Science.gov

Sample records for 100-percent design equivalent

  1. Investigation of Performance of Axial-Flow Compressor of XT-46 Turbine-Propeller Engine. I - Preliminary Investigation at 50-,70-, and 100-Percent Design Equivalent Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W.R.; Sandercrock, Donald M.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted to determine the performance of the 12-stage axial-flow compressor of the XT-46 turbine-propeller engine. This compressor was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 9 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.86. The design pressure ratios per stage were considerably greater than any employed in current aircraft gas-turbine engines using this type of compressor. The compressor performance was evaluated at two stations. The station near the entrance section of the combustors indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.3 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.63 for a corrected weight flow of 23.1 pounds per second. The other, located one blade-chord downstream of the last stator row, indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.97 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.81 for a corrected weight flow of 30.4 pounds per second. The difference in performance obtained at the two stations is attributed to shock waves in the vicinity of the last stator row. These shock waves and the accompanying flow choking, together with interstage circulatory flows, shift the compressor operating curves into the region where surge would normally occur. The inability of the compressor to meet design pressure ratio is probably due to boundary-layer buildup in the last stages, which cause axial velocities greater than design values that, in turn, adversely affect the angles of attack and turning angles in these blade rows.

  2. Steady-state performance of J85-21 compressor at 100 percent of design speed with and without interstage rake blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Internal compressor instrumentation blockage effects on steady state J85-21 compressor performance at 100 percent of design speed are determined. The blockage was generated by instrumented vanes for the first three compressor stages and by removal rakes for stages 4 to 9. Individual flow passage blockages ranged up to 4.5 percent with the instrumented vanes and up to 22 percent with the removable interstage rakes. At a Reynolds number index of 1.0, pressure ratio and airflow remained unchanged with insertion of the interstage rakes, but efficiency dropped 0.3 percentage point. Compressor exit profiles, compressor stage static pressure rise coefficients, turbine exit temperature, and fuel flow are also presented.

  3. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  4. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  5. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  6. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  7. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100 percent disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies... and indemnity compensation under chapter 13, title 38 U.S. Code....

  8. Validation of a dual-cycle ergometer for exercise during 100 percent oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Janet F.; Ohlhausen, John H.; Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been designed to determine if exercise, while prebreathing 100 percent oxygen prior to decompression, can reduce the current resting-prebreathe time requirements for extravehicular activity and high altitude reconnaissance flight. For that study, a suitable exercise mode was required. Design considerations included space limitations, cost, pressure suit compatibility, ease and maintenance of calibration, accuracy of work output, and assurance that no significant mechanical advantage or disadvantage would be introduced into the system. In addition, the exercise device must enhance denitrogenation by incorporation of both upper and lower body musculature at high levels of oxygen consumption. The purpose of this paper is to describe the specially constructed, dual-cycle ergometer developed for simultaneous arm and leg exercise during prebreathing, and to compare maximal oxygen uptake obtained on the device to that obtained during leg-only cycle ergometry and treadmill testing. Results demonstrate the suitability of the dual-cycle ergometer as an appropriate tool for exercise research during 100 percent oxygen prebreathing.

  9. 46 CFR 42.20-8 - Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100 percent reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flooding standard: Type âBâ vessel, 100 percent... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-8 Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100...-11 as applied to the following flooding standards: (1) If the vessel is 225 meters (738 feet) or...

  10. 46 CFR 42.20-8 - Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100 percent reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flooding standard: Type âBâ vessel, 100 percent... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-8 Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100...-11 as applied to the following flooding standards: (1) If the vessel is 225 meters (738 feet) or...

  11. 46 CFR 42.20-8 - Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100 percent reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flooding standard: Type âBâ vessel, 100 percent... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-8 Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100...-11 as applied to the following flooding standards: (1) If the vessel is 225 meters (738 feet) or...

  12. 46 CFR 42.20-8 - Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100 percent reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flooding standard: Type âBâ vessel, 100 percent... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-8 Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100...-11 as applied to the following flooding standards: (1) If the vessel is 225 meters (738 feet) or...

  13. 46 CFR 42.20-8 - Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100 percent reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flooding standard: Type âBâ vessel, 100 percent... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-8 Flooding standard: Type “B” vessel, 100...-11 as applied to the following flooding standards: (1) If the vessel is 225 meters (738 feet) or...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts 100 percent yard waste, you must only meet the emission limits in... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator combusts 100 percent yard waste, you must meet only the emission... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  17. Health plan auditing: 100-percent-of-claims vs. random-sample audits.

    PubMed

    Sillup, George P; Klimberg, Ronald K

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relative efficacy of two different methodologies for auditing self-funded medical claim expenses: 100-percent-of-claims auditing versus random-sampling auditing. Multiple data sets of claim errors or 'exceptions' from two Fortune-100 corporations were analysed and compared to 100 simulated audits of 300- and 400-claim random samples. Random-sample simulations failed to identify a significant number and amount of the errors that ranged from $200,000 to $750,000. These results suggest that health plan expenses of corporations could be significantly reduced if they audited 100% of claims and embraced a zero-defect approach.

  18. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  19. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  20. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  1. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or... percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  2. 7 CFR 205.303 - Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.303 Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.” (a) Agricultural products... product, the following: (1) The term, “100 percent organic” or “organic,” as applicable, to modify...

  3. 7 CFR 205.303 - Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.303 Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.” (a) Agricultural products... product, the following: (1) The term, “100 percent organic” or “organic,” as applicable, to modify...

  4. 7 CFR 205.303 - Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.303 Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.” (a) Agricultural products... product, the following: (1) The term, “100 percent organic” or “organic,” as applicable, to modify...

  5. 7 CFR 205.303 - Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.303 Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.” (a) Agricultural products... product, the following: (1) The term, “100 percent organic” or “organic,” as applicable, to modify...

  6. 7 CFR 205.303 - Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Labels, Labeling, and Market Information § 205.303 Packaged products labeled “100 percent organic” or “organic.” (a) Agricultural products... product, the following: (1) The term, “100 percent organic” or “organic,” as applicable, to modify...

  7. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment....1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  10. Health plan auditing: 100-percent-of-claims vs. random-sample audits.

    PubMed

    Sillup, George P; Klimberg, Ronald K

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relative efficacy of two different methodologies for auditing self-funded medical claim expenses: 100-percent-of-claims auditing versus random-sampling auditing. Multiple data sets of claim errors or 'exceptions' from two Fortune-100 corporations were analysed and compared to 100 simulated audits of 300- and 400-claim random samples. Random-sample simulations failed to identify a significant number and amount of the errors that ranged from $200,000 to $750,000. These results suggest that health plan expenses of corporations could be significantly reduced if they audited 100% of claims and embraced a zero-defect approach. PMID:21406351

  11. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... March 6, 2009. The monitors are commercially available from the applicant, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Air... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent... of the designation of five new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY:...

  12. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as ] amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of a new equivalent method...

  13. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI (multilayer insulation) system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Gonczy, J.D.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) were conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) under three experimental test arrangements. Each experiment measured the thermal performance of a 32-layer MLI blanket instrumented with twenty foil sensors to measure interstitial layer temperatures. Heat leak values and sensor temperatures were monitored during transient and steady state conditions under both design and degraded insulating vacuums. Heat leak values were measured using a heatmeter. MLI interstitial layer temperatures were measured using Cryogenic Linear Temperature Sensors (CLTS). Platinum resistors monitored system temperatures. High vacuum was measured using ion gauges; degraded vacuum employed thermocouple gauges. A four-wire system monitored instrumentation sensors and calibration heaters. An on-line computerized data acquisition system recorded and processes data. This paper reports on the instrumentation and experimental preparation used in carrying out these measurements. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head, but with the title extension Part 2: Laboratory results (300K--80K). 13 refs., 7 figs.

  14. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The new equivalent methods are automated... beta radiation attenuation. The newly designated equivalent methods are identified as follows: EQPM-0912-204, ``Teledyne Model 602 Beta\\PLUS\\ Particle Measurement System'' and ``SWAM 5a Dual...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in Appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit. (b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in § 60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit. (b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in § 60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit. (b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in § 60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit. (b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in § 60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in Appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit. (b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in § 60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of...

  20. Achieving Equivalence: A Transnational Curriculum Design Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Angela; Johal, Terry; Sharp, Kristen; Quinn, Shayna

    2016-01-01

    Transnational education is now essential to university international development strategies. As a result, tertiary educators are expected to engage with the complexities of diverse cultural contexts, different delivery modes, and mixed student cohorts to design quality learning experiences for all. To support this transition we developed a…

  1. Section Preequating under the Equivalent Groups Design without IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen; Puhan, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we introduce a section preequating (SPE) method (linear and nonlinear) under the randomly equivalent groups design. In this equating design, sections of Test X (a future new form) and another existing Test Y (an old form already on scale) are administered. The sections of Test X are equated to Test Y, after adjusting for the…

  2. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820 Section... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber...

  3. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820 Section... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber...

  4. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820 Section... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, Appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820 Section... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber...

  6. 7 CFR 205.670 - Inspection and testing of agricultural products to be sold or labeled as “100 percent organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sold or labeled as â100 percent organic,â âorganic,â or âmade with organic (specified ingredients or... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative... products to be sold or labeled as “100 percent organic,” “organic,” or “made with organic...

  7. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, Appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820 Section... Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber...

  8. Equivalent plate modeling for conceptual design of aircraft wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis method that generates conceptual-level design data for aircraft wing structures. A key requirement is that this data must be produced in a timely manner so that is can be used effectively by multidisciplinary synthesis codes for performing systems studies. Such a capability is being developed by enhancing an equivalent plate structural analysis computer code to provide a more comprehensive, robust and user-friendly analysis tool. The paper focuses on recent enhancements to the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) analysis code that significantly expands the modeling capability and improves the accuracy of results. Modeling additions include use of out-of-plane plate segments for representing winglets and advanced wing concepts such as C-wings along with a new capability for modeling the internal rib and spar structure. The accuracy of calculated results is improved by including transverse shear effects in the formulation and by using multiple sets of assumed displacement functions in the analysis. Typical results are presented to demonstrate these new features. Example configurations include a C-wing transport aircraft, a representative fighter wing and a blended-wing-body transport. These applications are intended to demonstrate and quantify the benefits of using equivalent plate modeling of wing structures during conceptual design.

  9. 40 CFR 53.8 - Designation of reference and equivalent methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Designation of reference and equivalent... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions § 53.8 Designation of reference and equivalent methods. (a) A candidate method determined by the Administrator...

  10. 40 CFR 53.8 - Designation of reference and equivalent methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Designation of reference and equivalent... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions § 53.8 Designation of reference and equivalent methods. (a) A candidate method determined by the Administrator...

  11. 40 CFR 53.8 - Designation of reference and equivalent methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designation of reference and equivalent... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions § 53.8 Designation of reference and equivalent methods. (a) A candidate method determined by the Administrator...

  12. Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

  13. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  14. Comparison of a Stimulus Equivalence Protocol and Traditional Lecture for Teaching Single-Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Sadie; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Garcia, Yors; Dunning, Johnna

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the effects of a computer-based stimulus equivalence protocol to a traditional lecture format in teaching single-subject experimental design concepts to undergraduate students. Participants were assigned to either an equivalence or a lecture group, and performance on a paper-and-pencil test that targeted relations among the…

  15. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, Muhammad Umer Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B.; Dennis, John Ojur; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.

    2015-07-22

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  16. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer; Dennis, John Ojur; Khir, M. H. Md.; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.; Tang, T. B.

    2015-07-01

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  17. Small-Sample Equating Using a Single-Group Nearly Equivalent Test (SiGNET) Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhan, Gautam; Moses, Timothy P.; Grant, Mary C.; McHale, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    A single-group (SG) equating with nearly equivalent test forms (SiGNET) design was developed by Grant to equate small-volume tests. Under this design, the scored items for the operational form are divided into testlets or mini tests. An additional testlet is created but not scored for the first form. If the scored testlets are testlets 1-6 and the…

  18. Unbalanced and Minimal Point Equivalent Estimation Second-Order Split-Plot Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Kowalski, Scott M.; Vining, G. Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Restricting the randomization of hard-to-change factors in industrial experiments is often performed by employing a split-plot design structure. From an economic perspective, these designs minimize the experimental cost by reducing the number of resets of the hard-to- change factors. In this paper, unbalanced designs are considered for cases where the subplots are relatively expensive and the experimental apparatus accommodates an unequal number of runs per whole-plot. We provide construction methods for unbalanced second-order split- plot designs that possess the equivalence estimation optimality property, providing best linear unbiased estimates of the parameters; independent of the variance components. Unbalanced versions of the central composite and Box-Behnken designs are developed. For cases where the subplot cost approaches the whole-plot cost, minimal point designs are proposed and illustrated with a split-plot Notz design.

  19. Inverse Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts Using Reversed Equivalent-Area Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Rallabhand, Sriam

    2011-01-01

    A promising path for developing a low-boom configuration is a multifidelity approach that (1) starts from a low-fidelity low-boom design, (2) refines the low-fidelity design with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) equivalent-area (Ae) analysis, and (3) improves the design with sonic-boom analysis by using CFD off-body pressure distributions. The focus of this paper is on the third step of this approach, in which the design is improved with sonic-boom analysis through the use of CFD calculations. A new inverse design process for off-body pressure tailoring is formulated and demonstrated with a low-boom supersonic configuration that was developed by using the mixed-fidelity design method with CFD Ae analysis. The new inverse design process uses the reverse propagation of the pressure distribution (dp/p) from a mid-field location to a near-field location, converts the near-field dp/p into an equivalent-area distribution, generates a low-boom target for the reversed equivalent area (Ae,r) of the configuration, and modifies the configuration to minimize the differences between the configuration s Ae,r and the low-boom target. The new inverse design process is used to modify a supersonic demonstrator concept for a cruise Mach number of 1.6 and a cruise weight of 30,000 lb. The modified configuration has a fully shaped ground signature that has a perceived loudness (PLdB) value of 78.5, while the original configuration has a partially shaped aft signature with a PLdB of 82.3.

  20. Optimal study design with identical power: an application of power equivalence to latent growth curve models.

    PubMed

    von Oertzen, Timo; Brandmaier, Andreas M

    2013-06-01

    Structural equation models have become a broadly applied data-analytic framework. Among them, latent growth curve models have become a standard method in longitudinal research. However, researchers often rely solely on rules of thumb about statistical power in their study designs. The theory of power equivalence provides an analytical answer to the question of how design factors, for example, the number of observed indicators and the number of time points assessed in repeated measures, trade off against each other while holding the power for likelihood-ratio tests on the latent structure constant. In this article, we present applications of power-equivalent transformations on a model with data from a previously published study on cognitive aging, and highlight consequences of participant attrition on power.

  1. Classes of Split-Plot Response Surface Designs for Equivalent Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Kowalski, Scott M.; Vining, G. Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    When planning an experimental investigation, we are frequently faced with factors that are difficult or time consuming to manipulate, thereby making complete randomization impractical. A split-plot structure differentiates between the experimental units associated with these hard-to-change factors and others that are relatively easy-to-change and provides an efficient strategy that integrates the restrictions imposed by the experimental apparatus. Several industrial and scientific examples are presented to illustrate design considerations encountered in the restricted randomization context. In this paper, we propose classes of split-plot response designs that provide an intuitive and natural extension from the completely randomized context. For these designs, the ordinary least squares estimates of the model are equivalent to the generalized least squares estimates. This property provides best linear unbiased estimators and simplifies model estimation. The design conditions that allow for equivalent estimation are presented enabling design construction strategies to transform completely randomized Box-Behnken, equiradial, and small composite designs into a split-plot structure.

  2. Equivalent circuit and optimum design of a multilayer laminated piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuxiang; Carazo, Alfredo Vazquez; Park, Seung Ho

    2011-12-01

    A multilayer laminated piezoelectric Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O(3) (PZT) ceramic transformer, operating in a half- wavelength longitudinal resonant mode (λ/2 mode), has been analyzed. This piezoelectric transformer is composed of one thickness-polarized section (T-section) for exciting the longitudinal mechanical vibrations, two longitudinally polarized sections (L-section) for generating high-voltage output, and two insulating layers laminated between the T-section and L-section layers to provide insulation between the input and output sections. Based on the piezoelectric constitutive and motion equations, an electro-elasto-electric (EEE) equivalent circuit has been developed, and correspondingly, an effective EEE coupling coefficient was proposed for optimum design of this multilayer transformer. Commercial finite element analysis software is used to determine the validity of the developed equivalent circuit. Finally, a prototype sample was manufactured and experimental data was collected to verify the model's validity.

  3. Design and analysis of numerical experiments. [applicable to fully nonlinear, global, equivalent-barotropic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Sacks, Jerome; Chang, Yue-Fang

    1993-01-01

    Methods for the design and analysis of numerical experiments that are especially useful and efficient in multidimensional parameter spaces are presented. The analysis method, which is similar to kriging in the spatial analysis literature, fits a statistical model to the output of the numerical model. The method is applied to a fully nonlinear, global, equivalent-barotropic dynamical model. The statistical model also provides estimates for the uncertainty of predicted numerical model output, which can provide guidance on where in the parameter space to conduct further experiments, if necessary. The method can provide significant improvements in the efficiency with which numerical sensitivity experiments are conducted.

  4. A Scrutiny of the Equivalent Static Lateral Load Method of Design for Multistory Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touqan, A. R.; Helou, S. H.

    2008-07-08

    Building structures with a soft storey are gaining widespread popularity in urban areas due to the scarcity of land and due to the pressing need for wide open spaces at the entrance level. In earthquake prone zones dynamic analysis based on the Equivalent Static Lateral Load method is attractive to the novice and the design codes leave the choice of the analysis procedure up to the discretion of the designer. The following is a comparison of the said method with the more elaborate Response Spectrum Method of analysis as they apply to a repertoire of different structural models. The results clearly show that the former provides similar results of response in structures with gradual change in storey stiffness; while it is over conservative for a bare frame structure. It is however less conservative for structures with a soft storey.

  5. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  6. Design and use of multisine signals for Li-ion battery equivalent circuit modelling. Part 1: Signal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widanage, W. D.; Barai, A.; Chouchelamane, G. H.; Uddin, K.; McGordon, A.; Marco, J.; Jennings, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Pulse Power Current (PPC) profile is often the signal of choice for obtaining the parameters of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM). Subsequently, a drive-cycle current profile is used as a validation signal. Such a profile, in contrast to a PPC, is more dynamic in both the amplitude and frequency bandwidth. Modelling errors can occur when using PPC data for parametrisation since the model is optimised over a narrower bandwidth than the validation profile. A signal more representative of a drive-cycle, while maintaining a degree of generality, is needed to reduce such modelling errors. In Part 1 of this 2-part paper a signal design technique defined as a pulse-multisine is presented. This superimposes a signal known as a multisine to a discharge, rest and charge base signal to achieve a profile more dynamic in amplitude and frequency bandwidth, and thus more similar to a drive-cycle. The signal improves modelling accuracy and reduces the experimentation time, per state-of-charge (SoC) and temperature, to several minutes compared to several hours for an PPC experiment.

  7. Assessment of equivalence using a concordance correlation coefficient in a repeated measurements design.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Some assay validation studies are conducted to assess agreement between repeated, paired continuous data measured on the same subject with different measurement systems. The goal of these studies is to show that there is an acceptable level of agreement between the measurement systems. Equivalence testing is a reasonable approach in assay validation. In this article, we use an equivalence-testing criterion based on a decomposition of a concordance correlation coefficient proposed by Lin (1989, 1992). Using a variance components approach, we develop bounds for conducting statistical tests using the proposed equivalence criterion. We conduct a simulation study to assess the performance of the bounds. The criteria are the ability to maintain the stated test size and the simulated power of the tests using these bounds. Bounds that perform well for small sample size are preferred. We present a computational example to demonstrate the methods described in the article.

  8. High School Equivalency. Part I: Theory and Design of the Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This handbook is a guide for an adult education program for the student who desires a New York State High School Equivalency Diploma. It covers areas ranging from the scope of the programs in grammar and usage, literature, social studies, mathematics, and sciences, to the background and purpose of the General Educational Development Tests. Special…

  9. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  10. Design and simulation of optoelectronic complementary dual neural elements for realizing a family of normalized vector 'equivalence-nonequivalence' operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Aleksandr I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Magas, Taras E.

    2010-04-01

    Equivalence models (EM) advantages of neural networks (NN) are shown in paper. EMs are based on vectormatrix procedures with basic operations of continuous neurologic: normalized vector operations "equivalence", "nonequivalence", "autoequivalence", "autononequivalence". The capacity of NN on the basis of EM and of its modifications, including auto-and heteroassociative memories for 2D images, exceeds in several times quantity of neurons. Such neuroparadigms are very perspective for processing, recognition, storing large size and strongly correlated images. A family of "normalized equivalence-nonequivalence" neuro-fuzzy logic operations on the based of generalized operations fuzzy-negation, t-norm and s-norm is elaborated. A biologically motivated concept and time pulse encoding principles of continuous logic photocurrent reflexions and sample-storage devices with pulse-width photoconverters have allowed us to design generalized structures for realization of the family of normalized linear vector operations "equivalence"-"nonequivalence". Simulation results show, that processing time in such circuits does not exceed units of micro seconds. Circuits are simple, have low supply voltage (1-3 V), low power consumption (milliwatts), low levels of input signals (microwatts), integrated construction, satisfy the problem of interconnections and cascading.

  11. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  12. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  13. Design of an axial flux PM motor using magnetic and thermal equivalent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, Romain-Bernard; Glises, Raynal; Espanet, Christophe; Saint Ellier, Emeline; Dubas, Frédéric; Chamagne, Didier

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new generation of electric motors (7.5-15 kW) for automotive powertrains. The target is a full electric direct drive vehicle, for the particular application to heavy quadricycles. An original axial flux PM structure is proposed due to the simplicity of its manufacturing. However it leads to a 3D structure, difficult to study. The paper deals with analytical models that can be used to achieve the analysis and the sizing of the motor. The electromagnetic behavior is modeled using a simple magnetic equivalent network and the thermal behavior is analyzed with a thermal network. Finally, the analytical results are compared to those experimentally obtained and it proves the interest of the proposed structure: the construction is simple and the performances are satisfying.

  14. Generation of Parametric Equivalent-Area Targets for Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood

    2011-01-01

    A tool with an Excel visual interface is developed to generate equivalent-area (A(sub e)) targets that satisfy the volume constraints for a low-boom supersonic configuration. The new parametric Ae target explorer allows users to interactively study the tradeoffs between the aircraft volume constraints and the low-boom characteristics (e.g., loudness) of the ground signature. Moreover, numerical optimization can be used to generate the optimal A(sub e) target for given A(sub e) volume constraints. A case study is used to demonstrate how a generated low-boom Ae target can be matched by a supersonic configuration that includes a fuselage, wing, nacelle, pylon, aft pod, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. The low-boom configuration is verified by sonic-boom analysis with an off-body pressure distribution at three body lengths below the configuration

  15. Establishing Equivalence: Methodological Progress in Group-Matching Design and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kover, Sara T.; Atwood, Amy K.

    2013-01-01

    This methodological review draws attention to the challenges faced by intellectual and developmental disabilities researchers in the appropriate design and analysis of group comparison studies. We provide a brief overview of matching methodologies in the field, emphasizing group-matching designs used in behavioral research on cognition and…

  16. Equivalence of time-multiplexed and frequency-multiplexed signals in digital communications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timor, U.

    1972-01-01

    In comparing different techniques for multiplexing N binary data signals into a single channel, time-division multiplexing (TDM) is known to have a theoretic efficiency of 100 percent (neglecting sync power) and thus seems to outperform frequency-division multiplexing systems (FDM). By considering more general FDM systems, we will show that both TDM and FDM are equivalent and have an efficiency of 100 percent. The difference between the systems is in the multiplexing and demultiplexing subsystems, but not in the performance or in the generated waveforms.

  17. Postsurgical pain outcome of vertical and transverse abdominal incision: Design of a randomized controlled equivalence trial [ISRCTN60734227

    PubMed Central

    Reidel, Margot A; Knaebel, Hanns-Peter; Seiler, Christoph M; Knauer, Christine; Motsch, Johann; Victor, Norbert; Büchler, Markus W

    2003-01-01

    Background There are two ways to open the abdominal cavity in elective general surgery: vertically or transversely. Various clinical studies and a meta-analysis have postulated that the transverse approach is superior to other approaches as regards complications. However, in a recent survey it was shown that 90 % of all abdominal incisions in visceral surgery are still vertical incisions. This discrepancy between existing recommendations of clinical trials and clinical practice could be explained by the lack of acceptance of these results due to a number of deficits in the study design and analysis, subsequent low internal validity, and therefore limited external generalisability. The objective of this study is to address the issue from the patient's perspective. Methods This is an intraoperatively randomized controlled observer and patient-blinded two-group parallel equivalence trial. The study setting is the Department of General-, Visceral-, Trauma Surgery and Outpatient Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, Medical School. A total of 172 patients of both genders, aged over 18 years who are scheduled for an elective abdominal operation and are eligible for either a transverse or vertical incision. To show equivalence of the two approaches or the superiority of one of them from the perspective of the patient, a primary endpoint is defined: the pain experienced by the patient (VAS 0–100) on day two after surgery and the amount of analgesic required (piritramide [mg/h]). A confidence interval approach will be used for analysis. A global α-Level of 0.05 and a power of 0.8 is guaranteed, resulting in a size of 86 patients for each group. Secondary endpoints are: time interval to open and close the abdomen, early-onset complications (frequency of burst abdomen, postoperative pulmonary complications, and wound infection) and late complications (frequency of incisional hernias). Different outcome variables will be ranked by patients and surgeons to assess the

  18. Design and Fabrication of a Differential Electrostatic Accelerometer for Space-Station Testing of the Equivalence Principle

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengtian; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Linlin; Wu, Qiuping

    2016-01-01

    The differential electrostatic space accelerometer is an equivalence principle (EP) experiment instrument proposed to operate onboard China’s space station in the 2020s. It is designed to compare the spin-spin interaction between two rotating extended bodies and the Earth to a precision of 10−12, which is five orders of magnitude better than terrestrial experiment results to date. To achieve the targeted test accuracy, the sensitive space accelerometer will use the very soft space environment provided by a quasi-drag-free floating capsule and long-time observation of the free-fall mass motion for integration of the measurements over 20 orbits. In this work, we describe the design and capability of the differential accelerometer to test weak space acceleration. Modeling and simulation results of the electrostatic suspension and electrostatic motor are presented based on attainable space microgravity condition. Noise evaluation shows that the electrostatic actuation and residual non-gravitational acceleration are two major noise sources. The evaluated differential acceleration noise is 1.01 × 10−9 m/s2/Hz1/2 at the NEP signal frequency of 0.182 mHz, by neglecting small acceleration disturbances. The preliminary work on development of the first instrument prototype is introduced for on-ground technological assessments. This development has already confirmed several crucial fabrication processes and measurement techniques and it will open the way to the construction of the final differential space accelerometer. PMID:27517927

  19. Design and Fabrication of a Differential Electrostatic Accelerometer for Space-Station Testing of the Equivalence Principle.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengtian; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Linlin; Wu, Qiuping

    2016-08-10

    The differential electrostatic space accelerometer is an equivalence principle (EP) experiment instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to compare the spin-spin interaction between two rotating extended bodies and the Earth to a precision of 10(-12), which is five orders of magnitude better than terrestrial experiment results to date. To achieve the targeted test accuracy, the sensitive space accelerometer will use the very soft space environment provided by a quasi-drag-free floating capsule and long-time observation of the free-fall mass motion for integration of the measurements over 20 orbits. In this work, we describe the design and capability of the differential accelerometer to test weak space acceleration. Modeling and simulation results of the electrostatic suspension and electrostatic motor are presented based on attainable space microgravity condition. Noise evaluation shows that the electrostatic actuation and residual non-gravitational acceleration are two major noise sources. The evaluated differential acceleration noise is 1.01 × 10(-9) m/s²/Hz(1/2) at the NEP signal frequency of 0.182 mHz, by neglecting small acceleration disturbances. The preliminary work on development of the first instrument prototype is introduced for on-ground technological assessments. This development has already confirmed several crucial fabrication processes and measurement techniques and it will open the way to the construction of the final differential space accelerometer.

  20. Design and Fabrication of a Differential Electrostatic Accelerometer for Space-Station Testing of the Equivalence Principle.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengtian; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Linlin; Wu, Qiuping

    2016-01-01

    The differential electrostatic space accelerometer is an equivalence principle (EP) experiment instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to compare the spin-spin interaction between two rotating extended bodies and the Earth to a precision of 10(-12), which is five orders of magnitude better than terrestrial experiment results to date. To achieve the targeted test accuracy, the sensitive space accelerometer will use the very soft space environment provided by a quasi-drag-free floating capsule and long-time observation of the free-fall mass motion for integration of the measurements over 20 orbits. In this work, we describe the design and capability of the differential accelerometer to test weak space acceleration. Modeling and simulation results of the electrostatic suspension and electrostatic motor are presented based on attainable space microgravity condition. Noise evaluation shows that the electrostatic actuation and residual non-gravitational acceleration are two major noise sources. The evaluated differential acceleration noise is 1.01 × 10(-9) m/s²/Hz(1/2) at the NEP signal frequency of 0.182 mHz, by neglecting small acceleration disturbances. The preliminary work on development of the first instrument prototype is introduced for on-ground technological assessments. This development has already confirmed several crucial fabrication processes and measurement techniques and it will open the way to the construction of the final differential space accelerometer. PMID:27517927

  1. The Single Group with Nearly Equivalent Tests (SiGNET) Design for Equating Very Small Volume Multiple-Choice Tests. Research Report. ETS RR-11-31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    The "single group with nearly equivalent tests" (SiGNET) design proposed here was developed to address the problem of equating scores on multiple-choice test forms with very small single-administration samples. In this design, the majority of items in each new test form consist of items from the previous form, and the new items that were…

  2. Performance of a 13-Stage Development Compressor for the J40-WE-24 Engine at Equivalent Speeds from 30 to 112 Percent of Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Lucas, James G.; Finger, Harold B.

    1953-01-01

    The performance of a 13-stage development comressor for the J40-WE-24 engine has been determined at equivalent speeds from 30 to 112 percent of design. The design total-pressure ratio of 6.0 and the design weight flow of 164 pounds per second were not attained, An analysis was conducted to determine the reasons for the poor performance at the design and over-design speed. The analysis indicated that most of the difficulty could be attributed to the fact that the first stage was overcompromised to favor part-speed performance,

  3. Near-100 percent Bragg Reflectivity of X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Y Shvydko; S Stoupin; V Blank; S Terentyev

    2011-12-31

    Ultrahigh-reflectance mirrors are essential optical elements of the most sophisticated optical instruments devised over the entire frequency spectrum. In the X-ray regime, super-polished mirrors with close to 100% reflectivity are routinely used at grazing angles of incidence. However, at large angles of incidence, and particularly at normal incidence, such high reflectivity has not yet been achieved. Here, we demonstrate by direct measurements that synthetic, nearly defect-free diamond crystals reflect more than 99% of hard X-ray photons backwards in Bragg diffraction, with a remarkably small variation in magnitude across the sample. This is a quantum leap in the largest reflectivity measured to date, which is at the limit of what is theoretically possible. This accomplishment is achieved under the most challenging conditions of normal incidence and with extremely hard X-ray photons.

  4. TNT equivalency of M10 propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, F. L.; Price, P.

    1978-01-01

    Peak, side-on blast overpressure and scaled, positive impulse have been measured for M10 single-perforated propellant, web size 0.018 inches, using configurations that simulate the handling of bulk material during processing and shipment. Quantities of 11.34, 22.7, 45.4, and 65.8 kg were tested in orthorhombic shipping containers and fiberboard boxes. High explosive equivalency values for each test series were obtained as a function of scaled distance by comparison to known pressure, arrival time and impulse characteristics for hemispherical TNT surface bursts. The equivalencies were found to depend significantly on scaled distance, with higher values of 150-100 percent (pressure) and 350-125 percent (positive impulse) for the extremes within the range from 1.19 to 3.57 m/cube root of kg. Equivalencies as low as 60-140 percent (pressure) and 30-75 percent (positive impulse) were obtained in the range of 7.14 to 15.8 m/cube root of kg. Within experimental error, both peak pressure and positive impulse scaled as a function of charge weight for all quantities tested in the orthorhombic configuration.

  5. Design and realisation of tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators for dosimetric studies on microwave antennas for interstitial ablation.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, V; Pinto, R; Lodato, R; Lovisolo, G A; Cavagnaro, M

    2012-07-01

    Thermal ablation therapies, based on electromagnetic field sources (interstitial or intracavitary antennas) at radio and microwave frequencies, are increasingly used in medicine due to their proven efficacy in the treatment of many diseases (tumours, stenosis, etc). Such techniques need standardized procedures, still not completely consolidated, as to analyze the behaviour of antennas for treatment optimisation. Several tissue-equivalent dielectric simulators (also named phantoms) have been developed to represent human head tissues, and extensively used in the analysis of human exposure to the electromagnetic emissions from hand-held devices; yet, very few studies have considered other tissues, as those met in ablation therapies. The objective of this study was to develop phantoms of liver and kidney tissue to experimentally characterise interstitial microwave antennas in reference conditions. Phantom properties depend on the simulated target tissue (liver or kidney) and the considered frequency (2.45 GHz in this work), addressing the need for a transparent liquid to easily control the positioning of the probe with respect to the antenna under test. An experimental set-up was also developed and used to characterise microwave ablation antenna performances. Finally, a comparison between measurements and numerical simulations was performed for the cross-validation of the experimental set-up and the numerical model. The obtained results highlight the fundamental role played by dielectric simulators in the development of microwave ablation devices, representing the first step towards the definition of a procedure for the ablation treatment planning.

  6. Design and use of multisine signals for Li-ion battery equivalent circuit modelling. Part 2: Model estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widanage, W. D.; Barai, A.; Chouchelamane, G. H.; Uddin, K.; McGordon, A.; Marco, J.; Jennings, P.

    2016-08-01

    An Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM) of a lithium ion (Li-ion) battery is an empirical, linear dynamic model and the bandwidth of the input current signal and level of non-linearity in the voltage response are important for the model's validity. An ECM is, however, generally parametrised with a pulse current signal, which is low in signal bandwidth (Part 1) and any non-linear dependence of the voltage on the current due to transport limitations is ignored. This paper presents a general modelling methodology which utilises the higher bandwidth and number of signal levels of a pulse-multisine signal to estimate the battery dynamics and non-linear characteristics without the need of a 3D look-up table for the model parameters. In the proposed methodology a non-parametric estimate of the battery dynamics and non-linear characteristics are first obtained which assists in the model order selection, and to assess the level of non-linearity. The new model structure, termed as the Non-linear ECM (NL-ECM), gives a lower Root Mean Square (RMS) and peak error when compared to an ECM estimated using a pulse data set.

  7. Synthesizing Equivalence Indices for the Comparative Evaluation of Technoeconomic Efficiency of Industrial Processes at the Design/Re-engineering Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotilas, P.; Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    The equivalence indices synthesized for the comparative evaluation of technoeconomic efficiency of industrial processes are of critical importance since they serve as both, (i) positive/analytic descriptors of the physicochemical nature of the process and (ii) measures of effectiveness, especially helpful for investigated competitiveness in the industrial/energy/environmental sector of the economy. In the present work, a new algorithmic procedure has been developed, which initially standardizes a real industrial process, then analyzes it as a compromise of two ideal processes, and finally synthesizes the index that can represent/reconstruct the real process as a result of the trade-off between the two ideal processes taking as parental prototypes. The same procedure makes fuzzy multicriteria ranking within a set of pre-selected industrial processes for two reasons: (a) to analyze the process most representative of the production/treatment under consideration, (b) to use the `second best' alternative as a dialectic pole in absence of the two ideal processes mentioned above. An implantation of this procedure is presented, concerning a facility of biological wastewater treatment with six alternatives: activated sludge through (i) continuous-flow incompletely-stirred tank reactors in series, (ii) a plug flow reactor with dispersion, (iii) an oxidation ditch, and biological processing through (iv) a trickling filter, (v) rotating contactors, (vi) shallow ponds. The criteria used for fuzzy (to count for uncertainty) ranking are capital cost, operating cost, environmental friendliness, reliability, flexibility, extendibility. Two complementary indices were synthesized for the (ii)-alternative ranked first and their quantitative expressions were derived, covering a variety of kinetic models as well as recycle/bypass conditions. Finally, analysis of estimating the optimal values of these indices at maximum technoeconomic efficiency is presented and the implications

  8. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  9. A d-statistic for single-case designs that is equivalent to the usual between-groups d-statistic.

    PubMed

    Shadish, William R; Hedges, Larry V; Pustejovsky, James E; Boyajian, Jonathan G; Sullivan, Kristynn J; Andrade, Alma; Barrientos, Jeannette L

    2014-01-01

    We describe a standardised mean difference statistic (d) for single-case designs that is equivalent to the usual d in between-groups experiments. We show how it can be used to summarise treatment effects over cases within a study, to do power analyses in planning new studies and grant proposals, and to meta-analyse effects across studies of the same question. We discuss limitations of this d-statistic, and possible remedies to them. Even so, this d-statistic is better founded statistically than other effect size measures for single-case design, and unlike many general linear model approaches such as multilevel modelling or generalised additive models, it produces a standardised effect size that can be integrated over studies with different outcome measures. SPSS macros for both effect size computation and power analysis are available.

  10. Estimating equivalence with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalence testing and corresponding confidence interval estimates are used to provide more enlightened statistical statements about parameter estimates by relating them to intervals of effect sizes deemed to be of scientific or practical importance rather than just to an effect size of zero. Equivalence tests and confidence interval estimates are based on a null hypothesis that a parameter estimate is either outside (inequivalence hypothesis) or inside (equivalence hypothesis) an equivalence region, depending on the question of interest and assignment of risk. The former approach, often referred to as bioequivalence testing, is often used in regulatory settings because it reverses the burden of proof compared to a standard test of significance, following a precautionary principle for environmental protection. Unfortunately, many applications of equivalence testing focus on establishing average equivalence by estimating differences in means of distributions that do not have homogeneous variances. I discuss how to compare equivalence across quantiles of distributions using confidence intervals on quantile regression estimates that detect differences in heterogeneous distributions missed by focusing on means. I used one-tailed confidence intervals based on inequivalence hypotheses in a two-group treatment-control design for estimating bioequivalence of arsenic concentrations in soils at an old ammunition testing site and bioequivalence of vegetation biomass at a reclaimed mining site. Two-tailed confidence intervals based both on inequivalence and equivalence hypotheses were used to examine quantile equivalence for negligible trends over time for a continuous exponential model of amphibian abundance. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Chemical and Biological Properties of Cyclic ADP-4-Thioribose as a Stable Equivalent of Cyclic ADP-Ribose

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Takayoshi; Takano, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Natsumi; Kudoh, Takashi; Murayama, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hashii, Minako; Higashida, Haruhiro; Weber, Karin; Guse, Andreas H.; Kameda, Tomoshi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Potter, Barry V. L.; Shuto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the successful synthesis of cyclic ADP-4-thioribose (cADPtR, 3), designed as a stable mimic of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR, 1), a Ca2+-mobilizing second messenger, in which the key N1-β-thioribosyladenosine structure was stereoselectively constructed by condensation between the imidazole nucleoside derivative 8 and the 4-thioribosylamine 7 via equilibrium in 7 between the α-anomer (7α) and the β-anomer (7β) during the reaction course. cADPtR is, unlike cADPR, chemically and biologically stable, while it effectively mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ like cADPR in various biological systems, such as sea urchin homogenate, NG108-15 neuronal cells, and Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Thus, cADPtR is a stable equivalent of cADPR, which can be useful as a biological tool for investigating cADPR-mediated Ca2+-mobilizing pathways. PMID:27200225

  12. TH-C-19A-01: Analytic Design Method to Make a 2D Planar, Segmented Ion Chamber Water-Equivalent for Proton Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W; Hollebeek, R; Teo, B; Maughan, R; Dolney, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quality Assurance (QA) measurements of proton therapy fields must accurately measure steep longitudinal dose gradients as well as characterize the dose distribution laterally. Currently, available devices for two-dimensional field measurements perturb the dose distribution such that routine QA measurements performed at multiple depths require multiple field deliveries and are time consuming. Methods: A design procedure for a two-dimensional detector array is introduced whereby the proton energy loss and scatter are adjusted so that the downstream dose distribution is maintained to be equivalent to that which would occur in uniform water. Starting with the design for an existing, functional two-dimensional segmented ion chamber prototype, a compensating material is introduced downstream of the detector to simultaneously equate the energy loss and lateral scatter in the detector assembly to the values in water. An analytic formalism and procedure is demonstrated to calculate the properties of the compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. The resulting design is validated with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: With respect to the specific prototype design considered, the results indicate that a graphite compensating layer of the proper dimensions can yield proton beam range perturbation less than 0.1mm and beam sigma perturbation less than 2% across the energy range of therapeutic proton beams. Conclusion: We have shown that, for a 2D gas-filled detector array, a graphite-compensating layer can balance the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering relative to uniform water. We have demonstrated an analytic formalism and procedure to determine a compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-04-2-0022. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations

  13. Psychotropic dose equivalence in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inada, Toshiya; Inagaki, Ataru

    2015-08-01

    Psychotropic dose equivalence is an important concept when estimating the approximate psychotropic doses patients receive, and deciding on the approximate titration dose when switching from one psychotropic agent to another. It is also useful from a research viewpoint when defining and extracting specific subgroups of subjects. Unification of various agents into a single standard agent facilitates easier analytical comparisons. On the basis of differences in psychopharmacological prescription features, those of available psychotropic agents and their approved doses, and racial differences between Japan and other countries, psychotropic dose equivalency tables designed specifically for Japanese patients have been widely used in Japan since 1998. Here we introduce dose equivalency tables for: (i) antipsychotics; (ii) antiparkinsonian agents; (iii) antidepressants; and (iv) anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics available in Japan. Equivalent doses for the therapeutic effects of individual psychotropic compounds were determined principally on the basis of randomized controlled trials conducted in Japan and consensus among dose equivalency tables reported previously by psychopharmacological experts. As these tables are intended to merely suggest approximate standard values, physicians should use them with discretion. Updated information of psychotropic dose equivalence in Japan is available at http://www.jsprs.org/en/equivalence.tables/. [Correction added on 8 July 2015, after first online publication: A link to the updated information has been added.].

  14. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  15. Design of nano- and microfiber combined scaffolds by electrospinning of collagen onto starch-based fiber meshes: a man-made equivalent of natural extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Santos, Marina I; Neves, Nuno; Reis, Rui L

    2011-02-01

    Mimicking the structural organization and biologic function of natural extracellular matrix has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the majority of scaffolding materials for bone regeneration highlights biochemical functionality in detriment of mechanical properties. In this work we present a rather innovative construct that combines in the same structure electrospun type I collagen nanofibers with starch-based microfibers. These combined structures were obtained by a two-step methodology and structurally consist in a type I collagen nano-network incorporated on a macro starch-based support. The morphology of the developed structures was assessed by several microscopy techniques and the collagenous nature of the nano-network was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, and especially regarding the requirements of large bone defects, we also successfully introduced the concept of layer by layer, as a way to produce thicker structures. In an attempt to recreate bone microenvironment, the design and biochemical composition of the combined structures also envisioned bone-forming cells and endothelial cells (ECs). The inclusion of a type I collagen nano-network induced a stretched morphology and improved the metabolic activity of osteoblasts. Regarding ECs, the presence of type I collagen on the combined structures provided adhesive support and obviated the need of precoating with fibronectin. It was also importantly observed that ECs on the nano-network organized into circular structures, a three-dimensional arrangement distinct from that observed for osteoblasts and resembling the microcappillary-like organizations formed during angiogenesis. By providing simultaneously physical and chemical cues for cells, the herein-proposed combined structures hold a great potential in bone regeneration as a man-made equivalent of extracellular matrix.

  16. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE UPDATE: PFRP EQUIVALENCY DETERMINATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will:

    Review the mandate of the Pathogen Equivalency Committee
    Review the PEC's current membership of 10
    Discuss how a typical application is evaluated
    Note where information can be found
    List present deliberations/applications and describe t...

  17. Equivalent Imperfections In Arched Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallemule, Marian

    2015-09-01

    There are currently three design methods to verify the in-plane buckling of an arched structure: substitute member method, the method of equivalent imperfection with recommendations for arched bridges, and the equivalent unique global and local initial imperfection method (EUGLI), which uses the critical elastic buckling mode as an imperfection. The latter method is included in the EN 1993-1-1 cl. 5.3.2 (11) since 2002; however, to this day it is neither utilized in the design practice nor is it incorporated in ordinary structural analysis software. The main purpose of this article is to show the application of the proposed methods in a step-by-step manner to the numerical example considered and to compare these design methods for various arched structures. Verification of the in-plane buckling of an arch is explained in detail.

  18. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  19. Concurrent management of postprandial glycaemia and nutrient intake using glycaemic glucose equivalents, food composition data and computer-assisted meal design.

    PubMed

    Monro, J A; Williams, M

    2000-06-01

    A computer system, called SERVE-NZ Nutririon Management System, for use in diabetes management, addresses the problem of concurrently controlling postprandial glycaemic response and nutrient intake in meals containing a number of foods, is described. It converts the weight and relative glycaemic potency of each food to its content of glycaemic glucose equivalents (GGE) - the amount of glucose theoretically inducing the same blood glucose response as would the specified quantity of food. Glycaemic glucose equivalents in a meal can be simply obtained by adding the GGE content of all foods in the meal to give a figure for the maximal glycaemic impact of the meal. Glycaemic glucose equivalents may be calculated using food composition databases that include available carbohydrate, common standard measure weights and glycaemic index values. If GGE is treated as a nutrient, an output of the total nutrient profile of a food or meal, and its glycaemic impact as GGE, can be obtained simultaneously. Application of a nutritional software system incorporating GGE values to management of glycaemic loadings and nutrient intakes over five meals within a day is demonstrated. The system may be a useful aid in self-management of glycaemia, as it will identify quantities of foods that can be consumed without exceeding the predetermined glucose tolerances of individuals. The graphical presentation of GGE and nutrient composition of meals may be a useful visual aid in educating clients with diabetes. The GGE values on food labels would provide easily understood guidance, not obtained from glycaemic index values, to the maximum number of items or quantity of a food that an individual should eat at a time. In its present basic form the calculation of GGE is most likely to slightly overestimate glycaemic impact, so it presents a worst-case prediction.

  20. 36 CFR 1194.5 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS General § 1194.5 Equivalent facilitation. Nothing in this part is intended to prevent the use of designs or technologies as alternatives...

  1. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  2. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Geyer, Amy; Drenkhahn, Robert; Bolch, Wesley E.; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient-phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients’ whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age-specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy-1. The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations. Other sources of uncertainty included errors associated

  3. The Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyazoe, Terumi; Anderson, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the key issues regarding The Interaction Equivalency Theorem posited by Anderson (2003a), which consists of the three interaction elements found in formal education courses among teacher, student, and content. It first examines the core concepts of the theorem and argues that two theses of different dimensions can be…

  4. Improved equivalent source theory.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2009-08-01

    The equivalent source theorem, which is an important technique in the study of radiation and scattering by apertures, is improved by using the two axioms of the modified theory of physical optics. The method is applied to the problem of radiation of electromagnetic waves by a parallel plate waveguide. The results are investigated numerically.

  5. Five Equivalent d Orbitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; McClure, Vance

    1970-01-01

    Amplifies and clarifies a previous paper on pyramidal d orbitals. Discusses two sets of pyramid d orbitals with respect to their maximum bond strength and their symmetry. Authors described the oblate and prolate pentagonal antiprisms arising from the two sets of five equivalent d orbitals. (RR)

  6. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  7. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  8. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  9. Weight management by phone conference call: a comparison with a traditional face-to-face clinic. Rationale and design for a randomized equivalence trial.

    PubMed

    Lambourne, Kate; Washburn, Richard A; Gibson, Cheryl; Sullivan, Debra K; Goetz, Jeannine; Lee, Robert; Smith, Bryan K; Mayo, Matthew S; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2012-09-01

    State-of-the-art treatment for weight management consists of a behavioral intervention to facilitate decreased energy intake and increased physical activity. These interventions are typically delivered face-to-face (FTF) by a health educator to a small group of participants. There are numerous barriers to participation in FTF clinics including availability, scheduling, the expense and time required to travel to the clinic site, and possible need for dependent care. Weight management clinics delivered by conference call have the potential to diminish or eliminate these barriers. The conference call approach may also reduce burden on providers, who could conduct clinic groups from almost any location without the expenses associated with maintaining FTF clinic space. A randomized trial will be conducted in 395 overweight/obese adults (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m(2)) to determine if weight loss (6 months) and weight maintenance (12 months) are equivalent between weight management interventions utilizing behavioral strategies and pre-packaged meals delivered by either a conference call or the traditional FTF approach. The primary outcome, body weight, will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Secondary outcomes including waist circumference, energy and macronutrient intake, and physical activity and will be assessed on the same schedule. In addition, a cost analysis and extensive process evaluation will be completed.

  10. Weight management by phone conference call: A comparison with a traditional face-to-face clinic. Rationale and design for a randomized equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Lambourne, Kate; Washburn, Richard A.; Gibson, Cheryl; Sullivan, Debra K.; Goetz, Jeannine; Lee, Robert; Smith, Bryan K.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art treatment for weight management consists of a behavioral intervention to facilitate decreased energy intake and increased physical activity. These interventions are typically delivered face-to-face (FTF) by a health educator to a small group of participants. There are numerous barriers to participation in FTF clinics including availability, scheduling, the expense and time required to travel to the clinic site, and possible need for dependent care. Weight management clinics delivered by conference call have the potential to diminish or eliminate these barriers. The conference call approach may also reduce burden on providers, who could conduct clinic groups from almost any location without the expenses associated with maintaining FTF clinic space. A randomized trial will be conducted in 395 overweight/obese adults (BMI 25–39.9 kg/m2) to determine if weight loss (6 months) and weight maintenance (12 months) are equivalent between weight management interventions utilizing behavioral strategies and pre-packaged meals delivered by either a conference call or the traditional FTF approach. The primary outcome, body weight, will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Secondary outcomes including waist circumference, energy and macronutrient intake, and physical activity and will be assessed on the same schedule. In addition, a cost analysis and extensive process evaluation will be completed. PMID:22664647

  11. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Metabolomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Michael H.; Ward, Jane L.; Baker, John M.

    Modern ‘metabolomic’ methods allow us to compare levels of many structurally diverse compounds in an automated fashion across a large number of samples. This technology is ideally suited to screening of populations of plants, including trials where the aim is the determination of unintended effects introduced by GM. A number of metabolomic methods have been devised for the determination of substantial equivalence. We have developed a methodology, using [1H]-NMR fingerprinting, for metabolomic screening of plants and have applied it to the study of substantial equivalence of field-grown GM wheat. We describe here the principles and detail of that protocol as applied to the analysis of flour generated from field plots of wheat. Particular emphasis is given to the downstream data processing and comparison of spectra by multivariate analysis, from which conclusions regarding metabolome changes due to the GM can be assessed against the background of natural variation due to environment.

  12. Performance of J33-A-27 Turbojet-Engine Compressor. III; Over-All Performance Characteristics of Modified Compressor with Water Injection at Design Equivalent Speed of 11,800 RPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withee, Joseph R., Jr.; Beede, William L.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1950-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of water injection on the over-all performance of a modified J33-A-27 turbojet-engine compressor at the design equivalent speed of 11,800 rpm. The water-air ratio by weight was 0.05. With water injection the peak pressure ratio increased 9.0 per- cent, the maximum efficiency decreased 15 percent (actual numerical difference 0.12), and. the maximum total weight flow increased 9.3 percent.

  13. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  14. Obtaining an equivalent beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1990-01-01

    In modeling a complex structure the researcher was faced with a component that would have logical appeal if it were modeled as a beam. The structure was a mast of a robot controlled gantry crane. The structure up to this point already had a large number of degrees of freedom, so the idea of conserving grid points by modeling the mast as a beam was attractive. The researcher decided to make a separate problem of of the mast and model it in three dimensions with plates, then extract the equivalent beam properties by setting up the loading to simulate beam-like deformation and constraints. The results could then be used to represent the mast as a beam in the full model. A comparison was made of properties derived from models of different constraints versus manual calculations. The researcher shows that the three-dimensional model is ineffective in trying to conform to the requirements of an equivalent beam representation. If a full 3-D plate model were used in the complete representation of the crane structure, good results would be obtained. Since the attempt is to economize on the size of the model, a better way to achieve the same results is to use substructuring and condense the mast to equivalent end boundary and intermediate mass points.

  15. Equivalence Principle in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) for a Hubble observer in Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We show that the affine structure of the light cone in the FLRW spacetime should be treated locally in terms of the optical metric gαβ which is not reduced to the Minkowski metric fαβ due to the nonuniform parametrization of the local equations of light propagation with the proper time of the observer's clock. The physical consequence of this difference is that the Doppler shift of radio waves measured locally is affected by the Hubble expansion.

  16. Gradient equivalent crystal theory.

    PubMed

    Zypman, F R; Ferrante, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the formalism of equivalent crystal theory (ECT) by introducing an electron density gradient term so that the total model density becomes a more accurate representation of the real local density. Specifically, we allow for the electron density around a lattice site to have directionality, in addition to an average value, as assumed in ECT. We propose that an atom senses its neighbouring density as a weighted sum-the weights given by the its own electronic probability. As a benchmark, the method is used to compute vacancy migration energy curves of iron. These energies are in good agreement with previously published results. PMID:21690822

  17. Local unitary equivalence of quantum states and simultaneous orthogonal equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Yang, Min; Zhao, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The correspondence between local unitary equivalence of bipartite quantum states and simultaneous orthogonal equivalence is thoroughly investigated and strengthened. It is proved that local unitary equivalence can be studied through simultaneous similarity under projective orthogonal transformations, and four parametrization independent algorithms are proposed to judge when two density matrices on ℂd1 ⊗ ℂd2 are locally unitary equivalent in connection with trace identities, Kronecker pencils, Albert determinants and Smith normal forms.

  18. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  19. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  20. 7 CFR 1717.854 - Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution, subtransmission and headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., report on compliance, report on internal controls, and management letter in accordance with 7 CFR part... distribution, subtransmission and headquarters facilities, and certain other community infrastructure. 1717.854... certain other community infrastructure. (a) Policy. Requests for a lien accommodation or...

  1. 7 CFR 1717.854 - Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution, subtransmission and headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., report on compliance, report on internal controls, and management letter in accordance with 7 CFR part... distribution, subtransmission and headquarters facilities, and certain other community infrastructure. 1717.854... certain other community infrastructure. (a) Policy. Requests for a lien accommodation or...

  2. 7 CFR 1717.855 - Application contents: Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... environmental report and/or other environmental documentation, if required by 7 CFR part 1794; (g) RUS Form 740c... Buildings; (h) A CWP or CWP amendment covering the proposed project, in accordance with 7 CFR part 1710..., Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters—Primary Covered Transactions, as required by 7 CFR part 3017;...

  3. 7 CFR 1717.854 - Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution, subtransmission and headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., report on compliance, report on internal controls, and management letter in accordance with 7 CFR part... distribution, subtransmission and headquarters facilities, and certain other community infrastructure. 1717.854... certain other community infrastructure. (a) Policy. Requests for a lien accommodation or...

  4. 7 CFR 1717.855 - Application contents: Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... environmental report and/or other environmental documentation, if required by 7 CFR part 1794; (g) RUS Form 740c... Buildings; (h) A CWP or CWP amendment covering the proposed project, in accordance with 7 CFR part 1710..., Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters—Primary Covered Transactions, as required by 7 CFR part 3017;...

  5. 7 CFR 1717.855 - Application contents: Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... environmental report and/or other environmental documentation, if required by 7 CFR part 1794; (g) RUS Form 740c... Buildings; (h) A CWP or CWP amendment covering the proposed project, in accordance with 7 CFR part 1710..., Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters—Primary Covered Transactions, as required by 7 CFR part 3017;...

  6. 7 CFR 1717.854 - Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution, subtransmission and headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., report on compliance, report on internal controls, and management letter in accordance with 7 CFR part... distribution, subtransmission and headquarters facilities, and certain other community infrastructure. 1717.854... certain other community infrastructure. (a) Policy. Requests for a lien accommodation or...

  7. 7 CFR 1717.855 - Application contents: Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... environmental report and/or other environmental documentation, if required by 7 CFR part 1794; (g) RUS Form 740c... Buildings; (h) A CWP or CWP amendment covering the proposed project, in accordance with 7 CFR part 1710..., Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters—Primary Covered Transactions, as required by 7 CFR part 3017;...

  8. 7 CFR 1717.856 - Application contents: Normal review-100 percent private financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... long-range financial forecast. The financial forecast must comply with the requirements of 7 CFR part... documents. These documents must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F and, as applicable... requirements study, which must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart E, to the same extent as...

  9. 7 CFR 1717.856 - Application contents: Normal review-100 percent private financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... long-range financial forecast. The financial forecast must comply with the requirements of 7 CFR part... documents. These documents must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F and, as applicable... requirements study, which must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart E, to the same extent as...

  10. 7 CFR 1717.854 - Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution, subtransmission and headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., report on compliance, report on internal controls, and management letter in accordance with 7 CFR part... of at least 1.25 and a DSC of at least 1.25 for each of 2 calendar years immediately preceding,...

  11. 7 CFR 1717.856 - Application contents: Normal review-100 percent private financing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... long-range financial forecast. The financial forecast must comply with the requirements of 7 CFR part... documents. These documents must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F and, as applicable... requirements study, which must meet the requirements of 7 CFR part 1710, subpart E, to the same extent as...

  12. Dual-cycle ergometry as an exercise modality during prebreathe with 100 percent oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, Cristine L.; Fischer, Michele D.; Webb, James T.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to reduce prebreathe time requirements prior to extravehicular activities and high-altitude flights, a combined arm and leg exercise task proposes to enhance denitrogenation by incorporation of both upper and lower body musculature at a moderately high work intensity during prebreathe with 100% oxygen. Preliminary findings indicated peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) levels attained on the dual-cycle ergometer do not differ significantly from those levels attained on the treadmill. Eight male subjects were exercised to VO2peak using leg-only cycle ergometry and dual-cycle ergometry on separate days. Preliminary data during dual-cycle ergometry showed arm work equaling 30% of the leg workrate at each stage of the incremental test resulted in arm fatigue in several subjects and a reduced VO2peak compared to dual-cycle ergometry with arm work at 20%. Thus, the 20% workrate was used during the dual-cycle VO2peak trial. On a third experimental day, subjects performed a 10 minute exercise test at a workrate required to elicit 75% of VO2peak for each subject on the dual-cycle ergometer. Blood lactate response to the exercise was monitored as an objective measure of fatigue. Peak VO2 levels attained on the leg-only and the dual-cycle ergometry tasks were not significantly different. Blood lactate levels were significantly elevated following the dual-cycle ergometry at 75% VO2peak. However, lactate levels show the expected rate of decline during recovery and, as demonstrated in the literature, should return to baseline levels within 30 minutes following exercise cessation. Thus, dual-cycle ergometry at 75% VO2peak appears to be a valid exercise for use during prebreathe and should not contribute to fatigue during subsequent EVA's.

  13. 7 CFR 1717.855 - Application contents: Advance approval-100 percent private financing of distribution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... environmental report and/or other environmental documentation, if required by 7 CFR part 1794; (g) RUS Form 740c... Buildings; (h) A CWP or CWP amendment covering the proposed project, in accordance with 7 CFR part 1710..., Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters—Primary Covered Transactions, as required by 7 CFR part 3017;...

  14. Pseudo-Equivalent Groups and Linking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.

    2015-01-01

    Adjustment by minimum discriminant information provides an approach to linking test forms in the case of a nonequivalent groups design with no satisfactory common items. This approach employs background information on individual examinees in each administration so that weighted samples of examinees form pseudo-equivalent groups in the sense that…

  15. Equivalence Principle and Gravitational Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Hohensee, Michael A.; Chu, Steven; Mueller, Holger; Peters, Achim

    2011-04-15

    We investigate leading order deviations from general relativity that violate the Einstein equivalence principle in the gravitational standard model extension. We show that redshift experiments based on matter waves and clock comparisons are equivalent to one another. Consideration of torsion balance tests, along with matter-wave, microwave, optical, and Moessbauer clock tests, yields comprehensive limits on spin-independent Einstein equivalence principle-violating standard model extension terms at the 10{sup -6} level.

  16. Saponification equivalent of dasamula taila.

    PubMed

    Saxena, R B

    1994-07-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  17. SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings. PMID:22556683

  18. Equivalence-Equivalence: Matching Stimuli with Same Discriminative Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpentier, Franck; Smeets, Paul M.; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that after being trained on A-B and A-C match-to-sample tasks, adults match not only same-class B and C stimuli (equivalence) but also BC compounds with same-class elements and with different-class elements (BC-BC). The assumption was that the BC-BC performances are based on matching equivalence and nonequivalence…

  19. Optical metrics and projective equivalence

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Stephen; Dunajski, Maciej; Gibbons, Gary; Warnick, Claude

    2011-04-15

    Trajectories of light rays in a static spacetime are described by unparametrized geodesics of the Riemannian optical metric associated with the Lorentzian spacetime metric. We investigate the uniqueness of this structure and demonstrate that two different observers, moving relative to one another, who both see the Universe as static may determine the geometry of the light rays differently. More specifically, we classify Lorentzian metrics admitting more than one hyper-surface orthogonal timelike Killing vector and analyze the projective equivalence of the resulting optical metrics. These metrics are shown to be projectively equivalent up to diffeomorphism if the static Killing vectors generate a group SL(2,R), but not projectively equivalent in general. We also consider the cosmological C metrics in Einstein-Maxwell theory and demonstrate that optical metrics corresponding to different values of the cosmological constant are projectively equivalent.

  20. Equivalency Theory and Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses distance education and the need for an accepted theory. Highlights include theories of independent study; theory of industrialization of teaching; theory of interaction and communication; and equivalency theory that is based on local control, personalized instruction, and telecommunications. (LRW)

  1. Equivalent damage: A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laflen, J. R.; Cook, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts in equivalent damage were evaluated to determine their applicability to the life prediction of hot path components of aircraft gas turbine engines. Equivalent damage was defined as being those effects which influence the crack initiation life-time beyond the damage that is measured in uniaxial, fully-reversed sinusoidal and isothermal experiments at low homologous temperatures. Three areas of equivalent damage were examined: mean stress, cumulative damage, and multiaxiality. For each area, a literature survey was conducted to aid in selecting the most appropriate theories. Where possible, data correlations were also used in the evaluation process. A set of criteria was developed for ranking the theories in each equivalent damage regime. These criteria considered aspects of engine utilization as well as the theoretical basis and correlative ability of each theory. In addition, consideration was given to the complex nature of the loading cycle at fatigue critical locations of hot path components; this loading includes non-proportional multiaxial stressing, combined temperature and strain fluctuations, and general creep-fatigue interactions. Through applications of selected equivalent damage theories to some suitable data sets it was found that there is insufficient data to allow specific recommendations of preferred theories for general applications. A series of experiments and areas of further investigations were identified.

  2. Quantitative and methodological aspects of stimulus equivalence.

    PubMed

    O'mara, H

    1991-01-01

    The number of different ways of linking stimuli in the training phase of a conditional discrimination procedure designed to teach equivalence relations has hitherto been underestimated. An algorithm from graph theory that produces the correct number of such different ways is given. The establishment of equivalence relations requires transitive stimulus control. A misconception in a previous analysis of the conditions necessary for demonstrating transitive stimulus control is indicated. This misconception concerns responding in an unreinforced test trial to a negative rather than a positive comparison stimulus. Such behavior cannot be attributed to discriminative control by degree of association with reinforcement if the negative comparison stimulus has been less associated with reinforcement than the positive comparison stimulus in an antecedent training phase.

  3. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  4. Children's Equivalence Judgments: Crossmapping Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mix, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Preschoolers made numerical comparisons between sets with varying degrees of shared surface similarity. When surface similarity was pitted against numerical equivalence (i.e., crossmapping), children made fewer number matches than when surface similarity was neutral (i.e, all sets contained the same objects). Only children who understood the…

  5. Meaning Equivalence and Linguistic Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhmanova, Olga; Marcenko, A. N.

    This manual discusses recent research in the field of semantics. It was prepared as part of a series of books to be used in connection with a course of advanced study for experienced philologists and teachers. The Introduction and Part One are based mainly on the 1971-1972 course of lectures on Meaning Equivalence by Akhmanova, and discuss the…

  6. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  7. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia Padilla; Armellini, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner) is present at a high level. This…

  8. Multiple Functions in Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVeigh, Brian; Keenan, Mickey

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effects of training a "drawing" response to each of three stimuli in a 5-member equivalence class. In Experiment 1 the stimuli were an arbitrary word, a shape, or a mathematical symbol. Subjects then were trained to draw a separate component of a stickman at each of the 3 stimuli. Subsequent tests for function…

  9. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  10. Equivalence theorem and infrared divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, T.

    1996-08-01

    We look at the equivalence theorem as a statement about the absence of polynomial infrared divergences when {ital m}{sub {ital W}}{r_arrow}0. We prove their absence in a truncated toy model and conjecture that, if they exist at all, they are due to couplings between light particles. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. The Stanford equivalence principle program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Paul W., Jr.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Bye, M.

    1989-01-01

    The Stanford Equivalence Principle Program (Worden, Jr. 1983) is intended to test the uniqueness of free fall to the ultimate possible accuracy. The program is being conducted in two phases: first, a ground-based version of the experiment, which should have a sensitivity to differences in rate of fall of one part in 10(exp 12); followed by an orbital experiment with a sensitivity of one part in 10(exp 17) or better. The ground-based experiment, although a sensitive equivalence principle test in its own right, is being used for technology development for the orbital experiment. A secondary goal of the experiment is a search for exotic forces. The instrument is very well suited for this search, which would be conducted mostly with the ground-based apparatus. The short range predicted for these forces means that forces originating in the Earth would not be detectable in orbit. But detection of Yukawa-type exotic forces from a nearby large satellite (such as Space Station) is feasible, and gives a very sensitive and controllable test for little more effort than the orbiting equivalence principle test itself.

  12. Functional classes and equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Murray; Wynne, Constance K.; Maguire, Russell W.; Barnes, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Three adult subjects were taught a set of two-choice simultaneous discriminations, with three positive and three negative stimuli; all possible combinations of positive and negative stimuli yielded nine different pairs. The discriminations were repeatedly reversed and rereversed, the former positive stimuli becoming negative and the former negative stimuli becoming positive. With all subjects, a reversal of the contingencies for one pair of stimuli became sufficient to change their responses to all of the other pairs. The reversals had produced functional stimulus classes. Then, all subjects showed conditional discriminations emerging between members of a functional class; given a sample from one class and comparisons from both classes, they selected the comparison that was in the same class as the sample. Next, 2 of the subjects showed that the within-class conditional relations possessed the symmetric and transitive properties of equivalence relations; after having been taught to relate new stimuli to existing class members, the subjects then matched other class members to the new stimuli. Subsequent tests of two-choice discriminations showed that the conditional discriminations had transferred functional class membership to the new stimuli. The 3rd subject, who did not show equivalence relations among functional class members, was also found to have lost the within-class conditional relations after the equivalence tests. PMID:16812597

  13. Information Leakage from Logically Equivalent Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Shlomi; McKenzie, Craig R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Framing effects are said to occur when equivalent frames lead to different choices. However, the equivalence in question has been incompletely conceptualized. In a new normative analysis of framing effects, we complete the conceptualization by introducing the notion of information equivalence. Information equivalence obtains when no…

  14. 75 FR 22126 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... November 12, 2008 (73 FR 67057-67059). The new equivalent method for O 3 is an automated method that... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  15. 76 FR 62402 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35597). The new O 3 equivalent method is an... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods; Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  16. Equivalence principle in Chameleon models .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Landau, S.; Salgado, M.; Sudarsky, D.

    Most theories that predict time and/or space variation of fundamental constants also predict violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP). Khoury and Weltmann proposed the chameleon model in 2004 and claimed that this model avoids experimental bounds on WEP. We present a contrasting view based on an approximate calculation of the two body problem for the chameleon field and show that the force depends on the test body composition. Furthermore, we compare the prediction of the force on a test body with Eötvös type experiments and find that the chameleon field effect cannot account for current bounds.

  17. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  18. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  19. Torsion Balance Test of Einstein's Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, Michael; Archibald, Adam; Nussinov, Tsitsi; Wagoner, Kasey; Cowsik, Ramanath

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a torsion balance experiment to test the equivalence principle (EP) which follows the solar attractor approach pioneered by Dicke in the early 1960s. By monitoring the response of a balance arranged as a composition dipole with an azimuthally symmetric mass distribution to the gravitational field produced by the Sun, we search for a diurnal modulation of the balance which would indicate a violation of the EP. Since reporting on the status of this experiment last year, the instrument has begun collecting data at a remote underground site. This talk will cover the design and fundamental sensitivity of the balance, and present the results of preliminary analysis of over 1200 hours of data.

  20. Classroom Activities for Introducing Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Equivalence relations and partitions are two interconnected ideas that play important roles in advanced mathematics. While students encounter the informal notion of equivalence in many courses, the formal definition of an equivalence relation is typically introduced in a junior level transition-to-proof course. This paper reports the results of a…

  1. 46 CFR 110.20-1 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equivalents. 110.20-1 Section 110.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Equivalents... engineering evaluations and tests to demonstrate the equivalence of the substitute....

  2. 46 CFR 110.20-1 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalents. 110.20-1 Section 110.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Equivalents... engineering evaluations and tests to demonstrate the equivalence of the substitute....

  3. 46 CFR 110.20-1 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equivalents. 110.20-1 Section 110.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Equivalents... engineering evaluations and tests to demonstrate the equivalence of the substitute....

  4. 46 CFR 110.20-1 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equivalents. 110.20-1 Section 110.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Equivalents... engineering evaluations and tests to demonstrate the equivalence of the substitute....

  5. Stimulus Equivalence: Testing Sidman's (2000) Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minster, Sara Tepaeru; Jones, Max; Elliffe, Douglas; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.

    2006-01-01

    Sidman's (2000) theory regarding the origin of equivalence relations predicts that a reinforcing stimulus common to distinct equivalence classes must drop out of the equivalence relations. This prediction was tested in the present study by arranging class-specific reinforcers, R1 and R2, following correct responding on the prerequisite conditional…

  6. 46 CFR 110.20-1 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equivalents. 110.20-1 Section 110.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Equivalents... engineering evaluations and tests to demonstrate the equivalence of the substitute....

  7. Interaction Equivalency in an OER, MOOCs and Informal Learning Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyazoe, Terumi; Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical paper attempts to clarify design issues that the field of education has encountered in the context of OER (Open Educational Resources), Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and increased emphasis on informal learning, as examined through the lens of the Interaction Equivalency Theorem. An overview of the core concepts of the…

  8. Advanced Life Support Equivalent System Mass Guidelines Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie; Fisher, John W.; Jones, Harry W.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Ewert, Michael K.; Hanford, Anthony J.; Hogan, John A.; Joshi, Jitendri, A.; Vaccari, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation which provides guidelines for performing an Equivalent System Mass (ESM) evaluation for trade study purposes. The document: 1) Defines ESM; 2) Explains how to calculate ESM; 3) Discusses interpretation of ESM results. The document is designed to provide detailed instructive material for researchers who are performing ESM evaluations for the first time.

  9. 75 FR 9894 - Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    .... This designation is made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as amended on November 12, 2008 (73 FR... AGENCY Office of Research and Development; Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of One New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of...

  10. Metabolic equivalents during scooter exercise.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Akira; Arimoto, Morio; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the metabolic equivalents (METs) for scooter exercise (riding a scooter, scootering) and to examine the energy expenditure and the heart rate response, so that the results can be used in health promotion activities. Eighteen young adults (10 males and 8 females) participated in scootering on a treadmill at three different speeds for six minutes each. Before, during, and after the exercise, pulmonary ventilation, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), carbon dioxide product, respiratory exchange ratio (R), and heart rate (HR) were measured. These measurements kept steady states from the 3rd to 6th minute of each different speed session. The MET values acquired during scootering at 80 m.min(-1), 110 m.min(-1), and 140 m.min(-1) were 3.9, 4.3, and 5.0, respectively. Calculated using VO(2) (ml.kg(-1).min(-1))x[4.0+R], the energy consumption for scootering at each speed was 67.0+/-10.6, 73.3+/-10.2, and 84.8+/-7.9 cal.kg(-1).min(-1), respectively. The regression equation between scootering speed (X, m.min(-1)) and VO(2) (Y, ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) is Y=0.062X+8.655, and the regression equation between HR (X, beats.min(-1)) and VO(2)reserve (Y, %) is Y=0.458X-11.264. These equations can be applied to both females and males. Thus, scootering at 80 to 140 m.min(-1) might not be sufficient to improve the cardiorespiratory fitness of young male adults similar to the participants, but it may contribute many healthy benefits to most female adults and even male adults, and improve their health and fitness at the faster speeds.

  11. It Pays to Be Organized: Organizing Arithmetic Practice around Equivalent Values Facilitates Understanding of Math Equivalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Nicole M.; Chesney, Dana L.; Matthews, Percival G.; Fyfe, Emily R.; Petersen, Lori A.; Dunwiddie, April E.; Wheeler, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that organizing arithmetic fact practice by equivalent values facilitates children's understanding of math equivalence. Children (M age = 8 years 6 months, N = 104) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 practice conditions: (a) equivalent values, in which problems were grouped by equivalent sums (e.g., 3 + 4 = 7, 2…

  12. Thermal performance measurements of a 100 percent polyester MLI (multilayer insulation) system for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gonczy, J.D.; Boroski, W.N.; Niemann, R.C.

    1989-09-01

    The plastic materials used in the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets of the superconducting magnets of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are comprised entirely of polyesters. This paper reports on tests conducted in three separate experimental blanket arrangements. The tests explore the thermal performance of two candidate blanket joint configurations each employing a variation of a stepped-butted joint nested between sewn blanket seams. The results from the joint configurations are compared to measurements made describing the thermal performance of the basic blanket materials as tested in an ideal joint configuration. Twenty foil sensors were incorporated within each test blanket to measure interstitial layer and joint layer temperatures. Heat flux and thermal gradients are reported for high and degraded insulating vacuums, and during transient and steady state conditions. In complement with this paper is an associate paper bearing the same title head but with the title extension Part 1: Instrumentation and experimental preparation (300K-80K)'. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Development of modified poly(perfluoropropyleneoxide) urethane systems for use in liquid oxygen and in enriched 100 percent oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    This program consisted of two separate though related phases. The initial phase was directed toward improving the mechanical and adhesive properties of the very highly fluorinated-polyurethane resin system derived from the hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropylene oxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate. Various new curing agents for this system were investigated, with the goal of providing a more thermally stable crosslink (cure) mechanism to provide wider applicability and fuller utilization of the outstanding oxygen resistance of the PFPO system. Complete resistance to liquid- and gaseous-oxygen impact at presures as high as 1035 N/sq cm were attained with the use of the PFPO resin castings. The second corollary phase was directed toward investigating the feasibility and optimization of the allophanate cured, urethane extended polymer derived from hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropyleneoxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate, as the adhesive system for use in a weld-bond configuration for liquid oxygen tankage. The synthesis and application procedures of the adhesive system to insure liquid oxygen compatibility (under 10 kg-m loading), and the development of procedures and techniques to provide high quality weld-bonded joint configurations were studied.

  14. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  15. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  16. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.6 Equivalence...

  17. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.6 Equivalence...

  18. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  19. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.6 Equivalence...

  20. Equivalent medium theory of layered sphere particle with anisotropic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingcai; Wang, Minzhong; Zhang, Beidou

    2016-08-01

    Researches on the optical properties of small particle have been widely concerned in the atmospheric science, astronomy, astrophysics, biology and medical science. This paper provides an equivalent dielectric theory for the functional graded particle with anisotropic shells, in which inhomogeneous and anisotropic particle was equivalently transformed into a new kind of homogeneous, continuous and isotropic sphere with same size but different permittivity, and then greatly simplify the calculation process of particle's optical property. Meanwhile, the paper also discusses whether the charge on the particle can change the expression of its equivalent permittivity or not. These results proposed in this paper can be used to simulate the electrical, optical properties of layered sphere, it also meet the research requirement in the design of functional graded particles in different subjects.

  1. Testing for Equivalence: A Methodology for Computational Cognitive Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Terrence; West, Robert

    2010-12-01

    The equivalence test (Stewart and West, 2007; Stewart, 2007) is a statistical measure for evaluating the similarity between a model and the system being modelled. It is designed to avoid over-fitting and to generate an easily interpretable summary of the quality of a model. We apply the equivalence test to two tasks: Repeated Binary Choice (Erev et al., 2010) and Dynamic Stocks and Flows (Gonzalez and Dutt, 2007). In the first case, we find a broad range of statistically equivalent models (and win a prediction competition) while identifying particular aspects of the task that are not yet adequately captured. In the second case, we re-evaluate results from the Dynamic Stocks and Flows challenge, demonstrating how our method emphasizes the breadth of coverage of a model and how it can be used for comparing different models. We argue that the explanatory power of models hinges on numerical similarity to empirical data over a broad set of measures.

  2. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifies it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.

  3. Methods for proving the equivalency of detonator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, Alan C; Akinci, Adrian A; Thomas, Keith A; Clarke, Steve A; Martin, Eric S; Murphy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges facing engineers is developing newer, safer detonators that are equivalent to devices currently in use. There is no clear consensus on an exact method for drawing equivalence of detonators. This paper summarizes our current efforts to develop diagnostics addressing various aspects of detonator design to better quantify and prove equivalency. We consider various optical techniques to quantify the output pressure and output wave shape. The development of a unique interpretation of streak camera breakouts, known as the apparent center of initiation, will be discussed as a metric for detonation wave shape. Specific examples apply these techniques to the comparison of a new laser-driven detonator with an existing exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. Successes and short-comings of the techniques will be discussed.

  4. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling With Application to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been proposed for developing structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with equivalent-continuum models. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As important examples with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the design of nanotube-based devices, the modeling technique has been applied to determine the effective-continuum geometry and bending rigidity of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the chemical structure of graphene has been substituted with equivalent-truss and equivalent continuum models. As a result, an effective thickness of the continuum model has been determined. This effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the interatomic spacing of graphite. The effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the inter-planar spacing of graphite. The effective bending rigidity of the equivalent-continuum model of a graphene sheet was determined by equating the vibrational potential energy of the molecular model of a graphene sheet subjected to cylindrical bending with the strain energy of an equivalent continuum plate subjected to cylindrical bending.

  5. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Hot Block Dilute Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide Filter Extraction'' In this method, total suspended... and nitric acid and two aliquots of hydrogen peroxide, for a total of two and a half hours extraction... Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) with Hot Block Dilute Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide...

  6. 33 CFR 106.130 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equivalents. 106.130 Section 106.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.130 Equivalents. For any...

  7. 33 CFR 159.19 - Testing equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testing equivalency. 159.19 Section 159.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.19 Testing equivalency. (a) If a...

  8. 33 CFR 159.19 - Testing equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing equivalency. 159.19 Section 159.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Certification Procedures § 159.19 Testing equivalency. (a) If a...

  9. 33 CFR 105.135 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalents. 105.135 Section 105.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES General § 105.135 Equivalents. For any measure required by this part,...

  10. 33 CFR 104.135 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalents. 104.135 Section 104.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: VESSELS General § 104.135 Equivalents. For any measure required by this part, the...

  11. 46 CFR 169.109 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equivalents. 169.109 Section 169.109 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.109 Equivalents. Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may...

  12. 46 CFR 169.109 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equivalents. 169.109 Section 169.109 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.109 Equivalents. Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may...

  13. 46 CFR 169.109 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalents. 169.109 Section 169.109 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.109 Equivalents. Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may...

  14. 46 CFR 169.109 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equivalents. 169.109 Section 169.109 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.109 Equivalents. Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may...

  15. 46 CFR 169.109 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equivalents. 169.109 Section 169.109 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.109 Equivalents. Substitutes for a fitting, appliance, apparatus, or equipment, may...

  16. Equivalent Mass of a Coil Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Finds that first-year college students can understand in detail the origin of the equivalent mass. Provides both a simple calculation derivation of this result as well as a noncalculus derivation. Argues that for every soft spring, the equivalent mass should be somewhere between m0/3 and m0/2. (CCM)

  17. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  18. 46 CFR 114.540 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equivalence of the substitute. (b) The Commandant may accept compliance by a high speed craft with the provisions of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an... approve a novel lifesaving appliance or arrangement as an equivalent if it has performance...

  19. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an equivalent to compliance with applicable... IMO Resolution A. 520(13) (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600); or (2) Has successfully... corporate structure of a vessel's company when determining the acceptability of an equivalent...

  20. Mania and Behavioral Equivalents: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturmey, Peter; Laud, Rinita B.; Cooper, Christopher L.; Matson, Johnny L.; Fodstad, Jill C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has failed to address the possibility of behavioral equivalents in people with ID and mania. The relationship between a measure of mania and possible behavioral equivalents was assessed in 693 adults, most with severe or profound ID, living in a large residential setting. The mania subscale of the DASH-II proved to be a…

  1. 7 CFR 1030.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1030.54 Section 1030.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1030.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54....

  2. 7 CFR 1001.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1001.54 Section 1001.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1001.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential...

  3. 7 CFR 1033.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1033.54 Section 1033.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1033.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential...

  4. 7 CFR 1000.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1000.54 Section 1000.54 Agriculture... Prices § 1000.54 Equivalent price. If for any reason a price or pricing constituent required for computing the prices described in § 1000.50 is not available, the market administrator shall use a price...

  5. 7 CFR 1126.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1126.54 Section 1126.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1126.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential...

  6. 7 CFR 1124.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1124.54 Section 1124.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1124.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential...

  7. 7 CFR 1006.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1006.54 Section 1006.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1006.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices...

  8. 7 CFR 1131.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1131.54 Section 1131.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1131.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices...

  9. 7 CFR 1005.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1005.54 Section 1005.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1005.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices...

  10. 7 CFR 1007.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1007.54 Section 1007.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1007.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices...

  11. 7 CFR 1032.54 - Equivalent price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1032.54 Section 1032.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1032.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential...

  12. 46 CFR 154.32 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalents. 154.32 Section 154.32 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES General § 154.32 Equivalents. (a) A vessel that fails...

  13. 33 CFR 106.130 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equivalents. 106.130 Section 106.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.130 Equivalents. For any...

  14. 33 CFR 106.130 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equivalents. 106.130 Section 106.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.130 Equivalents. For any...

  15. Equivalency Programmes (EPs) for Promoting Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Equivalency programmes (EPs) refers to alternative education programmes that are equivalent to the formal education system in terms of curriculum and certification, policy support mechanisms, mode of delivery, staff training, and other support activities such as monitoring, evaluation and assessment. The development of EPs is potentially an…

  16. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  17. Symmetry, Equivalence and Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack

    2006-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly at equilibrium is central to the formation of many biological structures and the emulation of this process through the creation of synthetic counterparts offers great promise for nanofabrication. The central problems in this field are an understanding of how the symmetry of the interacting particles encodes the geometrical structure of the organized structure and the nature of the thermodynamic transitions involved. Our approach is inspired by the self-assembly of actin, tubulin and icosahedral structures of plant and animal viruses. We observe chain, membrane,`nanotube' and hollow icosahedron structures using `equivalent' particles exhibiting an interplay between directional (dipolar and multi-polar) interactions and short-range (van der Waals) interactions. Specifically, a dipolar potential (continuous rotational symmetry) gives rise to chain formation, while potentials having discrete rotational symmetries (e.g., square quadrupole or triangular ring of dipoles) led to the self-organization of nanotube and icosahedral structures with some resemblance to tubulin and icosahedral viruses. The simulations are compared to theoretical models of molecular self-assembly, especially in the case of dipolar fluids where the corresponding analytic theory of equilibrium polymerization is well developed. These computations give insights into the design elements required for the development of synthetic systems exhibiting this type of organization.

  18. Equivalent Skin Analysis of Wing Structures Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Youhua; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    An efficient method of modeling trapezoidal built-up wing structures is developed by coupling. in an indirect way, an Equivalent Plate Analysis (EPA) with Neural Networks (NN). Being assumed to behave like a Mindlin-plate, the wing is solved using the Ritz method with Legendre polynomials employed as the trial functions. This analysis method can be made more efficient by avoiding most of the computational effort spent on calculating contributions to the stiffness and mass matrices from each spar and rib. This is accomplished by replacing the wing inner-structure with an "equivalent" material that combines to the skin and whose properties are simulated by neural networks. The constitutive matrix, which relates the stress vector to the strain vector, and the density of the equivalent material are obtained by enforcing mass and stiffness matrix equities with rec,ard to the EPA in a least-square sense. Neural networks for the material properties are trained in terms of the design variables of the wing structure. Examples show that the present method, which can be called an Equivalent Skin Analysis (ESA) of the wing structure, is more efficient than the EPA and still fairly good results can be obtained. The present ESA is very promising to be used at the early stages of wing structure design.

  19. Equivalence in Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Contexts: Benefits of Solving Problems with Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jody; Bisanz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Children's failure on equivalence problems (e.g., 5 + 4 = 7 + __) is believed to be the result of misunderstanding the equal sign and has been tested using symbolic problems (including "="). For Study 1 (N = 48), we designed a nonsymbolic method for presenting equivalence problems to determine whether Grade 2 children's difficulty is due to the…

  20. Equivalent circuit with complex physical constants and equivalent-parameters-expressed dissipation factors of piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wen, Yu-Mei; Li, Ping

    2006-06-01

    The equivalent circuit with complex physical constants for a piezoelectric ceramic in thickness mode is established. In the equivalent circuit, electric components (equivalent circuit parameters) are connected to real and imaginary parts of complex physical coefficients of piezoelectric materials. Based on definitions of dissipation factors, three of them (dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric dissipation factors) are represented by equivalent circuit parameters. Since the equivalent circuit parameters are detectable, the dissipation factors can be easily obtained. In the experiments, the temperature and the stress responses of the three dissipation factors are measured.

  1. Certainty equivalence in nonlinear output regulation with unmeasured error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celani, F.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we consider a nonlinear output regulation problem in which the controlled output and the measured output are not the same. It is assumed that the controlled plant has a single control input, and that it can be transformed into Gauthier-Kupka's observability canonical form. Then, it is shown that a design based on certainty equivalence is effective for determining a controller that solves the given problem.

  2. Relating equivalence relations to equivalence relations: A relational framing model of complex human functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dermot; Hegarty, Neil; Smeets, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    The current study aimed to develop a behavior-analytic model of analogical reasoning. In Experiments 1 and 2 subjects (adults and children) were trained and tested for the formation of four, three-member equivalence relations using a delayed matching-to-sample procedure. All subjects (Experiments 1 and 2) were exposed to tests that examined relations between equivalence and non-equivalence relations. For example, on an equivalence-equivalence relation test, the complex sample B1/C1 and the two complex comparisons B3/C3 and B3/C4 were used, and on a nonequivalence-nonequivalence relation test the complex sample B1/C2 was presented with the same two comparisons. All subjects consistently related equivalence relations to equivalence relations and nonequivalence relations to nonequivalence relations (e.g., picked B3/C3 in the presence of B1/C1 and picked B3/C4 in the presence of B1/C2). In Experiment 3, the equivalence responding, the equivalence-equivalence responding, and the nonequivalence-nonequivalence responding was successfully brought under contextual control. Finally, it was shown that the contextual cues could function successfully as comparisons, and the complex samples and comparisons could function successfully as contextual cues and samples, respectively. These data extend the equivalence paradigm and contribute to a behaviour-analytic interpretation of analogical reasoning and complex human functioning, in general. PMID:22477120

  3. 46 CFR 114.540 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approve a novel lifesaving appliance or arrangement as an equivalent if it has performance characteristics... Acceptance of Prototype Novel Life-Saving Appliances and Arrangements”; or (2) Has successfully undergone...

  4. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICE PRODUCT EVALUATION REPORTS: UNITED STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  5. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence...

  6. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.6 Equivalence...

  7. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    PubMed

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  8. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. PMID:26146035

  9. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  10. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  11. Inelastic diffraction and equivalence of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.

    1991-09-01

    A new approach to diffraction, based on the concept of equivalent states, is applied to the inclusive inelastic scattering. Differences from the classical description of Good and Walker are pointed out.

  12. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  13. Multilingual energy dictionary. [Equivalents in 6 languages

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, A.

    1981-01-01

    This dictionary covers 1600 entries - ranging from oil well to synthetic natural gas and waste heat recovery - that cover both concepts and equipment, providing the equivalents of the most-important energy terms in six languages: English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Each term is listed six times - under each language, with all five foreign equivalents - permitting easy translation among all six languages. Separate entries are also given for British and American English where usage differs in the two countries.

  14. The endotopism semigroups of an equivalence relation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuchok, Yu V; Toichkina, E A

    2014-05-31

    In this work we investigate six types of endotopism semigroups for a given equivalence relation. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of all such endotopisms are presented. Conditions for the regularity and coregularity of each of the endotopism semigroups of a given type are established. The notion of the endotype of a binary relation with respect to its endotopisms is introduced and the endotype of an arbitrary equivalence relation is calculated. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  15. On equivalent characterizations of convexity of functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios

    2013-04-01

    A detailed development of the theory of convex functions, not often found in complete form in most textbooks, is given. We adopt the strict secant line definition as the definitive definition of convexity. We then show that for differentiable functions, this definition becomes logically equivalent with the first derivative monotonicity definition and the tangent line definition. Consequently, for differentiable functions, all three characterizations are logically equivalent.

  16. The Physical Mirror Equivalence for the Local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciatori, Sergio Luigi; Compagnoni, Marco; Guerra, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the total space of the canonical bundle of and we use a proposal by Hosono, together with results of Seidel and Auroux-Katzarkov-Orlov, to deduce the physical mirror equivalence between and the derived Fukaya category of its mirror which assigns the expected central charge to BPS states. By construction, our equivalence is compatible with the mirror map relating the complex and the Kähler moduli spaces and with the computation of Gromov-Witten invariants.

  17. Equivalent Circuits as Related to Ionic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Alan; Mauro, Alexander

    1963-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between certain “equivalent circuits” and the fundamental flux equations of Nernst and Planck. It is shown that as a direct algebraic consequence of these equations one may construct two types of equivalent circuits for a homogeneous (charged or uncharged) membrane. The one, which we term the “pure electrical equivalent circuit,” correctly predicts all of the electrical properties of the membrane for both steady and transient states. The other, which we call the “mixed equivalent circuit,” predicts the steady state I, Ψ characteristics of the membrane and the steady state ionic fluxes; it is not applicable to non-steady state properties or measurements. We emphasize that with regard to the portrayal of the physical basis of the properties of a homogeneous membrane, the mixed equivalent circuit can be misleading. This is particularly significant because this same circuit can also be used to depict a mosaic membrane, in which case the circuit gives a realistic pictorialization of the physical origin of the membrane properties. It is hoped that our analysis will be of aid to workers in electrophysiology who make use of equivalent circuit terminology in discussing the behavior of the plasma membrane. PMID:19431324

  18. Equivalence Relations, Contextual Control, and Naming

    PubMed Central

    Randell, Tom; Remington, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports two experiments that investigated the role of verbal behavior in the emergence and generalization of contextually controlled equivalence classes. During both experiments, participants were trained with two different combinations of the same easily nameable, yet formally unrelated, pictorial stimuli. Match-to-sample baselines for eight four-member classes were established under the contextual control of two colors. In the presence of one color, conditional relations were established between stimuli whose normative names rhymed. In the presence of the other color, conditional relations were established between stimuli whose normative names did not rhyme. Although, during Experiment 1, all participants demonstrated equivalence classes involving rhyming stimuli, none demonstrated the formation of nonrhyme equivalence classes. To investigate this finding, Experiment 2 evaluated whether participants would demonstrate both rhyme and nonrhyme equivalence classes given more extensive exposure to the experimental contingencies. All participants demonstrated contextually controlled rhyme and nonrhyme equivalence classes, although rhyme classes were demonstrated with greater facility than nonrhyme classes. Results indicate that visual stimuli are named, that verbal bases for stimulus classification can affect the emergence of contextually controlled equivalence classes, and that untrained contextually controlled conditional discriminations involving novel stimuli can emerge on the basis of participants' verbal behavior. PMID:17191757

  19. Equivalent Mass versus Life Cycle Cost for Life Support Technology Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The decision to develop a particular life support technology or to select it for flight usually depends on the cost to develop and fly it. Other criteria - performance, safety, reliability, crew time, and risk - are considered, but cost is always an important factor. Because launch cost accounts for most of the cost of planetary missions, and because launch cost is directly proportional to the mass launched, equivalent mass has been used instead of cost to select life support technology. The equivalent mass of a life support system includes the estimated masses of the hardware and of the pressurized volume, power supply, and cooling system that the hardware requires. The equivalent mass is defined as the total payload launch mass needed to provide and support the system. An extension of equivalent mass, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), has been established for use in Advanced Life Support. A crew time mass-equivalent and sometimes other non-mass factors are added to equivalent mass to create ESM. Equivalent mass is an estimate of the launch cost only. For earth orbit rather than planetary missions, the launch cost is usually exceeded by the cost of Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDT&E). Equivalent mass is used only in life support analysis. Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is much more commonly used. LCC includes DDT&E, launch, and operations costs. Since LCC includes launch cost, it is always a more accurate cost estimator than equivalent mass. The relative costs of development, launch, and operations vary depending on the mission design, destination, and duration. Since DDT&E or operations may cost more than launch, LCC may give a more accurate cost ranking than equivalent mass. To be sure of identifying the lowest cost technology for a particular mission, we should use LCC rather than equivalent mass.

  20. Forced mixer lobes in ejector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, W. M., Jr.; Morin, B. L.; Gousy, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Forced mixer lobes in augmentor primary ejectors obtain a 100-percent increase in pumping over conventional design, together with nearly complete mixing in very short mixing ducts, through the generation of large scale axial vorticity in the mixing duct. The vorticity causes rapid mixing of the primary and secondary flows with low losses; since mixing length is minimized, wall friction losses are reduced, allowing more secondary flow to be pumped for a given total pressure in the primary flow. Analytical results are presented that are judged to have significant implications for future ejector test work.

  1. Stimulus equivalence: testing Sidman's (2000) theory.

    PubMed

    Minster, Sara Tepaeru; Jones, Max; Elliffe, Douglas; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D

    2006-05-01

    Sidman's (2000) theory regarding the origin of equivalence relations predicts that a reinforcing stimulus common to distinct equivalence classes must drop out of the equivalence relations. This prediction was tested in the present study by arranging class-specific reinforcers, R1 and R2, following correct responding on the prerequisite conditional discriminations (Ax-Bx, Cx-Bx) for two stimulus classes, A1B1C1 and A2B2C2. A class-common reinforcer, R3, was presented following correct responding on the prerequisite conditional discriminations for a further two stimulus classes, A3B3C3 and A4B4C4. Sidman's theory predicts reinforcer inclusion within Classes 1 and 2 only, given this training arrangement. Experiment 1 tested for the emergence of four equivalence classes and of stimulus-reinforcer and reinforcer-stimulus relations in each class. Four of the 6 subjects demonstrated the reinforcer-based relations in all four equivalence classes, rather than in only those classes with a class-specific reinforcer, as Sidman's theory predicts. One of the remaining 2 subjects showed the reinforcer-based relations in three of the four classes. Experiment 2 extended these findings to document the emergence of interclass matching relations based on the common reinforcer R3, in 5 of 6 subjects, such that a Class 3 sample occasioned the selection of a Class 4 sample when the Class 3 comparison was absent, and similarly, a Class 4 sample occasioned the selection of a Class 3 comparison when the Class 4 comparison was absent. These interclass relations emerged despite the simultaneous maintenance of Class 3 and 4 baseline conditional discriminations, so that the Class 3 and 4 stimuli and reinforcer simultaneously were, and were not, part of a single larger equivalence class. These data are irreconcilable with Sidman's theory, and question the utility of the application of the equivalence relation in describing derived stimulus relations.

  2. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  3. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  4. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1997-01-14

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

  5. Efficient identification of equivalences in dynamic graphs and pedigree structures.

    PubMed

    Koepke, Hoyt; Thompson, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    We propose a new framework for designing test and query functions for complex structures that vary across a given parameter such as genetic marker position. The operations we are interested in include equality testing, set operations, isolating unique states, duplication counting, or finding equivalence classes under identifiability constraints. A motivating application is locating equivalence classes in identity-by-descent (IBD) graphs, which are graph structures in pedigree analysis that change over genetic marker location. The nodes of these graphs are unlabeled and identified only by their connecting edges, a constraint easily handled by our approach. The general framework introduced is powerful enough to build a range of testing functions for IBD graphs, dynamic populations, and other structures using a minimal set of operations. The theoretical and algorithmic properties of our approach are analyzed and proved. Computational results on several simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:23899011

  6. The New Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature Chart.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osczevski, Randall; Bluestein, Maurice

    2005-10-01

    The formula used in the U.S. and Canada to express the combined effect of wind and low temperature on how cold it feels was changed in November 2001. Many had felt that the old formula for equivalent temperature, derived in the 1960s from Siple and Passel's flawed but quite useful Wind Chill Index, unnecessarily exaggerated the severity of the weather. The new formula is based on a mathematical model of heat flow from the upwind side of a head-sized cylinder moving at walking speed into the wind. The paper details the assumptions that were made in generating the new wind chill charts. It also points out weaknesses in the concept of wind chill equivalent temperature, including its steady-state character and a seemingly paradoxical effect of the internal thermal resistance of the cylinder on comfort and equivalent temperature. Some improvements and alternatives are suggested.

  7. Equivalent magnetization over the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Hamoudi, M.; Choi, Y.; Thebault, E.; Quesnel, Y.; Roest, W. R.; Lesur, V.

    2012-12-01

    In another presentation (Hamoudi et al., this meeting), we present the construction of a new candidate for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) over oceanic areas. This map is based on: (a) a more realistic forward modeling of the marine magnetic anomalies which includes remanent magnetization vectors taking into account the age and motion of the oceanic lithosphere; (b) evaluation of the equivalent magnetization by comparison of the synthetic and observed anomalies along ship tracks; and (c) adjustment of the synthetic anomaly maps using this equivalent magnetization prior to merging with the observed anomalies. A by-product of this approach is a global distribution of equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean. Note that, because no global basement map exists for the oceanic areas, we assume a uniform, 5 km-deep and 1 km-thick magnetized layer for the forward model. The resulting equivalent magnetization is therefore relative to this over-simplistic magnetic source. A first observation is that, within the hypotheses of the forward model, the average equivalent magnetization is about 3 A/m, a value which compares well with the Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) measured on ancient basalt samples. As expected, the mid-ocean ridges are marked by stronger equivalent magnetizations, an observation which reflects both the stronger NRM measured at ridge axes and their shallower bathymetry (not taken into account in our forward model). More interesting is the observation of significant along-axis variations. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the Kolbeinsey and Reykjanes ridges around Iceland are marked by a very strong equivalent magnetization and the Azores Plateau by a strong one as well.. Again this may reflect the combined effect of shallower seafloor, thicker and/or more magnetized basaltic layer at hotspots. In contrast, the areas between 45 and 55°N and between 0 and 10°N (Equatorial FZ) correspond to a weak equivalent magnetization. Further south

  8. System Equivalent for Real Time Digital Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xi

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method of making system equivalents for the Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS), which should enhance its capability of simulating large power systems. The proposed equivalent combines a Frequency Dependent Network Equivalent (FDNE) for the high frequency electromagnetic transients and a Transient Stability Analysis (TSA) type simulation block for the electromechanical transients. The frequency dependent characteristic for FDNE is obtained by curve-fitting frequency domain admittance characteristics using the Vector Fitting method. An approach for approximating the frequency dependent characteristic of large power networks from readily available typical power-flow data is also introduced. A new scheme of incorporating TSA solution in RTDS is proposed. This report shows how the TSA algorithm can be adapted to a real time platform. The validity of this method is confirmed with examples, including the study of a multi in-feed HVDC system based network.

  9. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-15

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  10. Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.; Glashow, S.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Cheimets, P. N.; Finkelstein, N.; Schneps, M.

    2005-01-01

    This Annual Report illustrates the work carried out during the last grant-year activity on the Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator. The activity focused on the following main topics: (1) analysis and conceptual design of a detector configuration suitable for the flight tests; (2) development of techniques for extracting a small signal from data strings with colored and white noise; (3) design of the mechanism that spins and releases the instrument package inside the cryostat; and (4) experimental activity carried out by our non-US partners (a summary is shown in this report). The analysis and conceptual design of the flight-detector (point 1) was focused on studying the response of the differential accelerometer during free fall, in the presence of errors and precession dynamics, for various detector's configurations. The goal was to devise a detector configuration in which an Equivalence Principle violation (EPV) signal at the sensitivity threshold level can be successfully measured and resolved out of a much stronger dynamics-related noise and gravity gradient. A detailed analysis and comprehensive simulation effort led us to a detector's design that can accomplish that goal successfully.

  11. High School Equivalency Testing in Arizona. Forum: Responding to Changes in High School Equivalency Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the state of Arizona has used the General Educational Development (GED) Test to award the Arizona High School Equivalency (HSE) Diploma, as the GED Test was the only test available, recognized and accepted in the United States as the measure by which adults could demonstrate the educational attainment equivalent to high school…

  12. Electrophysiological Correlates of Stimulus Equivalence Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haimson, Barry; Wilkinson, Krista M.; Rosenquist, Celia; Ouimet, Carolyn; McIlvane, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Research reported here concerns neural processes relating to stimulus equivalence class formation. In Experiment 1, two types of word pairs were presented successively to normally capable adults. In one type, the words had related usage in English (e.g., uncle, aunt). In the other, the two words were not typically related in their usage (e.g.,…

  13. Equivalent weight of humic acid from peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    By means of discontinuous titration, the equivalent weight of humic acid isolated from a peat was found to increase from 144 to 183 between the third and fifty-second day after the humic acid was dissolved. Infra-red studies showed that the material had probably condensed with loss of carbonyl groups. ?? 1960.

  14. Procedures for Determining the Equivalence of Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunivant, Noel

    Eight different methods are reviewed for determining whether two or more tests are equivalent measures. These methods vary in restrictiveness from the Wilks-Votaw test of compound symmetry (which requires that all means, variances, and covariances are equal), to Joreskog's theory of congeneric tests (which requires only that the tests are measures…

  15. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  16. 33 CFR 155.120 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equivalents. 155.120 Section 155.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS General § 155.120...

  17. 33 CFR 155.120 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equivalents. 155.120 Section 155.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS General § 155.120...

  18. 33 CFR 155.120 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalents. 155.120 Section 155.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS General § 155.120...

  19. 33 CFR 155.120 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equivalents. 155.120 Section 155.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS General § 155.120...

  20. 33 CFR 155.120 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equivalents. 155.120 Section 155.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS General § 155.120...

  1. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  2. 21 CFR 26.39 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Equivalence assessment. 26.39 Section 26.39 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  3. 21 CFR 26.39 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Equivalence assessment. 26.39 Section 26.39 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT...

  4. AN UPDATE ON TECHNOLOGIES SEEKING PFRP EQUIVALENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will: 1) Review the mandate of the Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC), 2) Review the PEC's current membership (of 10), 3) Discuss how a typical application is evaluated, 4) Note where information can be found by those interested in applying to the PEC, 5) List...

  5. Equivalence Relations, Contextual Control, and Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Tom; Remington, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports two experiments that investigated the role of verbal behavior in the emergence and generalization of contextually controlled equivalence classes. During both experiments, participants were trained with two different combinations of the same easily nameable, yet formally unrelated, pictorial stimuli. Match-to-sample baselines for…

  6. HOW TO PASS HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY EXAMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAGSBRUN, FRANCINE, ED.

    ORGANIZED INTO A FIVE-DAY STUDY PLAN, ALLOWING ONE DAY'S STUDY TO EACH PART OF THE EQUIVALENCY EXAMINATION (SPELLING AND GRAMMAR, SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND MATHEMATICS), THIS BOOK PROVIDES SAMPLE TESTS AND ANSWER SHEETS, A TEST SCORE RECORD AND SELF EVALUATION PROFILE, AND SUPPLEMENTARY TESTS FOR EACH SUBJECT. THE EXAMINEE CAN ORDER…

  7. Spin-Gravity Interactions and Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yu. N.; Silenko, A. J.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    The spin-gravity interactions imply the new manifestation of the equivalence principle leading to the absence of gravitoelectric and anomalous gravitomagnetic moments for fermions. This property is still valid in the presence of the space-time torsion due to the covariance arguments. The experimental bounds for the torsion, which may be extracted from modern co-magnetometer experiments, are discussed.

  8. The equivalent fundamental-mode source

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G.D.; Busch, R.D.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okajima, Shigeaki

    1997-02-01

    In 1960, Hansen analyzed the problem of assembling fissionable material in the presence of a weak neutron source. Using point kinetics, he defined the weak source condition and analyzed the consequences of delayed initiation during ramp reactivity additions. Although not clearly stated in Hansen`s work, the neutron source strength that appears in the weak source condition corresponds to the equivalent fundamental-mode source. In this work, we describe the concept of an equivalent fundamental-mode source and we derive a deterministic expression for a factor, g*, that converts any arbitrary source distribution to an equivalent fundamental-mode source. We also demonstrate a simplified method for calculating g* in subcritical systems. And finally, we present a new experimental method that can be employed to measure the equivalent fundamental-mode source strength in a multiplying assembly. We demonstrate the method on the zero-power, XIX-1 assembly at the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) Facility, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  9. 20 CFR 404.1526 - Medical equivalence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical equivalence. 404.1526 Section 404.1526 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1526...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1526 - Medical equivalence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical equivalence. 404.1526 Section 404.1526 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1526...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1526 - Medical equivalence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical equivalence. 404.1526 Section 404.1526 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1526...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1526 - Medical equivalence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical equivalence. 404.1526 Section 404.1526 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1526...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1526 - Medical equivalence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical equivalence. 404.1526 Section 404.1526 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1526...

  14. Reading adn Auditory-Visual Equivalences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Murray

    1971-01-01

    A retarded boy, unable to read orally or with comprehension, was taught to match spoken to printed words and was then capable of reading comprehension (matching printed words to picture) and oral reading (naming printed words aloud), demonstrating that certain learned auditory-visual equivalences are sufficient prerequisites for reading…

  15. 33 CFR 67.01-30 - Equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalents. 67.01-30 Section 67.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements §...

  16. A quality index for equivalent uniform dose

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Francisco Cutanda; Castrillón, Silvia Vargas

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) is the absorbed dose that, when homogeneously given to a tumor, yields the same mean surviving clonogen number as the given non-homogeneous irradiation. EUD is used as an evaluation tool under the assumption that two plans with the same value of EUD are equivalent, and their biological effect on the tumor (clonogen survival) would be the same as the one of a homogeneous irradiation of absorbed dose EUD. In this work, this assumption has been studied, and a figure of merit of its applicability has been obtained. Distributions of surviving clonogen number for homogeneous and non-homogeneous irradiations are found to be different even if their mean values are the same, the figure of merit being greater when there is a wider difference, and the equivalence assumption being less valid. Therefore, EUD can be closer to a uniform dose for some cases than for other ones (high α values, extreme heterogeneity), and the accuracy of the radiobiological indices obtained for evaluation, could be affected. Results show that the equivalence is very sensitive to the choice of radiobiological parameters, and this conclusion has been derived from mathematical properties of EUD. PMID:21897557

  17. 21 CFR 26.6 - Equivalence assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equivalence assessment. 26.6 Section 26.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION... inspection reports), joint training, and joint inspections for the purpose of assessing regulatory...

  18. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dezhong; He, Bin

    2003-11-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  19. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.19 and 1.26 respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 2.05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1980-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performances of a low-aspect-ratio transonic compressor stage are presented over the stable operating flow range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.840 at pressure ratios of 2.056 and 2.000, respectively. The stage stall margin at design speed was 10 percent.

  20. The formation of visual stimulus equivalences in children.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, R M; Davis-Lang, D; Sanchez, L

    1984-01-01

    Four normal children were presented a series of matching-to-sample tasks, using five sets of visual stimuli designated A, B, C, D, and E. Stimulus equivalences were established by matching stimuli from one set to those from another set. Each set consisted of three stimuli, so matching set A to set D meant that each stimulus in set A served as a sample with all three stimuli in set D as comparisons. Subjects were first taught AD and DC matching and were then able to perform AC/CA matching without additional training. After ED was taught directly, CE/EC and AE/EA performances emerged. Following CB training, three new equivalences were demonstrated: AB/BA, EB/BE, and DB/BD. Oral naming of each stimulus showed that subjects had not assigned a common label to stimuli in the same class, indicating that naming is not necessary for the formation of stimulus equivalences. The absence of response mediation suggests that matching to sample can form direct stimulus-stimulus associations. The data also provide support for the notion that generative performances are outcomes of existing stimulus-control relationships. PMID:6736856

  1. Practical application of equivalent linearization approaches to nonlinear piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1995-05-01

    The use of mechanical energy absorbers as an alternative to conventional hydraulic and mechanical snubbers for piping supports has attracted a wide interest among researchers and practitioners in the nuclear industry. The basic design concept of energy absorbers (EA) is to dissipate the vibration energy of piping systems through nonlinear hysteretic actions of EA!s under design seismic loads. Therefore, some type of nonlinear analysis needs to be performed in the seismic design of piping systems with EA supports. The equivalent linearization approach (ELA) can be a practical analysis tool for this purpose, particularly when the response approach (RSA) is also incorporated in the analysis formulations. In this paper, the following ELA/RSA methods are presented and compared to each other regarding their practice and numerical accuracy: Response approach using the square root of sum of squares (SRSS) approximation (denoted RS in this paper). Classical ELA based on modal combinations and linear random vibration theory (denoted CELA in this paper). Stochastic ELA based on direct solution of response covariance matrix (denoted SELA in this paper). New algorithms to convert response spectra to the equivalent power spectral density (PSD) functions are presented for both the above CELA and SELA methods. The numerical accuracy of the three EL are studied through a parametric error analysis. Finally, the practicality of the presented analysis is demonstrated in two application examples for piping systems with EA supports.

  2. Representing Identity and Equivalence for Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickett, K. M.; Sacchi, S.; Dubin, D.; Renear, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Matters of equivalence and identity are central to the stewardship of scientific data. In order to properly prepare for and manage the curation, preservation and sharing of digitally-encoded data, data stewards must be able to characterize and assess the relationships holding between data-carrying digital resources. However, identity-related questions about resources and their information content may not be straightforward to answer: for example, what exactly does it mean to say that two files contain the same data, but in different formats? Information content is frequently distinguished from particular representations, but there is no adequately developed shared understanding of what this really means and how the relationship between content and its representations hold. The Data Concepts group at the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS), University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, is developing a logic-based framework of fundamental concepts related to scientific data to support curation and integration. One project goal is to develop precise accounts of information resources carrying the same data. We present two complementary conceptual models for information representation: the Basic Representation Model (BRM) and the Systematic Assertion Model (SAM). We show how these models provide an analytical account of digitally-encoded scientific data and a precise understanding of identity and equivalence. The Basic Representation Model identifies the core entities and relationships involved in representing information carried by digital objects. In BRM, digital objects are symbol structures that express propositional content, and stand in layered encoding relationships. For example, an RDF description may be serialized as either XML or N3, and those expressions in turn may be encoded as either UTF-8 or UTF-16 sequences. Defining this encoding stack reveals distinctions necessary for a precise account of identity and equivalence

  3. Performance of low pressure tissue equivalent chambers and a new method for parameterizing the dose equivalent

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, Y.; Vasilik, D.G.; Brake, R.J.; Erkkila, B.H.; Littlejohn, G.J.

    1986-09-01

    The performance of spherical tissue equivalent chambers with equivalent diameters between 0.5 and 2..mu.. was tested experimentally using monoenergetic and polyenergetic neutron sources in the energy region of 10 keV to 14.5 MeV. Theoretical calculations were performed in order to obtain a simple algorithm for deriving the dose equivalent from the measured data. The algorithm relates the number of recoil particles to the dose equivalent, rather than having a one-to-one correspondence between the lineal energy and the linear energy transfer of the recoil particles. The calculations took into account neutron interactions with hydrogen atoms in the chamber wall as well as in the gas, and also the finite energy resolution determined by both the detector and the electronic system. Qualitatively, the calculations well dscribe the experimental results. The algorithm that was developed determines the neutron dose equivalent, from the data of the 0.5..mu.. chamber, to better than +-20% over the energy range of 30 keV to 14.5 MeV. The same algorithm also determines the dose equivalent from the data of the 2..mu.. chamber to better than +-20% over the energy of 70 keV to 14.5 MeV. The efficiency of the chambers is low and has an average value of 330 counts per mrem, or equivalently about 0.2 c/s per mrem/h. This efficiency enables the measurement of dose equivalent rates only above 100 mrem/h for an integration period of 3 seconds. However, integrated dose equivalents can be mesured as low as 0.1 mrem.

  4. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Paul

    1994-01-01

    This grant provided support for the STEP (Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle) program between October 1991 and September 1993. STEP, previously supported by NASA under Grant NAG8-837 'A Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle,' was selected by the European Space Agency for a Phase A study as a candidate for ESA's next medium size mission (M2). STEP was conceived as a joint NASA/ESA mission with equal participation by both agencies. ESA's contribution to the program would be the spacecraft; NASA would provide the launcher and half of the instrument, while the other half of the instrument would be provided by various European agencies. STEP was in competition with three other programs, INTEGRAL, PRISMA, and MARSNET. The final selection of a single mission for M2 took place in April 1993. STEP was not selected for M2 but made a very close second. The program is continuing in modified form.

  5. Equivalent dynamic model of DEMES rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; Xing, Zhiguang; McCoul, David; Niu, Junyang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by a small voltage-induced strain of the dielectric elastomer (DE), so it is a suitable candidate to make a rotary joint for a soft robot. Dynamic analysis is necessary for some applications, but the dynamic response of DEMESs is difficult to model because of the complicated morphology and viscoelasticity of the DE film. In this paper, a method composed of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement is presented to model the dynamic response of a DEMES rotary joint under an alternating voltage. Based on measurements of equivalent driving force and damping of the DEMES, the model can be derived. Some experiments were carried out to validate the equivalent dynamic model. The maximum angle error between model and experiment is greater than ten degrees, but it is acceptable to predict angular velocity of the DEMES, therefore, it can be applied in feedforward–feedback compound control.

  6. Anomalies, equivalence and renormalization of cosmological frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Valea, Mario

    2016-05-01

    We study the question of whether two frames of a given physical theory are equivalent or not in the presence of quantum corrections. By using field theory arguments, we claim that equivalence is broken in the presence of anomalous symmetries in one of the frames. This is particularized to the case of the relation between the Einstein and Jordan frames in scalar-tensor theories used to describe early Universe dynamics. Although in this case a regularization that cancels the anomaly exists, the renormalized theory always develops a nonvanishing contribution to the S matrix that is present only in the Jordan frame, promoting the different frames to different physical theories that must be UV completed in a different way.

  7. Physicochemical equivalence of chloroquine phosphate tablets.

    PubMed

    Bamiro, O A; Odeniyi, M A; Idowu, O B; Jaiyeoba, K T

    2004-12-01

    Seven brands of chloroquine phosphate tablets sourced from different retail outlets in the South-West Nigerian market were analysed in order to determine their physicochemical equivalence. The assessment parameters included uniformity of weight, friability, crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution tests and chemical assay of the tablets. All the brands passed the British Pharmacopoeia tests for weight uniformity, disintegration time and dissolution rate. Two brands, C and E passed the minimum criterion for crushing strength, four brands passed the friability test and two brands exceeded the specified amount of active drug content for chloroquine tablets. Only one brand C out of the seven brands that were analysed passed all the BP quality specifications. Hence none of the seven brands analysed could said to be physically and chemically equivalent. This study highlights the need for constant market monitoring of new products in order to ascertain their quality. PMID:15977447

  8. Are All Wrong FCI Answers Equivalent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedic, Helena; Rosenfield, Steven; Lasry, Nathaniel

    2010-10-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has been efficiently used to assess conceptual learning in mechanics. Each FCI question has one Newtonian answer and four wrong answers (distracters). Researchers and practitioners most frequently use measures of total score to assess learning. Yet, are all wrong answers equivalent? We conducted Latent Markov Chain Modeling (LMCM) analyses of all choices (right and wrong) on a subset of four FCI questions. LMCM assesses whether there are groups of students sharing similar patterns of responses. We infer that students sharing similar patterns also share similar reasoning. Our results show seven reasoning-groups. LMCM also computes probabilities of transition from one reasoning-group to another after instruction. Examining transitions between groups, we note a clear hierarchy. Groups at the top of the hierarchy are comprised of students that use Newtonian thinking more consistently but also choose certain wrong answers more frequently; suggesting that not all wrong answers are equivalent.

  9. Explosive materials equivalency, test methods and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koger, D. M.; Mcintyre, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to concepts of explosive equivalency of energetic materials based on specific airblast parameters. A description is provided of a wide bandwidth high accuracy instrumentation system which has been used extensively in obtaining pressure time profiles of energetic materials. The object of the considered test method is to determine the maximum output from the detonation of explosive materials in terms of airblast overpressure and positive impulse. The measured pressure and impulse values are compared with known characteristics of hemispherical TNT data to determine the equivalency of the test material in relation to TNT. An investigation shows that meaningful comparisons between various explosives and a standard reference material such as TNT should be based upon the same parameters. The tests should be conducted under the same conditions.

  10. Capacitors with low equivalent series resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Patrick Franz (Inventor); Lakeman, Charles D. E. (Inventor); Fuge, Mark (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) in a coin or button cell configuration having low equivalent series resistance (ESR). The capacitor comprises mesh or other porous metal that is attached via conducting adhesive to one or both the current collectors. The mesh is embedded into the surface of the adjacent electrode, thereby reducing the interfacial resistance between the electrode and the current collector, thus reducing the ESR of the capacitor.

  11. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ∼40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  12. Quantum mechanics from an equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1997-05-15

    The authors show that requiring diffeomorphic equivalence for one-dimensional stationary states implies that the reduced action S{sub 0} satisfies the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Planck constant playing the role of a covariantizing parameter. The construction shows the existence of a fundamental initial condition which is strictly related to the Moebius symmetry of the Legendre transform and to its involutive character. The universal nature of the initial condition implies the Schroedinger equation in any dimension.

  13. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  14. The Otto-engine-equivalent vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Couch, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    A vehicle comparison methodology based on the Otto-Engine Equivalent (OEE) vehicle concept is described. As an illustration of this methodology, the concept is used to make projections of the fuel economy potential of passenger cars using various alternative power systems. Sensitivities of OEE vehicle results to assumptions made in the calculational procedure are discussed. Factors considered include engine torque boundary, rear axle ratio, performance criteria, engine transient response, and transmission shift logic.

  15. Microwave Radar Retrieval of Snow Water Equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Rott, H.; Nagler, T. F.; Cline, D. W.; Duguay, C. R.; Essery, R.; Etchevers, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kern, M.; Macelloni, G.; Malnes, E.; Pulliainen, J. T.; Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Marshall, H.; Elder, K.

    2010-12-01

    Fresh water stored in snow on land is an important component of the global water cycle. In many regions of the world it is vital to health and commerce. To make global observations of snow water equivalent (SWE), the Cold Regions Hydrology High Resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) candidate mission based on X- and Ku-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies is currently going through the Phase-A study, sponsored by the European Space Agency. In addition, the Snow and Cold Land Processes (SCLP) mission, also based on the dual-frequency SAR concept, was one of the satellite missions recommended for future NASA implementation. The frequency range for the CoReH2O and SCLP microwave radar, chosen to optimize the sensitivity to volumetric snowpack properties, is 8-18 GHz (X- and Ku-bands). The overall radar SWE measurement principle has been demonstrated by measurements in 1980s-1990s and more recently the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiments in Colorado and Alaska, 2006-2008, the SARALPS-2007 and Helisnow-2008 campaigns in Europe. Ku-band has the capability to estimate SWE in shallow snowpacks, while X-band provides greater penetration for deeper snow. A dual-polarization (VV and VH) SAR will enable discrimination of the radar backscatter into volume and background vegetation/surface components, while the dual frequency design offers the capability of resolving a wide range of snow depths and snow grains. The baseline CoReH2O algorithm statistically minimizes the differences between radar measurements and radiative transfer model for snowpack. The performance of the retrieval algorithm has been studied with Ku- and X-band backscatter data measured by ground-based scatterometers at test sites in the Austrian Alps. The algorithm has also been applied to the airborne POLSCAT and satellite TerraSAR-X data acquired for the CLPX-II Kuparuk River Study Site in the tundra region of northern Alaska. The comparison with the field measurements reveals a RMSE of 0.7 cm for SWE

  16. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number ( Zeff), electron density ( ρe), photon mass attenuation coefficient ( μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient ( μen/ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ)tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( <1%) to that of water except PAGAT, MAGAT and NIPAM which had the variation of 3%, 2% and 3%, respectively. The value of μ/ρ and μen/ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( <1%) with that of water beyond 80 keV. The value of (S/ρ)tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy ( <80 keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application.

  17. Measurement equivalence in mixed mode surveys.

    PubMed

    Hox, Joop J; De Leeuw, Edith D; Zijlmans, Eva A O

    2015-01-01

    Surveys increasingly use mixed mode data collection (e.g., combining face-to-face and web) because this controls costs and helps to maintain good response rates. However, a combination of different survey modes in one study, be it cross-sectional or longitudinal, can lead to different kinds of measurement errors. For example, respondents in a face-to-face survey or a web survey may interpret the same question differently, and might give a different answer, just because of the way the question is presented. This effect of survey mode on the question-answer process is called measurement mode effect. This study develops methodological and statistical tools to identify the existence and size of mode effects in a mixed mode survey. In addition, it assesses the size and importance of mode effects in measurement instruments using a specific mixed mode panel survey (Netherlands Kinship Panel Study). Most measurement instruments in the NKPS are multi-item scales, therefore confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) will be used as the main analysis tool, using propensity score methods to correct for selection effects. The results show that the NKPS scales by and large have measurement equivalence, but in most cases only partial measurement equivalence. Controlling for respondent differences on demographic variables, and on scale scores from the previous uni-mode measurement occasion, tends to improve measurement equivalence, but not for all scales. The discussion ends with a review of the implications of our results for analyses employing these scales.

  18. Measurement equivalence in mixed mode surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hox, Joop J.; De Leeuw, Edith D.; Zijlmans, Eva A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surveys increasingly use mixed mode data collection (e.g., combining face-to-face and web) because this controls costs and helps to maintain good response rates. However, a combination of different survey modes in one study, be it cross-sectional or longitudinal, can lead to different kinds of measurement errors. For example, respondents in a face-to-face survey or a web survey may interpret the same question differently, and might give a different answer, just because of the way the question is presented. This effect of survey mode on the question-answer process is called measurement mode effect. This study develops methodological and statistical tools to identify the existence and size of mode effects in a mixed mode survey. In addition, it assesses the size and importance of mode effects in measurement instruments using a specific mixed mode panel survey (Netherlands Kinship Panel Study). Most measurement instruments in the NKPS are multi-item scales, therefore confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) will be used as the main analysis tool, using propensity score methods to correct for selection effects. The results show that the NKPS scales by and large have measurement equivalence, but in most cases only partial measurement equivalence. Controlling for respondent differences on demographic variables, and on scale scores from the previous uni-mode measurement occasion, tends to improve measurement equivalence, but not for all scales. The discussion ends with a review of the implications of our results for analyses employing these scales. PMID:25699002

  19. Semantic relatedness for evaluation of course equivalencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Beibei

    Semantic relatedness, or its inverse, semantic distance, measures the degree of closeness between two pieces of text determined by their meaning. Related work typically measures semantics based on a sparse knowledge base such as WordNet or Cyc that requires intensive manual efforts to build and maintain. Other work is based on a corpus such as the Brown corpus, or more recently, Wikipedia. This dissertation proposes two approaches to applying semantic relatedness to the problem of suggesting transfer course equivalencies. Two course descriptions are given as input to feed the proposed algorithms, which output a value that can be used to help determine if the courses are equivalent. The first proposed approach uses traditional knowledge sources such as WordNet and corpora for courses from multiple fields of study. The second approach uses Wikipedia, the openly-editable encyclopedia, and it focuses on courses from a technical field such as Computer Science. This work shows that it is promising to adapt semantic relatedness to the education field for matching equivalencies between transfer courses. A semantic relatedness measure using traditional knowledge sources such as WordNet performs relatively well on non-technical courses. However, due to the "knowledge acquisition bottleneck," such a resource is not ideal for technical courses, which use an extensive and growing set of technical terms. To address the problem, this work proposes a Wikipedia-based approach which is later shown to be more correlated to human judgment compared to previous work.

  20. Equivalent gravity modes - An interim evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Hong, S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of the main solar semidiurnal tidal mode in a dissipative atmosphere is studied both in a rotating spherical atmosphere and by means of the equivalent gravity mode approximation. Coefficients are chosen to crudely simulate the effects of molecular viscosity and conductivity. Major findings are: (1) Below 130 km, where friction is unimportant, equivalent gravity mode results are, for all practical purposes, identical to those at the equator obtained from a spherical calculation. (2) Above 130 km amplitudes over the equator obtained from the spherical calculation are about 30 percent smaller than those obtained from the equivalent gravity mode calculations. Also, there is a 15 deg (1/2 hour) difference in phase. (3) The amplitude reduction over the equator, is associated with a broadening of the latitude distribution of amplitude for the oscillatory pressure and temperature fields within the thermosphere. There is also significant variation of phase with latitude within the thermosphere. Associated with the above variations are significant changes in the latitude distribution of horizontal velocity within the thermosphere.

  1. Q-Markov covariance equivalent realization and its application to flexible structure identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ketao; Skelton, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The Q-Markov covariance equivalent realization algorithm is applied to NASA's Minimast structure to identify state-space models for the purpose of designing closed-loop controllers, and laboratory test results are shown for the identification and for the closed-loop performance. The paper also presents for the first time a deterministic formulation of covariance parameters from a pulse response, a stochastic formulation of Markov parameters from a white-noise response, and a simple Q-Markov covariance equivalent realization formulation. This requires only pulse laboratory tests or only white-noise laboratory tests to generate Q-Markov covariance equivalent realizations.

  2. 'Equivalence of care' in prison medicine: is equivalence of process the right measure of equity?

    PubMed

    Charles, Anna; Draper, Heather

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, the principle of equivalence has been accepted in many countries as the standard against which healthcare provision for prisoners should be measured. There are several ways in which this principle can be interpreted, but current policy in the UK and elsewhere seems to focus on the measurement and achievement of equivalence in the process of healthcare provision. We argue that it is not appropriate to apply this interpretation to all aspects of prisoner healthcare, as it does not necessarily address the challenges inherent to the prisoner population and prison setting. Consequently equivalence of health outcomes should also be considered alongside processes in the interests of providing healthcare in prison that is equivalent to that outside prison.

  3. Equivalent Structures on Sets: Equivalence Classes, Partitions and Fiber Structures of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, May

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on how students can be led to make meaningful connections between such structures on a set as a partition, the set of equivalence classes determined by an equivalence relation and the fiber structure of a function on that set (i.e., the set of preimages of all sets {b} for b in the range of the function). In this paper, I first…

  4. Applying the Interaction Equivalency Theorem to Online Courses in a Large Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia Padilla; Armellini, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Finding effective ways of designing online courses is a priority for corporate organizations. The interaction equivalency theorem states that meaningful learning can be achieved as long as courses are designed with at least a high level of one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner). This study aimed to…

  5. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    If the dark matter in galaxies and clusters is nonbaryonic, it can interact with additional long-range fields that are invisible to experimental tests of the equivalence principle. The astrophysical and cosmological implications of a long-range force coupled only to the dark matter are discussed and rather tight constraints on its strength are found. If the force is repulsive (attractive), the masses of galaxy groups and clusters (and the mean density of the universe inferred from them) have been systematically underestimated (overestimated). Such an interaction also has unusual implications for the growth of large-scale structure.

  6. Mechanical equivalent of quantum heat engines.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Jacques; Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice

    2008-06-01

    Quantum heat engines employ as working agents multilevel systems instead of classical gases. We show that under some conditions quantum heat engines are equivalent to a series of reservoirs at different altitudes containing balls of various weights. A cycle consists of picking up at random a ball from one reservoir and carrying it to the next, thereby performing or absorbing some work. In particular, quantum heat engines, employing two-level atoms as working agents, are modeled by reservoirs containing balls of weight 0 or 1. The mechanical model helps us prove that the maximum efficiency of quantum heat engines is the Carnot efficiency. Heat pumps and negative temperatures are considered.

  7. Tissue equivalent proportional counter neutron monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.C.; Strode, J.N.

    1980-06-01

    The Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a sensitive area monitoring instrument that can be used either in place at fixed locations or as a portable neutron exposure measuring device. The system monitors low levels of neutron radiation exposure and has the capability of accurately measuring neutron exposure rates as low as 0.1 mrem/hr. The computerized analysis system calculates the quality factor which is important for situations where the neutron to gamma ratio may vary significantly and irregularly such as in fuel fabrication or handling facilities.

  8. The equivalence principle in a quantum world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Donoghue, John F.; El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal; Holstein, Barry R.; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    We show how modern methods can be applied to quantum gravity at low energy. We test how quantum corrections challenge the classical framework behind the equivalence principle (EP), for instance through introduction of nonlocality from quantum physics, embodied in the uncertainty principle. When the energy is small, we now have the tools to address this conflict explicitly. Despite the violation of some classical concepts, the EP continues to provide the core of the quantum gravity framework through the symmetry — general coordinate invariance — that is used to organize the effective field theory (EFT).

  9. Galilean Equivalence for Galactic Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Satellite galaxies are tidally disrupted as they orbit the Milky Way. If dark matter (DM) experiences a stronger self-attraction than baryons, stars will preferentially gain rather than lose energy during tidal disruption, leading to an enhancement in the trailing compared to the leading tidal stream. The Sgr dwarf galaxy is seen to have roughly equal streams, challenging models in which DM and baryons accelerate differently by more than 10%. Future observations and a better understanding of DM distribution should allow detection of equivalence violation at the percent level.

  10. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2015-02-01

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  11. Toxic equivalence factors, problems and limitations.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H G

    1996-01-01

    It is a particular problem to set tolerance levels for mixtures containing chemicals classified as carcinogens. In the case of chlorinated dioxin and furan congeners, 'toxicity equivalence factors' (TEFs) were introduced. This concept has problems in itself and cannot be readily transferred to other mixtures, such as those of monocyclic nitroarenes in wastes of trinitrotoluene (TNT)-based explosives. The difficulties in finding suitable endpoints to compare the components are discussed (methaemoglobin formation; quantitative structure-activity relationships; mutagenicity; carcinogenicity). An alternative approach for the development tolerance levels in this instance is based on results obtained by measuring haemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of the most prevalent mixture components in humans.

  12. Seismic design technology for Breeder Reactor structures. Volume 3: special topics in reactor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: analysis techniques, equivalent damping values, probabilistic design factors, design verifications, equivalent response cycles for fatigue analysis, and seismic isolation. (JDB)

  13. Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.; Glashow, S.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Cheimets, P. N.; Finkelstein, N.; Schneps, M.

    2004-01-01

    The scientific goal of the experiment is to test the equality of gravitational and inertial mass (i.e., to test the Principle of Equivalence) by measuring the independence of the rate of fall of bodies from their compositions. The measurement is accomplished by measuring the relative displacement (or equivalently acceleration) of two falling bodies of different materials which are the proof masses of a differential accelerometer spinning about an horizontal axis to modulate a possible violation signal. A non-zero differential acceleration appearing at the signal frequency will indicate a violation of the Equivalence Principle. The goal of the experiment is to measure the Eotvos ratio og/g (differential acceleration/common acceleration) with a targeted accuracy that is about two orders of magnitude better than the state of the art (presently at several parts in 10(exp 13). The analyses carried out during this first grant year have focused on: (1) evaluation of possible shapes for the proof masses to meet the requirements on the higher-order mass moment disturbances generated by the falling capsule; (2) dynamics of the instrument package and differential acceleration measurement in the presence of errors and imperfections; (3) computation of the inertia characteristic of the instrument package that enable a separation of the signal from the dynamics-related noise; (4) a revised thermal analysis of the instrument package in light of the new conceptual design of the cryostat; (5) the development of a dynamic and control model of the capsule attached to the gondola and balloon to define the requirements for the leveling mechanism (6) a conceptual design of the leveling mechanism that keeps the capsule aligned before release from the balloon; and (7) a new conceptual design of the customized cryostat and a preliminary valuation of its cost. The project also involves an international cooperation with the Institute of Space Physics (IFSI) in Rome, Italy. The group at IFSI

  14. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  15. Learning Skinner's Verbal Operants: Comparing an Online Stimulus Equivalence Procedure to an Assigned Reading.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Ninness, Chris; Muñoz, Bridget E; Mellor, James

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of an online stimulus equivalence procedure to that of an assigned reading when learning Skinner's taxonomy of verbal behavior. Twenty-six graduate students participated via an online learning management system. One group was exposed to an online stimulus equivalence procedure (equivalence group) that was designed to teach relations among the names, antecedents, consequences, and examples of each elementary verbal operant. A comparison group (reading group) read a chapter from a popular textbook. Tests for the emergence of selection-based and topography-based intraverbal responses were then conducted, as were tests for generalization and maintenance. Overall, results suggest that the online equivalence procedure was not significantly more effective in promoting topography-based responses than the assigned reading. However, performance on selection-based tests was enhanced by the online equivalence procedure as was performance on topography-based tests when participants were required to provide operant names in response to consequences or examples. On average, the equivalence group performed at a level that was 10 percentage points (i.e., a full letter grade) above that of the reading group. The viability of the equivalence-based procedure is discussed in relation to the assigned reading. PMID:27606215

  16. Functional equivalence and spatial path memory.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Don R; Gunzelmann, Glenn M

    2011-11-01

    Loomis, Klatzky, Avraamides, Lippa and Golledge ( 2007 ) suggest that, when it comes to spatial information, verbal description and perceptual experience are nearly functionally equivalent with respect to the cognitive representations they produce. We tested this idea for the case of spatial memory for complex paths. Paths consisted entirely of unit-length segments followed by 90-degree turns, thus assuring that a path could be described with equal precision using either an egocentric verbal description or a virtual self-motion experience. The verbal description was analogous to driving directions (e.g., turn left and go one block, then turn right, etc.) except in three dimensions (allowing rotation followed by up or down movement). Virtual self-motion was depicted as first-person travel through a 3D grid of featureless corridors. Comparison of these two conditions produced a result that may be surprising to some, but nevertheless appears to support the notion of functional equivalence: Virtual self-motion does not produce better path memory than verbal description, when care is taken to present equally precise path information. This result holds for even very complex paths and despite evidence from proximity-based interference that the memory representation of the path is spatial.

  17. Equivalence of trans paths in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Juan; Hajek, Bruce

    2006-04-01

    We explore stochastic models for the study of ion transport in biological cells. Analysis of these models explains and explores an interesting feature of ion transport observed by biophysicists. Namely, the average time it takes ions to cross certain ion channels is the same in either direction, even if there is an electric potential difference across the channels. It is shown for simple single ion models that the distribution of a path (i.e., the history of location versus time) of an ion crossing the channel in one direction has the same distribution as the time-reversed path of an ion crossing the channel in the reverse direction. Therefore, not only is the mean duration of these paths equal, but other measures, such as the variance of passage time or the mean time a path spends within a specified section of the channel, are also the same for both directions of traversal. The feature is also explored for channels with interacting ions. If a system of interacting ions is in reversible equilibrium (net flux is zero), then the equivalence of the left-to-right trans paths with the time-reversed right-to-left trans paths still holds. However, if the system is in equilibrium, but not reversible equilibrium, then such equivalence need not hold.

  18. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  19. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  20. Breaking of Ensemble Equivalence in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squartini, Tiziano; de Mol, Joey; den Hollander, Frank; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-12-01

    It is generally believed that, in the thermodynamic limit, the microcanonical description as a function of energy coincides with the canonical description as a function of temperature. However, various examples of systems for which the microcanonical and canonical ensembles are not equivalent have been identified. A complete theory of this intriguing phenomenon is still missing. Here we show that ensemble nonequivalence can manifest itself also in random graphs with topological constraints. We find that, while graphs with a given number of links are ensemble equivalent, graphs with a given degree sequence are not. This result holds irrespective of whether the energy is nonadditive (as in unipartite graphs) or additive (as in bipartite graphs). In contrast with previous expectations, our results show that (1) physically, nonequivalence can be induced by an extensive number of local constraints, and not necessarily by long-range interactions or nonadditivity, (2) mathematically, nonequivalence is determined by a different large-deviation behavior of microcanonical and canonical probabilities for a single microstate, and not necessarily for almost all microstates. The latter criterion, which is entirely local, is not restricted to networks and holds in general.

  1. An Analysis of the Historical Regression Method of Predicting Posttest Grade Equivalents for Categorically-Aided Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hick, Thomas L.; Irvine, David J.

    To eliminate maturation as a factor in the pretest-posttest design, pretest scores can be converted to anticipate posttest scores using grade equivalent scores from standardized tests. This conversion, known as historical regression, assumes that without specific intervention, growth will continue at the rate (grade equivalents per year of…

  2. Nodal equivalence theory for hexagonal geometry, thermal reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.; Downar, T. )

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of advanced nodal methods is the determination of equivalent few-group parameters for the relatively large homogenized regions used in the nodal flux solution. The theoretical foundation for light water reactor (LWR) assembly homogenization methods has been clearly established, and during the last several years, its successes have secured its position in the stable of dependable LWR analysis methods. Groupwise discontinuity factors that correct for assembly homogenization errors are routinely generated along with the group constants during lattice physics analysis. During the last several years, there has been interest in applying equivalence theory to other reactor types and other geometries. A notable effort has been the work at Argonne National Laboratory to incorporate nodal equivalence theory (NET) for hexagonal lattices into the nodal diffusion option of the DIF3D code. This work was originally intended to improve the neutronics methods used for the analysis of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), and Ref. 4 discusses the success of that application. More recently, however, attempts were made to apply NET to advanced, thermal reactor designs such as the modular high-temperature gas reactor (MHTGR) and the new production heavy water reactor (NPR/HWR). The same methods that were successful for EBR-II have encountered problems for these reactors. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the sharp global flux gradients in these cores requires large discontinuity factors (greater than 4 or 5) to reproduce the reference solution. This disrupts the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node-wise flux moments and partial currents. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made over the last few years, including bounding the discontinuity factors and providing improved initial guesses for the flux solution, but nothing has been satisfactory.

  3. Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.

    2002-01-01

    The scientific goal of the experiment is to test the equality of gravitational and inertial mass (i.e., to test the Principle of Equivalence) by measuring the independence of the rate of fall of bodies from the composition of the falling body. The measurement is accomplished by measuring the relative displacement (or equivalently acceleration) of two falling bodies of different materials which are the proof masses of a differential accelerometer. The goal of the experiment is to measure the Eotvos ratio delta-g/g (differential acceleration/common acceleration) with an accuracy goal of a few parts in 10(exp 15). The estimated accuracy is about two orders of magnitude better than the present state of the art. The experiment is a null experiment in which a result different from zero will indicate a violation of the Equivalence Principle. The main goal of the study to be carried out under this grant is the flight definition of the experiment and bread boarding of critical components of the experiment that will enable us to be ready for the following phases of the project. The project involves an international cooperation in which the responsibility of the US side is the flight definition of the experimental facility while the responsibility of the non-US partners is the flight definition and laboratory prototyping of the differential acceleration detector. In summary, the experiment to be designed is for taking differential acceleration measurements with a high-sensitivity detector (the sensor) during free fall conditions lasting up to 30 s in a disturbance-free acceleration environment. The experiment strategy consists in letting the sensor free fall inside a few meters long (in the vertical direction) evacuated capsule that is falling simultaneously in the rarefied atmosphere after release from a helium balloon flying at a stratospheric altitude.

  4. 36 CFR 1192.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....2 Section 1192.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... these guidelines by use of other designs and technologies are permitted where the alternative designs... the procedure set forth in 49 CFR 37.7....

  5. Off-design correlation for losses due to part-span dampers on transonic rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. B.; Crouse, J. E.; Sandercock, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental data from 10 transonic fan rotors were used to correlate losses created by part-span dampers located near the midchord position on the rotor blades. The design tip speed of these rotors varied from 419 to 425 m/sec, and the design pressure ratio varied from 1.6 to 2.0. Additional loss caused by the dampers for operating conditions between 50 and 100 percent of design speed were correlated with relevant aerodynamic and geometric parameters. The resulting correlation predicts the variation of total-pressure-loss coefficient in the damper region to a good approximation.

  6. Performance of a transonic fan stage designed for a low meridional velocity ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Osborn, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance and design parameters of a transonic fan stage are presented. The fan stage was designed for a meridional velocity ratio of 0.8 across the tip of the stage, a pressure ratio of 1.57, a flow of 29.5 kilograms per second, and a tip speed of 426 meters per second. Radial surveys were obtained over the stable operating range from 50 to 100 percent of design speed. The measured, peak efficiency (0.81) of the stage occurred at a pressure ratio of 1.58 and a flow of 28.7 kilograms per second.

  7. Fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ye; Li, Ming; Shi, Nuannuan; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-10-01

    A fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. By employing an optical vector network analyzer (OVNA), transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are obtained. The influences of driven current on transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are also investigated. In addition to the advantage of integration, the proposed equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA also shows significant application in design of photonic devices for all-optical signal processing and computing.

  8. The relationship between stimulus equivalence and verbal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Genae A.; Chase, Philip N.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the apparent similarity between stimulus equivalence and verbal behavior, these phenomena have been described in different terms. With different terminologies for each phenomenon, the precise nature of their relationship is difficult to determine. To explore this relationship, this paper first defines stimulus equivalence using a synthesis of the mathematical definition of the equivalence relation and Sidman and Tailby's (1982) definition. Selected examples of stimulus equivalence are then described as verbal behavior using Skinner's (1957) terminology. The paper then cites instances of verbal behavior that cannot be described as stimulus equivalence and considers whether there are instances of stimulus equivalence that cannot be described as verbal behavior. PMID:22477634

  9. Equivalent Mass versus Life Cycle Cost for Life Support Technology Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The decision to develop a particular life support technology or to select it for flight usually depends on the cost to develop and fly it. Other criteria such as performance, safety, reliability, crew time, and technical and schedule risk are considered, but cost is always an important factor. Because launch cost would account for much of the cost of a future planetary mission, and because launch cost is directly proportional to the mass launched, equivalent mass has been used instead of cost to select advanced life support technology. The equivalent mass of a life support system includes the estimated mass of the hardware and of the spacecraft pressurized volume, power supply, and cooling system that the hardware requires. The equivalent mass of a system is defined as the total payload launch mass needed to provide and support the system. An extension of equivalent mass, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), has been established for use in the Advanced Life Support project. ESM adds a mass-equivalent of crew time and possibly other cost factors to equivalent mass. Traditional equivalent mass is strictly based on flown mass and reflects only the launch cost. ESM includes other important cost factors, but it complicates the simple flown mass definition of equivalent mass by adding a non-physical mass penalty for crew time that may exceed the actual flown mass. Equivalent mass is used only in life support analysis. Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is much more commonly used. LCC includes DDT&E, launch, and operations costs. For Earth orbit rather than planetary missions, the launch cost is less than the cost of Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDTBE). LCC is a more inclusive cost estimator than equivalent mass. The relative costs of development, launch, and operations vary depending on the mission destination and duration. Since DDTBE or operations may cost more than launch, LCC gives a more accurate relative cost ranking than equivalent mass. To select the lowest cost

  10. Development of an Equivalent Composite Honeycomb Model: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenackers, G.; Peeters, J.; Ribbens, B.; Vuye, C.

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis of complex geometries such as honeycomb composites, brings forth several difficulties. These problems are expressed primarily as high calculation times but also memory issues when solving these models. In order to bypass these issues, the main goal of this research paper is to define an appropriate equivalent model in order to minimize the complexity of the finite element model and thus minimize computation times. A finite element study is conducted on the design and analysis of equivalent layered models, substituting the honeycomb core in sandwich structures. A comparison is made between available equivalent models. An equivalent model with the right set of material property values is defined and benchmarked, consisting of one continuous layer with orthotropic elastic properties based on different available approximate formulas. This way the complex geometry does not need to be created while the model yields sufficiently accurate results.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength. PMID:24198726

  12. Numerical simulation on open wellbore shrinkage and casing equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Linzhi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength.

  13. Equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Erwan, T.; Lesur, V.

    2014-12-01

    As a by-product of our recent work to build a candidate model over the oceans for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) version 2, we derived global distributions of the equivalent magnetization in oceanic domains. In a first step, we use classic point source forward modeling on a spherical Earth to build a forward model of the marine magnetic anomalies at sea-surface. We estimate magnetization vectors using the age map of the ocean floor, the relative plate motions, the apparent polar wander path for Africa, and a geomagnetic reversal time scale. As magnetized source geometry, we assume 1 km-thick layer bearing a 10 A/m magnetization following the topography of the oceanic basement as defined by the bathymetry and sedimentary thickness. Adding a present-day geomagnetic field model allows the computation of our initial magnetic anomaly model. In a second step, we adjust this model to the existing marine magnetic anomaly data, in order to make it consistent with these data. To do so, we extract synthetic magnetic along the ship tracks for which real data are available and we compare quantitatively the measured and computed anomalies on 100, 200 or 400 km-long sliding windows (depending the spreading rate). Among the possible comparison criteria, we discard the maximal range - too dependent on local values - and the correlation and coherency - the geographical adjustment between model and data being not accurate enough - to favor the standard deviation around the mean value. The ratio between the standard deviations of data and model on each sliding window represent an estimate of the magnetization ratio causing the anomalies, which we interpolate to adjust the initial magnetic anomaly model to the data and therefore compute a final model to be included in our WDMAM candidate over the oceanic regions lacking data. The above ratio, after division by the magnetization of 10 A/m used in the model, represents an estimate of the equivalent magnetization under the

  14. Simulation of absolute amplitudes of ultrasound signals using equivalent circuits.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonny; Martinsson, Pär-Erik; Delsing, Jerker

    2007-10-01

    Equivalent circuits for piezoelectric devices and ultrasonic transmission media can be used to cosimulate electronics and ultrasound parts in simulators originally intended for electronics. To achieve efficient system-level optimization, it is important to simulate correct, absolute amplitude of the ultrasound signal in the system, as this determines the requirements on the electronics regarding dynamic range, circuit noise, and power consumption. This paper presents methods to achieve correct, absolute amplitude of an ultrasound signal in a simulation of a pulse-echo system using equivalent circuits. This is achieved by taking into consideration loss due to diffraction and the effect of the cable that connects the electronics and the piezoelectric transducer. The conductive loss in the transmission line that models the propagation media of the ultrasound pulse is used to model the loss due to diffraction. Results show that the simulated amplitude of the echo follows measured values well in both near and far fields, with an offset of about 10%. The use of a coaxial cable introduces inductance and capacitance that affect the amplitude of a received echo. Amplitude variations of 60% were observed when the cable length was varied between 0.07 m and 2.3 m, with simulations predicting similar variations. The high precision in the achieved results show that electronic design and system optimization can rely on system simulations alone. This will simplify the development of integrated electronics aimed at ultrasound systems. PMID:18019234

  15. [The false equivalent Galeazzi in children].

    PubMed

    Marzouki, A; Elibrahimi, A; Elmrini, A; Boutayeb, F

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a false Galeazzi equivalent in children. This injury is characterised by an epiphyseal detachment of the distal extremity of the ulna rather than a distal radio-ulnar dislocation. A 16-year-old patient was injured in a fall from a bike. Radiographs showed a fracture of the radial shaft with anterior angulation, together with a type II Salter-Harris epiphyseal injury at the level of the distal ulna. We were unable to perform a closed reduction under general anesthesia due to interposition of periosteum at the fracture site. Thus surgical management was the only option, which consisted of removing the offending periosteum and performing osteosynthesis of the radial shaft fracture with a plate, and the epiphyseal detachment with pins. After 10 months, we noted no bone growth disturbance, or any reduced mobility of the wrist. We will continue the follow-up to monitor bone growth disturbance of the distal extremity of the ulna.

  16. Disentangling signaling gradients generated by equivalent sources.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Noa; Barkai, Naama

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cells approach a mating partner by polarizing along a gradient of mating pheromones that are secreted by cells of the opposite mating type. The Bar1 protease is secreted by a-cells and, paradoxically, degrades the α-factor pheromones which are produced by cells of the opposite mating type and trigger mating in a-cells. This degradation may assist in the recovery from pheromone signaling but has also been shown to play a positive role in mating. Previous studies suggested that widely diffusing protease can bias the pheromone gradient towards the closest secreting cell. Here, we show that restricting the Bar1 protease to the secreting cell itself, preventing its wide diffusion, facilitates discrimination between equivalent mating partners. This may be mostly relevant during spore germination, where most mating events occur in nature.

  17. Equivalent damage validation by variable cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Carlo; Ferlito, Rachele; Zucconi, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this work is to perform a clustering analysis on the damage relieved in the old center of L'Aquila after the earthquake occurred on April 6, 2009 and to validate an Indicator of Equivalent Damage ED that summarizes the information reported on the AeDES card regarding the level of damage and their extension on the surface of the buildings. In particular we used a sample of 13442 masonry buildings located in an area characterized by a Macroseismic Intensity equal to 8 [1]. The aim is to ensure the coherence between the clusters and its hierarchy identified in the data of damage detected and in the data of the ED elaborated.

  18. Expressivism, Relativism, and the Analytic Equivalence Test.

    PubMed

    Frápolli, Maria J; Villanueva, Neftalí

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that, pace (Field, 2009), MacFarlane's assessment relativism and expressivism should be sharply distinguished. We do so by arguing that relativism and expressivism exemplify two very different approaches to context-dependence. Relativism, on the one hand, shares with other contemporary approaches a bottom-up, building block, model, while expressivism is part of a different tradition, one that might include Lewis' epistemic contextualism and Frege's content individuation, with which it shares an organic model to deal with context-dependence. The building-block model and the organic model, and thus relativism and expressivism, are set apart with the aid of a particular test: only the building-block model is compatible with the idea that there might be analytically equivalent, and yet different, propositions. PMID:26635690

  19. Phenomenological approaches of inflation and their equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga; Ramírez, Héctor

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we analyze two possible alternative and model-independent approaches to describe the inflationary period. The first one assumes a general equation of state during inflation due to Mukhanov, while the second one is based on the slow-roll hierarchy suggested by Hoffman and Turner. We find that, remarkably, the two approaches are equivalent from the observational viewpoint, as they single out the same areas in the parameter space, and agree with the inflationary attractors where successful inflation occurs. Rephrased in terms of the familiar picture of a slowly rolling, canonically normalized scalar field, the resulting inflaton excursions in these two approaches are almost identical. Furthermore, once the Galactic dust polarization data from Planck are included in the numerical fits, inflaton excursions can safely take sub-Planckian values.

  20. Snow water equivalent determination by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.; Hartline, B. K.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for accurate snowmelt runoff prediction is snow water equivalent (SWE) which is contentionally monitored using observations made at widely scattered points in or around specific watersheds. Remote sensors which provide data with better spatial and temporal coverage can be used to improve the SWE estimates. Microwave radiation, which can penetrate through a snowpack, may be used to infer the SWE. Calculations made from a microscopic scattering model were used to simulate the effect of varying SWE on the microwave brightness temperature. Data obtained from truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne systems from various test sites were studied. The simulated SWE compares favorable with the measured SWE. In addition, whether the underlying soil is frozen or thawed can be discriminated successfully on the basis of the polarization of the microwave radiation.

  1. Expressivism, Relativism, and the Analytic Equivalence Test

    PubMed Central

    Frápolli, Maria J.; Villanueva, Neftalí

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that, pace (Field, 2009), MacFarlane’s assessment relativism and expressivism should be sharply distinguished. We do so by arguing that relativism and expressivism exemplify two very different approaches to context-dependence. Relativism, on the one hand, shares with other contemporary approaches a bottom–up, building block, model, while expressivism is part of a different tradition, one that might include Lewis’ epistemic contextualism and Frege’s content individuation, with which it shares an organic model to deal with context-dependence. The building-block model and the organic model, and thus relativism and expressivism, are set apart with the aid of a particular test: only the building-block model is compatible with the idea that there might be analytically equivalent, and yet different, propositions. PMID:26635690

  2. Equivalence of topological insulators and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Cobanera, Emilio

    Systems of free fermions are classified by symmetry, space dimensionality, and topological properties described by K-homology. We show that by taking a many-body/Fock space viewpoint it becomes possible to establish equivalences of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of duality transformations. These mappings connect topologically inequivalent systems of fermions, jumping across entries in existent classification tables, because of the phenomenon of symmetry transmutation by which a symmetry and its dual partner have identical algebraic properties but very different physical interpretations and electromagnetic response. Since our analysis extends to interacting fermion systems we also briefly discuss some such applications. To illustrate main concepts we will present dual superconducting partners of paradigmatic models, such as the Haldane Chern insulator as well as a quantum spin Hall effect graphene model.

  3. Klein factors and Fermi-Bose equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the kink operator of the Heisenberg spin 1/2 model, we construct a set of Klein factors explicitly such that (1+1)-dimensional fermion theories with an arbitrary number of species are mapped onto the corresponding boson theories with the same number of species and vice versa. The actions for the resultant theories do not possess a nontrivial Klein factor. With this set of Klein factors, we are also able to map the simple boundary states, such as the Neumann and the Dirichlet boundary states, of the fermion (boson) theory onto those of the boson (fermion) theory. Applications of the Fermi-Bose equivalence with the constructed Klein factors to well-known (1+1)-dimensional theories have been discussed.

  4. Equivalent source mapping of lunar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, M.; Shibuya, H.

    2007-12-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) shall launch the SELENE (SELenological and ENgineering Explorer) spacecraft this autumn. Amongst many instruments, it has a magnetometer (LMAG: Lunar MAGnetomter) which will measure the magnetic field on the orbit around the Moon. The nominal orbit of the SELENE is about 100km in altitudes for 1 year observation. Although the extended mission is still not determined, LMAG team is requesting a low altitude (less than 50km) observation, if the remaining fuel allows. We are preparing data processing software for the mission. Here, we report an objective scheme for mapping the lunar crustal magnetic field from the orbital measurement data of unequal altitudes. In this study, the magnetic field is restored by solving a linear inverse-problem determining the sources distributed on the lunar surface to satisfy the observational data, which is known as the equivalent source method. Our scheme has three features improving the method: First, the source calculation is performed simultaneously with detrending. Second, magnetic charges (magnetic monopoles) are used as the equivalent sources. It reduces the density of the sources for the same smoothness in produced field, comparing to the dipole sauces. Third, the number of sources is taken large enough to avoid the problem of configuration of the sources, instead the damped least square assuming the strength of each charge is similar to the next one, and the smoothness factor is determined by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). It guarantees the objectivity of the calculation, in other words, there is no adjustable parameter which may depend of the researcher dealing the data analyses. For testing the scheme, we apply this method to the Lunar Prospector magnetometer data, and provide magnetic field map in the region centered at several regions of strong crustal field including the Reiner Gamma anomaly. The stability of the method and the resolution of the anomaly

  5. Elementary equivalence of Chevalley groups over local rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bunina, Elena I

    2010-05-11

    It is proved that (elementary) Chevalley groups over local rings with invertible 2 are elementarily equivalent if and only if their types and weight lattices coincide and the initial rings are elementarily equivalent. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  6. FROM CONCEPT TO EQUIVALENCY: THE 503 REGULATIONS AND THE PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PAPER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its creation in 1985, the Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC) has been reviewing innovative and alternative sludge disinfection technologies with regards to their abilities to protect human health and the environment. The PEC is charged to make recommendations on whether t...

  7. FROM CONCEPT TO EQUIVALENCY: THE 503 REGULATIONS AND THE PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its creation in 1985, the Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC) has been reviewing innovative and alternative sludge disinfection technologies with regards to their abilities to protect human health and the environment. The PEC is charged to make recommendations on whether t...

  8. Optimizing Equivalence-Based Instruction: Effects of Training Protocols on Equivalence Class Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Wright, Nicole A.; Fields, Lanny

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments evaluated the effects of the simple-to-complex and simultaneous training protocols on the formation of academically relevant equivalence classes. The simple-to-complex protocol intersperses derived relations probes with training baseline relations. The simultaneous protocol conducts all training trials and test trials in separate…

  9. High School Equivalency Testing in Washington. Forum: Responding to Changes in High School Equivalency Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Jon

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, as new high school equivalency exams were being developed and implemented across the nation and states were deciding which test was best for their population, Washington state identified the need to adopt the most rigorous test so that preparation to take it would equip students with the skills to be able to move directly from adult…

  10. An equivalent fluid/equivalent medium approach for the numerical simulation of coastal landslides propagation: theory and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, P.; Bozzano, F.

    2009-11-01

    Coastal and subaqueous landslides can be very dangerous phenomena since they are characterised by the additional risk of induced tsunamis, unlike their completely-subaerial counterparts. Numerical modelling of landslides propagation is a key step in forecasting the consequences of landslides. In this paper, a novel approach named Equivalent Fluid/Equivalent Medium (EFEM) has been developed. It adapts common numerical models and software that were originally designed for subaerial landslides in order to simulate the propagation of combined subaerial-subaqueous and completely-subaqueous landslides. Drag and buoyancy forces, the loss of energy at the landslide-water impact and peculiar mechanisms like hydroplaning can be suitably simulated by this approach; furthermore, the change in properties of the landslide's mass, which is encountered at the transition from the subaerial to the submerged environment, can be taken into account. The approach has been tested by modelling two documented coastal landslides (a debris flow and a rock slide at Lake Albano) using the DAN-W code. The results, which were achieved from the back-analyses, demonstrate the efficacy of the approach to simulate the propagation of different types of coastal landslides.

  11. Calculations of a wideband metamaterial absorber using equivalent medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojun; Yang, Helin; Wang, Danqi; Yu, Shengqing; Lou, Yanchao; Guo, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers (MMAs) have drawn increasing attention in many areas due to the fact that they can achieve electromagnetic (EM) waves with unity absorptivity. We demonstrate the design, simulation, experiment and calculation of a wideband MMA based on a loaded double-square-loop (DSL) array of chip resisters. For a normal incidence EM wave, the simulated results show that the absorption of the full width at half maximum is about 9.1 GHz, and the relative bandwidth is 87.1%. Experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. More importantly, equivalent medium theory (EMT) is utilized to calculate the absorptions of the DSL MMA, and the calculated absorptions based on EMT agree with the simulated and measured results. The method based on EMT provides a new way to analysis the mechanism of MMAs.

  12. Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

  13. Reasons for the Decalage between Identity Conservation and Equivalence Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ron

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments investigated which of two factors is responsible for decalage between Piaget's equivalence and identity conservation tasks. Performance of 78 primary school students between 57 and 79 months of age was compared on equivalence and identity tasks and a third task, equivalence I, which retains transitivity requirement of Piaget's task…

  14. 7 CFR 987.105 - Whole equivalent of pitted dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Whole equivalent of pitted dates. For the purposes of this part, the whole date equivalent weight of pitted dates shall be determined by dividing the weight of the pitted dates by 0.83. Identification and... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Whole equivalent of pitted dates. 987.105 Section...

  15. 7 CFR 987.105 - Whole equivalent of pitted dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Whole equivalent of pitted dates. For the purposes of this part, the whole date equivalent weight of pitted dates shall be determined by dividing the weight of the pitted dates by 0.83. Identification and... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whole equivalent of pitted dates. 987.105 Section...

  16. 7 CFR 987.105 - Whole equivalent of pitted dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Whole equivalent of pitted dates. For the purposes of this part, the whole date equivalent weight of pitted dates shall be determined by dividing the weight of the pitted dates by 0.83. Identification and... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Whole equivalent of pitted dates. 987.105 Section...

  17. 7 CFR 987.105 - Whole equivalent of pitted dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Whole equivalent of pitted dates. For the purposes of this part, the whole date equivalent weight of pitted dates shall be determined by dividing the weight of the pitted dates by 0.83. Identification and... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Whole equivalent of pitted dates. 987.105 Section...

  18. 7 CFR 987.105 - Whole equivalent of pitted dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Whole equivalent of pitted dates. For the purposes of this part, the whole date equivalent weight of pitted dates shall be determined by dividing the weight of the pitted dates by 0.83. Identification and... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Whole equivalent of pitted dates. 987.105 Section...

  19. Equivalent Circuits For AC-Impedance Analysis Of Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents investigation of equivalent circuits for ac-impedance analysis of corrosion. Impedance between specimen and electrolyte measured as function of frequency. Data used to characterize corrosion electrochemical system in terms of equivalent circuit. Eleven resistor/capacitor equivalent-circuit models were analyzed.

  20. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Equivalent Stress

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equivalent Stress A Appendix A to Part 154 Shipping...—Equivalent Stress I. Equivalent stress (σ c) is calculated by the following formula or another formula... normal stress in “x” direction. σy=total normal stress in “y” direction. τxy=total shear stress in...

  1. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Equivalent Stress

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equivalent Stress A Appendix A to Part 154 Shipping...—Equivalent Stress I. Equivalent stress (σ c) is calculated by the following formula or another formula... normal stress in “x” direction. σy=total normal stress in “y” direction. τxy=total shear stress in...

  2. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Equivalent Stress

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent Stress A Appendix A to Part 154 Shipping...—Equivalent Stress I. Equivalent stress (σ c) is calculated by the following formula or another formula... normal stress in “x” direction. σy=total normal stress in “y” direction. τxy=total shear stress in...

  3. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Equivalent Stress

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equivalent Stress A Appendix A to Part 154 Shipping...—Equivalent Stress I. Equivalent stress (σ c) is calculated by the following formula or another formula... normal stress in “x” direction. σy=total normal stress in “y” direction. τxy=total shear stress in...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Equivalent Stress

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equivalent Stress A Appendix A to Part 154 Shipping...—Equivalent Stress I. Equivalent stress (σ c) is calculated by the following formula or another formula... normal stress in “x” direction. σy=total normal stress in “y” direction. τxy=total shear stress in...

  5. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

  6. Using Gridded Snow Covered Area and Snow-Water Equivalence Spatial Data Sets to Improve Snow-Pack Depletion Simulation in a Continental Scale Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, J. C.; Tracey, J. A.; Markstrom, S. L.; Hay, L.

    2014-12-01

    Snow cover areal depletion curves were used in a continuous daily hydrologic model to simulate seasonal spring snowmelt during the period between maximum snowpack accumulation and total melt. The curves are defined as the ratio of snow-water equivalence (SWE) divided by the seasonal maximum snow-water equivalence (Ai) (Y axis) versus the percent snow cover area (SCA) (X axis). The slope of the curve can vary depending on local watershed conditions. Windy sparsely vegetated high elevation watersheds, for example, can have a steeper slope than lower elevation forested watersheds. To improve the accuracy of simulated runoff at ungaged watersheds, individual snow cover areal depletion curves were created for over 100,000 hydrologic response units (HRU) in the continental scale U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Hydrologic Model (NHM). NHM includes the same components of the USGS Precipitation-Runoff-Modeling System (PRMS), except it uses consistent land surface characterization and model parameterization across the U.S. continent. Weighted-mean daily time series of 1-kilometer gridded SWE, from Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS), and 500-meter gridded SCA, from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), for 2003-2014 were computed for each HRU using the USGS Geo Data Portal. Using a screening process, pairs of SWE/Ai and SCA from the snowmelt period of each year were selected. SCA values derived from imagery that did not have any cloud cover and were >0 and <100 percent were selected. Unrealistically low and high SCA values that were paired with high and low SWE/Ai ratios, respectively, were removed. Second order polynomial equations were then fit to the remaining pairs of SWE/Ai and SCA to create a unique curve for each HRU. Simulations comparing these new curves with an existing single default curve in NHM will be made to determine if there are significant improvements in runoff.

  7. Tests of the weak equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speake, C. C.; Will, C. M.

    2012-09-01

    The Einstein equivalence principle is the foundation for general relativity and all metric theories of gravity. Of its three tenets—the equality of acceleration of test bodies, or weak equivalence principle; the validity of Lorentz invariance in local freely falling frames; and the position invariance of local physical laws—the weak equivalence principle has played the most important role historically, and continues to be a focus of intense theoretical and experimental investigation. From the probably apocryphal 16th century demonstrations by Galileo at Pisa's leaning tower to the sensitive torsion-balance measurements of today (both pictured on the cover of this issue), this principle, dubbed WEP, has been crucial to the development of gravitation theory. The universality of the rate of acceleration of all types of matter in a gravitational field can be taken as evidence that gravitation is fundamentally determined by the geometry, or metric, of spacetime. Newton began his magnum opus 'The Principia' with a discussion of WEP and his experiments to verify it, while Einstein took WEP for granted in his construction of general relativity, never once referring to the epochal experiments by Baron Eötvös. The classic 1964 experiment of Roll, Krotkov and Dicke ushered in the modern era of high-precision tests, and the search for a 'fifth force' during the late 1980s (instigated, ironically, by purported anomalies in Eötvös's old data) caused the enterprise to pivot from pure tests of the foundation of GR to searches for new physics beyond the standard model of the non-gravitational interactions. Today, the next generation of experimental tests of WEP are being prepared for launch or are being developed, with the goal of reaching unprecedented levels of sensitivity, in search of signatures of interactions inspired by string theory, extra dimensions and other concepts from the world of high-energy physics. At the same time observations continue using lunar laser

  8. Centralized PI control for high dimensional multivariable systems based on equivalent transfer function.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xiaoli; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a new scheme to design full matrix controller for high dimensional multivariable processes based on equivalent transfer function (ETF). Differing from existing ETF method, the proposed ETF is derived directly by exploiting the relationship between the equivalent closed-loop transfer function and the inverse of open-loop transfer function. Based on the obtained ETF, the full matrix controller is designed utilizing the existing PI tuning rules. The new proposed ETF model can more accurately represent the original processes. Furthermore, the full matrix centralized controller design method proposed in this paper is applicable to high dimensional multivariable systems with satisfactory performance. Comparison with other multivariable controllers shows that the designed ETF based controller is superior with respect to design-complexity and obtained performance.

  9. Challenging a culture of racial equivalence.

    PubMed

    Song, Miri

    2014-03-01

    We live at a time when our understandings and conceptualizations of 'racism' are often highly imprecise, broad, and used to describe a wide range of racialized phenomena. In this article, I raise some important questions about how the term racism is used and understood in contemporary British society by drawing on some recent cases of alleged racism in football and politics, many of which have been played out via new media technologies. A broader understanding of racism, through the use of the term 'racialization', has been helpful in articulating a more nuanced and complex understanding of racial incidents, especially of people's (often ambivalent) beliefs and behaviours. However, the growing emphasis upon 'racialization' has led to a conceptualization of racism which increasingly involves multiple perpetrators, victims, and practices without enough consideration of how and why particular interactions and practices constitute racism as such. The trend toward a growing culture of racial equivalence is worrying, as it denudes the idea of racism of its historical basis, severity and power. These frequent and commonplace assertions of racism in the public sphere paradoxically end up trivializing and homogenizing quite different forms of racialized interactions. I conclude that we need to retain the term 'racism', but we need to differentiate more clearly between 'racism' (as an historical and structured system of domination) from the broader notion of 'racialization'.

  10. Testing the equivalence principle with atomic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Sven; Dittus, Hansjörg; Lämmerzahl, Claus; pre="the" post=""> QUANTUS,

    2012-09-01

    The weak equivalence principle (WEP), that is, the universality of free fall, states that all point-like neutral particles in a gravitational field fall in the same way. This is the basis of the geometrization of the gravitational interaction. Together with further requirements on the behavior of point particles, light propagation and clocks one can show that gravity is modeled by a Riemannian geometry. Since in the quantum domain all objects are extended, it is not clear whether the notion of a WEP in the quantum domain makes sense at all. We show that for matter wave interferometry the notion of WEP still can be given a meaning. We give a short overview over schemes which allows a violation of the WEP and emphasize that there are also schemes which show that there might be violations of the WEP in the quantum regime which are not present classically. This makes a test of the WEP with quantum matter necessary. We also give a brief outline of the efforts made for testing the WEP with interferometry with cold atoms in the Bremen drop tower carried out by the QUANTUS and PRIMUS collaboration.

  11. An instance of spurious equivalence relations

    PubMed Central

    Stikeleather, Gregory; Sidman, Murray

    1990-01-01

    Four normal children learned conditional discriminations that had upper-case or lower-case Greek letters as comparison stimuli, and dictated letter names as samples. Experimental stimuli were three pairs of letters; within each pair, an upper- and a lower-case letter were conditionally related to the same dictated sample. Four control stimuli, also upper- and lower-case letters, were each conditionally related to a different dictated sample. Conditional-discrimination tests for equivalence used the upper- and lower-case letters both as samples and comparisons. Untaught conditional relations between the upper- and lower-case members of each experimental stimulus pair were expected to emerge on the basis of their previously established relations to a common sample. The emergence of conditional relations between control stimuli, however, would have suggested an artifact. In test trials with the experimental stimuli as samples and comparisons, new conditional discriminations emerged as expected with all four children. With two of the children, however, consistent discriminations also emerged between control stimuli. Evidence suggested that uncontrolled features of the program for teaching the children the baseline conditional discriminations might have been responsible for the emergence of untaught conditional relations. PMID:22477599

  12. The Equivalence of Time and Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barukčića, Ilija

    The relationship between energy, time and space is still not solved in an appropriate manner. According to Newton's concept of time and space, both have to be taken as absolute. If we follow Leibniz and his arguments, space and time are relative. Since Einstein's theory of relativity we know at least that energy, time and space are deeply related. Albert Einstein originally predicted that time is nothing absolute but something relative, time changes and can change. Especially, time and gravitational field are related somehow even in detail if we still don't know how. According to the gravitational time dilation, the lower the gravitational potential, the more slowly time passes and vice versa. Somehow, it appears to be that the behaviour of time is directly linked to the behaviour of the gravitational field. The aim of this publication is to work out the interior logic between time and gravitational field and to make the proof that time is equivalent to the gravitational field and vice versa.

  13. Contextual control of emergent equivalence relations.

    PubMed

    Bush, K M; Sidman, M; de Rose, T

    1989-01-01

    Three college students in Experiment 1 and 1 student in Experiment 2 learned visual conditional discriminations under contextual control by tones; the visual comparison stimulus that was correct with a given sample stimulus depended on whether a high tone or a low tone was present. Two of the subjects in Experiment 1 then demonstrated the emergence of two sets of contextually controlled three-member classes of equivalent stimuli, and the subject in Experiment 2 showed the emergence of contextually controlled four-member classes; the class membership of each stimulus varied as a function of the tones. Class membership was demonstrated by the subjects' performance of new conditional discriminations that they had never been taught directly. In Experiment 2, the procedures were intended to ensure that the tones exerted second-order conditional control and did not simply form compounds with each of the visual stimuli, but the subject's verbal description of the tasks suggested that this intention might not have been successful. It could not be ascertained, therefore, whether the tones exerted contextual control as independent second-order conditional stimuli or simply as common elements of auditory-visual stimulus compounds.

  14. Macrostate equivalence of two general ensembles and specific relative entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    The two criteria of ensemble equivalence, i.e., macrostate equivalence and measure equivalence, are investigated for a general pair of states. Macrostate equivalence implies the two ensembles are indistinguishable by the measurement of macroscopic quantities obeying the large-deviation principle, and measure equivalence means that the specific relative entropy of these two states vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. It is shown that measure equivalence implies a macrostate equivalence for a general pair of states by deriving an inequality connecting the large-deviation rate functions to the specific relative Renyi entropies. The result is applicable to both quantum and classical systems. As applications, a sufficient condition for thermalization, the time scale of quantum dynamics of macrovariables, and the second law with strict irreversibility in a quantum quench are discussed.

  15. Macrostate equivalence of two general ensembles and specific relative entropies.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    The two criteria of ensemble equivalence, i.e., macrostate equivalence and measure equivalence, are investigated for a general pair of states. Macrostate equivalence implies the two ensembles are indistinguishable by the measurement of macroscopic quantities obeying the large-deviation principle, and measure equivalence means that the specific relative entropy of these two states vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. It is shown that measure equivalence implies a macrostate equivalence for a general pair of states by deriving an inequality connecting the large-deviation rate functions to the specific relative Renyi entropies. The result is applicable to both quantum and classical systems. As applications, a sufficient condition for thermalization, the time scale of quantum dynamics of macrovariables, and the second law with strict irreversibility in a quantum quench are discussed. PMID:27627225

  16. Equivalent width evaluation methods for Doppler, Lorentz, and Voigt profiles.

    PubMed

    Habib, Abdel Aziz M; Rammah, Yasser S

    2014-01-01

    An accurate technique has been developed to calculate the equivalent width of absorption lines. The calculations have been carried out for the pure Doppler and pure Lorentz limiting forms of the equivalent width. A novel expression for the equivalent width for Lorentz profile is given from direct integration of the line profile. The more general case of a Voigt profile leads to an analytical formula that permits a rapid estimate of the equivalent width for a wide range of maximum optical depths. The reliability of the approach is verified using a numerical application calculating the equivalent width for nickel resonance lines at 232.0 and 352.3 nm from atomic absorption (AA) measurements. The dependence of equivalent width on the number density of absorbing atoms is also provided. The results obtained for the equivalent width for the Voigt profile were compared with the data in the available literature obtained by different approaches. PMID:24480275

  17. Theoretical implications of incorporating relative biological effectiveness into radiobiological equivalence relationships

    PubMed Central

    Dale, R G

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Earlier radiobiological equivalence relationships as derived for low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations are revisited in the light of newer radiobiological models that incorporate an allowance for relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Methods: Linear-quadratic (LQ) radiobiological equations for calculating biologically effective dose at both low- and high-LET radiations are used to derive new conditions of equivalence between a variety of radiation delivery techniques. The theoretical implications are discussed. Results: The original (pre-LQ) concept of equivalence between fractionated and continuous radiotherapy schedules, in which the same physical dose is delivered in each schedule, inherently assumed that low-LET radiation would be used in both schedules. LQ-based equivalence relationships that allow for RBE and are derived assuming equal total physical dose between schedules are shown to be valid only in limited circumstances. Removing the constraint of equality of total physical dose allows the identification of more general (and more practical) relationships. Conclusion: If the respective schedules under consideration for equivalence both involve radiations of identical LET, then the original equivalence relationships remain valid. However, if the compared schedules involve radiations of differing LET, then new (and more restrictive) equivalence relationships are found to apply. Advances in knowledge: Theoretically derived equivalence relationships based on the LQ model provide a framework for the design and intercomparison of a wide range of clinical techniques including those involving high- and/or low-LET radiations. They also provide a means of testing for the validity of variously assumed tissue repair kinetics. PMID:23385996

  18. A restricted proof that the weak equivalence principle implies the Einstein equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.; Lee, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Schiff has conjectured that the weak equivalence principle (WEP) implies the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP). A proof is presented of Schiff's conjecture, restricted to: (1) test bodies made of electromagnetically interacting point particles, that fall from rest in a static, spherically symmetric gravitational field; (2) theories of gravity within a certain broad class - a class that includes almost all complete relativistic theories that have been found in the literature, but with each theory truncated to contain only point particles plus electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The proof shows that every nonmentric theory in the class (every theory that violates EEP) must violate WEP. A formula is derived for the magnitude of the violation. It is shown that WEP is a powerful theoretical and experimental tool for constraining the manner in which gravity couples to electromagnetism in gravitation theories.

  19. TACI: a code for interactive analysis of neutron data produced by a tissue equivalent proportional counter

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.

    1984-06-01

    The TEPC analysis code (TACI) is a computer program designed to analyze pulse height data generated by a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). It is written in HP BASIC and is for use on an HP-87XM personal computer. The theory of TEPC analysis upon which this code is based is summarized.

  20. Lotteries in Student Assignment: An Equivalence Result. NBER Working Paper No. 16140

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathak, Parag A.; Sethuraman, Jay

    2010-01-01

    This paper formally examines two competing methods of conducting a lottery in assigning students to schools, motivated by the design of the centralized high school student assignment system in New York City. The main result of the paper is that a single and multiple lottery mechanism are equivalent for the problem of allocating students to schools…

  1. Effects of a Supplemental Intervention Focused in Equivalency Concepts for Students with Varying Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jessica H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Tier 2 supplemental intervention focused on rational number equivalency concepts and applications on the mathematics performance of third-grade students with and without mathematics difficulties. The researcher used a pretest-posttest control group design and random assignment of 19…

  2. A Proposal on the Validation Model of Equivalence between PBLT and CBLT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huilin

    2014-01-01

    The validity of the computer-based language test is possibly affected by three factors: computer familiarity, audio-visual cognitive competence, and other discrepancies in construct. Therefore, validating the equivalence between the paper-and-pencil language test and the computer-based language test is a key step in the procedure of designing a…

  3. Contingency Mapping: Use of a Novel Visual Support Strategy as an Adjunct to Functional Equivalence Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kenneth E.; Mirenda, Pat

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of contingency mapping, a new visual support strategy designed to enhance clients' understanding of the contingencies associated with functional equivalence training (FET). The study was conducted in a general education classroom with an adolescent boy with autism who engaged in prompt dependent behavior. A…

  4. Two of a Kind: Are Your Districts' Evaluation Systems Equivalent? Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    States in the midst of implementing evaluation reforms face a common dilemma: how to ensure that all your districts are implementing quality educator evaluation systems while still providing them with the flexibility to design systems best suited to their own unique needs. One answer is to create an equivalency process (also known as an approval…

  5. Principle of Spacetime and Black Hole Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2016-06-01

    Modelling the universe without relying on a set of hypothetical entities (HEs) to explain observations and overcome problems and difficulties is essential to developing a physical cosmology. The well-known big bang cosmology, widely accepted as the standard model, stands on two fundamentals, which are Einstein’s general relativity (GR) that describes the effect of matter on spacetime and the cosmological principle (CP) of spacetime isotropy and homogeneity. The field equation of GR along with the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric of spacetime derived from CP generates the Friedmann equation (FE) that governs the development and dynamics of the universe. The big bang theory has made impressive successes in explaining the universe, but still has problems and solutions of them rely on an increasing number of HEs such as inflation, dark matter, dark energy, and so on. Recently, the author has developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which, instead of making many those hypotheses, only includes a new single postulate (or a new principle) to the cosmology - Principle of Spacetime and Black Hole Equivalence (SBHEP) - to explain all the existing observations of the universe and overcome all the existing problems in conventional cosmologies. This study thoroughly demonstrates how this newly developed black hole universe model, which therefore stands on the three fundamentals (GR, CP, and SBHEP), can fully explain the universe as well as easily conquer the difficulties according to the well-developed physics, thus, neither needing any other hypotheses nor existing any unsolved difficulties. This work was supported by NSF/REU (Grant #: PHY-1263253) at Alabama A & M University.

  6. Critique of the equivalent air altitude model.

    PubMed

    Conkin, Johnny; Wessel, James H

    2008-10-01

    The adverse effects of hypoxic hypoxia include acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema, and high altitude cerebral edema. It has long been assumed that those manifestations are directly related to reduction in the inspired partial pressure of oxygen (P(I)O2). This assumption underlies the equivalent air altitude (EAA) model, which holds that combinations of barometric pressure (P(B)) and inspired fraction of O2 (F(I)O2) that produce the same P(I)O2 will result in identical physiological responses. However, a growing body of evidence seems to indicate that different combinations of P(B) and P(I)O2 may produce different responses to the same P(I)O2. To investigate this question with respect to AMS, we conducted a search of the literature using the terms hypobaric hypoxia, normobaric hypoxia, and hypobaric normoxia. The results suggest that the EAA model provides only an approximate description of isohypoxia, and that P(B) has an independent effect on hypoxia and AMS. A historical report from 1956 and 15 reports from 1983 to 2005 compare the same hypoxic P(I)O2 at different P(B) with respect to the development of hypoxia and AMS. These data provide evidence for an independent effect of P(B) on hypoxia and AMS, and thereby invalidate EAA as an ideal model of isohypoxia. Refinement of the EAA model is needed, in particular for applications to high altitude where supplemental O2 is inadequate to prevent hypoxic hypoxia. Adjustment through probabilistic statistical modeling to match the current limited experimental observations is one approach to a better isohypoxic model. PMID:18856188

  7. Test of the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.; Glashow, S.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Cheimets, P.; Finkelstein, N.; Schneps, M.

    2004-01-01

    The scientific goal of the experiment is to test the equality of gravitational and inertial mass (i.e., to test the Principle of Equivalence) by measuring the independence of the rate of fall of bodies from the composition of the falling body. The measurement is accomplished by measuring the relative displacement (or equivalently acceleration) of two falling bodies of different materials which are the proof masses of a differential accelerometer. The goal of the experiment is to measure the Eoetvoes ratio sigma g/g (differential acceleration/common acceleration) with an accuracy goal of several parts in 10(exp 15). The estimated accuracy is about two orders of magnitude better than the present state of the art. The main goal of the study to be carried out under this grant is part of the flight definition of the experiment and laboratory testing of key components. The project involves an international cooperation in which the responsibility of the US side is the flight definition of the experimental facility while the responsibility of the non-US partners is the flight definition and laboratory prototyping of the differential acceleration detector.In summary, the experiment to be designed is for taking differential acceleration measurements with a high-sensitivity detector (the sensor) during free fall conditions lasting up to 30 s in a disturbance-free acceleration environment. The experiment strategy consists in letting the sensor free fall inside a few meters long (in the vertical direction) evacuated capsule that is falling simultaneously in the rarefied atmosphere after release from a helium balloon flying at a stratospheric altitude.

  8. Effect of design over-all compressor pressure ratio division on acceleration characteristics of three hypothetical two-spool turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, Richard E; Dugan, James F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    The engines, each with a compressor overall total-pressure ratio of 12 and a design inner-turbine-inlet temperature of 2500 degrees R, were investigated at static sea-level conditions to determine the effect on transient performance of varying the desitn pressure ratio divisions 2-6, 3-4, and 4-3 between the outer and inner compressors. The transient considered was an acceleration from 40 to 100 percent design thrust. When the outer compressor of each engine reached design speed, the inner compressors were overspeeding, the maximum being only 1.7 over design mechanical speed. Acceleration times for the three engines were equal.

  9. An angular dependent neutron effective-dose-equivalent dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veinot, Kenneth Guy

    The effective-dose-equivalent (EDE) is a strong function of angular orientation in a radiation field. Detection systems that attempt to measure the EDE directly would be desirable. Historically, dosimeters have been designed to respond as isotropically as possible in a radiation field. However, since the EDE is strongly dependent upon the incident angle of the radiation, past designs are no longer desirable for personal radiation dosimetry. In addition, the EDE is a function of incident neutron energy. CR-39 foils are commonly used neutron detectors. Neutrons produce tracks in CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) detectors over a wide energy range. Through chemical or electrochemical etching, these tracks can be enlarged and counted. From this track count, the fluence of neutrons incident on the CR-39 foils may be inferred. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are another method of neutron detection. Both of these detectors have angular response properties. In the present work, calculations of EDE were compared to calculations and measurements of the angular responses of CR-39 and TLD neutron dosimeters. The measurements used a variety of neutron sources, each with its own characteristic energy spectrum. This research resulted in a neutron personal dosimeter prototype whose angular response properties resembled the angular response of EDE.

  10. An equivalent viscoelastic model for rock mass with parallel joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchun; Ma, Guowei; Zhao, Jian

    2010-03-01

    An equivalent viscoelastic medium model is proposed for rock mass with parallel joints. A concept of "virtual wave source (VWS)" is proposed to take into account the wave reflections between the joints. The equivalent model can be effectively applied to analyze longitudinal wave propagation through discontinuous media with parallel joints. Parameters in the equivalent viscoelastic model are derived analytically based on longitudinal wave propagation across a single rock joint. The proposed model is then verified by applying identical incident waves to the discontinuous and equivalent viscoelastic media at one end to compare the output waves at the other end. When the wavelength of the incident wave is sufficiently long compared to the joint spacing, the effect of the VWS on wave propagation in rock mass is prominent. The results from the equivalent viscoelastic medium model are very similar to those determined from the displacement discontinuity method. Frequency dependence and joint spacing effect on the equivalent viscoelastic model and the VWS method are discussed.

  11. Response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter to neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.; Gibbons, F.; Braby, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose as a function of lineal energy was measured at the CERN-EC Reference-field Facility (CERF) using a 512-channel tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and neutron dose equivalent response evaluated. Although there are some differences, the measured dose equivalent is in agreement with that measured by the 16-channel HANDI tissue equivalent counter. Comparison of TEPC measurements with those made by a silicon solid-state detector for low linear energy transfer particles produced by the same beam, is presented. The measurements show that about 4% of dose equivalent is delivered by particles heavier than protons generated in the conducting tissue equivalent plastic. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effectiveness of ground level post-flight 100 percent oxygen breathing as therapy for pain-only altitude Decompression Sickness (DCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demboski, John T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1994-01-01

    In both the aviation and space environments, decompression sickness (DCS) is an operational limitation. Hyperbaric recompression is the most efficacious treatment for altitude DCS. However, the inherent recompression of descent to ground level while breathing oxygen is in itself therapy for altitude DCS. If pain-only DCS occurs during a hypobaric exposure, and the symptoms resolver during descent, ground level post-flight breathing of 100% O2 for 2 hours (GLO2) is considered sufficient treatment by USAF Regulation 161-21. The effectiveness of the GLO2 treatment protocol is defined.

  13. 47 CFR 54.319 - Elimination of high-cost support in areas with 100 percent coverage by an unsubsidized competitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service... by an unsubsidized competitor. (a) Universal service support shall be eliminated in an incumbent... suitable for real-time applications, including Voice over Internet Protocol, and usage capacity that...

  14. 7 CFR 205.670 - Inspection and testing of agricultural products to be sold or labeled as “100 percent organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... food group(s)).â 205.670 Section 205.670 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative... ingredients or food group(s)).” (a) All agricultural products that are to be sold, labeled, or represented...

  15. Equivalent Plate Analysis of Aircraft Wing with Discrete Source Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Mason, Brian H.

    2006-01-01

    An equivalent plate procedure is developed to provide a computationally efficient means of matching the stiffness and frequencies of flight vehicle wing structures for prescribed loading conditions. First, the equivalent plate is used to match the stiffness of a stiffened panel without damage and the stiffness of a stiffened panel with damage. For both stiffened panels, the equivalent plate models reproduce the deformation of a corresponding detailed model exactly for the given loading conditions. Once the stiffness was matched, the equivalent plate models were then used to predict the frequencies of the panels. Two analytical procedures using the lumped-mass matrix were used to match the first five frequencies of the corresponding detailed model. In both the procedures, the lumped-mass matrix for the equivalent plate is constructed by multiplying the diagonal terms of the consistent-mass matrix by a proportionality constant. In the first procedure, the proportionality constant is selected such that the total mass of the equivalent plate is equal to that of the detailed model. In the second method, the proportionality constant is selected to minimize the sum of the squares of the errors in a set of pre-selected frequencies between the equivalent plate model and the detailed model. The equivalent plate models reproduced the fundamental first frequency accurately in both the methods. It is observed that changing only the mass distribution in the equivalent plate model did not provide enough flexibility to match all of the frequencies.

  16. Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-08

    The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

  17. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL... Measurements for Gaseous Fuels per 100 Standard Cubic Feet Fuel Gallon equivalent measurement...

  18. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL... Measurements for Gaseous Fuels per 100 Standard Cubic Feet Fuel Gallon equivalent measurement...

  19. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL... Measurements for Gaseous Fuels per 100 Standard Cubic Feet Fuel Gallon equivalent measurement...

  20. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL... Measurements for Gaseous Fuels per 100 Standard Cubic Feet Fuel Gallon equivalent measurement...

  1. 49 CFR 538.8 - Gallon Equivalents for Gaseous Fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MANUFACTURING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL... Measurements for Gaseous Fuels per 100 Standard Cubic Feet Fuel Gallon equivalent measurement...

  2. Effects of select and reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed

    Perez, William F; Tomanari, Gerson Y; Vaidya, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The present study used a single-subject design to evaluate the effects of select or reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function. Adults were exposed to a matching-to-sample task with observing requirements (MTS-OR) in order to bias the establishment of sample/S+ (select) or sample/S- (reject) relations. In Experiment 1, four sets of baseline conditional relations were taught-two under reject control (A1B2C1, A2B1C2) and two under select control (D1E1F1, D2E2F2). Participants were tested for transitivity, symmetry, equivalence and reflexivity. They also learned a simple discrimination involving one of the stimuli from the equivalence classes and were tested for the transfer of the discriminative function. In general, participants performed with high accuracy on all equivalence-related probes as well as the transfer of function probes under select control. Under reject control, participants had high scores only on the symmetry test; transfer of function was attributed to stimuli programmed as S-. In Experiment 2, the equivalence class under reject control was expanded to four members (A1B2C1D2; A2B1C2D1). Participants had high scores only on symmetry and on transitivity and equivalence tests involving two nodes. Transfer of function was extended to the programmed S- added to each class. Results from both experiments suggest that select and reject controls might differently affect the formation of equivalence classes and the transfer of stimulus functions. PMID:26332076

  3. Effects of select and reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed

    Perez, William F; Tomanari, Gerson Y; Vaidya, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The present study used a single-subject design to evaluate the effects of select or reject control on equivalence class formation and transfer of function. Adults were exposed to a matching-to-sample task with observing requirements (MTS-OR) in order to bias the establishment of sample/S+ (select) or sample/S- (reject) relations. In Experiment 1, four sets of baseline conditional relations were taught-two under reject control (A1B2C1, A2B1C2) and two under select control (D1E1F1, D2E2F2). Participants were tested for transitivity, symmetry, equivalence and reflexivity. They also learned a simple discrimination involving one of the stimuli from the equivalence classes and were tested for the transfer of the discriminative function. In general, participants performed with high accuracy on all equivalence-related probes as well as the transfer of function probes under select control. Under reject control, participants had high scores only on the symmetry test; transfer of function was attributed to stimuli programmed as S-. In Experiment 2, the equivalence class under reject control was expanded to four members (A1B2C1D2; A2B1C2D1). Participants had high scores only on symmetry and on transitivity and equivalence tests involving two nodes. Transfer of function was extended to the programmed S- added to each class. Results from both experiments suggest that select and reject controls might differently affect the formation of equivalence classes and the transfer of stimulus functions.

  4. Identification of Low Order Equivalent System Models From Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of low order equivalent system dynamic models from flight test data was studied. Inputs were pilot control deflections, and outputs were aircraft responses, so the models characterized the total aircraft response including bare airframe and flight control system. Theoretical investigations were conducted and related to results found in the literature. Low order equivalent system modeling techniques using output error and equation error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were developed and validated on simulation data. It was found that some common difficulties encountered in identifying closed loop low order equivalent system models from flight test data could be overcome using the developed techniques. Implications for data requirements and experiment design were discussed. The developed methods were demonstrated using realistic simulation cases, then applied to closed loop flight test data from the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle.

  5. Equivalence testing of traditional and simulated clinical experiences: undergraduate nursing students' knowledge acquisition.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Pollock, Jane W

    2010-01-01

    Although simulated clinical experience is being used increasingly in nursing education, vital evidence related to knowledge acquisition associated with simulated clinical experience does not exist. This intervention study used a 2×2 crossover design and equivalence testing to explore the effects of simulated clinical experiences on undergraduate students' (n = 74) knowledge acquisition in a fundamentals of nursing course. Following random assignment, students participated in laboratory-based simulated clinical experiences with high-fidelity human patient simulators and traditional clinical experiences and completed knowledge pretests and posttests. Analysis identified significant knowledge gain associated with both simulated and traditional clinical experiences, with the groups' knowledge scores being statistically significantly equivalent. A priori equivalence bounds around the difference between the groups were set at ± 5 points. Simulated clinical experience was found to be as effective as traditional clinical experience in promoting students' knowledge acquisition.

  6. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  7. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%). PMID:27131714

  8. Functional equivalence and evolutionary convergence in complex communities of microbial sponge symbionts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu; Reynolds, David; Liu, Michael; Stark, Manuel; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Webster, Nicole S; Thomas, Torsten

    2012-07-01

    Microorganisms often form symbiotic relationships with eukaryotes, and the complexity of these relationships can range from those with one single dominant symbiont to associations with hundreds of symbiont species. Microbial symbionts occupying equivalent niches in different eukaryotic hosts may share functional aspects, and convergent genome evolution has been reported for simple symbiont systems in insects. However, for complex symbiont communities, it is largely unknown how prevalent functional equivalence is and whether equivalent functions are conducted by evolutionarily convergent mechanisms. Sponges represent an evolutionarily divergent group of species with common physiological and ecological traits. They also host complex communities of microbial symbionts and thus are the ideal model to test whether functional equivalence and evolutionary convergence exist in complex symbiont communities across phylogenetically divergent hosts. Here we use a sampling design to determine the phylogenetic and functional profiles of microbial communities associated with six sponge species. We identify common functions in the six microbiomes, demonstrating the existence of functional equivalence. These core functions are consistent with our current understanding of the biological and ecological roles of sponge-associated microorganisms and also provide insight into symbiont functions. Importantly, core functions also are provided in each sponge species by analogous enzymes and biosynthetic pathways. Moreover, the abundance of elements involved in horizontal gene transfer suggests their key roles in the genomic evolution of symbionts. Our data thus demonstrate evolutionary convergence in complex symbiont communities and reveal the details and mechanisms that underpin the process. PMID:22699508

  9. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  10. Comparison of Alternative Equivalent Circuits of Induction Motor with Real Machine Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradna, J.; Bauer, J.; Fligl, S.; Hlinovsky, V.

    The algorithms based on separated control of the motor flux and torque is used in order to gain the maximum performance from the induction machine. To push the efficiency and dynamics limits of the IM to its limits mostly FOC or DTC control strategies are used. Both are based on the knowledge of the hardly measurable variable-machine flux. To obtain the information about inner machine flux models based on the machine equivalent circuit are mostly used. Therefore the accuracy of the equivalent circuits has direct influence on the accuracy of the machine control. To reduce the complexity of the mathematical model the resistances and inductances are concentrated to one component and three phase winding is assumed to be symmetrical. In order to design control strategy for the induction motor, system equations and equivalent circuit must be established at first. This paper examines and compares some of the issues of adequate machine modeling and attempts to provide a firmer basis for selection of an appropriate model and to confirm or disprove the equivalence of different approaches. The results of the IM model run up are then compared to the results obtained from the measurements on the real machine and the equivalency is discussed.

  11. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  12. Postflame reaction chemistry of dichloromethane: Variations in equivalence ratio and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sgro, L.A.; Koshland, C.P.; Lucas, D.; Sawyer, R.F.

    2000-03-01

    The authors report on the destruction pathways and byproduct formation of dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) in conditions typical of incinerator postflame regions (injection temperature = 900--1,200 K; equivalence ratio = 0.6, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1; residence time = 0.28--0.35 s). This is the first study to independently vary equivalence ratio and temperature, and evaluate their impacts on byproduct yield and destruction efficiency. The authors inject 750 ppm CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} into postflame combustion products and measure byproducts with extractive FTIR spectroscopy. They use a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and reaction rate analysis to predict the changes in reaction pathways as a function of equivalence ratio. The predictions for major products and several intermediate species compare well with experiments; the largest disparities are an underprediction of phosgene (CCl{sub 2}O) and an overprediction of methyl chloride (CH{sub 3}Cl). Both the experiment and the numerical predictions show increased destruction at lower equivalence ratios. However, the experiments reveal increased levels of stable chlorinated organics at lower equivalence ratios, opposite to the numerical prediction. The authors discuss reasons for this discrepancy and implications of these results for designing control strategies to promote full conversion to HCl and to reduce chlorinated byproduct emissions.

  13. Research on the equivalent circuit model of a circular flexural-vibration-research on the equivalent circuit model of a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer with moderate thickness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wenjin; Wang, Qinglei; Su, Xujian

    2013-07-01

    The equivalent circuit model of a piezoelectric transformer is useful in designing and optimizing the related driving circuits. Based on previous work, an equivalent circuit model for a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer with moderate thickness is proposed and validated by finite element analysis. The input impedance, voltage gain, and efficiency of the transformer are determined through computation. The basic behaviors of the transformer are shown by numerical results.

  14. Optimum structural sizing of conventional cantilever and joined wing configurations using equivalent beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Chen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for the optimum sizing of single and joined wing structures that is based on representing the built-up finite element model of the structure by an equivalent beam model. The low order beam model is computationally more efficient in an environment that requires repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program that requires geometry and loading data typically available from an aerodynamic synthesis program, to create the finite element model of the lifting surface and an equivalent beam model. A fully stressed design procedure is used to obtain rapid estimates of the optimum structural weight for the beam model for a given geometry, and a qualitative description of the material distribution over the wing structure. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative single wing and joined wing structures.

  15. Design and operation of a solar heating and cooling system for a residential size building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littles, J. W.; Humphries, W. R.; Cody, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The first year of operation of solar house is discussed. Selected design information, together with a brief system description is included. The house was equipped with an integrated solar heating and cooling system which uses fully automated state-of-the art. Evaluation of the data indicate that the solar house heating and cooling system is capable of supplying nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating and approximately 50 percent of the thermal energy required to operate the absorption cycle air conditioner.

  16. Unitary equivalent classes of one-dimensional quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hiromichi

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates unitary equivalent classes of one-dimensional quantum walks. We prove that one-dimensional quantum walks are unitary equivalent to quantum walks of Ambainis type and that translation-invariant one-dimensional quantum walks are Szegedy walks. We also present a necessary and sufficient condition for a one-dimensional quantum walk to be a Szegedy walk.

  17. 30 CFR 70.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentrations. 70.206 Section 70.206 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 70.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations. The concentration of respirable dust... concentration to an equivalent concentration as measured with an MRE instrument. To convert a concentration...

  18. 30 CFR 70.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concentrations. 70.206 Section 70.206 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 70.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations. The concentration of respirable dust... concentration to an equivalent concentration as measured with an MRE instrument. To convert a concentration...

  19. 30 CFR 70.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentrations. 70.206 Section 70.206 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 70.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations. The concentration of respirable dust... concentration to an equivalent concentration as measured with an MRE instrument. To convert a concentration...

  20. 30 CFR 70.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentrations. 70.206 Section 70.206 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 70.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations. The concentration of respirable dust... concentration to an equivalent concentration as measured with an MRE instrument. To convert a concentration...

  1. 30 CFR 70.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concentrations. 70.206 Section 70.206 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 70.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations. The concentration of respirable dust... concentration to an equivalent concentration as measured with an MRE instrument. To convert a concentration...

  2. 33 CFR 101.130 - Equivalent security measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equivalent security measures. 101... MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL General § 101.130 Equivalent security measures. (a) For any measure required by part 104, 105, or 106 of this subchapter, the owner or operator may substitute...

  3. Mechanical Equivalent of Heat--Software for a Thermistor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boleman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Mechanical Equivalent of Heat Apparatus from PASCO scientific provides the means for doing a simple experiment to determine the mechanical equivalent of heat, "J." A necessary step of this experiment is to determine the temperature of an aluminum cylinder. By measuring the resistance of a thermistor embedded in the cylinder, one is able to…

  4. Assessment Battery for Communication: Development of Two Equivalent Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosco, Francesca M.; Angeleri, Romina; Zuffranieri, Marco; Bara, Bruno G.; Sacco, Katiuscia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop and test two equivalent forms of the Assessment Battery for Communication (ABaCo), a tool for evaluating pragmatic abilities in patients with neuropsychological and psychiatric disorders. The equivalent forms were created using the data from a sample of 390 children, then tested in a sample of 30 patients with…

  5. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary...

  6. 40 CFR 63.469 - Equivalent methods of control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalent methods of control. 63.469... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.469 Equivalent methods of control. Upon written...

  7. 40 CFR 60.623 - Equivalent equipment and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equivalent equipment and procedures. 60... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.623 Equivalent equipment and procedures. (a) Upon written application from any person,...

  8. 40 CFR 63.469 - Equivalent methods of control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equivalent methods of control. 63.469... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.469 Equivalent methods of control. Upon written...

  9. 40 CFR 60.623 - Equivalent equipment and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equivalent equipment and procedures. 60... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.623 Equivalent equipment and procedures. (a) Upon written application from any person,...

  10. Equivalent source modeling of the main field using Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported on software development for equivalent dipole source modeling of the main magnetic field. This includes a spatial statistical output capability, a subroutine to compute the equivalent spherical harmonic representation from the dipole distribution, and capability to plot the global locations of the dipoles and the values of the source magnetization.

  11. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  12. Nodal Structure and the Partitioning of Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lanny; Watanabe-Rose, Mari

    2008-01-01

    By definition, all of the stimuli in an equivalence class have to be functionally interchangeable with each other. The present experiment, however, demonstrated that this was not the case when using post-class-formation dual-option response transfer tests. With college students, two 4-node 6-member equivalence classes with nodal structures of…

  13. Teaching Brain-Behavior Relations Economically with Stimulus Equivalence Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Covey, Daniel P.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional interventions based on stimulus equivalence provide learners with the opportunity to acquire skills that are not directly taught, thereby improving the efficiency of instructional efforts. The present report describes a study in which equivalence-based instruction was used to teach college students facts regarding brain anatomy and…

  14. 33 CFR 101.130 - Equivalent security measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalent security measures. 101.130 Section 101.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: GENERAL General § 101.130 Equivalent security measures. (a) For...

  15. Some equivalences between the auxiliary field method and envelope theory

    SciTech Connect

    Buisseret, Fabien; Semay, Claude; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2009-03-15

    The auxiliary field method has been recently proposed as an efficient technique to compute analytical approximate solutions of eigenequations in quantum mechanics. We show that the auxiliary field method is completely equivalent to the envelope theory, which is another well-known procedure to analytically solve eigenequations, although relying on different principles a priori. This equivalence leads to a deeper understanding of both frameworks.

  16. 49 CFR 37.105 - Equivalent service standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent service standard. 37.105 Section 37.105 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Acquisition of Accessible Vehicles by Private Entities § 37.105 Equivalent service...

  17. Assessing Measurement Equivalence in Ordered-Categorical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elosua, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Assessing measurement equivalence in the framework of the common factor linear models (CFL) is known as factorial invariance. This methodology is used to evaluate the equivalence among the parameters of a measurement model among different groups. However, when dichotomous, Likert, or ordered responses are used, one of the assumptions of the CFL is…

  18. Probability of Equivalence Formation: Familiar Stimuli and Training Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arntzen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    The present study was conducted to show how responding in accord with equivalence relations changes as a function of position of familiar stimuli, pictures, and with the use of nonsense syllables in an MTO-training structure. Fifty college students were tested for responding in accord with equivalence in an AB, CB, DB, and EB training structure.…

  19. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary...

  20. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary...

  1. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary...

  2. 26 CFR 1.871-15 - Treatment of dividend equivalents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of dividend equivalents. 1.871-15 Section 1.871-15 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME... Treatment of dividend equivalents. (a) through (c) (d) Specified NPCs—(1) Specified NPCs before January...

  3. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary...

  4. 43 CFR 426.11 - Class 1 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equivalency determinations have been made, individual landowners with land classified as 2 or 3 for... measured in terms of net income per acre (reflecting both productivity and costs of production). The... farm income will be the measure of productivity to establish equivalency factors reflecting the...

  5. 43 CFR 426.11 - Class 1 equivalency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equivalency determinations have been made, individual landowners with land classified as 2 or 3 for... measured in terms of net income per acre (reflecting both productivity and costs of production). The... farm income will be the measure of productivity to establish equivalency factors reflecting the...

  6. Equivalence relations in individuals with language limitations and mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Jennifer; Saunders, Kathryn J

    2003-01-01

    The study of equivalence relations exhibited by individuals with mental retardation and language limitations holds the promise of providing information of both theoretical and practical significance. We reviewed the equivalence literature with this population, defined in terms of subjects having moderate, severe, or profound mental retardation. The literature includes 55 such individuals, most of whom showed positive outcomes on equivalence tests. The results to date suggest that naming skills are not necessary for positive equivalence test outcomes. Thus far, however, relatively few subjects with minimal language have been studied. Moreover, we suggest that the scientific contributions of studies in this area would be enhanced with better documentation of language skills and other subject characteristics. With recent advances in laboratory procedures for establishing the baseline performances necessary for equivalence tests, this research area is poised for rapid growth. PMID:13677612

  7. [Equivalence classes formation applied to learning musical notes].

    PubMed

    Escuer Acín, Emilio; García García, Andrés; Bohórquez Zayas, Cristóbal; Gutiérrez Domínguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-02-01

    Three experiments involving training and application of equivalence classes were carried out. In the first of them, with 6-6 years old children, and applying the equivalence classes logic to musical symbols and sounds learning, the necessary relations to build three equivalence classes (do, mi, sol) of five members each were acquired. In second and third experiments, five and seven equivalence classes (musical notes) of five member each were obtained. Six and a half years old children and one 17 years old Down syndrome diagnosed child took part in them, respectively. Results highlight the theoretical meaning of equivalence classes as explanation of human symbolic behavior, as the educational incomes of improving learning of basic elements in artistic skills.

  8. Job embeddedness scoring: measurement equivalence between rural and urban nurses.

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Kim, MyoungJin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the measurement equivalency (ME) of the job embeddedness (JE) instrument for rural and urban registered nurses (RNs) using a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional mailed survey. JE represents the sum of reasons an employee remains at the present job. RNs from both rural and urban areas returned a 40-item JE instrument designed to assess their level of embeddedness. Analysis was performed using a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis for JE ratings of rural and urban RNs. The findings indicated that the original 40-item JE instrument needed to be respecified to achieve adequate fit for the sample of rural and urban RNs. This 32-item respecified instrument demonstrated that rural and urban RNs use the same metric when giving ratings for JE items. The findings of ME across rural and urban RNs facilitate comparisons between the two groups. The implications of these findings are that differences in ratings between rural and urban RNs may be attributed to real differences and not merely measurement artifact. Examination of these differences may lead to real strategies to retain nurses, thus mitigating the impact of the global nursing shortage. PMID:24053001

  9. A Sounding Rocket Payload to Test the Weak Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2014-03-01

    We are developing SR-POEM, a payload for detecting a possible violation of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) while on a sounding rocket's free-fall trajectory. We estimate an uncertainty of σ (η) <=10-17 from a single flight. The experiment consists of calibration maneuvers plus eight 120 s drops of the two test masses (TMs). The instrument orientation will be reversed between successive drops, which reverses the signal but leaves most systematic errors unchanged. Each TM comprises three bars and a Y-shaped connector. The six bars are in a hexagonal housing and stand in a plane perpendicular to the symmetry axis (Z axis) of the payload and close to its CM. At a distance of 0.3 m along the Z axis, there is a highly stable plate that holds six of our tracking frequency laser gauges (TFGs), which measure the distances to the bars. The TMs are surrounded by capacitance plates, which allow both measurement and control of TM position and orientation. A central theme of the design is the prevention and correction of systematic error. Temperature stability of the instrument is essential and, during the brief night-time flight, it is achieved passively. This work was supported in part by NASA grant NNX08AO04G.

  10. New calculations of neutron kerma coefficients and dose equivalent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhou; Chen, Jinxiang

    2008-06-01

    For neutron energies ranging from 1 keV to 20 MeV, the kerma coefficients for elements H, C, N, O, light water, and ICRU tissue were deduced respectively from microscopic cross sections and Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP code). The results are consistent within admitted uncertainties with values evaluated by an international group (Chadwick et al 1999 Med. Phys. 26 974-91). The ambient dose equivalent generated in the ISO-recommended neutron field for an Am-Be neutron source (ISO 8529-1: 2001(E)) was obtained from the kerma coefficients and Monte Carlo calculation. In addition, it was calculated directly by multiplying the neutron fluence by the fluence-to-ambient dose conversion coefficients recommended by ICRP (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74 (Oxford: Pergamon)). The two results agree well with each other. The main feature of this work is our Monte Carlo simulation design and the treatments differing from the work of others in the calculation of neutron energy transfer in non-elastic processes. PMID:18495982

  11. Optimizing receiver configurations for resolution of equivalent dipole polarizabilities in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2004-02-12

    Equivalent dipole polarizabilities are a succinct way to summarize the inductive response of an isolated conductive body at distances greater than the scale of the body. At any time lag or frequency, an equivalent dipole polarizability response is comprised of 9 parameters; six specifying an equivalent dipole polarizability matrix (which is symmetric) and three specifying the apparent location of the body center. Smith and Morrison (2002) give equations for calculating uncertainties in equivalent dipole polarizability and position based on analysis of an iterative linearized inversion. Here, the root mean squared uncertainty in polarizability is weighted and summed over a number of control points and minimized using an evolutionary algorithm for a number of instrument designs. Three families of designs are presented: single transmitter systems for use on a 2-D grid of positions with negligible error in relative instrument location, two transmitter systems for use on a line of positions with negligible error in relative instrument location, and three transmitter systems for stand alone use. Results for the one and two transmitter systems are strongly degraded by errors in instrument position, whereas the three transmitter systems are insensitive to instrument positioning errors.

  12. Control equivalent turbulence input model for the UH-60 helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusardi, Jeff

    Flight test data from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter hovering in the atmospheric turbulence downwind of a large cube-shaped hanger on a wind day were collected. An inverse modeling method was used to extract the control inputs that are required to replicate the portion of the aircraft response attributable to atmospheric disturbances from the flight-test data. Based on the extracted control inputs, a parametric Control Equivalent Turbulence Input (CETI) model comprised of white-noise driven filters that have a Dryden-type form and are scalable for varying levels of turbulence were developed. The outputs of the filters are disturbance time histories that sum with the pilot's inputs, to replicate the effects of atmospheric turbulence in calm atmospheric conditions. A ground-based piloted simulation study was conducted in the NASA/Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) comparing the empirically based CETI model with flight-test data and with a complex Simulation Of Rotor Blade Element Turbulence (SORBET) model. Two test pilots performed precision hover tasks with increasing levels of simulated turbulence from both the CETI and SORBET models. The results of the simulation study showed good pilot acceptance of the CETI model and provided a good level of validation of the more complex rotating frame turbulence model. An in-flight simulation study was conducted on the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) UH-60 helicopter using the CETI model. Two test pilots performed a precision hover task on calm days with simulated CETI turbulence. Aircraft response metrics showed good agreement between a hover task with CETI simulated turbulence and the same task in atmospheric turbulence. Both pilots commented that the RASCAL's response to CETI turbulence was similar to the response hovering downwind of the large cube-shaped hangar on a windy day. The CETI model developed in this dissertation simulates turbulence by generating equivalent disturbance inputs to

  13. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.63 and 1.77, respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 2.05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1982-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a transonic compressor stage is presented over the stable operating range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. The stage was designed for a pressure ratio of 2.05 at a flow of 20.2 kg/sec and a tip speed of 455 m/sec. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.849 and 0.831, respectively, at the minimum flow condition. The stage stall point occurred at a flow higher than the design flow.

  14. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.63 and 1.78, respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 1.82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1982-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a transonic compressor stage is presented over the stable operating flow range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. The stage was designed for a pressure ratio of 1.82 at a flow 20.2 kg/sec and a tip speed of 455 m/sec. At design speed the stage achieved a peak efficiency of 0.821 at a pressure ratio of 1.817. The stage stall margin at design speed based on conditions at stall and peak efficiency was about 11 percent.

  15. Thévenin equivalence in disorderless quantum networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, C. A.; Wu, C. H.

    2015-01-14

    We outline the procedure of extending the Thévenin equivalence principle for classical electric circuits to reducing Aharonov-Bohm-based quantum networks into equivalent models. With examples, we show from first principles how the requirements are related to the electron band structure's Fermi level and the lattice spacing of the network. Quantum networks of varying degrees of coupling strength from four basic classifications of single and double entangled loops sharing symmetry and highly correlated band structures are used to demonstrate the concept. We show the limitations of how the principle may be applied. Several classes of examples are given and their equivalent forms are shown.

  16. An equivalent spring for nonlinear springs in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radomirovic, Dragi; Kovacic, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    This work is concerned with nonlinear springs in series with the aim of obtaining the equivalent spring and its characteristics. The case of two linear springs in series is presented first as a basis for the extension to the cases of two purely nonlinear springs in series and two or more equal Duffing springs in series, which both allow the exact determination of the equivalent spring. Then, the most general case of two nonlinear springs with odd-power terms and different coefficients is examined. The condition is derived in terms of their characteristics for which the exact solution for the equivalent spring can be obtained.

  17. Singularity theory of fitness functions under dimorphism equivalence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Golubitsky, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We apply singularity theory to classify monomorphic singular points as they occur in adaptive dynamics. Our approach is based on a new equivalence relation called dimorphism equivalence, which is the largest equivalence relation on strategy functions that preserves ESS singularities, CvSS singularities, and dimorphisms. Specifically, we classify singularities up to topological codimension two and compute their normal forms and universal unfoldings. These calculations lead to the classification of local mutual invasibility plots that can be seen generically in systems with two parameters.

  18. Weight propagation and equivalent horsepower for alternate-engined cars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, G. J.; Kurtz, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate properly the consequences of replacing conventional Otto-cycle engines with alternate power systems, comparisons must be carried out at the vehicle level with functionally equivalent cars. This paper presents the development and application of a procedure for establishing equivalent vehicles. A systematic weight propagation methodology, based on detailed weight breakdowns and influence factors, yields the vehicle weight impacts due to changes in engine weight and power. Performance-matching criteria, utilizing a vehicle simulation program, are then employed to establish Otto-engine-equivalent vehicles, whose characteristics can form the basis for alternative engine evaluations.

  19. Criterion for SLOCC equivalence of multipartite quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tinggui; Zhao, Ming-Jing; Huang, Xiaofen

    2016-10-01

    We study the stochastic local operation and classical communication (SLOCC) equivalence for arbitrary dimensional multipartite quantum states. For multipartite pure states, we present a necessary and sufficient criterion in terms of their coefficient matrices. This condition can be used to classify some SLOCC equivalent quantum states with coefficient matrices having the same rank. For multipartite mixed state, we provide a necessary and sufficient condition by means of the realignment of matrix. Some detailed examples are given to identify the SLOCC equivalence of multipartite quantum states.

  20. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR< 17 and fuel adiabat α > 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production.

  1. Stress distribution in and equivalent width of flanges of wide, thin-wall steel beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, George

    1940-01-01

    The use of different forms of wide-flange, thin-wall steel beams is becoming increasingly widespread. Part of the information necessary for a national design of such members is the knowledge of the stress distribution in and the equivalent width of the flanges of such beams. This problem is analyzed in this paper on the basis of the theory of plane stress. As a result, tables and curves are given from which the equivalent width of any given beam can be read directly for use in practical design. An investigation is given of the limitations of this analysis due to the fact that extremely wide and thin flanges tend to curve out of their plane toward the neutral axis. A summary of test data confirms very satisfactorily the analytical results.

  2. The case of bruce: A teacher's model of his students' algebraic thinking about equivalent expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallagan, Jean E.

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a middle school mathematics teacher's model of his students' responses to algebraic tasks involving equivalent expressions and the distributive property. The teacher engaged in two model-eliciting activities designed for teachers by creating a library of his students' work and an accompanying "Ways of Thinking"[WOT] sheet (Doerr & Lesh, 2003). These activities were designed to help reveal the teachers' models of students' algebraic thinking and to promote the development of that model. Results of the analysis showed that the teacher developed a clearer understanding of the role of a variable in algebraic instruction. The teacher employed visual strategies for the first time and began to perceive their usefulness in helping students understand the equivalence of two expressions.

  3. Equivalent circuit for VO{sub 2} phase change material film in reconfigurable frequency selective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sanphuang, Varittha; Ghalichechian, Nima; Nahar, Niru K.; Volakis, John L.

    2015-12-21

    We developed equivalent circuits of phase change materials based on vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films. These circuits are used to model VO{sub 2} thin films for reconfigurable frequency selective surfaces (FSSs). This is important as it provides a way for designing complex structures. A reconfigurable FSS filter using VO{sub 2} ON/OFF switches is designed demonstrating −60 dB isolation between the states. This filter is used to provide the transmission and reflection responses of the FSS in the frequency range of 0.1–0.6 THz. The comparison between equivalent circuit and full-wave simulation shows excellent agreement.

  4. Equivalence Reliability among the FITNESSGRAM[R] Upper-Body Tests of Muscular Strength and Endurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Todd; Barfield, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the equivalence reliability between the suggested FITNESSGRAM[R] muscular strength and endurance test, the 90[degrees] push-up (PSU), and alternate FITNESSGRAM[R] tests of upper-body strength and endurance (i.e., modified pull-up [MPU], flexed-arm hang [FAH], and pull-up [PU]). Children (N = 383) in Grades 3…

  5. Dosimetric verification of the anisotropic analytical algorithm in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kaoru; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the accuracy of dose calculations performed by the convolution/superposition based anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in lung equivalent heterogeneities with and without bone equivalent heterogeneities. Methods: Calculations of PDDs using the AAA and Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C) were compared to ionization chamber measurements with a heterogeneous phantom consisting of lung equivalent and bone equivalent materials. Both 6 and 10 MV photon beams of 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were used for the simulations. Furthermore, changes of energy spectrum with depth for the heterogeneous phantom using MCNP were calculated. Results: The ionization chamber measurements and MCNP calculations in a lung equivalent phantom were in good agreement, having an average deviation of only 0.64{+-}0.45%. For both 6 and 10 MV beams, the average deviation was less than 2% for the 4x4 and 10x10 cm{sup 2} fields in the water-lung equivalent phantom and the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field in the water-lung-bone equivalent phantom. Maximum deviations for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field in the lung equivalent phantom before and after the bone slab were 5.0% and 4.1%, respectively. The Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated an increase of the low-energy photon component in these regions, more for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field compared to the 4x4 cm{sup 2} field. Conclusions: The low-energy photon by Monte Carlo simulation component increases sharply in larger fields when there is a significant presence of bone equivalent heterogeneities. This leads to great changes in the build-up and build-down at the interfaces of different density materials. The AAA calculation modeling of the effect is not deemed to be sufficiently accurate.

  6. 12 CFR 28.15 - Capital equivalency deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... issuer or the instrument; (iv) Repurchase agreements; or (v) Other similar assets permitted by the OCC to... repurchase agreements on a case-by-case basis. (b) Increase in capital equivalency deposits. For...

  7. Improved Equivalent Linearization Implementations Using Nonlinear Stiffness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents two new implementations of equivalent linearization for solving geometrically nonlinear random vibration problems of complicated structures. The implementations are given the acronym ELSTEP, for "Equivalent Linearization using a STiffness Evaluation Procedure." Both implementations of ELSTEP are fundamentally the same in that they use a novel nonlinear stiffness evaluation procedure to numerically compute otherwise inaccessible nonlinear stiffness terms from commercial finite element programs. The commercial finite element program MSC/NASTRAN (NASTRAN) was chosen as the core of ELSTEP. The FORTRAN implementation calculates the nonlinear stiffness terms and performs the equivalent linearization analysis outside of NASTRAN. The Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) implementation performs these operations within NASTRAN. Both provide nearly identical results. Within each implementation, two error minimization approaches for the equivalent linearization procedure are available - force and strain energy error minimization. Sample results for a simply supported rectangular plate are included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  8. Development of an Equivalent Wind Plant Power-Curve: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.; Ela, E.; Orwig, K.

    2010-06-01

    Development of an equivalent wind plant power-curve becomes highly desirable and useful in predicting plant output for a given wind forecast. Such a development is described and summarized in this paper.

  9. Equivalence ratio and constriction effects on RBCC thrust augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koupriyanov, M.; Etele, J.

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of a variable area rocket based combined cycle engine with and without simultaneous mixing and combustion is presented. The flowfield is solved using a steady, quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid control volume formulation with combustion effects included via a generalized equilibrium calculation. Compression augmentation is shown to be sensitive to the equivalence ratio within the primary rocket chamber, where ejector section performance is greatest at both low and high equivalence ratios but near a minimum at stoichiometric conditions. The thrust generated by the RBCC engine compared to that generated by the same rocket in isolation can be increased by as much as 12% at constriction ratios of between 45% and 50%. Thrust augmentation is also shown to vary with equivalence ratio, where for a fixed geometry the maximum thrust is generated at equivalence ratios slightly below unity.

  10. Stimulus generalization and equivalence classes: a model for natural categories.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, L; Reeve, K F; Adams, B J; Verhave, T

    1991-01-01

    Two three-member classes were formed by training AB and BC using a conditional discrimination procedure. The A and B stimuli were nonsense syllables, and the C stimuli were sets of "short" or "long" lines. To test for equivalence, C1 or C2 was presented as a sample with A1 and A2 as comparisons. Once the class-related comparison was chosen consistently, different line lengths were substituted for the training lines in the CA tests. In general, the likelihood of choosing a given comparison was an inverse function of the difference in the length of the test line from the training line. Stimuli in an equivalence class became functionally related not only to each other but also to novel stimuli that resembled a member of the equivalence class. The combination of primary generalization and equivalence class formation, then, can serve as a model to account for the development of naturally occurring categories. PMID:2066703

  11. The equivalence between dislocation pile-ups and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Gao, Q.

    1990-01-01

    Cracks and dislocation pile-ups are equivalent to each other. In this paper, the physical equivalence between cracks and pile-ups is delineated, and the relationshps between crack-extension force, force on the leading dislocation, stress-intensity factor, and dislocation density are reviewed and summarized. These relations make it possible to extend quantitatively the recent advances in the concepts and practices of fracture mechanics to the studies of microfractures and microplastic deformations.

  12. Cohomology of groups and splendid equivalences of derived categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    In an earlier paper we studied the impact of equivalences between derived categories of group rings on their cohomology rings. Especially the group of auto-equivalences TrPic(RG) of the derived category of a group ring RG as introduced by Raphaël Rouquier and the author defines an action on the cohomology ring of this group. We study this action with respect to the restriction map, transfer, conjugation and the local structure of the group G.

  13. A Derived Transfer of Mood Functions through Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Smeets, Paul M.; Luciano, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the transfer of induced happy and sad mood functions through equivalence relations. Sixteen subjects participated in a combined equivalence and mood induction procedure. In Phase 1, all subjects were trained in 2 conditional discriminations using a matching-to-sample format (i.e., A1-B1, A2-B2, A1-C1, A2-C2). In…

  14. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle as a Probe of Modified Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jonas P; Overduin, James M; Poyneer, Alexander J

    2016-08-12

    The proposed satellite test of the equivalence principle (STEP) will detect possible violations of the weak equivalence principle by measuring relative accelerations between test masses of different composition with a precision of one part in 10^{18}. A serendipitous by-product of the experimental design is that the absolute or common-mode acceleration of the test masses is also measured to high precision as they oscillate along a common axis under the influence of restoring forces produced by the position sensor currents, which in drag-free mode lead to Newtonian accelerations as small as 10^{-14}  g. This is deep inside the low-acceleration regime where modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) diverges strongly from the Newtonian limit of general relativity. We show that MOND theories (including those based on the widely used "n family" of interpolating functions as well as the covariant tensor-vector-scalar formulation) predict an easily detectable increase in the frequency of oscillations of the STEP test masses if the strong equivalence principle holds. If it does not hold, MOND predicts a cumulative increase in oscillation amplitude which is also detectable. STEP thus provides a new and potentially decisive test of Newton's law of inertia, as well as the equivalence principle in both its strong and weak forms. PMID:27563947

  15. Exact Power and Sample Size Calculations for the Two One-Sided Tests of Equivalence

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2016-01-01

    Equivalent testing has been strongly recommended for demonstrating the comparability of treatment effects in a wide variety of research fields including medical studies. Although the essential properties of the favorable two one-sided tests of equivalence have been addressed in the literature, the associated power and sample size calculations were illustrated mainly for selecting the most appropriate approximate method. Moreover, conventional power analysis does not consider the allocation restrictions and cost issues of different sample size choices. To extend the practical usefulness of the two one-sided tests procedure, this article describes exact approaches to sample size determinations under various allocation and cost considerations. Because the presented features are not generally available in common software packages, both R and SAS computer codes are presented to implement the suggested power and sample size computations for planning equivalence studies. The exact power function of the TOST procedure is employed to compute optimal sample sizes under four design schemes allowing for different allocation and cost concerns. The proposed power and sample size methodology should be useful for medical sciences to plan equivalence studies. PMID:27598468

  16. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle as a Probe of Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Overduin, James M.; Poyneer, Alexander J.

    2016-08-01

    The proposed satellite test of the equivalence principle (STEP) will detect possible violations of the weak equivalence principle by measuring relative accelerations between test masses of different composition with a precision of one part in 1 018 . A serendipitous by-product of the experimental design is that the absolute or common-mode acceleration of the test masses is also measured to high precision as they oscillate along a common axis under the influence of restoring forces produced by the position sensor currents, which in drag-free mode lead to Newtonian accelerations as small as 10-14 g . This is deep inside the low-acceleration regime where modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) diverges strongly from the Newtonian limit of general relativity. We show that MOND theories (including those based on the widely used "n family" of interpolating functions as well as the covariant tensor-vector-scalar formulation) predict an easily detectable increase in the frequency of oscillations of the STEP test masses if the strong equivalence principle holds. If it does not hold, MOND predicts a cumulative increase in oscillation amplitude which is also detectable. STEP thus provides a new and potentially decisive test of Newton's law of inertia, as well as the equivalence principle in both its strong and weak forms.

  17. Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle as a Probe of Modified Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jonas P; Overduin, James M; Poyneer, Alexander J

    2016-08-12

    The proposed satellite test of the equivalence principle (STEP) will detect possible violations of the weak equivalence principle by measuring relative accelerations between test masses of different composition with a precision of one part in 10^{18}. A serendipitous by-product of the experimental design is that the absolute or common-mode acceleration of the test masses is also measured to high precision as they oscillate along a common axis under the influence of restoring forces produced by the position sensor currents, which in drag-free mode lead to Newtonian accelerations as small as 10^{-14}  g. This is deep inside the low-acceleration regime where modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) diverges strongly from the Newtonian limit of general relativity. We show that MOND theories (including those based on the widely used "n family" of interpolating functions as well as the covariant tensor-vector-scalar formulation) predict an easily detectable increase in the frequency of oscillations of the STEP test masses if the strong equivalence principle holds. If it does not hold, MOND predicts a cumulative increase in oscillation amplitude which is also detectable. STEP thus provides a new and potentially decisive test of Newton's law of inertia, as well as the equivalence principle in both its strong and weak forms.

  18. Exact Power and Sample Size Calculations for the Two One-Sided Tests of Equivalence.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2016-01-01

    Equivalent testing has been strongly recommended for demonstrating the comparability of treatment effects in a wide variety of research fields including medical studies. Although the essential properties of the favorable two one-sided tests of equivalence have been addressed in the literature, the associated power and sample size calculations were illustrated mainly for selecting the most appropriate approximate method. Moreover, conventional power analysis does not consider the allocation restrictions and cost issues of different sample size choices. To extend the practical usefulness of the two one-sided tests procedure, this article describes exact approaches to sample size determinations under various allocation and cost considerations. Because the presented features are not generally available in common software packages, both R and SAS computer codes are presented to implement the suggested power and sample size computations for planning equivalence studies. The exact power function of the TOST procedure is employed to compute optimal sample sizes under four design schemes allowing for different allocation and cost concerns. The proposed power and sample size methodology should be useful for medical sciences to plan equivalence studies. PMID:27598468

  19. Piezogenerator impedance matching using Mason equivalent circuit for harvester identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Richard, Claude

    2014-04-01

    Any piezoelectric generator structure can be modeled close to its resonance by an equivalent circuit derived from the well known Mason equivalent circuit. This equivalent circuit can therefore be used in order to optimize the harvested power using usual electrical impedance matching. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the full process leading to the definition of the proper passive load allowing the optimization of the harvested energy of any harvesting device. First, the electric equivalent circuit of the generator is derived from the Mason equivalent circuit of a seismic harvester. Theoretical ideal impedance matching and optimal load analyze is then given emphasizing the fact that for a given acceleration a constant optimal output power is achievable for any frequency as long as the optimal load is feasible. Identification of the equivalent circuit of an experimental seismic harvester is then derived and matched impedance is defined both theoretically and experimentally. Results demonstrate that an optimal load can always be obtained and that the corresponding output power is constant. However, it is very sensitive to this impedance, and that even if impedance matching is a longtime well known technique, it is not really experimentally and practically achievable.

  20. [Generalization of money-handling though training in equivalence relationships].

    PubMed

    Vives-Montero, Carmen; Valero-Aguayo, Luis; Ascanio, Lourdes

    2011-02-01

    This research used a matching-to-sample procedure and equivalence learning process with language and verbal tasks. In the study, an application of the equivalence relationship of money was used with several kinds of euro coins presented. The sample consisted of 16 children (8 in the experimental group and 8 in the control group) aged 5 years. The prerequisite behaviors, the identification of coins and the practical use of different euro coins, were assessed in the pre and post phases for both groups. The children in the experimental group performed an equivalence task using the matching-to-sample procedure. This consisted of a stimulus sample and four matching stimuli, using a series of euro coins with equivalent value in each set. The children in the control group did not undergo this training process. The results showed a large variability in the children's data of the equivalence tests. The experimental group showed the greatest pre and post changes in the statistically significant data. They also showed a greater generalization in the identification of money and in the use of euro coins than the control group. The implications for educational training and the characteristics of the procedure used here for coin equivalence are discussed.