked potential (AEP) to changes in amplitude rise time (ART) and rate of formant transition (RFT) of consonant–vowel (CV) pairsin4–6-year olds and adults. In the AEP session, individuals listened passively to the CVs /ba/, /wa/, and a /ba/ with a superimposed slower-rising /wa/ envelope (/ba/wa). In the behavioral session, individuals listened to the same stimuli and judged whether they heard a /ba/ or /wa/. We hypothesized that a developmental shift in weighting strategies should be reflected in a change in the morphology of the N1–P2 AEP. In 6-year olds and adults, the N1–P2 amplitude at the vertex reflected a change in RFT but not in ART. In contrast, in the 4–5-year olds, the vertex N1–P2 did not show specificity to changes in ART or RFT. In all groups, the N1–P2 amplitude at channel C4 (right hemisphere) reflected a change in ART but not in RFT. Behaviorally, 6-year olds and adults predominately utilized RFT cues (classified /ba/wa as /ba/) during phonetic judgments, as opposed to 4–5-year olds which utilized both cues equally. Our findings suggest that both ART and RFT are encoded in the auditory cortex, but an N1–P2 shift toward the vertex following age 4–5 indicates a shift toward an adult-like weighting strategy, such that, to utilize RFT to a greater extent. PMID:23570734

  18. Melting Ice, Rising Seas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Sea level rise is an indicator that our planet is warming. Much of the world's population lives on or near the coast, and rising seas are something worth watching. Sea level can rise for two reason...

  19. Sonic-boom measurements in the focus region during the ascent of Apollo 17. [maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bow-shock rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sonic-boom pressure signatures recorded during the ascent phase of Apollo 17 are presented. The measurements were obtained onboard six U.S. Navy ships positioned along the ground track of the spacecraft vehicle in the area of expected focus resulting from the flight path and acceleration of the vehicle. Tracings of the measured signatures are presented along with values of the maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bowshock rise time. Also included are brief descriptions of the ships and their location, the deployment of the sonic-boom instrumentation, flight profiles and operating conditions for the launch vehicle and spacecraft, surface-weather and sea-state information at the measuring sites, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas. Comparisons of the measured and predicted sonic-boom overpressures for the Apollo 17 mission are presented. The measured data are also compared with data from the Apollo 15 and 16 missions and data from flight test programs of various aircraft.

  20. Optimal battery charging, Part I: Minimizing time-to-charge, energy loss, and temperature rise for OCV-resistance battery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, A.; Han, X.; Avvari, G. V.; Raghunathan, N.; Balasingam, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a closed-form solution to the problem of optimally charging a Li-ion battery. A combination of three cost functions is considered as the objective function: time-to-charge (TTC), energy losses (EL), and a temperature rise index (TRI). First, we consider the cost function of the optimization problem as a weighted sum of TTC and EL. We show that the optimal charging strategy in this case is the well-known Constant Current-Constant Voltage (CC-CV) policy with the value of the current in the CC stage being a function of the ratio of weighting on TTC and EL and of the resistance of the battery. Then, we extend the cost function to a weighted sum of TTC, EL and TRI and derive an analytical solution for the problem. It is shown that the analytical solution can be approximated by a CC-CV with the value of current in the CC stage being a function of ratio of weighting on TTC and EL, resistance of the battery and the effective thermal resistance.

  1. Contemporary sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Anny; Llovel, William

    2010-01-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing observations have become available. Here we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level observations from tide gauges over the twentieth century and from satellite altimetry since the early 1990s. We next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on timescales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion of the oceans, land ice mass loss, and land water-storage change. We show that for the 1993-2007 time span, the sum of climate-related contributions (2.85 +/- 0.35 mm year(-1)) is only slightly less than altimetry-based sea level rise (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm year(-1)): approximately 30% of the observed rate of rise is due to ocean thermal expansion and approximately 55% results from land ice melt. Recent acceleration in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets increases the latter contribution up to 80% for the past five years. We also review the main causes of regional variability in sea level trends: The dominant contribution results from nonuniform changes in ocean thermal expansion.

  2. Hydrological Characteristics of Recurrent Slope Lineae on Mars Based on Time-Resolved HiRISE Analyses and Comparisons with Fluid Flow Through an Antarctic Terrestrial Analog Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, J. S.; Fountain, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    We test the "wet" (brine-related) RSL formation mechanism by using repeat HiRISE images to determine whether a simple Darcy flow model can explain the spatial pattern of RSL darkening. This remote hydrogeological tool is verified in Antarctic soil.

  3. Structural Theories and Race-Specific Drug Arrests: What Structural Factors Account for the Rise in Race-Specific Drug Arrests over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Karen F.; Maggard, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies examining the structural correlates of urban crime have generated a large body of research; however, few studies have linked the structural conditions to race-specific drug arrests. In this study, the authors examine the impact of urban disadvantage, social disorganization, and racial threat indicators on the rise in race-specific drug…

  4. Time-resolved photoluminescence from self-assembled Ge(Si) islands in multilayer SiGe/Si and SiGe/SOI structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonskiy, A. N. Baidakova, N. A.; Novikov, A. V.; Lobanov, D. N.

    2013-11-15

    The results of a study of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the photoluminescence (PL) from multilayer structures with self-assembled Ge(Si) islands grown on silicon and 'silicon-on-insulator' substrates in relation to temperature and the excitation-light wavelength are presented. A substantial increase in island-related PL intensity is observed for structures with Ge(Si) islands grown on silicon substrates upon an increase in temperature from 4 to 70 K. This increase is due to the diffusion of nonequilibrium carriers from the silicon substrate into the active layer with the islands. In this case, a slow component with a characteristic time of {approx}100 ns appears in the PL rise kinetics. At the same time, no slow component in the PL rise kinetics and no rise in the PL intensity with increasing temperature are observed for structures grown on 'silicon-on-insulator' substrates, in which the active layer with the islands is insulated from the silicon substrate. It is found that absorption of the excitation light in the islands and SiGe wetting layers mainly contributes to the excitation of the PL signal from the islands under sub-bandgap optical pump conditions.

  5. Paleoposition of the northern margin of Armorica in Late Devonian times: Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Frankenstein Intrusive Complex (Mid-German Crystalline Rise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwing, Alexander; Bachtadse, Valerian

    2000-09-01

    A detailed rockmagnetic and paleomagnetic study of the Frankenstein Intrusive Complex (FIC, 363±7 Ma in age), southwestern Germany, has been carried out in order to test whether the paleomagnetic declinations within the internal parts of the European Variscides follow a common trend controlled by the structural grain of the orogen or whether the distribution of declinations follows a random pattern. In addition, new paleomagnetic data will contribute to further refine the drift history of the Armorican Terrane Assemblage during late Paleozoic times. The unmetamorphosed Frankenstein Igneous Complex forms part of the Mid-German Crystalline Rise within the Armorican Terrane Assemblage, amalgamated to Avalonia and Baltica during the Variscan orogeny, Stepwise thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization experiments identify four components (A, B, Cn, and Cr) of magnetization. Component A is a recent viscous overprint that parallels the present-day geomagnetic field. The high unblocking temperatures of A in some samples can be explained by the presence of multidomain magnetite. Component B is carried by hematite and is considered to be a late Carboniferous remagnetization. Components Cr and Cn, found in 110 samples from 20 sites, are antiparallel and pass a class C reversal test. Their primary origin is further supported by a contact test. Cr and Cn have maximum unblocking temperatures of up to 580°C and occasionally above over 600°C, indicating magnetite and hematite to carry the characteristic remanent magnetization. Ore microscopy revealed that primary hematite lamellae in ilmenite carry Cr and Cn and that a secondary generation of hematite is the carrier of B. The overall site mean direction of Cr and Cn (20 sites) based on endpoints and remagnetization circle analysis of 198°/40° (declination/inclination) with a 95% confidence limit (α95) of 4.9° and a precision parameter (k) of 45.0 defines a paleopole at 15°S, 9°W. When comparing to the apparent

  6. Ground potential rise monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachery W.; Zevenbergen, Gary A.

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  7. The rising risks of rising tides

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.; Lindh, G.

    1996-12-31

    The erosion of beaches, flooding of agricultural land, and intrusion of saltwater into coastal streams could become a reality if temperatures climb. Over the past century, sea levels have risen 4 to 6 inches. Now, the Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts that sea levels will rise between 8 and 28 inches by 2070, say Hans Hanson, associate professor emeritus in the Department of Water Resources Engineering at the University of Lund in Sweden. Coastal communities, which harbor more than half the world`s population, are poorly equipped to combat the threat of encroaching waters. {open_quotes}Few public officials have developed comprehensive strategies to address the potential consequences of sea-level rise,{close_quotes} the authors say. In response to the lack of long-term strategies to address the potential consequences of sea-level rise,{close_quotes} the authors say. In response to the lack of long-term strategies, the IPCC has recommended that coastal nations implement coastal-zone management plans by 2000. {open_quotes}Low-lying islands and high-use, developed coastal areas... face an urgent need to develop strategies for coping with sea-level rise,{close_quotes} the authors conclude.

  8. Systematic investigation of effects of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering on photoluminescence rise times of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Masaaki Ohno, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-07

    We have systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of free excitons in GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As single quantum wells, focusing on the energy relaxation process due to exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering under non-resonant and weak excitation conditions as a function of GaAs-layer thickness from 3.6 to 12.0 nm and temperature from 30 to 50 K. The free exciton characteristics were confirmed by observation that the PL decay time has a linear dependence with temperature. We found that the free exciton PL rise rate, which is the reciprocal of the rise time, is inversely linear with the GaAs-layer thickness and linear with temperature. This is consistent with a reported theoretical study of the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate in the energy relaxation process in quantum wells. Consequently, it is conclusively verified that the PL rise rate is dominated by the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate. In addition, from quantitative analysis of the GaAs-layer thickness and temperature dependences, we suggest that the PL rise rate reflects the number of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering events.

  9. Acronical Risings and Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    A concept found in historical primary sources, and useful in contemporary historiography, is the acronical rising and setting of stars (or planets). Topocentric terms, they provide information about a star's relationship to the Sun and thus its visibility in the sky. Yet there remains ambiguity as to what these two phrases actually mean. "Acronical” is said to have come from the Greek akros ("point,” "summit,” or "extremity") and nux ("night"). While all sources agree that the word is originally Greek, there are alternate etymologies for it. A more serious difficulty with acronical rising and setting is that there are two competing definitions. One I call the Poetical Definition. Acronical rising (or setting) is one of the three Poetical Risings (or Settings) known to classicists. (The other two are cosmical rising/setting, discussed below, and the more familiar helical rising/setting.) The term "poetical" refers to these words use in classical poetry, e. g., that of Columella, Hesiod, Ovid, Pliny the Younger, and Virgil. The Poetical Definition of "acronical” usually is meant in this context. The Poetical Definition of "acronical” is as follows: When a star rises as the Sun sets, it rises acronically. When a star sets as the Sun sets, it sets acronically. In contrast with the Poetical Definition, there also is what I call the Astronomical Definition. The Astronomical Definition is somewhat more likely to appear in astronomical, mathematical, or navigational works. When the Astronomical Definition is recorded in dictionaries, it is often with the protasis "In astronomy, . . . ." The Astronomical Definition of "acronical” is as follows: When a star rises as the Sun sets, it rises acronically. When a star sets as the Sun rises, it sets acronically. I will attempt to sort this all out in my talk.

  10. Processing time using Datatrieve-11, clunks, and FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Horning, R.R.; Goode, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    Although Datatrieve-11 processes dates with 100-ns resolution using clunks, it has no provision for processing time. This paper describes a set of Datatrieve-11 procedures and FORTRAN-callable subroutines for handling time, as well as dates, expressed in clunks. Although the FORTRAN-callable subroutines use RMS modules, these modules can be extracted from the appropriate RMS library, allowing FORTRAN programs to be linked to an FCS library instead of to RMS.

  11. Tharsis Rise Graben

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 22 May 2002) The Science This image is located in the northwestern portion of the Tharsis Rise at about 12 N and 125 W (235 E). What is immediately noticeable in this image is the series of linear features that are called graben. These features are associated with crustal extension which results in a series of up and down blocks of crust that run perpendicular to the direction of the extension. Images of Mars have shown a large number of these tectonic features concentrated on or near the Tharsis region. The Tharsis region is an enormous bulge that causes major tectonic disruptions across the planet when it tries to settle down from its height and reach equilibrium with the rest of the planet. The graben in this image display a number of preferential directions indicating that the crustal stresses that caused the graben have changed over time. By examining the cross-cutting relationships between the features, it is possible to reassemble the history of the area. The Story Now, if you thought that Mars was almost perfectly round, think again! The red planet has a large bulge sticking out from it called Tharsis. Almost 3,000 miles across, this enormous region rises almost four miles above the average radius of the planet. That's quite a bulge! Since Tharsis the land of the largest volcanoes in the solar system, it may have been formed by both the uplift of land from tectonic action and the build-up of lava flows. Tharsis can cause some pretty major tectonic disruptions across the planet when it tries to settle down from its height and reach a better equilibrium with the rest of the planet. In this image, located in the northwestern portion of the Tharsis Rise, a whole lot of lowered features stripe the landscape. They are called grabens, and formed when the crust of the planet was stretched tectonically. This kind of crustal extension (or stretching) tends to form a series of up-and-down blocks of crust that run perpendicular to the direction of the crustal

  12. Antarctic ice rise formation, evolution, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic ice rises originate from the contact between ice shelves and one of the numerous topographic highs emerging from the edge of the continental shelf. While investigations of the Raymond effect indicate their millennial-scale stability, little is known about their formation and their role in ice shelf stability. Here we present for the first time the simulation of an ice rise using the BISICLES model. The numerical results successfully reproduce several field-observable features, such as the substantial thinning downstream of the ice rise and the successive formation of a promontory and ice rise with stable radial ice flow center, showing that ice rises are formed during the ice sheet deglaciation. We quantify the ice rise buttressing effect, found to be mostly transient, delaying grounding line retreat significantly but resulting in comparable steady state positions. We demonstrate that ice rises are key in controlling simulations of Antarctic deglaciation.

  13. Perceptual Temporal Asymmetry Associated with Distinct ON and OFF Responses to Time-Varying Sounds with Rising versus Falling Intensity: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Bing; Koerner, Tess K; Schlauch, Robert S; Tanaka, Keita; Kawakatsu, Masaki; Nemoto, Iku; Imada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated evoked ON and OFF responses to ramped and damped sounds in normal-hearing human adults. Two pairs of stimuli that differed in spectral complexity were used in a passive listening task; each pair contained identical acoustical properties except for the intensity envelope. Behavioral duration judgment was conducted in separate sessions, which replicated the perceptual bias in favour of the ramped sounds and the effect of spectral complexity on perceived duration asymmetry. MEG results showed similar cortical sites for the ON and OFF responses. There was a dominant ON response with stronger phase-locking factor (PLF) in the alpha (8-14 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) bands for the damped sounds. In contrast, the OFF response for sounds with rising intensity was associated with stronger PLF in the gamma band (30-70 Hz). Exploratory correlation analysis showed that the OFF response in the left auditory cortex was a good predictor of the perceived temporal asymmetry for the spectrally simpler pair. The results indicate distinct asymmetry in ON and OFF responses and neural oscillation patterns associated with the dynamic intensity changes, which provides important preliminary data for future studies to examine how the auditory system develops such an asymmetry as a function of age and learning experience and whether the absence of asymmetry or abnormal ON and OFF responses can be taken as a biomarker for certain neurological conditions associated with auditory processing deficits. PMID:27527227

  14. Perceptual Temporal Asymmetry Associated with Distinct ON and OFF Responses to Time-Varying Sounds with Rising versus Falling Intensity: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Bing; Koerner, Tess K; Schlauch, Robert S; Tanaka, Keita; Kawakatsu, Masaki; Nemoto, Iku; Imada, Toshiaki

    2016-08-05

    This magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated evoked ON and OFF responses to ramped and damped sounds in normal-hearing human adults. Two pairs of stimuli that differed in spectral complexity were used in a passive listening task; each pair contained identical acoustical properties except for the intensity envelope. Behavioral duration judgment was conducted in separate sessions, which replicated the perceptual bias in favour of the ramped sounds and the effect of spectral complexity on perceived duration asymmetry. MEG results showed similar cortical sites for the ON and OFF responses. There was a dominant ON response with stronger phase-locking factor (PLF) in the alpha (8-14 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) bands for the damped sounds. In contrast, the OFF response for sounds with rising intensity was associated with stronger PLF in the gamma band (30-70 Hz). Exploratory correlation analysis showed that the OFF response in the left auditory cortex was a good predictor of the perceived temporal asymmetry for the spectrally simpler pair. The results indicate distinct asymmetry in ON and OFF responses and neural oscillation patterns associated with the dynamic intensity changes, which provides important preliminary data for future studies to examine how the auditory system develops such an asymmetry as a function of age and learning experience and whether the absence of asymmetry or abnormal ON and OFF responses can be taken as a biomarker for certain neurological conditions associated with auditory processing deficits.

  15. Perceptual Temporal Asymmetry Associated with Distinct ON and OFF Responses to Time-Varying Sounds with Rising versus Falling Intensity: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Bing; Koerner, Tess K.; Schlauch, Robert S.; Tanaka, Keita; Kawakatsu, Masaki; Nemoto, Iku; Imada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated evoked ON and OFF responses to ramped and damped sounds in normal-hearing human adults. Two pairs of stimuli that differed in spectral complexity were used in a passive listening task; each pair contained identical acoustical properties except for the intensity envelope. Behavioral duration judgment was conducted in separate sessions, which replicated the perceptual bias in favour of the ramped sounds and the effect of spectral complexity on perceived duration asymmetry. MEG results showed similar cortical sites for the ON and OFF responses. There was a dominant ON response with stronger phase-locking factor (PLF) in the alpha (8–14 Hz) and theta (4–8 Hz) bands for the damped sounds. In contrast, the OFF response for sounds with rising intensity was associated with stronger PLF in the gamma band (30–70 Hz). Exploratory correlation analysis showed that the OFF response in the left auditory cortex was a good predictor of the perceived temporal asymmetry for the spectrally simpler pair. The results indicate distinct asymmetry in ON and OFF responses and neural oscillation patterns associated with the dynamic intensity changes, which provides important preliminary data for future studies to examine how the auditory system develops such an asymmetry as a function of age and learning experience and whether the absence of asymmetry or abnormal ON and OFF responses can be taken as a biomarker for certain neurological conditions associated with auditory processing deficits. PMID:27527227

  16. High speed electrostatic photomultiplier tube for the 1.06 micrometer wavelength. Cup and slat dynode chain combined with flat cathode and coax output produces 0.25 nsec rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, S. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Varian cup and slat dynode chain was modified to have a flat cathode. These modifications were incorporated in an all-electrostatic photomultiplier tube having a rise time of 0.25 n sec. The tube delivered under the contract had a flat S-20 opaque cathode with a useful diameter of 5 mm. The design of the tube is such that a III to V cathode support is mounted in place of the existing cathode substrate. This cathode support is designed to accept a transferred III to V cathode and maintain the cathode surface in the same position as the S-20 photocathode.

  17. Global sea level rise

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, B.C. )

    1991-04-15

    Published values for the long-term, global mean sea level rise determined from tide gauge records exhibit considerable scatter, from about 1 mm to 3 mm/yr. This disparity is not attributable to instrument error; long-term trends computed at adjacent sites often agree to within a few tenths of a millimeter per year. Instead, the differing estimates of global sea level rise appear to be in large part due to authors' using data from gauges located at convergent tectonic plate boundaries, where changes of land elevation give fictitious sea level trends. In addition, virtually all gauges undergo subsidence or uplift due to postglacial rebound (PGR) from the last deglaciation at a rate comparable to or greater than the secular rise of sea level. Modeling PGR by the ICE-3G model of Tushingham and Peltier (1991) and avoiding tide gauge records in areas of converging tectonic plates produces a highly consistent set of long sea level records. The value for mean sea level rise obtained from a global set of 21 such stations in nine oceanic regions with an average record length of 76 years during the period 1880-1980 is 1.8 mm/yr {plus minus} 0.1. This result provides confidence that carefully selected long tide gauge records measure the same underlying trend of sea level and that many old tide gauge records are of very high quality.

  18. Simple approximations for estimating quickly the motion and timing of salt diapir rise, overhang development, and associated thermal anomalies using present-day observations: Case history from the Gulf of Mexico and Danish North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, I. ); Thomsen, R.O. )

    1993-09-01

    Estimates of the upward motion of salt, due solely to buoyancy forces, through deposited and depositing sedimentary cover can be split into several parts: the critical thickness of sedimentary cover necessary to cause an underlying salt to become buoyant; the critical thickness of sedimentary cover necessary for a salt diapir to reach the sediment mudline in the absence of an impeding pressure of competent sediments opposing salt rise and in the absence of significant overpressure (both differential impedance and differential overpressure will slow the rise of the salt to the mudline); the effective speed of motion of the salt through the nonimpeding sediments during the salt's buoyant-ascent phase; current observed salt-top depth below mudline versus nonimpeded predicted salt-top depth leading to (a) minimum estimate of mechanical strength of competent resistive layers, and (b) an approximate estimate of buoyancy pressure of salt attempting to penetrate the resistive cover layer; uplift estimate of the overlying competent sediments because of the buoyancy pressure, in relation to observed uplift, leading to an estimate of salt-diapir rise speed since reaching the impeding formation; timing estimates of [open quotes]mushroom cap[close quotes] development of salt since emplacement of the resistive overlying layer and an estimate of the lateral competence of sedimentary beds ahead of the mushroom-salt sheet cap as a consequence of the observed mushroom extent; an estimate of evolving thermal anomalies around the dynamic salt/sediment system as a consequence of high-salt thermal conductivity. Such simple rough estimation methods are important in assessing the local and regional factors influencing the dynamic, thermal, and hydrocarbon retention factors in basinal sediments influenced by salt. Examples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Danish North Sea illustrate how to use both seismic and/or downhole data to perform the simple estimates.

  19. Sea Level Rise in Tuvalu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. C.; Ho, C. R.; Cheng, Y. H.

    2012-04-01

    Most people, especially for Pacific Islanders, are aware of the sea level change which may caused by many factors, but no of them has deeper sensation of flooding than Tuvaluan. Tuvalu, a coral country, consists of nine low-lying islands in the central Pacific between the latitudes of 5 and 10 degrees south, has the average elevation of 2 meters (South Pacific Sea Level and Climate Monitoring Project, SPSLCMP report, 2006) up to sea level. Meanwhile, the maximum sea level recorded was 3.44m on February 28th 2006 that damaged Tuvaluan's property badly. Local people called the flooding water oozes up out of the ground "King Tide", that happened almost once or twice a year, which destroyed the plant, polluted their fresh water, and forced them to colonize to some other countries. The predictable but uncontrollable king tide had been observed for a long time by SPSLCMP, but some of the uncertainties which intensify the sea level rise need to be analyzed furthermore. In this study, a span of 18 years of tide gauge data accessed from Sea Level Fine Resolution Acoustic Measuring Equipment (SEAFRAME) are compared with the satellite altimeter data accessed from Archiving Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Data in Oceanography (AVISO). All above are processed under the limitation of same time and spatial range. The outcome revealed a 9.26cm difference between both. After the tide gauge data shifted to the same base as altimeter data, the results showed the unknown residuals are always positive under the circumstances of the sea level rise above 3.2m. Apart from uncertainties in observing, the residual reflected unknown contributions. Among the total case number of sea level rise above 3.2m is 23 times, 22 of which were recorded with oceanic warm eddy happened simultaneously. The unknown residual seems precisely matched with oceanic warm eddies and illustrates a clear future approach for Tuvaluan to care for.

  20. Superconducting, fast rise-time voltage source

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, R.M.

    1983-01-25

    A pulse generator comprises a toroid of a superconducting material such as niobium on a glass or ceramic substrate. A cryogenic source such as liquid helium cools the toroid to within a few degrees of absolute zero and a perpetually circulatory current is set up in the toroid. A laser beam is fired at the toroid to cause localized heating and the resultant current drop due to the material resistance causes an output pulse to be induced in an adjacent current winding.

  1. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, G.J.; Sampayan, S.E.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-10-13

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 12 figs.

  2. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  3. Was the economic crisis 1997-1998 responsible for rising suicide rates in East/Southeast Asia? A time-trend analysis for Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Sen; Gunnell, David; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Cheng, Andrew T A

    2009-04-01

    In 1997-1998 a widespread economic crisis hit the economies of many East/Southeast Asian countries; its impact on suicide rates across the region has not been systematically documented. We investigated the impact of the Asian economic crisis (1997-1998) on suicide in Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Thailand. Suicide and population data for the period 1985-2006 were extracted from the World Health Organisation's mortality database and Taiwanese mortality statistics. Sex-specific age-standardised suicide rates for people aged 15years or above were analysed using joinpoint regression. Trends in divorce, marriage, unemployment, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and alcohol consumption were compared with trends in suicide rates graphically and using time-series analysis. Suicide mortality decreased in the late 1980s and early 1990s but subsequently increased markedly in all countries except Singapore, which had steadily declining suicide rates throughout the study period. Compared to 1997, male rates in 1998 rose by 39% in Japan, 44% in Hong Kong and 45% in Korea; rises in female rates were less marked. Male rates also rose in Thailand, but accurate data were incomplete. The economic crisis was associated with 10,400 more suicides in 1998 compared to 1997 in Japan, Hong Kong and Korea. Similar increases in suicide rates were not seen in Taiwan and Singapore, the two countries where the economic crisis had a smaller impact on GDP and unemployment. Time-series analyses indicated that some of the crisis's impact on male suicides was attributable to increases in unemployment. These findings suggest an association of the Asian economic crisis with a sharp increase in suicide mortality in some, but not all, East/Southeast Asian countries, and that these increases were most closely associated with rises in unemployment.

  4. Four-dimensional visualization of rising microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, Jung Ho; Jung, Ji Won; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Lim, Jae-Hong

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional imaging, which indicates imaging in three spatial dimensions as a function of time, provides useful evidence to investigate the interactions of rising bubbles. However, this has been largely unexplored for microbubbles, mostly due to problems associated with strong light scattering and shallow depth of field in optical imaging. Here, we developed tracking x-ray microtomography that is capable of visualizing rising microbubbles in four dimensions. Bubbles are tracked by moving the in-situ cell to account for their rise velocity. The sizes, shapes, time-dependent positions, and velocities of individual rising microbubbles are clearly identified, despite substantial overlaps between bubbles in the field of view. Our tracking x-ray microtomography affords opportunities for understanding bubble-bubble (or particle) interactions at microscales - important in various fields such as microfluidics, biomechanics, and floatation.

  5. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  6. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  7. Safety Rises to New Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafo, Joseph; Robillard, Marc

    2001-01-01

    Explains how high-rise residence halls can provide high-level safety and security at colleges and universities. Boston University is used to illustrate high-rise security and fire protection issues. (GR)

  8. Measurement of DNA Translocation Dynamics in a Solid-State Nanopore at 100 ns Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Drndić, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2016-07-13

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics. PMID:27332998

  9. Measurement of DNA Translocation Dynamics in a Solid-State Nanopore at 100 ns Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Drndić, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2016-07-13

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics.

  10. Investigation of cosmic rays in very short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltonen, J.; Valtonen, E.; Torsti, J. J.; Arvela, H.; Lumme, M.; Nieminen, M.; Vainikka, E.

    1985-01-01

    A fast databuffer system, where cosmic ray events in the Turku hadron spectrometer, including particle arrival times are recorded with time resolution of 100 ns was constructed. The databuffer can be read continuously by a microprocessor, which preanalyzes the data and transfers it to the main computer. The time span, that can be analyzed in every detail, is a few seconds. The high time resolution enables a study of time correlated groups of high energy particles. In addition the operational characteristics of the spectrometer can be monitored in detail.

  11. Arrested Bubble Rise in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamstaes, Catherine; Eggers, Jens

    2016-06-01

    If a long air bubble is placed inside a vertical tube closed at the top it can rise by displacing the fluid above it. However, Bretherton found that if the tube radius, R, is smaller than a critical value Rc=0.918 ℓ_c , where ℓ_c=√{γ /ρ g} is the capillary length, there is no solution corresponding to steady rise. Experimentally, the bubble rise appears to have stopped altogether. Here we explain this observation by studying the unsteady bubble motion for Rrise in infinite time remains very small, giving the appearance of arrested motion.

  12. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  13. Calculation of Temperature Rise in Calorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.; Witt, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Gives a simple but fuller account of the basis for accurately calculating temperature rise in calorimetry. Points out some misconceptions regarding these calculations. Describes two basic methods, the extrapolation to zero time and the equal area method. Discusses the theoretical basis of each and their underlying assumptions. (CW)

  14. The Silver Lining in Rising Health Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Don

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the emotional, financial, and structural reasons that health care costs in the United States, and therefore for colleges, continue to rise at staggering rates. Asserts that colleges must build health care cost reality into budget strategy, and level with constituents that there will not be a solution for the cost explosion any time soon.…

  15. States' Budgets Reflect Rising Tax Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Many state budgets are reaping the benefits of tax revenues that are rising faster than at any time since the economic slowdown ended. Overall tax collections by states rose by 11.7 percent in the first quarter of 2005, giving the legislatures extra cash to shore up school aid, increase teacher pay, and finance new initiatives such as full-day…

  16. HiRISE: The People's Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Eliason, E.; Gulick, V. C.; Spinoza, Y.; Beyer, R. A.; HiRISE Team

    2010-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, orbiting Mars since 2006 on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), has returned more than 17,000 large images with scales as small as 25 cm/pixel. From it’s beginning, the HiRISE team has followed “The People’s Camera” concept, with rapid release of useful images, explanations, and tools, and facilitating public image suggestions. The camera includes 14 CCDs, each read out into 2 data channels, so compressed images are returned from MRO as 28 long (up to 120,000 line) images that are 1024 pixels wide (or binned 2x2 to 512 pixels, etc.). This raw data is very difficult to use, especially for the public. At the HiRISE operations center the raw data are calibrated and processed into a series of B&W and color products, including browse images and JPEG2000-compressed images and tools to make it easy for everyone to explore these enormous images (see http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/). Automated pipelines do all of this processing, so we can keep up with the high data rate; images go directly to the format of the Planetary Data System (PDS). After students visually check each image product for errors, they are fully released just 1 month after receipt; captioned images (written by science team members) may be released sooner. These processed HiRISE images have been incorporated into tools such as Google Mars and World Wide Telescope for even greater accessibility. 51 Digital Terrain Models derived from HiRISE stereo pairs have been released, resulting in some spectacular flyover movies produced by members of the public and viewed up to 50,000 times according to YouTube. Public targeting began in 2007 via NASA Quest (http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/HiRISE/quest/) and more than 200 images have been acquired, mostly by students and educators. At the beginning of 2010 we released HiWish (http://www.uahirise.org/hiwish/), opening HiRISE targeting to anyone in the world with Internet access, and already more

  17. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  18. Rising cigarette prices and rising obesity: coincidence or unintended consequence?

    PubMed

    Courtemanche, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Economists have begun to debate if the rise in cigarette prices in the U.S. in recent decades has contributed to the nation's rise in obesity, reaching conclusions that are surprisingly sensitive to specification. I show that allowing for the effect to occur gradually over several years leads to the conclusion that a rise in cigarette prices is actually associated with a long-run reduction in body mass index and obesity. This result is robust to the different methodologies used in the literature. I also provide evidence that indirect effects on exercise and food consumption may explain the counterintuitive result.

  19. Explaining Alberta's rising mesothelioma rates.

    PubMed

    Cree, M; Lalji, M; Jiang, B; Carriere, K C; Beach, J; Kamruzzaman, A

    2009-01-01

    Although mesothelioma rates have been rising worldwide, little is known about mesothelioma trends in Alberta. This population-based descriptive study used Alberta Cancer Board Registry data from 1980 to 2004 to develop an age-period-cohort model of male pleural mesothelioma incidence rates over time. Both age and cohort effects are associated with incidence rates. The highest-risk cohort comprised men born between 1930 and 1939, reflecting widespread asbestos use and exposure beginning in the 1940s in Canada. We predict that 1393 Albertan men 40 years and older will die of pleural mesothelioma between 1980 and 2024; 783 (56.2%) of these deaths will occur between 2010 and 2024. The total number of mesothelioma deaths in Alberta will be higher when all age groups, both sexes, and all disease sites are included, with numbers likely peaking sometime between 2015 and 2019. In addition to the ongoing efforts that focus on eliminating asbestos-related disease in Alberta, the challenge is to implement surveillance systems to prevent future epidemics of preventable occupational cancers in Alberta.

  20. Rising Food Prices: Who's Responsible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1973-01-01

    Rise in food prices can be partially attributed to the high food consumption level throughout Europe and North America, coupled with failure to evolve systems for more production of cattle, soybeans, and fisheries at lower cost. (PS)

  1. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  2. High-efficiency and compact semiconductor lasers with monolithically integrated switches for generation of high-power nanosecond pulses in time-of-flight (TOF) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipchenko, Sergey; Podoskin, Aleksandr; Soboleva, Olga; Zakharov, Maxim S.; Bakhvalov, Kirill; Romanovich, Dmitrii; Pikhtin, Nikita; Tarasov, Il`ya; Bagaev, Timur; Ladugin, Maxim; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr; Simakov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We present a new approach based on the integration of the functions of a high-efficiency current switch and a laser emitter into a single heterostructure as elements of time-of-flight (TOF) systems. The approach being developed employs the effect of an electrical bistability, which occurs in the general case in thyristor structures. We report recent results obtained in a study of the dynamic electrical and optical characteristics of the pulsed sources we developed. An effective generation of 2- to 100-ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 905 nm is demonstrated. The possibility of generating laser pulses shorter than 1 ns is considered. The maximum peak power reached values of 7 and 50 W for 10- and 100-ns pulses, respectively.

  3. Late Noachian development of the Coprates rise, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Schultz, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    The Coprates rise forms a 900 km long, north to northeast trending ridge south of Coprates Chasma between long. 56 and 60 degs. Radar and stereo photogrammetric data indicate that the rise is 2 to 4 km above a neighboring trough to the east. The break in slope between the rise and this trough is well defined topographically and in Viking images. In turn, the trough is bordered to the to the east at long. 52 deg by a much gentler rise. West of the Coprates rise, the terrain dips about 0.2 deg to roughly long. 75 deg. The rise and flanking highs were previously interpreted to be tilted fault blocks formed by either Tharsis tectonism or an ancient impact. Results are now reported of a preliminary geologic study that documents Late Noachian growth of the Coprates rise as a asymmetric fold. More comprehensive work will lead to a mechanical analysis of the kinematic development of the rise. It is concluded that the Coprate rise formed during the Late Noachian by 2 to 4 km of asymmetric uplift (steeper on its east flank). The timing is inconsistent with an origin by an early impact, but it coincides in time with early Tharsis centered radial faulting at Syria Planum.

  4. Bottlenecks aggravate rising construction costs

    SciTech Connect

    2008-05-15

    Rising demand for power in developing countries combined with concerns about carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants in developed countries have created a bonanza for carbon-light technologies, including nuclear, renewables and natural gas plants. This, in turn, has put upward pressure on the price of natural gas in key markets while resulting in shortages in critical components for building renewables and nuclear reactors. Globalization of the power industry means that pressures in one segment or one region translate into shortages and rising prices everywhere else.

  5. High-Rising Rec Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Examines how tight urban sites can yield sports spaces that favorably compare to their more rural campus counterparts. Potential areas of concern when recreation centers are reconfigured into high-rise structures are highlighted, including building codes, building access, noise control, building costs, and lighting. (GR)

  6. The Rise of Blog Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the growth of blogs in popular culture, and the fact that they are becoming more widely accepted in the media industry. The rise and popularity of blogs--short for "Web logs"--are causing journalism educators to overhaul their teachings. In fact, blogging's influence varies from one university program to the next, just like…

  7. Temperature rise of installed FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Report discusses temperature profiles of installed FCC for wood and tile surfaces. Three-conductor FCC was tested at twice nominal current-carrying capacity over bare floor and under carpet, with result indicating that temperature rise is not a linear function of current with FCC at this level.

  8. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  9. Post-Cromerian rise in sea level

    SciTech Connect

    Olausson, E.

    1992-03-01

    The intensified cooling in the northern hemisphere during the Elsterian-Saalian ice ages (isotopic stages 22-6) resulted in a reduction of the Antarctic ice sheet by 10-15 x 106 km3, equal to a rise in sea level by about 40 m. This rise in sea level changed the hydrography of the Black Sea during the late Pleistocene warmer times, caused anoxic conditions in the eastern Mediterranean during the corresponding warming-up phases, and enhanced water transport of less saline water from the Pacific into the Arctic Ocean (the present sill depth of the Bering Strait is about 50 m). The increased supply of less saline water strengthened the halocline in the Arctic Ocean, increasing the sea ice there and, by higher albedo, its cooling effect on the adjacent continents.

  10. Falling and Rising in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2010-01-01

    When an object is immersed in a liquid and released, it may sink to the bottom or rise to the surface and float. If the object's density is greater than that of the liquid, it sinks. If the object's density is less than the density of the liquid, it floats. In the special case when the object's density matches the density of the liquid, it will…

  11. Biomechanical analyses of rising from a chair.

    PubMed

    Schultz, A B; Alexander, N B; Ashton-Miller, J A

    1992-12-01

    Quantification of the biomechanical factors that underlie the inability to rise from a chair can help explain why this disability occurs and can aid in the design of chairs and of therapeutic intervention programs. Experimental data collected earlier from 17 young adult and two groups of elderly subjects, 23 healthy and 11 impaired, rising from a standard chair under controlled conditions were analyzed using a planar biomechanical model. The joint torque strength requirements and the location of the floor reaction force at liftoff from the seat in the different groups and under several conditions were calculated. Analyses were also made of how body configurations and the use of hand force affect these joint torques and reaction locations. In all three groups, the required torques at liftoff were modest compared to literature data on voluntary strengths. Among the three groups rising with the use of hands, at the time of liftoff from the seat, the impaired old subjects, on an average, placed the reaction force the most anterior, the healthy old subjects placed it intermediately and the young subjects placed it the least anterior, within the foot support area. Moreover, the results suggest that, at liftoff, all subjects placed more importance on locating the floor reaction force to achieve acceptable postural stability than on diminishing the magnitudes of the needed joint muscle strengths.

  12. Temperature rise and wear of sliding contact of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Arindam Roy; Sardar, Santanu; Karmakar, Santanu Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The tribo-failure of machine elements under relative sliding velocities is greatly affected by frictional heating and resultant contact temperature rise. Nevertheless, the tribo-failure of automotive components is a combined effect of mechanical, thermal and chemical phenomena. Over the decades, there have been developed a number of different mathematical models for predicting surface temperature rise at sliding contact under different geometries of asperity contacts and operating conditions. The experimental investigation is still relevant today to find out the surface temperature rise at sliding contact along with the outcomes of friction and wear under various operating conditions for real time applications. The present work aims at finding average surface temperature rise at different sliding velocities, normal loads with different surface roughness experimentally. It also involves to prepare two different rough surfaces of alloy steels and to study their influences in the process of generating contact temperature rise under a given operating conditions.

  13. Rise, stagnation, and rise of Danish women's life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Rau, Roland; Jeune, Bernard; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Lenart, Adam; Christensen, Kaare; Vaupel, James W

    2016-04-12

    Health conditions change from year to year, with a general tendency in many countries for improvement. These conditions also change from one birth cohort to another: some generations suffer more adverse events in childhood, smoke more heavily, eat poorer diets, etc., than generations born earlier or later. Because it is difficult to disentangle period effects from cohort effects, demographers, epidemiologists, actuaries, and other population scientists often disagree about cohort effects' relative importance. In particular, some advocate forecasts of life expectancy based on period trends; others favor forecasts that hinge on cohort differences. We use a combination of age decomposition and exchange of survival probabilities between countries to study the remarkable recent history of female life expectancy in Denmark, a saga of rising, stagnating, and now again rising lifespans. The gap between female life expectancy in Denmark vs. Sweden grew to 3.5 y in the period 1975-2000. When we assumed that Danish women born 1915-1945 had the same survival probabilities as Swedish women, the gap remained small and roughly constant. Hence, the lower Danish life expectancy is caused by these cohorts and is not attributable to period effects.

  14. Martian Heat on the Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows that the atmospheric temperatures above the surface of Mars at Gusev Crater, Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's landing site, fluctuate to a significant degree. The color red denotes warmer temperatures, while blue is cooler. The red and yellow waves of color represent thermals, or pockets of heat, which rise and fall across the surface. These data, acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, help scientists understand how the bottom layer of air closest to the surface behaves and interacts with global winds.

  15. Drainage in a rising foam.

    PubMed

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; Rouyer, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2016-01-21

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheology of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile as a function of height. The theoretical profiles are very different if the interfaces are considered as mobile or rigid, but all of our experimental profiles are described by the model with mobile interfaces. Even the systems with dodecanol are well known to behave as rigid in forced drainage experiments. This is because in rising foams the liquid fraction profile is fixed by the flux at the bottom of the foam. Here the foam is wet with higher permeability and the interfaces are not in equilibrium. These results demonstrate once again that it is not only the surfactant system that controls the mobility of the interface, but also the hydrodynamic problem under consideration. For example liquid flow through the foam during generation or in forced drainage is intrinsically different. PMID:26554500

  16. Microbiology of salt rising bread.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory; Bardwell, Genevieve; McClane, Bruce; Brown, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Salt rising bread (SRB) is an Appalachian traditional bread made without yeast, using a starter derived from flour, milk and potatoes. The "rising agent" has been identified as Clostridium perfringens, not salt, and is presumably derived from the environment. Although no cases of illness have been attributed to SRB, C. perfringens type A is a common cause of food poisoning from meats and gravies. Other C. perfringens isolates may cause enteritis necroticans (pig-bel disease) and gas gangrene. Past research documents that pathogenic strains derived from wounds may be used to produce bread and that bacteria isolated from this bread retain their pathogenicity. SRB starter samples were cultured at the University of Pittsburgh and abundant C. perfringens, type A grew out of all samples. However none of the cultures were positive for enterotoxin and thus would be unlikely to cause human food borne disease. While this does not preclude the possibility of other starter mixes containing enteropathogenic strains, the baking process appears to reduce bacterial contamination to safe levels and SRB has not been implicated in causing any human disease.

  17. A composition analyzer for microparticles using a spark ion source. [using time of flight spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.; Berg, O. E.

    1975-01-01

    Iron microparticles were fired onto a capacitor-type microparticle detector which responded to an impact with a spark discharge. Ion currents were extracted from the spark and analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectra showed the element of both detector and particle materials. The total extracted ion currents was typically 10A within a period of 100ns, indicating very efficient vaporization of the particle and ionization of the vapor. Potential applications include research on cosmic dust, atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets, particles ejected by rocket or jet engines, by machining processes, or by nuclear bomb explosions.

  18. Pulsar timing sensitivity to very-low-frequency gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jenet, Fredrick A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-04-15

    We compute the sensitivity, constrained by instrumental, propagation, and other fundamental noises, of pulsar timing to very-low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Reaching predicted GW signal strengths will require suppression of time-of-arrival fluctuations caused by interstellar plasma turbulence and a reduction of white rms timing noise to < or approx. 100 ns. Assuming negligible intrinsic pulsar rotational noise, perfect time transfer from time standard to observatory, and stable pulse profiles, the resulting single-pulsar signal-to-noise ratio=1 sensitivity is limited by terrestrial time standards at h{sub rms}{approx}2x10{sup -16} [f/ (1 cycle/year)]-1/2 for f<3x10{sup -8} Hz, where f is the Fourier frequency and a bandwidth of 1 cycle/(10 years) is assumed. Since this sensitivity is comparable to predicted GW signal levels, a reliable detection will require substantial signal-to-noise ratio improvement via pulsar timing array.

  19. Large Topographic Rises on Venus: Implications for Mantle Upwelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Bindschandler, Duane L.; Senske, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Topographic rises on Venus have been identified that are interpreted to be the surface manifestation of mantle upwellings. These features are classified into groups based on their dominant morphology. Atla and Beta Regiones are classified as rift-dominated, Dione, western Eistla, Bell, and Imdr Regiones as volcano-dominated, and Themis, eastern Eistla, and central Eistla Regiones as corona-dominated. At several topographic rises, geologic indicators were identified that may provide evidence of uplifted topography (e.g., volcanic flow features trending upslope). We assessed the minimum contribution of volcanic construction to the topography of each rise, which in general represents less than 5% of the volume of the rise, similar to the volumes of edifices at terrestrial hotspot swells. The total melt volume at each rise is approximated to be 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) cu km. The variations in morphology, topography, and gravity signatures at topographic rises are not interpreted to indicate variations in stage of evolution of a mantle upwelling. Instead, the morphologic variations between the three classes of topographic rises are interpreted to indicate the varying influences of lithospheric structure, plume characteristics, and regional tectonic environment. Within each class, variations in topography, gravity, and amount of volcanism may be indicative of differing stages of evolution. The similarity between swell and volcanic volumes for terrestrial and Venusian hotspots implies comparable time-integrated plume strengths for individual upwellings on the two planets.

  20. Parkinson's Rates Rising Among American Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159464.html Parkinson's Rates Rising Among American Men Smoking is known to help shield against the ... disease may be on the rise for U.S. men over the past three decades, and the trend ...

  1. The rising fastball: baseball's impossible pitch.

    PubMed

    McBeath, M K

    1990-01-01

    Batters in professional baseball are confronted with pitches that appear to curve, dip, wobble, or rise. The rising fastball is a pitch where the ball appears to hop up as much as a third of a meter with a sudden increase in speed. Physics experiments confirm that many reported trajectories are possible, but not the rising fastball. The present paper shows how the apparent rise may be explained as a perceptual illusion due to the hitter underestimating original speed of the pitch.

  2. Stochastic secular trends in sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Victor; Zorita, Eduardo; Heimbach, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Global mean sea level (GMSL) has been rising since (at least) the nineteenth century and the rate of rise may be increasing. Several studies that attempt to explain the long-term trend of GMSL during the instrumental record share the common assumption that this trend is deterministic in nature and different from natural variations. Here we show that the trend can alternatively be explained, at least in part, as being caused by random variations within the coupled ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system, and hence not having a deterministic origin. These random trends, which add to externally forced changes (e.g., through anthropogenic climate change), are a consequence of the integrated character of GMSL, which is the cumulative addition of temporal contributions that exhibit random character, and whose integration results in GMSL variations with persistence on decadal-centennial time scales. The generation of trends by integration of random stationary noise (i.e., even in a constant climate) is a robust and fundamental feature of stochastically forced systems with memory. The integrated character of GMSL results in an intrinsic difficulty in distinguishing internal from externally forced trends.

  3. High resolution rainfall measurements around a high rise building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Stijn; van de Giesen, Nick; Hut, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    A number of disdrometers (acoustic rain gauge) has been placed around a high rise building on a place where variation in spatial distribution of precipitation is expected, to show the advantage of high resolution rainfall measurements in a urban area. The standard recommendation for the placement of a rain gauge is that the gauge is positioned at a distance corresponding to two to four times the height of any nearby obstruction to obtain a measurement that is representative for the surrounding area. In an urban area it is almost impossible to find a location that suits this recommendation. Rain measurements in urban area with a high spatial resolution are desired, to obtain a better understanding of urban hydrology, but costs may be prohibitive. A low cost disdrometer has been developed to make it affordable to perform rain measurements with a very high spatial and temporal resolution. The disdrometer is tested around a high rise building on the Delft University of Technology campus. The faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EWI) on the campus of Delft University of Technology consists of a high rise building of 90 meters and a low rise building of 15 meters. Sensors are placed on the low rise building to measure the impact of the high rise building on the spatial distribution of precipitation. In addition to the disdrometer, two other methods are used to measure precipitation differences around the high rise building. Tipping bucket rain gauges have been placed on two elevator shaft housings on the low rise building, of which one is situated in the shadow of the high rise building. Simultaneously, runoff from the elevator shafts is measured. A comparison of the different methods will be presented.

  4. Large Volcanic Rises on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    1997-01-01

    Large volcanic rises on Venus have been interpreted as hotspots, or the surface manifestation of mantle upwelling, on the basis of their broad topographic rises, abundant volcanism, and large positive gravity anomalies. Hotspots offer an important opportunity to study the behavior of the lithosphere in response to mantle forces. In addition to the four previously known hotspots, Atla, Bell, Beta, and western Eistla Regiones, five new probable hotspots, Dione, central Eistla, eastern Eistla, Imdr, and Themis, have been identified in the Magellan radar, gravity and topography data. These nine regions exhibit a wider range of volcano-tectonic characteristics than previously recognized for venusian hotspots, and have been classified as rift-dominated (Atla, Beta), coronae-dominated (central and eastern Eistla, Themis), or volcano-dominated (Bell, Dione, western Eistla, Imdr). The apparent depths of compensation for these regions ranges from 65 to 260 km. New estimates of the elastic thickness, using the 90 deg and order spherical harmonic field, are 15-40 km at Bell Regio, and 25 km at western Eistla Regio. Phillips et al. find a value of 30 km at Atla Regio. Numerous models of lithospheric and mantle behavior have been proposed to interpret the gravity and topography signature of the hotspots, with most studies focusing on Atla or Beta Regiones. Convective models with Earth-like parameters result in estimates of the thickness of the thermal lithosphere of approximately 100 km. Models of stagnant lid convection or thermal thinning infer the thickness of the thermal lithosphere to be 300 km or more. Without additional constraints, any of the model fits are equally valid. The thinner thermal lithosphere estimates are most consistent with the volcanic and tectonic characteristics of the hotspots. Estimates of the thermal gradient based on estimates of the elastic thickness also support a relatively thin lithosphere (Phillips et al.). The advantage of larger estimates of

  5. Pulsating proton aurora caused by rising tone Pc1 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Omura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    We found rising tone emissions with a dispersion of ˜1 Hz per several tens of seconds in the dynamic spectrum of a Pc1 geomagnetic pulsation (Pc1) observed on the ground. These Pc1 rising tones were successively observed over ˜30 min from 0250 UT on 14 October 2006 by an induction magnetometer at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude 61.7°N). Simultaneously, a Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms panchromatic (THEMIS) all-sky camera detected pulsations of an isolated proton aurora with a period of several tens of seconds, ˜10% variations in intensity, and fine structures of 3° in magnetic longitudes. The pulsations of the proton aurora close to the zenith of ATH have one-to-one correspondences with the Pc1 rising tones. This suggests that these rising tones scatter magnetospheric protons intermittently at the equatorial region. The radial motion of the magnetospheric source, of which the isolated proton aurora is a projection, can explain the central frequency increase of Pc1, but not the shorter period (tens of seconds) frequency increase of ˜1 Hz in Pc1 rising tones. We suggest that EMIC-triggered emissions generate the frequency increase of Pc1 rising tones on the ground and that they also cause the Pc1 pearl structure, which has a similar characteristic time.

  6. Thermal lens measurements in liquids on a submicrosecond time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Isak, S. J.; Komorowski, S. J.; Merrow, C. N.; Poston, P. E.; Eyring, E. M.

    1989-03-01

    The use of the thermal lens method is shown to be quite suitable for kinetic studies of quenching on a submicrosecond time scale. The lower limit of time resolution that can be achieved is determined by the acoustic transit time, /tau//sub /ital a//, in the medium. A thermal lens signal with a 100-ns time constant due to the quenched triplet state of benzophenone is readily measured. The thermal lens method is superior to the photoacoustic (PA) method in the breadth of the accessible time range, and in the significantly fewer measurements required to obtain accurate data, including no requirement for a reference sample; it is also less sensitive to geometrical and laser power requirements than is the PA method.

  7. Geochemistry and age of Shatsky, Hess, and Ojin Rise seamounts: Implications for a connection between the Shatsky and Hess Rises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Geldmacher, Jörg; Hauff, Folkmar; Heaton, Daniel; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Hoernle, Kaj; Heydolph, Ken; Sager, William W.

    2016-07-01

    Shatsky Rise in the Northwest Pacific is the best example so far of an oceanic plateau with two potential hotspot tracks emanating from it: the linear Papanin volcanic ridge and the seamounts comprising Ojin Rise. Arguably, these hotspot tracks also project toward the direction of Hess Rise, located ∼1200 km away, leading to speculations that the two plateaus are connected. Dredging was conducted on the massifs and seamounts around Shatsky Rise in an effort to understand the relationship between these plateaus and associated seamounts. Here, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages and trace element and Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic data for the recovered dredged rocks and new trace elements and isotopic data for a few drill core samples from Hess Rise. Chemically, the samples can be subdivided into plateau basalt-like tholeiites and trachytic to alkalic ocean-island basalt compositions, indicating at least two types of volcanic activity. Tholeiites from the northern Hess Rise (DSDP Site 464) and the trachytes from Toronto Ridge on Shatsky's TAMU massif have isotopic compositions that overlap with those of the drilled Shatsky Rise plateau basalts, suggesting that both Rises formed from the same mantle source. In contrast, trachytes from the southern Hess Rise (DSDP Site 465A) have more radiogenic Pb isotopic ratios that are shifted toward a high time-integrated U/Pb (HIMU-type mantle) composition. The compositions of the dredged seamount samples show two trends relative to Shatsky Rise data: one toward lower 143Nd/144Nd but similar 206Pb/204Pb ratios, the other toward similar 143Nd/144Nd but more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratios. These trends can be attributed to lower degrees of melting either from lower mantle material during hotspot-related transition to plume tail or from less refractory shallow mantle components tapped during intermittent deformation-related volcanism induced by local tectonic extension between and after the main volcanic-edifice building episodes on Shatsky

  8. Plume rise measurements at turbigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfossi, D.

    The fourth C.E.C. campaign on remote sensing of air pollution, organized jointly by ENEL and the Commission of European Communities, was held at Turbigo (northern Italy) during September 1979. This paper presents analyses of plume measurements obtained during that campaign by the ENEL groundbased Lidar. The five stacks of Turbigo Power Plant have different heights and emission parameters and their plumes usually combine, so a model for multiple sources developed by D. Anfossi et al. (1978, Atmospheric Environment12, 1821-1826) was used to predict the plume rises. These predictions are compared with the observations. Measurements of σy and σz over the first 1000 m are compared with the curves derived from other observations in the Po Valley, using the no-lift balloon technique over the same range of downwind distance. Skewness and kurtosis distributions are shown, both along the vertical and the horizontal directions. In order to show the plume structure in more detail, we present two examples of Lidar-derived cross sections and the corresponding vertically and horizontally integrated concentration profiles.

  9. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  10. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  11. A modified infrared spectrometer with high time resolution and its application for investigating fast conformational changes of the GTPase Ras.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of proteins and protein interactions. The investigation of many biological processes is possible by means of caged compounds, which set free biologically active substances upon light activation. Some caged compounds could provide sub-nanosecond time resolution, e.g., para-hydroxyphenacyl-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) forms GTP in picoseconds. However, the time resolution in single shot experiments with rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers is limited to about 10 ms. Here we use an infrared diode laser instead of the conventional globar and achieve a time resolution of 100 ns. This allows for the time-resolved measurement of the fast Ras(off) to Ras(on) conformational change at room temperature. We quantified the activation parameters for this reaction and found that the free energy of activation for this reaction is mainly enthalpic. Investigation of the same reaction in the presence of the Ras binding domain of the effector Raf (RafRBD) reveals a four orders of magnitude faster reaction, indicating that Ras·RafRBD complex formation directly induces the conformational change. Recent developments of broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers will further improve time resolution and usability of the setup. The reported 100 ns time resolution is the best achieved for a non-repetitive experiment so far.

  12. An improved microfluidics approach for monitoring real-time interaction profiles of ultrafast molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Rakshit, Surajit; Kar, Shantimoy; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Our study illustrates the development of a microfluidics (MF) platform combining fluorescence microscopy and femtosecond/picosecond-resolved spectroscopy to investigate ultrafast chemical processes in liquid-phase diffusion-controlled reactions. By controlling the flow rates of two reactants in a specially designed MF chip, sub-100 ns time resolution for the exploration of chemical intermediates of the reaction in the MF channel has been achieved. Our system clearly rules out the possibility of formation of any intermediate reaction product in a so-called fast ionic reaction between sodium hydroxide and phenolphthalein, and reveals a microsecond time scale associated with the formation of the reaction product. We have also used the developed system for the investigation of intermediate states in the molecular recognition of various macromolecular self-assemblies (micelles) and genomic DNA by small organic ligands (Hoechst 33258 and ethidium bromide). We propose our MF-based system to be an alternative to the existing millisecond-resolved "stopped-flow" technique for a broad range of time-resolved (sub-100 ns to minutes) experiments on complex chemical/biological systems.

  13. Stable plume rise in a shear layer.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J

    2007-03-01

    Solutions are given for plume rise assuming a power-law wind speed profile in a stably stratified layer for point and finite sources with initial vertical momentum and buoyancy. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume rise equations in a stable atmosphere. In a shear layer, the point of maximum rise occurs further downwind and is slightly lower compared with the plume rise with a constant wind speed equal to the wind speed at the top of the stack. If the predictions with shear are compared with predictions for an equivalent average wind speed over the depth of the plume, the plume rise with shear is higher than plume rise with an equivalent average wind speed.

  14. Rising drug costs: the impact on dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rico, M J

    2000-01-01

    In the US prescription drug costs are rising faster than any other component of health care expenditures, and show no signs of slowing. Spending on prescription drugs has been estimated by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to be rising by approximately 12% per year, more than twice the rate for national health care expenditures (5.1%). Factors driving the rise in prescription drug costs include the introduction of new drugs, and consumer demand. PMID:10785406

  15. The rising fastball: baseball's impossible pitch.

    PubMed

    McBeath, M K

    1990-01-01

    Batters in professional baseball are confronted with pitches that appear to curve, dip, wobble, or rise. The rising fastball is a pitch where the ball appears to hop up as much as a third of a meter with a sudden increase in speed. Physics experiments confirm that many reported trajectories are possible, but not the rising fastball. The present paper shows how the apparent rise may be explained as a perceptual illusion due to the hitter underestimating original speed of the pitch. PMID:2096372

  16. The Rise of the CISO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Doug

    2007-01-01

    The late 1980s was an exciting time to be a CIO in higher education. Computing was being decentralized as microcomputers replaced mainframes, networking was emerging, and the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET) was introducing the concept of an "internet" to hundreds of thousands of new users. Security wasn't much of an issue; the big…

  17. Research on fast rise time EMP radiating-wave simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lisi; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Yun

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an antenna of High altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) radiating-wave simulator which expands the testing zone larger than the traditional transmission line simulator. The numerical results show that traverse electramagnetic (TEM) antenna can be used to radiate HEMP simulation radiating wave, but in low frequency band the emissive capability is poor. The experiment proves the numerical model is valid. The results of this paper show that TEM antenna can be used to HEMP radiating-wave simulator, and can prove the low frequency radiation capability through resistance loaded method.

  18. Does falling smoking lead to rising obesity?

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jonathan; Frakes, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The strong negative correlation over time between smoking rates and obesity have led some to suggest that reduced smoking is increasing weight gain in the U.S. This conclusion is supported by the findings of Chou et al. [Chou, S.-Y., Grossman, M., Saffer, H., 2004. An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Journal of Health Economics 23, 565-587], who conclude that higher cigarette prices lead to increased body weight. We investigate this issue and find no evidence that reduced smoking leads to weight gain. Using the cigarette tax rather than the cigarette price and controlling for non-linear time effects, we find a negative effect of cigarette taxes on body weight, implying that reduced smoking leads to lower body weights. Yet our results, as well as Chou et al., imply implausibly large effects of smoking on body weight. Thus, we cannot confirm that falling smoking leads in a major way to rising obesity rates in the U.S.

  19. BUNCH PATTERNS AND PRESSURE RISE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.IRISO-ARIZ,U.

    2004-07-05

    The RHIC luminosity is limited by pressure rises with high intensity beams. At injection and store, the dominating cause for the pressure rise was shown to be electron clouds. We discuss bunch distributions along the circumference that minimize the electron cloud effect in RHIC. Simulation results are compared with operational observations.

  20. Global coastal hazards from future sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornitz, Vivien

    1991-03-01

    A rise of sea level between 0.3 and 0.9 m by the end of the next century, caused by predicted greenhouse climate warming, would endanger human populations, cities, ports, and wetlands in low-lying coastal areas, through inundation, erosion and salinization. The consequences of a global sea level rise would be spatially non-uniform because of local or regional vertical crustal movements, differential resistance to erosion, varying wave climates, and changeable longshore currents. Although many factors can influence sea level, leading to a noisy record, various studies utilizing tide-gauge data find an average global rate of sea level rise of 1-2 mm/yr, over the last 100 years. This trend is part of a general rise over the last 300 years, since the low point of the Little Ice Age. Sea level rise may accelerate 3-8 times over present rates, within the next century. The permanently inundated coastal zone would extend to a depth equivalent to the vertical rise in sea level. Major river deltas, coastal wetlands and coral islands would be most affected. Episodic flooding by storm waves and surges would penetrate even farther inland. Beach and cliff erosion will be accentuated. Saltwater penetration into coastal aquifers and estuaries could contaminate urban water supplies and affect agricultural production. Research on relative risks and impacts of sea level rise on specific localities is still at an early stage. Development of a global coastal hazards data base, intended to provide an overview of the relative vulnerabilities of the world's coastlines, is described in this paper. To date, information on seven variables, associated with inundation and erosion hazards, has been compiled for the U.S., and parts of Canada and Mexico. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) has been designed to flag high risk coastal segments. Preliminary results are presented for the eastern United States, as a test case.

  1. The rise of model protozoa.

    PubMed

    Montagnes, David; Roberts, Emily; Lukeš, Julius; Lowe, Chris

    2012-04-01

    It is timely to evaluate the role of protozoa as model organisms given their diversity, abundance and versatility as well as the economic and ethical pressures placed on animal-based experimentation. We first define the term model organism and then examine through examples why protozoa make good models. Our examples reflect major issues including evolution, ecology, population and community biology, disease, the role of organelles, ageing, space travel, toxicity and teaching. We conclude by recognising that although protozoa may in some cases not completely mimic tissue- or whole-animal-level processes, they are extremely flexible and their use should be embraced. Finally, we offer advice on obtaining emergent model protozoa.

  2. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration.

    PubMed

    Harris, W S; Garate, E P; Heidbrink, W W; McWilliams, R; Roche, T; Trask, E; Zhang, Yang

    2008-10-01

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 micros chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, DeltaE/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  3. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W. S.; Garate, E. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Zhang Yang

    2008-10-15

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 {mu}s chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, {delta}E/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  4. Timescales for detecting a significant acceleration in sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Ivan D; Wahl, Thomas; Rohling, Eelco J; Price, René M; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B; Calafat, Francisco M; Dangendorf, Sönke

    2014-04-14

    There is observational evidence that global sea level is rising and there is concern that the rate of rise will increase, significantly threatening coastal communities. However, considerable debate remains as to whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing and, if so, by how much. Here we provide new insights into sea level accelerations by applying the main methods that have been used previously to search for accelerations in historical data, to identify the timings (with uncertainties) at which accelerations might first be recognized in a statistically significant manner (if not apparent already) in sea level records that we have artificially extended to 2100. We find that the most important approach to earliest possible detection of a significant sea level acceleration lies in improved understanding (and subsequent removal) of interannual to multidecadal variability in sea level records.

  5. Timescales for detecting a significant acceleration in sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Ivan D; Wahl, Thomas; Rohling, Eelco J; Price, René M; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B; Calafat, Francisco M; Dangendorf, Sönke

    2014-01-01

    There is observational evidence that global sea level is rising and there is concern that the rate of rise will increase, significantly threatening coastal communities. However, considerable debate remains as to whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing and, if so, by how much. Here we provide new insights into sea level accelerations by applying the main methods that have been used previously to search for accelerations in historical data, to identify the timings (with uncertainties) at which accelerations might first be recognized in a statistically significant manner (if not apparent already) in sea level records that we have artificially extended to 2100. We find that the most important approach to earliest possible detection of a significant sea level acceleration lies in improved understanding (and subsequent removal) of interannual to multidecadal variability in sea level records. PMID:24728012

  6. Timescales for detecting a significant acceleration in sea level rise

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Ivan D.; Wahl, Thomas; Rohling, Eelco J.; Price, René M.; Pattiaratchi, Charitha B.; Calafat, Francisco M.; Dangendorf, Sönke

    2014-01-01

    There is observational evidence that global sea level is rising and there is concern that the rate of rise will increase, significantly threatening coastal communities. However, considerable debate remains as to whether the rate of sea level rise is currently increasing and, if so, by how much. Here we provide new insights into sea level accelerations by applying the main methods that have been used previously to search for accelerations in historical data, to identify the timings (with uncertainties) at which accelerations might first be recognized in a statistically significant manner (if not apparent already) in sea level records that we have artificially extended to 2100. We find that the most important approach to earliest possible detection of a significant sea level acceleration lies in improved understanding (and subsequent removal) of interannual to multidecadal variability in sea level records. PMID:24728012

  7. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Burke, Sarah; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David

    2010-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband system (APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision, with four pulsars having rms residuals of less than or about 100 ns and 13 less than 1 microsecond. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project.

  8. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Hobbs, George; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Champion, David; Burke, Sarah; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan

    2009-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision, with three pulsars having rms residuals of less than or about 100 ns and more than half less than 1 microsecond. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project.

  9. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Hobbs, George; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Hotan, Aidan; Jenet, Rick; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Champion, David; You, Xiaopeng; Burke, Sarah

    2009-04-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision, with three pulsars having rms residuals of less than or about 100 ns and more than half less than 1 microsecond. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project.

  10. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Hobbs, George; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Jenet, Rick; van Straten, Willem; Yardley, Daniel Roger Billing; Burke, Sarah; Oslowski, Stefan; Hotan, Aidan; Champion, David

    2010-04-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision, with four pulsars having rms residuals of less than or about 100 ns and 13 less than 1 microsecond. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project.

  11. Recent sedimentation on the new jersey slope and rise.

    PubMed

    Stanley, D J; Nelsen, T A; Stuckenrath, R

    1984-10-12

    Radiocarbon dating and sedimentological studies of closely spaced cores indicate movement during the Holocene of sediments on the New Jersey continental slope and upper rise between Wilmington and Lindenkohl canyons. The uneven time-stratigraphic thickness of the late Quaternary sediment sections between cores and the nonuniform deposition rate at any given core site and among core sites show that the sediment blanket in canyon and intercanyon areas has been affected by downslope, gravity-driven pocesses during the Holocene to the present. The reduced rate of deposition on the slope and upper rise between the late Pleistocene and the present is largely due to decreased off-shelf transport in response to the eustatic rise in sea level. Very old radiocarbon dates at core tops result from emplacement of older reworked materials from upslope or from truncation of sections by mass wasting processes exposing older material at the sea floor. These processes also account for an irregular sequence of dated sections within cores and stratigraphic irregularities of the surficial cover from core to core. Marked variability in deposition rates on the slope and upper rise is largely a function of topographic configuration, proximity and accessibility to sediment source, and transport processes seaward of the shelf break. Moreover, higher accumulation rates on the upper rise are attributed primarily to slope bypassing. Bypassing, prevalent during the late Pleistocene, has continued periodically to the present.

  12. Preferential amplification of rising versus falling frequency whistler mode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. D.; Harid, V.; Spasojevic, M.; Gołkowski, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of ground-based ELF/VLF observations of injected whistler mode waves from the 1986 Siple Station experiment demonstrates the preferential magnetospheric amplification of rising over descending frequency-time ramps. From examining conjugate region receptions of ±1 kHz/s frequency-time ramps, we find that rising ramps generate an average total power 1.9 times higher than that of falling frequency ramps when both are observed during a transmission. And in 17% of receptions, only rising ramps are observed above the noise floor. Furthermore, the amplification ratio inversely correlates with the noise and total signal power. Using a narrowband Vlasov-Maxwell numerical simulation, we explore the preferential amplification due to differences in linear growth rate as a function of frequency, relative to the frequency which maximizes the linear growth rate for a given anisotropy, and in nonlinear phase trapping. These results contribute to the understanding of magnetospheric wave amplification and the preference for structured rising elements in chorus.

  13. RADIOACTIVELY POWERED RISING LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-11-10

    The rising luminosity of the recent, nearby supernova 2011fe shows a quadratic dependence with time during the first Almost-Equal-To 0.5-4 days. In addition, studies of the composite light curves formed from stacking together many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have found similar power-law indices for the rise, but may also show some dispersion that may indicate diversity. I explore what range of power-law rises are possible due to the presence of radioactive material near the surface of the exploding white dwarf (WD). I summarize what constraints such a model places on the structure of the progenitor and the distribution and velocity of ejecta. My main conclusion is that for the inferred explosion time for SN 2011fe, its rise requires an increasing mass fraction X {sub 56} Almost-Equal-To (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} of {sup 56}Ni distributed between a depth of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} and 0.3 M {sub Sun} below the WD's surface. Radioactive elements this shallow are not found in simulations of a single C/O detonation. Scenarios that may produce this material include helium-shell burning during a double-detonation ignition, a gravitationally confined detonation, and a subset of deflagration to detonation transition models. In general, the power-law rise can differ from quadratic depending on the details of the velocity, density, and radioactive deposition gradients in a given event. Therefore, comparisons of this work with observed bolometric rises of SNe Ia would place strong constraints on the properties of the shallow outer layers, providing important clues for identifying the elusive progenitors of SNe Ia.

  14. Ampicillin: Rise Fall and Resurgence

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

  15. Airport cleanup rises above problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, N.; Lucas, B.; Frumer, B.; Roth, R.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers used a treatment combination to improve the in-situ bioremediation system`s efficiency in removing underground fuel leaks at JFK Airport. John F. Kennedy International Airport, in New York City, on Jamaica Bay, has an above-ground storage capacity of about 32 million gallons of jet fuel, which flow through about 50 miles of high-pressure underground pipe to the central terminal area. EAch terminal`s fuel hydrant system was the major source os subsurface contamination at the site. The site is covered by 1 to 1.5 feet of reinforced concrete pavement. Liquid phase jet fuel (free product) was measured on the water table with true thickness ranging from less than 1 inch to 1 foot. After analysis of core samples, contamination was found adsorbed to the soil with maximum levels at the water table. This article describes the clean up, covering the following topics: microbial conditions during system operation; above-ground treatment challenges: free product emulsification, presence of biomass; evaluation of enhancements: dissolved air floatation, coagulation and flocculation, retention time adjustments; conclusions.

  16. Drivers of Pontocaspian Biodiversity Rise and Demise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselingh, Frank; Flecker, Rachel; Wilke, Thomas; Leroy, Suzanne; Krijgsman, Wout; Stoica, Marius

    2015-04-01

    In the past two million years, the region of the Black Sea Basin, Caspian Basin and adjacent Anatolia and the Balkans were the stage of the evolution of a unique brackish water fauna, the so-called Pontocaspian fauna. The fauna is the result of assembly of genera with a Paratethyan origin and Anatolian origins during the Early Pleistocene. The rapid diversification of the Pontocaspian fauna is the result of the very dynamic nature of the lakes (the Caspian Sea is technically a lake) and seas in the region in the past two million years. In most times the various lake basins were isolated (like today), but in other episodes connections existed. Regional and global climate as well as the regional tectonic regimes were main drivers of lake basin evolution. Over the past 80 years a major biodiversity crisis is hitting the Pontocaspian faunas due to environmental degradation, pollution and invasive species. In the new EU-ETN PRIDE (Drivers of Pontocaspian Biodiversity Rise and Demise)we will be documenting the geological context of past diversifications and turnover events. We present examples of rapid turnover (biodiversity crises) in the Quaternary, assess driving forces and draw implications for the nature of the current human-mediated biodiversity crisis in the region.

  17. Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159853.html Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults To curb diabetes, researchers ... News) -- Among obese American adults, control of blood sugar is worsening, leading to more diabetes and heart ...

  18. Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160227.html Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause 'Danger zone' for women earlier ... WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease risk factors -- such as abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood ...

  19. Biogenic Methane and the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David; McKay, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis does not make the rise of oxygen inevitable. What is required is that reductant and oxygen be separated and permanently segregated. The usual picture for Earth is that oxygenic photosynthesis split CO2 into carbon and oxygen, with the carbon buried in sediments and the oxygen mostly taken up by oxides of iron and sulfur. The relatively small atmospheric reservoir of O2 is regulated by the carbon burial rate, reaction with volcanic and metamorphic gases, and oxidation of reduced carbon released as old sediments weather. Absent from this picture is a distinction between the Archean and modern times: on average, carbon burial fluxes would have been matched by oxygen losses then as now. Separation of reductant from oxidant is only provisional. No net oxidation of the continents occurs, and so no change of diagenetic, metamorphic, or volcanic gases is expected. Nor would any change in oxidative weathering be expected. Something more than carbon burial is required to make the Archean different. The escape of hydrogen to space permanently separates the reductant from the oxidant. Hydrogen escape is widely believed to have led to the present highly oxidized states of Mars and Venus. Hydrogen escape has usually been thought small for Archaean Earth, because water vapor is cold-trapped at the troposphere and thus held to levels of a few ppmv in the stratosphere. This cold trapping renders hydrogen escape negligible. However, methane is not cold trapped, and its expected abundance in the Archaean, given low oxygen levels and a biogenic source, would have been high, probably more than 100 times present. At such levels methane would have driven geologically significant levels of hydrogen escape. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Rising Sea Levels: Truth or Scare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Alan

    2007-01-01

    When "ITV News" ran an item that shocked the author, about rising sea levels that will have caused the entire evacuation of the islands by the end of this year, he began to wonder whether the Pacific Ocean is really rising as fast as this. The media reporting of such things can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it brought to the author's…

  1. Subsidence and Relative Sea-level Rise in Threatened Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Higgins, S.

    2014-12-01

    In determining the risk lowland deltaic topography, as threatened by sea level rise and land subsidence, a number of important processes must be evaluated. Sea level rise is a global process but with local manifestations. Asian deltas have been experiencing higher rates of sea level rise due to the steric impact on dynamic (ocean) topography. Other large scale geophysical impacts on relative sea level at the local scale include the isostatic and flexural response to Holocene sea level history, Holocene sediment loads, and in former ice sheet zones --- glacial rebound. Tectonism does play a role on relative sea level rise, particularly in South America where the Eastern coastline, particularly Argentina, is rising relative to regional sea levels. Subsidence is impacted by both natural ground compaction, and accelerated compaction due to, for example, peat oxidation that often has a human driver (e.g. swamp reclammation). Subsidence is also impacted by the extraction of deeper deposits of petroleum and water. Rates of delta subsidence vary widely, depending on the magnitude of the anthropogenic driver, from a few mm/y to 100's of mm/y. Ground water withdrawal is the dominant reason behind much of the world's coastal subsidence, with important exceptions. On average subsidence rates (all causes) now contribute to local sea level innundations at rates four times faster then sea level is rising. New technologies, particularly InSAR and GPS methods, can often pin point the local cause (e.g. water withdrawl for agriculture versus for aquaculture). Subsurface soil or rock heterogeneity, and other very local geological patterns such as historical river pathways, also influence the temporal and spatial patterns associated with delta subsidence.

  2. Nothing But MORB at Shatsky Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    I compare basaltic rocks and glasses obtained by IODP Expedition 324 drilling at Shatsky Rise, a Jurassic Large Igneous Province in the northwestern Pacific, to mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Indian Ocean and East Pacific Rise. Data are compositions in Sano et al (2012) and electron-probe microanalyses of spinel and clinopyroxene. Although several different basalt types were obtained from Shatsky Rise, they all have counterparts along modern spreading ridges, namely depleted (normal, or N-type) and enriched (E-type) MORB plus one extremely depleted type, here termed 'truly depleted'. The latter is similar to eastern Pacific basalts from small intra-transform spreading segments (e.g., Siqueiros fracture zone) and near-ridge seamounts. Basalts from Shatsky Rise are mainly strongly differentiated ferrobasalts; some appear to have mixed with or assimilated small amounts of silicic differentiates and with E-MORB. Similar processes also occur along the East Pacific Rise (9N, Endeavor Deep, Pacific-Antarctic East Pacific Rise). Some clinopyroxene crystals occur in gabbro clots at one site. The textures and mineral compositions resemble those of gabbro cumulates at Hess Deep, eastern Pacific. Spinel compositions from two sites, including in 'truly depleted' basalt, are similar to those in strongly depleted picritic basalt from Siqueiros Fracture Zone, except that they crystallized at lower temperature. Petrogenetic models suggest slightly lower temperatures and smaller degrees of partial melting for all parental Shatsky basalts than for either the N-type or depleted (D-type) MORB of Gale et al (2013). Those with smaller extents of melting resemble basalts from the very slowly spreading and deeply rifted Southwest Indian Ridge near the Indian Ocean triple junction. In summary, Shatsky Rise basalts in all respects resemble those of modern spreading ridges, but mostly to the East Pacific Rise. Compositions of mantle sources were similar; conditions of partial melting

  3. Sea level rise, hydrologic runoff, and the flooding of Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Nicótina, L.; Alessi Celegon, E.; Beraldin, F.; Botter, G.; Carniello, L.; Cecconi, G.; Defina, A.; Settin, T.; Uccelli, A.; D'Alpaos, L.; Marani, M.

    2008-12-01

    This paper deals with hydrologic studies relevant to the works engineered for the protection of the city of Venice (Italy) from major flooding under significant climate change scenarios. Such works foresee the temporary closure of the lagoon surrounding the city to tidal exchanges with the Adriatic Sea in times of sea storm surges via the operation of a set of mobile gates. A general hydrologic model of the ˜2000 km2 mainland contributing runoff to the lagoon of Venice is coupled in time and space with a 2-D finite element model of the relevant tidal hydrodynamics to forecast maximum lagoonal surges in times of closure. We also study the impacts of run-through discharges bypassing the mobile gates and wind setups at time scales comparable to the foreseen closures (from a few to tens of hours). Climate change scenarios are recapitulated by up to +50 cm relative sea level rises by 2100 (the projected lifetime of the current protection works). Possible flooding of the city due to residual fluxes entering the lagoon during prolonged closures is examined. A probabilistic framework is also proposed for computing the statistics of maximum lagoon rises and stage-rise durations. Our studies suggest the adequacy of the design of temporary closures with respect to flooding and provide methods for general exercises in assessing the impact of regional climate change scenarios.

  4. Exhaust cloud rise and growth for Apollo Saturn engines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Empirical and analytical results have been reduced from time-lapse photographs of exhaust clouds during the launch of Apollo 10, 14, 15, and 16 from the Kennedy Space Center. Theoretical predictions of the buoyant cloud rise and growth compare very favorably to actual measurements. The mathematical model predicts with engineering accuracy the terminal altitude and size of the clouds. A principal input to MSFC's multilayer diffusion model is top height of the exhaust cloud. It is this characteristic dimension that is the main subject of this report. An interesting occurrence during launch is the formation of bimodal exhaust cloud which is due to the north-south oriented flame trench directly beneath the base of the vehicle. This study has added considerable information on engine exhaust cloud rise and growth which is essential to the study of atmospheric dispersal in time and space.

  5. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Kaganovich, D.; Helle, M. H.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D.

    2013-10-01

    Laser triggering and guiding of underwater electrical discharges are being investigated and developed at NRL for applications including advanced micromachining and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. As part of this development we recently made several high-spatial-resolution, time-resolved measurements of underwater optical filamentation and laser ionization. Using 2-laser pump-probe backlit imaging techniques, we were able to achieve time resolution as short as 35 fs and spatial resolution down to 1 micron. Shadowgraph images show few-micron diameter gas bubbles forming throughout the pump beam path in ps timescales. Microbubble numbers and density increased with pulse energy and time during the pump pulse. We also obtained time-resolved spectra of ns-laser-ionized water, revealing black-body radiation lasting more than 100 ns after the ionizing pulse. Results from ongoing underwater laser ionization, filamentation, and discharge-guiding experiments will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  6. Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Presentation by Cristina Milesi, First Author, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA at the "Meeting the Challenge of Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County" on June 19, 2005 Santa Clara County, bordering with the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay, is highly vulnerable to flooding and to sea level rise (SLR). In this presentation, the latest sea level rise projections for the San Francisco Bay will be discussed in the context of extreme water height frequency and extent of flooding vulnerability. I will also present preliminary estimations of levee requirements and possible mitigation through tidal restoration of existing salt ponds. The examples will draw mainly from the work done by the NASA Climate Adaptation Science Investigators at NASA Ames.

  7. Visualizing Sea Level Rise with Augmented Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Looking Glass is an application on the iPhone that visualizes in 3-D future scenarios of sea level rise, overlaid on live camera imagery in situ. Using a technology known as augmented reality, the app allows a layperson user to explore various scenarios of sea level rise using a visual interface. Then the user can see, in an immersive, dynamic way, how those scenarios would affect a real place. The first part of the experience activates users' cognitive, quantitative thinking process, teaching them how global sea level rise, tides and storm surge contribute to flooding; the second allows an emotional response to a striking visual depiction of possible future catastrophe. This project represents a partnership between a science journalist, MIT, and the Rhode Island School of Design, and the talk will touch on lessons this projects provides on structuring and executing such multidisciplinary efforts on future design projects.

  8. Who Gets a Mentor? A Longitudinal Assessment of the Rising Star Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Romila; Ragins, Belle Rose; Tharenou, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the rising star hypothesis, which proposes that individuals who are on the fast track to career success are more likely to gain mentors than others. The study used a sample of employees who had never been mentored and examined the relationship between rising star attributes measured at Time 1 and the attainment of a mentor a…

  9. Quality and the Rise of Value-Added in Education: The Case of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Martin; McNamara, Gerry; O'Hara, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the rise of value-added as a measure of quality in education. As a point of departure, the paper begins with an analysis of the rise of the concept of quality in education and discusses how, at times, various contradictory determinants of quality have managed to influence the evaluation and assessment frameworks of most…

  10. Rising prostate-specific antigen values during neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy: The importance of monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Niblock, Paddy; Pickles, Tom . E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) before external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From prospectively collected data, we identified 182 patients who received between 3 and 12 months of N-ADT before definitive external beam radiotherapy and who had at least three PSA readings during the neoadjuvant period. One hundred fifty patients had PSA values that continued to fall (Non-Rise group), but 32 had a PSA value that started to rise (Rise group). The two groups were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Pearson chi-square tests. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were performed for time to treatment failure, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The median follow-up was 62.5 months for the Non-Rise group and 53 months for the Rise group. Patients who sustained a PSA rise during the N-ADT period had a shorter time to PSA relapse (p = 0.013), poorer CSS (p = 0.027), and poorer OS (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of a PSA rise during the N-ADT period for CSS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.038). Conclusions:: A subset of patients treated with N-ADT develop a rising PSA profile that likely represents early androgen resistance. They have significantly worse outcome.

  11. Noise rise in nondegenerate parametric amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, P.H. ); Movshovich, R.; Yurke, B. )

    1991-05-20

    The noise-rise phenomenon is a long-standing problem that was first observed in Josephson-junction-parametric amplifiers over ten years ago. We present here a case where noise-rise data from a Josephson junction is successfully explained, using a theory based on the universal properties of a dynamical system operated near a bifurcation point. The experiment and theory presented here is for a bifurcation of the Hopf type, a case not discussed previously. The predicted behavior is qualitatively different from that of previously studied bifurcations.

  12. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  13. HIGH RISE OR LOW RISE. A STUDY OF DECISION FACTORS IN RESIDENCE HALLS PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT IS TO SERVE COLLEGE OFFICIALS, HOUSING ADMINISTRATORS, PLANNING GROUPS AND ARCHITECTS BY FOCUSING ON THE DECISION FACTORS WHICH RELATE TO HIGH-RISE AND LOW-RISE STUDENT HOUSING. DECISION FACTORS INCLUDE--(1) LAND USE IMPLICATIONS, (2) SITE REQUIREMENTS--BUILDING CODES, SUB-SOIL CONSIDERATIONS, NATURAL TERRAIN,…

  14. The Rise of School-Supporting Nonprofits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko; Gazley, Beth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines voluntary contributions to public education via charitable school foundations, booster clubs, parent teacher associations, and parent teacher organizations. We use panel data on school-supporting charities with national coverage from 1995 to 2010, which we geocode and match to school districts. We document the meteoric rise of…

  15. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report…

  16. Project RISE: Workplace Literacy Education in Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Hal; And Others

    A reflective self-assessment process was used to evaluate Project RISE, a 1-year, federally funded workplace literacy project. The goal of the evaluation was to help staff understand their collective experience in a way that might help them to serve their clients more effectively in the future. A list of the most critical problems faced by staff…

  17. Sea Level Rise National Coastal Property Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of sea level rise on coastal properties depends critically on the human response to the threat, which in turn depends on several factors, including the immediacy of the risk, the magnitude of property value at risk, options for adapting to the threat and the cost of th...

  18. The Rise of the Digital Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing shift to digital offerings among public libraries. Libraries increasingly are fulfilling roles as technology hubs for their communities, with high demand for technology and career development training resources. Ebooks and other digital materials are on the rise, while print is being scaled back. More libraries are turning to…

  19. How To Attack Rising Energy Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents manufacturer and engineer suggestions on how schools can solve their rising energy costs in the face of more demanding classroom needs placing greater demands of Heating and air conditioning ventilation systems. The use of CO2 sensors, boiler technology and two-pipe systems are explored. (GR)

  20. Rising Political Consciousness: Transformational Learning in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis, Mazalan; Muhamad, Mazanah

    As part of a larger study (not discussed) ten educated Malaysian citizens were interviewed to find whether their rising political consciousness, over a ten year period (1988-1999), indicated that their transformation was influenced by their culture. The subjects were between 35-45 years old, married, with an average of four children. All were…

  1. Facts and Fancies On High Rise Living

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Murray; Steinbach, Andrew

    1973-01-01

    The authors, after reviewing various findings and opinions about the effects of high rise living on each segment of the population, state their own findings from a six-year practice in a downtown Toronto complex of single family units and apartments. They show that the pathology of patients does not differ markedly in either group. PMID:20468903

  2. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  3. Self-assembling of zinc phthalocyanines on ZnO (1010) surface through multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Melis, Claudio; Raiteri, Paolo; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2011-12-27

    We adopt a hierarchic combination of theoretical methods to study the assembling of zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPcs) on a ZnO (1010) surface through multiple time scales. Atomistic simulations, such as model potential molecular dynamics and metadynamics, are used to study the energetics and short time evolution (up to ∼100 ns) of small ZnPc aggregates. The stability and the lifetime of large clusters is then studied by means of an atomistically informed coarse-grained model using classical molecular dynamics. Finally, the macroscopic time scale clustering phenomenon is studied by Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithms as a function of temperature and surface coverage. We provide evidence that at room temperature the aggregation is likely to occur at sufficiently high coverage, and we characterize the nature, morphology, and lifetime of ZnPc's clusters. We identify the molecular stripes oriented along [010] crystallographic directions as the most energetically stable aggregates.

  4. Sea Level Rise Impacts On Infrastructure Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualini, D.; Mccown, A. W.; Backhaus, S.; Urban, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Increase of global sea level is one of the potential consequences of climate change and represents a threat for the U.S.A coastal regions, which are highly populated and home of critical infrastructures. The potential danger caused by sea level rise may escalate if sea level rise is coupled with an increase in frequency and intensity of storms that may strike these regions. These coupled threats present a clear risk to population and critical infrastructure and are concerns for Federal, State, and particularly local response and recovery planners. Understanding the effect of sea level rise on the risk to critical infrastructure is crucial for long planning and for mitigating potential damages. In this work we quantify how infrastructure vulnerability to a range of storms changes due to an increase of sea level. Our study focuses on the Norfolk area of the U.S.A. We assess the direct damage of drinking water and wastewater facilities and the power sector caused by a distribution of synthetic hurricanes. In addition, our analysis estimates indirect consequences of these damages on population and economic activities accounting also for interdependencies across infrastructures. While projections unanimously indicate an increase in the rate of sea level rise, the scientific community does not agree on the size of this rate. Our risk assessment accounts for this uncertainty simulating a distribution of sea level rise for a specific climate scenario. Using our impact assessment results and assuming an increase of future hurricanes frequencies and intensities, we also estimate the expected benefits for critical infrastructure.

  5. Updating Maryland's sea-level rise projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boesch, Donald F.; Atkinson, Larry P.; Boicourt, William C.; Boon, John D.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Ezer, Tal; Horton, Benjamin P.; Johnson, Zoe P.; Kopp, Robert E.; Li, Ming; Moss, Richard H.; Parris, Adam; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    With its 3,100 miles of tidal shoreline and low-lying rural and urban lands, “The Free State” is one of the most vulnerable to sea-level rise. Historically, Marylanders have long had to contend with rising water levels along its Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean and coastal bay shores. Shorelines eroded and low-relief lands and islands, some previously inhabited, were inundated. Prior to the 20th century, this was largely due to the slow sinking of the land since Earth’s crust is still adjusting to the melting of large masses of ice following the last glacial period. Over the 20th century, however, the rate of rise of the average level of tidal waters with respect to land, or relative sea-level rise, has increased, at least partially as a result of global warming. Moreover, the scientific evidence is compelling that Earth’s climate will continue to warm and its oceans will rise even more rapidly. Recognizing the scientific consensus around global climate change, the contribution of human activities to it, and the vulnerability of Maryland’s people, property, public investments, and natural resources, Governor Martin O’Malley established the Maryland Commission on Climate Change on April 20, 2007. The Commission produced a Plan of Action that included a comprehensive climate change impact assessment, a greenhouse gas reduction strategy, and strategies for reducing Maryland’s vulnerability to climate change. The Plan has led to landmark legislation to reduce the state’s greenhouse gas emissions and a variety of state policies designed to reduce energy consumption and promote adaptation to climate change.

  6. Is the detection of accelerated sea level rise imminent?

    PubMed Central

    Fasullo, J. T.; Nerem, R. S.; Hamlington, B.

    2016-01-01

    Global mean sea level rise estimated from satellite altimetry provides a strong constraint on climate variability and change and is expected to accelerate as the rates of both ocean warming and cryospheric mass loss increase over time. In stark contrast to this expectation however, current altimeter products show the rate of sea level rise to have decreased from the first to second decades of the altimeter era. Here, a combined analysis of altimeter data and specially designed climate model simulations shows the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo to likely have masked the acceleration that would have otherwise occurred. This masking arose largely from a recovery in ocean heat content through the mid to late 1990 s subsequent to major heat content reductions in the years following the eruption. A consequence of this finding is that barring another major volcanic eruption, a detectable acceleration is likely to emerge from the noise of internal climate variability in the coming decade. PMID:27506974

  7. Is the detection of accelerated sea level rise imminent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasullo, J. T.; Nerem, R. S.; Hamlington, B.

    2016-08-01

    Global mean sea level rise estimated from satellite altimetry provides a strong constraint on climate variability and change and is expected to accelerate as the rates of both ocean warming and cryospheric mass loss increase over time. In stark contrast to this expectation however, current altimeter products show the rate of sea level rise to have decreased from the first to second decades of the altimeter era. Here, a combined analysis of altimeter data and specially designed climate model simulations shows the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo to likely have masked the acceleration that would have otherwise occurred. This masking arose largely from a recovery in ocean heat content through the mid to late 1990 s subsequent to major heat content reductions in the years following the eruption. A consequence of this finding is that barring another major volcanic eruption, a detectable acceleration is likely to emerge from the noise of internal climate variability in the coming decade.

  8. Is the detection of accelerated sea level rise imminent?

    PubMed

    Fasullo, J T; Nerem, R S; Hamlington, B

    2016-08-10

    Global mean sea level rise estimated from satellite altimetry provides a strong constraint on climate variability and change and is expected to accelerate as the rates of both ocean warming and cryospheric mass loss increase over time. In stark contrast to this expectation however, current altimeter products show the rate of sea level rise to have decreased from the first to second decades of the altimeter era. Here, a combined analysis of altimeter data and specially designed climate model simulations shows the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo to likely have masked the acceleration that would have otherwise occurred. This masking arose largely from a recovery in ocean heat content through the mid to late 1990 s subsequent to major heat content reductions in the years following the eruption. A consequence of this finding is that barring another major volcanic eruption, a detectable acceleration is likely to emerge from the noise of internal climate variability in the coming decade.

  9. Estimating Hardness from the USDC Tool-Bit Temperature Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    A method of real-time quantification of the hardness of a rock or similar material involves measurement of the temperature, as a function of time, of the tool bit of an ultrasonic/sonic drill corer (USDC) that is being used to drill into the material. The method is based on the idea that, other things being about equal, the rate of rise of temperature and the maximum temperature reached during drilling increase with the hardness of the drilled material. In this method, the temperature is measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in the USDC tool bit near the drilling tip. The hardness of the drilled material can then be determined through correlation of the temperature-rise-versus-time data with time-dependent temperature rises determined in finite-element simulations of, and/or experiments on, drilling at various known rates of advance or known power levels through materials of known hardness. The figure presents an example of empirical temperature-versus-time data for a particular 3.6-mm USDC bit, driven at an average power somewhat below 40 W, drilling through materials of various hardness levels. The temperature readings from within a USDC tool bit can also be used for purposes other than estimating the hardness of the drilled material. For example, they can be especially useful as feedback to control the driving power to prevent thermal damage to the drilled material, the drill bit, or both. In the case of drilling through ice, the temperature readings could be used as a guide to maintaining sufficient drive power to prevent jamming of the drill by preventing refreezing of melted ice in contact with the drill.

  10. The sitting and rising test for assessing people with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S.M.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Chan, Wayne L.S.; Hung, Ben K.Y.; Chung, Ricci K.S.; Chim, Tina H.T.; Kwong, Patrick W.H.; Liu, Tai-Wa; Tse, Mimi M.Y.; Chung, Raymond C.K.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the sitting-rising test (SRT), the correlations of sitting-rising test scores with measures of strength, balance, community integration and quality of life, as well as the cut-off score which best discriminates people with chronic stroke from healthy older adults were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects with chronic stroke (n=30) and healthy older adults (n=30) were recruited. The study had a cross-sectional design, and was carried out in a university rehabilitation laboratory. Sitting-rising test performance was scored on two occasions. Other measurements included ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor strength, the Fugl-Meyer assessment, the Berg Balance Scale, the timed up and go test, the five times sit-to-stand test, the limits of stability test, and measures of quality of health and community integration. [Results] Sitting-rising test scores demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities (ICC=0.679 to 0.967). Sitting-rising test scores correlated significantly with ankle strength, but not with other test results. The sitting-rising test showed good sensitivity and specificity. A cut-off score of 7.8 best distinguished healthy older adults from stroke subjects. [Conclusions] The sitting-rising test is a reliable and sensitive test for assessing the quality of sitting and rising movements. Further studies with a larger sample are required to investigate the test’s validity. PMID:27390398

  11. Early to Bed, Early to Rise a Back-To-School Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160532.html Early to Bed, Early to Rise a Back-to-School Challenge ... idea. Allow your kids some quiet time before bed to unwind. "That can include relaxing activities, such ...

  12. Coastal subsidence and relative sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface fluid-pressure declines caused by pumping of groundwater or hydrocarbons can lead to aquifer-system compaction and consequent land subsidence. This subsidence can be rapid, as much as 30 cm per year in some instances, and large, totaling more than 13 m in extreme examples. Thus anthropogenic subsidence may be the dominant contributor to relative sea-level rise in coastal environments where subsurface fluids are heavily exploited. Maximum observed rates of human-induced subsidence greatly exceed the rates of natural subsidence of unconsolidated sediments (~0.1–1 cm yr−1) and the estimated rates of ongoing global sea-level rise (~0.3 cm yr−1).

  13. Hurricanes, sea level rise, and coastal change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen hurricanes have made landfall along the U.S. east and Gulf coasts over the past decade. For most of these storms, the USGS with our partners in NASA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have flown before and after lidar missions to detect changes in beaches and dunes. The most dramatic changes occurred when the coasts were completely submerged in an inundation regime. Where this occurred locally, a new breach was cut, like during Hurricane Isabel in North Carolina. Where surge inundated an entire island, the sand was stripped off leaving marshy outcrops behind, like during Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Sea level rise together with sand starvation and repeated hurricane impacts could increase the probabilities of inundation and degrade coasts more than sea level rise alone.

  14. Numerical and approximate solutions for plume rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Gordon Hall, J.

    Numerical and approximate analytical solutions are compared for turbulent plume rise in a crosswind. The numerical solutions were calculated using the plume rise model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass.19, 585-590), over a wide range of pertinent parameters. Some wind shear and elevated inversion effects are included. The numerical solutions are seen to agree with the approximate solutions over a fairly wide range of the parameters. For the conditions considered in the study, wind shear effects are seen to be quite small. A limited study was made of the penetration of elevated inversions by plumes. The results indicate the adequacy of a simple criterion proposed by Briggs (1969, AEC Critical Review Series, USAEC Division of Technical Information extension, Oak Ridge, Tennesse).

  15. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  16. Scientific reticence and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.

    2007-04-01

    I suggest that a 'scientific reticence' is inhibiting the communication of a threat of a potentially large sea level rise. Delay is dangerous because of system inertias that could create a situation with future sea level changes out of our control. I argue for calling together a panel of scientific leaders to hear evidence and issue a prompt plain-written report on current understanding of the sea level change issue.

  17. Time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer imaging of protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Harsha E; Miller, Lawrence W

    2012-01-01

    Lanthanide-based or luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) microscopy can be used to sensitively image interactions between reporter-labeled proteins in living mammalian cells. With LRET, luminescent lanthanide complexes are used as donors, conventional fluorophores are used as acceptors, and donor-sensitized acceptor emission occurs at time scales that reflect the long (~ms) lanthanide emission lifetime. These long-lived signals can be separated from short-lifetime (~ns) sample autofluorescence and directly excited acceptor fluorescence by using pulsed light to excite the specimen and by implementing a short delay (>100 ns) before detection, thereby increasing measurement sensitivity. As practical implementation of time-resolved LRET microscopy requires several potentially unfamiliar experimental techniques, we explicitly describe herein methods to label proteins in living mammalian cells with luminescent terbium complexes, image interactions between terbium-labeled proteins and green fluorescent protein fusions, and quantitatively analyze LRET images. PMID:22289461

  18. The Darwin Rise: A Cretaceous superswell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, M. K.; Winterer, E. L.; Sager, W. W.; Natland, J. H.; Ito, G.

    1990-07-01

    The Japanese Guyots, Wake Guyots, and Mid-Pacific Mountains are part of a broad area of Cretaceous volcanism in the western Pacific termed the “Darwin Rise.” Based on Seabeam bathymetric data we classify these drowned volcanic islands as: type “A,” those that advanced to the atoll stage before final submergence; type “B,” those that drowned at the barrier reef stage; and type “V,” those with little or no reef material on their volcanic summits. Widespread evidence for karst topography extending to depths of 200 m on the summits of A and B guyots sheds new light on events leading to the synchronous extinction of reefs on the Darwin Rise in the mid-Cretaceous. We propose that after the formation of the reefs on the A and B guyots, the entire region was elevated at approximately the Aptian-Albian boundary (113 Ma) to form a superswell similar to that existing now in French Polynesia. The type V guyots formed on this anomalously shallow lithosphere. The demise of the reefs was the direct result of the rise of this superswell, although climate factors may have prevented reef recolonization following its later subsidence.

  19. Claritas rise, Mars: Pre-Tharsis magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Williams, J.-P.; Ruiz, J.; McGuire, P.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Wang, R.; Scharenbroich, L.; Hare, T.M.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Baker, V.R.; Wheelock, S.J.; Ferris, J.C.; Miyamoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    Claritas rise is a prominent ancient (Noachian) center of tectonism identified through investigation of comprehensive paleotectonic information of the western hemisphere of Mars. This center is interpreted to be the result of magmatic-driven activity, including uplift and associated tectonism, as well as possible hydrothermal activity. Coupled with its ancient stratigraphy, high density of impact craters, and complex structure, a possible magnetic signature may indicate that it formed during an ancient period of Mars' evolution, such as when the dynamo was in operation. As Tharsis lacks magnetic signatures, Claritas rise may pre-date the development of Tharsis or mark incipient development, since some of the crustal materials underlying Tharsis and older parts of the magmatic complex, respectively, could have been highly resurfaced, destroying any remanent magnetism. Here, we detail the significant characteristics of the Claritas rise, and present a case for why it should be targeted by the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Mars Express spacecrafts, as well as be considered as a prime target for future tier-scalable robotic reconnaissance. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Dynamics of rising bubble inside a viscosity-stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Premlata, A. R.; Sahu, Kirti

    2015-11-01

    The rising bubble dynamics in an unconfined quiescent viscosity-stratified medium has been numerically investigated. This is frequently encountered in industrial as well as natural phenomena. In spite of the large number of studies carried out on bubbles and drops, very few studies have examined the influence of viscosity stratification on bubble rise dynamics. To the best of our knowledge, none of them have isolated the effects of viscosity-stratification alone, even though it is known to influence the dynamics extensively, which is the main objective of the present study. By conducting time-dependent simulations, we present a library of bubble shapes in the Gallilei and the Eötvös numbers plane. Our results demonstrate some counter-intuitive phenomena for certain range of parameters due to the presence of viscosity stratification in the surrounding fluid. We found that in a linearly increasing viscosity medium, for certain values of parameters, bubble undergoes large deformation by forming an elongated skirt, while the skirt tends to physically separate the wake region from the rest of the surrounding fluid. This peculiar dynamics is attributed to the migration of less viscous fluid that is carried in the wake of the bubble as it rises, and thereby creating an increase.

  1. Present-day sea level rise: A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, Anny; Lombard, Alix; Llovel, William

    2008-11-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes have improved considerably in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing data sets have become available. Here we report on the current knowledge of present-day sea level change. We briefly present observational results on sea level change from satellite altimetry since 1993 and tide gauges for the past century. We next discuss recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on time scales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion, land ice mass loss and land water storage change. For the 1993-2003 decade, the sum of climate-related contributions agree well (within the error bars) with the altimetry-based sea level, half of the observed rate of rise being due to ocean thermal expansion, land ice plus land waters explaining the other half. Since about 2003, thermal expansion increase has stopped, whereas the sea level continues to rise, although at a reduced rate compared to the previous decade (2.5 mm/yr versus 3.1 mm/yr). Recent increases in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets appear able to account alone for the rise in sea level reported over the last five years.

  2. Propagation of solutes and pressure into aquifers following river stage rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Chani; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Robinson, Neville I.

    2013-09-01

    Water level rises associated with river flow events induce both pressure and solute movement into adjacent aquifers at vastly different rates. We present a simple analytical solution that relates the travel time and travel distance of solutes into an aquifer following river stage rise to aquifer properties. Combination with an existing solution for pressure propagation indicates that the ratio of solute to pressure travel times is proportional to the ratio of the volume of water stored in the aquifer before the river stage rise and the volume added by the stage rise and is independent of hydraulic conductivity. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of an aquifer slice perpendicular to a river demonstrate that the solutions are broadly applicable to variably saturated aquifers and partially penetrating rivers. The solutions remain applicable where river stage rise and fall occur, provided that regional hydraulic gradients are low and the duration of the river stage rise is less than pressure and solute travel times to the observation point in the aquifer. Consequently, the solutions provide new insight into the relationships between aquifer properties and distance and time of solute propagation and, in some cases, may be used to estimate system characteristics. Travel time metrics obtained for a flood event in the Cockburn River in eastern Australia using electrical conductivity measurements enabled estimates of aquifer properties and a lateral extent of river-aquifer mixing of 25 m. A detailed time series of any soluble tracer with distinctly different concentrations in river water and groundwater may be used.

  3. Education And Public Outreach With MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; McEwen, A.

    2005-12-01

    The HiRISE team is planning an innovative education and public outreach program with a variety of formal and informal educational activities. These include educator workshops, large-scale displays of HiRISE images at museums and planetariums, and opportunities for students and the general public to suggest HiRISE image observations and to participate in data analysis via the internet. Additionally, HiRISE team members have committed to spending at least 5% of their time in outreach activities and to coordinating local EP/O activities in their regions. The centerpiece of the E/PO program is HiRISE's interactive website called HiWeb (http://marsoweb.nasa.nasa.gov/hirise). HiRISE's public website will provide user-friendly web tools for students, team members, and the general public to suggest target locations for HiRISE imaging. HiWeb will provide interactive viewing and analysis of HiRISE images in context with other available Mars data. Web events, involving participation by team members, will inform students and interested members of the public of HiRISE capabilities and science goals and provide support for submitting good image suggestions. Curriculum modules and activities will focus on Mars geology, the image suggestion process and working with digital image data. We will also provide online opportunities for student and public participation in data analysis to create databases of geologic features (gullies, boulders, craters, wind streaks, etc.) present in the HiRISE images. Educator workshops will be held each year at or near the institution of HiRISE team members. Workshop background materials and instructions for all hands-on activities will be placed on HiWeb to facilitate sharing of information with other educators and the general public.

  4. PERSPECTIVE: The tripping points of sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Alan D.

    2009-12-01

    coastal management in which options for shore protection or retreats are clearly identified and where economic, ecosystem and social impacts can be clearly evaluated. At stake are both the future of wetlands that provide important ecosystem services and the safety and sustainability of our coastal communities. This is a huge challenge requiring adequate data, long-term planning, federal-state cooperation, and integration of environmental laws. The time is at hand to assess a business-as-usual response to sea level rise or to explore a more holistic and integrated approach. President Obama has said: `The threat from climate change is serious, it is urgent, and it is growing. Our generation's response to this challenge will be judged by history, for if we fail to meet it—boldly, swiftly, and together—we risk consigning future generations to an irreversible catastrophe' [3]. Though the President was talking about action to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, cooperation to address the consequences of rising sea level and changing climate is just as urgent. References [1] Titus J G et al 2009 State and local governments plan for development of most land vulnerable to rising sea level along the US Atlantic coast Environ. Res. Lett. 4 044008 [2] US Global Change Research Program 2009 Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States (June 2009) [3] www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Remarks-by-the-President-at-UN-Secretary-General-Ban-Ki-moons-Climate-Change-Summit/

  5. How much more global warming and sea level rise?

    PubMed

    Meehl, Gerald A; Washington, Warren M; Collins, William D; Arblaster, Julie M; Hu, Aixue; Buja, Lawrence E; Strand, Warren G; Teng, Haiyan

    2005-03-18

    Two global coupled climate models show that even if the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere had been stabilized in the year 2000, we are already committed to further global warming of about another half degree and an additional 320% sea level rise caused by thermal expansion by the end of the 21st century. Projected weakening of the meridional overturning circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean does not lead to a net cooling in Europe. At any given point in time, even if concentrations are stabilized, there is a commitment to future climate changes that will be greater than those we have already observed. PMID:15774757

  6. How much more global warming and sea level rise?

    PubMed

    Meehl, Gerald A; Washington, Warren M; Collins, William D; Arblaster, Julie M; Hu, Aixue; Buja, Lawrence E; Strand, Warren G; Teng, Haiyan

    2005-03-18

    Two global coupled climate models show that even if the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere had been stabilized in the year 2000, we are already committed to further global warming of about another half degree and an additional 320% sea level rise caused by thermal expansion by the end of the 21st century. Projected weakening of the meridional overturning circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean does not lead to a net cooling in Europe. At any given point in time, even if concentrations are stabilized, there is a commitment to future climate changes that will be greater than those we have already observed.

  7. Diabesity: an overview of a rising epidemic.

    PubMed

    Farag, Youssef M K; Gaballa, Mahmoud R

    2011-01-01

    'Diabesity' is the term for diabetes occurring in the context of obesity. In this review, we will overview the latest epidemiological data available describing the rising prevalence, health impact and economic impact of diabesity. We will also outline the measures required to slowdown this newly evolving epidemic. The global prevalence of diabetes in 2010 was 284 million people worldwide constituting around 6.4% of the world population, which is higher than was projected in earlier studies. Furthermore, the projections for 2030 show the prevalence to reach 439 million individuals comprising ~7.7% of the world population. The burden of diabetes on the world economy has been rising steadily in the last decade to reach $376 billion in 2010 and is expected to reach $490 billion in 2030. Diabesity represents a substantial economic burden as reflected by diabetes and obesity consuming 14 and 5.7% of the USA's total health expenditure, respectively, representing the highest known expenditure on diabesity worldwide. When costs associated with being overweight were also included, the upper limit of obesity expenditure rises to 9.1% of the USA's total healthcare expenditure. The highest recorded expenditure on diabetes alone was in Saudi Arabia consuming 21% of the country's total health expenditure, with no data available about the health expenditure on obesity. The health impact of diabesity is substantial to include long-term diabetic complications, reduction in health-related functioning, reduction of quality of life and reduced overall life expectancy. Long-term complications include myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular stroke and end-stage renal disease. Also recent advances have found that there is an association between chronic stress, depression and sleeping troubles to both diabetes and obesity. This century is the unprecedented diabetogenic era in human history. It is thus urgent to take steps including screening, prevention and early management in an attempt to

  8. The rise flank trails left by migrating offsets of the equatorial East Pacific Rise axis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, P. )

    1989-01-10

    Sea Beam and magnetic surveys of the young (<1 Ma) rise flank around nontransform rise crest offsets at 5.5{degree}N, 4.9{degree}N, 3.4{degree}, 2.0{degree}N, and 2.8{degree}S mapped distinctive trails of obliquely lineated, highly magnetic crust that spreads from the characteristically curving overlapping rift zones. A Deep Tow survey around the small (1.5 km) 3.9{degree}N offset and the large (27 km) 2.0{degree}N offset provided more detailed infromation on the formation of crust in the offset trails, and of the structure of tectoniclly modified crust at interrift rise crest sites. Patches of interrift crust, which forms deep overlap basins at medium size offsets and basins and plateaus of rotated abyssal hills at large offsets, are periodically shed from the axial zone, together with abandoned portions of overlapped rift zone, to become important elements of the rise flank trails. The oblique aximuths of the paired 'fracture zone' trails that diverge from the rise crest offsets show that most have migrated along the rise crest at average speeds of 25-125 mm/yr. Net movement of the 27-km 2.8{degree}S offset has been slower, with alternating periods of rapid northward and southward migration. Information on the migration history of the surveyed offsets was supplemented by inferring the migration direction of another eight offsets on the equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR) whose trails were less throughly mapped. Most offsets of the southern Pacific-Cocos boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated north; the patterns are not readily explained by the inferred distribution of mantle upwellings along the EPR axis.

  9. Time-resolved electron temperature and electron density measurements in a nanosecond pulse filament discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Time evolution of electron density and electron temperature in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures at a pressure of 100 Torr is studied by Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering and kinetic modeling. The discharge is sustained between two spherical electrodes separated by a 1 cm gap and powered by high voltage pulses ~150 ns duration. Discharge energy coupled to the plasma filament 2-3 mm in diameter is 4-5 mJ/pulse, with specific energy loading of up to ~0.3 eV/molecule. At all experimental conditions, a rapid initial rise of electron temperature and electron density during the discharge pulse is observed, followed by the decay in the afterglow, over ~100 ns-1 µs. Electron density in the afterglow decays more rapidly as H2 or O2 fraction in the mixture is increased. In He/H2 mixtures, this is likely due to more rapid recombination of electrons in collisions with \\text{H}2+ and \\text{H}3+ ions, compared to recombination with \\text{He}2+ ions. In O2/He mixtures, electron density decay in the afterglow is affected by recombination with \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}4+ ions, while the effect of three-body attachment is relatively minor. Peak electron number densities and electron temperatures are n e  =  (1.7-3.1) · 1014 cm-3 and T e  =  2.9-5.5 eV, depending on gas mixture composition. Electron temperature in the afterglow decays to approximately T e  ≈  0.3 eV, considerably higher compared to the gas temperature of T  =  300-380 K, inferred from O2 pure rotational Raman scattering spectra, due to superelastic collisions. The experimental results in helium and O2-He mixtures are compared with kinetic modeling predictions, showing good agreement.

  10. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  11. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  12. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R. ); Hashimoto, P.S. ); Reed, J.W. and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA )

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs.

  13. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders T.; Kroon, Aart

    2010-05-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay thickness. Autocompaction was incorporated in the model, and shown to play a major role for the translation of accretion rates measured as length per unit time to accumulation rates measured as mass per area per unit time. This is important, even for shallow salt marsh deposits for which it is demonstrated that mass depth down core can be directly related to the bulk dry density of the surface layer by means of a logarithmic function. The results allow for an evaluation of the use of marker horizons in the topmost layers and show that it is important to know the level of the marker in relation to the salt marsh base. In general, deeper located markers will indicate successively smaller accretion rates with the same sediment input. Thus, stability analysis made on the basis of newly established marker horizons will be biased and indicate salt marsh stabilities far above the correct level. Running the model with a constant sea level revealed that balance between the inner and the outer salt marsh deposition can not be achieved within a reasonable time scale. Likewise it is shown that only one specific sea level rise provides equilibrium for a given location on the salt marsh. With a higher sea level rise, the marsh at the specific location will eventually drown, whereas - with a sea level rise below this level - it will grow towards the top of the rising tidal frame. The short term variation of salt marsh accretion was found to correlate well with variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation - the NAO winter index. Comparisons between the geomorphological development of wind tide affected salt marshes, like those present on the Danish North Sea coasts, and primary astronomically

  14. Gas-rise velocities during kicks

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.B. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on experiments to examine gas migration rates in drilling muds that were performed in a 15-m-long, 200-mm-ID inclinable flow loop where air injection simulates gas entry during a kick. These tests were conducted using a xanthum gum (a common polymer used in drilling fluids) solution to simulate drilling muds as the liquid phase and air as the gas phase. This work represents a significant extension of existing correlations for gas/liquid flows in large pipe diameters with non- Newtonian fluids. Bubbles rise faster in drilling muds than in water despite the increased viscosity. This surprising result is caused by the change in the flow regime, with large slug-type bubbles forming at lower void fractions. The gas velocity is independent of void fraction, thus simplifying flow modeling. Results show that a gas influx will rise faster in a well than previously believed. This has major implications for kick simulation, with gas arriving at the surface earlier than would be expected and the gas outflow rate being higher than would have been predicted. A model of the two-phase gas flow in drilling mud, including the results of this work, has been incorporated into the joint Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR)/BP Intl. kick model.

  15. Quantitative effect of initial current rise on pumping the double-pulsed copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The laser energy at optimum time delay of a double-pulsed CuCl laser was experimentally determined to be a logarithmic function of the initial current rise of the pumping pulse over the total circuit inductance range 1 to 12 microhenrys. The minimum delay was found to decrease with initial current rise, which implies that faster rising current pulses are more efficient at pumping copper atoms from the ground state to the upper laser level because lasing threshold occurs with a higher population in the lower laser level.

  16. Initiation of the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament by Localized Emerging Magnetic Field via Microflaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    EUV data from EIT show that a filament of 2001 February 28 underwent a slow-rise phase lasting about 6 hrs, before rapidly erupting in a fast-rise phase. Concurrent images in soft X-rays (SXRs) from Yohkoh/SXT show that a series of three microflares, prominent in SXT images but weak in EIT approx.195 Ang EUV images, occurred near one end of the filament. The first and last microflares occurred respectively in conjunction with the start of the slow-rise phase and the start of the fast-rise phase, and the second microflare corresponded to a kink in the filament trajectory. Beginning within 10 hours of the start of the slow rise, new magnetic flux emerged at the location of the microflaring. This localized new flux emergence and the resulting microflares, consistent with reconnection between the emerging field and the sheared sigmoid core magnetic field holding the filament, apparently caused the slow rise of this field and the transition to explosive eruption. For the first time in such detail, the observations show this direct action of localized emerging flux in the progressive destabilization of a sheared core field in the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME). Similar processes may have occurred in other recently-studied events, NASA supported this work through NASA SR&T and SEC GI grants.

  17. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M. D.; Hadmack, Michael R.; Madey, John M. J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun.

  18. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D; Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun.

  19. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D; Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun. PMID:24007094

  20. AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C.; Fan, Y.

    2010-11-10

    The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrograde flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.

  1. Sea-level rise and coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Blankespoor, Brian; Dasgupta, Susmita; Laplante, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    This paper seeks to quantify the impact of a1-m sea-level rise on coastal wetlands in 86 developing countries and territories. It is found that approximately 68 % of coastal wetlands in these countries are at risk. A large percentage of this estimated loss is found in Europe and Central Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific, as well as in the Middle East and North Africa. A small number of countries will be severely affected. China and Vietnam(in East Asia and the Pacific), Libya and Egypt (in the Middle East and North Africa), and Romania and Ukraine (in Europe and Central Asia) will bear most losses. In economic terms, the loss of coastal wetlands is likely to exceed $703 million per year in 2000 US dollars. PMID:24659473

  2. The rise of the rhizosolenid diatoms.

    PubMed

    Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Muyzer, Gerard; Abbas, Ben; Rampen, Sebastiaan W; Massé, Guillaume; Allard, W Guy; Belt, Simon T; Robert, Jean-Michel; Rowland, Steven J; Moldowan, J Michael; Barbanti, Silvana M; Fago, Frederick J; Denisevich, Peter; Dahl, Jeremy; Trindade, Luiz A F; Schouten, Stefan

    2004-04-23

    The 18S ribosomal DNA molecular phylogeny and lipid composition of over 120 marine diatoms showed that the capability to biosynthesize highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes is restricted to two specific phylogenetic clusters, which independently evolved in centric and pennate diatoms. The molecular record of C25 HBI chemical fossils in a large suite of well-dated marine sediments and petroleum revealed that the older cluster, composed of rhizosolenid diatoms, evolved 91.5 +/- 1.5 million years ago (Upper Turonian), enabling an accurate dating of the pace of diatom evolution that is unprecedented. The rapid rise of the rhizosolenid diatoms probably resulted from a major reorganization of the nutrient budget in the mid-Cretaceous oceans, triggered by plate tectonics.

  3. Sea-level rise and coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Blankespoor, Brian; Dasgupta, Susmita; Laplante, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    This paper seeks to quantify the impact of a1-m sea-level rise on coastal wetlands in 86 developing countries and territories. It is found that approximately 68 % of coastal wetlands in these countries are at risk. A large percentage of this estimated loss is found in Europe and Central Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific, as well as in the Middle East and North Africa. A small number of countries will be severely affected. China and Vietnam(in East Asia and the Pacific), Libya and Egypt (in the Middle East and North Africa), and Romania and Ukraine (in Europe and Central Asia) will bear most losses. In economic terms, the loss of coastal wetlands is likely to exceed $703 million per year in 2000 US dollars.

  4. The rise of the rhizosolenid diatoms.

    PubMed

    Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Muyzer, Gerard; Abbas, Ben; Rampen, Sebastiaan W; Massé, Guillaume; Allard, W Guy; Belt, Simon T; Robert, Jean-Michel; Rowland, Steven J; Moldowan, J Michael; Barbanti, Silvana M; Fago, Frederick J; Denisevich, Peter; Dahl, Jeremy; Trindade, Luiz A F; Schouten, Stefan

    2004-04-23

    The 18S ribosomal DNA molecular phylogeny and lipid composition of over 120 marine diatoms showed that the capability to biosynthesize highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes is restricted to two specific phylogenetic clusters, which independently evolved in centric and pennate diatoms. The molecular record of C25 HBI chemical fossils in a large suite of well-dated marine sediments and petroleum revealed that the older cluster, composed of rhizosolenid diatoms, evolved 91.5 +/- 1.5 million years ago (Upper Turonian), enabling an accurate dating of the pace of diatom evolution that is unprecedented. The rapid rise of the rhizosolenid diatoms probably resulted from a major reorganization of the nutrient budget in the mid-Cretaceous oceans, triggered by plate tectonics. PMID:15105500

  5. Rise and fall of species occupancy in Cenozoic fossil mollusks.

    PubMed

    Foote, Michael; Crampton, James S; Beu, Alan G; Marshall, Bruce A; Cooper, Roger A; Maxwell, Phillip A; Matcham, Iain

    2007-11-16

    In the time between speciation and extinction, a species' ecological and biogeographic footprint-its occupancy-will vary in response to macroecological drivers and historical contingencies. Despite their importance for understanding macroecological processes, general patterns of long-term species occupancy remain largely unknown. We documented the occupancy histories of Cenozoic marine mollusks from New Zealand. For both genera and species, these show a distinct pattern of increase to relatively short-lived peak occupancy at mid-duration, followed by a decline toward extinction. Thus, species at greatest risk for extinction are those that have already been in decline for a substantial period of time. This pattern of protracted rise and fall stands in contrast to that of incumbency, insofar as species show no general tendency to stay near maximal occupancy once established.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  7. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Hansen, C. J.; Portyankina, G.; Russell, P. S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2009-04-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to monitor the seasonal evolution of several regions at high southern latitudes and, in particular, the geyser-like activity which may result from the process described by Kieffer [JGR, 112, 8005, 2007] involving translucent CO2 ice. Here, we mostly concentrate on observations of the Inca City (81S, 296E) region. The observations indicate rapid on-set of activity at the beginning of southern spring with activity initiating before HiRISE can obtain adequately illuminated images (Ls < 174 at Inca City). Most sources became active within the subsequent 8 weeks. Activity is indicated by the production of dark deposits surrounded by brighter bluer deposits which probably arise from the freezing out of vented CO2 [Titus et al., AGU Abstract P41A-0188, 2007]. These deposits originate from araneiform structures (spiders), stones on ridges, cracks on slopes, and along linear cracks in the slab ice on flatter surfaces. The type of activity observed can often be explained qualitatively by considering the local topography. Some dark fans were observed to shorten enormously in length on a timescale of 18 days. We consider this to be strong evidence that emission was in progress at the time of HiRISE image acquisition. The orientations of surficial deposits were mostly topographically controlled in Inca City in 2007. The deposition of dark material also appeared to be influenced by local topography suggesting that the ejection from the vents was at low velocity (<10 m/s) and that a ground-hugging flow type process (a sort of "cryo-fumarole") may have been occurring. The presentation will illustrate the above features and make a first comparison between activity separated by one full Martian year. Our first observations indicate a stronger influence of wind in 2009.

  8. Dynamics of rising bubble inside a viscosity-stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premlata, A. R.; Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2015-07-01

    The rising bubble dynamics in an unconfined quiescent viscosity-stratified medium has been numerically investigated. This is frequently encountered in industrial as well as natural phenomena. In spite of the large number of studies carried out on bubbles and drops, very few studies have examined the influence of viscosity stratification on bubble rise dynamics. To the best of our knowledge, none of them have isolated the effects of viscosity-stratification alone, even though it is known to influence the dynamics extensively, which is the main objective of the present study. By conducting time-dependent simulations, we present a library of bubble shapes in the Galilei and the Eötvös numbers plane. Our results demonstrate some counter-intuitive phenomena for certain range of parameters due to the presence of viscosity stratification in the surrounding fluid. We found that in a linearly increasing viscosity medium, for certain values of parameters, bubble undergoes large deformation by forming an elongated skirt, while the skirt tends to physically separate the wake region from the rest of the surrounding fluid. This peculiar dynamics is attributed to the migration of less viscous fluid that is carried in the wake of the bubble as it rises, and thereby creating an increasingly larger viscosity contrast between the fluid occupied in the wake region and the surrounding fluid, unlike that observed in a constant viscosity medium. It is also observed that the effect of viscosity stratification is qualitatively different for different regimes of the dimensionless parameters. In future, it will be interesting to investigate this problem in three-dimensions.

  9. Seismic modeling of a rising mine water table

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Orlowsky; Bobo Lehmann

    2007-01-15

    In former deep coal mining areas in Germany the mine water table is regulated by a water pump system such that the drinking water at the earth's surface is not influenced. For the modelling of possible changes at the earth's surface using the so called box model, a finite element model of the hydrogeologic situation in the Ruhr Area has been developed. To observe the depth of the mine water table usually old shafts or exploration drill holes are used at selected locations. Nevertheless, there are to less observation stations for a detailed modelling of the complete Ruhr Area so that additional observation locations are needed. To avoid the construction of expensive and complicated drill holes down to more than 1000 m depth an alternative technique to monitor the rising of the mine water table could be the time-lapse seismic (TLS) which is routinely used to monitor the effects of the exploitation of oil and gas deposits. It is expected, that the mine water table will not be detected directly as an additional reflector of seismic waves, due to the fact, that the impedance contrast between saturated carbonate rock and none saturated rock is too weak. Nevertheless, the reflectivity function of the layers in the underground will change, due to the water saturation process such that it might be possible to observe the rising of the mine water table using the TLS method. To define the requirements for the acquisition instrumentation and for the seismic field geometry extensive seismic modelling was performed to investigate, if it is possible to identify the rising of the mine water table. In a first step the influence of water saturation on the reflectivity and the velocities of seismic waves in carbonate rocks have to be determined. If the mine water table can be monitored, a direct input of the seismic results into a geological model should be possible to forecast critical changes at the surface. 5 refs.

  10. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  11. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label...

  12. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label...

  13. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label...

  14. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label...

  15. 21 CFR 137.185 - Enriched self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enriched self-rising flour. 137.185 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.185 Enriched self-rising flour. Enriched self-rising flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label...

  16. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Temperature rise. 111.20-5 Section 111.20-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The temperature rise, based on an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C, must not exceed the following: (1)...

  17. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Temperature rise. 111.20-5 Section 111.20-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The temperature rise, based on an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C, must not exceed the following: (1)...

  18. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temperature rise. 111.20-5 Section 111.20-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The temperature rise, based on an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C, must not exceed the following: (1)...

  19. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temperature rise. 111.20-5 Section 111.20-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The temperature rise, based on an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C, must not exceed the following: (1)...

  20. 46 CFR 111.20-5 - Temperature rise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Temperature rise. 111.20-5 Section 111.20-5 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Transformer Construction, Installation, and Protection § 111.20-5 Temperature rise. (a) The temperature rise, based on an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C, must not exceed the following: (1)...

  1. Cyclic fractionation processes beneath the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, A.; Almeev, R. R.; Holtz, F.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the magma ascent, storage and differentiation beneath large igneous provinces (LIPs) is still under debate. Mainly two competing models are explaining the formation of LIPs: 1) the arrival of a deep sourced mantle plume in the lithosphere, and 2) decompression melting of unusually fusible mantle beneath fast-spreading ridges. The Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau is a unique opportunity to discuss this problem because its tectonic evolution along the Pacific-Farallon-Izanagi triple junction is well known. We examined samples recovered during IODP Expedition 324 at the Tamu Massif, one of three massifs of the Shatsky Rise. In general, the Shatsky Rise glasses are tholeiitic basalts containing 5 to 8.7 wt% MgO. Compared to MORB, the glass compositions are high in FeO (Fe8: 10.3) and low in SiO2 and Na2O (Na8: 1.9), indicating high amounts of partial melting at great depth. The CaO/Al2O3 ratios in the Tamu Massif evolved glasses are higher respectively to MORB indicating low pressure cotectic fractionation. In general, the basaltic glasses from Shatsky Rise show differentiation trends similar to those of other oceanic plateaus, as e.g. Ontong Java and Kerguelen. Pressures and temperatures of magma storage were estimated for 40 naturally quenched glasses (5-6.5 wt% MgO) along a drilled profile of 150 m length. Based on the glass major element compositions (electron microprobe) and glass H2O contents (infrared spectroscopy), we simulated the conditions of multiple saturation (Liq+Ol+Pl+Cpx) using the COMAGMAT program. The calculated pressures range from 240 MPa to 1 atm and the calculated temperatures range from 1150 to 1100 °C, indicating polybaric crystallization in a shallow magma reservoir. As a result, along the drilled profile, we identified two complete cycles of magma injection in the reservoir with subsequent fractionation and eruption followed by a time of magmatic inactivity. The most magnesian samples of the Shatsky Rise were drilled at Ori

  2. Mangrove sedimentation and response to relative sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodroffe, CD; Rogers, K.; Mckee, Karen L.; Lovelock, CE; Mendelssohn, IA; Saintilan, N.

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur on upper intertidal shorelines in the tropics and subtropics. Complex hydrodynamic and salinity conditions influence mangrove distributions, primarily related to elevation and hydroperiod; this review considers how these adjust through time. Accumulation rates of allochthonous and autochthonous sediment, both inorganic and organic, vary between and within different settings. Abundant terrigenous sediment can form dynamic mudbanks; tides redistribute sediment, contrasting with mangrove peat in sediment-starved carbonate settings. Sediments underlying mangroves sequester carbon, but also contain paleoenvironmental records of adjustments to past sea-level changes. Radiometric dating indicates long-term sedimentation, whereas Surface Elevation Table-Marker Horizon measurements (SET-MH) provide shorter perspectives, indicating shallow subsurface processes of root growth and substrate autocompaction. Many tropical deltas also experience deep subsidence, which augments relative sea-level rise. The persistence of mangroves implies an ability to cope with moderately high rates of relative sea-level rise. However, many human pressures threaten mangroves, resulting in continuing decline in their extent throughout the tropics.

  3. Mangrove Sedimentation and Response to Relative Sea-Level Rise.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, C D; Rogers, K; McKee, K L; Lovelock, C E; Mendelssohn, I A; Saintilan, N

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur on upper intertidal shorelines in the tropics and subtropics. Complex hydrodynamic and salinity conditions, related primarily to elevation and hydroperiod, influence mangrove distributions; this review considers how these distributions change over time. Accumulation rates of allochthonous and autochthonous sediment, both inorganic and organic, vary between and within different settings. Abundant terrigenous sediment can form dynamic mudbanks, and tides redistribute sediment, contrasting with mangrove peat in sediment-starved carbonate settings. Sediments underlying mangroves sequester carbon but also contain paleoenvironmental records of adjustments to past sea-level changes. Radiometric dating indicates long-term sedimentation, whereas measurements made using surface elevation tables and marker horizons provide shorter perspectives, indicating shallow subsurface processes of root growth and substrate autocompaction. Many tropical deltas also experience deep subsidence, which augments relative sea-level rise. The persistence of mangroves implies an ability to cope with moderately high rates of relative sea-level rise. However, many human pressures threaten mangroves, resulting in a continuing decline in their extent throughout the tropics.

  4. Rising soil temperature in China and its potential ecological impact

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Enli; Zhou, Daowei; Luo, Zhongkui; Zhang, Zhengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Global warming influences a series of ecological processes and ecosystems’ stability. Although comprehensive studies have been done to investigate responses of various ecosystem processes to rising air temperatures, less is known about changes in soil temperatures and their impact on below-ground processes, particularly in deep layers. Herein, we used 50 y of temperature data (1962–2011) from 360 sites in China to assess spatio-temporal changes in soil temperatures from the surface to a depth of 3.20 m. We determined, apparently for the first time, that soil surface temperature increased 31% more than air temperature, potentially leading to more carbon release to the atmosphere than predicted. Annual mean surface temperature increased by 2.07–4.04 and 0.66–2.21 °C in northern and southern China, respectively, with the greatest in winter. Warming occurred as deep as 3.20 m. The soil temperature rise was predicted to have increased soil respiration by up to 28%, reinforcing climate warming and extending the potential growing season by up to 20 d across China. However, use of only air temperature to estimate soil temperature changes would underestimate those impacts. In conclusion, these results highlighted the importance of soil warming and of using soil temperature to assess and predict soil processes. PMID:27765953

  5. Mangrove Sedimentation and Response to Relative Sea-Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, C. D.; Rogers, K.; McKee, K. L.; Lovelock, C. E.; Mendelssohn, I. A.; Saintilan, N.

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur on upper intertidal shorelines in the tropics and subtropics. Complex hydrodynamic and salinity conditions, related primarily to elevation and hydroperiod, influence mangrove distributions; this review considers how these distributions change over time. Accumulation rates of allochthonous and autochthonous sediment, both inorganic and organic, vary between and within different settings. Abundant terrigenous sediment can form dynamic mudbanks, and tides redistribute sediment, contrasting with mangrove peat in sediment-starved carbonate settings. Sediments underlying mangroves sequester carbon but also contain paleoenvironmental records of adjustments to past sea-level changes. Radiometric dating indicates long-term sedimentation, whereas measurements made using surface elevation tables and marker horizons provide shorter perspectives, indicating shallow subsurface processes of root growth and substrate autocompaction. Many tropical deltas also experience deep subsidence, which augments relative sea-level rise. The persistence of mangroves implies an ability to cope with moderately high rates of relative sea-level rise. However, many human pressures threaten mangroves, resulting in a continuing decline in their extent throughout the tropics. *

  6. Optimization of water distribution systems in high-rise buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Han Tong; Chew, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    The scarcity of land in Singapore has led to a rapid escalation of land prices in recent years. This has resulted in developers building taller and taller buildings in order to maximize their return on building projects. Due to the height involved, the water distribution system in such buildings is a multi-stage one. Hence the problem of deciding the number of stages and the location of each stage arises. In this paper, we will describe the design decisions to be taken in the preliminary design of a multi-stage water distribution system in a high-rise building and pose it as an optimization problem to minimize the overall cost of implementation. The variable costcomponents are the cost of pumps, the floor space cost and the operational cost of the water distribution system. We will describe a study on a 66-story building and highlight the major findings. Interesting results are observed when the cost components are taken one at a time. The strategy for finding the optimum or near optimum for other high-rise buildings will be discussed.

  7. Mangrove Sedimentation and Response to Relative Sea-Level Rise.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, C D; Rogers, K; McKee, K L; Lovelock, C E; Mendelssohn, I A; Saintilan, N

    2016-01-01

    Mangroves occur on upper intertidal shorelines in the tropics and subtropics. Complex hydrodynamic and salinity conditions, related primarily to elevation and hydroperiod, influence mangrove distributions; this review considers how these distributions change over time. Accumulation rates of allochthonous and autochthonous sediment, both inorganic and organic, vary between and within different settings. Abundant terrigenous sediment can form dynamic mudbanks, and tides redistribute sediment, contrasting with mangrove peat in sediment-starved carbonate settings. Sediments underlying mangroves sequester carbon but also contain paleoenvironmental records of adjustments to past sea-level changes. Radiometric dating indicates long-term sedimentation, whereas measurements made using surface elevation tables and marker horizons provide shorter perspectives, indicating shallow subsurface processes of root growth and substrate autocompaction. Many tropical deltas also experience deep subsidence, which augments relative sea-level rise. The persistence of mangroves implies an ability to cope with moderately high rates of relative sea-level rise. However, many human pressures threaten mangroves, resulting in a continuing decline in their extent throughout the tropics. PMID:26407146

  8. Microbial geochemistry in rising plumes of two hydrothermal vents at the Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G.; Breier, J. A.; Toner, B. M.; Sheik, C.; Cron, B. R.; Li, M.; Reed, D. C.; Anantharaman, K.; Baker, B. J.; Jain, S.; Klausmeier, C. A.; Jiang, H.; German, C. R.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S. P.; McDermott, J. M.; Bennett, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Slow and ultraslow spreading ridges comprise ~50% of the global ridge-axis length and are thus relevant to the impact of hydrothermal activity on global ocean biogeochemistry. These ridges host ultramafic vent systems with reducing chemical environments that yield hydrothermal fluids rich in methane, hydrogen, and organic carbon, thus providing energy sources to biological communities relevant to the origin and early evolution of life on Earth and the potential for life on other planets. Microbial-geochemical interactions are also important for understanding how deep-sea hydrothermal vents impact ocean biogeochemistry, especially in hydrothermal plumes, where vent fluids stimulate chemosynthetic microbial communities and microbes influence the oceanic fate of hydrothermally-sourced elements. Many critical processes occur in the rising portion of hydrothermal plumes, which are dynamic and challenging to sample. To address these questions and challenges, we developed methods for the in situ collection and preservation of paired microbiology and geochemical samples from rising hydrothermal plumes. Samples were collected with ROV Jason from two hydrothermal vent systems, Von Damm and Beebe, which are in close proximity to each other on the Mid Cayman Rise yet are quite distinct in terms of chemistry, temperature, and depth. Bulk geochemistry, spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and molecular microbiological approaches were applied to yield some of the first views into the dynamic biotic and abiotic processes operative in rising hydrothermal plumes from an ultra-slow spreading system. Results indicate that the Cayman plumes are enriched in hydrogen, sulfur, and methane-utilizing microorganisms relative to background deep Caribbean seawater. Clear differences were observed between near-vent samples, which were dominated by seafloor-derived organisms, and samples from the upper buoyant or non-buoyant plume. These Cayman plume microbes are distinct from those observed in

  9. Northern east Pacific rise: Magnetic anomaly and bathymetric framework

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Mammerickx, J.

    1982-08-10

    The oceanic crust in the eastern Pacific between 7/sup 0/N and 30/sup 0/N and east of 127/sup 0/W contains a fairly complete history of the spreading centers associated with the East Pacific Rise since 25 m.y. B.P. (late Oligocene). In this paper, we have summarized the seafloor spreading magnetic-anomaly data and the bathymetric data that reflect the record of this technique history. The well-defined magnetic lineations north of the Clarion fracture zone, in the mouth of the Gulf of California, and on the east flank of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are carefully examined and used to provide a guide for interpreting the spreading pattern between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones, southward of the Rivera fracture zone over the Mathematician Ridge, and over the entire EPR east of the Mathematician Ridge between the Rivera and Siqueiros fracture zones. The bathymetric data provide a trace of the fracture zone pattern in each of the above mentioned areas. The fracture zone bathymetry and the seafloor spreading magnetc lineations on the EPR south of the Rivera fracture zone have a distinctive fanning pattern caused by close poles of rotation and plate boundary reorganizations. All these data provide a good record of the plate reorganizations in the middle Miocene at magnetic anomaly 5A time (12.5 to 11 m.y. B.P.), in the late Miocene at a magnetic anomaly 3'--4 time (6.5 m.y. B.P.), and in the Pliocene at magnetic anomaly 2'--3 time (3.5 m.y.B.P.). Several abandoned spreading centers, including the Mathematician Ridge, were left behind as a result of these reorganizations. The Mathematician Ridge is shown to be a set of ridges and trough whose origin is related to the tectonics activity associated with each of the above mentioned reorganizations since anomaly 5A.

  10. China's rising hydropower demand challenges water sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Zhao, Dandan; Gerbens-Leenes, P W; Guan, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    Demand for hydropower is increasing, yet the water footprints (WFs) of reservoirs and hydropower, and their contributions to water scarcity, are poorly understood. Here, we calculate reservoir WFs (freshwater that evaporates from reservoirs) and hydropower WFs (the WF of hydroelectricity) in China based on data from 875 representative reservoirs (209 with power plants). In 2010, the reservoir WF totaled 27.9 × 10(9) m(3) (Gm(3)), or 22% of China's total water consumption. Ignoring the reservoir WF seriously underestimates human water appropriation. The reservoir WF associated with industrial, domestic and agricultural WFs caused water scarcity in 6 of the 10 major Chinese river basins from 2 to 12 months annually. The hydropower WF was 6.6 Gm(3) yr(-1) or 3.6 m(3) of water to produce a GJ (10(9) J) of electricity. Hydropower is a water intensive energy carrier. As a response to global climate change, the Chinese government has promoted a further increase in hydropower energy by 70% by 2020 compared to 2012. This energy policy imposes pressure on available freshwater resources and increases water scarcity. The water-energy nexus requires strategic and coordinated implementations of hydropower development among geographical regions, as well as trade-off analysis between rising energy demand and water use sustainability. PMID:26158871

  11. China's rising hydropower demand challenges water sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Zhao, Dandan; Gerbens-Leenes, P W; Guan, Dabo

    2015-07-09

    Demand for hydropower is increasing, yet the water footprints (WFs) of reservoirs and hydropower, and their contributions to water scarcity, are poorly understood. Here, we calculate reservoir WFs (freshwater that evaporates from reservoirs) and hydropower WFs (the WF of hydroelectricity) in China based on data from 875 representative reservoirs (209 with power plants). In 2010, the reservoir WF totaled 27.9 × 10(9) m(3) (Gm(3)), or 22% of China's total water consumption. Ignoring the reservoir WF seriously underestimates human water appropriation. The reservoir WF associated with industrial, domestic and agricultural WFs caused water scarcity in 6 of the 10 major Chinese river basins from 2 to 12 months annually. The hydropower WF was 6.6 Gm(3) yr(-1) or 3.6 m(3) of water to produce a GJ (10(9) J) of electricity. Hydropower is a water intensive energy carrier. As a response to global climate change, the Chinese government has promoted a further increase in hydropower energy by 70% by 2020 compared to 2012. This energy policy imposes pressure on available freshwater resources and increases water scarcity. The water-energy nexus requires strategic and coordinated implementations of hydropower development among geographical regions, as well as trade-off analysis between rising energy demand and water use sustainability.

  12. Iraqi crude exports may rise further

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-08

    Iraq will soon start exporting crude oil through a 550 mi, 500,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline from Iraq to Banias, Syria, on the Mediterranean. Iraq has already been transporting a reported 400,000 bbl/day in a 700,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline that goes to Dortyol, Turk., on the Mediterranean. Iraq's theoretical export capacity will soon reach 1.2 million bbl/day (compared with 3.2 million bbl/day before the war), assuming that the facilities are undamaged. Iran has been exporting some crude from its Kharg Island terminal, presumably by Iranian boat to the Lavan Island terminal at the southern end of the gulf, where it would be transported along with crude from offshore fields in the area. The exports apparently had been large enough to keep spot-market prices from rising much above the $40/bbl level, and in Dec. 1980, the spot-market prices eased to just under the $40 mark. Indonesia has raised the premium on its Sumatran light crude by $1/bbl, bringing the total to $35.20. Other producers have not yet raised their prices correspondingly. The agenda of the Dec. 1980 price-fixing meeting in Indonesia (assuming it takes place as planned) is discussed.

  13. Volcanic rocks cored on hess rise, Western Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Windom, K.E.; Seifert, K.E.; Thiede, Jorn

    1980-01-01

    Large aseismic rises and plateaus in the western Pacific include the Ontong-Java Plateau, Magellan Rise, Shatsky Rise, Mid-Pacific Mountains, and Hess Rise. These are relatively old features that rise above surrounding sea floors as bathymetric highs. Thick sequences of carbonate sediments overlie, what are believed to be, Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous volcanic pedestals. We discuss here petrological and tectonic implications of data from volcanic rocks cored on Hess Rise. The data suggest that Hess Rise originated at a spreading centre in the late early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian stages). Subsequent off-ridge volcanism in the late Albian-early Cenomanian stages built a large archipelago of oceanic islands and seamounts composed, at least in part, of alkalic rocks. The volcanic platform subsided during its northward passage through the mid-Cretaceousequatorial zone. Faulting and uplift, and possibly volcanism, occurred in the latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian stages). Since then, Hess Rise continued its northward movement and subsidence. Volcanic rocks from holes drilled on Hess Rise during IPOD Leg 62 (Fig. 1) are briefly described here and we relate the petrological data to the origin and evolution of that rise. These are the first volcanic rocks reported from Hess Rise. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Study of the time-resolved, 3-dimensional current density distribution in solid metallic liners at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C.; Cordaro, S. W.; Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Potter, W.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the time varying current density distribution in solid metallic liner experiments at the 1 MA level. Measurements are taken using an array of magnetic field probes which provide 2D triangulation of the average centroid of the drive current in the load at 3 discrete axial positions. These data are correlated with gated optical self-emission imaging which directly images the breakdown and plasma formation region. Results show that the current density is azimuthally non-uniform and changes significantly throughout the 100 ns experimental timescale. Magnetic field probes show clearly motion of the current density around the liner azimuth over 10 ns timescales. If breakdown is initiated at one azimuthal location, the current density remains non-uniform even over large spatial extents throughout the current drive. The evolution timescales are suggestive of a resistive diffusion process or uneven current distributions among simultaneously formed but discrete plasma conduction paths.

  15. Time-resolved photoluminescence of type-II quantum dots and isoelectronic centers in Zn-Se-Te superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C.-K.; Cartwright, A. N.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally and time-resolved photoluminescence of a ZnTe /ZnSe superlattice reveals a smooth transition of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime from ˜100ns at 2.35eV to less than a few nanoseconds at 2.8eV. The significant increase of the lifetime in the low energy region is strong evidence to support the formation of type-II quantum dots (QDs), since in these nanostructures the spatial separation of carriers is increased. The shorter lived emission above 2.5eV is attributed to excitons bound to Te isoelectronic centers in the ZnSe matrix. The smooth transition of the PL lifetime confirms that clusters of these Te atoms evolve into type-II ZnTe /ZnSe QDs.

  16. Anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in porous media.

    PubMed

    Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D; Sprittles, James E

    2012-07-01

    The anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in a porous medium discovered experimentally more than a decade ago [T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)] is described. The developed theory is based on considering the principal modes of motion of the menisci that collectively form the wetting front on the Darcy scale. These modes, which include (i) dynamic wetting mode, (ii) threshold mode, and (iii) interface depinning process, are incorporated into the boundary conditions for the bulk equations formulated in the regular framework of continuum mechanics of porous media, thus allowing one to consider a general case of three-dimensional flows. The developed theory makes it possible to describe all regimes observed in the experiment, with the time spanning more than four orders of magnitude, and highlights the dominant physical mechanisms at different stages of the process.

  17. Rising dough and baking bread at the Australian synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, S. C.; McCann, T.; Day, L.; Favaro, J.; Tuhumury, H.; Thompson, D.; Maksimenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat protein quality and the amount of common salt added in dough formulation can have a significant effect on the microstructure and loaf volume of bread. High-speed synchrotron micro-CT provides an ideal tool for observing the three dimensional structure of bread dough in situ during proving (rising) and baking. In this work, the synchrotron micro-CT technique was used to observe the structure and time evolution of doughs made from high and low protein flour and three different salt additives. These experiments showed that, as expected, high protein flour produces a higher volume loaf compared to low protein flour regardless of salt additives. Furthermore the results show that KCl in particular has a very negative effect on dough properties resulting in much reduced porosity. The hundreds of datasets produced and analysed during this experiment also provided a valuable test case for handling large quantities of data using tools on the Australian Synchrotron's MASSIVE cluster.

  18. The rise and fall of gluten!

    PubMed

    Aziz, Imran; Branchi, Federica; Sanders, David S

    2015-08-01

    Mankind has existed for 2·5 million years but only in the last 10,000 years have we been exposed to wheat. Wheat was first cultivated in the Fertile Crescent (South Western Asia) with a farming expansion that lasted from about 9000BC to 4000BC. Thus it could be considered that wheat (and gluten) is a novel introduction to man's diet! Prior to 1939 the rationing system had already been devised. This led to an imperative to try to increase agricultural production. Thus it was agreed in 1941 that there was a need to establish a Nutrition Society. The very roots of the society were geared towards necessarily increasing the production of wheat. This goal was achieved and by the end of the 20th century, global wheat output had expanded 5-fold. Perhaps as a result the epidemiology of coeliac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy has changed. CD is a state of heightened immunological responsiveness to ingested gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. CD now affects 1 % or more of all adults, for which the treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, there is a growing body of evidence to show that a far greater proportion of individuals without coeliac disease are taking a gluten-free diet of their own volition. This clinical entity has been termed non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), although the condition is fraught with complexities due to overlap with other gluten-based constituents that can also trigger similar clinical symptoms. This review will explore the relationship between gluten, the rising prevalence of modern coeliac disease, and the new entity of NCGS along with its associated uncertainties.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Matthew; Francois, Marianne M.

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  20. Kinematic the flaying frontal rising kick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasik, Jacek

    2007-08-01

    Eventually every competitor will have to face the decision which path to take in order to achieve success. In many situations estimation is the best tool for achieving success. In order to successfully complete the rising kick test during the special techniques competition, the competitor, as well as his or hers trainer must be aware of the optimal methods in achieving the best result. It is known that in order to achieve victory one must fulfill a number of conditions different for a specific discipline, but there is also a way a certain technique that theoretically allows achieving the best result. Currently almost every one of the top competitors doesn't use the traditional technique (the scissors technique) and performs the test using the non-scissors technique. During the special technique test, the height that the competitor successfully completes, is a sum of 3 heights: the height of the competitor's center of gravity at the moment of the take-off, the change of the height of the center of gravity of the competitor during the flight, and the difference between the highest point of the center of gravity of the competitor and the height at witch the target is suspended. This is shown by the following formula: H = hsc + hw + Δh + hn. There are several factors that influence the height of the test: the speed of the center of gravity, the angle created by the vector of speed and the horizontal line, the change in altitude of the center of gravity and the force of the take-off. This thesis contains the theoretical solutions, from the physical point of view, to successfully complete this test while achieving the highest possible altitude of the jump.

  1. Influence of early rising on performance in tasks requiring attention and memory.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, V Shankar; Raghavendra, Bhat Ramachandra; Manjunath, Nandi Krishnamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Rising early in the morning has been a prescribed discipline of ancient Indian tradition. While there are no scientific studies comparing early rising volitionally versus circumstantially, selected studies on the latter (rising forcefully) have shown negative impact on an individual's peroformance. Hence the present study was undertaken to assess the influence of early rising (during Brahma-muhurtha) on tasks requiring attention and the ability to recall. Fifty four normal healthy male volunteers, with ages ranging from 16-22 years from a residential school were selected. They were randomly allocated to two groups (Brahma-muhurtha and control). They were assessed on day 1, day 10 and day 20 of the intervention, using a digit letter substitution task and verbal and spatial memory task. The Brahma-muhurtha group were asked to rise before 4:30 am in the morning based on the traditional Indian astrological calculations, while the control group were allowed to wake up just before 7 am which was their regular timing for waking. Brahma-muhurtha group after 20 days showed a significant improvement in the net scores for digit letter substitution task as well as scores for verbal and spatial memory tasks. The control group also showed an improvement in the memory task but not in the task requiring attentional processes. The present study suggests that rising early in the morning as described in ancient Indian tradition influences the process of attention and can improve the ability to recall. PMID:23781653

  2. Short time transient thermal behavior of solid-state microrefrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzahri, Y.; Christofferson, J.; Zeng, G.; Shakouri, A.

    2009-12-01

    We present detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the short time transient thermal behavior of SiGe superlattice microrefrigerators on a chip. Transient temperature profiles of microrefrigerator devices of different sizes are obtained using thermoreflectance technique. Thermal imaging with submicron spatial resolution, 0.1 K temperature resolution, and 100 ns temporal resolution is achieved. The dynamic behavior of the microrefrigerators shows an interplay between Peltier and Joule effects. Peltier cooling appears first with a time constant of about 10-30 μs, then Joule heating in the device starts taking over with a time constant of about 50-150 μs. The experimental results agree very well with the theoretical predictions based on thermal quadruple method. The difference in the two time constants can be explained considering the three-dimensional thermal resistances and capacitances of the microrefrigerator. In addition this shows that the Joule heating at the top metal/semiconductor interface does not dominate the microrefrigerator performance. Experimental results show that under high current pulsed operation, the microrefrigerator device can provide cooling for about 30 μs, even though steady state measurements show heating.

  3. SEA-LEVEL RISE. Sea-level rise due to polar ice-sheet mass loss during past warm periods.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; Carlson, A E; Long, A J; Milne, G A; Clark, P U; DeConto, R; Horton, B P; Rahmstorf, S; Raymo, M E

    2015-07-10

    Interdisciplinary studies of geologic archives have ushered in a new era of deciphering magnitudes, rates, and sources of sea-level rise from polar ice-sheet loss during past warm periods. Accounting for glacial isostatic processes helps to reconcile spatial variability in peak sea level during marine isotope stages 5e and 11, when the global mean reached 6 to 9 meters and 6 to 13 meters higher than present, respectively. Dynamic topography introduces large uncertainties on longer time scales, precluding robust sea-level estimates for intervals such as the Pliocene. Present climate is warming to a level associated with significant polar ice-sheet loss in the past. Here, we outline advances and challenges involved in constraining ice-sheet sensitivity to climate change with use of paleo-sea level records. PMID:26160951

  4. SEA-LEVEL RISE. Sea-level rise due to polar ice-sheet mass loss during past warm periods.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; Carlson, A E; Long, A J; Milne, G A; Clark, P U; DeConto, R; Horton, B P; Rahmstorf, S; Raymo, M E

    2015-07-10

    Interdisciplinary studies of geologic archives have ushered in a new era of deciphering magnitudes, rates, and sources of sea-level rise from polar ice-sheet loss during past warm periods. Accounting for glacial isostatic processes helps to reconcile spatial variability in peak sea level during marine isotope stages 5e and 11, when the global mean reached 6 to 9 meters and 6 to 13 meters higher than present, respectively. Dynamic topography introduces large uncertainties on longer time scales, precluding robust sea-level estimates for intervals such as the Pliocene. Present climate is warming to a level associated with significant polar ice-sheet loss in the past. Here, we outline advances and challenges involved in constraining ice-sheet sensitivity to climate change with use of paleo-sea level records.

  5. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, Jeff S.; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Krause, Crystal M.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds.

  6. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Jeff S; Reynolds, Michelle H; Seavy, Nathaniel E; Krause, Crystal M

    2012-08-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds. PMID:22624702

  7. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Jeff S; Reynolds, Michelle H; Seavy, Nathaniel E; Krause, Crystal M

    2012-08-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds.

  8. Swarm dynamics may give rise to Lévy flights

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andrew M.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    “Continuous-time correlated random walks” are now gaining traction as models of scale-finite animal movement patterns because they overcome inherent shortcomings with the prevailing paradigm - discrete random walk models. Continuous-time correlated random walk models are founded on the classic Langevin equation that is driven by purely additive noise. The Langevin equation is, however, changed fundamentally by the smallest of multiplicative noises. The inclusion of such noises gives rise to Lévy flights, a popular but controversial model of scale-free movement patterns. Multiplicative noises have not featured prominently in the literature on biological Lévy flights, being seen, perhaps, as no more than a mathematical contrivance. Here we show how Langevin equations driven by multiplicative noises and incumbent Lévy flights arise naturally in the modelling of swarms. Model predictions find some support in three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. We hereby provide a new window on Lévy flights as models of movement pattern data, linking patterns to generative processes. PMID:27465971

  9. Swarm dynamics may give rise to Lévy flights.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew M; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    "Continuous-time correlated random walks" are now gaining traction as models of scale-finite animal movement patterns because they overcome inherent shortcomings with the prevailing paradigm - discrete random walk models. Continuous-time correlated random walk models are founded on the classic Langevin equation that is driven by purely additive noise. The Langevin equation is, however, changed fundamentally by the smallest of multiplicative noises. The inclusion of such noises gives rise to Lévy flights, a popular but controversial model of scale-free movement patterns. Multiplicative noises have not featured prominently in the literature on biological Lévy flights, being seen, perhaps, as no more than a mathematical contrivance. Here we show how Langevin equations driven by multiplicative noises and incumbent Lévy flights arise naturally in the modelling of swarms. Model predictions find some support in three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. We hereby provide a new window on Lévy flights as models of movement pattern data, linking patterns to generative processes. PMID:27465971

  10. Storminess helps coastal marshes withstand sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Rising sea levels are predicted to threaten many coastal sea marshes around the world in the coming decades as the Earth's climate warms. In addition to accelerating sea level rise, global climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and severity of storms in many places around the world. However, few studies have taken into account how an increased storminess might affect the ability of coastal marshes to withstand sea level rise.

  11. Demographic responses to sea level rise in California

    SciTech Connect

    Constable, A. |; Van Arsdol, M.D. Jr.; Sherman, D.J.; Wang, J.; McMullin-Messier, P.A.; Rollin, L.

    1996-12-31

    Human consequences of sea level rise in California coastal counties reflect increasing population densities. Populations of coastal counties potentially affected by sea level rise are projected to increase from 26.2 million persons in 1990 to 63.3 million persons in 2040. Urbanization dominates Los Angeles and the South Coast and San Francisco Bay and Delta regions. California shoreline populations subject to potential disruption impacts of sea level rise are increasing rapidly. Enhanced risk zones for sea level rise are specified for the Oxnard Plain of Ventura County on the south coast of California. Four separate sea level rise scenarios are considered: (1) low (sea level rise only); (2) moderate (adding erosion); (3) high (adding erosion and storm surges); and (4) a maximum case, a 3 m enhanced risk zone. Population impacts are outlined for the 3 m zone. More serious impacts from storm surges are expected than from sea level rise and erosion. Stakeholders who support or oppose policies which may expose populations to sea level rise include energy, commercial, financial, industrial, public agency, private interest and governmental organizations. These organizations respond to extreme events from differing positions. Vested interests determine the degree of mitigation employed by stakeholders to defer impacts of sea level rise.

  12. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  13. 57. photographer unknown 30 October 1935 PIERS RISING FROM CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. photographer unknown 30 October 1935 PIERS RISING FROM CONCRETE DECK. BAFFLES IN VARIOUS STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  14. Effects of sea level rise on rugged coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Belknap, D.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Rugged coasts are usually rock framed, with more or less discontinuous unconsolidated sediment supply. Evolution of rugged coasts with respect to rising sea level is locally variable, involving rapid changes in facies over short distances and times. Glaciated and tectonic coasts are common examples. Three aspects of coastal evolution dominate rugged coasts during rising sea level: (1) drowning of resistant rocky shores, (2) bluff erosion in sediments or cliff erosion in less resistant rocks, involving marine abrasion as well as terrestrial processes and control by rock structures, and (3) larger scale structural control creating indentations and salients. The third aspect results in embayed coasts that may evolve as estuarine, fjord, or barrier-backbarrier systems. Of overriding concern for stratigraphic interpretation are paleogeography and sediment sources. The Maine coast and nearshore are classic examples of drowned shoreline, and record the effects of glaciation and rapid relative sea level changes over the past 14,000 yr. Offshore at {minus}60 m is a lowstand shoreline (approximately 10,000 yr B.P.), which ranges from cliff to barrier split( ). The inner shelf has evolved through drowning of shelf valleys and peninsulas, bluff erosion and formation of local transgressive barrier-backbarrier systems. Often short-term steady state equilibrium is established until a threshold is reached followed by rapid reorganization at a new location. This occurs in barrier systems, by overtopping of sills in estuaries, and in variable bluff and cliff erosion sites. Preservation potential is high only in valley axes and at sea level stillstand positions.

  15. Projections of Rapidly Rising Temperatures over Africa Under Low Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbrecht, Francois; Adegoke, Jimmy; Bopape, Mary-Jane; Naidoo, Mogesh; Garland, Rebecca; Thatcher, Marcus; McGregor, John; Katzfe, Jack; Werner, Micha; Ichoku, Charles; Gatebe, Charles

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of observed trends in African annual-average near-surface temperatures over the last five decades reveals drastic increases, particularly over parts of the subtropics and central tropical Africa. Over these regions, temperatures have been rising at more than twice the global rate of temperature increase. An ensemble of high-resolution downscalings, obtained using a single regional climate model forced with the sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice fields of an ensemble of global circulation model (GCM) simulations, is shown to realistically represent the relatively strong temperature increases observed in subtropical southern and northern Africa. The amplitudes of warming are generally underestimated, however. Further warming is projected to occur during the 21st century, with plausible increases of 4-6 C over the subtropics and 3-5 C over the tropics by the end of the century relative to present-day climate under the A2 (a low mitigation) scenario of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios. High impact climate events such as heat-wave days and high fire-danger days are consistently projected to increase drastically in their frequency of occurrence. General decreases in soil-moisture availability are projected, even for regions where increases in rainfall are plausible, due to enhanced levels of evaporation. The regional downscalings presented here, and recent GCM projections obtained for Africa, indicate that African annual-averaged temperatures may plausibly rise at about 1.5 times the global rate of temperature increase in the subtropics, and at a somewhat lower rate in the tropics. These projected increases although drastic, may be conservative given the model underestimations of observed temperature trends. The relatively strong rate of warming over Africa, in combination with the associated increases in extreme temperature events, may be key factors to consider when interpreting the suitability of global mitigation targets in terms of African

  16. Comment [on “Sea level rise shown to drive coastal erosion”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Young, Robert S.; Bush, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Leatherman et al. [2000] (Eos, Trans., AGU, February 8, 2000, p.55) affirm that global eustatic sea-level rise is driving coastal erosion. Furthermore, they argue that the long-term average rate of shoreline retreat is 150 times the rate of sea-level rise. This rate, they say, is more than a magnitude greater than would be expected from a simple response to sea-level rise through inundation of the shoreline. We agree that sea-level rise is the primary factor causing shoreline retreat in stable coastal areas.This is intuitive. We also believe, however, that the Leatherman et al. [2000] study has greatly underestimated the rate of coastal recession along most low slope shorelines. Slopes along the North Carolina continental shelf/coastal plain approach 10,000:1. To us, this suggests that we should expect rates of shoreline recession 10,000 times the rate of sea-level rise through simple inundation of the shoreline.

  17. Is School Bullying Really on the Rise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Ken; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Whether bullying in schools is increasing, as is widely believed, was investigated drawing upon empirical studies undertaken in a wide range of countries in which findings had been published describing its prevalence at different points in time between 1990 and 2009. Results do not support the view that reported bullying in general has increased…

  18. Rescuing Education: The Rise of Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The term "experiential education" can be--and has been--applied to a wide range of educational programming. Malcolm McKenzie's working definition of experiential education is this: it promotes learning through direct experience, often outside the classroom, at times not directly related to academic courses, frequently not graded,…

  19. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Kasen, Daniel; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our

  20. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal waterbirds are vulnerable to water-level changes especially under predictions of accelerating sea-level rise and increased storm frequency in the next century. Tidal and wind-driven fluctuations in water levels affecting marshes, their invertebrate communities, and their dependent waterbirds are manifested in daily, monthly, seasonal, annual, and supra-annual (e.g., decadal or 18.6-yr) periodicities. Superimposed on these cyclic patterns is a long-term (50?80 yr) increase in relative sea-level rise that varies from about 2?4 + mm/yr along the Atlantic coastline. At five study sites selected on marsh islands from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to coastal Virginia, we monitored marsh elevation changes and flooding, tide variations over time, and waterbird use. We found from longterm marsh core data that marsh elevations at three of five sites may not be sufficient to maintain pace with current sea-level rise. Results of the short-term (3?4 yr) measures using surface elevation tables suggest a more dramatic difference, with marsh elevation change at four of five sites falling below relative sea-level rise. In addition, we have found a significant increase (in three of four cases) in the rate of surface marsh flooding in New Jersey and Virginia over the past 70?80 yr during May?July when waterbirds are nesting on or near the marsh surface. Short-term, immediate effects of flooding will jeopardize annual fecundity of many species of concern to federal and state agencies, most notably American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Nelson?s Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni), Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (A. caudacutus), Seaside Sparrow (A. maritima), Coastal Plain Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens), Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis), Forster?s Tern (Sterna forsteri), Gull-billed Tern (S. nilotica), Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger), and American Oystercatcher (Haemotopus palliatus). Forster?s Terns are probably most at risk given the large proportion of their

  1. Combating a rising incidence of Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Beckford-Ball, Jason

    A statement released last week by the Health Protection Agency highlighted a recent increase in the incidence of Legionnaire's disease in England and Wales. Although an upsurge in cases is common at this time of year due to people returning from holidays abroad, only a small proportion of the recent cases can be attributed to foreign travel. Nurses need to be aware of the symptoms and what health measures they can take.

  2. The rise of blogs in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joni

    2012-04-01

    The number of blogs and related online activities continues to grow exponentially each year. Patients increasingly are turning to the Internet for personalized, timely, and relevant health information; blogs remain a large source of that information. Nurses and other healthcare professionals can harness the informational, educational, networking, and supportive power of blogs, as well, and should understand how to access and use blogs for professional use.

  3. The rise of blogs in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joni

    2012-04-01

    The number of blogs and related online activities continues to grow exponentially each year. Patients increasingly are turning to the Internet for personalized, timely, and relevant health information; blogs remain a large source of that information. Nurses and other healthcare professionals can harness the informational, educational, networking, and supportive power of blogs, as well, and should understand how to access and use blogs for professional use. PMID:22459532

  4. The Formation of the Rising Generation under the Conditions of Social Differentiation in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabunova, A.

    2008-01-01

    The transformations in Russian society that took place in the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century led to a rapid rise in social and economic differentiation. According to official data, the income gap between the 10 percent most-well-off and the 10 percent least-well-off families (the capital coefficient) rose to 14.8 times in…

  5. Application of a rising plate meter to estimate forage yield on dairy farms in PA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately assessing pasture forage yield is necessary for producers who want to budget feed expenses and make informed pasture management decisions. Clipping and weighing forage from a known area is a direct method to measure pasture forage yield, however it is time consuming. The rising plate mete...

  6. Application of a rising plate meter to estimate forage yield on dairy farms in Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately assessing pasture forage yield is necessary for producers who want to budget feed expenses and make informed pasture management decisions. Clipping and weighing forage from a known area is a direct method to measure pasture forage yield, however it is time consuming. The rising plate mete...

  7. El Niño and a record CO2 rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Richard A.; Jones, Chris D.; Knight, Jeff R.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Kennedy, John J.

    2016-09-01

    The recent El Niño event has elevated the rise in CO2 concentration this year. Here, using emissions, sea surface temperature data and a climate model, we forecast that the CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa will for the first time remain above 400 ppm all year, and hence for our lifetimes.

  8. Rising levels of atmospheric oxygen and evolution of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Gacesa, Ranko; Dunlap, Walter C; Barlow, David J; Laskowski, Roman A; Long, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the master transcription regulator of antioxidant defences is provided by the Nrf2 protein. Phylogenetic analyses of Nrf2 sequences are used here to derive a molecular clock that manifests persuasive evidence that Nrf2 orthologues emerged, and then diverged, at two time points that correlate with well-established geochemical and palaeobiological chronologies during progression of the 'Great Oxygenation Event'. We demonstrate that orthologues of Nrf2 first appeared in fungi around 1.5 Ga during the Paleoproterozoic when photosynthetic oxygen was being absorbed into the oceans. A subsequent significant divergence in Nrf2 is seen during the split between fungi and the Metazoa approximately 1.0-1.2 Ga, at a time when oceanic ventilation released free oxygen to the atmosphere, but with most being absorbed by methane oxidation and oxidative weathering of land surfaces until approximately 800 Ma. Atmospheric oxygen levels thereafter accumulated giving rise to metazoan success known as the Cambrian explosion commencing at ~541 Ma. Atmospheric O2 levels then rose in the mid Paleozoic (359-252 Ma), and Nrf2 diverged once again at the division between mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates during the Permian-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma). Understanding Nrf2 evolution as an effective antioxidant response may have repercussions for improved human health.

  9. Rising levels of atmospheric oxygen and evolution of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Gacesa, Ranko; Dunlap, Walter C; Barlow, David J; Laskowski, Roman A; Long, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the master transcription regulator of antioxidant defences is provided by the Nrf2 protein. Phylogenetic analyses of Nrf2 sequences are used here to derive a molecular clock that manifests persuasive evidence that Nrf2 orthologues emerged, and then diverged, at two time points that correlate with well-established geochemical and palaeobiological chronologies during progression of the 'Great Oxygenation Event'. We demonstrate that orthologues of Nrf2 first appeared in fungi around 1.5 Ga during the Paleoproterozoic when photosynthetic oxygen was being absorbed into the oceans. A subsequent significant divergence in Nrf2 is seen during the split between fungi and the Metazoa approximately 1.0-1.2 Ga, at a time when oceanic ventilation released free oxygen to the atmosphere, but with most being absorbed by methane oxidation and oxidative weathering of land surfaces until approximately 800 Ma. Atmospheric oxygen levels thereafter accumulated giving rise to metazoan success known as the Cambrian explosion commencing at ~541 Ma. Atmospheric O2 levels then rose in the mid Paleozoic (359-252 Ma), and Nrf2 diverged once again at the division between mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates during the Permian-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma). Understanding Nrf2 evolution as an effective antioxidant response may have repercussions for improved human health. PMID:27297177

  10. Rising levels of atmospheric oxygen and evolution of Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Gacesa, Ranko; Dunlap, Walter C.; Barlow, David J.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Long, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the master transcription regulator of antioxidant defences is provided by the Nrf2 protein. Phylogenetic analyses of Nrf2 sequences are used here to derive a molecular clock that manifests persuasive evidence that Nrf2 orthologues emerged, and then diverged, at two time points that correlate with well-established geochemical and palaeobiological chronologies during progression of the ‘Great Oxygenation Event’. We demonstrate that orthologues of Nrf2 first appeared in fungi around 1.5 Ga during the Paleoproterozoic when photosynthetic oxygen was being absorbed into the oceans. A subsequent significant divergence in Nrf2 is seen during the split between fungi and the Metazoa approximately 1.0–1.2 Ga, at a time when oceanic ventilation released free oxygen to the atmosphere, but with most being absorbed by methane oxidation and oxidative weathering of land surfaces until approximately 800 Ma. Atmospheric oxygen levels thereafter accumulated giving rise to metazoan success known as the Cambrian explosion commencing at ~541 Ma. Atmospheric O2 levels then rose in the mid Paleozoic (359–252 Ma), and Nrf2 diverged once again at the division between mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates during the Permian-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma). Understanding Nrf2 evolution as an effective antioxidant response may have repercussions for improved human health. PMID:27297177

  11. Near-simultaneous great earthquakes at Tongan megathrust and outer rise in September 2009.

    PubMed

    Beavan, J; Wang, X; Holden, C; Wilson, K; Power, W; Prasetya, G; Bevis, M; Kautoke, R

    2010-08-19

    The Earth's largest earthquakes and tsunamis are usually caused by thrust-faulting earthquakes on the shallow part of the subduction interface between two tectonic plates, where stored elastic energy due to convergence between the plates is rapidly released. The tsunami that devastated the Samoan and northern Tongan islands on 29 September 2009 was preceded by a globally recorded magnitude-8 normal-faulting earthquake in the outer-rise region, where the Pacific plate bends before entering the subduction zone. Preliminary interpretation suggested that this earthquake was the source of the tsunami. Here we show that the outer-rise earthquake was accompanied by a nearly simultaneous rupture of the shallow subduction interface, equivalent to a magnitude-8 earthquake, that also contributed significantly to the tsunami. The subduction interface event was probably a slow earthquake with a rise time of several minutes that triggered the outer-rise event several minutes later. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the normal fault ruptured first and dynamically triggered the subduction interface event. Our evidence comes from displacements of Global Positioning System stations and modelling of tsunami waves recorded by ocean-bottom pressure sensors, with support from seismic data and tsunami field observations. Evidence of the subduction earthquake in global seismic data is largely hidden because of the earthquake's slow rise time or because its ground motion is disguised by that of the normal-faulting event. Earthquake doublets where subduction interface events trigger large outer-rise earthquakes have been recorded previously, but this is the first well-documented example where the two events occur so closely in time and the triggering event might be a slow earthquake. As well as providing information on strain release mechanisms at subduction zones, earthquakes such as this provide a possible mechanism for the occasional large tsunamis generated at the Tonga

  12. Origin of Corona-Dominated Topographic Rises on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S.; Stofan, E.

    1999-01-01

    Both large-scale mantel upwellings, comparable to terrestrial hotspots on Earth, and smaller scale mantel upwellings, known as coronae, occur on Venus. Corona-dominated rises have many of the characteristics of large scale mantle upwellings, or hotspots, such as broad topographic rises greater than 1000km in diameter and large positive gravity anomalies.

  13. The New Woman in "The Sun Also Rises"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaoping

    2010-01-01

    Hemingway is a famous American writer and a spokesman of the Lost Generation. His life attitude of the characters in the novels influenced the whole world. His first masterpiece "The Sun Also Rises" contributes a lot to the rise of feminism and make the world began to be familiar with a term: The New Woman through the portrayal of Brett.…

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  19. The Rise of Conservatism since World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dan T.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rise of the conservatism movement in the United States since World War II. States that laissez-faire capitalism and the rise of communism contributed to the popularity of conservatism in the United States. Focuses on the role of U.S. Presidents, such as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. (CMK)

  20. Estuaries May Face Increased Parasitism as Sea Levels Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-12-01

    Invertebrates in estuaries could be at a greater risk of parasitism as climate change causes sea levels to rise. A new paper published 8 December in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (doi:10.1073/pnas.1416747111) describes how rapid sea level rise in the Holocene affected the population of parasitic flatworms called trematodes.

  1. The Rise and Fall of the Neo-Liberal University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Bronwyn; Gottsche, Michael; Bansel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The rise of neo-liberal universities over the last 15-20 years has been characterised as an inevitable effect both of globalisation and the associated dominance of capital. In this article we will analyse that rise, seeking to understand how it has come about and its impact on intellectual work. In the final pages of the article we turn towards…

  2. RISE Evaluation and Development System: Student Learning Objectives Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the help of teachers and leaders throughout the state, the Indiana Department of Education has developed an optional model teacher evaluation system named RISE. Whether corporations choose to adopt RISE or a model of their own, the department's goal is to assist corporations in developing or adopting models that both comply with IC 20-28-11.5…

  3. Cenozoic seismic stratigraphy of the SW Bermuda Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, G.S.; Driscoll, N.W.; Miller, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    The seismic Horizon A-Complex (Tucholke, 1979) readily explains reflector patterns observed along the western third of the Bermuda Rise; farther east, basement is much more rugged and gravity flows shed from local topographic highs complicate the stratigraphy. Distal turbidites on the southwestern Bermuda Rise onlap reflector A* from the west, suggesting early Paleocene mass wasting of the North American margin. Locally erosive bottom currents cut into the middle Eocene section of the SW Bermuda Rise; these northward flowing currents preceded those that formed reflector Au along the North American margin near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Southward flowing currents swift enough to erode the sea floor and to form reflector Au did not reach as far east as the SW Bermuda Rise. Instead, the main effect of these Au currents was to pirate sediment into contour-following geostrophic flows along the North American margin and to deprive the deep basin and the Bermuda Rise of sediment transported down-slope. Consequently, post-Eocene sediments away from the margin are fine-grained muds. Deposition of these muds on the SW Bermuda Rise was controlled by northward flowing bottom currents. The modern Hatteras Abyssal Plain developed in the late Neogene as turbidites once again onlapped the SW Bermuda Rise. Today, these deposits extend farthest east in fracture zone valleys and in the swales between sediment waves. Northward flowing currents continue at present to affect sediment distribution patterns along the western edge of the Bermuda Rise.

  4. Projecting Future Sea Level Rise for Water Resources Planning in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Kao, K.; Chung, F.

    2008-12-01

    Sea level rise is one of the major concerns for the management of California's water resources. Higher water levels and salinity intrusion into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta could affect water supplies, water quality, levee stability, and aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna species and their habitat. Over the 20th century, sea levels near San Francisco Bay increased by over 0.6ft. Some tidal gauge and satellite data indicate that rates of sea level rise are accelerating. Sea levels are expected to continue to rise due to increasing air temperatures causing thermal expansion of the ocean and melting of land-based ice such as ice on Greenland and in southeastern Alaska. For water planners, two related questions are raised on the uncertainty of future sea levels. First, what is the expected sea level at a specific point in time in the future, e.g., what is the expected sea level in 2050? Second, what is the expected point of time in the future when sea levels will exceed a certain height, e.g., what is the expected range of time when the sea level rises by one foot? To address these two types of questions, two factors are considered: (1) long term sea level rise trend, and (2) local extreme sea level fluctuations. A two-step approach will be used to develop sea level rise projection guidelines for decision making that takes both of these factors into account. The first step is developing global sea level rise probability distributions for the long term trends. The second step will extend the approach to take into account the effects of local astronomical tides, changes in atmospheric pressure, wind stress, floods, and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. In this paper, the development of the first step approach is presented. To project the long term sea level rise trend, one option is to extend the current rate of sea level rise into the future. However, since recent data indicate rates of sea level rise are accelerating, methods for estimating sea level rise

  5. Mars reconnaissance orbiter's high resolution imaging science experiment (HiRISE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Eliason, E.M.; Bergstrom, J.W.; Bridges, N.T.; Hansen, C.J.; Delamere, W.A.; Grant, J. A.; Gulick, V.C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.; Kirk, R.L.; Mellon, M.T.; Squyres, S. W.; Thomas, N.; Weitz, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The HiRISE camera features a 0.5 m diameter primary mirror, 12 m effective focal length, and a focal plane system that can acquire images containing up to 28 Gb (gigabits) of data in as little as 6 seconds. HiRISE will provide detailed images (0.25 to 1.3 m/pixel) covering ???1% of the Martian surface during the 2-year Primary Science Phase (PSP) beginning November 2006. Most images will include color data covering 20% of the potential field of view. A top priority is to acquire ???1000 stereo pairs and apply precision geometric corrections to enable topographic measurements to better than 25 cm vertical precision. We expect to return more than 12 Tb of HiRISE data during the 2-year PSP, and use pixel binning, conversion from 14 to 8 bit values, and a lossless compression system to increase coverage. HiRISE images are acquired via 14 CCD detectors, each with 2 output channels, and with multiple choices for pixel binning and number of Time Delay and Integration lines. HiRISE will support Mars exploration by locating and characterizing past, present, and future landing sites, unsuccessful landing sites, and past and potentially future rover traverses. We will investigate cratering, volcanism, tectonism, hydrology, sedimentary processes, stratigraphy, aeolian processes, mass wasting, landscape evolution, seasonal processes, climate change, spectrophotometry, glacial and periglacial processes, polar geology, and regolith properties. An Internet Web site (HiWeb) will enable anyone in the world to suggest HiRISE targets on Mars and to easily locate, view, and download HiRISE data products. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Effects of Sea Level-Rise on Carbon Accretion in Coastal Wetlands (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Long-term storage of organic carbon in sediment is one of the key functions of coastal wetlands. Owing to the rise of sea level, a fraction of their primary production is buried annually. However, the productivity of tidelands and, hence, carbon accretion depend on their relative elevation within the tidal frame. It has been shown empirically that there is an optimum relative elevation for maximum primary production. The equilibrium elevation is a function of the rate of sea-level rise. Hence, productivity and carbon accretion are also affected by the rate of sea-level rise. Mathematically it can be shown that tidelands maintain their elevation relative to the ocean through feedbacks among primary production, flooding, and sedimentation. At the low end of the sea-level-rise spectrum, a rising sea increases the flooding of marshes, decreasing sediment salinity, stimulating primary production and increasing sedimentation. At the high end, marshes cannot keep pace with sea level and convert to tidal mud flats or open water. Consequently, the long-term storage of carbon by tidelands will depend on the future trajectory of sea-level. In general, cumulative carbon accretion of existing marshes decreases as the forecasted rise in sea level increases. Other important variables include tide range and concentration of suspended sediments. Carbon accretion will be lower in microtidal than macrotidal estuaries, particularly at high rates of sea-level rise. Sensitivity of carbon accretion to tide range decreases as the concentration of suspended sediments increases. These results indicate that future carbon accretion by coastal wetlands will not be uniform in space or time.

  7. A Current Source Method For t(sub q) Measurement of Fast Switching Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    A current source driven circuit has been constructed to measure the turn-off time (t(sub q)) of fast-switching SiC thyristors. This circuit operates from a single power supply and a dual channel pulse generator to provide adjustment of forward current, magnitude and duration of reverse applied voltage, and rate of rise of reapplied forward voltage. Values of t(sub q) down to 100 ns can be resolved.

  8. Rise in landing-related skydiving fatalities.

    PubMed

    Hart, Christian L; Griffith, James D

    2003-10-01

    The purpose was to assess whether adoption of potentially dangerous skydiving gear and skydiving practices has led to an increase in fatalities. Beginning in the early 1990s, civilian skydivers began to utilize high performance parachutes that fly much faster and are much more responsive than older style parachutes. Also, skydivers began to fly these parachutes in a more aggressive manner. An analysis of data from the 507 skydiving fatalities in the USA between 1986 and 2001 indicated that this shift toward high performance parachutes and aggressive flying techniques was temporally associated with an increase in parachute-landing deaths. During the same time period, the total number of fatalities remained fairly stable.

  9. New analytical approximations for the liquid rise in a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Santander, J. L.; Martín, G.

    2015-04-01

    We present the ordinary differential equation (ODE) that governs the motion of a liquid rising in a capillary tube in such a way that we can easily derive the principal analytical approximations given in the literature. From this presentation, the numerical solution of the liquid rise over time could be computed very quickly and easily. Furthermore, we derive other analytical approximations not given in the literature, providing a mathematical justification for the cases in which such approximations are good. Some of the approximations found fit the experimental data better than the analytical approximations given in the literature.

  10. Comment [on “Sea level rise shown to drive coastal erosion”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Morton, Robert; Fletcher, Charles; Thieler, E. Robert; Howd, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In a recent article (Eos, Trans., AGU, February 8, 2000, p.55), Leatherman et al. [2000] state that they have confirmed an association between sea-level rise and coastal erosion. Applying their results to the New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland coasts and using a projected sea-level rise, the authors predict that by 2050 the shoreline will recede 60 m, about two times the average beach width. However, Leatherman et al. [2000] have not convincingly quantified a relationship between sea-level rise and shoreline erosion.We do not agree with their rationale for subsetting their data, and they have not considered other explanations for a background erosion along the U.S. east coast. Furthermore, their future projections are not supported by their analyses.

  11. A semi-empirical approach to projecting future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2007-01-19

    A semi-empirical relation is presented that connects global sea-level rise to global mean surface temperature. It is proposed that, for time scales relevant to anthropogenic warming, the rate of sea-level rise is roughly proportional to the magnitude of warming above the temperatures of the pre-Industrial Age. This holds to good approximation for temperature and sea-level changes during the 20th century, with a proportionality constant of 3.4 millimeters/year per degrees C. When applied to future warming scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, this relationship results in a projected sea-level rise in 2100 of 0.5 to 1.4 meters above the 1990 level.

  12. Radiometric Calibration of Mars HiRISE High Resolution Imagery Based on Fpga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yifan; Geng, Xun; Xing, Shuai; Tang, Yonghe; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large data amount of HiRISE imagery, traditional radiometric calibration method is not able to meet the fast processing requirements. To solve this problem, a radiometric calibration system of HiRISE imagery based on field program gate array (FPGA) is designed. The montage gap between two channels caused by gray inconsistency is removed through histogram matching. The calibration system is composed of FPGA and DSP, which makes full use of the parallel processing ability of FPGA and fast computation as well as flexible control characteristic of DSP. Experimental results show that the designed system consumes less hardware resources and the real-time processing ability of radiometric calibration of HiRISE imagery is improved.

  13. Method for Assessing Impacts of Global Sea Level Rise on Navigation Gate Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, P. S.; White, K. D.; Friedman, D.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal navigation infrastructure may be highly vulnerable to changing climate, including increasing sea levels and altered frequency and intensity of coastal storms. Future gate operations impacted by global sea level rise will pose unique challenges, especially for structures 50 years and older. Our approach is to estimate future changes in gate operational frequency based on a bootstrapping method to forecast future water levels. A case study will be presented to determine future changes in frequency of operations over the next 100 years. A statistical model in the R programming language was developed to apply future sea level rise projections using the three sea level rise scenarios prescribed by USACE Engineer Regulation ER 1100-2-8162. Information derived from the case study will help forecast changes in operational costs caused by increased gate operations and inform timing of decisions on adaptation measures.

  14. Estimating Temperature Rise Due to Flashlamp Heating Using Irreversible Temperature Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the nondestructive thermography inspection techniques uses photographic flashlamps. The flashlamps provide a short duration (about 0.005 sec) heat pulse. The short burst of energy results in a momentary rise in the surface temperature of the part. The temperature rise may be detrimental to the top layer of the part being exposed. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure the nondestructive nature of the technique. Amount of the temperature rise determines whether the flashlamp heating would be detrimental to the part. A direct method for the temperature measurement is to use of an infrared pyrometer that has much shorter response time than the flash duration. In this paper, an alternative technique is given using the irreversible temperature 'indicators. This is an indirect technique and it measures the temperature rise on the irreversible temperature indicators and computes the incident heat flux. Once the heat flux is known, the temperature rise on the part can be computed. A wedge shaped irreversible temperature indicator for measuring the heat flux is proposed. A procedure is given to use the wedge indicator.

  15. The importance of plume rise on the concentrations and atmospheric impacts of biomass burning aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Carolin; Freitas, Saulo R.; Kottmeier, Christoph; Kraut, Isabel; Rieger, Daniel; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We quantified the effects of the plume rise of biomass burning aerosol and gases for the forest fires that occurred in Saskatchewan, Canada, in July 2010. For this purpose, simulations with different assumptions regarding the plume rise and the vertical distribution of the emissions were conducted. Based on comparisons with observations, applying a one-dimensional plume rise model to predict the injection layer in combination with a parametrization of the vertical distribution of the emissions outperforms approaches in which the plume heights are initially predefined. Approximately 30 % of the fires exceed the height of 2 km with a maximum height of 8.6 km. Using this plume rise model, comparisons with satellite images in the visible spectral range show a very good agreement between the simulated and observed spatial distributions of the biomass burning plume. The simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) with data of an AERONET station is in good agreement with respect to the absolute values and the timing of the maximum. Comparison of the vertical distribution of the biomass burning aerosol with CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) retrievals also showed the best agreement when the plume rise model was applied. We found that downwelling surface short-wave radiation below the forest fire plume is reduced by up to 50 % and that the 2 m temperature is decreased by up to 6 K. In addition, we simulated a strong change in atmospheric stability within the biomass burning plume.

  16. Crustal structure of Shatsky Rise from joint refraction and reflection seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.; Sager, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shatsky Rise in the western Pacific is one of a few gigantic oceanic plateaus in the world, with a surface area of ˜ 4.8 ± 105~km2 (about the same size as California). In contrast to other large oceanic plateaus formed during the Cretaceous Quite Period, Shatsky Rise formed during the frequent reversals of magnetic polarity, allowing its tectonic environment to be resolved in detail. It was formed at a rapidly spreading ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, so the effect of lithospheric lid on magma migration is expected to be minimal, thereby facilitating the petrological interpretation of its seismic structure in terms of parental mantle processes. In the summer of 2010, a seismic refraction survey combined with multichannel seismic profiling was conducted across Shatsky Rise. Twenty eight ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed along two crossing perpendicular lines, and all of the instruments were recovered successfully, yielding a large volume of high-quality wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with the source-receiver distance often exceeding 200~km. In this contribution, we present the P-wave velocity structure of the Shatsky Rise crust, which is constructed by joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography, and also discuss its implications for the origin of Shatsky Rise.

  17. Rise of an argon bubble in liquid steel in the presence of a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Kumar, P.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2016-09-01

    The rise of gaseous bubbles in viscous liquids is a fundamental problem in fluid physics, and it is also a common phenomenon in many industrial applications such as materials processing, food processing, and fusion reactor cooling. In this work, the motion of a single argon gas bubble rising in quiescent liquid steel under an external magnetic field is studied numerically using a Volume-of-Fluid method. To mitigate spurious velocities normally generated during numerical simulation of multiphase flows with large density differences, an improved algorithm for surface tension modeling, originally proposed by Wang and Tong ["Deformation and oscillations of a single gas bubble rising in a narrow vertical tube," Int. J. Therm. Sci. 47, 221-228 (2008)] is implemented, validated and used in the present computations. The governing equations are integrated by a second-order space and time accurate numerical scheme, and implemented on multiple Graphics Processing Units with high parallel efficiency. The motion and terminal velocities of the rising bubble under different magnetic fields are compared and a reduction in rise velocity is seen in cases with the magnetic field applied. The shape deformation and the path of the bubble are discussed. An elongation of the bubble along the field direction is seen, and the physics behind these phenomena is discussed. The wake structures behind the bubble are visualized and effects of the magnetic field on the wake structures are presented. A modified drag coefficient is obtained to include the additional resistance force caused by adding a transverse magnetic field.

  18. Models for the rise of the dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Benton, Michael J; Forth, Jonathan; Langer, Max C

    2014-01-20

    Dinosaurs arose in the early Triassic in the aftermath of the greatest mass extinction ever and became hugely successful in the Mesozoic. Their initial diversification is a classic example of a large-scale macroevolutionary change. Diversifications at such deep-time scales can now be dissected, modelled and tested. New fossils suggest that dinosaurs originated early in the Middle Triassic, during the recovery of life from the devastating Permo-Triassic mass extinction. Improvements in stratigraphic dating and a new suite of morphometric and comparative evolutionary numerical methods now allow a forensic dissection of one of the greatest turnovers in the history of life. Such studies mark a move from the narrative to the analytical in macroevolutionary research, and they allow us to begin to answer the proposal of George Gaylord Simpson, to explore adaptive radiations using numerical methods.

  19. Rising Temperatures Reduce Global Wheat Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rötter, R. P.; Lobell, D. B.; Cammarano, D.; Kimball, B. A.; Ottman, M. J.; Wall, G. W.; White, J. W.; Reynolds, M. P.; Alderman, P. D.; Prasad, P. V. V.; Aggarwal, P. K.; Anothai, J.; Basso, B.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, A. J.; De Sanctis, G.; Doltra, J.; Fereres, E.; Garcia-Vila, M.; Gayler, S.; Hoogenboom, G.; Hunt, L. A.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Jabloun, M.; C. D. Jones,; Kersebaum, K. C.; Koehler, A-K.; Müller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O’Leary, G.; Olesen, J. E.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Eyshi Rezaei, E.; Ruane, A. C.; Semenov, M. A.; Shcherbak, I.; Stöckle, C.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Thorburn, P. J.; Waha, K.; Wang, E.; Wallach, D.; Wolf, J.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Crop models are essential tools for assessing the threat of climate change to local and global food production. Present models used to predict wheat grain yield are highly uncertain when simulating how crops respond to temperature. Here we systematically tested 30 different wheat crop models of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project against field experiments in which growing season mean temperatures ranged from 15 degrees C to 32? degrees C, including experiments with artificial heating. Many models simulated yields well, but were less accurate at higher temperatures. The model ensemble median was consistently more accurate in simulating the crop temperature response than any single model, regardless of the input information used. Extrapolating the model ensemble temperature response indicates that warming is already slowing yield gains at a majority of wheat-growing locations. Global wheat production is estimated to fall by 6% for each degree C of further temperature increase and become more variable over space and time.

  20. [Burnout: rising interest phenomenon in stressful workplace].

    PubMed

    Della Valle, E; De Pascale, G; Cuccaro, A; Di Mare, M; Padovano, L; Carbone, U; Farinaro, E

    2006-01-01

    Many stressful situations, particularly strong and long time lasting, can induce the burnout syndrome. The definition "burnout" refers to emotional and exhausting conditions related to working environment. Since 70'ties, many studies, have focused on this topic, have assessed that this condition is much more frequent in some particular professional categories: teachers, physicians, nurses, social workers, policemen, judges (the so-called helping professions). The main syndrome characteristics are: physical and emotional fatigue, depersonalization, frustration for unsuccessful professional realization and reduced personal accomplishment in competence and productivity with decreasing critical sense towards working field. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) has been the most popular instrument for measuring burnout in medical research. The coherence of many studies results on helping professions in different countries, leads to the conclusion that basically burnout is a psycho-social phenomenon of international relevance. These studies have also identified personal, relational and environmental risk factors susceptible to prevention. PMID:16649514

  1. Rise in landing-related skydiving fatalities.

    PubMed

    Hart, Christian L; Griffith, James D

    2003-10-01

    The purpose was to assess whether adoption of potentially dangerous skydiving gear and skydiving practices has led to an increase in fatalities. Beginning in the early 1990s, civilian skydivers began to utilize high performance parachutes that fly much faster and are much more responsive than older style parachutes. Also, skydivers began to fly these parachutes in a more aggressive manner. An analysis of data from the 507 skydiving fatalities in the USA between 1986 and 2001 indicated that this shift toward high performance parachutes and aggressive flying techniques was temporally associated with an increase in parachute-landing deaths. During the same time period, the total number of fatalities remained fairly stable. PMID:14620223

  2. Sea-Level Rise Impacts on Hudson River Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooks, A.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2015-12-01

    The response of tidal marshes to increasing sea-level rise is uncertain. Tidal marshes can adapt to rising sea levels through vertical accretion and inland migration. Yet tidal marshes are vulnerable to submergence if the rate of sea-level rise exceeds the rate of accretion and if inland migration is limited by natural features or development. We studied how Piermont and Iona Island Marsh, two tidal marshes on the Hudson River, New York, would be affected by sea-level rise of 0.5m, 1m, and 1.5m by 2100. This study was based on the 2011-2012 Coastal New York LiDAR survey. Using GIS we mapped sea-level rise projections accounting for accretion rates and calculated the submerged area of the marsh. Based on the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve Vegetation 2005 dataset, we studied how elevation zones based on vegetation distributions would change. To evaluate the potential for inland migration, we assessed land cover around each marsh using the National Land Cover Database 2011 Land Cover dataset and examined the slope beyond the marsh boundaries. With an accretion rate of 0.29cm/year and 0.5m of sea-level rise by 2100, Piermont Marsh would be mostly unchanged. With 1.5m of sea-level rise, 86% of Piermont Marsh would be flooded. For Iona Island Marsh with an accretion rate of 0.78cm/year, sea-level rise of 0.5m by 2100 would result in a 4% expansion while 1.5m sea-level rise would cause inundation of 17% of the marsh. The results indicate that Piermont and Iona Island Marsh may be able to survive rates of sea-level rise such as 0.5m by 2100 through vertical accretion. At rates of sea-level rise like 1.5m by 2100, vertical accretion cannot match sea-level rise, submerging parts of the marshes. High elevations and steep slopes limit Piermont and Iona Island Marsh's ability to migrate inland. Understanding the impacts of sea-level rise on Piermont and Iona Island Marsh allows for long-term planning and could motivate marsh conservation programs.

  3. Online Citizen Science with Clickworkers & MRO HiRISE E/PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Deardorff, G.; Kanefsky, B.; HiRISE Science Team

    2010-12-01

    contributors. In HiRISE Clickworkers, over a dozen different geologic features have been identified on over 57,000 image tiles. A key objective of Clickworkers has been to break up work into manageable chunks so that people can contribute a few minutes at a time and their work all adds up. Our HiRISE Student Image Challenges (http://quest.nasa.gov), another online citizen science project, provide educators and students a virtual science team experience. Registered participants are given access to HiWeb, the HiRISE team’s image suggestion facility to submit their image suggestions. Once the images are returned, students browse, pan and zoom through their acquired images online and at full resolution before they are released to the public (http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/HiRISE/quest/). Students fill out a report form summarizing the key results of their image analysis and with the help of a HiRISE team member write a caption for their image. The image is posted on the HiRISE image release website along with the caption, with credit to the suggesting class and school. HiWish, HiRISE’s public image suggestion website (see McEwen et al., this mtg.), provides a simpler interface for the public at large to submit HiRISE images. HiWish also provides a list of recently submitted image requests.

  4. Effects of sea level rise on deltaic coastal marshlands, Mississippi River deltaic plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.E.; Penland, S. ); Roberts, H.H.; Coleman, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Low-relief deltaic coastal plains commonly experience land loss because of the cumulative effects of natural and human-induced processes. Although it is difficult to separate the individual factors within the overall process, interplay between these factors can result in a rate of relative sea level rise greater than the natural rate of coastal-plain aggradation that causes land loss. Between 1956 and 1978, about 11,400 and 2,490 ha of marsh were lost in east Texas and Mississippi, respectively. Louisiana's loss was 18,755 ha. Relative sea level rise over the last 65 yr has averaged 0.23 cm/yr in the Gulf and as much as 1-1.5 cm/yr in the delta plain. The Environmental Protection Agency predicts the rate of sea level rise to increase over the next century. Rates of relative sea level rise for the Gulf of Mexico are expected to increase from 0.23-1.5 cm/yr to 0.6-3.7 cm/yr. The current rate of relative sea level rise and land loss in the subsiding Mississippi delta is a response that can be expected for many US coastal areas over the next century. With the predicted change, the Mississippi River delta complex will experience dramatically increased rates of land loss. Isles Dernieres will disappear by the year 2000, and Plaquemines and Terrebonne marshes will be gone between 2020 and 2080. Based on the lowest predicted sea level rise rate, by the year 2100, the delta plain could be reduced from 150.9 {times} 10{sup 3} ha to 29.8 x 10{sup 3} ha or to 4.9 {times} 10{sup 3} ha if calculations are based on the highest rate.

  5. The contribution of sea-level rise to flooding in large river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele-Eich, I.; Hopson, T. M.; Gilleland, E.; Lamarque, J.; Hu, A.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to both impact sea level rise as well as flooding. Our study focuses on the combined effect of climate change on upper catchment precipitation as well as on sea-level rise at the river mouths and the impact this will have on river flooding both at the coast and further upstream. We concentrate on the eight catchments of the Amazonas, Congo, Orinoco, Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna, Mississippi, St. Lawrence, Danube and Niger rivers. To assess the impact of climate change, upper catchment precipitation as well as monthly mean thermosteric sea-level rise at the river mouth outflow are taken from the four CCSM4 1° 20th Century ensemble members as well as from six CCSM4 1° ensemble members for the RCP scenarios RCP8.5, 6.0, 4.5 and 2.6. Continuous daily time series for average catchment precipitation and discharge are available for each of the catchments. To arrive at a future discharge time series, we used these observations to develop a simple statistical hydrological model which can be applied to the modelled future upper catchment precipitation values. The analysis of this surrogate discharge time series alone already yields significant changes in flood return levels as well as flood duration. Using the geometry of the river channel, the backwater effect of sea-level rise is incorporated in our analysis of both flood frequencies and magnitudes by calculating the effective additional discharge due to the increase in water level at the river mouth outflow, as well as its tapering impact upstream. By combining these effects, our results focus on the merged impact of changes in extreme precipitation with increases in river height due to sea-level rise at the river mouths. Judging from our preliminary results, the increase in effective discharge due to sea-level rise cannot be neglected when discussing late 21st century flooding in the respective river basins. In particular, we find that especially in countries with low elevation gradient, flood

  6. Flooded Dark Matter and S level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub; Unwin, James

    2016-03-01

    Most dark matter models set the dark matter relic density by some interaction with Standard Model particles. Such models generally assume the existence of Standard Model particles early on, with the dark matter relic density a later consequence of those interactions. Perhaps a more compelling assumption is that dark matter is not part of the Standard Model sector and a population of dark matter too is generated at the end of inflation. This democratic assumption about initial conditions does not necessarily provide a natural value for the dark matter relic density, and furthermore superficially leads to too much entropy in the dark sector relative to ordinary matter. We address the latter issue by the late decay of heavy particles produced at early times, thereby associating the dark matter relic density with the lifetime of a long-lived state. This paper investigates what it would take for this scenario to be compatible with observations in what we call Flooded Dark Matter (FDM) models and discusses several interesting consequences. One is that dark matter can be very light and furthermore, light dark matter is in some sense the most natural scenario in FDM as it is compatible with larger couplings of the decaying particle. A related consequence is that the decay of the field with the smallest coupling and hence the longest lifetime dominates the entropy and possibly the matter content of the Universe, a principle we refer to as "Maximum Baroqueness". We also demonstrate that the dark sector should be colder than the ordinary sector, relaxing the most stringent free-streaming constraints on light dark matter candidates. We will discuss the potential implications for the core-cusp problem in a follow-up paper. The FDM framework will furthermore have interesting baryogenesis implications. One possibility is that dark matter is like the baryon asymmetry and both are simultaneously diluted by a late entropy dump. Alternatively, FDM is compatible with an elegant non

  7. Rising CO2 concentrations affect settlement behaviour of larval damselfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, B. M.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    Reef fish larvae actively select preferred benthic habitat, relying on olfactory, visual and acoustic cues to discriminate between microhabitats at settlement. Recent studies show exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) impairs olfactory cue recognition in larval reef fishes. However, whether this alters the behaviour of settling fish or disrupts habitat selection is unknown. Here, the effect of elevated CO2 on larval behaviour and habitat selection at settlement was tested in three species of damselfishes (family Pomacentridae) that differ in their pattern of habitat use: Pomacentrus amboinensis (a habitat generalist), Pomacentrus chrysurus (a rubble specialist) and Pomacentrus moluccensis (a live coral specialist). Settlement-stage larvae were exposed to current-day CO2 levels or CO2 concentrations that could occur by 2100 (700 and 850 ppm) based on IPCC emission scenarios. First, pair-wise choice tests were performed using a two-channel flume chamber to test olfactory discrimination between hard coral, soft coral and coral rubble habitats. The habitat selected by settling fish was then compared among treatments using a multi-choice settlement experiment conducted overnight. Finally, settlement timing between treatments was compared across two lunar cycles for one of the species, P. chrysurus. Exposure to elevated CO2 disrupted the ability of larvae to discriminate between habitat odours in olfactory trials. However, this had no effect on the habitats selected at settlement when all sensory cues were available. The timing of settlement was dramatically altered by CO2 exposure, with control fish exhibiting peak settlement around the new moon, whereas fish exposed to 850 ppm CO2 displaying highest settlement rates around the full moon. These results suggest larvae can rely on other sensory information, such as visual cues, to compensate for impaired olfactory ability when selecting settlement habitat at small spatial scales. However, rising CO2 could cause larvae

  8. Behavioural addiction-A rising tide?

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Samuel R; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J; Goudriaan, Anna E; van Holst, Ruth Janke; Zohar, Joseph; Grant, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    The term 'addiction' was traditionally used in relation to centrally active substances, such as cocaine, alcohol, or nicotine. Addiction is not a unitary construct but rather incorporates a number of features, such as repetitive engagement in behaviours that are rewarding (at least initially), loss of control (spiralling engagement over time), persistence despite untoward functional consequences, and physical dependence (evidenced by withdrawal symptoms when intake of the substance diminishes). It has been suggested that certain psychiatric disorders characterized by maladaptive, repetitive behaviours share parallels with substance addiction and therefore represent 'behavioural addictions'. This perspective has influenced the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), which now has a category 'Substance Related and Addictive Disorders', including gambling disorder. Could other disorders characterised by repetitive behaviours, besides gambling disorder, also be considered 'addictions'? Potential examples include kleptomania, compulsive sexual behaviour, 'Internet addiction', trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), and skin-picking disorder. This paper seeks to define what is meant by 'behavioural addiction', and critically considers the evidence for and against this conceptualisation in respect of the above conditions, from perspectives of aetiology, phenomenology, co-morbidity, neurobiology, and treatment. Research in this area has important implications for future diagnostic classification systems, neurobiological models, and novel treatment directions. PMID:26585600

  9. Behavioural addiction-A rising tide?

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Samuel R; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J; Goudriaan, Anna E; van Holst, Ruth Janke; Zohar, Joseph; Grant, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    The term 'addiction' was traditionally used in relation to centrally active substances, such as cocaine, alcohol, or nicotine. Addiction is not a unitary construct but rather incorporates a number of features, such as repetitive engagement in behaviours that are rewarding (at least initially), loss of control (spiralling engagement over time), persistence despite untoward functional consequences, and physical dependence (evidenced by withdrawal symptoms when intake of the substance diminishes). It has been suggested that certain psychiatric disorders characterized by maladaptive, repetitive behaviours share parallels with substance addiction and therefore represent 'behavioural addictions'. This perspective has influenced the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), which now has a category 'Substance Related and Addictive Disorders', including gambling disorder. Could other disorders characterised by repetitive behaviours, besides gambling disorder, also be considered 'addictions'? Potential examples include kleptomania, compulsive sexual behaviour, 'Internet addiction', trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), and skin-picking disorder. This paper seeks to define what is meant by 'behavioural addiction', and critically considers the evidence for and against this conceptualisation in respect of the above conditions, from perspectives of aetiology, phenomenology, co-morbidity, neurobiology, and treatment. Research in this area has important implications for future diagnostic classification systems, neurobiological models, and novel treatment directions.

  10. Rise of the Sensors: Nociception and Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Once there was a day when all type C nonmyelinated neurons were indistinguishable. That time of histologic analysis has passed, and we have entered an era of unparalleled technological insight into the mechanisms of pain and pruritus. Since the description of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor protein vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), in 1997, we have seen the number of related sensor ion channels, G protein–coupled receptors, and signaling proteins explode. Specific nociceptive pathways have been identified based on their sensitivity to mechanical, heat, chemical, and cold stimuli. Pruritus is now recognized to have both histamine-sensitive and histamine-independent afferent arcs. Cross-talk between C-fibre systems and myelinated neural pathways has become more complex, but through complexity, a new reality of sensory coding is emerging. A multitude of novel therapeutics have been and are in planning and production stages. These will almost certainly revolutionize our understanding and treatment of pain and itch by the end of this decade. PMID:22367178

  11. The Import of the Cortisol Rise in Child Care Differs as a Function of Behavioral Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Kryzer, Erin; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Children of ages 3 to 4.5 years (N = 107; 45 boys, 62 girls) were studied twice, 6 months apart, to examine whether the cortisol rise in child care at Time 1 (T1) was associated with (a) changes in anxious, vigilant behavior from T1 to Time 2 (T2) and (b) higher internalizing symptoms at T2. Controlling for measures of home environment and child…

  12. The rise of novelty in ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Radeloff, Volker C; Williams, John W; Bateman, Brooke L; Burke, Kevin D; Carter, Sarah K; Childress, Evan S; Cromwell, Kara J; Gratton, Claudio; Hasley, Andrew O; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Latzka, Alexander W; Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Meine, Curt D; Munoz, Samuel E; Neeson, Thomas M; Pidgeon, Anna M; Rissman, Adena R; Rivera, Ricardo J; Szymanski, Laura M; Usinowicz, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and ongoing change creates novelty in ecosystems everywhere, both when comparing contemporary systems to their historical baselines, and predicted future systems to the present. However, the level of novelty varies greatly among places. Here we propose a formal and quantifiable definition of abiotic and biotic novelty in ecosystems, map abiotic novelty globally, and discuss the implications of novelty for the science of ecology and for biodiversity conservation. We define novelty as the degree of dissimilarity of a system, measured in one or more dimensions relative to a reference baseline, usually defined as either the present or a time window in the past. In this conceptualization, novelty varies in degree, it is multidimensional, can be measured, and requires a temporal and spatial reference. This definition moves beyond prior categorical definitions of novel ecosystems, and does not include human agency, self-perpetuation, or irreversibility as criteria. Our global assessment of novelty was based on abiotic factors (temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition) plus human population, and shows that there are already large areas with high novelty today relative to the early 20th century, and that there will even be more such areas by 2050. Interestingly, the places that are most novel are often not the places where absolute changes are largest; highlighting that novelty is inherently different from change. For the ecological sciences, highly novel ecosystems present new opportunities to test ecological theories, but also challenge the predictive ability of ecological models and their validation. For biodiversity conservation, increasing novelty presents some opportunities, but largely challenges. Conservation action is necessary along the entire continuum of novelty, by redoubling efforts to protect areas where novelty is low, identifying conservation opportunities where novelty is high, developing flexible yet strong regulations and policies, and

  13. The rise of novelty in ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Radeloff, Volker C; Williams, John W; Bateman, Brooke L; Burke, Kevin D; Carter, Sarah K; Childress, Evan S; Cromwell, Kara J; Gratton, Claudio; Hasley, Andrew O; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Latzka, Alexander W; Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Meine, Curt D; Munoz, Samuel E; Neeson, Thomas M; Pidgeon, Anna M; Rissman, Adena R; Rivera, Ricardo J; Szymanski, Laura M; Usinowicz, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and ongoing change creates novelty in ecosystems everywhere, both when comparing contemporary systems to their historical baselines, and predicted future systems to the present. However, the level of novelty varies greatly among places. Here we propose a formal and quantifiable definition of abiotic and biotic novelty in ecosystems, map abiotic novelty globally, and discuss the implications of novelty for the science of ecology and for biodiversity conservation. We define novelty as the degree of dissimilarity of a system, measured in one or more dimensions relative to a reference baseline, usually defined as either the present or a time window in the past. In this conceptualization, novelty varies in degree, it is multidimensional, can be measured, and requires a temporal and spatial reference. This definition moves beyond prior categorical definitions of novel ecosystems, and does not include human agency, self-perpetuation, or irreversibility as criteria. Our global assessment of novelty was based on abiotic factors (temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition) plus human population, and shows that there are already large areas with high novelty today relative to the early 20th century, and that there will even be more such areas by 2050. Interestingly, the places that are most novel are often not the places where absolute changes are largest; highlighting that novelty is inherently different from change. For the ecological sciences, highly novel ecosystems present new opportunities to test ecological theories, but also challenge the predictive ability of ecological models and their validation. For biodiversity conservation, increasing novelty presents some opportunities, but largely challenges. Conservation action is necessary along the entire continuum of novelty, by redoubling efforts to protect areas where novelty is low, identifying conservation opportunities where novelty is high, developing flexible yet strong regulations and policies, and

  14. The complex reality of sea-level rise in an atoll nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rise famously poses an existential threat to island nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Maldives. Yet as the global mean sea-level rises, the response of any one location at any given time will depend on the natural variability in regional sea-level and other impact of local human activities on coastal processes. As with climate warming, the state of an individual shoreline or the extent of flooding on a given day is not proof of a sea-level trend, nor is a global sea-level trend a good predictor of individual flooding or erosion events. Failure to consider the effect of natural variability and local human activity on coastal processes often leads to misattribution of flooding events and even some long-term shoreline changes to global sea level rise. Moreover, unverified attribution of individual events or changes to specific islets to sea level rise can inflame or invite scepticism of the strong scientific evidence for an accelerating increase in the global sea level due to the impacts of human activity on the climate system. This is particularly important in developing nations like Kiribati, which are depending on international financial support to adapt to rising sea levels. In this presentation, I use gauge data and examples from seven years of field work in Tarawa Atoll, the densely populated capital of Kiribati, to examine the complexity of local sea level and shoreline change in one of the world's most vulnerable countries. First, I discuss how the combination of El Nino-driven variability in sea-level and the astronomical tidal cycle leads to flooding and erosion events which can be mistaken for evidence of sea-level rise. Second, I show that human modification to shorelines has redirected sediment supply, leading, in some cases, to expansion of islets despite rising sea levels. Taken together, the analysis demonstrates the challenge of attributing particular coastal events to global mean sea-level rise and the impact on decision-making. The

  15. Plume rise in a shear layer with neutral stability.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J

    2005-05-01

    Several solutions have been published to predict the rise of buoyant plumes in a shear layer with a power-law velocity profile. Each of these solutions is either a special case or is based on oversimplifying assumptions. In this paper, solutions to the plume-rise equations are given for buoyant and nonbuoyant plumes with initial vertical momentum. Solutions are given for both point sources and sources with a finite initial size under neutral stability. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume-rise equations.

  16. Measuring sand flux on Mars using HiRISE Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N. T.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.; Mattson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As wind is the major agent of sediment transport on Mars, a quantitative estimate of aeolian processes is therefore essential to assess recent geological evolution and current climate. We adapted the Co-registration of Optically Sensed Image and Correlation (COSI-Corr) toolbox to the MRO HiRISE imager specifications to produce a dense map of the ripples migration on the surface of the Martian dunes on the Nili Patera area. The ripple migration rate, along with an estimate of the ripple height, were used to derive the sand flux, a key quantity that controls the style and rate of landscape evolution. Using the dunes shape, size, and height, which were extracted from a DEM of the dune field, we show that the dunes are near steady state, and we observe that dune migration rate varies inversely with size and position within the dune field. The time scale associated with the formation and evolution of the Nili Patera dune field, estimated from comparing the sand volume with the sand flux and the dunes migration rates with the length scale of the dune field, is on the order of 10s to 100s of thousands Earth years. However, sand fluxes at the dune crests are 0.7 - 4.8 m3 m-1 per Earth year, which is comparable to that of dunes in Victoria Valley, Antarctica. This implies that rates of landscape modification from aeolian abrasion on Mars may be comparable to that on Earth.

  17. Rise of Racetrack Memory! Domain Wall Spin-Orbitronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, Stuart

    Memory-storage devices based on the current controlled motion of a series of domain walls (DWs) in magnetic racetracks promise performance and reliability beyond that of conventional magnetic disk drives and solid state storage devices (1). Racetracks that are formed from atomically thin, perpendicularly magnetized nano-wires, interfaced with adjacent metal layers with high spin-orbit coupling, give rise to domain walls that exhibit a chiral Néel structure (2). These DWs can be moved very efficiently with current via chiral spin-orbit torques (2,3). Record-breaking current-induced DW speeds exceeding 1,000 m/sec are found in synthetic antiferromagnetic structures (3) in which the net magnetization of the DWs is tuned to almost zero, making them ``invisible''. Based on these recent discoveries, Racetrack Memory devices have the potential to operate on picosecond timescales and at densities more than 100 times greater than other memory technologies. (1) S.S.P. Parkin et al., Science 320, 5873 (2008); S.S.P. Parkin and S.-H. Yang, Nat. Nano. 10, 195 (2015). (2) K.-S. Ryu metal. Nat. Nano. 8, 527 (2013). (3) S.-H. Yang, K.-S. Ryu and S.S.P. Parkin, Nat. Nano. 10, 221 (2015). (4). S.S.P. Parkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3598 (1991).

  18. Pacific sea level rise patterns and global surface temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyser, Cheryl E.; Yin, Jianjun; Landerer, Felix W.; Cole, Julia E.

    2016-08-01

    During 1998-2012, climate change and sea level rise (SLR) exhibit two notable features: a slowdown of global surface warming (hiatus) and a rapid SLR in the tropical western Pacific. To quantify their relationship, we analyze the long-term control simulations of 38 climate models. We find a significant and robust correlation between the east-west contrast of dynamic sea level (DSL) in the Pacific and global mean surface temperature (GST) variability on both interannual and decadal time scales. Based on linear regression of the multimodel ensemble mean, the anomalously fast SLR in the western tropical Pacific observed during 1998-2012 indicates suppression of a potential global surface warming of 0.16° ± 0.06°C. In contrast, the Pacific contributed 0.29° ± 0.10°C to the significant interannual GST increase in 1997/1998. The Pacific DSL anomalies observed in 2015 suggest that the strong El Niño in 2015/2016 could lead to a 0.21° ± 0.07°C GST jump.

  19. Scattering by infinitely rising one-dimensional potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, E. M.; Sesma, J.

    2015-12-01

    Infinitely rising one-dimensional potentials constitute impenetrable barriers which reflect totally any incident wave. However, the scattering by such kind of potentials is not structureless: resonances may occur for certain values of the energy. Here we consider the problem of scattering by the members of a family of potentials Va(x) = - sgn(x) | x | a, where sgn represents the sign function and a is a positive rational number. The scattering function and the phase shifts are obtained from global solutions of the Schrödinger equation. For the determination of the Gamow states, associated to resonances, we exploit their close relation with the eigenvalues of the PT-symmetric Hamiltonians with potentials VaPT(x) = - i sgn(x) | x | a. Calculation of the time delay in the scattering at real energies is used to characterize the resonances. As an additional result, the breakdown of the PT-symmetry of the family of potentials VaPT for a < 3 may be conjectured.

  20. Mars' Active Surface: Observing Changes with Orthorectified HiRISE Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, S.; McEwen, A. S.; Ojha, L.; Bridges, N. T.; Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Mogk, N.

    2012-12-01

    Active processes on Mars have been observed and documented with high resolution images from orbit. The HiRISE camera, operating on MRO since 2006, acquires images of the surface of Mars at up to 25 cm pixel scale, and has stereo capability. The use of HiRISE stereo images to produce digital terrain models (DTMs) allows for orthorectification of the stereo pair and other images targeted over the same area. HiRISE DTMs typically have 1 or 2 m horizontal resolution with vertical precision on the order of 10's of cm. DTM production with HiRISE requires that the source stereo pair has similar lighting and minimal surface differences. However, there is no similar requirement for orthorectifying other images taken of the same area. Changes on the surface can then be measured accurately in the orthoimages as topographic distortions have been minimized. Time sequences of surface changes can be constructed from a series of orthoimages, providing essential data for understanding their rate and magnitude. Some of the current areas of study using HiRISE DTMs and orthoimages include recurring slope lineae (RSL) (McEwen et al., Science 333, 740, 2011), dune and ripple migration (Bridges et al., Nature 485, 339, 2012), seasonal frost changes, and gully activity. In some cases, DTMs from before and after significant surface movement can be compared to measure volumetric changes. The demand for HiRISE DTMs and orthoimages has led to advances in techniques for their production and analysis. Improved image processing and terrain editing tools result in better DTMs and orthoimages, as well as minimize the time required to produce them. We present here ongoing work to refine these techniques and develop new methods for generating orthoimage sequences, including orthorectification of the HiRISE 3-band color strip. Results are illustrated using series of orthoimages over dunes, RSL sites and other areas of Martian surface activity. HiRISE DTMs and orthoimages are released to the Planetary

  1. When Indoor Temps Rise, So Do COPD Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Temps Rise, So Do COPD Symptoms And inside air pollution makes symptoms even worse, study says To use ... COPD), particularly in homes with high levels of air pollution, researchers report. The research included 69 people with ...

  2. Number of Americans with Severe Joint Pain Keeps Rising

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_161349.html Number of Americans With Severe Joint Pain Keeps Rising CDC tally estimates that close ... 2016 THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe joint pain plagues an increasing number of aging, often ...

  3. Book Review: Venus Rising: Cultural Astronomy in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedegar, K.

    2014-10-01

    Book review: Dr Peter G. Alcock's important new publication, Venus Rising: South African Astronomical Beliefs, Customs and Observations. See also articles by Alcock, P.G. and Labuscagne, L. in the next issue.

  4. Shaping of the continental rise by deep geostrophic contour currents.

    PubMed

    Heezen, B C; Hollister, C D; Ruddiman, W F

    1966-04-22

    Geostrophic contour-following bottom currents involved in the deep thermohaline circulation of the world ocean appear to be the principal agents which control the shape of the continental rise and other sediment bodies.

  5. The rise of the bank infomediary in health care.

    PubMed

    Casillas, John

    2008-08-01

    Banks are evolving in four key areas that collectively comprise the rise of a "bank infomediary": Efficient administrative processing; Medical Internet; Health information broker; Community care platform. PMID:18709871

  6. View facing south, near Structure 515, of Transmission Line rising ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing south, near Structure 51-5, of Transmission Line rising out of Marias River Valley - Havre Rainbow Transmission Line, Havre City to Great Falls vicinity, Montana, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  7. [Book review] Sea level rise: history and consequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Eric E.

    2004-01-01

    Review of: Sea level Rise: history and consequences. Bruce Douglas, Michael S. Kearney and Stephen P. Leatherman (eds), Sand Diego: Academic Press, 2001, 232 pp. plus CD-RIM, US$64.95, hardback. ISBN 0-12-221345-9.

  8. 9. REYNOLDS AVENUE BRIDGE, ROAD VIEW. NOTE THE GRADE RISES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. REYNOLDS AVENUE BRIDGE, ROAD VIEW. NOTE THE GRADE RISES OVER TRACKS DUE TO INCREASED LOCOMOTIVE SIZES. SEVERAL MONUMENTS WERE MOVED TO FACILITATE THIS. VIEW NE. - Gettysburg National Military Park Tour Roads, Gettysburg, Adams County, PA

  9. Shaping of the continental rise by deep geostrophic contour currents.

    PubMed

    Heezen, B C; Hollister, C D; Ruddiman, W F

    1966-04-22

    Geostrophic contour-following bottom currents involved in the deep thermohaline circulation of the world ocean appear to be the principal agents which control the shape of the continental rise and other sediment bodies. PMID:17815077

  10. Abortion Rates Rising in Zika-Affected Countries, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159500.html Abortion Rates Rising in Zika-Affected Countries, Study Shows ... from mosquito-borne Zika may be driving up abortion rates in Latin American countries affected by the ...

  11. Sea-Level Projections from the SeaRISE Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowicki, Sophie; Bindschadler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) is a community organized modeling effort, whose goal is to inform the fifth IPCC of the potential sea-level contribution from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in the 21st and 22nd century. SeaRISE seeks to determine the most likely ice sheet response to imposed climatic forcing by initializing an ensemble of models with common datasets and applying the same forcing to each model. Sensitivity experiments were designed to quantify the sea-level rise associated with a change in: 1) surface mass balance, 2) basal lubrication, and 3) ocean induced basal melt. The range of responses, resulting from the multi-model approach, is interpreted as a proxy of uncertainty in our sea-level projections. http://websrv.cs .umt.edu/isis/index.php/SeaRISE_Assessment.

  12. Flat as a Pancake? Exploring Rising in Baked Goods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that can be used for acid-base chemistry, everyday chemistry, or food chemistry. Investigates the rising in baked goods. Includes both instructor information and student activity sheets. (YDS)

  13. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (<10 ns) magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  14. Triggering Process of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Rising Tone Emissions in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Omura, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Spacecraft observations and simulations show generation of coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising-tone frequencies. In the inner magnetosphere, the spontaneously triggered EMIC waves are generated by the energetic protons with large temperature anisotropy. We reproduced EMIC triggered emissions in the Earth's magnetosphere by real scale hybrid simulations with cylindrical magnetic geometry. We obtained spontaneously triggered nonlinear EMIC waves with rising frequencies in the H+ band of the EMIC dispersion relation. The proton holes in the phase space are formed. We have also derived the theoretical optimum wave amplitude for triggering process of the EMIC nonlinear wave growth. The optimum wave amplitude and the nonlinear transition time show a good agreement with the present simulation result. The nonlinear wave growth over a limited time forms a sub-packet structure of a rising tone emission. The formation process of a sub-packet is repeated because of a new triggering wave generated by the phase-organized protons, which are released from the previous sub-packet. Then the EMIC triggered emission is formed as a train of sub-packets generated at different rising frequencies.

  15. Triggering process of electromagnetic ion cyclotron rising tone emissions in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masafumi; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2013-09-01

    Spacecraft observations and simulations show generation of coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising tone frequencies. In the inner magnetosphere, the spontaneously triggered EMIC waves are generated by the energetic protons with large temperature anisotropy. We reproduced EMIC triggered emissions in the Earth's magnetosphere by real scale hybrid simulations with cylindrical magnetic geometry. We obtained spontaneously triggered nonlinear EMIC waves with rising frequencies in the H+band of the EMIC dispersion relation. The proton holes in the phase space are formed. We have also derived the theoretical optimum wave amplitude for triggering process of the EMIC nonlinear wave growth. The optimum wave amplitude and the nonlinear transition time show a good agreement with the present simulation result. The nonlinear wave growth over a limited time forms a subpacket structure of a rising tone emission. The formation process of a subpacket is repeated because of a new triggering wave generated by the phase-organized protons, which are released from the previous subpacket. Then, the EMIC triggered emission is formed as a train of subpackets generated at different rising frequencies.

  16. Field monitoring of column shortenings in a high-rise building during construction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok; Kim, Jong Moon; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-10-24

    The automatic monitoring of shortenings of vertical members in high-rise buildings under construction is a challenging issue in the high-rise building construction field. In this study, a practical system for monitoring column shortening in a high-rise building under construction is presented. The proposed monitoring system comprises the following components: (1) a wireless sensing system and (2) the corresponding monitoring software. The wireless sensing system comprises the sensors and energy-efficient wireless sensing units (sensor nodes, master nodes, and repeater nodes), which automate the processes for measuring the strains of vertical members and transmitting the measured data to the remote server. The monitoring software enables construction administrators to monitor real-time data collected by the server via an Internet connection. The proposed monitoring system is applied to actual 66-floor and 72-floor high-rise buildings under construction. The system enables automatic and real-time measurements of the shortening of vertical members, which can result in more precise construction.

  17. Field Monitoring of Column Shortenings in a High-Rise Building during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok; Kim, Jong Moon; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    The automatic monitoring of shortenings of vertical members in high-rise buildings under construction is a challenging issue in the high-rise building construction field. In this study, a practical system for monitoring column shortening in a high-rise building under construction is presented. The proposed monitoring system comprises the following components: (1) a wireless sensing system and (2) the corresponding monitoring software. The wireless sensing system comprises the sensors and energy-efficient wireless sensing units (sensor nodes, master nodes, and repeater nodes), which automate the processes for measuring the strains of vertical members and transmitting the measured data to the remote server. The monitoring software enables construction administrators to monitor real-time data collected by the server via an Internet connection. The proposed monitoring system is applied to actual 66-floor and 72-floor high-rise buildings under construction. The system enables automatic and real-time measurements of the shortening of vertical members, which can result in more precise construction. PMID:24284768

  18. Climate change. How fast are sea levels rising?

    PubMed

    Church, J A

    2001-10-26

    Sea levels are rising as a result of global warming, but assessing the rate of the rise is proving difficult. In his Perspective, Church highlights the report by Cabanes et al., who have reassessed observational data and find that it is closer to model estimates than previously found. However, observational data are still limited and models disagree in their regional projections. With present data and models, regional sea-level changes cannot be predicted with confidence.

  19. Recent contributions of glaciers and ice caps to sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Wahr, John; Pfeffer, W Tad; Swenson, Sean

    2012-02-08

    Glaciers and ice caps (GICs) are important contributors to present-day global mean sea level rise. Most previous global mass balance estimates for GICs rely on extrapolation of sparse mass balance measurements representing only a small fraction of the GIC area, leaving their overall contribution to sea level rise unclear. Here we show that GICs, excluding the Greenland and Antarctic peripheral GICs, lost mass at a rate of 148 ± 30 Gt yr(-1) from January 2003 to December 2010, contributing 0.41 ± 0.08 mm yr(-1) to sea level rise. Our results are based on a global, simultaneous inversion of monthly GRACE-derived satellite gravity fields, from which we calculate the mass change over all ice-covered regions greater in area than 100 km(2). The GIC rate for 2003-2010 is about 30 per cent smaller than the previous mass balance estimate that most closely matches our study period. The high mountains of Asia, in particular, show a mass loss of only 4 ± 20 Gt yr(-1) for 2003-2010, compared with 47-55 Gt yr(-1) in previously published estimates. For completeness, we also estimate that the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, including their peripheral GICs, contributed 1.06 ± 0.19 mm yr(-1) to sea level rise over the same time period. The total contribution to sea level rise from all ice-covered regions is thus 1.48 ± 0.26 mm (-1), which agrees well with independent estimates of sea level rise originating from land ice loss and other terrestrial sources.

  20. Modeling the Rise of Fibril Magnetic Fields in Fully Convective Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria A.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2016-08-01

    Many fully convective stars exhibit a wide variety of surface magnetism, including starspots and chromospheric activity. The manner by which bundles of magnetic field traverse portions of the convection zone to emerge at the stellar surface is not especially well understood. In the solar context, some insight into this process has been gleaned by regarding the magnetism as consisting partly of idealized thin flux tubes (TFTs). Here we present the results of a large set of TFT simulations in a rotating spherical domain of convective flows representative of a 0.3 M ⊙ main-sequence star. This is the first study to investigate how individual flux tubes in such a star might rise under the combined influence of buoyancy, convection, and differential rotation. A time-dependent hydrodynamic convective flow field, taken from separate 3D simulations calculated with the anelastic equations, impacts the flux tube as it rises. Convective motions modulate the shape of the initially buoyant flux ring, promoting localized rising loops. Flux tubes in fully convective stars have a tendency to rise nearly parallel to the rotation axis. However, the presence of strong differential rotation allows some initially low-latitude flux tubes of moderate strength to develop rising loops that emerge in the near-equatorial region. Magnetic pumping suppresses the global rise of the flux tube most efficiently in the deeper interior and at lower latitudes. The results of these simulations aim to provide a link between dynamo-generated magnetic fields, fluid motions, and observations of starspots for fully convective stars.

  1. Rising motion of a bubble layer near a vertical wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2015-11-01

    Bubbly flows in vertical pipes and channels form a wall-peak distribution of bubbles under certain conditions. The dynamics of the bubbles near the wall is different than in an unbounded liquid. Here we report the rising motion of bubbles in a liquid near a vertical wall. In a simulation of a bubbly flow in a periodic domain with a vertical wall on one side, an average pressure gradient is applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in a shear flow which is in turn generated by rising motion of bubbles. The rise velocity of the bubbles on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Eotvos number, and the average volume fraction of bubbles near the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented.

  2. Short Lived Climate Pollutants cause a Long Lived Effect on Sea-level Rise: Analyzing climate metrics for sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterner, E.; Johansson, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change depends on the increase of several different atmospheric pollutants. While long term global warming will be determined mainly by carbon dioxide, warming in the next few decades will depend to a large extent on short lived climate pollutants (SLCP). Reducing emissions of SLCPs could contribute to lower the global mean surface temperature by 0.5 °C already by 2050 (Shindell et al. 2012). Furthermore, the warming effect of one of the most potent SLCPs, black carbon (BC), may have been underestimated in the past. Bond et al. (2013) presents a new best estimate of the total BC radiative forcing (RF) of 1.1 W/m2 (90 % uncertainty bounds of 0.17 to 2.1 W/m2) since the beginning of the industrial era. BC is however never emitted alone and cooling aerosols from the same sources offset a majority of this RF. In the wake of calls for mitigation of SLCPs it is important to study other aspects of the climate effect of SLCPs. One key impact of climate change is sea-level rise (SLR). In a recent study, the effect of SLCP mitigation scenarios on SLR is examined. Hu et al (2013) find a substantial effect on SLR from mitigating SLCPs sharply, reducing SLR by 22-42% by 2100. We choose a different approach focusing on emission pulses and analyse a metric based on sea level rise so as to further enlighten the SLR consequences of SLCPs. We want in particular to understand the time dynamics of SLR impacts caused by SLCPs compared to other greenhouse gases. The most commonly used physical based metrics are GWP and GTP. We propose and evaluate an additional metric: The global sea-level rise potential (GSP). The GSP is defined as the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a forcer to the sea level rise after a time horizon caused by an emissions pulse of a CO2. GSP is evaluated and compared to GWP and GTP using a set of climate forcers chosen to cover the whole scale of atmospheric perturbation life times (BC, CH4, N2O, CO2 and SF6). The study

  3. Micro- and nano- second time scale, high power electrical wire explosions in water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, Alon; Efimov, Sergey; Sayapin, Arkadii; Fedotov, Alexander; Gurovich, Viktor; Krasik, Yakov

    2006-10-01

    Experimental and magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation results of micro- and nanosecond time scale underwater electrical Al, Cu and W wires explosions are presented. A capacitor bank with stored energy up to 6 kJ (discharge current up to 80 kA with 2.5 μs quarter period) was used in microsecond time scale experiments and water forming line generator with current amplitude up to 100 kA and pulse duration of 100 ns were used in nanosecond time scale experiments. Extremely high energy deposition of up to 60 times the atomization enthalpy was registered in nanosecond time scale explosions. A discharge channel evolution and surface temperature were analyzed by streak shadow imaging and using fast photo-diode with a set of interference filters, respectively. Microsecond time scale electrical explosion of cylindrical wire array showed extremely high pressure of converging shock waves at the axis, up to 0.2 MBar. A 1D and 2D magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation demonstrated good agreement with such experimental parameters as discharge channel current, voltage, radius, and temperature.

  4. Seismic characteristics of outer-rise earthquakes in the different seismic coupling subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing the seismogenic zone of major subduction plate boundaries provides us a possible to reduce large earthquakes hazard. In the past several decades, many scientists have analyzed various geophysical methods and datasets, such as seismic and geodetic ground motion data, historical tsunami deposits, aftershock distributions, and seafloor bathymetry, trying to understand the mechanisms behind great devastating earthquakes, and to estimate the probability of a major earthquake occurrence in the future. In this study, by using the global earthquake catalog (GCMT) from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2011. We firstly re-examines the outer-rise earthquake model proposed by the Christensen (1988) at the subduction zones suggested to have different coupling levels. The compressive stress cumulated during the subducting processes are often reflected by the occurrence of compressional outer-rise earthquakes. Thus, in the region where the compressional outer-rise earthquakes take place without any corresponding large underthrusting earthquakes, the seismic potential is usually considered to be high. We re-examined the high seismic potential areas determined by this criteria in Christensen (1988) and confirm that the large underthrusting earthquakes did really occur in the 30 years following the appearance of compressional outer-rise events, such as in Tonga region in the vicinity of 20S, a Mw 8.3 large earthquake occurred in 2006. This result represents that the outer-rise earthquake model could be an indicator for the generation of large earthquakes along subduction zones. In addition, to have a more accurate estimation for the seismic potential, we discuss the relationship between the generation of earthquakes and the change of cumulative gravitational potential energy caused by earthquakes (ΔGPE) over time. Our result shows an acceleration of ΔGPE before large earthquakes. Our result also shows that the extensional outer-rise events for strong seismic coupling

  5. Sea-level rise risks to coastal cities: what are the limits to adaptation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Reeder, T.; Brown, S.; Haigh, I. D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the consequence of sea-level rise for coastal cities has long lead times and huge political implications. Civilisation has emerged and developed during a period of several thousand years during which in geological terms sea level has been unusually stable. We have now moved out of this period raising important challenges for the future. In 2005 there were 136 coastal cities with a population exceeding one million people and a collective population of 400 million people. All these cities are threatened by flooding from the sea to varying degrees and these risks are increasing due to growing exposure (people and assets), rising sea levels due to climate change, and in some cities, significant coastal subsidence due to human agency (drainage and groundwater withdrawals from susceptible soils). City abandonment due to sea-level rise is widely discussed in the media, but most of the discussion is speculative. The limits to adaptation and abandonment of cities are not predictable in a formal sense - while the rise in mean sea level raises the likelihood of a catastrophic flood, extreme events are what cause damage and trigger a response, be it abandonment or a defence upgrade. Several types of potential adaptation limits can be recognised: (1) physical/engineering limits; (2) economic/financial limits; and (3) socio-political limits. The latter two types of limits are much less understood, and yet issues such as loss of confidence rather than a simple engineering failure may be instrumental in the future of a coastal city. There are few studies which quantify the sea-level rise threshold at which cities will be challenged, especially for large rises exceeding a metre or more. Exceptions include London and the Thames Estuary and the Amsterdam and Rotterdam (the Netherlands) where adaptation to a rise of sea level of up to 4 m or more appears feasible. This lack of knowledge on sea-level rise thresholds for coastal cities is of concern, and similar

  6. Stress-induced rise in body temperature is repeatable in free-ranging Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Réale, Denis; Garant, Dany; Speakman, John R; Humphries, Murray M

    2012-04-01

    In response to handling or other acute stressors, most mammals, including humans, experience a temporary rise in body temperature (T(b)). Although this stress-induced rise in T(b) has been extensively studied on model organisms under controlled environments, individual variation in this interesting phenomenon has not been examined in the field. We investigated the stress-induced rise in T(b) in free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) to determine first if it is repeatable. We predicted that the stress-induced rise in T(b) should be positively correlated to factors affecting heat production and heat dissipation, including ambient temperature (T(a)), body mass (M(b)), and field metabolic rate (FMR). Over two summers, we recorded both T(b) within the first minute of handling time (T(b1)) and after 5 min of handling time (T(b5)) 294 times on 140 individuals. The mean ∆T(b) (T(b5) - T(b1)) during this short interval was 0.30 ± 0.02°C, confirming that the stress-induced rise in T(b) occurs in chipmunks. Consistent differences among individuals accounted for 40% of the total variation in ∆T(b) (i.e. the stress-induced rise in T(b) is significantly repeatable). We also found that the stress-induced rise in T(b) was positively correlated to T(a), M(b), and mass-adjusted FMR. These results confirm that individuals consistently differ in their expression of the stress-induced rise in T(b) and that the extent of its expression is affected by factors related to heat production and dissipation. We highlight some research constraints and opportunities related to the integration of this laboratory paradigm into physiological and evolutionary ecology. PMID:22076533

  7. Combined flux compression and plasma opening switch on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Felber, Franklin S; Waisman, Eduardo M; Mazarakis, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 micros. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  8. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  9. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  10. Future sea-level rise in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, Gaia; Spada, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    Secular sea level variations in the Mediterranean Sea are the result of a number of processes characterized by distinct time scales and spatial patterns. Here we predict the future sea level variations in the Mediterranean Sea to year 2050 combining the contributions from terrestrial ice melt (TIM), glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), and the ocean response (OR) that includes the thermal expansion and the ocean circulation contributions. The three contributions are characterized by comparable magnitudes but distinctly different sea-level fingerprints across the Mediterranean basin. The TIM component of future sea-level rise is taken from Spada et al. (2013) and it is mainly driven by the melt of small glaciers and ice caps and by the dynamic ice loss from Antarctica. The sea-level fingerprint associated with GIA is studied using two distinct models available from the literature: ICE-5G(VM2) (Peltier, 2004) and the ice model progressively developed at the Research School of Earth Sciences (RSES) of the National Australian University (KL05) (see Fleming and Lambeck, 2004 and references therein). Both the GIA and the TIM sea-level predictions have been obtained with the aid of the SELEN program (Spada and Stocchi, 2007). The spatially-averaged OR component, which includes thermosteric and halosteric sea-level variations, recently obtained using a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model (Carillo et al., 2012), vary between 2 and 7 cm according to scenarios adopted (EA1B and EA1B2, see Meehl at al., 2007). Since the sea-level variations associated with TIM mainly result from the gravitational interactions between the cryosphere components, the oceans and the solid Earth, and long-wavelength rotational variations, they are characterized by a very smooth global pattern and by a marked zonal symmetry reflecting the dipole geometry of the ice sources. Since the Mediterranean Sea is located in the intermediate far-field of major ice sources, TIM sea-level changes have sub

  11. Fires and the rise and regulation of atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T. M.

    2012-04-01

    When did oxygen first approach 21% of the atmosphere, and what regulates it there? These are enduring puzzles in Earth system science, and fire science provides a key part of the answers. The results of ignition experiments with natural fuels indicate that to start a fire requires at least 17% oxygen in the atmosphere. Thus, the appearance of charcoal in the fossil record around 420 million years ago in the Silurian Period indicates atmospheric oxygen was >17% then. Here we hypothesise that the first non-vascular plants, which began colonising the land surface around 50 million years beforehand (in the Ordovician Period), caused a rise in atmospheric oxygen concentration to a level >17% sufficient to support fires. We base this on weathering experiments with an analogue for the first non-vascular plants, and modelling with the COPSE model of the coupled phosphorus, carbon and oxygen biogeochemical cycles. The experiments reveal that a non-vascular plant (the moss Physcomitrella patens) hugely amplifies phosphorus weathering by a factor of up to 60. The modelling shows that early plant colonisation could hence have increased phosphorus supply to the ocean, fuelling photosynthetic production and organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of oxygen to the atmosphere. Atmospheric oxygen is predicted to have risen through the late Ordovician and into the Silurian. Since 370 million years ago, the nearly continuous record of charcoal indicates that oxygen has remained above 17% of the atmosphere. At the same time, the continued persistence of forests means fires have never been so frequent as to prevent trees from regenerating, setting a contested upper limit on oxygen of around 30%. The restriction of oxygen variation within a factor of two suggests remarkable regulation, because the whole oxygen reservoir has been replaced over 100 times in this interval. Fires are a prime candidate for forming part of the regulating mechanism, and giving it a 'set point', as

  12. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L

    2012-12-18

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145-65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130-125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian-Albian (ca. 125-100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian-Campanian (ca. 100-84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches.

  13. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments

    PubMed Central

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145–65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130–125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian–Albian (ca. 125–100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian–Campanian (ca. 100–84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches. PMID:23213256

  14. Rise to dominance of angiosperm pioneers in European Cretaceous environments.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Clément; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Dilcher, David L

    2012-12-18

    The majority of environments are dominated by flowering plants today, but it is uncertain how this dominance originated. This increase in angiosperm diversity happened during the Cretaceous period (ca. 145-65 Ma) and led to replacement and often extinction of gymnosperms and ferns. We propose a scenario for the rise to dominance of the angiosperms from the Barremian (ca. 130 Ma) to the Campanian (ca. 84 Ma) based on the European megafossil plant record. These megafossil data demonstrate that angiosperms migrated into new environments in three phases: (i) Barremian (ca. 130-125 Ma) freshwater lake-related wetlands; (ii) Aptian-Albian (ca. 125-100 Ma) understory floodplains (excluding levees and back swamps); and (iii) Cenomanian-Campanian (ca. 100-84 Ma) natural levees, back swamps, and coastal swamps. This scenario allows for the measured evolution of angiosperms in time and space synthesizing changes in the physical environment with concomitant changes in the biological environment. This view of angiosperm radiation in three phases reconciles previous scenarios based on the North American record. The Cretaceous plant record that can be observed in Europe is exceptional in many ways. (i) Angiosperms are well preserved from the Barremian to the Maastrichtian (ca. 65 Ma). (ii) Deposits are well constrained and dated stratigraphically. (iii) They encompass a full range of environments. (iv) European paleobotany provides many detailed studies of Cretaceous floras for analysis. These factors make a robust dataset for the study of angiosperm evolution from the Barremian to the Campanian that can be traced through various ecosystems and related to other plant groups occupying the same niches. PMID:23213256

  15. Complexities in Barrier Island Response to Sea-Level Rise: Insights from Model Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L. J.; List, J. H.; Williams, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    As sea level rises, a barrier island will respond either by migrating landward across the underlying substrate to higher elevations or by disintegrating if there is no longer sufficient sand volume and relief above sea level to prevent inundation during storms. Using the morphological-behavior model GEOMBEST, we investigate the sea-level rise response of a complex coastal environment to changes in variety of factors, thus yielding insights into barrier island evolution. Our base case is a simplified Holocene run which simulates a possible scenario for the evolution of a 25-km stretch of the North Carolina Outer Banks over the last 8500 years. Varying one parameter at a time, we explore the degree to which changes in sea-level rise rate, sediment supply/loss rate, offshore limits to sediment transport, substrate erodibility, substrate composition and depth- dependent response rate produce changes in average landward barrier island migration rate, average depth of substrate erosion, and final barrier island volume. As expected, sensitivity analyses reveal that within the range of possible values for the North Carolina coast, sea-level rise rate, followed by sediment supply rate, is the most important factor in determining barrier island response to sea-level rise. More surprisingly, the analyses in aggregate indicate that barrier island evolution is highly sensitive to the range of substrate slopes encountered throughout landward migration (i.e., the slope history); as a barrier encounters a continually changing substrate slope, island volume constantly changes, moving toward equilibrium with the current average slope. Through this process, steeper average slope histories produce smaller barrier islands while shallower average slope histories produce larger barrier islands. In both cases, secondary effects on substrate erosion depth and migration rate also result. Notably, similar geometric effects explain an insensitivity of simulation results to changes in offshore

  16. Rapid shoreward encroachment of salt marsh cordgrass in response to accelerated sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Bertness, Mark D.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of New England salt marsh communities is intrinsically linked to the magnitude, frequency, and duration of tidal inundation. Cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) exclusively inhabits the frequently flooded lower elevations, whereas a mosaic of marsh hay (Spartina patens), spike grass (Distichlis spicata), and black rush (Juncus gerardi) typically dominate higher elevations. Monitoring plant zonal boundaries in two New England salt marshes revealed that low-marsh cordgrass rapidly moved landward at the expense of higher-marsh species between 1995 and 1998. Plant macrofossils from sediment cores across modern plant community boundaries provided a 2,500-year record of marsh community composition and documented the migration of cordgrass into the high marsh. Isotopic dating revealed that the initiation of cordgrass migration occurred in the late 19th century and continued through the 20th century. The timing of the initiation of cordgrass migration is coincident with an acceleration in the rate of sea-level rise recorded by the New York tide gauge. These results suggest that increased flooding associated with accelerating rates of sea-level rise has stressed high-marsh communities and promoted landward migration of cordgrass. If current rates of sea-level rise continue or increase slightly over the next century, New England salt marshes will be dominated by cordgrass. If climate warming causes sea-level rise rates to increase significantly over the next century, these cordgrass-dominated marshes will likely drown, resulting in extensive losses of coastal wetlands. PMID:11724926

  17. Color imaging of Mars by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delamere, W.A.; Tornabene, L.L.; McEwen, A.S.; Becker, K.; Bergstrom, J.W.; Bridges, N.T.; Eliason, E.M.; Gallagher, D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.; Mattson, S.; McArthur, G.K.; Mellon, M.T.; Milazzo, M.; Russell, P.S.; Thomas, N.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE has been producing a large number of scientifically useful color products of Mars and other planetary objects. The three broad spectral bands, coupled with the highly sensitive 14 bit detectors and time delay integration, enable detection of subtle color differences. The very high spatial resolution of HiRISE can augment the mineralogic interpretations based on multispectral (THEMIS) and hyperspectral datasets (TES, OMEGA and CRISM) and thereby enable detailed geologic and stratigraphic interpretations at meter scales. In addition to providing some examples of color images and their interpretation, we describe the processing techniques used to produce them and note some of the minor artifacts in the output. We also provide an example of how HiRISE color products can be effectively used to expand mineral and lithologic mapping provided by CRISM data products that are backed by other spectral datasets. The utility of high quality color data for understanding geologic processes on Mars has been one of the major successes of HiRISE. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Color imaging of Mars by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamere, W. Alan; Tornabene, Livio L.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Becker, Kris; Bergstrom, James W.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Eliason, Eric M.; Gallagher, Dennis; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Mattson, Sarah; McArthur, Guy K.; Mellon, Michael T.; Milazzo, Moses; Russell, Patrick S.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE has been producing a large number of scientifically useful color products of Mars and other planetary objects. The three broad spectral bands, coupled with the highly sensitive 14 bit detectors and time delay integration, enable detection of subtle color differences. The very high spatial resolution of HiRISE can augment the mineralogic interpretations based on multispectral (THEMIS) and hyperspectral datasets (TES, OMEGA and CRISM) and thereby enable detailed geologic and stratigraphic interpretations at meter scales. In addition to providing some examples of color images and their interpretation, we describe the processing techniques used to produce them and note some of the minor artifacts in the output. We also provide an example of how HiRISE color products can be effectively used to expand mineral and lithologic mapping provided by CRISM data products that are backed by other spectral datasets. The utility of high quality color data for understanding geologic processes on Mars has been one of the major successes of HiRISE.

  19. Incorporating Infrastructure and Vegetation Effects on Sea Level Rise Predictions in Low-Gradient Coastal Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Sandi Rojas, S.; Trivisonno, F.; Saco, P. M.; Riccardi, G.

    2015-12-01

    At the regional and global scales, coastal management and planning for future sea level rise scenarios is typically supported by modelling tools that predict the expected inundation extent. These tools rely on a number of simplifying assumptions that, in some cases, may result in important overestimation or underestimation of the inundation extent. One of such cases is coastal wetlands, where vegetation strongly affects both the magnitude and the timing of inundation. Many coastal wetlands display other forms of flow restrictions due to, for example, infrastructure or drainage works, which also alters the inundation patterns. In this contribution we explore the effects of flow restrictions on inundation patterns under sea level rise conditions in coastal wetlands. We use a dynamic wetland evolution model that not only incorporates the effects of flow restrictions due to culverts, bridges and weirs as well as vegetation, but also considers that vegetation changes as a consequence of increasing inundation. We apply our model to a coastal wetland in Australia and compare predictions of our model to predictions using conventional approaches. We found that some restrictions accentuate detrimental effects of sea level rise while others moderate them. We also found that some management strategies based on flow redistribution that provide short term solution may result more damaging in the long term if sea level rise is considered.

  20. Rapid shoreward encroachment of salt marsh cordgrass in response to accelerated sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J P; Bertness, M D

    2001-12-01

    The distribution of New England salt marsh communities is intrinsically linked to the magnitude, frequency, and duration of tidal inundation. Cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) exclusively inhabits the frequently flooded lower elevations, whereas a mosaic of marsh hay (Spartina patens), spike grass (Distichlis spicata), and black rush (Juncus gerardi) typically dominate higher elevations. Monitoring plant zonal boundaries in two New England salt marshes revealed that low-marsh cordgrass rapidly moved landward at the expense of higher-marsh species between 1995 and 1998. Plant macrofossils from sediment cores across modern plant community boundaries provided a 2,500-year record of marsh community composition and documented the migration of cordgrass into the high marsh. Isotopic dating revealed that the initiation of cordgrass migration occurred in the late 19th century and continued through the 20th century. The timing of the initiation of cordgrass migration is coincident with an acceleration in the rate of sea-level rise recorded by the New York tide gauge. These results suggest that increased flooding associated with accelerating rates of sea-level rise has stressed high-marsh communities and promoted landward migration of cordgrass. If current rates of sea-level rise continue or increase slightly over the next century, New England salt marshes will be dominated by cordgrass. If climate warming causes sea-level rise rates to increase significantly over the next century, these cordgrass-dominated marshes will likely drown, resulting in extensive losses of coastal wetlands.

  1. Mass and volume contributions to twentieth-century global sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laury; Douglas, Bruce C

    2004-03-25

    The rate of twentieth-century global sea level rise and its causes are the subjects of intense controversy. Most direct estimates from tide gauges give 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1), whereas indirect estimates based on the two processes responsible for global sea level rise, namely mass and volume change, fall far below this range. Estimates of the volume increase due to ocean warming give a rate of about 0.5 mm yr(-1) (ref. 8) and the rate due to mass increase, primarily from the melting of continental ice, is thought to be even smaller. Therefore, either the tide gauge estimates are too high, as has been suggested recently, or one (or both) of the mass and volume estimates is too low. Here we present an analysis of sea level measurements at tide gauges combined with observations of temperature and salinity in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans close to the gauges. We find that gauge-determined rates of sea level rise, which encompass both mass and volume changes, are two to three times higher than the rates due to volume change derived from temperature and salinity data. Our analysis supports earlier studies that put the twentieth-century rate in the 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1) range, but more importantly it suggests that mass increase plays a larger role than ocean warming in twentieth-century global sea level rise.

  2. Tension between reducing sea-level rise and global warming through solar-radiation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, P. J.; Sriver, R. L.; Keller, K.

    2012-02-01

    Geoengineering using solar-radiation management (SRM) is gaining interest as a potential strategy to reduce future climate change impacts. Basic physics and past observations suggest that reducing insolation will, on average, cool the Earth. It is uncertain, however, whether SRM can reduce climate change stressors such as sea-level rise or rates of surface air temperature change. Here we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantify the possible response of sea levels and surface air temperatures to projected climate forcings and SRM strategies. We find that SRM strategies introduce a potentially strong tension between the objectives to reduce (1) the rate of temperature change and (2) sea-level rise. This tension arises primarily because surface air temperatures respond faster to radiative forcings than sea levels. Our results show that the forcing required to stop sea-level rise could cause a rapid cooling with a rate similar to the peak business-as-usual warming rate. Furthermore, termination of SRM was found to produce warming rates up to five times greater than the maximum rates under the business-as-usual CO2 scenario, whereas sea-level rise rates were only 30% higher. Reducing these risks requires a slow phase-out of many decades and thus commits future generations.

  3. Rising sea level may cause decline of fringing coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Michael E.; Ogston, Andrea S.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2011-08-01

    Coral reefs are major marine ecosystems and critical resources for marine diversity and fisheries. These ecosystems are widely recognized to be at risk from a number of stressors, and added to those in the past several decades is climate change due to anthropogenically driven increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Most threatening to most coral reefs are elevated sea surface temperatures and increased ocean acidity [e.g., Kleypas et al., 1999; Hoegh-Guldberg et al., 2007], but sea level rise, another consequence of climate change, is also likely to increase sedimentary processes that potentially interfere with photosynthesis, feeding, recruitment, and other key physiological processes (Figure 1). Anderson et al. [2010] argue compellingly that potential hazardous impacts to coastlines from 21st-century sea level rise are greatly underestimated, particularly because of the rapid rate of rise. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea level will rise in the coming century (1990-2090) by 2.2-4.4 millimeters per year, when projected with little contribution from melting ice [Meehl et al., 2007]. New studies indicate that rapid melting of land ice could substantially increase the rate of sea level rise [Grinsted et al., 2009; Milne et al., 2009].

  4. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  5. Rising sea level may cause decline of fringing coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Michael E.; Ogston, Andrea S.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are major marine ecosystems and critical resources for marine diversity and fisheries. These ecosystems are widely recognized to be at risk from a number of stressors, and added to those in the past several decades is climate change due to anthropogenically driven increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Most threatening to most coral reefs are elevated sea surface temperatures and increased ocean acidity [e.g., Kleypas et al., 1999; Hoegh-Guldberg et al., 2007], but sea level rise, another consequence of climate change, is also likely to increase sedimentary processes that potentially interfere with photosynthesis, feeding, recruitment, and other key physiological processes (Figure 1). Anderson et al. [2010] argue compellingly that potential hazardous impacts to coastlines from 21st-century sea level rise are greatly underestimated, particularly because of the rapid rate of rise. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea level will rise in the coming century (1990–2090) by 2.2–4.4 millimeters per year, when projected with little contribution from melting ice [Meehl et al., 2007]. New studies indicate that rapid melting of land ice could substantially increase the rate of sea level rise [Grinsted et al., 2009; Milne et al., 2009].

  6. Rising sea level may cause decline of fringing coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, M.E.; Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are major marine ecosystems and critical resources for marine diversity and fisheries. These ecosystems are widely recognized to be at risk from a number of stressors, and added to those in the past several decades is climate change due to anthropogenically driven increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Most threatening to most coral reefs are elevated sea surface temperatures and increased ocean acidity [e.g., Kleypas et al., 1999; Hoegh-Guldberg et al., 2007], but sea level rise, another consequence of climate change, is also likely to increase sedimentary processes that potentially interfere with photosynthesis, feeding, recruitment, and other key physiological processes (Figure 1). Anderson et al. [2010] argue compellingly that potential hazardous impacts to coastlines from 21st-century sea level rise are greatly underestimated, particularly because of the rapid rate of rise. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that sea level will rise in the coming century (1990-2090) by 2.2-4.4 millimeters per year, when projected with little contribution from melting ice [Meehl et al., 2007]. New studies indicate that rapid melting of land ice could substantially increase the rate of sea level rise [Grinsted et al., 2009; Milne et al., 2009].

  7. STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rises into sky after KSC liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rises into the clear morning sky after liftoff from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A at 8:24:00 am (Eastern Standard Time (EST)). This profile view shows OV-103, riding atop the external tank (ET) and flanked by two solid rocket boosters. Exhaust plumes billow from the SRB skirts. The diamond shock effect is visible at the three space shuttle main engine (SSME) nozzles.

  8. Speculative Truth - Henry Cavendish, Natural Philosophy, and the Rise of Modern Theoretical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormmach, Russell

    2004-03-01

    With a never-before published paper by Lord Henry Cavendish, as well as a biography on him, this book offers a fascinating discourse on the rise of scientific attitudes and ways of knowing. A pioneering British physicist in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Cavendish was widely considered to be the first full-time scientist in the modern sense. Through the lens of this unique thinker and writer, this book is about the birth of modern science.

  9. Flexural ridges, trenches, and outer rises around coronae on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Flexural signatures outboard of Venusian coronal rims are examined with the purpose of inferring the thickness of the planet's elastic lithosphere. Topographic profiles of several prominent coronae which display clear trench and outer rise signatures are presented. Via a thin elastic plate flexure model to characterize the shape of the trench and outer rise, Venusian flexures are found to be similar in both amplitude and wavelength to lithospheric flexures seaward of subduction zones on earth. It is shown that circumferential fractures are concentrated in areas where the topography is curved downward, in good agreement with the high tensile stress predicted by the flexure models. Two scenarios for the development of the ridge-trench-outer rise flexural topography and circumferential fractures of coronae are presented. The first scenario involves reheating and thermal subsidence of the lithosphere interior to the corona, while the second involves expansion of the corona interior and roll back of the subducting lithosphere exterior to the corona.

  10. Coastal Impacts Due to Sea-Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Duncan M.; Fenster, Michael S.; Argow, Britt A.; Buynevich, Ilya V.

    2008-05-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) recently estimated that global sea level will rise from 0.18 to 0.59 m by the end of this century. Rising sea level not only inundates low-lying coastal regions but also contributes to the redistribution of sediment along sandy coasts. Over the long term, sea-level rise (SLR) causes barrier islands to migrate landward while conserving mass through offshore and onshore sediment transport. Under these conditions, coastal systems adjust to SLR dynamically while maintaining a characteristic geometry that is unique to a particular coast. Coastal marshes are susceptible to accelerated SLR because their vertical accretion rates are limited and they may drown. As marshes convert to open water, tidal exchange through inlets increases, which leads to sand sequestration in tidal deltas and erosion of adjacent barrier shorelines.

  11. Who is to blame for the rise in obesity?

    PubMed

    Lusk, Jayson L; Ellison, Brenna

    2013-09-01

    We sought to determine who the public perceives as most contributing to the rise in obesity and to identify the determinants of such perceptions. A nationwide survey was conducted among 800 US individuals. Respondents were asked to place each of seven entities (food manufacturers, grocery stores, restaurants, government policies, farmers, individuals, and parents) into three categories: primarily, somewhat, and not to blame for the rise in obesity. Eighty percent said individuals were primarily to blame for the rise in obesity. Parents were the next-most blameworthy group, with 59% ascribing primary blame. Responses fell along three dimensions related to individual responsibility, agribusiness responsibility, and government-farm policy. A number of individual-specific factors were associated with perceptions of blame. For example, individuals with a more statist score on the economic political ideology scale were more likely to blame the government and agribusiness for obesity.

  12. Overestimation of marsh vulnerability to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Temmerman, Stijn; Skeehan, Emily E.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Coastal marshes are considered to be among the most valuable and vulnerable ecosystems on Earth, where the imminent loss of ecosystem services is a feared consequence of sea level rise. However, we show with a meta-analysis that global measurements of marsh elevation change indicate that marshes are generally building at rates similar to or exceeding historical sea level rise, and that process-based models predict survival under a wide range of future sea level scenarios. We argue that marsh vulnerability tends to be overstated because assessment methods often fail to consider biophysical feedback processes known to accelerate soil building with sea level rise, and the potential for marshes to migrate inland.

  13. Overestimation of marsh vulnerability to sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Temmerman, Stijn; Skeehan, Emily E.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes are considered to be among the most valuable and vulnerable ecosystems on Earth, where the imminent loss of ecosystem services is a feared consequence of sea level rise. However, we show with a meta-analysis that global measurements of marsh elevation change indicate that marshes are generally building at rates similar to or exceeding historical sea level rise, and that process-based models predict survival under a wide range of future sea level scenarios. We argue that marsh vulnerability tends to be overstated because assessment methods often fail to consider biophysical feedback processes known to accelerate soil building with sea level rise, and the potential for marshes to migrate inland.

  14. Sea-level rise and its impact on coastal zones.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Robert J; Cazenave, Anny

    2010-06-18

    Global sea levels have risen through the 20th century. These rises will almost certainly accelerate through the 21st century and beyond because of global warming, but their magnitude remains uncertain. Key uncertainties include the possible role of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets and the amplitude of regional changes in sea level. In many areas, nonclimatic components of relative sea-level change (mainly subsidence) can also be locally appreciable. Although the impacts of sea-level rise are potentially large, the application and success of adaptation are large uncertainties that require more assessment and consideration.

  15. The rising tide: Global warming and world sea levels

    SciTech Connect

    Edgerton, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    The author presents a broad-based and well-written approach to the impacts of sea level rise. Besides chapters on global warming, sources of sea level variability and the future, the effects on coastal nations, the book contains an important action-oriented discussion of proposed legislation and guidelines for planning and management aimed at reducing loss and damage produced by sea-level rise. The list of acknowledgements includes all the leading practitioners in the field. The references and information are current; reports and information from 1989 and 1990 meetings are included.

  16. Ore potential of the Marcus-Wake rise (Central Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. V.; Mel'nikov, M. E.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Sorokhtin, N. O.

    2015-12-01

    The data on the geological structure of different guyots on the Marcus-Wake rise with cobalt-bearing Fe-Mn crusts are discussed. Crusts are represented by three-layer aggregates composed of one lower phosphatized (I-1) and two upper non-phosphatized (II and III) layers. Fe-vernadite and Mn-feroxygite are the major ore minerals in all studied crusts and their layers. Small contents of vernadite, asbolane-buserite, and goethite are registered. Crusts of guyots on the rise are characterized by a stable concentration of heavy and rare metals (Cotot, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, and Cd) independently of their latitudinal location.

  17. Coastal flooding by tropical cyclones and sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Jonathan D; Irish, Jennifer L; Camargo, Suzana J

    2013-12-01

    The future impacts of climate change on landfalling tropical cyclones are unclear. Regardless of this uncertainty, flooding by tropical cyclones will increase as a result of accelerated sea-level rise. Under similar rates of rapid sea-level rise during the early Holocene epoch most low-lying sedimentary coastlines were generally much less resilient to storm impacts. Society must learn to live with a rapidly evolving shoreline that is increasingly prone to flooding from tropical cyclones. These impacts can be mitigated partly with adaptive strategies, which include careful stewardship of sediments and reductions in human-induced land subsidence.

  18. MRO HiRISE Observations of the Nucleus of Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Delamere, W. A.; Heyd, R.; Mattson, S.; Tamppari, L.; Zurek, R. W.; Schaller, C.; Block, K.; Polit, A. T.; Milkovich, S. M.; Hansen, C. J.; Thomas, N.; Cremonese, G.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at a distance of 131,000 ± 3,000 km on Oct 19, 2014. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will observe the comet on multiple orbits within 2.5 days before and after closest approach. The HiRISE telescope has a 50 cm aperture and an instantaneous field of view of one micro-radian per pixel, so the best image will have a scale near 131 m/pixel. If imaging is successful (i.e., not too smeared) and if the nucleus is larger than ~200 m diameter, this will provide the first resolved images of the nucleus of a long-period comet. Previous resolved images cover the nuclei of short-period comets, whose surfaces have been processed by many close passes by the sun. The encounter velocity is 56 km/s, so the best observations of the nucleus are only possible a few hours near closest approach, as seen from portions of 3 MRO orbits. A total of 20 HiRISE observations are planned for these 3 orbits, with exposure times varying from 0.13 to 2.5 s to cover a range of potential brightness. The HiRISE CCDs are operated at much higher temperatures, 20-30C, than those used for astronomical observations, so the maximum exposure time is limited by dark current signal. HiRISE objectives are to measure the shape and dimensions of the nucleus, determine its albedo (currently unknown for long-period comets), measure the rotation period and axis, and observe the inner coma for bright jets or outbursts. The phase angles range from 90 to 107 degrees, which will make imaging the nucleus challenging. The fast relative motions and changing geometries of the comet and MRO also make it challenging to acquire unsmeared images, since the image must pass directly down the 128 lines used for time-delay integration (TDI). Although the comet's trajectory is probably well known (as nongravitational effects have not been detected), the exact timing is uncertain. Small timing errors could result in the image passing down the TDI rows at an angle, producing smeared

  19. What we have learned about Shatsky Rise Oceanic Plateau from IODP Expedition 324

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Sager, W. W.; Geldmacher, J.; Koppers, A. A.; Heydolph, K.; Almeev, R.; Hanyu, T.; Delacour, A.

    2012-12-01

    In fall 2009, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 324 drilled igneous cores at five sites (U1346 to U1350) to study the origin of Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau, one of the large igneous provinces of the Pacific Ocean. Since we are now three years post-cruise and seeing results of studies come to light, we present here what we have learned about Shatsky Rise. Located ~1500 km east of Japan, Shatsky Rise consists of three massifs, Tamu, Ori, and Shirshov, which were generated along the trace of a mid-ocean ridge triple junction during the latest Jurassic to Early Cretaceous times. Radiometric dating of cored basalts using the 40Ar/39Ar technique is turning out to be challenging due to low-K content of the basalts, but preliminary ages show that eruptions are age progressive across Shatsky Rise. Eruptions apparently began at the southwest, with Tamu Massif, then moved to the northeast with time. Geochemistry data indicate that four magma types exist on the plateau; namely normal, low-Ti, high-Nb, and U1349 types. The normal type constitute ~94% lava units of the oldest volcano (Tamu Massif) and the other three types comprise ~57% of samples from the younger Ori Massif, implying that geochemical compositions may have become heterogeneous with time. Phase equilibria modeling and our new experimental data both indicate the low pressure magma fractionation (<200-300MPa). Model calculations of immobile trace elements estimate that melting fraction of Shatsky Rise is similar to normal mid-ocean ridge basalt (N-MORB), but there is greater effect of residual garnet inferring the depth of melting is probably higher. Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic results for the normal, low-Ti, and U1349 type basalts are almost identical and fall within the N-MORB range, but the high-Nb type basalts have distinctly enriched compositions. The normal type basalts show uniform and lower 3He/4He than N-MORB, suggesting the presence of recycled material in the magma source of Shatsky Rise

  20. Capillary rise in a microchannel of arbitrary shape and wettability: hysteresis loop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2012-12-11

    Capillary rise in an asymmetric microchannel, in which both contact angle (wettability) and open angle (geometry) can vary with position, is investigated based on free-energy minimization. The integration of the Young-Laplace equation yields the general force balance between surface tension and gravity. The former is surface tension times the integration of cos θ(u) along the contact line, where θ(u) depicts the local difference between contact angle and open angle. The latter comes from the total volume right underneath the meniscus. For the same channel height, multiple solutions can be obtained from the force balance. However, the stable height of capillary rise must satisfy stability analysis. Several interesting cases have been studied, including short capillary, truncated cone, hyperboloid, and two different plates. As the tube length is smaller than Jurin's height, the angle of contact will be tuned to fulfill the force balance. While only one stable state is seen for divergent channels, two stable states can be observed for convergent channels. Three regimes can be identified for the plot of the stable height of capillary rise against the channel height. The higher height dominates in the short channel regime, while the lower height prevails in the tall channel regime. However, both solutions are stable in the intermediate regime. Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are performed to validate our theoretical predictions. Our results offer some implications for water transport to the tops of tall trees. A small bore at the uppermost leaf connected to a larger xylem conduit corresponds to a convergent channel, and two stable heights are possible. The slow growth of the tree can be regarded as a gradual rise of the convergent channel. Consequently, the stable height of capillary rise to the top of a tall tree can always be achieved. PMID:23171321

  1. Uplift of Lord Howe Rise during the Late Paleogene: Constraints from Micropaleontological Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulhanek, D. K.; Morgans, H. E.; Bache, F.; Collot, J.; Rouillard, P.; Sutherland, R.

    2013-12-01

    unconformity at all sites, which is consistent with tectonic activity in the region during the late Paleogene. The New Caledonia Basin and northern Lord Howe Rise sites show ~1000 m of shallowing across the unconformity, despite being at significantly different water depths today. Southern Lord Howe Rise Site 207 records the greatest change in paleodepth, with more than 1000 m of shallowing. At Site 592, only approximately 500 m of shallowing occurred across the unconformity. These results suggest tectonic activity in the region near the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in addition to the oceanographic changes that occurred at that time.

  2. Shatsky Rise: Constraining Duration of Volcanism in a Jurassic Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages from Shatsky Rise, an oceanic plateau (2.7 × 106 km3) composed of three large volcanic edifices: TAMU, ORI and Shirsov Massif. TAMU Massif (~144.8 × 1.2 Ma; Mahoney et al., 2004) was the first to form at the intersection of an ancient triple junction and is now considered to be the largest singular shield volcano ever to have formed on Earth (Sager et al. 2013; accepted for publication in Nature Geosciences). ORI and Shirsov Massif appear to have formed later in time, following the northward migration of the triple junction. However, it remains unclear whether mechanisms involved in the formation of this triple junction and related mid-ocean ridge volcanism created Shatsky Rise, or whether a plume source is required to explain its significant size and volume. With the age determinations presented here we will attempt to constrain the duration of magmatism, reveal the eruption rates of the Shatsky Rise shield volcanoes, and determine the nature of the age progression along the Shatsky Rise massifs, if it exists. In addition, we will relate the Shatsky Rise volcanic history to the formation of numerous seamounts on and around the Shatsky Rise area. Overall, 50 groundmass and plagioclase separates from across Shatsky Rise and the related seamounts were carefully picked and processed. Thirty-four samples were analyzed from TAMU massif, coming from IODP Expedition 324 Site U1347 (17 samples), ODP Leg 198 Site 1213B (14 samples) and dredging cruise TN037 (3 samples). Seventeen samples were analyzed from ORI Massif, coming from IODP Expedition 324 Sites U1349 and U1350 (16 samples) and a single dredge along the flank of the massif from TN037 (1 sample). Four samples were analyzed from Shirsov Massif, all from IODP Expedition 324 Site U1346. Samples were variably altered but were treated with an extensive acid leaching regimen (Koppers et al., 2004), including 2 x 15 minutes of 5% HF treatments for plagioclases. Samples

  3. Thin Crust over the Marion Rise - Remelting the Residue of the African Super Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; ZHOU, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Marion Rise is a ~3100-km long section of the SW Indian Ridge that runs up from ~5600-m depth near the Rodriguez Triple Junction to ~860-m depth as it passes north of the Marion Hotspot. It is characterized by a deep rift valley along most of its length, and numerous large-offset transforms. These characteristics are inconsistent with the rise being supported by sub-axial asthenospheric flow down the ridge axis from the Marion Plume. The large-offset transforms would block such flow even if the plume had sufficient flux to support the rise. Moreover, abyssal peridotites are abundant along the entire length, with nearly amagmatic spreading occurring well up the rise. This and the deep rift valley both indicate that the crust is thin or even missing along nearly its entire length. At the same time, basalt glasses and mantle peridotites show striking along axis variations in chemistry that indicate they are the complimentary residues of increasingly high degrees of mantle melting as the crest of the rise is approached. The thin crust along the rise, however, is inconsistent with increased melt production, and can only be accounted for as the result of remelting a previously depleted mantle residue centered on the Marion Plume. Mantle anisotropy and tomography (e.g.: Behn et al., EPSL 2004) are consistent with the northward movement of southern Africa over the last 100 Ma, such that the Marion Hotspot would appear to be a vestigial remnant of the African Super Plume. This, as well as isotopic data from the ridge (Meyzen et al., G3 2005) indicate that the present-day mantle beneath the ridge is the residue of the generation of the Karoo flood basalts in which the present day hotspot is imbedded. Thus, the Marion Rise is supported by an isostatic anomaly due to emplacement of the depleted plume head associated with eruption of the Karoo basalts into the asthenosphere beneath southern African. With the northward migration of Africa, this residue is entrained into the

  4. 5. DETAIL OF HINGES ON RISING DOOR (OPEN) THAT REGULATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF HINGES ON RISING DOOR (OPEN) THAT REGULATES AIR FLOW - Sublet Mine No. 6, Fan House, North structure, west side of Willow Creek Valley, east of County Road No. 306, 3 miles north of U.S. Highway 189, Kemmerer, Lincoln County, WY

  5. The Rise and Fall of the Australian DBA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortt, Michael A.; Pervan, Simon J; Hogan, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the drivers behind the rise and fall of the Australian Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) and to assess its future. Design/methodology/approach: Data covering the period 1993-2013 was sourced from the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training to provide a comprehensive…

  6. Women's Cancer Risk Rises with Years Spent Overweight

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160451.html Women's Cancer Risk Rises With Years Spent Overweight Study found odds for 4 types rose 10 percent for every decade of obesity To use the ... her risk of several cancers, researchers report. The study, which followed nearly 74, ...

  7. RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES AT TOP LEFT. CAMERA FACES WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2581. Unknown Photographer, 6/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest. Wood fill rises ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest. Wood fill rises from foundation piers of cold water basin. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: May 1, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-2826 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. The epidemiology of autistic spectrum disorders: is the prevalence rising?

    PubMed

    Wing, Lorna; Potter, David

    2002-01-01

    For decades after Kanner's original paper on the subject was published in 1943, autism was generally considered to be a rare condition with a prevalence of around 2-4 per 10,000 children. Then, studies carried out in the late 1990s and the present century reported annual rises in incidence of autism in pre-school children, based on age of diagnosis, and increases in the age-specific prevalence rates in children. Prevalence rates of up to 60 per 10,000 for autism and even more for the whole autistic spectrum were reported. Reasons for these increases are discussed. They include changes in diagnostic criteria, development of the concept of the wide autistic spectrum, different methods used in studies, growing awareness and knowledge among parents and professional workers and the development of specialist services, as well as the possibility of a true increase in numbers. Various environmental causes for a genuine rise in incidence have been suggested, including the triple vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR]. Not one of the possible environmental causes, including MMR, has been confirmed by independent scientific investigation, whereas there is strong evidence that complex genetic factors play a major role in etiology. The evidence suggests that the majority, if not all, of the reported rise in incidence and prevalence is due to changes in diagnostic criteria and increasing awareness and recognition of autistic spectrum disorders. Whether there is also a genuine rise in incidence remains an open question.

  10. The Rising Cost of Higher Education. APPA Thought Leaders 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Thought Leaders Symposium, sponsored in part by DTZ, a UGL company, and Jacobs, focused on the topic of the rising cost of higher education. More than three dozen higher education leaders--including presidents, provosts, business officers, consultants, association executives, and facilities professionals--participated in a facilitated…

  11. Rising to the Challenge: Meaningful Assessment of Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Rising to the Challenge: Meaningful Assessment of Student Learning" was envisioned in response to a 2007 request for proposals from the U.S. Department of Education's Fund for Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE). FIPSE called for national, consortial contributions to improving the knowledge and abilities to assess student learning for…

  12. Freon bubble rise measurements in a vertical rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Symolon, P.D.; Moore, W.E.; Trabold, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    Isolated bubble rise experiments provide data on bubble drag as a function of size and fluid properties. This data is useful in obtaining drag models for higher void fraction bubbly flows. Previous experiments (Haberman and Morton, 1953) have shown that the purity of the fluid affects the bubble rise velocity, and therefore the drag coefficient. For contaminated systems, impurities collecting at the liquid-vapor interface increase the effective viscous drag and decrease the rise velocity. In the current experimental work, Freon-114 is used to simulate high temperature environments. Freon is chosen as the modeling fluid because it boils at a lower temperature, and may be scaled appropriately. However, if the purity of the Freon test liquid is unknown, using it to model high temperature environments may lead to inaccurate results. The purpose of the bubble rise experiment is then (1) to identify the purity of the Freon test liquid, and (2) understand the bubble drag mechanism for single bubbles as a building block for multiple bubble drag models.

  13. Punishing Kids: The Rise of the "Boot Camp"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Martin; Pini, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the rise of 'the boot camp' as a means of addressing "the problem of troubled youth" in contemporary industrialised nations such as Australia and the UK. Drawing on a corpus of publicly available material including press releases and policy documents, media reports, and programme websites, the paper…

  14. Reconsidering Low-Rising Intonation in American English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levis, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Sought to determine whether two low-rising intonation contours should be accepted as distinct patterns in American English, alongside three other widely accepted contours. Dialogues varying only in their intonation contour were presented in a random order to 47 speakers of Midwestern American English. Subjects interpreted the meaning of the…

  15. Managing Problems of Acceptability through High Rise-Fall Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Trevor; Walker, Traci

    2013-01-01

    This article examines one of the ways in which matters of truth, appropriateness, and acceptability are raised and managed within the course of everyday conversation. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we show that by repeating what another participant has said and doing so with a high rise-fall intonation contour, a speaker claims…

  16. Effects of a rise in base level on graded streams

    SciTech Connect

    Dickfoss, P.V. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-04-01

    What changes take place in a longitudinal river profile due to a rise in base level would seem to be a fundamental question in geomorphology, however, little has been accomplished toward answering this question, and the prevailing views are contradictory. Most authors say that a river will adjust its entire profile in response to a rise in base level. This misconception appears to have started in Elmo G. Harris' 1901 article, Effects of Dams and Like Obstructions in Silt-bearing Streams. The hypothesis became popular after publication of J. Hoover Mackin's classic 1948 paper, Concept of the Graded River. In the section Rise of Base Level'' Mackin explained that ''...the only generalization that can be made is that the new profile will be everywhere adjusted to the new prevailing conditions.'' Although Mackin's idea was a conceptual one, the concept has subsequently been taken literally. Contrary to this perception, the small amount of work that has been completed shows rivers will adjust their profiles only a short distance upstream from reservoir level. This may be due to the adjustment becoming infinitesimally small upstream and grading into the original profile so that the adjustment upstream is negligible. Unfortunately the misconception of stream aggradation in response to a rise in base level has prevailed for over 90 years and is widespread in the literature. Many textbooks, both introductory and advanced, from 1971 to the present, and some of the leading names in geomorphology have accepted the misconception without question.

  17. Whither Opportunity? Rising Inequality, Schools, and Children's Life Chances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Murnane, Richard, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As the incomes of affluent and poor families have diverged over the past three decades, so too has the educational performance of their children. But how exactly do the forces of rising inequality affect the educational attainment and life chances of low-income children? In "Whither Opportunity?" a distinguished team of economists,…

  18. RISING ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rising CO2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere could alter Earth's climate system, but it is thought that higher concentrations may improve plant growth by way of the fertilization effect. Forests, an important part of the Earth's carbon cycle, are postulated to sequester a...

  19. The Rise of Twisted Magnetic Tubes in a Stratified Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Emonet, T.

    1996-11-01

    First results from a two-dimensional numerical study of the buoyant rise of twisted magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are presented. We show in detail the process by which the transverse component of the field can suppress the splitting of the rising tube into two vortex filaments. For the suppression to be effective, the pitch angle of the twisted field lines has to be above a threshold given by the condition that the magnetic equivalent of the Weber number (see § 2.2) be below 1. The shape obtained for the tube and wake is strongly reminiscent of laboratory experiments with air bubbles rising in liquids. The magnetized region outside an equipartition boundary is peeled away from the tube: two sidelobes are formed, which lag behind the tube and contain only a fraction of the initial magnetic flux. This is similar to the formation of a skirt in the fluid dynamical case. The velocities of rise predicted by the thin flux tube approximation are compared with those obtained here.

  20. Knowledge Work: The Rise of the Office Economy. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Leonie; Kurth, Brian; Kerr, Ella

    The rise of the office economy and its impact on vocational education and training (VET) in Australia were examined by replicating the methodology used in Carnevale and Rose's U.S. study on the impact of the new office economy. Both studies took a functional approach to analyzing economic activities and the work force and focused primarily on…

  1. 11. Buttress rising above stream bed elevation. Concrete mixing plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Buttress rising above stream bed elevation. Concrete mixing plant is at right, west tower and placement tower boom are visible. Photographer unknown, November 24, 1926. Source: Ralph Pleasant. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Rising Cost of Gasoline Pinches Students at Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    Aware of the increasing burden of fuel costs on their students, administrators of rural community colleges are looking for ways to help students stay on track with their studies even as their monthly transportation bills rise. Two common tactics are increasing the number of online courses and offering block scheduling that allows students to pack…

  3. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the... sufficient quantity to neutralize the sodium bicarbonate. The combined weight of such acid-reacting substance and sodium bicarbonate is not more than 4.5 parts to each 100 parts of flour used. Subject to...

  4. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the... sufficient quantity to neutralize the sodium bicarbonate. The combined weight of such acid-reacting substance and sodium bicarbonate is not more than 4.5 parts to each 100 parts of flour used. Subject to...

  5. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the... sufficient quantity to neutralize the sodium bicarbonate. The combined weight of such acid-reacting substance and sodium bicarbonate is not more than 4.5 parts to each 100 parts of flour used. Subject to...

  6. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the... sufficient quantity to neutralize the sodium bicarbonate. The combined weight of such acid-reacting substance and sodium bicarbonate is not more than 4.5 parts to each 100 parts of flour used. Subject to...

  7. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of the... sufficient quantity to neutralize the sodium bicarbonate. The combined weight of such acid-reacting substance and sodium bicarbonate is not more than 4.5 parts to each 100 parts of flour used. Subject to...

  8. Colleges' Debt Is Fed by Rising Bond Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Brad

    2008-01-01

    Dozens of colleges and universities, including some of the country's wealthiest institutions, are facing a sharp rise in interest payments on a whopping mound of debt. About a third of the nearly 300 private institutions rated by Moody's Investors Service are financing more than half their debt with variable-rate bonds, some of whose rates have…

  9. Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the face of so many daunting near-term challenges, U.S. government and industry are letting the crucial strategic issues of U.S. competitiveness slip below the surface. Five years ago, the National Academies prepared "Rising Above the Gathering Storm," a book that cautioned: "Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of…

  10. Thermodynamics of Capillary Rise: Why Is the Meniscus Curved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriksson, Ulf; Eriksson, Jan Christer

    2004-01-01

    The thermodynamics of capillary rise is explained as the gravitational elevation of the whole column of liquid caused by the positive connection between the liquid, and the solid wall of the capillary tube. The curvature of the meniscus is ascribed to the maintenance of a physiochemical balance throughout the gravitational column of liquid.

  11. Community College Attrition: The Continual Rise in Community College Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinloch, Nattie Freeda

    2012-01-01

    Community college attrition continues to rise. The lowest rate during the period of 1983-2008 for public two year community college retention was 51.3%, and the lowest retention rate for private two year colleges was 55.5% (Act, 2008, pp. 4). The purpose of this study is to examine the perspective of student retention by faculty members through…

  12. The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

  13. Suppressing the Morning Rise in Cortisol Impairs Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Meier, Flurina; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid levels impair memory retrieval. We investigated whether retrieval under naturally elevated glucocorticoid levels, i.e., during the morning rise in cortisol can be improved by suppressing cortisol. In a crossover study 16 men retrieved emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learned 3 d earlier) 30 min after morning…

  14. Pressure Rise Due to a Fire in an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atallah, Sami; deRis, John N.

    1969-01-01

    Can temperature and pressure rise resulting from a fast developing fire in an enclosure be predicted? Toward that end, the authors developed equations, the results of which were compared with the few available experimental data and with the Apollo accident pressure record.

  15. Frequency sweep rates of rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Comparison between nonlinear theory and Cluster observation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhaoguo; Zong, Qiugang Wang, Yongfu; Liu, Siqing; Lin, Ruilin; Shi, Liqin

    2014-12-15

    Resonant pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to account for the rapid loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons. For the rising tone EMIC wave (classified as triggered EMIC emission), its frequency sweep rate strongly affects the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. Based on the Cluster observations, we analyze three typical cases of rising tone EMIC waves. Two cases locate at the nightside (22.3 and 22.6 magnetic local time (MLT)) equatorial region and one case locates at the duskside (18MLT) higher magnetic latitude (λ = –9.3°) region. For the three cases, the time-dependent wave amplitude, cold electron density, and cold ion density ratio are derived from satellite data; while the ambient magnetic field, thermal proton perpendicular temperature, and the wave spectral can be directly provided by observation. These parameters are input into the nonlinear wave growth model to simulate the time-frequency evolutions of the rising tones. The simulated results show good agreements with the observations of the rising tones, providing further support for the previous finding that the rising tone EMIC wave is excited through the nonlinear wave growth process.

  16. Neogene-Quaternary depositional history of the eastern US continental rise seaward of the Washington-Norfolk Canyon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Locker, S.D.; Laine, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    High quality, digitally recorded and processed, water gun and air gun seismic reflection data collected seaward of the present position of the Washington-Norfolk canyon systems reveals new information on the development of the continental rise. This includes insight into the depositional history of the Washington-Norfolk fan system and the relative importance of gravity flow depositional processes versus abyssal bottom current reworking during rise development. Three major post-Horizon A/sup u/ accretionary sequences describe major changes in depositional processes and history within the region. Accretionary sequence I (early to middle Miocene) is characterized by the initial development of a depositional bulge seaward of the Washington-Norfolk canyon systems which is modified by bottom currents on the lower-most rise to form a proto-Hatteras Outer Ridge. The predominance of chaotic and hummocky seismic facies suggests widespread reworking by abyssal bottom currents. Accretionary sequence II (middle Miocene to late Pliocene) in this area is characterized by sediment waves (lower rise) and smooth, southward dipping, parallel reflectors associated with a thick central rise drift(.) deposit off the Hudson system to the North. Washington-Norfolk fan development appears less important during this time. Bottom currents are active, but more depositional in nature than during accretionary sequence I. Accretionary sequence III (late Pliocene to Present) is marked by gravity flow processes and distinct development of the Washington-Norfolk fan on the central rise.

  17. Keep up or drown: adjustment of western Pacific coral reefs to sea-level rise in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    van Woesik, R; Golbuu, Y; Roff, G

    2015-07-01

    Since the Mid-Holocene, some 5000 years ago, coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean have been vertically constrained by sea level. Contemporary sea-level rise is releasing these constraints, providing accommodation space for vertical reef expansion. Here, we show that Porites microatolls, from reef-flat environments in Palau (western Pacific Ocean), are 'keeping up' with contemporary sea-level rise. Measurements of 570 reef-flat Porites microatolls at 10 locations around Palau revealed recent vertical skeletal extension (78±13 mm) over the last 6-8 years, which is consistent with the timing of the recent increase in sea level. We modelled whether microatoll growth rates will potentially 'keep up' with predicted sea-level rise in the near future, based upon average growth, and assuming a decline in growth for every 1°C increase in temperature. We then compared these estimated extension rates with rates of sea-level rise under four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Our model suggests that under low-mid RCP scenarios, reef-coral growth will keep up with sea-level rise, but if greenhouse gas concentrations exceed 670 ppm atmospheric CO2 levels and with +2.2°C sea-surface temperature by 2100 (RCP 6.0 W m(-2)), our predictions indicate that Porites microatolls will be unable to keep up with projected rates of sea-level rise in the twenty-first century.

  18. Keep up or drown: adjustment of western Pacific coral reefs to sea-level rise in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    van Woesik, R; Golbuu, Y; Roff, G

    2015-07-01

    Since the Mid-Holocene, some 5000 years ago, coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean have been vertically constrained by sea level. Contemporary sea-level rise is releasing these constraints, providing accommodation space for vertical reef expansion. Here, we show that Porites microatolls, from reef-flat environments in Palau (western Pacific Ocean), are 'keeping up' with contemporary sea-level rise. Measurements of 570 reef-flat Porites microatolls at 10 locations around Palau revealed recent vertical skeletal extension (78±13 mm) over the last 6-8 years, which is consistent with the timing of the recent increase in sea level. We modelled whether microatoll growth rates will potentially 'keep up' with predicted sea-level rise in the near future, based upon average growth, and assuming a decline in growth for every 1°C increase in temperature. We then compared these estimated extension rates with rates of sea-level rise under four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Our model suggests that under low-mid RCP scenarios, reef-coral growth will keep up with sea-level rise, but if greenhouse gas concentrations exceed 670 ppm atmospheric CO2 levels and with +2.2°C sea-surface temperature by 2100 (RCP 6.0 W m(-2)), our predictions indicate that Porites microatolls will be unable to keep up with projected rates of sea-level rise in the twenty-first century. PMID:26587277

  19. Rising tides or rising stars?: Dynamics of shared attention on Twitter during media events.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ru; Keegan, Brian; Margolin, Drew; Lazer, David

    2014-01-01

    "Media events" generate conditions of shared attention as many users simultaneously tune in with the dual screens of broadcast and social media to view and participate. We examine how collective patterns of user behavior under conditions of shared attention are distinct from other "bursts" of activity like breaking news events. Using 290 million tweets from a panel of 193,532 politically active Twitter users, we compare features of their behavior during eight major events during the 2012 U.S. presidential election to examine how patterns of social media use change during these media events compared to "typical" time and whether these changes are attributable to shifts in the behavior of the population as a whole or shifts from particular segments such as elites. Compared to baseline time periods, our findings reveal that media events not only generate large volumes of tweets, but they are also associated with (1) substantial declines in interpersonal communication, (2) more highly concentrated attention by replying to and retweeting particular users, and (3) elite users predominantly benefiting from this attention. These findings empirically demonstrate how bursts of activity on Twitter during media events significantly alter underlying social processes of interpersonal communication and social interaction. Because the behavior of large populations within socio-technical systems can change so dramatically, our findings suggest the need for further research about how social media responses to media events can be used to support collective sensemaking, to promote informed deliberation, and to remain resilient in the face of misinformation.

  20. Temperature rise, sea level rise and increased radiative forcing - an application of cointegration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Thejll, Peter; Johansen, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the statistical relationship between changes in global temperature, global steric sea level and radiative forcing in order to reveal causal relationships. There are in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We therefore apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis, originating from the field of econometrics, which is able to correctly handle the analysis of series with trends and other long-range dependencies. Further, we find a relationship between steric sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the steric sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. This result is obtained both when analyzing observed data and data from a CMIP5 historical model run. Finally, we find that in the data from the historical run, the steric sea level, in turn, is driven by the external forcing. Finally, we demonstrate that combining these two results can lead to a novel estimate of radiative forcing back in time based on observations.