Science.gov

Sample records for 100-year institutional control

  1. Tuskegee: 100 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Renelda

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history and accomplishments of Tuskegee Institute over the past 100 years. Highlights the role played by Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. DuBois; discusses the career of the school's retiring president, Luther Foster. Provides information on the new president, Dr. Benjamin Payton, and discusses future directions for the college. (APM)

  2. NETL: The First 100 Years

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory celebrates 100 years of innovative energy technology development. NETL has been a leader in energy technology development. This video takes a look back at the many accomplishments over the past 100 years. These advances benefit the American people, enhance our nation's energy security and protect our natural resources.

  3. OUR FIRST 100 YEARS, HIGHLIGHTS OF CENTENNIAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE (MARYLAND SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF, FREDERICK, MARYLAND, MARCH 7-8, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State School for the Deaf, Frederick.

    TWO SPEECHES PRESENTED AT THE CENTENNIAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE OF THE MARYLAND SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF IN MARCH 1968 ARE CONTAINED IN THIS BOOKLET ALONG WITH A SHORT HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL AND A LIST OF AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS REPRESENTED. HELMER R. MYKLEBUST, IN "LEARNING AND EDUCATIONAL FAILURE IN DEAF CHILDREN--PSYCHONEUROLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS,"…

  4. [100 years' of clinical electrocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Mijo

    2003-01-01

    In 1903 Willem Einthoven published in Pflügers Arch his classic article on the investigation of human electrocardiogram by his string galvanometer. Many historians of medicine, Einthoven also marked that publication as the beginning of clinical electrocardiography. Many investigators like Galvani, Manteucci, Kölliker, Müller, Lipmann, Waller, Ader, Einthoven, Lewis, Wilson and others participated in creation and development of electrocardiogram. From that time electrocardiogram quickly became, and has remained the most essential diagnostic laboratory tool in investigation of heart diseases. The aim of this article is to remind us of the beginning of this part of cardiology 100 years ago. PMID:15209030

  5. 100 years of Lewy pathology.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    In 1817, James Parkinson described the symptoms of the shaking palsy, a disease that was subsequently defined in greater detail, and named after Parkinson, by Jean-Martin Charcot. Parkinson expected that the publication of his monograph would lead to a rapid elucidation of the anatomical substrate of the shaking palsy; in the event, this process took almost a century. In 1912, Fritz Heinrich Lewy identified the protein aggregates that define Parkinson disease (PD) in some brain regions outside the substantia nigra. In 1919, Konstantin Nikolaevich Tretiakoff found similar aggregates in the substantia nigra and named them after Lewy. In the 1990s, α-synuclein was identified as the main constituent of the Lewy pathology, and its aggregation was shown to be central to PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. In 2003, a staging scheme for idiopathic PD was introduced, according to which α-synuclein pathology originates in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve and progresses from there to other brain regions, including the substantia nigra. In this article, we review the relevance of Lewy's discovery 100 years ago for the current understanding of PD and related disorders. PMID:23183883

  6. Convergence: Human Intelligence The Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    How might human intelligence evolve over the next 100 years? This issue paper explores that idea. First, the paper summarizes five emerging perspectives about human intelligence: Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences theory, Robert Sternberg's triarchic theory of intelligence, Ellen Langer's mindfulness theory, David Perkins' learnable…

  7. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  8. Budgetary Control Procedures for Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Ray M.

    Budgetary control procedures for not-for-profit institutions are presented in this compilation of budgetary materials and ideas gathered at the Program for Institutional Administrators at the University of Notre Dame. Budgetary reporting and control are suggested as the most effective tools for coordinating and controlling the acquisition and use…

  9. Remembering Robert Goddard's vision 100 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” —such are the goals of most of us.Yet a few always exist who feel called by a higher purpose. Society often owes them a great deal.Robert Hutchins Goddard, whose work made spaceflight possible, found his vision 100 years ago this October as a youth of 17. His family was staying on the farm of a relative, when he was asked to trim the branches of a cherry tree behind the barn.

  10. Vitamins: preparing for the next 100 years.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2012-10-01

    The insights gained from the last 100 years of vitamin research and applications have contributed substantially to our fundamental understanding of biology and importantly to the promotion of human health. There is no reason to think that the next 100 years will be any less fruitful if we are committed to preparing for them, particularly by changing four critical nutrition paradigms. First, we must move beyond the concept of preventing vitamin deficiencies and inadequacies to establishing health and, further, to creating optimal physiological functions. Each essential vitamin possesses different concentration thresholds for its variety of effects and the required balance necessary to achieving each has yet to be fully defined. Second, we must apply the research approaches and methods of “-omics,” systems biology, and imaging technologies to define the dynamic role of vitamins and their broad array of genomic, molecular, biochemical, and functional interactions. Such work is necessary to understand the multiplicity of vitamin actions and ultimately apply them directly at the level of the individual. Third, we must revise the concept of evidence-based nutrition away from its current hierarchical system to recognize in a comprehensive and integrated way the attributes of each type of approach to research. To adhere to a single gold standard of the randomized clinical trial ignores both how we have moved forward so productively during the last 100 years and the vital information to be gained from basic research and other human studies; further, it acts to stifle innovation in both scientific and regulatory affairs. Fourth, we must understand that changes in the supply and distribution of food during the next century are likely to be at least as dramatic as those which have occurred over this last one. For example, inevitable environmental constraints will require more food protein be derived from plant than animal sources, a shift that will directly impact the

  11. 100 Years of the Physics of Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John

    2013-10-01

    The Child-Langmuir Law (CL), discovered 100 years ago, gives the maximum current that can be transported across a planar diode in the steady state. As a quintessential example of the impact of space-charge shielding near a charged surface, it is central to the studies of high current diodes, such as high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics, electron and ion sources, and high current drivers used in high-energy density physics experiments. CL remains a touchstone of fundamental sheath physics, including contemporary studies of nano-scale quantum diodes and plasmonic devices. Its solid state analog is the Mott-Gurney law, governing the maximum charge injection in solids, such as organic materials and other dielectrics, which is important to energy devices, such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. This paper reviews the important advances in the physics of diodes since the discovery of CL, including virtual cathode formation and extension of CL to multiple dimensions, to the quantum regime, and to ultrafast processes. We will review the influence of magnetic fields, multiple species in bipolar flow, electromagnetic and time dependent effects in both short pulse and high frequency THz limits, and single electron regimes. Transitions from various emission mechanisms (thermionic, field, and photo-emission) to the space charge limited state (CL) will be addressed, especially highlighting important simulation and experimental developments in selected contemporary areas of study. This talk will stress the fundamental physical links between the physics of beams to limiting currents in other areas, such as low temperature plasmas, laser plasmas, and space propulsion. Also emphasized is the role of non-equilibrium phenomena associated with materials and plasmas in close contact. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. Technique for estimating depths of 100-year floods in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, Herbert N., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are developed for estimating 100-year flood depths in natural channels of unregulated Pennsylvania streams that drain less than 2,200 square miles. Equations and graphs are presented relating the depth of the 100-year flood above median stage and drainage area in five defined hydrologic areas in the State. Another graph defines the relation between drainage area and median depth of flow over the low point of riffles. Thus 100-year depths on riffles can be estimated by summing depth values derived from two simple relations.

  13. 100-Year Flood-It's All About Chance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Dinicola, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In the 1960's, the United States government decided to use the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood as the basis for the National Flood Insurance Program. The 1-percent AEP flood was thought to be a fair balance between protecting the public and overly stringent regulation. Because the 1-percent AEP flood has a 1 in 100 chance of being equaled or exceeded in any 1 year, and it has an average recurrence interval of 100 years, it often is referred to as the '100-year flood'. The term '100-year flood' is part of the national lexicon, but is often a source of confusion by those not familiar with flood science and statistics. This poster is an attempt to explain the concept, probabilistic nature, and inherent uncertainties of the '100-year flood' to the layman.

  14. Spring wheat gliadins: Have they changed in 100 years?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been many hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars released in North Dakota during the last 100 years. These cultivars have been improved for various characteristics such as, adaptation to weather conditions, high yield, and good milling and baking quality. The objectives of this study wer...

  15. 100 Years of Commitment to Children: Change and Continuity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima

    The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) is the oldest philanthropy in the nation focused on improving the life prospects of children. This booklet, produced for FCD's centennial, describes the organization's origins and changes during the past 100 years. The booklet's sections, which include photographs, quotes, and a timeline, are: (1) "The…

  16. Centennial Calendar- 100 Years of the American Phytopathological Society

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I edited a 40-page publication (calendar) that covered 18 chapters written by members of our society. This covered pioneering researchers, departments, and epidemics of the last 100 years of plant pathology in the U. S. This was given to all members of the American Phytopathological Society who att...

  17. A universal celebration: 100 years of Korotkoff sounds, 1905 - 2005.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Nasim H

    2005-12-01

    The measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressure by auscultation was first described 100 years ago, when a young Russian army doctor, Nicolai Sergeevich Korotkoff, addressed a meeting at the Medical Academy of St. Petersburg on 8th November 1905. During the last hundred years, Korotkoff's contribution has proved to be one of the most useful methods in the diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and prevention of life threatening cardiovascular ailments and the centenary of his discovery should be celebrated universally. PMID:17153281

  18. The Archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism: Documenting 100 Years of Carnegie Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington document more than a century of geophysical and astronomical investigations. Primary source materials available for historical research include field and laboratory notebooks, equipment designs, plans for observatories and research vessels, scientists' correspondence, and thousands of expedition and instrument photographs. Yet despite its history, DTM long lacked a systematic approach to managing its documentary heritage. A preliminary records survey conducted in 2001 identified more than 1,000 linear feet of historically-valuable records languishing in dusty, poorly-accessible storerooms. Intellectual control at that time was minimal. With support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the "Carnegie Legacy Project" was initiated in 2003 to preserve, organize, and facilitate access to DTM's archival records, as well as those of the Carnegie Institution's administrative headquarters and Geophysical Laboratory. Professional archivists were hired to process the 100-year backlog of records. Policies and procedures were established to ensure that all work conformed to national archival standards. Records were appraised, organized, and rehoused in acid-free containers, and finding aids were created for the project web site. Standardized descriptions of each collection were contributed to the WorldCat bibliographic database and the AIP International Catalog of Sources for History of Physics. Historic photographs and documents were digitized for online exhibitions to raise awareness of the archives among researchers and the general public. The success of the Legacy Project depended on collaboration between archivists, librarians, historians, data specialists, and scientists. This presentation will discuss key aspects (funding, staffing, preservation, access, outreach) of the Legacy Project and is aimed at personnel in observatories, research

  19. Ernst Mach on the vestibular organ 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Henn, V; Young, L R

    1975-01-01

    Ernst Mach (1838-1916) performed pioneering research on vestibular function 100 years ago. His experiments were mainly psychophysical and included measurements of threshold and study of the vestibular-visual interaction. Contrary to general belief, he concluded that the adequate stimulus for the semicircular canals must be pressure. He presented evidence specifically against the sustained endolymph flow theory of Breuer (1874) and Crum Brown (1874), with which he is frequently associated. Excerpts from his publications are given and their relevance to current research is discussed. PMID:1093083

  20. Ragnar Granit 100 years--memories and reflections.

    PubMed

    Kernell, D

    2000-12-01

    The Swedish-Finnish Nobel laureate Ragnar Granit, born 100 years ago, is commemorated in a brief article by one of his former PhD students and collaborators. After a short account of Granit's life and scientific career, special attention is given to Granit's role as a teacher in research training and his published thoughts on this matter, partly reflecting Granit's own experience as a "postdoc" in the laboratory of Sherrington (Oxford). The article includes personal recollections of how it was to work together with Granit in his laboratory. PMID:11232369

  1. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and

  2. 100 years of sedimentation study by the USGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G. Douglas

    1989-01-01

    On January 15, 1889, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting sediment data on the Rio Grande at Embudo, New Mexico. During the past 100 years the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division (WRD) has collected daily sediment data at more than 1,200 sites. Projects have addressed the problems associated with reservoir construction, agricultural irrigation projects, energy production, and transport and deposition of pollutants sorbed to sediments. The Survey has been active as a charter member of the Federal Interagency Sediment Project and currently has three full-time hydrologists working on the project. The WRD's sediment-research projects have covered a wide variety of subjects from the fundamental theories of resistance to flow and sediment transport in alluvial channels to lunar erosion mechanisms.

  3. Revisiting the 100 Year Old Radioactivity Lectures of Frederick Soddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Between 1908 and 1922, Frederick Soddy, MA., FRS (Dr. Lee`s Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Univ. of Oxford) published four editions of a compendium of his experimental lectures delivered at the University of Glasgow, under the title ``The Interpretation of Radium, and the Structure of the Atom''. Professor Soddy taught his students about `radium writing' and the emanation of radium. He presented a radium clock designed by Professor Strutt; showed students `Pleochroic Halos'; and described the separation of `ionium' from its isotope, thorium. The process of constructing a cohesive logic to empirical observations of this newly discovered phenomenon of radioactivity was a challenging one. Some aspects did not stand the test of time. However, revisiting these lectures after 100 years gives us fascinating insight into the mental processes of the early pioneers in radioactivity.

  4. Opening the 100-Year Window for Time-Domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan; Tang, Sumin; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    The large-scale surveys such as PTF, CRTS and Pan-STARRS-1 that have emerged within the past 5 years or so employ digital databases and modern analysis tools to accentuate research into Time Domain Astronomy (TDA). Preparations are underway for LSST which, in another 6 years, will usher in the second decade of modern TDA. By that time the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project will have made available to the community the full sky Historical TDA database and digitized images for a century (1890-1990) of coverage. We describe the current DASCH development and some initial results, and outline plans for the ``production scanning'' phase and data distribution which is to begin in 2012. That will open a 100-year window into temporal astrophysics, revealing rare transients and (especially) astrophysical phenomena that vary on time-scales of a decade. It will also provide context and archival comparisons for the deeper modern surveys.

  5. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity (5-8 April 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    As part of the celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Conference "Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity" was held in Golm, near Potsdam, Germany, on April 5-8, 2005. The Conference was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (also known as the Albert Einstein Institute), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2005. Conference participants discussed progress made in theoretical and experimental research during the 100 years since the publication of Einstein's famous papers in 1905, the year which has gone down in history as 'Albert Einstein's ANNUS MIRABILIS'.

  6. 100 years of Belgian rainfall: are there trends?

    PubMed

    Vaes, G; Willems, P; Berlamont, J

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 the digitisation of old rainfall records of measurements at Uccle (Belgium) was completed, which resulted in a unique rainfall series of 100 years (period 1898-1997). This is an ideal opportunity to search for trends in the rainfall over the last century. Large variations in rainfall probability over the century have been observed. For small aggregation levels there is a small decrease in extreme rainfall events over the century. For large aggregation levels there is a more explicit increase in extreme rainfall. Because the rainfall on seasonal aggregation level is only slightly increased, the increase in extreme rainfall events for aggregation levels between a few days and a few months can only occur due to larger clustering. However, the final conclusion is that no significant trend can be observed. A pure random variation of the rainfall can cause equally large variations. This does not exclude a possible trend in flooding frequency, due to the strong increase in urbanisation over the last century. PMID:11888184

  7. Colloquium: 100 years of mass spectrometry: Perspectives and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Simon; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely regarded as the most sensitive and specific general purpose analytical technique. More than a century has passed for MS since the ground-breaking work of Nobel laureate Sir Joseph John Thomson in 1913. This Colloquium aims to (1) give an historical overview of the major instrumentation achievements that have driven mass spectrometry forward in the past century, including those leading up to the initial work of Thomson, (2) provide the nonspecialist with an introduction to MS, and (3) highlight some key applications of MS and explore the current and future trends. Because of the vastness of the subject area and quality of the manifold research efforts that have been undertaken over the last 100 years, which have contributed to the foundations and subsequent advances in mass spectrometry, it should be understood that not all of the key contributions may have been included in this Colloquium. Mass spectrometry has embraced a multitude of scientific disciplines and to recognize all of the achievements is an impossible task, such has been the diverse impact of this invaluable technique. Scientific progress is usually made via the cumulative effort of a large number of researchers; the achievements reported herein are only a representation of that effort.

  8. Pedernales oilfield, eastern Venezuela: The first 100 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gluyas, J.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, W.

    1996-08-01

    Petroleum seeps and surface tar mats attracted oil explorers to Pedernales in eastern Venezuela 100 years ago. Commercial production from the Pedernales Field was established by Creole in 1933. In three production periods, broken by WWII and the end of the Creole-Texaco refining contract, Creole and Lagoven produced about 60 MMSTB from about 60 wells in about 60 years. Peak production was in the late 1950s, when the field delivered 12,000 BOPD. Production was stopped in 1986. In March 1993, BP Venezuela acquired the license to reactivate Pedernales on behalf of Lagoven, and BP`s first well in the field was drilled in August 1994. A second was completed in early 1995. The production from each well was sufficiently encouraging for commerciality to be declared in March 1995. Phase 1 of the field reactivation demanded a production rate of 11,500 BOPD. As of now (September, 1995) six wells, including one gas disposal well, have been completed. Wells have been placed using a combination of old well data and mapping based on a close spaced 2D seismic survey shot in early 1994. Results from these first few wells indicate that the required production rate will be achieved despite severely depleted reservoir pressures. This paper tells the story of reactivation and re-evaluation of one of eastern Venezuela`s oldest oilfields.

  9. Slope restoration for a 100-year old canal

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, R.L.; Lewis, S.W.; Liebersbach, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Turlock Irrigation District (TID) is located in the northern portion of the fertile San Joaquin Valley of California. TID`s primary water supply is conveyed from the 100-year-old LaGrange Diversion Dam via their historic Upper Main Canal. The original canal was constructed by excavating into slate bedrock for the uphill (cut) bank, and constructing unmortared rock walls and rock fill for the downhill (fill) embankment; the excavation was then lined with concrete. Soil fill raises of the downhill embankment over the last 30 years have reduced the slope stability to unacceptable levels in the steepest embankment areas. In March of 1994, two surficial slides prompted investigation of the long term embankment stability in the Warehouse Slide Area. Based on results of analysis for various stabilization scenarios, TID chose a stabilization method which included: (1) excavation of an access bench below the existing canal, (2) installation of steel pipe piles through the existing rock fill and into the bedrock, (3) construction of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining wall and (4) construction of a soil-cement canal roadway pavement. The design was chosen by the owner because of cost competitiveness compared to other design alternatives and because the construction sequence allowed uninterrupted use of the canal. By using local river cobble for the MSE wall facing material, TID met the desired 50-year design life of the repair while maintaining the area`s historic visual features.

  10. Overuse syndrome in musicians--100 years ago. An historical review.

    PubMed

    Fry, H J

    Overuse syndrome in musicians was extensively reported 100 years ago. The clinical features and results of treatment, which were recorded in considerable detail, match well the condition that is described today. The medical literature that is reviewed here extends from 1830 to 1911 and includes 21 books and 54 articles from the English language literature, apart from two exceptions; however, the writers of the day themselves reviewed French, German and Italian literature on the subject. The disorder was said to result from the overuse of the affected parts. Two theories of aetiology, not necessarily mutually exclusive, were argued. The central theory regarded the lesion as being in the central nervous system, the peripheral theory implied a primary muscle disorder. No serious case was put forward for a psychogenic origin, though emotional factors were believed to aggravate the condition. Advances in musical instrument manufacture--particularly the development of the concert piano and the clarinet--may have played a part in the prevalence of overuse syndrome in musicians. Total rest from the mechanical use of the hand was the only effective treatment recorded. PMID:3540544

  11. 100 years of California’s water rights system: patterns, trends and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, Theodore E.; Viers, Joshua H.

    2014-08-01

    For 100 years, California’s State Water Resources Control Board and its predecessors have been responsible for allocating available water supplies to beneficial uses, but inaccurate and incomplete accounting of water rights has made the state ill-equipped to satisfy growing societal demands for water supply reliability and healthy ecosystems. Here, we present the first comprehensive evaluation of appropriative water rights to identify where, and to what extent, water has been dedicated to human uses relative to natural supplies. The results show that water right allocations total 400 billion cubic meters, approximately five times the state’s mean annual runoff. In the state’s major river basins, water rights account for up to 1000% of natural surface water supplies, with the greatest degree of appropriation observed in tributaries to the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and in coastal streams in southern California. Comparisons with water supplies and estimates of actual use indicate substantial uncertainty in how water rights are exercised. In arid regions such as California, over-allocation of surface water coupled with trends of decreasing supply suggest that new water demands will be met by re-allocation from existing uses. Without improvements to the water rights system, growing human and environmental demands portend an intensification of regional water scarcity and social conflict. California’s legal framework for managing its water resources is largely compatible with needed reforms, but additional public investment is required to enhance the capacity of the state’s water management institutions to effectively track and regulate water rights.

  12. Stigma, biomedical efficacy, and institutional control.

    PubMed

    Goldin, C S

    1990-01-01

    This paper explores the role of biomedical efficacy in the rehabilitation of the disabled. Ethnographic data are presented from two studies, one concerned with the prevocationally blind, the other with the institutionalized chronically mentally ill. A comparison of rehabilitation for these two groups suggests that when disabilities do not respond well to biomedical interventions, inconsistent and contradictory interpretations and policies about etiology, therapy, and post-treatment prognosis are likely to flourish. These conflicts may, in turn, increase pressure on rehabilitation institutions to maintain control over their clients. This paper addresses these issues in order to stimulate discussion about the relationship of different kinds of disability to stigma and rehabilitation. PMID:2315755

  13. Progress of Cometary Science in the Past 100 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1999-01-01

    Enormous strides made by cometary science during the 20th century defy any meaningful comparison of its state 100 years ago and now. The great majority of the subfields enjoying much attention nowadays did not exist in the year 1900. Dramatic developments, especially in the past 30-50 years, have equally affected observational and theoretical studies of comets. The profound diversification of observing techniques has been documented by the ever widening limits on the electromagnetic spectrum covered. While the time around 1900 marked an early period of slow and painful experimentation with photographic methods in cometary studies, observations of comets from the x-ray region to the radio waves have by now become routine. Many of the new techniques, and all those involved with the wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, were made possible by another major breakthrough of this century - observing from space. Experiments on dedicated Earth-orbiting satellites as well as several deep-space probes have provided fascinating new information on the nature and makeup of comets. In broader terms, much of the progress has been achieved thanks to fundamental discoveries and major advances in electronics, whose applications resulted in qualitatively new instruments (e.g. radiotelescopes) and sensors or detectors (e.g. CCD arrays). The most universal effect on the entire cometary science, from observing to data handling to quantitative interpretations, has been, as in any other branch of science, due to the introduction of electronic computers, with their processing capabilities not only unheard of, but literally unimaginable, in the age of classical desk calculators. As if all this should not be enough, the today's generations of comet scientists have, in addition, been blessed with nature's highly appreciated cooperation. Indeed, in the span of a dozen years, between 1985 and 1997, we were privileged to witness four remarkable cometary events: (i) a return of Halley

  14. [The Revista Médica de Chile. 100 years ago].

    PubMed

    Costa-Casaretto, C

    1990-01-01

    Manuel Barros Borgoño MD, Professor of Surgery who graduated in France (1879) was President of the Santiago Medical Society (1885), Dean of the Faculty of Medicine (1889-95) and Rector of the University of Chile (1901). He was a contributor of the Journal. As a prominent surgeon, he introduced different forms of anesthesia, like morphine and atropine, cocaine and methylchloride. He was an organizer of the first Chilean and the first Latin American Medical Congress. In the University he encouraged medical research and helped establish the basic role of the University as a leading institution in the nation. He died in 1903. PMID:2152709

  15. The death of Florence Nightingale: BJN 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Castledine, Sir George

    This August marks the centenary of the death of Florence Nightingale, who died at 2 o'clock on Saturday 13 August 1910 at her home, 10 South Street, Park Lane, London. The following are some snippets which appeared in the BJN of the 20 and 27 August 1910. It was not until the announcement of her death in the morning papers of Monday 15 August that the country heard about Nightingale's death. In her last hours she was attended by Sir Thomas Barlow and two nurses from the Nursing Sisters' Institution, Devonshire Square, founded by Mrs Elizabeth Fry in 1840. PMID:20966869

  16. 100 Years of Alzheimer's disease (1906-2006).

    PubMed

    Lage, José Manuel Martínez

    2006-01-01

    As we commemorate the first centennial since Alzheimer's disease (AD) was first diagnosed, this article casts back into the past while also looking to the future. It reflects on the life of Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) and the scientific work he undertook in describing the disorder suffered by Auguste D. from age 51 to 56 and the neuropathological findings revealed by her brain, reminding us of the origin of the eponym. It highlights how, throughout the 1960's, the true importance of AD as the major cause of late life dementia ultimately came to light and narrates the evolution of the concepts related to AD throughout the years and its recognition as a major public health problem. Finally, the article pays homage to the work done by the Alzheimer's Association and the research undertaken at the Alzheimer's Disease Centres within the framework of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Program, briefly discussing the long road travelled in the fight against AD in the past 25 years and the scientific odyssey that we trust will result in finding a cure. PMID:17004362

  17. 100 years of seismic research on the Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodehl, Claus; Kennett, Brian; Artemieva, Irina M.; Thybo, Hans

    2013-12-01

    The detection of a seismic boundary, the “Moho”, between the outermost shell of the Earth, the Earth's crust, and the Earth's mantle by A. Mohorovičić was the consequence of increased insight into the propagation of seismic waves caused by earthquakes. This short history of seismic research on the Moho is primarily based on the comprehensive overview of the worldwide history of seismological studies of the Earth's crust using controlled sources from 1850 to 2005, by Prodehl and Mooney (2012). Though the art of applying explosions, so-called “artificial events”, as energy sources for studies of the uppermost crustal layers began in the early 1900s, its effective use for studying the entire crust only began at the end of World War II. From 1945 onwards, controlled-source seismology has been the major approach to study details of the crust and underlying crust-mantle boundary, the Moho. The subsequent description of history of controlled-source crustal seismology and its seminal results is subdivided into separate chapters for each decade, highlighting the major advances achieved during that decade in terms of data acquisition, processing technology, and interpretation methods. Since the late 1980s, passive seismology using distant earthquakes has played an increasingly important role in studies of crustal structure. The receiver function technique exploiting conversions between P and SV waves at discontinuities in seismic wavespeed below a seismic station has been extensively applied to the increasing numbers of permanent and portable broad-band seismic stations across the globe. Receiver function studies supplement controlled source work with improved geographic coverage and now make a significant contribution to knowledge of the nature of the crust and the depth to Moho.

  18. Nigeria Anopheles Vector Database: An Overview of 100 Years' Research

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia Nkem; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Ademowo, Olusegun George; Bockarie, Moses; Kelly-Hope, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important vectors of malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF), which are major public health diseases in Nigeria. Malaria is caused by infection with a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium and LF by the parasitic worm Wuchereria bancrofti. Updating our knowledge of the Anopheles species is vital in planning and implementing evidence based vector control programs. To present a comprehensive report on the spatial distribution and composition of these vectors, all published data available were collated into a database. Details recorded for each source were the locality, latitude/longitude, time/period of study, species, abundance, sampling/collection methods, morphological and molecular species identification methods, insecticide resistance status, including evidence of the kdr allele, and P. falciparum sporozoite rate and W. bancrofti microfilaria prevalence. This collation resulted in a total of 110 publications, encompassing 484,747 Anopheles mosquitoes in 632 spatially unique descriptions at 142 georeferenced locations being identified across Nigeria from 1900 to 2010. Overall, the highest number of vector species reported included An. gambiae complex (65.2%), An. funestus complex (17.3%), An. gambiae s.s. (6.5%). An. arabiensis (5.0%) and An. funestus s.s. (2.5%), with the molecular forms An. gambiae M and S identified at 120 locations. A variety of sampling/collection and species identification methods were used with an increase in molecular techniques in recent decades. Insecticide resistance to pyrethroids and organochlorines was found in the main Anopheles species across 45 locations. Presence of P. falciparum and W. bancrofti varied between species with the highest sporozoite rates found in An. gambiae s.s, An. funestus s.s. and An. moucheti, and the highest microfilaria prevalence in An. gambiae s.l., An. arabiensis, and An. gambiae s.s. This comprehensive geo-referenced database provides an essential baseline on Anopheles

  19. Global change and water resources in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. C.; Hirsch, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We are in the midst of a continental-scale, multi-year experiment in the United States, in which we have not defined our testable hypotheses or set the duration and scope of the experiment, which poses major water-resources challenges for the 21st century. What are we doing? We are expanding population at three times the national growth rate in our most water-scarce region, the southwestern United States, where water stress is already great and modeling predicts decreased streamflow by the middle of this century. We are expanding irrigated agriculture from the west into the east, particularly to the southeastern states, where increased competition for ground and surface water has urban, agricultural, and environmental interests at odds, and increasingly, in court. We are expanding our consumption of pharmaceutical and personal care products to historic high levels and disposing them in surface and groundwater, through sewage treatment plants and individual septic systems. These substances are now detectable at very low concentrations and we have documented significant effects on aquatic species, particularly on fish reproduction function. We don’t yet know what effects on human health may emerge, nor do we know if we need to make large investments in water treatment systems, which were not designed to remove these substances. These are a few examples of our national-scale experiment. In addition to these water resources challenges, over which we have some control, climate change models indicate that precipitation and streamflow patterns will change in coming decades, with western mid-latitude North America generally drier. We have already documented trends in more rain and less snow in western mountains. This has large implications for water supply and storage, and groundwater recharge. We have documented earlier snowmelt peak spring runoff in northeastern and northwestern States, and western montane regions. Peak runoff is now about two weeks earlier than it was

  20. 78 FR 12788 - Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Institution of Investigation; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Bark Control Collars; Notice of Institution of Investigation; Institution of... importation of certain electronic bark control collars by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... the United States after importation of certain electronic bark control collars that infringe claims...

  1. INL Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-08-01

    This document reports the results of the fiscal year 2006 institutional controls assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites at the Idaho National Laboratory. These activities are described in the INEEL Sitewide Institutional Control Plan. Inspections were performed by Long-term Stewardship Program personnel with representatives of the various facilities. The assessments showed that the various institutional control measures in place across the Idaho National Laboratory Site are functioning as intended. Information in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan was reviewed as part of the annual assessment and was revised as needed to reflect the current status of the institutional control sites.

  2. Pupil Control As an Institutional Pattern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul

    This study of pupil control attitudes was based on the assumption that public school teachers and college education instructors hold divergent views on pupil control. These divergent views would then be imposed on the preservice teachers. The Pupil Control Ideology (PCI) Scale and the Dogmatism Scale, Form E, were randomly distributed to 100…

  3. Pupil Control as an Institutional Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Differences in attitudes toward pupil control between university educators and cooperating pupil school teachers were measured to determine if student teachers might be receiving conflicting sets of expectations. The results of the study confirm that college supervisors have a more humanistic attitude toward pupil control than cooperating teachers…

  4. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-07-27

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites, which requires a Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. The revision is needed to provide an update as remedial actions are completed and new areas of concern are found. This Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan is based on guidance in the May 3, 1999, EPA Region 10 Final Policy on the Use of Institutional Controls at Federal Facilities; the September 29, 2000, EPA guidance Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating, and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups; and the April 9, 2003, DOE Policy 454.1, "Use of Institutional Controls." These policies establish measures that ensure short- and long-term effectiveness of institutional controls that protect human health and the environment at federal facility sites undergoing remedial action pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or corrective action pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The site-specific institutional controls currently in place at the Idaho National Laboratory are documented in this Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan. This plan is being updated, along with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan, to reflect the progress of remedial activities and changes in CERCLA sites.

  5. Improving the Internal Accounting Controls of Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostolou, Nicholas G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Accounting controls are primarily concerned with methods and procedures that safeguard an entity's assets and ensure the reliability of its financial records. This article discusses internal control objectives as applied to educational institutions, outlines specific steps necessary to develop an effective internal control system, and mentions…

  6. Action Stations! 100 years of trauma care on maritime and amphibious operations in the Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M; Smith, J E

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century trauma care within the Royal Navy (RN) has evolved; wartime experiences and military medical research have combined to allow significant improvement in the care of casualties. This article describes the key maritime and amphibious operations that have seen the Royal Navy Medical Service (RNMS) deliver high levels of support to wherever the Naval Service has deployed in the last 100 years. Key advancements in which progress has led to improved outcomes for injured personnel are highlighted--the control and treatment of blood loss, wound care, and the prevention and management of organ failure with optimal resuscitation. Historians often point out how slowly military medicine progressed for the first few thousand years of its recorded history, and how quickly it has progressed in the last century. This reflective article will show how the RNMS has been an integral part of that story, and how the lessons learnt by our predecessors have shaped our modern day doctrine surrounding trauma care. PMID:26292385

  7. Safety Control and Safety Education at Technical Institutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Hiroshi

    The importance of safety education for students at technical institutes is emphasized on three grounds including safety of all working members and students in their education, research and other activities. The Kanazawa Institute of Technology re-organized the safety organization into a line structure and improved safety minds of all their members and now has a chemical materials control system and a set of compulsory safety education programs for their students, although many problems still remain.

  8. Discharge, gage height, and elevation of 100-year floods in the Hudson River basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, Roger J.

    1978-01-01

    The flood discharge that may be expected to be equaled or exceeded on the average of once in 100 years (100-year flood) was computed by the log-Pearson Type-III frequency relation for 72 stations in the Hudson River basin. These discharges and, where available, their corresponding gage height and elevation above mean sea level are presented in tabular form. A short explanation of computation methods is included. The data are to be used as part of a federally funded study of the water resources and related land resources of the Hudson River basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Innovation and Involvement: 100 Years of Community Work with Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasby, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Birmingham Settlement has provided services to British older adults for over 100 years, including such innovations as adult day centers, meals on wheels, and transportation services. The participation of the clientele in research helped flesh out the history of the settlement through narratives that demonstrate its impact on the life of the…

  10. 100 Years of Cotton Production, Harvesting and Ginning Systems Engineering: 1907 - 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) celebrated its centennial year during 2007. As part of the ASABE centennial, the authors were asked to describe agricultural engineering accomplishments in U.S. cotton production, harvesting and ginning over the past 100 years. ...

  11. What Would You Look Like If You Were 100 Years Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project inspired by the 100th day of school in which first-grade students created a self-portrait of themselves at 100 years old and wrote an accompanying essay. States that the students drew wrinkles on the faces, age-appropriate clothing, gray or white hair, and even glasses as a finishing touch. (CMK)

  12. The life and times of the LED - a 100-year history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    2007-04-01

    Many people believe that the LED was discovered by US researchers working in the 1960s. In fact, Henry Round at Marconi Labs noted the emission of light from a semiconductor diode 100 years ago and, independently, a forgotten Russian genius - Oleg Losev - discovered the LED.

  13. Industrial and Institutional Pest Control. Sale Publication 4073.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information needed to meet Environmental Protection Agency standards on industrial and institutional pest control, and to help prepare for certification. It gives descriptions and pictures of general insect pests, parasitic pests of man, occasional invaders, wood-destroying pests, stored product pests, vertebrates, and weeds. The…

  14. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  15. Areas subject to inundation by the 100-year flood in Avra Valley, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeske, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Avra Valley in Pima County, Arizona, is sparsely populated and is used mainly for agriculture and cattle grazing; however, its proximity to Tucson makes it desirable for urban development. Administrators and planners concerned with future land development may use the map report to determine the approximate areas that are subject to inundation by the 100-year flood. Avra Valley is drained mainly by Brawley Wash; Blanco Wash drains the west side of the valley. Most of the natural drainage system consists of small braided channels bordered by narrow bands of dense vegetation, which cause floodwater to spread over wide areas of shallow depths. During the 100-year flood, the areas inundated by Brawley and Blanco Washes may join in several places. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Creating Long Term Income Streams for the 100 Year Starship Study Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, A. J.

    Development and execution of long term research projects are very dependent on a consistent application of funding to maximize the potential for success. The business structure for the 100 Year Starship Study project should allow for multiple income streams to cover the expenses of the research objectives. The following examples illustrate the range of potential avenues: 1) affiliation with a charitable foundation for creating a donation program to fund a long term endowment for research, 2) application for grants to fund initial research projects and establish the core expertise of the research entity, 3) development of intellectual property which can then be licensed for additional revenue, 4) creation of spinout companies with equity positions retained by the lab for funding the endowment, and 5) funded research which is dual use for the technology goals of the interstellar flight research objectives. With the establishment of a diversified stream of funding options, then the endowment can be funded at a level to permit dedicated research on the interstellar flight topics. This paper will focus on the strategy of creating spinout companies to create income streams which would fund the endowment of the 100 Year Starship Study effort. This technique is widely used by universities seeking to commercially develop and market technologies developed by university researchers. An approach will be outlined for applying this technique to potentially marketable technologies generated as a part of the 100 Year Starship Study effort.

  17. 100 years since the discovery of cosmic rays. A brief history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavassa, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    With the words "Cosmic Rays" we mean particles impinging on the earth atmosphere. The existence of these particles was discovered in 1912, i.e. exactly 100 years ago, by the Austrian physicist Victor Hesss. In this contribution I will describe the steps that lead to such a discovery: from the electroscope measurements, showing their spontaneous discharge, to the correct explanation of this results with the existence of charged particles arriving from outside of the atmosphere. Then I will discuss the first steps of experimental particle physics, obtained with experiments performed detecting cosmic rays, that allowed important discoveries as the detection of antimatter and of new subatominc particles as muons and pions.

  18. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the Phase I DOE/PRDA investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production and Chloride Control. The Phase I DOE/PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHE) also continued this month as the inlet particulate control system (installed September 1996) is maintaining the inlet particulate mass loading to the unit at an average value of 0.2 lb./MMBTU. The one-year tube wear analysis project conducted across this unit will be completed in the early part of March. At the completion of testing, a final inspection will be conducted before the unit is cleaned, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analysis. Once the unit is removed from the ECTC, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber unit will be assembled and configured back into the flue gas path for future testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter configuration) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. In February 1997, the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block continued. This PRDA project is being jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy and is part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The pilot portion of the CLS/Anhydrite project is being conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process incorporating chloride control, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate) production. While the three areas of the

  19. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the DOE/PRDA Phase I investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production. The DOE/PRDA Phase I testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CH) was completed this month. This one-year tube wear analysis investigation was completed on 3/10/97, and a final inspection of the unit was made on 3/21/97. The CH unit and its related equipment are currently being removed from the ECTC test configuration, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analyses. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  20. Morphological response of songbirds to 100 years of landscape change in North America.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, A

    2010-06-01

    Major landscape changes caused by humans may create strong selection pressures and induce rapid evolution in natural populations. In the last 100 years, eastern North America has experienced extensive clear-cutting in boreal areas, while afforestation has occurred in most temperate areas. Based on museum specimens, I show that wings of several boreal forest songbirds and temperate songbirds of non-forest habitats have become more pointed over the last 100 years. In contrast, wings of most temperate forest and early-successional boreal forests species have become less pointed over the same period. In contrast to wing shape, the bill length of most species did not change significantly through time. These results are consistent with the "habitat isolation hypothesis", i.e., songbirds evolved in response to recent changes in the amount of available habitat and associated implications for mobility. Rapid morphological evolution may mitigate, without necessarily preventing, negative consequences of habitat loss caused by humans through direct exploitation or climate change. PMID:20583699

  1. Solar wind variations in the 60-100 year period range: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The evidence for and against the reality of a solar wind variation in the period range of 60-100 years is reexamined. Six data sets are reviewed; sunspot numbers, geomagnetic variations, two auroral data sets and two (14)C data sets. These data are proxies for several different aspects of the solar wind and the presence or absence of 60-100 year cyclic behavior in a particular data set does not necessarily imply the presence or absence of this variation in other sets. It was concluded that two different analyses of proxy data for a particular characteristic of the heliospheric solar wind yielded conflicting results. This conflict can be resolved only by future research. It is also definitely confirmed that proxy data for the solar wind in the ecliptic at 1 A.U. undergo a periodic variation with a period of approximately 87 years. The average amplitude and phase of this variation as seen in eleven cycles of proxy data are presented.

  2. Controlling Reactive Nitrogen: Attaining Cost Effectiveness and Institutional Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, O.

    2012-12-01

    The fact that reactive nitrogen (Nr) cascades by changing form and moving between air, land and water makes its management and control especially difficult. The cascade means that excess Nr's negative impacts may initially occur, flow through, or linger in air, land or water. The critical question becomes where and how to interdict, not only in terms of technical capacity but also in terms of cost effectiveness and institutional capacity. The nature of Nr also needs to inform the questions that need to be asked to be able to deal with Nr. For much of the world, agriculture is the major contributor to Nr.The stark trade-off often involves excess Nr that is the product of increased food production. As it is often the largest source of excess Nr, agriculture has to be a focus for Nr control and management efforts. This paper will start with the Nr balance sheet for the US and outline some of the trade-offs and opportunities for controlling Nr.The institutional responsibility and capacity to take effective action will be assessed on the basis of US institutions and their history. This will involve illustrating some of the difficulties posed by the cascading nature of Nr as it movesfrom one regulatory jurisdiction to another. Within the US agricultural sector. the history and politics of dealing with such problems will be traced as they relate to the willingness and capacity of the sector to more effectively control or manage problems like Nr. The institutional history of the sector has a strong influence onwhat can be accomplished in a cost effective way - one that is very different from the history and practice in Australia or Europe. The EPA Science Advisory Boards' suggestion that a twenty five percent reduction in excess Nr should be achievable will be traced through for agriculture and allied situations illustrating some of the possibilities and dilemmas. Finally, the issue of metrics will be addressed. As a caution to policy makers, one can obtain very different

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber and the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger this month as the effects of increased particulate loading are being studied. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. Testing in October at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) included tests from the Pilot Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block as part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions. The 1996 program is being performed on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and the spray dryer/pulse jet fabric filter (SDA/PJFF) pilot units. The 1996 Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block is a continuation of the 1995 TER test block and will focus on up to five research areas, depending on experimental results. These areas are: (1) Mercury speciation methods; (2) Effect of FGD system operating variables on mercury removal; (3) Novel methods for elemental mercury control; (4) Catalytic methods for converting elemental mercury to oxidized mercury; and (5) Electrostatic charging of particulate material in the FGD inlet flue gas stream. The work during October continued to focus on catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury. These tests included the evaluation of two different loadings of catalyst CT-9 (carbon-based material) over extended periods (8-10 days) and an evaluation of FAB-2B (bulk bituminous fly ash taken from the first hopper of the

  4. Tree rings record 100 years of hydrologic change within a wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, Thomas M.; Kappel, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrology and tree growth were investigated within a small wetland in the Tully Valley of central New York, about 20 miles south of Syracuse. In late 1994 it was noted that some wetland trees were dying, and local residents reported that flow of a small stream draining the wetland seemingly increased and became more brackish since the mid to late 1980s. The wetland is about 3 miles north of an extensive salt mining operation known to have degraded local water quality, but no effects of mining had been confirmed previously near the wetland. The oldest wetland trees started to grow before the onset of mining in 1889, and thus tree-ring studies were undertaken not only to investi-gate recent hydrologic change within the wetland, but also to search for evidence of any other changes during the last 100 years.

  5. 100 Years of British military neurosurgery: on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A G

    2015-01-01

    Death from head injuries has been a feature of conflicts throughout the world for centuries. The burden of mortality has been variously affected by the evolution in weaponry from war-hammers to explosive ordnance, the influence of armour on survivability and the changing likelihood of infection as a complicating factor. Surgery evolved from haphazard trephination to valiant, yet disjointed, neurosurgery by a variety of great historical surgeons until the Crimean War of 1853-1856. However, it was events initiated by the Great War of 1914-1918 that not only marked the development of modern neurosurgical techniques, but our approach to military surgery as a whole. Here the author describes how 100 years of conflict and the input and intertwining relationships between the 20th century's great neurosurgeons established neurosurgery in the United Kingdom and beyond. PMID:26292388

  6. Sustainable Foods and Medicines Support Vitality, Sex and Longevity for a 100-Year Starship Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. R.

    Extended space flight requires foods and medicines that sustain crew health and vitality. The health and therapeutic needs for the entire crew and their children for a 100-year space flight must be sustainable. The starship cannot depend on resupply or carry a large cargo of pharmaceuticals. Everything in the starship must be completely recyclable and reconstructable, including food, feed, textiles, building materials, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and medicines. Smart microfarms will produce functional foods with superior nutrition and sensory attributes. These foods provide high-quality protein and nutralence (nutrient density), that avoids obesity, diabetes, and other Western diseases. The combination of functional foods, lifestyle actions, and medicines will support crew immunity, energy, vitality, sustained strong health, and longevity. Smart microfarms enable the production of fresh medicines in hours or days, eliminating the need for a large dispensary, which eliminates concern over drug shelf life. Smart microfarms are adaptable to the extreme growing area, resource, and environmental constraints associated with an extended starship expedition.

  7. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g <= 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g <= 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ~0.1-0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  8. 100 years of Pb deposition and transport in soils in Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In Illinois, atmospheric deposition is one major source of heavy metal inputs to agricultural land. The atmospheric Pb deposition and transport record in agricultural soils in Champaign, Illinois, was established by studying surface and subsurface soil samples collected during the past 100 years from the Morrow Plots on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Pb content in the soil samples was measured and the Ph deposition fluxes were calculated. The Pb content in surface soils increased sharply in the first half of the 20th century, and stayed invariant since. The maximum Pb flux from the atmosphere was estimated to be 27 (??14) ??g cm-2 yr-1 around 1940. The major pollution source for this increase probably was residential coal burning. It was estimated that in 50 yr, more than 50% of the Pb input had been lost from the surface soils.

  9. A profile of Frank Harrison: a pioneering Sheffield dentist from 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Figures, K; Smith, C

    2012-10-01

    A review of the personal papers relating to Frank Harrison and held by the School of Clinical Dentistry in Sheffield reveal what a dedicated clinician he was and the significance of his achievements from over 100 years ago, both locally and nationally for his chosen profession and also for the people of Sheffield. In addition to being one of the first dentists in the world to experiment with X-rays in dentistry, and the first to write up his findings in a dental journal, he designed and patented dental instruments, wrote books, lectured on fine art (particularly Venetian and Florentine art), and gave lectures to the public in the hope that they would heed his message on the importance of maintaining good oral health. A search of national archives and library resources has added further information about his family and professional accomplishments. PMID:23099699

  10. The Reissner Canard: The first all-metal airplane 100 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Egon

    2012-10-01

    In 1912 Professor Hans Reissner of the Technical University Aachen built a canard-type aeroplane, the world-wide first completely out of metal: although the Reissner Canard initiated a new technology with the Junkers J1 the first to follow in 1915 and 1000 more until now, little is known about the very first steps way back in Aachen. This paper tries to recapture some details of the developments 100 years ago with the aid of early publications and photographs and shed some light on the first wing fabricated out of a corrugated aluminum sheet mounted at the tail of the braced-steel-pipe fuselage to earn its airworthiness in Berlin Johannisthal in 1912.

  11. PREFACE: Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá-Durán, P.; Font, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Lledó, M. A.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Olmo, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the international scientific conference ''Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution''. The conference was devoted to discussing the current state-of-the-art of a wide variety of topics of research in the fields of Gravitation and General Relativity in the ''pre-centennial'' year of General Relativity. The name of the conference was chosen to highlight the importance of the upcoming one hundredth anniversary of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, officially established by the Internal Society on General Relativity and Gravitation in November 25th, 2015. In particular, the conference was organized along three main lines of present-day research and applications of the theory, namely, Relativistic Astrophysics, Mathematical Relativity, and the interface between Gravitation and Quantum Field Theory.

  12. 100+ years of instrumental seismology: the example of the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchak, Dmitry; Di Giacomo, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Systematic seismological observations of earthquakes using seismic instruments on a global scale began more than 100 years ago. Since then seismologists made many discoveries about the Earth interior and the physics of the earthquakes, also thanks to major developments in the seismic instrumentation deployed around the world. Besides, since the establishment of the first global networks (Milne and Jesuit networks), seismologists around the world stored and exchanged the results of routine observations (e.g., picking of arrival times, amplitude-period measurements, etc.) or more sophisticated analyses (e.g., moment tensor inversion) in seismological bulletins/catalogues. With a project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), the ISC and the Team of International Experts released a new global earthquake catalogue, the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php), which, differently from previous global seismic catalogues, has the unique feature of covering the entire period of instrumental seismology with locations and magnitude re-assessed using modern approaches for the global earthquakes selected for processing (in the current version approximately 21,000). During the 110 years covered by the ISC-GEM catalogue many seismological developments occurred in terms of instrumentation, seismological practice and knowledge of the physics of the earthquakes. In this contribution we give a brief overview of the major milestones characterizing the last 100+ years of instrumental seismology that were relevant for the production of the ISC-GEM catalogue and the major challenges we faced to obtain a catalogue as homogenous as possible.

  13. Are Geodetically and Geologically Constrained Vertical Deformation Models Compatible With the 100-Year Coastal Tide Gauge Record in California?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Sea level change has been continuously recorded along the California coastline at several tide gauge stations for the past 50-100 years. These stations provide a temporal record of sea level change, generally attributed to post-glacial rebound and ocean climate phenomena. However, geological processes, including displacements from large earthquakes, have also been shown to produce sea level variations. Furthermore, the vertical tectonic response to interseismic strain accumulation in regions of major fault bends has been shown to produce uplift and subsidence rates consistent with sea level trends. To investigate the long-term extent and implication of tectonic deformation on sea level change, we compare time series data from California tide gauge stations to model estimates of vertical displacements produced by earthquake cycle deformation. Using a 3-D semi-analytic viscoelastic model, we combine geologic slip rates, geodetic velocities, and historical seismic data to simulate both horizontal and vertical deformation of the San Andreas Fault System. Using this model, we generate a time-series of vertical displacements spanning the 100-year sea level record and compare this to tide gauge data provided by the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Comparison between sea level data and a variety of geologically and geodetically constrained models confirms that the two are highly compatible. Vertical displacements are largely controlled by interseismic strain accumulation, however displacements from major earthquakes are also required to explain varying trends in the sea level data. Models based on elastic plate thicknesses of 30-50km and viscosities of 7x10^1^8-2x10^1^9 Pa-s produce vertical displacements at tide-gauge locations that explain long-term trends in the sea level record to a high degree of accuracy at nearly all stations. However, unmodeled phenomena are also present in the sea level data and require further inspection.

  14. 75 FR 74045 - Guidance on Planning, Implementing, Maintaining, and Enforcing Institutional Controls at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Contaminated Sites AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: EPA... Enforcing Institutional Controls at Contaminated Sites. The Agency will consider the information gathered... Enforcing Institutional Controls at Contaminated Sites addresses some of the common issues that may...

  15. 77 FR 9218 - Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Proposed Waivers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... the Federal Register (72 FR 27297) (May 15, 2007, notice), operate career and technical education... Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Proposed Waivers and Extension... the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program (TCPCTIP),...

  16. Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  17. Flood risk management in the Thames Estuary looking ahead 100 years.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Sarah; Donovan, Bill

    2005-06-15

    The River Thames tidal defences have provided protection against the increasing threat of tidal flooding from the North Sea for more than 2000 years. The flood of 1953 was the catalyst for the construction of the current system of River Thames tidal defences, which includes the Thames Barrier, and has provided one of the best standards of flood defence in the UK for over 20 years. Substantial growth is planned through "Thames Gateway", a regeneration initiative of the United Kingdom government. These new developments will fundamentally change the developed footprint in the Thames Estuary flood-plain, and will be in place for at least the next 100 years. This presents a challenge of planning future defence against a background of uncertainty over climate and other environmental change, while ensuring that correct decisions are made concerning the nature and location of new building in the tidal flood-plain. Through its "Thames Estuary 2100" project, the Environment Agency is developing a long-term strategy for flood risk management in the estuary. Implementation of major construction works on the River Thames could commence from around 2015. Alternatively, it may be decided that minimum works are undertaken to provide security and major investment is delayed until uncertainties over climate change have abated. Whatever long-term option is chosen, this must be preceded by a period of collaboration with the Thames Gateway developments to ensure appropriate and sustainable flood defences are incorporated in new riverside construction. PMID:16191661

  18. From Smallpox to Big Data: The Next 100 Years of Epidemiologic Methods.

    PubMed

    Gange, Stephen J; Golub, Elizabeth T

    2016-03-01

    For more than a century, epidemiology has seen major shifts in both focus and methodology. Taking into consideration the explosion of "big data," the advent of more sophisticated data collection and analytical tools, and the increased interest in evidence-based solutions, we present a framework that summarizes 3 fundamental domains of epidemiologic methods that are relevant for the understanding of both historical contributions and future directions in public health. First, the manner in which populations and their follow-up are defined is expanding, with greater interest in online populations whose definition does not fit the usual classification by person, place, and time. Second, traditional data collection methods, such as population-based surveillance and individual interviews, have been supplemented with advances in measurement. From biomarkers to mobile health, innovations in the measurement of exposures and diseases enable refined accuracy of data collection. Lastly, the comparison of populations is at the heart of epidemiologic methodology. Risk factor epidemiology, prediction methods, and causal inference strategies are areas in which the field is continuing to make significant contributions to public health. The framework presented herein articulates the multifaceted ways in which epidemiologic methods make such contributions and can continue to do so as we embark upon the next 100 years. PMID:26443419

  19. Psychologists in medical schools and academic medical centers: over 100 years of growth, influence, and partnership.

    PubMed

    Robiner, William N; Dixon, Kim E; Miner, Jacob L; Hong, Barry A

    2014-04-01

    Psychologists have served on the faculties of medical schools for over 100 years. Psychologists serve in a number of different roles and make substantive contributions to medical schools' tripartite mission of research, education, and clinical service. This article provides an overview of the history of psychologists' involvement in medical schools, including their growing presence in and integration with diverse departments over time. We also report findings from a survey of medical school psychologists that explored their efforts in nonclinical areas (i.e., research, education, administration) as well as clinical endeavors (i.e., assessment, psychotherapy, consultation). As understanding of the linkage between behavioral and psychological factors and health status and treatment outcomes increases, the roles of psychologists in health care are likely to expand beyond mental health. An increasing focus on accountability-related to treatment outcomes and interprofessional research, education, and models of care delivery-will likely provide additional opportunities for psychologists within health care and professional education. The well-established alignment of psychologists' expertise and skills with the mission and complex organizational needs of medical schools augurs a partnership on course to grow stronger. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24588315

  20. [Nutrient dynamics over the past 100 years and its restoration baseline in Dianshan Lake].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Dong, Xu-Hui; Dong, Zhi; Sun, Dun-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The restoration of eutrophic lakes requires a good knowledge on the history and baseline of nutrients in the lakes. This work conducted an analysis on 210Pb/137Cs, water content, loss-on-ignition, sedimentary total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC) and diatoms in the four sediment cores from Dianshan Lake (near Shanghai City). Good coherence in palaeoproxies between the cores indicates a relatively stable sedimentary environment. With increasing human impact, diatom communities shifted from oligo-trophic species Cyclotella bodanica, C. ocelata, Achnanthes minutissima, Cocconeis placentula var lineate, Cymbella sp. , Fragilaria pintata, F. brevistrata, F. construens var venter to recent eutrophic species including Cyclostephanos dubias, C. atomus, Stephanodiscus minitulus, S. hantzschi, Aulacoseria alpigena. The epilimnetic TP over the past 100 years reconstructed using an established diatom-TP transfer function matches well with the monitoring TP where exists. Based on the sedimentary nutrient characteristics and diatom-reconstructed nutrient dynamics, we proposed that the nutrient baseline for Dianshan Lake is 50-60 microg x L(-1), 500 mg x kg(-1) and 550 mg x kg(-1) for water TP concentration, sedimentary TP and TN, respectively. PMID:23233952

  1. Rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa during the past 1,100 years.

    PubMed

    Verschuren, D; Laird, K R; Cumming, B F

    2000-01-27

    Knowledge of natural long-term rainfall variability is essential for water-resource and land-use management in sub-humid regions of the world. In tropical Africa, data relevant to determining this variability are scarce because of the lack of long instrumental climate records and the limited potential of standard high-resolution proxy records such as tree rings and ice cores. Here we present a decade-scale reconstruction of rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa over the past 1,100 years, based on lake-level and salinity fluctuations of Lake Naivasha (Kenya) inferred from three different palaeolimnological proxies: sediment stratigraphy and the species compositions of fossil diatom and midge assemblages. Our data indicate that, over the past millennium, equatorial east Africa has alternated between contrasting climate conditions, with significantly drier climate than today during the 'Medieval Warm Period' (approximately AD 1000-1270) and a relatively wet climate during the 'Little Ice Age' (approximately AD 1270-1850) which was interrupted by three prolonged dry episodes. We also find strong chronological links between the reconstructed history of natural long-term rainfall variation and the pre-colonial cultural history of east Africa, highlighting the importance of a detailed knowledge of natural long-term rainfall fluctuations for sustainable socio-economic development. PMID:10667789

  2. Migration and health in Southern Africa: 100 years and still circulating

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Mark N.; Williams, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Migration has deep historical roots in South and Southern Africa and to this day continues to be highly prevalent and a major factor shaping South African society and health. In this paper we examine the role of migration in the spread of two diseases nearly 100 years apart: tuberculosis following the discovery of gold in 1886 and HIV in the early 1990s. Both cases demonstrate the critical role played by human migration in the transmission and subsequent dissemination of these diseases to rural areas. In both cases, migration acts to assemble in one high-risk environment thousands of young men highly susceptible to new diseases. With poor living and working conditions, these migration destinations act as hot-spots for disease transmission. Migration of workers back to rural areas then serves as a highly efficient means of disseminating these diseases to rural populations. We conclude by raising some more recent questions examining the current role of migration in Southern Africa. PMID:24653964

  3. [100 years of Draeger Medical Technology (1902 - 2002) -- working for the applicability of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Strätling, M; Schmucker, P

    2004-09-01

    This survey analyses the history of 100 years of Draeger Medical Technology. Between 1889 and 1902 a number of inventions on the field of pressure gas technology allowed to solve application problems, which until then proved major obstacles to the safe and efficient use of compressed gases such as oxygen, nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide for medical and industrial purposes. A special significance is to be awarded here to pressure reducing valves, but also reliable manometers, nozzles and valves for pressure tanks were not generally available until then. These were first successfully and on a really significant scale introduced into international medical and non-medical pressure-gas technology by Draeger Inc. (Luebeck/Germany), and proved particularly successful in anaesthesia and rescue-devices (e. g. in the "Roth-Draeger Anaesthesia Apparatus" (1902). Consequently, starting in 1902, Draeger Inc. increasingly put an emphasis on developing medical and rescue technology and -- by doing so -- gained an important influence on the history of the implementation of modern oxygen therapy and of inhalative anaesthesia. A survey of the historically most important Draeger-Developments is provided. PMID:15490342

  4. Potential Hazards of Tsunami Waves along the Chinese coast in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Sevre, E. O.; Shi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In the next 100 years the Chinese coast faces potentially non-negligible danger from tsunamogenic earthquakes originating at the neighboring subducting plate boundaries in the Phillipines and the Ryukyu Islands. There are significant differences in the bottom bathymetry between the South China Sea bordering the southern province of Guangdong and the East China Sea and Yellow Sea adjacent to the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shandong. We have found that the linear shallow-water equations can be used to predict with good enough accuracy the travel time of tsunami waves in the South China Sea, but the nonlinear shallow-water equations must be used for the shallower seas next to the northern Chinese provinces. There are some differences in the travel time predictions between the linear and nonlinear theories for the Yellow Sea region. This difference is enough to make a difference in terms of warning. We will use our newly developed probability method, called the probabilistic forecast of tsunami hazards ( PFTH ) for predicting the danger of tsunami waves with a certain height of around 2 meters to impinge on the cities along the Chinese coast in the next century.We have used the Gutenberg-Richter relationship applied locally to each locale for evaluating the probability of the seismic risk for large earthquakes, greater than magnitude 7. We have only included the frequency of shallow large earthquakes to take place . For the southern cities of Hong Kong and Macau, we found that the probability of a 2 meter wave to hit these ports is around 10 % in the next century. Cities in Taiwan are less vulnerable than the large coastal cities on the Chinese mainland. The probability results for the northern cities of Shanghai and Qingdao are around a few per cent for smaller wave heights like one meter or so. But even these smaller waves can be damaging --

  5. To Humbly Go: Guarding Against Perpetuating Models of Colonization in the 100-Year Starship Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, W. R.

    Past patterns of exploration, colonization and exploitation on Earth continue to provide the predominant paradigms that guide many space programs. Any project of crewed space exploration, especially of the magnitude envisioned by the 100-Year Starship Study, must guard against the hubris that may emerge among planners, crew, and others associated with the project, including those industries and bureaucracies that will emerge from the effort. Maintaining a non-exploitative approach may be difficult in consideration of the century of preparatory research and development and the likely multigenerational nature of the voyage itself. Starting now with mission dreamers and planners, the purpose of the voyage must be cast as one of respectful learning and humble discovery, not of conquest (either actual or metaphorical) or other inappropriate models, including military. At a minimum, the Study must actively build non-violence into the voyaging culture it is beginning to create today. References to exploitive colonization, conquest, destiny and other terms from especially American frontier mythology, while tempting in their propagandizing power, should be avoided as they limit creative thinking about alternative possible futures. Future voyagers must strive to adapt to new environments wherever possible and be assimilated by new worlds both biologically and behaviorally rather than to rely on attempts to recreate the Earth they have left. Adaptation should be strongly considered over terraforming. This paper provides an overview of previous work linking the language of colonization to space programs and challenges the extension of the myth of the American frontier to the Starship Study. It argues that such metaphors would be counter-productive at best and have the potential to doom long-term success and survival by planting seeds of social decay and self-destruction. Cautions and recommendations are suggested.

  6. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    PubMed

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    100 years, their low-intensity but long-term land use at settlement sites has triggered a rejuvenation of the ecosystem that is still present. Our data demonstrates that aboveground-belowground interactions strongly control ecosystem responses to historical human land use and that medium- to long-term consequences of even low-intensity human activities must be better accounted for if we are to predict and manage ecosystems succession following land-use abandonment. PMID:24933815

  7. The Revised WIPP Passive Institutional Controls Program - A Conceptual Plan - 13145

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Russ; Klein, Thomas; Van Luik, Abraham

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy/Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is responsible for managing all activities related to the disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed waste in the geologic repository, 650 m below the land surface, at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The main function of the Passive Institutional Controls (PIC's) program is to inform future generations of the long-lived radioactive wastes buried beneath their feet in the desert. For the first 100 years after cessation of disposal operations, the rooms are closed and the shafts leading underground sealed, WIPP is mandated by law to institute Active Institutional Controls (AIC's) with fences, gates, and armed guards on patrol. At this same time a plan must be in place of how to warn/inform the future, after the AIC's are gone, of the consequences of intrusion into the geologic repository disposal area. A plan was put into place during the 1990's with records management and storage, awareness triggers, permanent marker design concepts and testing schedules. This work included the thoughts of expert panels and individuals. The plan held up under peer review and met the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Today the NEA is coordinating a study called the 'Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) Across Generations' to provide the international nuclear waste repository community with a guide on how a nuclear record archive programs should be approached and developed. CBFO is cooperating and participating in this project and will take what knowledge is gained and apply that to the WIPP program. At the same time CBFO is well aware that the EPA and others are expecting DOE to move forward with planning for the future WIPP PIC's program; so a plan will be in place in time for WIPP's closure slated for the early 2030's. The DOE/CBFO WIPP PIC's program in place today meets the regulatory criteria, but complete feasibility of implementation is questionable, and may not be in conformance

  8. Climatic and Hydrological Changes of Past 100 Years in Asian Arid Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhaodong; Salnikov, Vitaliy; Xu, Changchun

    2014-05-01

    The Asian Arid Zone (AAZ) is here defined to include the following regions: northwestern China, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Generally speaking, the AAZ has experienced a temperature rising during the past 100 years that was significantly faster than the global average (0.14 ºC per decade). Specifically, the rate was 0.39 ºC per decade in northwestern China (1950-2010), 0.26 ºC per decade in Kazakhstan (1936-2005), 0.22 ºC per decade in Mongolia (1940-2010), 0.29 ºC per decade in Uzbekistan (1950-2005), 0.18 ºC per decade in Turkmenistan (1961-1995). It should be noted that the mountainous parts of AAZ seems to have experienced a slower rate of temperature rising. For example, the rate was 0.10 ºC per decade in Tajikistan (1940-2005) and was 0.08 ºC per decade in Kyrgyzstan (1890-2005). Precipitation has a slight increasing trend in northwestern China, but it has fluctuated along a near-constant line in the rest of the AAZ. Hydrological data from high-elevation basin show that the runoff has been increasing primarily as a result of rising temperature that caused increases in ice melting. A natural decreasing trend of surface runoff in low-elevation basins is undeniable and the decreasing trend is attributable to intensified evaporation under warming conditions. It is true that the total amount of runoff in the Tianshan Mountains and the associated basins has been increased primarily as a result of temperature rising-resulted increases in ice melting. But, approaching to the turning point of glacier-melting supplies to runoff will pose a great threat to socio-economic sustainability and to ecological security. The turning point refers to the transition from increasing runoff to decreasing runoff within ice melting supplied watersheds under a warming climate.

  9. Accuracy assessment of the ERP prediction method based on analysis of 100-year ERP series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Z.; Tissen, V. M.

    2012-12-01

    A new method has been developed at the Siberian Research Institute of Metrology (SNIIM) for highly accurate prediction of UT1 and Pole motion (PM). In this study, a detailed comparison was made of real-time UT1 predictions made in 2006-2011 and PMpredictions made in 2009-2011making use of the SNIIM method with simultaneous predictions computed at the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), USNO. Obtained results have shown that proposed method provides better accuracy at different prediction lengths.

  10. A technique for estimating heights reached by the 100-year flood on unregulated, nontidal streams in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coble, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method for estimating the heights reached by floods having a recurrence interval of 100 years is defined for nontidal streams with unregulated flows in North Carolina. The flood heights are the vertical distance between stream stage at median discharge (50 percent duration) and the 100-year flood stage and are defined for streams draining areas between 1 and 10,000 square miles for each of the three physiographic areas in the State. An illustrated example of how the method can be used in conjunction with topographic maps to estimate flood heights and delineate inundated areas by interpolation is given.

  11. The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory -- A remarkable first 100 years of tracking eruptions and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babb, Janet L.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the centennial of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). With the support and cooperation of visionaries, financiers, scientists, and other individuals and organizations, HVO has successfully achieved 100 years of continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes. As we celebrate this milestone anniversary, we express our sincere mahalo—thanks—to the people who have contributed to and participated in HVO’s mission during this past century. First and foremost, we owe a debt of gratitude to the late Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., the geologist whose vision and efforts led to the founding of HVO. We also acknowledge the pioneering contributions of the late Frank A. Perret, who began the continuous monitoring of Kīlauea in 1911, setting the stage for Jaggar, who took over the work in 1912. Initial support for HVO was provided by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, which financed the initial cache of volcano monitoring instruments and Perret’s work in 1911. The Hawaiian Volcano Research Association, a group of Honolulu businessmen organized by Lorrin A. Thurston, also provided essential funding for HVO’s daily operations starting in mid-1912 and continuing for several decades. Since HVO’s beginning, the University of Hawaiʻi (UH), called the College of Hawaii until 1920, has been an advocate of HVO’s scientific studies. We have benefited from collaborations with UH scientists at both the Hilo and Mänoa campuses and look forward to future cooperative efforts to better understand how Hawaiian volcanoes work. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated HVO continuously since 1947. Before then, HVO was under the administration of various Federal agencies—the U.S. Weather Bureau, at the time part of the Department of Agriculture, from 1919 to 1924; the USGS, which first managed HVO from 1924 to 1935; and the National Park Service from 1935 to 1947. For 76 of its first 100 years, HVO has been

  12. Safe, Effective Use of Pesticides, A Manual for Commercial Applicators: Home, Institutional, and Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This manual is designed to assist pest control operators to prepare for certification under the Michigan Pesticide Control Act of 1976. The primary focus of this publication is on home, institutional, and structural pest control. The ten sections included describe: (1) Insect control; (2) Rodent control; (3) Special situation pest control; (4)…

  13. Male Control and Female Oppression. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    Following sections that define sexism, that give examples of individual, cultural, and institutional sexism, and that provide random thoughts on sexism and racism, statistics are listed for women and their relationship to various areas such as the economy, education, sports, the government, the media, and housing. Specific topics subsumed under…

  14. The Bee Disease Diagnostic Service - 100 Years and Growing at the USDA Bee Research laboratory, Beltsville, MD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the history of honey bee research in the Washington, D.C. area including the 100 year old bee disease diagnostic service available for beekeepers and apiary inspectors. This service provides the Bee Research Laboratory with first-hand knowledge of the problems facing the beek...

  15. Looking toward the Future: New Research Helps Black Sororities and Fraternities Consider New Governing Structures for the Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2004-01-01

    From a historical perspective, it's interesting to note that at their 100-year mark Black fraternities and sororities are facing some of the very same political criticisms encountered half a century ago. The Black Greeks' ability to be a greater force for social change is also constrained by the basic internal structures of the organizations…

  16. Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

    1989-01-01

    Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. White Control and Minority Oppression. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    Salient facts about white control and minority oppression are provided for major areas such as the economy, health, housing, education, the media, government, and the census. Economic data on white control cover topics such as wealth, the stock exchange, businesses, banks, union control and membership, and others. Data per training to minority…

  18. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  19. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  20. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  1. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  2. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  3. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  4. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  5. Supervision Exercised by States over Privately Controlled Institutions of Higher Education. Bulletin, 1934, No. 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeely, John H.

    1934-01-01

    In most of the States there are privately controlled institutions providing higher education. An obligation rests upon the State in the interest of public welfare to insure the high quality of that higher education. The purpose of this inquiry is to analyze the extent of supervision exercised over privately controlled institutions of higher…

  6. Cancer prevention: from 1727 to milestones of the past 100 years.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Scott M; Hawk, Ernest T

    2009-07-01

    The rich, multidisciplinary history of cancer prevention recounted here begins with surgical and workplace recommendations of the 1700s and ends with 2009 results of the enormous (35,535 men) Selenium and Vitamin E [prostate] Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT). This history comprises a fascinating array of chemopreventive, vaccine, surgical, and behavioral science research, both preclinical and clinical. Preclinical milestones of cancer prevention include the 1913 and 1916 mouse studies by Lathrop and Loeb of cancer development associated with pregnancy or cancer prevention through castration (oophorectomy), preventing chemically induced mouse carcinogenesis as early as 1929, energy restriction studies in the 1940s, the 1950s discoveries and later molecular characterizations of field cancerization and multistep carcinogenesis, and the effects of angiogenesis inhibition in genetically engineered mice reported in 2009. The extraordinary panoply of clinical research includes numerous large and smaller chemoprevention studies of nutritional supplements, other dietary approaches, a Bacillus Calmette-Guérin trial in 1976, molecular-targeted agents, and agents to prevent infection-related cancers such as hepatitis B virus vaccine to prevent liver cancer in 1984. Clinical surgical prevention includes removal of intraepithelial neoplasia detected by screening (including Pap testing developed in 1929 and culposcopy for cervical premalignancy and colonoscopy and polypectomy to prevent colorectal cancer begun in the 1960s) and prophylactic surgeries, such as in Lynch syndrome patients begun in 1977. Behavioral studies include smoking cessation and control beginning in the 1950s, obesity control rooted in studies of 1841, and genetic-counseling and cancer-survivorship studies. This history of pioneering events may help in better understanding who we are and what we want to achieve as cancer prevention researchers and practitioners. PMID:19491253

  7. History of Right Heart Catheterization: 100 Years of Experimentation and Methodology Development

    PubMed Central

    Nossaman, Bobby D.; Scruggs, Brittni A.; Nossaman, Vaughn E.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The development of right heart catheterization has provided the clinician the ability to diagnose patients with congenital and acquired right heart disease, and to monitor patients in the ICU with significant cardiovascular illnesses. The development of bedside pulmonary artery catheterization has become a standard of care for the critically ill patient since its introduction into the ICU almost 40 years ago. However, adoption of this procedure into the mainstream of clinical practice occurred without prior evaluation or demonstration of its clinical or cost-effectiveness. Moreover, current randomized, controlled trials provide little evidence in support of the clinical utility of pulmonary artery catheterization in the management of critically ill patients. Nevertheless, the right heart catheter is an important diagnostic tool to assist the clinician in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease and acquired right heart disease, and moreover, when catheter placement is proximal to the right auricle (atria), this catheter provides an important and safe route for administration of fluids, medications, and parenteral nutrition. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the development of right heart catheterization that led to the ability to conduct physiologic studies in cardiovascular dynamics in normal individuals and in patients with cardiovascular diseases, and to review current controversies of the extension of the right heart catheter, the pulmonary artery catheter. PMID:20160536

  8. Formalization, implementation, and modeling of institutional controllers for distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José N; Silva, Porfírio; Lima, Pedro U; Martinoli, Alcherio

    2014-01-01

    The work described is part of a long term program of introducing institutional robotics, a novel framework for the coordination of robot teams that stems from institutional economics concepts. Under the framework, institutions are cumulative sets of persistent artificial modifications made to the environment or to the internal mechanisms of a subset of agents, thought to be functional for the collective order. In this article we introduce a formal model of institutional controllers based on Petri nets. We define executable Petri nets-an extension of Petri nets that takes into account robot actions and sensing-to design, program, and execute institutional controllers. We use a generalized stochastic Petri net view of the robot team controlled by the institutional controllers to model and analyze the stochastic performance of the resulting distributed robotic system. The ability of our formalism to replicate results obtained using other approaches is assessed through realistic simulations of up to 40 e-puck robots. In particular, we model a robot swarm and its institutional controller with the goal of maintaining wireless connectivity, and successfully compare our model predictions and simulation results with previously reported results, obtained by using finite state automaton models and controllers. PMID:23373975

  9. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Institute By Notice dated April 16, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on April 23, 2013, 78 FR... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits, reagents,...

  10. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  11. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  12. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX... a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  13. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  14. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  15. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX... a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  16. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX... a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  17. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX... a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  18. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  19. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  20. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  1. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... organizations. 15a.12 Section 15a.12 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... institution which is controlled by a religious organization to the extent application of this part would not... institution which wishes to claim the exemption set forth in paragraph (a) of this section shall do so...

  2. Conservatism, institutionalism, and the social control of intergroup conflict.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan D

    2008-03-01

    This research investigates the state social control of intergroup conflict by assessing the sociopolitical determinants of hate crime prosecutions. Consistent with insights from the political sociology of punishment, group-threat accounts of intergroup relations and the state, and neoinstitutional theory, the findings suggest that hate crime prosecutions are fewer where political conservatism, Christian fundamentalism, and black population size are higher, although this last effect is nonlinear. Linkages between district attorneys' offices and communities, on the other hand, increase hate crime prosecutions and the likelihood of offices' creating hate crime policies. Yet these policies are sometimes decoupled from actual enforcement, and such decoupling is more likely in politically conservative districts. The results indicate that common correlates of criminal punishment have very different effects on types of state social control that are protective of minority groups, and also suggest conditions under which policy and practice become decoupled in organizational settings. PMID:18831129

  3. Secretin, 100 years later.

    PubMed

    Chey, William Y; Chang, Ta-Min

    2003-01-01

    One hundred years have elapsed since the discovery of secretin by Bayliss and Starling in 1902. In the past century, the research of secretin has gone by many milestones including isolation, purification and structural determination, chemical synthesis, establishment of its hormonal status by radioimmunoassay and immunoneutralization, identification of the specific receptor, cloning of secretin and its receptor, and identification of a secretin-releasing peptide. It has become clear that secretin is a hormone-regulating pancreatic exocrine secretion of fluid and bicarbonate, gastric acid secretion, and gastric motility. The release and actions of secretin is regulated by hormone-hormonal and neurohormonal interactions. The vagus nerve, particularly its afferent pathway, plays an essential role in the physiological actions of secretin. Substantial information about the property of the secretin receptor has been accumulated, but a potent secretin receptor-specific antagonist remains to be formulated. The neural regulatory mechanisms of the release and action of secretin await further elucidation. The physiological role of secretin in intestinal secretions and motility and extragastrointestinal organs remains to be defined. The presence of secretin and its receptor in the central nervous system is well documented, but its function as a neuropeptide has been recognized gradually and requires extensive study in the future. PMID:14673718

  4. Physics in 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Here I indulge in wide-ranging speculations on the shape of physics, and technology closely related to physics, over the next one hundred years. Themes include the many faces of unification, the re-imagining of quantum theory, and new forms of engineering on small, intermediate, and large scales.

  5. 100 Years of Science

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Dick

    2004-07-07

    The last half-century has seen enormous strides in many scientific and technical areas. In fundamental physics previously unrelated fields like weak interactions and electromagnetism have been linked. Cosmology has been probed back to the Big Bang. Computing and communications have moved from minor topics to subjects that dominate the economy. The structure of DNA has been untangled. We may be on the threshold of understanding the origin of life and even discovering life elsewhere in the universe. Several of these diverse topics such as cosmology and fundamental physics are already profoundly coupled. Remarkably, ties exist between all of these subjects. These ties will be reviewed in light of opportunities ahead in the next decades.

  6. 100 Years of Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atiyah, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The 20th century was a period of extraordinary expansion and progress in mathematics. Concentrates on a few key themes that can be discerned such as local to global, increase in dimension, commutative to non-commutative, linear to non-linear, and homology theory, although it is impossible to list all the main achievements. (ASK)

  7. Simulations of the Greenland ice sheet 100 years into the future with the full Stokes model Elmer/Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Gagliardini, O.

    2011-12-01

    the surface precipitation and temperature and the set S (three experiments) applies an amplification factor to change the basal sliding velocity. The experiments are compared to a constant climate control run beginning at present (epoch 2004-1-1 0:0:0) and running up to 100 years holding the climate constant to its present state. The experiments with the amplification factor (Set S) show high sensitivities. Relative to the control run, the scenario with an amplification factor of 3x applied to the sliding velocity produces a Greenland contribution to sea level rise of ~25 cm. An amplification factor of 2.5x produces a contribution of ~16 cm and an amplification factor 2x produces a contribution of ~9 cm. The experiments with the changes to the surface precipitation and temperature (set C) show a contribution to sea level rise of ~4 cm when a factor 1x is applied to the temperature and precipitation anomalies. A factor 1.5x produces a sea level rise of ~8 cm and a factor 2x produces a sea level rise of ~12 cm.

  8. 78 FR 23958 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical...

  9. Estimated 100-year peak flows and flow volumes in the Big Lost River and Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Kjelstrom, L.C.; Berenbrock, C.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide estimates of the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes that could enter the INEL area from the Big Lost River and Brich Creek are needed as input data for models that will be used to delineate the extent of the 100-year flood plain at the INEL. The methods, procedures and assumptions used to estimate the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes are described in this report.

  10. Spatio-temporal analysis of rainfall trends over a maritime state (Kerala) of India during the last 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Archana; Ajith Joseph, K.; Nair, K. S.

    2014-05-01

    Kerala, a maritime state of India is bestowed with abundant rainfall which is about three times the national average. This study is conducted to have a better understanding of rainfall variability and trend at regional level for this state during the last 100 years. It is found that the rainfall variation in northern and southern regions of Kerala is large and the deviation is on different timescales. There is a shifting of rainfall mean and variability during the seasons. The trend analysis on rainfall data over the last 100 years reveals that there is a significant (99%) decreasing trend in most of the regions of Kerala especially in the month of January, July and November. The annual and seasonal trends of rainfall in most regions of Kerala are also found to be decreasing significantly. This decreasing trend may be related to global anomalies as a result of anthropogenic green house gas (GHG) emissions due to increased fossil fuel use, land-use change due to urbanisation and deforestation, proliferation in transportation associated atmospheric pollutants. We have also conducted a study of the seasonality index (SI) and found that only one district in the northern region (Kasaragod) has seasonality index of more than 1 and that the distribution of monthly rainfall in this district is mostly attributed to 1 or 2 months. In rest of the districts, the rainfall is markedly seasonal. The trend in SI reveals that the rainfall distribution in these districts has become asymmetric with changes in rainfall distribution.

  11. Over 100 years of environmental change recorded by foraminifers and sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-12-01

    The marine microfauna of Mobile Bay has been profoundly influenced by the development and expansion of the primary shipping channel over the last ˜100 years. Foraminifers and sediments from seven box cores with excess lead-210 chronology document that channel dredging and spoil disposal have altered circulation, reduced estuarine mixing, changed sedimentation patterns, and caused a faunal turnover within the bay. Beginning in the late 1800s, changes in estuarine mixing allowed for greater low-pH freshwater influence in the bay, and ultimately began environmental changes that resulted in the loss of calcareous foraminifers. By the early 1900s, box cores throughout Mobile Bay record a ˜100-year trend of increasing calcareous test dissolution that continues to the present. Since the completion of the current shipping channel in the 1950s, restricted tidal flushing and increased terrestrial organic matter, documented by carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, stimulated an increase in agglutinated foraminiferal densities. However, in deeper areas of the bay, hypoxic water has negatively impacted the marine microfauna. Comparisons of the present-day foraminiferal assemblage with foraminifers collected in the early 1970s indicate that the continued biologic loss of calcareous foraminifers in the bay has allowed the introduction of a new agglutinated foraminiferal species into the bay.

  12. Developing institutions for regional land-use planning and control: the Adirondack experience. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    This article deals with the institutional structure of the most-significant regional land-use planning and control institution that has been created to date in New York State - i.e., the Adirondack Park Agency. In recent years a fairly substantial volume of literature has been generated about the Adirondack Park Agency and land-use controls in the Adirondacks. Much of that literature has focused on the substance of the land-use controls created in the Adirondack context and the types of legal issues likely to be confronted in the administration of those controls. The Adirondack Park Agency is examined here in terms of its structure as a land-use planning and control institution in order to identify those aspects of its structure that enhance or hinder the fulfillment of the purposes for which it was created - and to assess the importance of the Agency's institutional structure to its continued existence as a viable planning and regulatory entity. From this examination, it is hoped useful information will be provided to other efforts to establish viable regional land-use planning and control institutions.

  13. Automated Serials Control at the Indian Institutes of Technology: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Tapas Kumar; Panda, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the functional attributes of the automated serials control systems of the libraries in seven Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and provide a comparative analysis. Design/methodology/approach: Features of the serials control modules of the library management systems (LMSs) in use in the…

  14. 1,100 years after an earthquake: modification of the earthquake record by submergence, Puget Lowland, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Crustal faults may pose a complicated story for earthquake reconstruction. In some cases, regional tectonic strain overprints the record of coseismic land-level changes. This study looks at the record of earthquakes at two sites in the Puget Lowland, Gorst and the Skokomish delta, and how post-earthquake submergence modified the paleoseismic records. The Puget Lowland is the slowly subsiding forearc basin of the northern Cascadia subduction zone. A series of active thrust faults cross this lowland. Several of these faults generated large (M7+) earthquakes, about 1,100 years ago and both field sites have submerged at least 1.5 m since that time. This submergence masked the geomorphic record of uplift in some areas, resulting in a misreading of the zone of earthquake deformation and potential misinterpretation of the underlying fault structure. Earthquakes ~1,100 years ago uplifted both field localities and altered river dynamics. At Gorst, a tsunami and debris flow accompanied uplift of at least 3 m by the Seattle fault. The increased sediment load resulted in braided stream formation for a period after the earthquake. At the Skokomish delta, differential uplift trapped the river on the eastern side of the delta for the last 1,100 years resulting in an asymmetric intertidal zone, 2-km wider on one side of the delta than the other. The delta slope or submergence may contribute to high rates of flooding on the Skokomish River. Preliminary results show the millennial scale rates of submergence vary with the southern Puget Lowland submerging at a faster rate than the northern Puget Lowland. This submergence complicates the reconstruction of past earthquakes and renders assessment of future hazards difficult for those areas that are based on uplifted marine platforms and other coastal earthquake signatures in several ways. 1) Post-earthquake submergence reduces the apparent uplift of marine terraces. 2) Submergence makes zones of earthquake deformation appear narrower. 3

  15. The History of Parenting Practices: An Overview! Events, Policies and Theories That Have Influenced Parenting Practices over the Last 100 Years. [Videotape and Worksheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Noting that parenting is a learned experience and that the source of information on parenting has changed considerably over the last 100 years, this videotape examines the history of parent education over the past 100 years, highlighting events influencing family life, policies and legislation to assist families, and parenting theories for each…

  16. Evaluating the 100 year floodplain as an indicator of flood risk in low-lying coastal watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, A.; Brody, S.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is the fastest growing region in the United States. Since 1960, the number of housing units built in the low-lying coastal counties has increased by 246%. The region experiences some of the most intense rainfall events in the country and coastal watersheds are prone to severe flooding characterized by wide floodplains and ponding. This flooding is further exacerbated as urban development encroaches on existing streams and waterways. While the 100 year floodplain should play an important role in our ability to develop disaster resilient communities, recent research has indicated that existing floodplain delineations are a poor indicator of actual flood losses in low-lying coastal regions. Between 2001 and 2005, more than 30% of insurance claims made to FEMA in the Gulf Coast region were outside of the 100 year floodplain and residential losses amounted to more than $19.3 billion. As population density and investments in this region continue to increase, addressing flood risk in coastal communities should become a priority for engineers, urban planners, and decision makers. This study compares the effectiveness of 1-D and a 2-D modeling approaches to spatially capture flood claims from historical events. Initial results indicate that 2-D models perform much better in coastal environments and may serve better for floodplain modeling helping to prevent unintended losses. The results of this study encourage a shift towards better engineering practices using existing 2-D models in order to protect resources and provide guidance for urban development in low-lying coastal regions.

  17. Local knowledge, science, and institutional change: the case of desertification control in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    This article studies the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change in ecological and environmental management. Based on an empirical study on desertification control in 12 counties in north China, the study found the following major results: (1) although there was a cubic relationship between the extent and effect of local knowledge, local knowledge significantly influenced the impact of science on institutional change; (2) local knowledge took effect mainly through affecting formal laws and regulations, major actors, and methods of desertification control in institutional change but had no significant impact on the types of property rights; and (3) local knowledge enhanced the impact of science on the results of desertification control through affecting the impact of science on institutional change. These findings provide a reference for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners, both in China and in other regions of the world, to further explore the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change and the roles of local knowledge or knowledge in institutional change and governance. PMID:25479704

  18. Sediment records of environmental changes in the south end of the Zhejiang-Fujian coastal mud area during the past 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linmiao; Li, Guangxue; Gao, Fei; Liu, Ling; Liu, Yong; Dada, Olusegun A.

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies carried out in the East China Sea (ECS) mud area focused on long-term environmental changes in sedimentary records during the Holocene, especially during the mid-Holocene high-stand water levels period. These results indicate that sensitive grain size groups can be used as a sedimentary proxy to reconstruct the evolution of the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM). The studies have been carried out mainly in the northern and middle portions of the Zhejiang-Fujian coastal mud, however, similar research in the southern portion and the comparison between sedimentary proxy and modern measured data of EAWM are lacking. In this paper, we focused on a sedimentary record of the past 100 years with an enhanced resolution of 1.8 years. Investigations of the southern end of the Zhejiang-Fujian coastal mud area were conducted on the basis of 210Pb chronology, grain-size analysis and chemical element analysis. The correspondence between the mean grain size (Mz) of sediment sensitive grain size and the measured EAWM was confi rmed for the fi rst time. We found that during the recent 100 years, the variation of the mean grain size of the sensitive population in the southern portion of the Zhejiang-Fujian mud was mainly controlled by the EAWM intensity changes; and not directly related to changes in the sediment discharge from Datong station of the Changjiang River (DTSD). Finally, recent changes in the content of heavy metals in study area refl ect the impact of human activities on the environment.

  19. The beginnings of Orthopedic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic: A Review of the First Orthopedic Patients who Presented Over 100 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Morrey, Bernard F; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Background Formalized training in the specialty of orthopedic surgery began at the Mayo Clinic nearly 100 years ago, and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal injuries and disease began even earlier. A robust historical patient database provides the opportunity for review of the first recorded orthopedic cases at our institution, which date back to 1907. Methods The first 400 sequential medical charts of the Mayo Clinic’s patient record database were comprehensively reviewed in order to identify the first documented orthopedic cases. Results Of the first 400 patients reviewed, 15 (4%) received specific orthopedic diagnoses. All presented during a three week period in 1907, and they traveled from all over the region for evaluation. The diagnoses included skeletal tuberculosis (n=6), traumatic fracture (n=3), osteomyelitis (n=2), syphilitic pathologic fracture (n=1), syphilitic ostitis of the tibia and radius (n=1), painful flat foot (n=1), and Morton’s toe (n=1). Included with the records are patient demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, physical examination findings, radiograph reports, operative reports, and detailed drawings of symptomatology. Conclusion Although the technology and science has advanced since the early practice of orthopedic surgery that took place over a century ago, we consider ourselves to be merely an extension of those who established the field before us. Just as the past relies on the future for the continuation of what it began so many years ago, we rely on our founders for the groundwork that they laid in creating this field of surgical medicine PMID:27528834

  20. INL SITEWIDE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS, AND OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR CERCLA RESPONSE ACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    JOLLEY, WENDELL L

    2008-02-05

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the 'Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites', which required a Site-wide institutional controls plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. This revision identifies and consolidates the institutional controls and operations and maintenance requirements into a single document.

  1. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Educational... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1317.205 Educational... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled...

  2. 40 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 5.205 Section 5.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  3. 34 CFR 410.1 - What is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Program? 410.1 Section 410.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  4. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 1317.205 Section 1317.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  5. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 1317.205 Section 1317.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX...

  6. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 1317.205 Section 1317.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX...

  7. Institutional Level Identity Control Strategies in the Distance Education Environment: A Survey of Administrative Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amigud, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Physical separation of students and instructors creates the gap of anonymity and limited control over the remote learning environment. The ability of academic institutions to authenticate students and validate authorship of academic work at various points during a course is necessary for preserving not only perceived credibility but also public…

  8. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 618.205 Section 618.205 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING...

  9. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 41.205 Section 41.205 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage...

  10. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  11. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  12. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  13. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  14. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  15. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  16. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  17. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  18. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  19. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  20. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  1. 78 FR 64018 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Research Triangle Institute Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on July 25, 2013,...

  2. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. 106.12 Section 106.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION...

  3. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements for establishing logical access... Prescriptions § 1311.130 Requirements for establishing logical access control—Institutional practitioner. (a... practitioner that enters permissions for logical access controls into the application. The...

  4. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for establishing logical access...) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.130 Requirements for establishing logical access control—Institutional... practitioner that enters permissions for logical access controls into the application. The...

  5. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. 106.12 Section 106.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION...

  6. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. 15a.12 Section 15a.12 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... identifying the provisions of this part which conflict with a specific tenet of the religious organization....

  7. Regime Shifts in Shallow Lakes: Responses of Cyanobacterial Blooms to Watershed Agricultural Phosphorus Loading Over the Last ~100 Years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaire, J. C.; Taranu, Z. E.; MacDonald, G. K.; Velghe, K.; Bennett, E.; Gregory-Eaves, I.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid changes in ecosystem states have occurred naturally throughout Earth's history. However, environmental changes that have taken place since the start of the Anthropocene may be destabilizing ecosystems and increasing the frequency of regime shifts in response to abrupt changes in external drivers or local intrinsic dynamics. To evaluate the relative influence of these forcers and improve our understanding of the impact of future change, we examined the effects of historical catchment phosphorus loading associated with agricultural land use on lake ecosystems, and whether this caused a shift from a stable, clear-water, regime to a turbid, cyanobacteria-dominated, state. The sedimentary pigments, diatom, and zooplankton (Cladocera) records from a currently clear-water shallow lake (Roxton Pond) and a turbid-water shallow lake (Petit lac Saint-François; PSF) were examined to determine if a cyanobacteria associated pigment (i.e. echinenone) showed an abrupt non-linear response to continued historical phosphorus load index (determined by phosphorus budget) over the last ~100 years. While PSF lake is presently in the turbid-water state, pigment and diatom analyses indicated that both lakes were once in the clear-water state, and that non-linear increases in catchment phosphorus balance resulted in an abrupt transition to cyanobacteria dominated states in each record. These results show that phosphorus loading has resulted in state shifts in shallow lake ecosystems that has been recorded across multiple paleolimnological indicators preserved in the sedimentary record.

  8. On the Influence of the NAO on Outlet Glacier Stability in SE Greenland during the Past 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland Ice sheet has gained massive attention in recent years due to a sudden increase in mass loss at the onset of this century. A significant part of this mass loss has been attributed to increased ice discharge at the margin through iceberg calving from marine-terminating outlet glaciers. However, due to the lack of instrumental data beyond the past 20-30 years it is difficult to evaluate if this was an outstanding event or if it was part of a recurring phenomenon acting on inter-annual, inter-decadal or centennial timescales. In order to improve understanding of the timescales involved in glacier changes and on the influence of ocean and atmosphere variability we investigate sediment archives from fjords with marine terminating glaciers. Near the glacier margin the sedimentation rates are relatively high due to glacial flour input and rafting of iceberg debris. Our studies of several sediment cores obtained from Sermilik Fjord by Helheim Glacier in Southeast Greenland has allowed us to reconstruct glacier calving, shelf temperature and fjord water renewal rate for the past 100 years. These studies show that dominant modes of climate variability, i.e. the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, affect ocean properties near the glacier and that the recorded variability concurs with reconstructed outlet glacier changes. This presentation provides an overview these studies.

  9. DNA from a 100-year-old holotype confirms the validity of a potentially extinct hummingbird species

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, Jeremy J.; Witt, Christopher C.; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Graves, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    We used mtDNA sequence data to confirm that the controversial 100-year-old holotype of the Bogotá sunangel (Heliangelus zusii) represents a valid species. We demonstrate that H. zusii is genetically well differentiated from taxa previously hypothesized to have given rise to the specimen via hybridization. Phylogenetic analyses place H. zusii as sister to a clade of mid- to high-elevation Andean species currently placed in the genera Taphrolesbia and Aglaiocercus. Heliangelus zusii, presumed extinct, has never been observed in nature by biologists. We infer that the species occupied a restricted distribution between the upper tropical and temperate zones of the northern Andes and that it was most probably driven to extinction by deforestation that accompanied human population growth during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining DNA from nearly microscopic tissue samples from old hummingbird specimens and suggest that these methods could be used to resolve the taxonomy of dozens of avian taxa known only from type specimens. PMID:19776061

  10. The anticipated spatial loss of microtidal beaches in the next 100 years due to sea level rise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, G.; Poulos, S.

    2012-04-01

    The anticipated sea level rise is expected to influence on a global scale the earth coast in the near future and it is considered to be a main factor related to coastal retreat, with beach zones being among the most vulnerable coastal landforms. Records for the period 1890-1990 have shown that sea level has already risen by 18cm (min: +10cm, max: +25cm), while the projected to 2100 sea level rise has estimated to be 20 to 50cm (IPCC, 2007). It has to be highlighted that a small rise of few tens of meters would cause shoreline retreat of a few to tens meters in the case of low lying coasts, i.e. beach zones (e.g. Bruun 1962, Nichol and Letherman, 1995, Ciavola and Corbau, 2002). Within the concept of climate change, sea level rise could also being related, in regional scale, to changes of meteorological factors such as intensity, duration and direction of the onshore blowing winds, variation in atmospheric pressure. In the microtidal Greek waters temporary changes in sea level exceeds the 1 m (HHS, 2004) This work investigates the impact of sea level rise to sixteen beach zones along the Greek coast. More specifically, shoreline retreat has been estimated for time periods of 10, 20, 50 and 100 years for the corresponding sea level rise of 0,038, 0,076m, 0,19m and 0,38m, according to the A1B scenario of IPCC (2007) and utilizing Dean's (1991) equation; the latter includes in the calculations both the effects of the anticipated sea level rise and the associated storm surge The appropriate morphodynamic and sedimentological data used for the estimation of beach retreat has been deduced from field measurements. Finally, the percentage of the sub-aerial area lost for each beach zone, under investigation, has been estimated. The results show that coastline retreat follows a liner increase in the case of eleven out of the 16 beach zones, for a time period of 100 years. Santava beach zone (inner Messiniakos Gulf) undergoes most of erosion in the first period of 20 years

  11. Changing patterns of infant death over the last 100 years: autopsy experience from a specialist children's hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pryce, JW; Weber, MA; Ashworth, MT; Roberts, SEA; Malone, M; Sebire, NJ

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Infant mortality has undergone a dramatic reduction in the UK over the past century because of improvements in public health policy and medical advances. Postmortem examinations have been performed at Great Ormond Street Hospital for over 100 years, and analysis of cases across this period has been performed to assess changing patterns of infant deaths undergoing autopsy. Design Autopsy reports from 1909 and 2009 were examined. Age, major pathology and cause of death was reviewed from these cases and entered into an anonymized database. A subsequent comparative analysis was performed. Setting All postmortems performed and reported at Great Ormond Street Hospital in 1909 and 2009. Participants Infant deaths, aged 0–365 days, were identified and subsequently analysed for the two years. Main outcome measures Comparative proportional analysis of postmortem findings from the two time periods. Results Three-hundred and fifty-seven and 347 autopsy reports were identified from 1909 and 2009 including 178 and 128 infant deaths, respectively. The commonest cause of death in 1909 was infection (74%) compared to 20% of deaths in 2009. The most frequent final ‘diagnosis’ in 2009 was ‘unexplained sudden unexpected infant death (SUDI)’, despite a full postmortem including ancillary investigations. In contrast, there were no such cases recorded in 1909, but there were frequent deaths due to gastroenteritis and malnutrition together accounting for 16% of cases, compared to one case of gastroenteritis in 2009. Fifteen percent of 1909 cases had infections which are almost never fatal with appropriate treatment in 2009, including tuberculosis, diphtheria and syphilis. Congenital anomalies were detected with similar frequencies at both time points, (21% and 19% in 1909 and 2009, respectively). Conclusion In the UK, significant changes in patterns of pathology have occurred in paediatric autopsy cases performed at a single specialist centre. Fatal infections and

  12. Current-wave spectra coupling project. Volume I. Hurricane fields and cross sections, surface winds and currents, significant waves and wave spectra for potential OTEC sites: (A) Keahole Point, Hawaii, 100 year hurricane; (B) Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, 100 year hurricane; (C) New Orleans, Louisiana, 100 year hurricane; (D) West Coast of Florida, 100 year hurricane; and for (E) Hurricane Camille (1969) off Louisiana Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Bretschneider, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    This volume is an extension of and consists of several modifications to the earlier report by Bretschneider (April 1979) on the subject of hurricane design wind, wave and current criteria for the four potential OTEC sites. The 100-year hurricane criteria for the design of OTEC plants is included. The criteria, in addition to the maximum conditions of winds, waves and surface current, include: hurricane fields for wind speed U/sub s/ and significant wave height H/sub s/; hurricane fields for modal wave period f/sub 0//sup -1/ and maximum energy density S/sub max/ of the wave spectrum; the corresponding Ekman wind-driven surface current V/sub s/; tabulated cross-sections for U/sub s/, H/sub s/, f/sub 0//sup -1/ and S/sub max/ through max U/sub s/ and through max H/sub s/ along traverses at right angles to and along traverses parallel to the forward movement of the hurricane; most probable maximum wave height and the expected corresponding wave period, based on statistical analysis of maximum wave heights from five hurricanes; design wave spectra for maximum U/sub s/ and also maximum H/sub s/, since maximum U/sub s/ and maximum H/sub s/ do not occur simultaneously; the envelope of wave spectra through maximum U/sub s/ and through maximum H/sub s/ along traverses parallel to the forward movement of the hurricane; the above same determinations for Hurricane Camille (1969) as for the four OTEC locations; and alternative methods (suggested) for obtaining design wave spectra from the joint probability distribution functions for wave height and period given by Longuet-Higgins (1975) and C.N.E.X.O. after Arhan, et al (1976).

  13. Acidophilic denitrifiers dominate the N2O production in a 100-year-old tea orchard soil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Long, Xi-En; Chapman, Stephen J; Yao, Huaiying

    2015-03-01

    Aerobic denitrification is the main process for high N2O production in acid tea field soil. However, the biological mechanisms for the high emission are not fully understood. In this study, we examined N2O emission and denitrifier communities in 100-year-old tea soils with four pH levels (3.71, 5.11, 6.19, and 7.41) and four nitrate concentration (0, 50, 200, and 1000 mg kg(-1) of NO3 (-)-N) addition. Results showed the highest N2O emission (10.1 mg kg(-1) over 21 days) from the soil at pH 3.71 with 1000 mg kg(-1) NO3 (-) addition. The N2O reduction and denitrification enzyme activity in the acid soils (pH <7.0) were significantly higher than that of soils at pH 7.41. Moreover, TRF 78 of nirS and TRF 187 of nosZ dominated in soils of pH 3.71, suggesting an important role of acidophilic denitrifiers in N2O production and reduction. CCA analysis also showed a negative correlation between the dominant denitrifier ecotypes (nirS TRF 78, nosZ TRF 187) and soil pH. The representative sequences were identical to those of cultivated denitrifiers from acidic soils via phylogenetic tree analysis. Our results showed that the acidophilic denitrifier adaptation to the acid environment results in high N2O emission in this highly acidic tea soil. PMID:25273518

  14. [Risks and control of complete market-oriented reforms of medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiannong; Tian, Yongquan

    2014-04-01

    Marketization has become the mainstream since the new public management emerges globally in second half of the 20th century. Some countries infuse private capital into medical institutions which used to be managed by the government originally, and cause the medical industry reforms to be market-oriented. Market-oriented reforms of medical institutions may have risks in the following aspects: the risk of uneven distribution of medical resources, the risk of market failure, the moral risk of government renting-seeking and corruption and the decay of social justice values. Measures of controlling these risks include defining the function orientation of the government, completing the institution-building of healthcare system, improving primary medical system and strengthening social consciousness of hospitals. PMID:24820269

  15. Addressing institutional amplifiers in the dynamics and control of tuberculosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis outbreaks originating in prisons, mines, or hospital wards can spread to the larger community. Recent proposals have targeted these high-transmission institutional amplifiers by improving case detection, treatment, or reducing the size of the exposed population. However, what effects these alternative proposals may have is unclear. We mathematically modeled these control strategies and found case detection and treatment methods insufficient in addressing epidemics involving common types of institutional amplifiers. Movement of persons in and out of amplifiers fundamentally altered the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in a manner not effectively mitigated by detection or treatment alone. Policies increasing the population size exposed to amplifiers or the per-person duration of exposure within amplifiers potentially worsened incidence, even in settings with high rates of detection and treatment success. However, reducing the total population size entering institutional amplifiers significantly lowered tuberculosis incidence and the risk of propagating new drug-resistant tuberculosis strains. PMID:21212197

  16. Snow accumulation rate on Qomolangma (Mount Everest), Himalaya: synchroneity with sites across the Tibetan Plateau on 50-100 year timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, Susan; Hooke, Roger Leb.; Mayewski, Paul Andrew; Kang, Shichang; Hou, Shugui; Qin, Dahe

    Annual-layer thickness data, spanning AD 1534-2001, from an ice core from East Rongbuk Col on Qomolangma (Mount Everest, Himalaya) yield an age-depth profile that deviates systematically from a constant accumulation-rate analytical model. The profile clearly shows that the mean accumulation rate has changed every 50-100 years. A numerical model was developed to determine the magnitude of these multi-decadal-scale rates. The model was used to obtain a time series of annual accumulation. The mean annual accumulation rate decreased from ˜0.8 m ice equivalent in the 1500s to ˜0.3 m in the mid-1800s. From ˜1880 to ˜1970 the rate increased. However, it has decreased since ˜1970. Comparison with six other records from the Himalaya and the Tibetan Plateau shows that the changes in accumulation in East Rongbuk Col are broadly consistent with a regional pattern over much of the Plateau. This suggests that there may be an overarching mechanism controlling precipitation and mass balance over this area. However, a record from Dasuopu, only 125 km northwest of Qomolangma and 700 m higher than East Rongbuk Col, shows a maximum in accumulation during the 1800s, a time during which the East Rongbuk Col and Tibetan Plateau ice-core and tree-ring records show a minimum. This asynchroneity may be due to altitudinal or seasonal differences in monsoon versus westerly moisture sources or complex mountain meteorology.

  17. A 100-year record of changes in water renewal rate in Sermilik fjord and its influence on calving of Helheim glacier, southeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Camilla S.; Schmidt, Sabine; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Straneo, Fiammetta; Grycel, Aleksandra; Hass, Christian H.; Henrik Kjær, Kurt; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Niels; Dyke, Laurence M.; Olsen, Jesper; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2014-08-01

    Here we present a 100 year long proxy record for the renewal rate of the subsurface ocean waters in Sermilik Fjord at the edge of Helheim Glacier, based on investigations of two sediment cores (ER11-24 and ER11-25) obtained from the head of the fjord. By calculating the mean sortable silt (SSbar) in current-sorted melt water plume sediments we find that episodes of increased water renewal rates lasting 3-5 years coincide with a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. This is not surprising as low pressure systems and northeasterly storms are observed more frequently along the east coast of Greenland during positive NAO years as a result of the northward shift in the North Atlantic storm track. Previous studies of sediment cores obtained from the mid-region of the fjord showed that Helheim Glacier destabilization coincides with a negative NAO index. Therefore we conclude that inter-annual variability in storm-induced flushing of Sermilik Fjord and thus the water renewal rate towards the glacier margin is not the controlling factor for inter-annual variability in Helheim Glacier destabilization. Such knowledge may have implications on predictive model studies of ice-ocean interactions and glacier behavior.

  18. Erosion and Deposition Patterns of the Mississippi River as a Result of the "100-Year" Flood Event of April 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D.; Magnani, M.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Due to damming in the upper Mississippi River system, rates of sedimentation on the Mississippi River have decreased by more than half since the 1930s, which has resulted in the subsidence of the historic deltaic systems. In order to counteract this trend, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have diverted most of the Mississippi River sediment flow towards the current deltaic system, although there is concern that current sediment deposition rates may not be enough. Modern land loss along the Mississippi River deltaic plain is a function of many parameters, including the sediment storage and the sediment budget of the river. These parameters are poorly constrained for most rivers. This study explores the possibility of estimating the amount of sediment mobilization during the "100-Year" flood that took place in April 2011 in the portion of the Mississippi River flowing by Memphis, Tennessee. The opportunity to acquire high resolution seismic CHIRP data along the Mississippi River immediately after the flood allows us to compare the new data with similar data acquired in September 2009 in the same part of the river, to evaluate changes sedimentary structures and in the sediment removal/deposition due to the exceptional flooding event. The data were acquired in both cases using an Edgetech SB-512i CHIRP, a 0.7 - 1.2 kHz source pulse, and were recorded to a depth of 5 - 50 m sub-bottom. The compared segments were taken along the same 20 km track of river and comparisons were drawn between them at 9 intersection points. Two main observations can be made from the preliminary analysis of the two datasets: 1) the 2011 data show evidence of widespread erosion and limited deposition. Up to 6 m of alluvium appear to have been eroded from the river bottom. Where sediments have been newly deposited, they are characterized by massive appearance and lack of internal structure; 2) the wavelengths of the sandbars imaged in the post-flood data are 1.5 - 3 times longer than those

  19. Accumulation of Pharmaceuticals, Enterococcus, and Resistance Genes in Soils Irrigated with Wastewater for Zero to 100 Years in Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Siebe, Christina; Willaschek, Elisha; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Huebner, Johannes; Amelung, Wulf; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Siemens, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Irrigation with wastewater releases pharmaceuticals, pathogenic bacteria, and resistance genes, but little is known about the accumulation of these contaminants in the environment when wastewater is applied for decades. We sampled a chronosequence of soils that were variously irrigated with wastewater from zero up to 100 years in the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, and investigated the accumulation of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, clarithromycin, carbamazepine, bezafibrate, naproxen, diclofenac, as well as the occurrence of Enterococcus spp., and sul and qnr resistance genes. Total concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine increased with irrigation duration reaching 95% of their upper limit of 1.4 µg/kg (ciprofloxacin), 4.3 µg/kg (sulfamethoxazole), and 5.4 µg/kg (carbamazepine) in soils irrigated for 19–28 years. Accumulation was soil-type-specific, with largest accumulation rates in Leptosols and no time-trend in Vertisols. Acidic pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate) were not retained and thus did not accumulate in soils. We did not detect qnrA genes, but qnrS and qnrB genes were found in two of the irrigated soils. Relative concentrations of sul1 genes in irrigated soils were two orders of magnitude larger (3.15×10−3±0.22×10−3 copies/16S rDNA) than in non-irrigated soils (4.35×10−5±1.00×10−5 copies/16S rDNA), while those of sul2 exceeded the ones in non-irrigated soils still by a factor of 22 (6.61×10–4±0.59×10−4 versus 2.99×10−5±0.26×10−5 copies/16S rDNA). Absolute numbers of sul genes continued to increase with prolonging irrigation together with Enterococcus spp. 23S rDNA and total 16S rDNA contents. Increasing total concentrations of antibiotics in soil are not accompanied by increasing relative abundances of resistance genes. Nevertheless, wastewater irrigation enlarges the absolute concentration of resistance genes in soils due to a long-term increase in

  20. Electrical Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-02-18

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI/ADA Technologies dry sorbent sampling unit and the testing of Hg catalysts/sorbents in this low-flow, temperature controlled system. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  1. Determination of the 100-year flood plain on Upper Three Runs and selected tributaries, and the Savannah River at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanier, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The 100-year flood plain was determined for Upper Three Runs, its tributaries, and the part of the Savannah River that borders the Savannah River Site. The results are provided in tabular and graphical formats. The 100-year flood-plain maps and flood profiles provide water-resource managers of the Savannah River Site with a technical basis for making flood-plain management decisions that could minimize future flood problems and provide a basis for designing and constructing drainage structures along roadways. A hydrologic analysis was made to estimate the 100-year recurrence- interval flow for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The analysis showed that the well-drained, sandy soils in the head waters of Upper Three Runs reduce the high flows in the stream; therefore, the South Carolina upper Coastal Plain regional-rural-regression equation does not apply for Upper Three Runs. Conse- quently, a relation was established for 100-year recurrence-interval flow and drainage area using streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations on Upper Three Runs. This relation was used to compute 100-year recurrence-interval flows at selected points along the stream. The regional regression equations were applicable for the tributaries to Upper Three Runs, because the soil types in the drainage basins of the tributaries resemble those normally occurring in upper Coastal Plain basins. This was verified by analysis of the flood-frequency data collected from U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 02197342 on Fourmile Branch. Cross sections were surveyed throughout each reach, and other pertinent data such as flow resistance and land-use were col- lected. The surveyed cross sections and computed 100-year recurrence-interval flows were used in a step-backwater model to compute the 100-year flood profile for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The profiles were used to delineate the 100-year flood plain on topographic maps. The Savannah River forms the southwestern border

  2. The University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy CCD camera control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jim, K. T. C.; Yamada, H. T.; Luppino, G. A.; Hlivak, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy CCD Camera Control System consists of a NeXT workstation, a graphical user interface, and a fiber optics communications interface which is connected to a San Diego State University CCD controller. The UH system employs the NeXT-resident Motorola DSP 56001 as a real time hardware controller. The DSP 56001 is interfaced to the Mach-based UNIX of the NeXT workstation by DMA and multithreading. Since the SDSU controller also uses the DPS 56001, the NeXT is used as a development platform for the embedded control software. The fiber optic interface links the two DSP 56001's through their Synchronous Serial Interfaces. The user interface is based on the NeXTStep windowing system. It is easy to use and features real-time display of image data and control over all camera functions. Both Loral and Tektronix 2048 x 2048 CCD's have been driven at full readout speeds, and the system is intended to be capable of simultaneous readout of four such CCD's. The total hardware package is compact enough to be quite portable and has been used on five different telescopes on Mauna Kea. The complete CCD control system can be assembled for a very low cost. The hardware and software of the control system has proven to be quite reliable, well adapted to the needs of astronomers, and extensible to increasingly complicated control requirements.

  3. Towards a robust calving and melt-history for Helheim Glacier, SE Greenland, for the last 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. J.; Ellegaard, M.; Markussen, T. N.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of increased ice-discharge from tidewater glaciers in Greenland in the early and mid 2000s has led to concern about a possible rapid loss of ice from the ice sheet in a scenario with increasing air and ocean water temperatures. In order to evaluate the strength and uniqueness of the observed increase a robust data-set on the temporal variation of calving and melt is strongly needed. The only reliable data prior to the period of aerial photographs and instrumental observations is the archive preserved at the seabed in the fjords and coastal waters off the ice sheet. Establishment of core-chronology is central in studies of these archives and is based on Pb-210 dating which will reach approx. 100 years back in time. Establishment of a detailed and accurate core-chronology by means of Pb-210 dating and Cs-137 peaks is by no means a trivial task in environments influenced by episodic deposition of ice-rafted debris (IRD). The deposition will have a relatively large component of random variability which could be mistaken for actual changes in sedimentation rate, especially so if only one or a few cores are analyzed. To increase the reliability of the calving reconstruction, a total of 13 cores have been sampled in this study in Sermilik Fjord in August 2012 at depths between approximately 700 to 900 m. Eleven of the cores are from within the central basin north of 66 degrees North and two are from the outer part of the fjord south of that line. CTD-profiles and measurements of floc size in situ indicate that the sedimentation is significantly influenced by deposition of IRD and temporal changes in sediment accumulation rates will therefore be examined for all the cores. The cores are also being analyzed for their content of dinoflagellate cysts and diatoms in order to examine possible temporal changes in ocean water temperature in the fjord. So far (August 2013) six cores have been studied and the total average accumulation rate for each year since 1925 has

  4. WIPP Case Study - Compliance Monitoring, Passive Institutional Controls, and Record Keeping

    SciTech Connect

    WAGNER, STEPHEN W; BEAUHEIM, RICHARD L.; PFEIFLE, TOM W.; BETHEL, AMY; SOSA-YATES, GRACE ANN; WILLIAMS, CECELIA V.; MILLIGAN, MARGARET; FOX, MICHAEL

    2002-07-01

    The WIPP Case Study describes the compliance monitoring program, record keeping requirements, and passive institutional controls that are used to help ensure the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will safety contain radioactive waste and indicate dangers and location of the wastes. The radioactive components in the waste are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) while the hazardous components in the waste are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). This paper addresses monitoring relating to radionuclide containment performance, passive institutional controls, and record keeping over a 10,000-year time frame. Monitoring relating to the hazardous components and the associated regulator are not addressed in this paper. The WIPP containment performance is mandated by release limits set by regulation. Regulations also require the radioactive waste containment performance of the WIPP to be predicted by a ''Performance Assessment.'' The EPA did not base the acceptance of the WIPP solely on predicted containment but included additional assurance measures. One such assurance measure is monitoring, which may be defined as the on-going measurement of conditions in and around the repository. This case study describes the evolution of the WIPP monitoring program as the WIPP project progressed through the planning, site characterization, regulatory promulgation, and eventual operational stages that spanned a period of over 25 years. Included are discussions of the regulatory requirements for monitoring, selection of monitoring parameters, trigger values used to identify unexpected conditions, assessment of monitoring data against the trigger values, and plans for post-closure monitoring. The United EPA established the requirements for Passive Institutional Controls (PICs) for disposal sites. The requirements state the a disposal site must be designated by the most permanent markers, records, and other passive institutional controls

  5. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental control technology. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block. A second phase of the lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG) was also conducted simultaneously on the Pilot System this month. This month the ECTC was off-line from 6/9 through 6/19 to complete a Facility retrofit project. During this brief outage, modifications were made to the ECTC Flue Gas Handling System to enhance the facility capabilities, and to prepare for future High Velocity Wet FGD Testing. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the low temperature performance testing resumed this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the new SCR catalysts.

  7. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  8. Institutional Control Policies and Implementation for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vefa Yucel, Greg Shott, Denise Wieland, et al.

    2007-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has implemented varying institutional control policies in performance assessment/composite analysis (PA/CA) calculations for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (Shott et al., 1998; 2000; Bechtel Nevada [BN] and Neptune and Company Inc. [Neptune], 2006). The facilities are within the actively maintained boundaries of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that are enforced by NNSA/NSO. Under current policies, access required for exposure of the member of public (MOP) or the inadvertent human intruder (IHI) is prohibited. Uncertainties affecting institutional control policies are the duration and effectiveness of the controls during the post-closure period. Implementing a uniform set of institutional control policies for the RWMSs that encompasses waste management and environmental restoration programs and is consistent with the end-state vision for the environmental management programs for the NTS (DOE, 2006) is a primary goal of the maintenance program. The NNSA/NSO Performance Management Plan (DOE, 2002) complies with DOE Policy P455.1, 'Use of Risk-Based End States' (DOE, 2003a). Expected future land uses are a driver in selecting acceptable end state conditions and clean-up goals for the NTS. NNSA/NSO Environmental Management's (EM's) land management assumptions and framework for Environmental Management activities are as follows: The NTS will remain under federal control in perpetuity as an NNSA test site, and the large buffer zone surrounding the NTS (the Nevada Test and Training Range) is assumed to remain under the control of the U.S. Air Force. There are no plans for transfer of any NTS lands to other agencies or public entities. Access will continue to be restricted to the NTS and the surrounding areas. For management purposes, NNSA/NV EM activities have been established based on the source of contamination and type of waste

  9. Flow and sediment processes in a cutoff meander of the Danube Delta during 100-year recurrent flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugaru Tiron, L.; Le Coz, J.; Provansal, M.; Dutu, F.

    2009-04-01

    River training operations, such as meander cutoff, initiated for navigational purposes often lead to dramatic changes in the streamwise profiles (Hooke, 1986, Kesel, 2003; Kiss et al., 2007). Meander correction affects both the hydraulic and morphodynamical behavior of the modified branches that sedimentation occurs in time, while newly built canals usually experience degradation (Jugaru et. al, 2006). This study reports and analyzes new data on the hydrological and sedimentary processes at work during a morphogenic flood in a large modified meander (the Mahmudia meander) of the St. George branch, the southern branch of the Danube Delta. The 100-year recurrent flood that occurred in 2006 offered an exceptional opportunity for scanning different cross sections of the Mahmudia meander system by means of the emerging Doppler profiler (aDcp) technology in order to analyze the impact on sedimentation and dynamic processes in the study area. The Mahmudia study site corresponds to a vast natural meander which was cut off in 1984-1988 by an artificial canal opened to shipping. The meander correction accelerated fluxes through the artificial canal and dramatically enhanced deposition in the former meander. After his formation, the cutoff meander acted as sediment storage locations, essentially removing channel and point bar sediments from the active sediment budget of the main channel (Popa, 1997). During the one-hundred-year recurrent flood in April 2006, bathymetry, flow velocity and discharge data were acquired across several sections of both natural and artificial channels with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp Workhorse Sentinel 600 kHz, Teledyne RDI) in order to investigate the distribution of the flow and sediment and his impact on sedimentation in a channelized reach and its adjacent cutoff. The contrasting hydro-sedimentary processes at work in both channels and bifurcation/confluence nodal points are analyzed from the measured flux distribution

  10. 2003 Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Assessment Report for Hanford CERCLA Response Action

    SciTech Connect

    TEIMOURI, A.E.

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this assessment as specified in the Institutional Controls (IC) Plan was two-fold: (1) to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of ICs associated with ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'' (CERCLA) Records of Decision (RODs); and (2) to identify corrective actions as necessary. Additionally, this assessment covered an assessment of sitewide ICs at the Hanford Site. The IC Plan was approved by the Tri-Party agencies July 2002, ''Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for Hanford CERCLA Response Actions,'' DOE/RL-2001-41, Revision 0. The goal of the Plan was to identify ICs for current CERCLA response actions, describe how they are implemented and maintained, and serve as a reference for the selection of ICs in the future. Section 4.2 of the IC Plan summarizes the objectives for the assessment as follows: ''A focused and periodic self-assessment and reporting of ICs provides for an evaluation of the effectiveness of the controls and the opportunity for cost-effective improvements.

  11. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  12. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  13. Perioperative Glycemic Control in Plastic Surgery: Review and Discussion of an Institutional Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dortch, John D; Eck, Dustin L; Ladlie, Beth; TerKonda, Sarvam P

    2016-07-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia is a well-known risk factor for surgical morbidity such as wound healing, infection, and prolonged hospitalization. This association has been reported for a number of surgical subspecialties, including plastic surgery. Specialty-specific guidelines have become increasingly available in the literature. Currently, glucose management guidelines for plastic surgery are lacking. Recognizing that multiple approaches exist for perioperative glucose, protocol-based models provide the necessary structure and guidance for approaching glycemic control. In this article, we review the influence of diabetes on outcomes in plastic surgery patients and propose a practical approach to perioperative blood glucose management based on current Endocrine Society and Mayo Clinic institutional guidelines. PMID:27301370

  14. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee, July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-15

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System and the Pulse Jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B and W/CHX Heat Exchanger project. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Inspections of these idled systems were conducted this month.

  15. [Diflucortolone-21-valerate Reference Standard (Control 871) of National Institute of Hygienic Sciences].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hiroshige, R; Murai, M; Tokunaga, H; Okada, S; Kimura, T

    1989-01-01

    Diflucortolone-21-valerate was tested for the preparation of "Diflucortolone-21-valerate Reference Standard (Control 871)". Analytical data obtained were as follows: loss on drying, 0.05%; infrared spectrum, 1745, 1727, 1667, 1625, 1611, 1169 cm-1; ultraviolet spectrum, lambda max = 239 nm; absorbance, E1%1cm (239 nm) = 348.8; optical rotation, [alpha]20D: + 100.8 degrees; melting point, 203.2 degrees C; thin-layer chromatography, three contaminants were detected; high-performance liquid chromatography, two contaminants were detected; fluorine, 8.06%. On the basis of those results, this material was authorized as the National Institute of Hygienic Sciences Reference Standard (Control 871). PMID:2636922

  16. Learning in the tutorial group: a balance between individual freedom and institutional control.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Anita; Aanstoot, Janna; Hammarström, Inger Lundeborg; Samuelsson, Christina; Johannesson, Eva; Sandström, Karin; Berglind, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility. Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases student's motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful. PMID:23848371

  17. Assessing the Quality of Randomized Controlled Urological Trials Conducted by Korean Medical Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the quality of randomized controlled urological trials conducted by Korean medical institutions. Materials and Methods Quality assessment was conducted by using the Jadad scale; in addition, the van Tulder scale and the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool were used as individual indices. All assessments were performed by two reviewers. If the outcomes differed, the two reviewers and a third reviewer adjusted the discrepancy in the results through discussion. Starting from 1986, a quality analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted in 1-year and 5-year units. The quality assessment was conducted by subject, type of intervention, presence of double blinding, presence of funding, and review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results Whereas the number of RCTs published has gradually increased, there was no significant difference in the quality of the RCTs according to publication year. Drug studies, double-blind studies, studies with funding, and studies reviewed by IRBs had higher quality scores and a higher percentage of high-quality RCTs than did other studies. Thirty-six RCTs were published in journals included in the Science Citation Index and 20 RCTs were published in journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded. The largest number of RCTs (32.32%) were published by the Korean Journal of Urology. Conclusions A quantitative increase was observed in RCTs over time, but no qualitative improvement in the RCTs was observed. It seems necessary to put effort into the quality improvement of RCTs at the design stage. PMID:23700493

  18. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  19. Geological control of flow in the Institute and Möller Ice Streams, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Ross, N.; Corr, H.; Bingham, R. G.; Rippin, D. M.; Le Brocq, A.; Siegert, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The conditions at the base of an ice sheet influence its flow, and reflect the ongoing interaction between moving ice and the underlying geology. Critical influences on ice flow include subglacial topography, bed lithology, and geothermal heat flux. These factors are influenced either directly by local geology, or by the regional tectonic setting. Geophysical methods have been used in many parts of Antarctica, such as the Siple Coast, to reveal the role subglacial geology plays in influencing ice flow. Until recently, however, the Institute and Möller Ice Streams, which drain ~20% of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet into the Weddell Sea, were only covered by sparse airborne radar (~50 km line spacing), and reconnaissance aeromagnetic data, limiting our understanding of the geological template for this sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Here we present our geological interpretation of the first integrated aerogeophysical survey over the catchments of the Institute and Möller Ice Streams, which collected ~25,000 km of new aerogeophysical data during the 2010/11 field season. These new airborne radar, magnetic and gravity data reveals both the subglacial topography, and the subglacial geology. Our maps show the fastest flowing coastal part of the Institute Ice Stream crosses a sedimentary basin underlain by thinned continental crust. Further inland two distinct ice flow provinces are recognised: the Pagano Ice Flow Province, which follows the newly identified, ~75 km wide, sinistral strike-slip Pagano Fault Zone at the boundary between East and West Antarctica; and the Ellsworth Ice Flow Province, which is controlled by the Permo-Triassic structural grain of folded Middle Cambrian-Permian meta-sediments, and Jurassic granitic rocks which form significant subglacial highlands. Our new data highlight the importance of understanding subglacial geology when explaining the complex pattern of ice flow observed in the ice sheet interior.

  20. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  1. Uncertainties of the global-to-regional temperature and precipitation simulations in CMIP5 models for past and future 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lilong; Xu, Jianjun; Powell, Alfred M.; Jiang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Global-to-regional surface temperature and precipitation trends are examined based on the CMIP5 model 100 years of historical simulations and another future 100 years following the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) emission scenario projection. Different from the ensemble mean approach in the previous studies, the probabilistic multimodal ensemble prediction with Gaussian fitting is used to generate probabilistic simulations. The results show that the averaged precipitation increases slightly with global warming, but the response is not globally uniform. Both historical model simulations and the RCP emission scenario projections suffer from large uncertainties in the selected models and the geographic distribution. The spatial distribution of spreads among the multimodal scenario projections is similar to that in the historical simulations, except the magnitude of spread sharply increases and the region expands equatorward and poleward in surface temperature and precipitation, respectively.

  2. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. Also, several installation activities were initiated this month for the testing of a new EPRI/ADA Technologies sorbent sampling system in December. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  4. 77 FR 55504 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Institute By Notice dated May 15, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on May 22, 2012, 77 FR 30327... Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives...

  5. Controlling scabies in institutional settings: a review of medications, treatment models, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2004-01-01

    , education, treatment, and disinfection leads to failure to control scabies epidemics. Control of epidemics of institutional scabies requires attention to treatment effects and logistics. Treatment is low risk, but cumbersome because many individuals need be treated. It is advisable to restrict, where possible, the number of staff members that deal with scabies patients to limit the spread of the scabies. Prolonged surveillance is required for the eradication of institutional scabies. While the foregoing plans require coordination of all involved personnel and sustained efforts, they are necessary to halt the spread of scabies to patients and staff, to enhance their morale, and to prevent deterioration of labor and public relations. PMID:14979741

  6. Celebrating 100 Years of Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Wright brothers' first flight, the article profiles aviation and aerospace technology programs that are training workers in aviation safety and explorations. Looks at programs from Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell, Pima Community College, and Olathe Northwest High School. (JOW)

  7. [Dermatitis artefacta 100 years ago].

    PubMed

    Heras-Mendaza, F

    2009-10-01

    In 1909, the Spanish dermatologist Juan de Azúa published a study of the main features of skin lesions in dermatitis artefacta. In the article, he paid particular attention to the psychological state of these patients, their family situation, and what they were hoping to gain with pathomimicry. Azúa directly confronted the patients with the diagnosis, which he demonstrated by applying an occlusive dressing. Written in a literary style typical of the times, the article includes the subjective impressions of Azúa, through which he manages to transmit a much more realistic image of these patients than that portrayed with the sterile language we tend to use in current medical literature. PMID:19775543

  8. 100 years of Philips Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delft, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    On Thursday 23 October 1913, a Dutch newspaper published the following advertisement: Hiring: A capable young scientist with a doctorate in physics. Must be a good experimenter. Letters containing information on age, life history and references may be submitted to Philips in Eindhoven. Two days later, a candidate applied: Gilles Holst. At that time, Holst was working in Leiden as an assistant to Heike Kamerlingh Onnes, a recent Nobel Prize winner.

  9. 100 Years of Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpher, Nancy L.; Wright Ron, D.

    2006-01-01

    One may have heard of reality TV, but what about reality learning? The latter is probably a term one hasn't seen much, although it is in many ways a clearer and more concise name for a concept that in 2006 marks its 100th anniversary: cooperative education, or "co-op." Co-op, a break-through idea pioneered at the University of Cincinnati by Herman…

  10. Simulation of water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Berenbrock, C.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1997-10-01

    Delineation of areas at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that would be inundated by a 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek is needed by the US Department of Energy to fulfill flood-plain regulatory requirements. Birch Creek flows southward about 40 miles through an alluvium-filled valley onto the northern part of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory site on the eastern Snake River Plain. The lower 10-mile reach of Birch Creek that ends in Birch Creek Playa near several Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities is of particular concern. Twenty-six channel cross sections were surveyed to develop and apply a hydraulic model to simulate water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek. Model simulation of the 100-year peak flow (700 cubic feet per second) in reaches upstream from State Highway 22 indicated that flow was confined within channels even when all flow was routed to one channel. Where the highway crosses Birch Creek, about 315 cubic feet per second of water was estimated to move downstream--115 cubic feet per second through a culvert and 200 cubic feet per second over the highway. Simulated water-surface elevation at this crossing was 0.8 foot higher than the elevation of the highway. The remaining 385 cubic feet per second flowed southwestward in a trench along the north side of the highway. Flow also was simulated with the culvert removed. The exact location of flood boundaries on Birch Creek could not be determined because of the highly braided channel and the many anthropogenic features (such as the trench, highway, and diversion channels) in the study area that affect flood hydraulics and flow. Because flood boundaries could not be located exactly, only a generalized flood-prone map was developed.

  11. THE INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERED AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH WITH LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUSLY CLOSED SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2005-02-01

    Environmental remediation efforts that are underway at hundreds of contaminated sites in the United States will not be able to remediate large portions of those sites to conditions that would permit unrestricted access. Rather, large volumes of waste materials, contaminated soils and cleanup residuals will have to be isolated either in place or in new, often on-site, disposal cells with long term monitoring, maintenance and institutional control needs. The challenge continues to be to provide engineering systems and controls that can ensure the protection of public health and the environment over very long time horizons (hundreds to perhaps thousands of years) with minimal intervention. Effective long term management of legacy hazardous and nuclear waste requires an integrated approach that addresses both the engineered containment and control system itself and the institutional controls and other responsibilities that are needed. Decisions concerning system design, monitoring and maintenance, and the institutional controls that will be employed are best done through a "risk-nformed, performance-based" approach. Such an approach should incorporate an analysis of potential "failure" modes and consequences for all important system features, together with lessons learned from experience with systems already in place. The authors will present the preliminary results of a case study approach that included several sites where contamination isolation systems including institutional controls have been implemented. The results are being used together with failure trees and logic diagrams that have been developed for both the engineered barriers and the institutional controls. The use of these analytical tools to evaluate the potential for different levels of failure and associated consequences will be discussed. Of special interest is the robustness of different approaches to providing long-term protection through redundancy and defense in depth.

  12. 41 CFR 101-4.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Educational institutions... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 101-4.205 Educational institutions and other entities...

  13. Proceedings of the Summer Institute on Biological Control of Plant Insects and Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Fowden G., Ed.; Harris, F. A., Ed.

    This institute, conducted at Mississippi State University, was an outgrowth of the Council of Higher Education in the Agricultural Science's efforts to study the needs and opportunities for the advancement of scientific knowledge in land grant institutions and recommend programs for implementation. The proceedings serve as an information source to…

  14. A Theory of Institutional Change and Control: Tri-Partite Power. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Arthur

    This paper describes the Tri-Partite Theory of institutional change, which proposes that organizations in general and educational institutions in particular pass through three phases, each dominated by a specific personality type: person-orientation (loyalty to a charismatic leader as the basis of motivation); plan-orientation (functions…

  15. Comparison of the 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods computed from observed data with the 1995 urban flood-frequency estimating equations for Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, Ernest J.

    1997-01-01

    Flood-frequency relations were computed for 28 urban stations, for 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods and the computations were compared to corresponding recurrence interval floods computed from the estimating equations from a 1995 investigation. Two stations were excluded from further comparisons or analyses because neither station had a significant flood during the period of observed record. The comparisons, based on the student's t-test statistics at the 0.05 level of significance, indicate that the mean residuals of the 25- and 100-year floods were negatively biased by 26.2 percent and 31.6 percent, respectively, at the 26 stations. However, the mean residuals of the 2-year floods were 2.5 percent lower than the mean of the 2-year floods computed from the equations, and were not significantly biased. The reason for this negative bias is that the period of observed record at the 26 stations was a relatively dry period. At 25 of the 26 stations, the two highest simulated peaks used to develop the estimating equations occurred many years before the observed record began. However, no attempt was made to adjust the estimating equations because higher peaks could occur after the period of observed record and an adjustment to the equations would cause an underestimation of design floods.

  16. Lessons From Love Canal: Considerations for the Effective Use of Institutional Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Fil, Richard M.

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide background on a well-known failure of an institutional control (IC), an overview of the types and potential shortcomings of individual ICs, provide some considerations for more effectively selecting and maintaining appropriate ICs in the context of a decommissioning project (including those that may be subject to various federal and state requirements). In light of these considerations, it should be clear that the potential liabilities arising from the failure to comply with ICs may be very significant, even if such failure is not directly caused by the party responsible for the pre-existing conditions. A number of options exist to help manage risk at sites where impacts will remain in place following the completion of active decommissioning efforts. It is important to involve all appropriate professionals early on and throughout the process and to consult with other relevant parties (e.g., regulatory agencies, the community, and potential site owners and occupants) to evaluate the most appropriate ICs available. This is particularly critical in the context of a long-term decommissioning project involving a large number of contractors, personnel turnover or departure, potential isolation of individuals with focused technical or regulatory expertise, or other factors that may affect more ideal communication. Mechanisms for ensuring long-term compliance with ICs, as well as reliable approaches for enforcing their terms, also warrant early and on-going attention. However, even with a detailed and thoughtful approach, it must be recognized under certain circumstances that a more realistic goal may be to continue to reasonably minimize potential risks rather than absolutely avoid all risks for all time.

  17. Visible, Durable, Enforceable Institutional Controls: Weldon Spring Site - A 10-Year Journey - 13190

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlmeyer, Terri; Thompson, Randy; Starr, Ken

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management's (LM's) mission is to manage the DOE's post-closure responsibilities and ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. LM has control and custody of legacy land, structures, and facilities and is responsible for maintaining them at levels suitable for their long-term use. This includes all engineered and institutional controls (ICs) designed as another level of assurance to prevent exposure to residual contamination and waste. The development and management of ICs has been, and continues to be, a critical component to the success of LM surveillance and maintenance activities. Many major federal laws, Executive Orders, regulations, and various other drivers influence the establishment and use of ICs at LM sites. LM uses a wide range of ICs to appropriately limit access to, or uses of, land, facilities, and other real and personal properties; protect the environment; maintain the physical safety and security of DOE facilities; and prevent or limit inadvertent human and environmental exposure to residual contaminants and other hazards. The ICs at the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site were developed in close coordination with federal and state regulators. An Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) was issued in February 2005, which clarified the use restrictions necessary for the remedial actions specified in the Records of Decision for the separate operable units to remain protective over the long-term. The operable units included the Chemical Plant Operable Unit, the Chemical Plant Groundwater Operable Unit, and the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit. The ESD clarified specific requirements for each site area that needed use restrictions and established how DOE would implement, maintain, and monitor the specific requirements. DOE developed the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site (LTS and M Plan) that addressed the full scope of the site

  18. 77 FR 30327 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits, reagents, and reference standards...

  19. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... been approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part...) The Institute reserves the right to revoke, for cause, any certificate of approval where it is...

  20. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... been approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part...) The Institute reserves the right to revoke, for cause, any certificate of approval where it is...

  1. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... been approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part...) The Institute reserves the right to revoke, for cause, any certificate of approval where it is...

  2. Effects of 100 years wastewater irrigation on resistance genes, class 1 integrons and IncP-1 plasmids in Mexican soil

    PubMed Central

    Jechalke, Sven; Broszat, Melanie; Lang, Friederike; Siebe, Christina; Smalla, Kornelia; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Long-term irrigation with untreated wastewater can lead to an accumulation of antibiotic substances and antibiotic resistance genes in soil. However, little is known so far about effects of wastewater, applied for decades, on the abundance of IncP-1 plasmids and class 1 integrons which may contribute to the accumulation and spread of resistance genes in the environment, and their correlation with heavy metal concentrations. Therefore, a chronosequence of soils that were irrigated with wastewater from 0 to 100 years was sampled in the Mezquital Valley in Mexico in the dry season. The total community DNA was extracted and the absolute and relative abundance (relative to 16S rRNA genes) of antibiotic resistance genes (tet(W), tet(Q), aadA), class 1 integrons (intI1), quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (qacE+qacEΔ1) and IncP-1 plasmids (korB) were quantified by real-time PCR. Except for intI1 and qacE+qacEΔ1 the abundances of selected genes were below the detection limit in non-irrigated soil. Confirming the results of a previous study, the absolute abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples increased significantly over time (linear regression model, p < 0.05) suggesting an increase in bacterial biomass due to repeated irrigation with wastewater. Correspondingly, all tested antibiotic resistance genes as well as intI1 and korB significantly increased in abundance over the period of 100 years of irrigation. In parallel, concentrations of the heavy metals Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cr significantly increased. However, no significant positive correlations were observed between the relative abundance of selected genes and years of irrigation, indicating no enrichment in the soil bacterial community due to repeated wastewater irrigation or due to a potential co-selection by increasing concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:25784901

  3. Reconstruction of soil moisture for the past 100 years in eastern Siberia by using δ13C of larch tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tei, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maximov, Trofim C.

    2013-07-01

    stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) chronology for the past 100 years was developed from larch tree rings in eastern Siberia (near Yakutsk, 62°14'N, 129°37'E), to reconstruct past soil moisture water equivalent (SWE). Based on the correlation analyses between SWE and tree ring δ13C, we developed a linear regression model for SWE in the late growing period (LGP: 15 July to 31 August) using annual tree ring δ13C, which was calculated from the combination of latewood in a current year and earlywood in the following year, and then reconstructed SWE (LGP) for 1908-2007. Reconstructed SWE was compared with factors such as the output of the land surface model, annual precipitation, and Palmer Drought Severity Index for July. From the results, the reconstructed SWE appears reasonable and shows a large variation, including repeated occurrences of severe drought and an unprecedented high soil moisture event in 2006-2007 during the past 100 years. The reconstruction also captured a past documented record of severe drought in the 1940s. Despite the generally good performance of the reconstruction, by the 1930s the estimated SWE was higher than that expected from the annual precipitation. Tree ring width and δ13C were negatively correlated in most periods. However, the negative correlation was weaker for the period from 1919 to 1925, when relatively low air temperature was observed. This result suggests that the rate of photosynthesis, together with the degree of stomata opening, also affected the tree ring δ13C during cool periods.

  4. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  5. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  6. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  7. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  8. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  9. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  10. The Influence of Institutional Control on the Persistence of Minority Students: A Descriptive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Oscar F.

    This study relates the personal characteristics, high school experiences, and college experiences of students pursuing a baccalaureate degree to the type of institution they attended and their ethnicity. Multivariate analysis was performed on data drawn from the High School and Beyond database. Summary conclusions include the following: (1)…

  11. Shifting Governance and Control in Church-Related Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fioke, Clarence J.; King, Richard A.

    Factors related to shifts in governance patterns of church-related private colleges were investigated through historical document analysis, interviews with 34 presidents and board members, and 59 questionnaires returned by current and past board members of 2 New Mexico institutions. Document analysis focused upon mission statements, annual…

  12. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of this part which conflict with a specific tenet of the religious organization. (Secs. 901, 902, Education Amendments of 1972, 86 Stat....

  13. 77 FR 47111 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Institute By Notice dated May 31, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on June 8, 2012, 77 FR 34069... hearings on applications to import narcotic raw material are not appropriate. 72 FR 3417 (2007). Regarding...-Methyl-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine (7395)......... I 4-Methylaminorex (cis isomer) (1590) I...

  14. Microbe-mediated transformations of marine dissolved organic matter during 2,100 years of natural incubation in the cold, oxic crust of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Walter, S. R.; Jaekel, U.; Huber, J. A.; Dittmar, T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, oxic seawater from the deep ocean is downwelled into the basaltic crust, supplying the crustal aquifer with an initial inoculum of organic matter and electron acceptors. Studies have shown that fluids circulating within the crust are minimally altered from original seawater, making this subsurface environment a unique natural experiment in which the fate of marine organic matter and the limitations of microbial adaptability in the context of reduced carbon supply can be examined. To make the subsurface crustal aquifer accessible, two CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories have been installed at North Pond, a sediment-filled depression beneath the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. Radiocarbon analysis of dissolved inorganic (DIC) and organic carbon (DOC) in samples recovered from these observatories show uncoupled aging between DOC and DIC with Δ14C values of DOC as low as -933‰ despite isolation from the open ocean for, at most, 2,100 years. This extreme value is part of a general trend of decreasing DOC δ13C and Δ14C values with increasing incubation time within the aquifer. Combined with reduced concentrations of DOC, our results argue for selective microbial oxidation of the youngest, most 13C-enriched components of downwelled DOC, possibly identifying these as characteristics of the more bioavailable fractions of deep-ocean dissolved organic matter. They also suggest that microbial oxidation during low-temperature hydrothermal circulation could be an important sink for aged marine dissolved organic matter.

  15. Evolution of US maize (Zea mays L.) root architectural and anatomical phenes over the past 100 years corresponds to increased tolerance of nitrogen stress.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Galindo-Castañeda, Tania; Schussler, Jeffrey R; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the nitrogen use efficiency of maize is an important goal for food security and agricultural sustainability. In the past 100 years, maize breeding has focused on yield and above-ground phenes. Over this period, maize cultivation has changed from low fertilizer inputs and low population densities to intensive fertilization and dense populations. The authors hypothesized that through indirect selection the maize root system has evolved phenotypes suited to more intense competition for nitrogen. Sixteen maize varieties representing commercially successful lines over the past century were planted at two nitrogen levels and three planting densities. Root systems of the most recent material were 7 º more shallow, had one less nodal root per whorl, had double the distance from nodal root emergence to lateral branching, and had 14% more metaxylem vessels, but total mextaxylem vessel area remained unchanged because individual metaxylem vessels had 12% less area. Plasticity was also observed in cortical phenes such as aerenchyma, which increased at greater population densities. Simulation modelling with SimRoot demonstrated that even these relatively small changes in root architecture and anatomy could increase maize shoot growth by 16% in a high density and high nitrogen environment. The authors concluded that evolution of maize root phenotypes over the past century is consistent with increasing nitrogen use efficiency. Introgression of more contrasting root phene states into the germplasm of elite maize and determination of the functional utility of these phene states in multiple agronomic conditions could contribute to future yield gains. PMID:25795737

  16. Evolution of US maize (Zea mays L.) root architectural and anatomical phenes over the past 100 years corresponds to increased tolerance of nitrogen stress

    PubMed Central

    York, Larry M.; Galindo-Castañeda, Tania; Schussler, Jeffrey R.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the nitrogen use efficiency of maize is an important goal for food security and agricultural sustainability. In the past 100 years, maize breeding has focused on yield and above-ground phenes. Over this period, maize cultivation has changed from low fertilizer inputs and low population densities to intensive fertilization and dense populations. The authors hypothesized that through indirect selection the maize root system has evolved phenotypes suited to more intense competition for nitrogen. Sixteen maize varieties representing commercially successful lines over the past century were planted at two nitrogen levels and three planting densities. Root systems of the most recent material were 7 º more shallow, had one less nodal root per whorl, had double the distance from nodal root emergence to lateral branching, and had 14% more metaxylem vessels, but total mextaxylem vessel area remained unchanged because individual metaxylem vessels had 12% less area. Plasticity was also observed in cortical phenes such as aerenchyma, which increased at greater population densities. Simulation modelling with SimRoot demonstrated that even these relatively small changes in root architecture and anatomy could increase maize shoot growth by 16% in a high density and high nitrogen environment. The authors concluded that evolution of maize root phenotypes over the past century is consistent with increasing nitrogen use efficiency. Introgression of more contrasting root phene states into the germplasm of elite maize and determination of the functional utility of these phene states in multiple agronomic conditions could contribute to future yield gains. PMID:25795737

  17. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-12-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs.

  18. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs. PMID:26633149

  19. Quantification of uncertainties in the 100-year flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station and its application in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Huidae; Bones, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has introduced the concept of the "1-percent plus" flow to incorporate various uncertainties in estimation of the 100-year or 1-percent flow. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no clear directions for calculating the 1-percent plus flow have been defined in the literature. Although information about standard errors of estimation and prediction is provided along with the regression equations that are often used to estimate the 1-percent flow at ungaged sites, uncertainty estimation becomes more complicated when there is a nearby gaged station because regression flows and the peak flow estimate from a gage analysis should be weighted to compute the weighted estimate of the 1-percent flow. In this study, an equation for calculating the 1-percent plus flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station is analytically derived. Also, a detailed process is introduced for calculating the 1-percent plus flow for an ungaged site near a gaged station in Georgia as an example and a case study is performed. This study provides engineers and practitioners with a method that helps them better assess flood risks and develop mitigation plans accordingly.

  20. Infection Control Programs and Antibiotic Control Programs to Limit Transmission of Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections: Evolution of Old Problems and New Challenges for Institutes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Lin, Li-Chen; Chang, Yu-Jun; Chen, Yu-Min; Chang, Chin-Yen; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii complex (A. baumannii) has been isolated worldwide. The rapid spread of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii complex (MDRAB) in clinical settings has made choosing an appropriate antibiotic to treat these infections and executing contact precautions difficult for clinicians. Although controlling the transmission of MDRAB is a high priority for institutions, there is little information about MDRAB control. Therefore, this study evaluated infection control measures for A. baumannii infections, clusters and outbreaks in the literature. Methods: We performed a review of OVID Medline (from 1980 to 2015), and analyzed the literature. Results: We propose that both infection control programs and antibiotic control programs are essential for control of MDRAB. The first, effective control of MDRAB infections, requires compliance with a series of infection control methods including strict environmental cleaning, effective sterilization of reusable medical equipment, concentration on proper hand hygiene practices, and use of contact precautions, together with appropriate administrative guidance. The second strategy, effective antibiotic control programs to decrease A. baumannii, is also of paramount importance. Conclusion: We believe that both infection control programs and antibiotics stewardship programs are essential for control of MDRAB infections. PMID:26264006

  1. Business Planning as Pedagogy: Language and Control in a Changing Institutional Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Leslie S.; Townley, Barbara; Cooper, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on Pierre Bourdieu's work on power as symbolic violence, examines business planning's pedagogical function in Alberta, Canada's museum and cultural heritage sites. Control involves redirecting work and changing producers' identity and work understandings via construction of markets, consumers, and products. Control was achieved by pedagogic…

  2. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments/soils of different wetlands along 100-year coastal reclamation chronosequence in the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingqing; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Gao, Zhaoqin; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-06-01

    PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) were determined in sediment/soil profiles to a depth of 30 cm from three different wetlands (i.e., ditch wetlands, riparian wetlands and reclaimed wetlands) of the Pearl River Estuary to elucidate their levels, distribution and toxic risks along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation. All detected PCB congeners and the total 15 PCBs (∑15 PCBs) decreased with depth along sediment/soil profiles in these three wetlands. The ∑15 PCBs concentrations ranged from 17.68 to 169.26 ng/g in surface sediments/soils. Generally, old wetlands tended to have higher PCB concentrations than younger ones. The dominant PCB congeners at all sampling sites were light PCB homologues (i.e., tetra-CBs and tri-CBs). According to the sediment quality guideline, the average PCB concentrations exceeded the threshold effects level (TEL, 21.6 ng/g) at most of the sampling sites, exhibiting possible adverse biological effects, which were dominantly caused by light PCB congeners. The total toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations of 10 dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) detected at all sampling sites ranged from 0.04 to 852.7 (10(-3) ng/g), mainly affected by PCB126. Only DL-PCB concentrations in ditch and riparian wetland sediments with 40-year reclamation histories (i.e., D40 and Ri40) exhibited moderate adverse biological effects according to SQGQ values. Principal component analysis indicated that PCBs in three wetland sediments/soils mainly originated from Aroclor 1016, 1242, and 1248. Correlation analysis showed that sediment/soil organic carbon content had a significant correlation with the concentrations of several PCB congeners (P < 0.05), whereas no significant correlations were observed between any PCBs congeners and grain size or aggregate content (P > 0.05). PMID:27038573

  5. Innate threat-sensitive foraging: black-tailed deer remain more fearful of wolf than of the less dangerous black bear even after 100 years of wolf absence.

    PubMed

    Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Malcuit, Hélène; Le Saout, Soizic; Martin, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-01

    Anti-predator behaviors often entail foraging costs, and thus prey response to predator cues should be adjusted to the level of risk (threat-sensitive foraging). Simultaneously dangerous predators (with high hunting success) should engender the evolution of innate predator recognition and appropriate anti-predator behaviors that are effective even upon the first encounter with the predator. The above leads to the prediction that prey might respond more strongly to cues of dangerous predators that are absent, than to cues of less dangerous predators that are actually present. In an applied context this would predict an immediate and stronger response of ungulates to the return of top predators such as wolves (Canis lupus) in many parts of Europe and North America than to current, less threatening, mesopredators. We investigated the existence of innate threat-sensitive foraging in black-tailed deer. We took advantage of a quasi-experimental situation where deer had not experienced wolf predation for ca. 100 years, and were only potentially exposed to black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested the response of deer to the urine of wolf (dangerous) and black bear (less dangerous). Our results support the hypothesis of innate threat-sensitive foraging with clear increased passive avoidance and olfactory investigation of cues from wolf, and surprisingly none to black bear. Prey which have previously evolved under high risk of predation by wolves may react strongly to the return of wolf cues in their environments thanks to innate responses retained during the period of predator absence, and this could be the source of far stronger non-consumptive effects of the predator guild than currently observed. PMID:24288079

  6. Climatic selection on genes and traits after a 100 year-old invasion: a critical look at the temperate-tropical clines in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Ary A; Weeks, Andrew R

    2007-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster invaded Australia around 100 years ago, most likely through a northern invasion. The wide range of climatic conditions in eastern Australia across which D. melanogaster is now found provides an opportunity for researchers to identify traits and genes that are associated with climatic adaptation. Allozyme studies indicate clinal patterns for at least four loci including a strong linear cline in Adh and a non-linear cline in alpha-Gpdh. Inversion clines were initially established from cytological studies but have now been validated with larger sample sizes using molecular markers for breakpoints. Recent collections indicate that some genetic markers (Adh and In(3R)Payne) have changed over the last 20 years reflecting continuing evolution. Heritable clines have been established for quantitative traits including wing length/area, thorax length and cold and heat resistance. A cline in egg size independent of body size and a weak cline in competitive ability have also been established. Postulated clinal patterns for resistance to desiccation and starvation have not been supported by extensive sampling. Experiments under laboratory and semi-natural conditions have suggested selective factors generating clinal patterns, particularly for reproductive patterns over winter. Attempts are being made to link clinal variation in traits to specific genes using QTL analysis and the candidate locus approach, and to identify the genetic architecture of trait variation along the cline. This is proving difficult because of inversion polymorphisms that generate disequilibrium among genes. Substantial gaps still remain in linking clines to field selection and understanding the genetic and physiological basis of the adaptive shifts. However D. melanogaster populations in eastern Australia remain an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. PMID:16955331

  7. Fractionation, transfer, and ecological risks of heavy metals in riparian and ditch wetlands across a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in an estuary of China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Wen, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinhui

    2015-06-01

    The effect of reclamation on heavy metal concentrations and the ecological risks in ditch wetlands (DWs) and riparian wetlands (RWs) across a 100-year chronosequence in the Pearl River Estuary of China was investigated. Concentrations of 4 heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in soil and plant samples, and sequential extracts of soil samples were determined, using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry. Results showed that heavy metal concentrations were higher in older DW soils than in the younger ones, and that the younger RW soils contained higher heavy metal concentrations compared to the older ones. Although the increasing tendency of heavy metal concentrations in soil was obvious after wetland reclamation, the metals Cu, Pb, and Zn exhibited low or no risks to the environment based on the risk assessment code (RAC). Cd, on the other hand, posed a medium or high risk. Cd, Pb, and Zn were mainly bound to Fe-Mn oxide, whereas most of Cu remained in the residual phase in both ditch and riparian wetland soils, and the residual proportions generally increased with depth. Bioconcentration and translocation factors for most of these four heavy metals significantly decreased in the DWs with older age (p<0.05), whereas they increased in the RWs with younger age (p<0.05). The DW soils contained higher concentrations of heavy metals in the organic fractions, whereas there were more carbonate and residual fractions in the RW soils. The non-bioavailable fractions of Cu and Zn, and the organic-bound Cd and Pb significantly inhibited plant growth. PMID:25723958

  8. Institutional hypertension control in Malaysia: a multicenter study focusing on gender and cardiovascular risk factor profile difference.

    PubMed

    Oteh, Maskon; Azarisman, Shah Mohd Shah; Azreen, Syazril Adnan; Jamaluddin, Ab Rahman; Aszrin, Abdullah; Ting, Chih Kuan; Shaiful Bahri, Ismail

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia is alarmingly high. The National Survey in 2006 showed 43% of people aged ≥30 had hypertension and among treated patients, only 26% reached the target blood pressure (BP) of <140/90 mmHg. We evaluated BP control in tertiary institutions in Malaysia and the difference in hypertension control between genders and within specific cardiovascular risk factor groups. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining BP control among hypertensive patients attending three specialist institutions in Malaysia, located in Kuala Lumpur, Kuantan and Kota Bharu. A total of 950 patients with known hypertension for at least 6 months were recruited between January 2007 and July 2008. There were more males (n=548, 57.7%) with a mean age of 60.3±10.5 (±s.d.) years. The mean systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP were 138.8±20.3 mmHg and 79.6±11.3 mmHg, respectively. In total, 48.5% of all the patients had good BP control (<140/90 mmHg). Males had better SBP control compared with female (SBP: 135.9±18.7 vs. 142.8±21.7 mmHg, P<0.001). Overall, 54.6% of the patients had ischemic heart disease (IHD), 24.2% had undergone coronary revascularization, 50.1% were diabetic, 68.6% hyperlipidemic, 17.3% smokers and 27.5% had renal impairment. Males and small numbers of antihypertensives used were independently associated with better treatment outcome. In summary, our data reveal a poorer BP control, secondary to higher SBP levels in women. Moreover, the gender difference is more pronounced in patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus, renal impairment and IHD. PMID:21150917

  9. Crossing institutional boundaries: mapping the policy process for improved control of endemic and neglected zoonoses in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Okello, Anna; Welburn, Susan; Smith, James

    2015-07-01

    The recent adoption of the World Health Assembly Resolution 66.12 for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in May 2013 is an important turning point for advocacy regarding a number of endemic zoonotic infections, defined by the World Health Organization as the neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs). In addition to NTD-listed zoonoses such as rabies, echinococcosis (hydatid disease), leishmaniasis, Human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) and Taenia solium cysticercosis, the NZDs also include important bacterial zoonoses such as anthrax, bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis. To date, analysis of the processes that prioritize, develop and deliver zoonoses control programmes in many low- and middle-income countries is lacking, despite its potential to highlight significant evidence gaps and institutional constraints to the intersectoral approach required for their control. Policy process analysis was conducted via a series of semi-structured interviews with key policy actors within various ministries and institutes in Uganda and Nigeria. The study concluded that despite the rhetoric around 'linear' models of health policy development promoting consultation with a wide range of national stakeholders, the decision-making process for zoonotic disease control appears instead overtly influenced by the external political economy of trending pandemic threats, often overlooking national and regional zoonoses priorities. The inclusion of political systems remains a key factor in the zoonoses analysis matrix, enhancing our understanding of the intersectoral and transdisciplinary approaches required for their control. The authors consider policy process analysis to be a fundamental first step of any attempt to holistically strengthen human and animal health systems in a development context, particularly regarding the promotion of integrated control policies for regionally important zoonoses under the growing One Health movement. PMID:25000963

  10. Contradictions of Control: The Organizational Context of School Knowledge. The Institutional Context Controlling Classroom Knowledge. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Linda M.

    To analyze high school students' access to the forms and content of knowledge, the author used nonparticipant ethnographic research in four midwestern high schools to study how the pattern of knowledge control in the classroom varies in different administrative contexts. Through observation of social studies classrooms and interviews with…

  11. Quality Control and Quality Assurance in Teacher Training Institutions: Messages from Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkin, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    External factors, such as university affiliation, can help improve teacher-training programs. Using the University of Botswana (UB) as an example, this paper discusses quality control and assurance; evaluates their impact on courses offered, final examinations, and teaching practice; and evaluates operational drawbacks of UB's system, suggesting…

  12. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any... the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  13. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any... the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  14. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to... organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  15. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to... organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  16. Apply Pesticides Correctly, A Guide for Commercial Applicators: Industrial, Institutional, Structural and Health Related Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide contains basic information to meet the specific standards for pesticide applicators. The thrust of this document is the recognition and control of common pests. Included are those which directly affect man such as bees, roaches, mites, and mosquitoes; and those which destroy food products and wooden structures. Both mechanical and…

  17. 100 Years of benthic foraminiferal history on the inner Texas shelf inferred from fauna and stable isotopes: Preliminary results from two cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Josiah; Grossman, Ethan L.; Carlin, Joseph A.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2012-04-01

    Coastal regions, such as the Texas-Louisiana shelf, are subject to seasonal hypoxia that strongly depends on the magnitude of freshwater discharge from local and regional river systems. We have determined benthic foraminiferal fauna and isotopic compositions in two 210Pb dated box cores (BR4 and BR5) to examine the evidence for nearshore hypoxia and freshwater discharge on the Texas shelf during the last 100 years. The 210Pb chronologies of both cores reveal sedimentation rates of 0.2 and 0.1 cm yr-1, translating to ˜60 and ˜90 year records. The fauna of both cores were almost exclusively composed of Ammonia parkinsoniana and Elphidium excavatum, indicating euryhaline ambient waters. The Ammonia-Elphidium (A-E) index, a qualitative measure of low oxygen conditions, shows an increase from values between 20 and 50 to near 100 in both cores, suggesting low oxygen conditions between 1960 and the core top. Between 1950 and 1960 (9-10 cm), low A-E values in BR4 coincide with high δ18O and δ13C values greater than 0‰ and -1‰ respectively. This event corresponds to severe drought (the Texas Drought of Record) over the Brazos River drainage basin and considerably reduced river discharge from 1948 to 1957. High A-E values prior to this event imply low-oxygen conditions were prevalent prior to anthropogenic exacerbation of Louisiana shelf hypoxia and at least since the dredging of a new Brazos River delta in 1929. Elphidium excavatum δ13C values are very low (-4‰) and indicative of significant vital effect. The δ13C values of A. parkinsoniana average -3‰ and exhibit little variability, most likely reflecting pore waters influenced by aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The association of lowered Brazos River discharge with more oxygenated shelf bottom waters suggests Brazos River discharge and shelf hypoxia are linked, but the influence of Mississippi-Atchafalaya discharge can also contribute to shelf stratification.

  18. A 100-year Reconstruction of Regional Sea Ice Extent in the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas as Derived from the RICE Ice Core, Coastal West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, D. B.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Baisden, W. T.; Keller, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic sea ice increased over the past decades. This increase is the result of an increase in the Ross Sea (RS) and along the coast of East Antarctica, whereas the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas (ABS) and the Antarctic Peninsula has seen a general decline. Several mechanisms have been suggested as drivers for the regional, complex sea ice pattern, which include changes in ocean currents, wind pattern, as well as ocean and atmospheric temperature. As part of the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project, a 763 m deep ice core was retrieved from Roosevelt Island (RI; W161° 21', S79°41', 560 m a.s.l.), West Antarctica. The new record provides a unique opportunity to investigate mechanism driving sea ice variability in the RS and ABS sectors. Here we present the water stable isotope record (δD) from the upper part of the RICE core 0-40 m, spanning the time period from 1894 to 2011 (Fig. 1a). Annual δD are correlated with Sea Ice Concentration (SIC). A significant negative (r= -0.45, p≤ 0.05) correlation was found between annual δD and SIC in the eastern RS sector (boxed region in Fig. 1b) for the following months NDJFMA (austral summer and fall). During NDJFMA, RI receives local moisture input from the RS, while during the rest of the year a large extent of this local moisture source area will be covered with sea ice with the exception of the RS Polynya. Concurrently, we observe positive δD and SIC correlations in the ABS, showing a dipole pattern with the eastern RS. For this reason, we suggest that the RICE δD might be used as a proxy for past SIC for the RS and ABS region. There is no overall trend in δD over 100 years (r= -0.08 ‰ dec-1, p= 0.81, 1894-2011). However, we observe a strong increase from 2000-2011 of 17.7 ‰ dec-1(p≤ 0.1), yet the recent δD values and trend of the last decade are not unprecedented (Fig. 1a). We investigate changes in sea surface temperature, atmospheric temperature, inferred surface ocean currents and

  19. [Conflicts of interest in public institutions. It will be the network to exercise control?].

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched a health awareness campaign soliciting the use of antiviral drug for influenza. The claim is not supported by any statement of the Food and Drug Administration, since the Agency concluded that oseltamivir «has not been proven to have a positive impact on the potential consequences (such as hospitalizations, mortality, or economic impact) of seasonal, avian, or pandemic influenza». A feature article published in The BMJ has pointed out the fact that some pharmaceutical companies involved in production and marketing of antiviral drugs have provided funding to the CDC Foundation to support qualitative research into influenza prevention and treatment messaging. This incident highlights the need to better manage the possible conflicts of interest that may arise in the work of governmental agencies, threatening their reputation.The role of the internet can be valuable to raise awareness of these issues, even considering the interest that social media have fuelled on the debate on the effectiveness and safety of antiviral drugs. PMID:25959886

  20. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal test block (TER) as the Pilot was operated under forced oxidation conditions. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. Following these studies, a brief test of the Pilot High Velocity FGD configuration (PHV) was conducted. This test block will be continued at the end of the month after the Fall outage is completed. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. During this month`s outage, the inlet and outlet damper plates were sealed to isolate the SCR system from flue gas. Also, the internals of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) and catalyst reactor tower were inspected and cleaned so that the system could be available for future test activities. Monthly inspections of all SCR system equipment placed in this cold-standby mode, as well as the fire safety systems in the SCR building, will continue to be conducted by the ECTC maintenance department and will include manual rotation of the booster fan.

  1. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, November 1995. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Pilot High Velocity (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurement studies involving the EPA Draft Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber system was utilized in the TER test configuration this month while the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber unit remained in a state of cold-standby. A monthly inspection was conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems in the SCR building. These inspections will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff each month.

  2. Georg von Békésy, Nobel Laureate in Physiology, Experimental Physicist and Art Collector was Born 100 Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, László

    Georg von Békésy was born one hundred years ago, on July 3, 1899 in Budapest, Hungary. He graduated from the University of Bern as a chemist in 1921. He received a Ph.D. in physics in Budapest under the supervision of Charles Tangl in 1923. From 1926 to 1947 he worked in Hungary's best-equipped research laboratory, in the Postal Experimental Institution as a postal engineer. Here he lead basic physical research on ear preparations and on realistic models of the ear, made by himself, to investigate the structure and the working of the ear and, first of all, the inner ear (cochlea). For the results of his research in Hungary, Békésy received the Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1961. The paper also introduces Georg von Békésy as a passionate art collector and expert.

  3. US/Russian program in materials protection, control and accounting at the RRC Kurchatov Institute: 1997--1998

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.; Rumyantsev, A.; Shmelev, V.

    1998-12-31

    Six US Department of Energy Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute to improve nuclear material protection, control and accounting (MPC and A) at Kurchatov. In 1997--1998 the primary thrust of this program has been directed to Building 106, which houses a number of test reactors and critical facilities. Substantial improvements in physical protection, upgrades in the physical inventory taking procedures, installation of equipment for the computerized materials accounting system, and installation of nuclear material portal monitors and neutron-based measurement equipment are being carried out at this facility. Software for the computerized accounting system, named KI-MACS, has been developed at Kurchatov and the system has been fully integrated with the bar code printing and reading equipment, electronic scales, and nondestructive assay equipment provided under this program. Additional 1997--1998 activities at Kurchatov include continuation of a tamper indicating device program, vulnerability assessments of several facilities, hosting of a Russian-American Workshop on Fissile Material Control and Accountability at Critical Facilities, and the development of accounting procedures for transfers of nuclear materials between material balance areas.

  4. Book Review: 100 years of observational astronomy and astrophysics : homage to Miklos Konkoly Thege / C. Sterken, 2001 / Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    Miklós Konkoly Thege (1842-1916) was a wealthy Hungarian nobleman who established a private observatory at Ógyalla, nowadays a state institution known as the Konkoly Observatory. This interesting book is the proceedings of a workshop held in 1999 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Astronomical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, based on the Konkoly Observatory. There are five parts to the book. The first is about the history of the Konkoly Observatory and its activities. Konkoly Thege was very active in instrumental matters - his book Praktische Anleitung ... (1883) was influential during the period when astrophysics was undergoing its first period of rapid development, and a copy of it exists in the SAAO collection. Konkoly was a pioneer in astronomical photometry and spectroscopy and made use of the Zöllner visual photometer as well as the schraffierkassette method for photographic photometry. The second part of the book is concerned with early astrophysics in various countries. The article on Japanese astronomy around 1899 (by M Takeuti) deals with a period not covered by articles in English. At this time, Japan was still recovering from the two centuries of isolation imposed by the Edo Shogunate, and research astronomy was just beginning. CD Laney's Astronomy in the Dismal Swamp, a quirky collection of stories about the Royal Observatory, Cape, follows. Other chapters deal with the Marseille Observatory and the French astronomer Jules Janssen (1824-1907). Two articles by J Hearnshaw and K Staubermann deal with the history of astronomical photometry in the third part. The fourth part is about early female astronomers and the difficulties they faced, including paragraphs on Dorothea Klumpke (who married Isaac Roberts), Agnes Clerke, Maria Mitchell and the famous ladies of the Harvard Observatory who worked on spectral classification and the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. Most of the last part is a fascinating

  5. Effect of an institutional development plan for user participation on professionals' knowledge, practice, and attitudes. A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Governments in several countries attempt to strengthen user participation through instructing health care organisations to plan and implement activities such as user representation in administrational boards, improved information to users, and more individual user participation in clinical work. The professionals are central in implementing initiatives to enhance user participation in organisations, but no controlled studies have been conducted on the effect on professionals from implementing institutional development plans. The objective was to investigate whether implementing a development plan intending to enhance user participation in a mental health hospital had any effect on the professionals' knowledge, practice, or attitudes towards user participation. Methods This was a non-randomized controlled study including professionals from three mental health hospitals in Central Norway. A development plan intended to enhance user participation was implemented in one of the hospitals as a part of a larger re-organizational process. The plan included i.e. establishing a patient education centre and a user office, purchasing of user expertise, appointing contact professionals for next of kin, and improving of the centre's information and the professional culture. The professionals at the intervention hospital thus constituted the intervention group, while the professionals at two other hospitals participated as control group. All professionals were invited to answer the Consumer Participation Questionnaire (CPQ) and additional questions, focusing on knowledge, practice, and attitudes towards user participation, two times with a 16 months interval. Results A total of 438 professionals participated (55% response rate). Comparing the changes in the intervention group with the changes in the control group revealed no statistically significant differences at a 0.05 level. The implementation of the development plan thus had no measurable effect on the

  6. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant

    PubMed Central

    Noll, J.; Cecala, A.; Hummer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent. PMID:26834293

  7. Miklós Konkoly Thege (1842-1916). 100 Years of Observational Astronomy and Astrophysics - A collection of papers on the history of Observational Astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    2001-10-01

    century science - and of observational astrophysics in particular - is the role played by female scientists. This aspect is profoundly reviewed in the fourth part of the book. The last part analyses interpretations of early observations, with emphasis on early research on the expansion of the universe. In spite of a certain level of inhomogeneity which is the unavoidable consequence of the wide range in the scientific and historical backgrounds of the participants, this book embraces an appreciable degree of coherence, since it illustrates the rise of the `new astronomy' in the 19th century in different countries with very different cultures, across the limits of social status, wealth and gender. All speakers - whether they are librarians, observational or theoretical astrophysicists, or historians of science - approach the question why a wealthy noblemam who maintained a vast network of international scientific contacts succeeded in establishing a leading scientific institution, while at the same time similar institutions in other countries - in spite of financial support by their governments - barely could develop. This is the reason why this collection of papers has been presented in book form where figures, citations and information are easily cross-referenced.

  8. Statistical Methods for Establishing Quality Control Ranges for Antibacterial Agents in Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Susceptibility Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Turnidge, John; Bordash, Gerry

    2007-01-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for antimicrobial agents against QC strains for both dilution and disk diffusion testing are currently set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), using data gathered in predefined structured multilaboratory studies, so-called tier 2 studies. The ranges are finally selected by the relevant CLSI subcommittee, based largely on visual inspection and a few simple rules. We have developed statistical methods for analyzing the data from tier 2 studies and applied them to QC strain-antimicrobial agent combinations from 178 dilution testing data sets and 48 disk diffusion data sets, including a method for identifying possible outlier data from individual laboratories. The methods are based on the fact that dilution testing MIC data were log normally distributed and disk diffusion zone diameter data were normally distributed. For dilution testing, compared to QC ranges actually set by CLSI, calculated ranges were identical in 68% of cases, narrower in 7% of cases, and wider in 14% of cases. For disk diffusion testing, calculated ranges were identical to CLSI ranges in 33% of cases, narrower in 8% of cases, and 1 to 2 mm wider in 58% of cases. Possible outliers were detected in 8% of diffusion test data but none of the disk diffusion data. Application of statistical techniques to the analysis of QC tier 2 data and the setting of QC ranges is relatively simple to perform on spreadsheets, and the output enhances the current CLSI methods for setting of QC ranges. PMID:17438045

  9. Barriers and challenges of implementing tobacco control policies in hospitals: applying the institutional analysis and development framework to the Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Cristina

    2009-08-01

    This article analyzes tobacco control policies in hospitals based on the experience of the Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals, Spain. The objective is to understand through this case study how tobacco policies are designed and implemented in health care organizations. Because tobacco control is a public health issue, governmental, institutional, and professional involvement is necessary. This article identifies and examines the structure and relationships among the different actors involved in the tobacco control policies in health care organizations using Ostrom's Institutional Analysis and Development framework.This theory helps one understand the policy failures and rethink the future challenges. Critical issues should be reviewed to enhance implementation of smoke-free hospitals-such as assuring the compliance of nonsmoking areas and introducing compulsory tobacco cessation activities that are promoted and monitored by the public administration. The author suggests that relying primarily on an organization's interpretation of rules leads to irregular implementation. PMID:19900946

  10. The Flexner Report ― 100 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report of 1910 transformed the nature and process of medical education in America with a resulting elimination of proprietary schools and the establishment of the biomedical model as the gold standard of medical training. This transformation occurred in the aftermath of the report, which embraced scientific knowledge and its advancement as the defining ethos of a modern physician. Such an orientation had its origins in the enchantment with German medical education that was spurred by the exposure of American educators and physicians at the turn of the century to the university medical schools of Europe. American medicine profited immeasurably from the scientific advances that this system allowed, but the hyper-rational system of German science created an imbalance in the art and science of medicine. A catching-up is under way to realign the professional commitment of the physician with a revision of medical education to achieve that purpose. PMID:21966046

  11. Human Fetal Behavior: 100 Years of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Low, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews literature on human fetal behavior. Includes descriptions of coupling of body movements and fetal heart rate and behavior maturation from conception to term. Discusses use of stimulus-induced behavior to examine sensory and cognitive development, and spontaneous and stimulus-induced behavior to assess fetal well-being. Notes research focus…

  12. A 100-year perspective on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Szurszewski, J H

    1998-03-01

    This contribution to the centennial commemorative issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology identifies some of the important studies of spontaneous electrical and motor activity in the gastrointestinal tract published in the Journal between 1898 and 1996. Emphasis is given to the contributions made by Walter B. Cannon, Walter C. Alvarez, Emil Bozler, C. Ladd Prosser, and James Christensen. PMID:9565541

  13. Beam Line: 100 years of elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, A.; Weinberg, S.; Quigg, C.; Riordan, M.; Panofsky, W. K. H.

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  14. Tunguska explosion- 100 years of the event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteancu, Mircea; Dragan, Dorian; Dohotariu, Ionel; Mafalda; Alimpie, Laurentiu; Monea, Cristian; Diaconu, Marius; Gaina, Alex; Stanescu, Octavian

    2008-06-01

    The authors discusse the Tunguska event, the well known explosion, which has occured 100 ago in the Central Siberia near the Podkamennaia Tunguska river. A number of the books and encyclopaediaes with reference to the event are reviewed. At the same time the last 2 hypotheses ennounced by prof. Ioan Nistor (gaseus Methan pouch) and prof. Edward Drobyshevsky (2H2 +O2 solid solution) are also discussed.

  15. Nuclear and Radiochemistry: the First 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, G.; Herrmann, G.

    This chapter gives a brief overview of the development of nuclear and radiochemistry from Mme. Curie's chemical isolation of radium toward the end of the twentieth century. The first four sections deal with fairly distinct time periods: (1) the pioneering years when the only radioactive materials available were the naturally occurring ones; (2) the decade of rapid growth and expansion of both the fundamental science and its applications following the discoveries of the neutron and artificial radioactivity; (3) the World War II period characterized by the intense exploration of nuclear fission and its ramifications; (4) what can be called the “golden era” - the 3 to 4 decades following World War II when nuclear science was generously supported and therefore flourished. In the final section, research trends pursued near the end of the century are briefly touched upon.

  16. 100 Years Werner Heisenberg: Works and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenfuß, Dietrich; Lüst, Dieter; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2003-09-01

    Over 40 renowned scientists from all around the world discuss the work and influence of Werner Heisenberg. The papers result from the symposium held by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Heisenberg's birth, one of the most important physicists of the 20th century and cofounder of modern-day quantum mechanics. Taking atomic and laser physics as their starting point, the scientists illustrate the impact of Heisenberg's theories on astroparticle physics, high-energy physics and string theory right up to processing quantum information.

  17. Dairy innovations over the past 100 Years.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H

    2009-09-23

    The dairy industry in the United States has undergone many changes over the past century. Adulteration and contamination of milk were rampant before the passage and enforcement of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, and the introduction and eventual acceptance of certified and pasteurized milk have provided consumers with a consistently safe product. Homogenization and advances in the packaging and transport of milk gradually took hold, improving the milk supply. Other developments included the concentration of milk and whey, lactose-reduced milk, and the popularization of yogurt. Consumers have benefited from advances in butter packaging, low-fat ice cream, cheese manufacture, and yogurt technology, which has helped create the large demand for dairy products in the United States. Current trends and issues, including the increasing popularity of organic and artisanal products and the use of rBST, will shape the future of the dairy industry. PMID:19719132

  18. The Flexner Report--100 years later.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Thomas P

    2011-09-01

    The Flexner Report of 1910 transformed the nature and process of medical education in America with a resulting elimination of proprietary schools and the establishment of the biomedical model as the gold standard of medical training. This transformation occurred in the aftermath of the report, which embraced scientific knowledge and its advancement as the defining ethos of a modern physician. Such an orientation had its origins in the enchantment with German medical education that was spurred by the exposure of American educators and physicians at the turn of the century to the university medical schools of Europe. American medicine profited immeasurably from the scientific advances that this system allowed, but the hyper-rational system of German science created an imbalance in the art and science of medicine. A catching-up is under way to realign the professional commitment of the physician with a revision of medical education to achieve that purpose. PMID:21966046

  19. Scoring functions--the first 100 years.

    PubMed

    Tame, Jeremy R H

    2005-06-01

    The use of simple linear mathematical models to estimate chemical properties is not a new idea. Albert Einstein used very simple 'gravity-like' forces to explain the capillarity of different liquids in 1900-1901. Today such models are used in more complicated situations, and a great many have been developed to analyse interactions between proteins and their ligands. This is not surprising, since proteins are too complicated to model accurately without lengthy numerical analysis, and simple models often do at least as good a job in predicting binding constants as much more computationally expensive methods. One hundred years after Einstein's 'miraculous year' in which he transformed physics, it is instructive to recall some of his even earlier work. As approximations, 'scoring functions' are excellent, but it is dangerous to read too much into them. A few cautionary tales are presented for the beginner to the field of ligand affinity prediction by linear models. PMID:16231202

  20. [The Einthoven's electrocardiograph after 100 years].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, A; Iturralde, P

    2001-01-01

    The initial studies about the "irritability" of animal tissues by iatrophysic and iatromechanic scientists are reviewed. These studies led to discover the so called animal electricity envisaged by Luigi Galvani in the XVIII century and demonstrated by Carlo Matteucci and his followers in the XIX. Beginning with the Galvani's "reoscopic" frog, which allowed to assess the electrical current in a qualitative sense, it was possible to arrive, at the beginnings of the XX century, to the string electrocardiograph presented by Willem Einthoven in 1901. This opened the way that led to fabrication of ever more sophisticated instruments until the present systems of endocardial mapping by magnetic technology or by multipolar catheters, which permit to quickly identify the site of origin or the spreading ways of a tachycardia for their ablation with radio-frequency. Intracardiac echocardiography is also employed to define the anatomy of right atrium, during intracardiac cartography, in order to establish the most adequate sites for ablation. On the other hand, a logic i.e. rational, method for the interpretation of results from the electrical exploration of the heart has been developed. This one was introduced by Frank N. Wilson in Ann Arbor and has been fittingly applied by Demetrio Sodi Pallares in Mexico. Important diagnostic advances and notable therapeutic inferences have been derived from these latter developments. PMID:11692816

  1. The AOCS publications: a 100 year history

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth of societies and its associated publications is an indicator of how chemistry, a society such as AOCS, and the fats and oils industry have grown over time. During the late 18th century a shift from monographs to chemical periodicals occurred. Since then journals have been the preferred ...

  2. Spinoff 2003: 100 Years of Powered Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Today, NASA continues to reach milestones in space exploration with the Hubble Telescope, Earth-observing systems, the Space Shuttle, the Stardust spacecraft, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the International Space Station, the Mars rovers, and experimental research aircraft these are only a few of the many initiatives that have grown out of NASA engineering know-how to drive the Agency s missions. The technical expertise gained from these programs has transferred into partnerships with academia, industry, and other Federal agencies, ensuring America stays capable and competitive. With Spinoff 2003, we once again highlight the many partnerships with U.S. companies that are fulfilling the 1958 Space Act stipulation that NASA s vast body of scientific and technical knowledge also benefit mankind. This year's issue showcases innovations such as the cochlear implant in health and medicine, a cockpit weather system in transportation, and a smoke mask benefiting public safety; many other products are featured in these disciplines, as well as in the additional fields of consumer/home/recreation, environment and resources management, computer technology, and industrial productivity/ manufactacturing technology. Also in this issue, we devote an entire section to NASA s history in the field of flight and showcase NASA s newest enterprise dedicated to education. The Education Enterprise will provide unique teaching and learning experiences for students and teachers at all levels in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The Agency also is committed, as never before, to engaging parents and families through NASA s educational resources, content, and opportunities. NASA s catalyst to intensify its focus on teaching and learning springs from our mission statement: to inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can.

  3. Analysis of 100 Years of Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelting-Gibson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen historical and contemporary curriculum designs were analyzed for elements of assessment that support student learning and inform instructional decisions. Educational researchers are purposely paying attention to the role assessment plays in a well-designed planning and teaching process. Assessment is a vital component to educational…

  4. Blue Marble Space Institute essay contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, based in Seattle, Wash., is inviting college students to participate in its essay contest. Essays need to address the question, "In the next 100 years, how can human civilization prepare for the long-term changes to the Earth system that will occur over the coming millennium?" According to the institute, the purpose of the contest is "to stimulate creative thinking relating to space exploration and global issues by exploring how changes in the Earth system will affect humanity's future."

  5. SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS IN IRRIGATION RETURN FLOW QUALITY CONTROL. VOLUME IV. GRAND VALLEY CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Grand Valley was used as a case study area for developing an effective process for implementing technical and institutional solutions to the problem of pollution from irrigation return flows. This area is the most significant agricultural salt source in the Upper Colorado Riv...

  6. Computer networks for financial activity management, control and statistics of databases of economic administration at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyupikova, T. V.; Samoilov, V. N.

    2003-04-01

    Modern information technologies urge natural sciences to further development. But it comes together with evaluation of infrastructures, to spotlight favorable conditions for the development of science and financial base in order to prove and protect legally new research. Any scientific development entails accounting and legal protection. In the report, we consider a new direction in software, organization and control of common databases on the example of the electronic document handling, which functions in some departments of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research.

  7. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  8. A randomized controlled trial comparing foster care and institutional care for children with signs of reactive attachment disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smyke, Anna T.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Drury, Stacy S.; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Guthrie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors examined signs of emotionally withdrawn (inhibited type) and indiscriminately social (disinhibited type) reactive attachment disorder in Romanian children enrolled in a randomized trial of foster care compared with institutional care and in a comparison group of never-institutionalized children. Method At baseline and when children were ages 30, 42, and 54 months and 8 years, caregivers were interviewed with the Disturbances of Attachment Interview to assess changed in signs of reactive attachment disorder in three groups of children: those receiving care as usual (including continued institutional care) (N=68); those placed in foster care after institutional care (N=68), and those who were never institutionalized (N=72). The impact of gender, ethnicity, and baseline cognitive ability was also examined. Results On the Disturbances of Attachment Interview, signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder decreased after placement in foster care, and scores were indistinguishable from those of never-institutionalized children after 30 months. Signs of the disinhibited type were highest in the usual care group, lower in the foster care group, and lowest in the never-institutionalized group. Early placement in foster care (before age 24 months) was associated with fewer signs of the disinhibited type. Lower baseline cognitive ability was associated with more signs of the inhibited type in the usual care group and more signs of the disinhibited type in both groups. Conclusions Signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder responded quickly to placement in foster care; signs of the disinhibited type showed less robust resolution with foster placement. Lower baseline cognitive ability was linked to signs of reactive attachment disorder. PMID:22764361

  9. Institutional Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Warren J.

    1984-01-01

    Institutional economics remains a viable alternative approach to economics. It stresses power, technology, and a holistic and evolutionary approach while critiquing the neoclassical approach. General features of institutional economics are examined, and the work of institutionalists in specific areas is discussed. (RM)

  10. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed Consultation and…

  11. Institutional History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Discusses recent work on scientific institutions in the United States, indicating that although historians have explored the origins of institutions, few have pursued these organizations into their later and perhaps equally complex years. Learned/professional organizations, museums, publications, and philanthropy are among the major topic areas…

  12. Effects of institutional rearing and foster care on psychopathology at age 12 years in Romania: follow-up of an open, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Kathryn L; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Drury, Stacy S; Miron, Devi; Nelson, Charles A; Fox, Nathan A; Zeanah, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Early social deprivation can negatively affect domains of functioning. We examined psychopathology at age 12 years in a cohort of Romanian children who had been abandoned at birth and placed into institutional care, then assigned either to be placed in foster care or to care as usual. Methods We used follow-up data from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), a randomised controlled trial of abandoned children in all six institutions for young children in Bucharest, Romania. In the initial trial, 136 children, enrolled between ages 6–31 months, were randomly assigned to either care as usual or placement in foster care. In this study we followed up these children at age 12 years to assess psychiatric symptoms using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (4th edition; DISC-IV). We also recruited Romanian children who had never been placed in an institution from paediatric clinics and schools in Bucharest as a comparator group who had never been placed in an institution. The primary outcome measure was symptom counts assessed through DISC-IV scores for three domains of psychopathology: internalising symptoms, externalising symptoms, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We compared mean DISC-IV scores between trial participants and comparators who had never been placed in an institution, and those assigned to care as usual or foster care. Analyses were done by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00747396. Findings We followed up 110 children from the BEIP trial between Jan 27, 2011, and April 11, 2014, and 49 children as comparators who had never been placed in an institution. The 110 children who had ever been placed in an institution had higher symptom counts for internalising disorders (mean 0.93 [SD 1.68] vs 0.45 [0.84], difference 0.48 [95% CI 0.14–0.82]; p=0.0127), externalising disorders (2.31 [2.86] vs 0.65 [1.33], difference 1.66 [1.06–2.25]; p<0

  13. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons.

  14. 31 CFR 561.202 - Prohibitions on persons owned or controlled by U.S. financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Destruction Proliferators Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 544, will have the identifier “ ” at the end of... Assets Control's Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (the “SDN List”). The SDN List...://www.treasury.gov/sdn. Additional information pertaining to the SDN List can be found in Appendix A...

  15. 31 CFR 561.202 - Prohibitions on persons owned or controlled by U.S. financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pursuant to the Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferators Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 544, will have... List (the “SDN List”). The SDN List is accessible through the following page on the Office of Foreign Assets Control's Web site: www.treasury.gov/sdn. Additional information pertaining to the SDN List can...

  16. 31 CFR 561.202 - Prohibitions on persons owned or controlled by U.S. financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pursuant to the Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferators Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 544, will have... List (the “SDN List”). The SDN List is accessible through the following page on the Office of Foreign Assets Control's Web site: www.treasury.gov/sdn. Additional information pertaining to the SDN List can...

  17. 31 CFR 561.202 - Prohibitions on persons owned or controlled by U.S. financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pursuant to the Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferators Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 544, will have... List (the “SDN List”). The SDN List is accessible through the following page on the Office of Foreign Assets Control's Web site: www.treasury.gov/sdn. Additional information pertaining to the SDN List can...

  18. Preventing and controlling foodborne disease in commercial and institutional food service settings: a systematic review of published intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Viator, Catherine; Blitstein, Jonathan; Brophy, Jenna E; Fraser, Angela

    2015-02-01

    This study reviews the current literature on behavioral and environmental food safety interventions conducted in commercial and institutional food service settings. A systematic search of the published literature yielded 268 candidate articles, from which a set of 23 articles reporting intervention outcomes was retained for evaluation. A categorization of measured outcomes is reported; studies addressed multiple outcomes ranging from knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of personal hygiene and food safety to management practices and disease rates and outbreaks. This study also investigates the quality of reported research methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions, using a nine-point quality index adapted by the authors. The observed scores suggest that there are opportunities to improve the design and reporting of research in the field of foodborne disease prevention as it applies to food safety interventions that target the food service industry. The aim is to aid researchers in this area to design higher quality studies and to produce clearer and more useful reports of their research. In turn, this can help to create a more complete evidence base that can be used to continually improve interventions in this domain. PMID:25710165

  19. CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  20. Effect of an Intervention to Break the Gender Bias Habit for Faculty at One Institution: A Cluster Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Molly; Devine, Patricia G.; Manwell, Linda Baier; Byars-Winston, Angela; Fine, Eve; Ford, Cecilia E.; Forscher, Patrick; Isaac, Carol; Kaatz, Anna; Magua, Wairimu; Palta, Mari; Sheridan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite sincere commitment to egalitarian, meritocratic principles, subtle gender bias persists, constraining women’s opportunities for academic advancement. The authors implemented a pair-matched, single-blind, cluster-randomized, controlled study of a gender bias habit-changing intervention at a large public university. Method Participants were faculty in 92 departments or divisions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Between September 2010 and March 2012, experimental departments were offered a gender bias habit-changing intervention as a 2.5 hour workshop. Surveys measured gender bias awareness; motivation, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations to reduce bias; and gender equity action. A timed word categorization task measured implicit gender/leadership bias. Faculty completed a worklife survey before and after all experimental departments received the intervention. Control departments were offered workshops after data were collected. Results Linear mixed-effects models showed significantly greater changes post-intervention for faculty in experimental vs. control departments on several outcome measures, including self-efficacy to engage in gender equity promoting behaviors (P = .013). When ≥ 25% of a department’s faculty attended the workshop (26 of 46 departments), significant increases in self-reported action to promote gender equity occurred at 3 months (P = .007). Post-intervention, faculty in experimental departments expressed greater perceptions of fit (P = .024), valuing of their research (P = .019), and comfort in raising personal and professional conflicts (P = .025). Conclusions An intervention that facilitates intentional behavioral change can help faculty break the gender bias habit and change department climate in ways that should support the career advancement of women in academic medicine, science, and engineering. PMID:25374039

  1. 75 FR 71134 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  2. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer. I. Analysis of tumor parameters, tumor dose and local control: the experience of the Gustave-Roussy Institute and the Princess Margaret Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Arriagada, R.; Mouriesse, H.; Sarrazin, D.; Clark, R.M.; Deboer, G.

    1985-10-01

    This retrospective study involved 463 breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at the Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients either had operable tumors, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Results were analyzed according to tumor response, local recurrence rate, tumor size, tumor fixation, nodal fixation and tumor dose. Conventional statistical analysis of local control showed two significant factors: tumor dose and tumor size. Multivariate analysis permitted to define an ''individual risk'' (IR) of local recurrence according to three independent factors: tumor size, tumor fixation, and nodal fixation. It was shown that the IR was a good prognostic factor for local control. Increase in tumor dose gave a similar effect in the local recurrence relative risk for all the IR groups. According to the slope of the dose-effect curve, it was deduced that a dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of local recurrence 2-fold. In fact, it was shown that tumor dose was the most significant independent factor on local control, able to produce up to a 10-fold increase compared to 2-fold decrease for tumor size. If the IR of local recurrence is known, a theoretical predictive value on local control, taking into account the tumor dose, can be determined according to the present data.

  3. Job strain and determinants in staff working in institutions for people with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan: a test of the Job Demand-Control-Support model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the job strain of staff working in disability institutions. This study investigated the staff's job strain profile and its determinants which included the worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environments in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study survey was carried out among 1243 workers by means of a self-answered questionnaire. The outcome variable (high-strain job) was evaluated. The explanatory variables were: worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environment evaluated according to Karasek's Job Demand-Control-Support model. The results show that many staff characteristics were correlated with job strain, such as staff's working hours, age, gender, job title, educational level, religion, in-job training, working years in disability institutions and Effort-Reward Imbalance factors. Organization factors, such as geographical, institutional ownership and accreditation performance and size were also correlated with staff's job strain. In multiple a logistic regression model of the job strain, we found that the factors of financial reward (high compare to low, OR=0.95, 95% CI=0.928-0.975), extrinsic effort (high compare to low, OR=1.072, 95% CI=1.072-1.158), perceived job stress (sometimes stressful compare to no stress, OR=2.305, 95% CI=1.161-4.575; very stressful compare to no stress, OR=3.931, 95% CI=1.738-8.893) of the staff were significantly correlated to the high job strain of the staff. An important focus of future research should be extending the findings to consider the factors to affect the high job strain to improve the well-being for staff working for people with intellectual disability. PMID:18434088

  4. Integration of Genomic and Other Epidemiologic Data to Investigate and Control a Cross-Institutional Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Victoria J.; Smith, Alyson; Al-Shahib, Ali; Botchway, Stella; Macdonald, Emily; Daniel, Roger; Phillips, Sarah; Platt, Steven; Doumith, Michel; Tewolde, Rediat; Coelho, Juliana; Jolley, Keith A.; Underwood, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Single-strain outbreaks of Streptococcus pyogenes infections are common and often go undetected. In 2013, two clusters of invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) infection were identified in independent but closely located care homes in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. Investigation included visits to each home, chart review, staff survey, microbiologic sampling, and genome sequencing. S. pyogenes emm type 1.0, the most common circulating type nationally, was identified from all cases yielding GAS isolates. A tailored whole-genome reference population comprising epidemiologically relevant contemporaneous isolates and published isolates was assembled. Data were analyzed independently using whole-genome multilocus sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Six isolates from staff and residents of the homes formed a single cluster that was separated from the reference population by both analytical approaches. No further cases occurred after mass chemoprophylaxis and enhanced infection control. Our findings demonstrate the ability of 2 independent analytical approaches to enable robust conclusions from nonstandardized whole-genome analysis to support public health practice. PMID:27192043

  5. Integration of Genomic and Other Epidemiologic Data to Investigate and Control a Cross-Institutional Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Chalker, Victoria J; Smith, Alyson; Al-Shahib, Ali; Botchway, Stella; Macdonald, Emily; Daniel, Roger; Phillips, Sarah; Platt, Steven; Doumith, Michel; Tewolde, Rediat; Coelho, Juliana; Jolley, Keith A; Underwood, Anthony; McCarthy, Noel D

    2016-06-01

    Single-strain outbreaks of Streptococcus pyogenes infections are common and often go undetected. In 2013, two clusters of invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) infection were identified in independent but closely located care homes in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. Investigation included visits to each home, chart review, staff survey, microbiologic sampling, and genome sequencing. S. pyogenes emm type 1.0, the most common circulating type nationally, was identified from all cases yielding GAS isolates. A tailored whole-genome reference population comprising epidemiologically relevant contemporaneous isolates and published isolates was assembled. Data were analyzed independently using whole-genome multilocus sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Six isolates from staff and residents of the homes formed a single cluster that was separated from the reference population by both analytical approaches. No further cases occurred after mass chemoprophylaxis and enhanced infection control. Our findings demonstrate the ability of 2 independent analytical approaches to enable robust conclusions from nonstandardized whole-genome analysis to support public health practice. PMID:27192043

  6. Institutional Tuberculosis Transmission. Controlled Trial of Upper Room Ultraviolet Air Disinfection: A Basis for New Dosing Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Mphaphlele, Matsie; Dharmadhikari, Ashwin S.; Jensen, Paul A.; Rudnick, Stephen N.; van Reenen, Tobias H.; Pagano, Marcello A.; Leuschner, Wilhelm; Sears, Tim A.; Milonova, Sonya P.; van der Walt, Martie; Stoltz, Anton C.; Weyer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Transmission is driving the global tuberculosis epidemic, especially in congregate settings. Worldwide, natural ventilation is the most common means of air disinfection, but it is inherently unreliable and of limited use in cold climates. Upper room germicidal ultraviolet (UV) air disinfection with air mixing has been shown to be highly effective, but improved evidence-based dosing guidelines are needed. Objectives: To test the efficacy of upper room germicidal air disinfection with air mixing to reduce tuberculosis transmission under real hospital conditions, and to define the application parameters responsible as a basis for proposed new dosing guidelines. Methods: Over an exposure period of 7 months, 90 guinea pigs breathed only untreated exhaust ward air, and another 90 guinea pigs breathed only air from the same six-bed tuberculosis ward on alternate days when upper room germicidal air disinfection was turned on throughout the ward. Measurements and Main Results: The tuberculin skin test conversion rates (>6 mm) of the two chambers were compared. The hazard ratio for guinea pigs in the control chamber converting their skin test to positive was 4.9 (95% confidence interval, 2.8–8.6), with an efficacy of approximately 80%. Conclusions: Upper room germicidal UV air disinfection with air mixing was highly effective in reducing tuberculosis transmission under hospital conditions. These data support using either a total fixture output (rather than electrical or UV lamp wattage) of 15–20 mW/m3 total room volume, or an average whole-room UV irradiance (fluence rate) of 5–7 μW/cm2, calculated by a lighting computer-assisted design program modified for UV use. PMID:25928547

  7. Institutional Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  8. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal. PMID:25197837

  9. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  10. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  11. Risk Factors for Discontinuation of Exclusive Breastfeeding by One Month of Postnatal Age Among High Risk Newborns: An Institution Based Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chandrika, Parul; Gathwala, Geeta; Narwal, Varun; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Background Beyond one month of age, there is generally a drop in the proportion of mothers providing exclusive breastfeeding to their infants. Infants with morbidities during neonatal period have been observed to be at higher risk of discontinuation. Objective To enumerate the prevalent factors behind discontinuation of breastfeeding among high risk newborns by first month of life. Materials and Methods A case control study conducted at high risk newborn followup clinic of a teaching medical institute in northern India between January and May 2013. Infants were divided on the basis of continuation (controls) or discontinuation (cases) of exclusive breastfeeding at one month of age. The socio-demographic factors along with maternal and neonatal medical factors were compared among groups. Results During the study period, 112 newborns were screened. Forty seven cases and thirty eight controls were enrolled and finally evaluated. Female gender of newborn, less educated mothers and large families were observed to be associated with discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding during first month of life among high risk newborns. Requirement of parenteral fluids during hospital stay emerged as the only independent medical reason. Conclusion As in healthy newborns, the socio-cultural factors overshadow the medical reasons for discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding during first month of life among high risk newborns. PMID:26266176

  12. Clarification of Institutional Controls at the Rocky Flats Site Central Operable Unit and Implementation of the Soil Disturbance Review Plan - 13053

    SciTech Connect

    DiSalvo, Rick; Surovchak, Scott; Spreng, Carl; Moritz, Vera

    2013-07-01

    Cleanup and closure of DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado, which was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989, was accomplished under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado Hazardous Waste Act (CHWA). The physical cleanup work was completed in late 2005 and all buildings and other structures that composed the Rocky Flats industrial complex were removed from the surface, but remnants remain in the subsurface. Other remaining features include two landfills closed in place with covers, four groundwater treatment systems, and surface water and groundwater monitoring systems. Under the 2006 Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision for Rocky Flats Plant (US DOE) Peripheral Operable Unit and the Central Operable Unit (CAD/ROD), the response actions selected for the Central Operable Unit (OU) are institutional controls (ICs), physical controls, and continued monitoring and maintenance. The objectives of these ICs were to prevent unacceptable exposure to remaining subsurface contamination and to prevent contaminants from mobilizing to surface water and to prevent interfering with the proper functioning of the engineered components of the remedy. An amendment in 2011 of the 2006 CAD/ROD clarified the ICs to prevent misinterpretation that would prohibit work to manage and maintain the Central OU property. The 2011 amendment incorporated a protocol for a Soil Disturbance Review Plan for work subject to ICs that requires approval from the State and public notification by DOE prior to conducting approved soil-disturbing work. (authors)

  13. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Adela; Martín, Miguel; Ruiz, Amparo; Casas, Ana M.; Baena-Cañada, Jose M; Lope, Virginia; Antolín, Silvia; Sánchez, Pedro; Ramos, Manuel; Antón, Antonio; Muñoz, Montserrat; Bermejo, Begoña; De Juan-Ferré, Ana; Jara, Carlos; Chacón, José I; Jimeno, María A.; Rosado, Petra; Díaz, Elena; Guillem, Vicente; Lluch, Ana; Carrasco, Eva; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the “World Cancer Research Fund” and the “American Institute of Cancer Research” (WCRF/AICR) one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity. Objective To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer. Methods During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1)Maintain adequate body weight; 2)Be physically active; 3)Limit the intake of high density foods; 4)Eat mostly plant foods; 5)Limit the intake of animal foods; 6)Limit alcohol intake; 7)Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8)Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1)Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2-) using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively. Results Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59)), especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47)) and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05)) and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78)) tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28); p for interaction=0.014) and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63)); the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44)) and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31)); and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19)) showed the strongest associations. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention might

  14. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  15. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  16. Community Involvement as an Effective Institutional Control at the Weldon Spring Site, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Deyo, Y.E.; Pauling, T.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) was conducted for the purpose of remediating a portion of a former trinitrotoluene and dinitrotoluene production plant that was operational from 1941 to 1945 and a former uranium refinery that was operational from 1957 to 1966. Surface remediation activities concluded in 2001 with the completion of a 45-acre (.18 square kilometer) on-site engineered disposal facility. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities at the site were officially transferred to the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2003. The Weldon Spring Site is located within the St. Louis, Missouri, metropolitan area (population 3 million). DOE's close relationship with surrounding land owners created a need for innovative solutions to long-term surveillance and maintenance issues at the site. Through a Secretarial proclamation, a plan was established for development of a comprehensive public involvement and education program. This program would act as an institutional control to communicate the historical legacy of the site and would make information available about contamination present at the site to guide people in making decisions about appropriate site activities. In August 2002, the Weldon Spring Site Interpretive Center opened to the public with exhibits about the history of the area, the remediation work that was completed, and a site information repository that is available to visitors. In addition, the Hamburg Trail for hiking and biking was constructed as a joint DOE/MDC effort. The 8-mile trail travels through both DOE and MDC property; a series of historical markers posted along its length to communicate the history of the area and the remediation work that was done as part of WSSRAP activities. A ramp and viewing platform with informational plaques were constructed on the disposal cell to provide an additional mechanism for public education. With a basic marketing program, site visitor-ship has

  17. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy for Management of Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas: Long-Term Outcomes of Tumor Control and Visual Function at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Kapoor, Sumit; Kharkar, Siddharth; Batra, Sachin; Jackson, Juan F.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Miller, Neil R.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the long-term outcomes of patients treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCRT) for presumed optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 9 patients with a presumed ONSM were treated with FCRT at our institution. The indications for FCRT were significant visual dysfunction at presentation, progression of visual dysfunction during a period of observation, tumor growth documented by sequential imaging, or a combination of these findings. In 2 patients, FCRT was performed as adjuvant therapy, and in 7, it was the initial and primary treatment. Results: Of the 9 patients, 6 were women and 3 were men, with a mean age of 47 years. All 9 patients had evidence of optic nerve dysfunction in the affected eye, characterized by reduced visual acuity, a visual field defect, and a relative afferent pupillary defect. In addition, 2 patients had proptosis and 1 had diplopia. The mean follow-up period was 98 {+-} 31.7 months (median, 90; range, 61-151). After FCRT, the visual function improved in the 7 patients who had undergone FCRT as the primary treatment. However, 2 patients who were blind in their affected eye at FCRT remained blind. In 4 of the 7 patients with improvement, the improvement was documented within 1-3 months after FCRT. The tumor control rate was 100%. Proptosis and diplopia also regressed in 100% of patients. At 2 years after FCRT, 1 patient had developed radiation retinopathy. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that FCRT is a safe and effective treatment of ONSMs, affording satisfactory long-term tumor control, good functional outcome, and low treatment morbidity. FCRT should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with presumed ONSMs for whom the treatment has been deemed appropriate.

  18. Profile of Degree/Certificate-Seeking Entering Undergraduate Students, by Control and Level of Institution. Web Tables. NCES 2011-252

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginder, Scott; Mason, Marcinda

    2011-01-01

    The Student Right to Know Act requires institutions that participate in any student financial assistance program under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) to disclose graduation rates. To assist institutions in meeting this requirement, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) collects these rates as part of the…

  19. 10 CFR 61.59 - Institutional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... out an institutional control program to physically control access to the disposal site following transfer of control of the disposal site from the disposal site operator. The institutional control program... disposal site, periodic surveillance, minor custodial care, and other requirements as determined by...

  20. 10 CFR 61.59 - Institutional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... out an institutional control program to physically control access to the disposal site following transfer of control of the disposal site from the disposal site operator. The institutional control program... disposal site, periodic surveillance, minor custodial care, and other requirements as determined by...

  1. Institutions and poverty.

    PubMed

    Tebaldi, Edinaldo; Mohan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    This study utilises eight alternative measures of institutions and the instrumental variable method to examine the impacts of institutions on poverty. The estimates show that an economy with a robust system to control corruption, an effective government, and a stable political system will create the conditions to promote economic growth, minimise income distribution conflicts, and reduce poverty. Corruption, ineffective governments, and political instability will not only hurt income levels through market inefficiencies, but also escalate poverty incidence via increased income inequality. The results also imply that the quality of the regulatory system, rule of law, voice and accountability, and expropriation risk are inversely related to poverty but their effect on poverty is via average income rather than income distribution. PMID:20645460

  2. Job Strain and Determinants in Staff Working in Institutions for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: A Test of the Job Demand-Control-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the job strain of staff working in disability institutions. This study investigated the staff's job strain profile and its determinants which included the worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environments in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study survey was carried out among 1243 workers by means of a self-answered…

  3. To Control the Abuses of Government: The Veto and the Separation of Powers. A Guide for Discussion of Proposals to Institute Item and Legislative Veto Powers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Alice; Henze, Mary L.

    A discussion guide, one of a series on constitutional reform issues by The Jefferson Foundation as part of The Jefferson Meeting on the Constitution project, examines proposals to institute item and legislative veto power. The first section discusses the historical background surrounding the formative debate on veto legislation. The separation of…

  4. Institutional Priority for Diversity at Christian Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This evaluative study explored the relationship between institutional priority for diversity and minority enrollment at four schools within the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, a consortium of Christian institutions. This institutional evaluation utilized public resources in order to gather descriptive data on minority enrollment…

  5. Steady-state sustainment of high-{beta} plasmas through stability control in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Isayama, A.

    2005-05-15

    Recent results from steady-state sustainment of high-{beta} plasma experiments in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) tokamak [A. Kitsunezaki et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 42, 179 (2002)] are described. Extension of discharge duration to 65 s (formerly 15 s) has enabled physics research with long time scale. In long-duration high-{beta} research, the normalized beta {beta}{sub N}=2.5, which is comparable to that in the steady-state operation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [R. Aymar, P. Barabaschi, and Y. Shimomura, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)], has been sustained for about 15 s with confinement enhancement factor H{sub 89PL} above 2, where the duration is about 80 times energy confinement time and {approx}10 times current diffusion time ({tau}{sub R}). In the scenario aiming at longer duration with {beta}{sub N}{approx}1.9, which is comparable to that in the ITER standard operation scenario, duration has been extended to 24 s ({approx}15{tau}{sub R}). Also, from the viewpoint of collisionality and Larmor radius of the plasmas, these results are obtained in the ITER-relevant regime with a few times larger than the ITER values. No serious effect of current diffusion on instabilities is observed in the region of {beta}{sub N} < or approx. 2.5, and in fact neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which limit the achievable {beta} in the stationary high-{beta}{sub p} H-mode discharges, are suppressed throughout the discharge. In high-{beta} research with the duration of several times {tau}{sub R}, a high-{beta} plasma with {beta}{sub N}{approx}2.9-3 has been sustained for 5-6 s with two scenarios for NTM suppression: (a) NTM avoidance by modification of pressure and current profiles, and (b) NTM stabilization with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD)/electron cyclotron heating (ECH). NTM stabilization with the second harmonic X-mode ECCD/ECH has been performed, and it is found that EC current

  6. Institute Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann; Steadman, Jackie; Little, Sally; Underwood, Debra; Blackman, Mack; Simonds, Judy

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the MSFC working group on Institutes in 1995 on the structure, organization and business arrangements of Institutes at a time when the agency was considering establishing science institutes. Thirteen institutes, ten science centers associated with the state of Georgia, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and IIT Research Institute (IITRI), and general data on failed institutes were utilized to form this report. The report covers the working group's findings on institute mission, structure, director, board of directors/advisors, the working environment, research arrangements, intellectual property rights, business management, institute funding, and metrics.

  7. Education in Summer: 100 Years at UW-Madison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison.

    College summer sessions, and specifically the summer program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison between 1885-1985 are discussed in two papers and a conference summary. In "History of Summer School at the University of Wisconsin," John W. Jenkins and Barry J. Teicher examine the emergence and nature of summer programs in the context of the…

  8. Celebrating 100 Years of Flight: Testing Wing Designs in Aircraft

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugalee, David K.; Nusinov, Chuck; Giersch, Chris; Royster, David; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation involving several designs of airplane wings in trial flight simulations based on a NASA CONNECT program. Students' experiences with data collection and interpretation are highlighted. (Contains 5 figures.)

  9. Shell shock at Queen Square: Lewis Yealland 100 years on

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Edgar; Lees, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the treatment of functional neurological symptoms during World War I by Lewis Yealland at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic in London. Yealland was among the first doctors in Britain to incorporate electricity in the systematic treatment of shell shock. Our analysis is based on the original case records of his treatment of 196 soldiers with functional motor and sensory symptoms, functional seizures and somatoform disorders. Yealland’s treatment approach integrated peripheral and central electrical stimulation with a variety of other—psychological and physical—interventions. A combination of electrical stimulation of affected muscles with suggestion of imminent improvement was the hallmark of his approach. Although his reported success rates were high, Yealland conducted no formal follow-up. Many of the principles of his treatment, including the emphasis on suggestion, demonstration of preserved function and the communication of a physiological illness model, are encountered in current therapeutic approaches to functional motor and sensory symptoms. Yealland has been attacked for his use of electrical stimulation and harsh disciplinary procedures in popular and scientific literature during and after World War I. This criticism reflects changing views on patient autonomy and the social role of doctors and directly impacts on current debates on ethical justification of suggestive therapies. We argue that knowledge of the historical approaches to diagnosis and management of functional neurological syndromes can inform both aetiological models and treatment concepts for these challenging conditions. PMID:23384604

  10. [100 years ago: landmarks in the medical education of women].

    PubMed

    Völker, A

    1989-08-01

    The discussion about the study of medicine for women rose in high waves in Germany in the middle of the eighties of the last century. A lecture on this topic held by the anatomist Waldeyer in 1888 was typical for the reservations of the majority of the German professors. It led to a polemics by means of which a convinced suffragatte tried to refute those prejudices which had to be overcome before beginning with 1908 the way to the Prussian universities was judicially made free for the German women. PMID:2683428

  11. [The 20th century: 100 years of misfortune and splendor].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliéxer

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century has been one of the most intense and convulsive periods in the History of humanity. A century of paradoxes and contrasts, it began with optimism, it witnessed the apocalypse of two world wars, and finished with unimaginable scientific progress that gave us a new civilization that we cannot yet grasp. In this century, significant events happened that shaped our time and projected their results toward an immediate future. Some of these were providential in understanding man's life, fighting against illnesses and prolonging life, and others were of undeniable social importance for humanity. Some knowledge was based on the work of others. Philosophy was embedded in mathematics, as was science in philosophy, while politics and the economy exercised so decisive an influence in our way of feeling and living that culture and society were affected to the core. Within that century the biggest technological revolution of all the time was also created, as transcendent as it was unimaginable, which put mankind on the road to the stars with the moon landing and in the process created the information society whose signature symbol, the internet, emerged as a new demiurge. However, the 20th century, with all its misfortune and splendor, paradoxes and contrasts, creation and destruction, was the most transcendent in the whole of history and it bequeaths to the future a promising horizon in the search for a renovated meaning of life and a yearning for peaceful coexistence for the whole humanity. PMID:15754756

  12. 100 years after the Marsica earthquake: contribute of outreach activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Giordani, Azzurra; Valle, Veronica; Riposati, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Many outreach events have been proposed by the scientific community to celebrate the Centenary of the January 13, 1915 earthquake, that devastated the Marsica territory, located in Central Apennines. The Laboratorio Divulgazione Scientifica e Attività Museali of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Laboratory for Outreach and Museum Activities) in Rome, has realised an interactive exhibition in the Castello Piccolomini, Celano (AQ), to retrace the many aspects of the earthquake disaster, in a region such as Abruzzo affected by several destructive earthquakes during its history. The initiatives represent an ideal opportunity for the development of new programs of communication and training on seismic risk and to spread the culture of prevention. The INGV is accredited with the Servizio Civile Nazionale (National Civic Service) and volunteers are involved in the project "Science and Outreach: a comprehensive approach to the divulgation of knowledge of Earth Sciences" starting in 2014. In this contest, volunteers had the opportunity to fully contribute to the exhibition, in particular, promoting and realising two panels concerning the social and environmental consequences of the Marsica earthquake. Describing the serious consequences of the earthquake, we may raise awareness about natural hazards and about the only effective action for earthquake defense: building with anti seismic criteria. After studies and researches conducted in libraries and via web, two themes have been developped: the serious problem of orphans and the difficult reconstruction. Heavy snowfalls and the presence of wolves coming from the high and wild surrounding mountains complicated the scenario and decelerated the rescue of the affected populations. It is important to underline that the earthquake was not the only devastating event in the country in 1915; another drammatic event was, in fact, the First World War. Whole families died and the still alive infants and children were sent to Rome in hospitals and in other suitable structures. Many stories of poor orphans are known but we decided to outlines stories that besides the dramma had an happy ending. To understand the hugeness of the tragedy, we may consider that the number of towns and villages completely destroyed by the earthquake was more than fifty. The reconstruction was very difficult and slow also because of the war, and involved the relocation of settlements in different places. The first shelters to be reconstructed were those for survivors: very small shacks built with anti seismic criteria. They are still on the territory, to be a symbol of the reconstruction and a remined evidence of the earthquake.

  13. Martin Gardner: 100 Years of the Magic of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillaspy, John D.

    2014-10-01

    2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Martin Gardner, a man whose writings helped inspire generations of young students to pursue a career in physics and mathematics. From his first to his last, and many in between, Gardner's publications often combined magic and science. A recurring theme was the clever use of physical principles to produce an apparently miraculous effect that stimulated the mind to wonder "how is that possible?" In contrast to the disconnect between science and mystery that one often encounters in teaching today, Gardner embraced these two disparate elements, and fused them into a whole that made learning a joy.

  14. Women and the RAS: 100 years of Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy

    2016-02-01

    In January 1916, the RAS elected its first women Fellows. Mandy Bailey looks back at the social and scientific circumstances of this step towards equality, introducing a year of articles celebrating the centenary.

  15. Ernst Mach on the vestibular organ 100 years ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews the contributions of Ernst Mach to vestibular research. His experiments, mainly psychophysical in nature, included measurements of threshold and investigation of the vestibular-visual interaction. Among his conclusions are that the adequate stimulus for the semicircular canals must be pressure, and that the sustained endolymph flow theory of Breuer (1874) and Crum Brown (1874) is erroneous. Excerpts are given of Mach's publications on vestibular functions.-

  16. Huck Finn: 100 Years of Durn Fool Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanek, Lou Willett

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the censorship of Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" since it was first published in 1885. Highlights include Twain's public image, viewpoints of censors, the banning of the book and school censorship cases, and the celebration of the centennial of "Huckleberry Finn." Nine references are cited. (EJS)

  17. The FCS Body of Knowledge: Shaping the Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article shares the Body of Knowledge (BOK) as articulated in the new "Accreditation Documents for Undergraduate Programs in Family and Consumer Sciences" (2010). The purpose of sharing the BOK is to enhance awareness of the current knowledge base of family and consumer sciences (FCS), whether for new or lifelong AAFCS members, those exploring…

  18. 100 Years of the Quantum - the Glory and the Shame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, John Archibald

    2001-03-01

    What is the greatest mystery that stands out on the books of physics today? Every one of us will have a different answer. Some will say it is the structure of the elementary particles. Others ask in what form is the mass or the attraction that has held the universe together thus far against perpetual expansion. Others will think of the November 11, 1999 dedication of America's first 6 kilometer by 6 kilometer gravity wave detector and will ask what information it will bring us about events going on in the deep and secret places of the universe. My own hope is that we'll see in time to come the answer to a question now almost a century old, "How come the quantum?" Gregory Breit would have sympathized with the investigations at each of these fronts, and could surely have filled us in on what the pioneers thought and said about the question, "How come the quantum?" ...

  19. Food Production and Antimicrobial Resistance – The Next 100 Years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of food is complex and ensuring the safety of food for human consumption provides serious challenges. Since 1996 the U.S. has conducted surveillance on food borne and commensal antimicrobial resistance bacteria through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System - Enteric Bac...

  20. 100 Years of Curriculum History, Theory, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews a collection of papers written by the American Educational Research Association's first 50 presidents that deal specifically with curricular issues. It characterizes the ways in which curricula were conceptualized, implemented, and assessed, with an eye toward the epistemological and methodological framings that the authors…

  1. Media Storytelling, Curriculum, and the Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy Harris

    2012-01-01

    Journalism as an academic field in the United States has frequently changed and grown through new professions and new industries coming under its umbrella (sometimes but not always driven by technological and/or economic changes) and academic developments such as cultural studies and media studies. But journalism is still rooted in good…

  2. Preface: A Celebration of 100 Years of Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, O. M.; Muench, R. D.; Overland, J. E.

    On June 24, 1993, one hundred years had passed since Fridtjof Nansen and his companions set out on one of the most daring and exciting research expeditions the world had ever seen. They allowed their vessel, the Fram, to be frozen into the ice close to the New Siberian Islands, in the Arctic Ocean. Three years were to elapse before the ice released its hold on the Fram and allowed her to return to Norway via the strait between Greenland and Spitsbergen, which later came to be known as Fram Strait. The research carried out during Fram's drift in the ice altered forever our concept of the Arctic Basin.

  3. 100 years of the cullars rotation (c. 1911).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alabama’s “Cullars Rotation” experiment (circa 1911) was placed on the National Register of Historical Places as the oldest, continuous, soil fertility experiment in the South in 2003. Along with its nearby predecessor on the National Register, “The Old Rotation” (circa 1896), these experiments cont...

  4. Martin Gardner: 100 Years of the Magic of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillaspy, John D.

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Martin Gardner, a man whose writings helped inspire generations of young students to pursue a career in physics and mathematics. From his first to his last, and many in between, Gardner's publications often combined magic and science. A recurring theme was the clever use of physical principles…

  5. Healing at Home: 100 Years of Public Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Ellen T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Now More than Ever" (Fahy); "Healing at Home" (photo essay); "Amelia Greenwald: Pioneer in International Public Health Nursing" (Mayer); "Alaska's Watched Pot" (Nord); and "Gertrude Weld Peabody: Unsung Patron of Public Health Nursing Education" (Doona). (JOW)

  6. Hazards of ionising radiation: 100 years of observations on man.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.

    1995-01-01

    In November 1895, when Conrad Röntgen serendipitously discovered X-rays, epidemiology was effectively limited to the study of infectious disease. What little epidemiological work was done in other fields was done as part of clinical medicine or under the heading of geographical pathology. The risks from exposure to X-rays and subsequently from other types of ionising radiation were consequently discovered by qualitative association or animal experiment. They did not begin to be quantified in humans until half a century later, when epidemiology emerged as a scientific discipline capable of quantifying risks of non-infectious disease and the scientific world was alerted to the need for assessing the effects of the radiation to which large populations might be exposed by the use of nuclear energy in peace and war. PMID:8519643

  7. 250 Fireballs Observed in Norway 100 Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorve, J.

    2014-07-01

    In 1941 the Norwegian Academy of Sciences, presented a study in the Mathematcal-Natural Sciences section, by the Norwegian astronomer Sigurd Einbu. In this report, the information of each fireball is presented in a table containing eight parameters, including their radiants. The report also contains several illustrations. For about 60 of the most interesting fireballs, Einbu included additional information, as describing them in more details. Like, those fireballs producing infrasonic sounds, and/or having superbolide brightness. Also, the strong smell of sulfur, have been reported by a number of persons in a meteorite drop zone. Also, a unique incident of four bright fireballs that were observed within a period of 12 hours, all with the same radiant. During this period, we also experienced the brightest fireball that ever has been observed in Norway, the Trysil superbolide, of 1927. This paper discusses Einbu's report. With respect to when it was published, is surprisingly well suited to also to be read and studied by interested researchers.

  8. The Niagara Movement's Powerful Fruit-100 Years of Protest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malveaux, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASAALH) was founded 90 years ago on Sept. 9, 1915. It's founder, Dr. Carter G. Woodson, author of the scathing masterpiece, The Miseducation of the Negro (1933), was also the thunder of Negro History Week (1926), the forerunner to contemporary Black History Month celebrations.…

  9. Developing Resilient Children: After 100 Years of Montessori Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Meg

    2008-01-01

    In this millennium, educators are faced with a number of issues that Dr. Maria Montessori could not have predicted. Today, students are different from the children Dr. Montessori observed in her "Casa dei Bambini." They are influenced by technology in all its forms. Some suffer from medical problems such as complex food allergies, which wreak…

  10. Larkspur - Poison Weed (100 Years of Delphinium Research)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are found in the foothill and mountain rangelands of the western United States. Losses to ranchers from larkspurs range from 2 to 5 percent and as high as 15% in places with large stands of toxic larkspur. There are three basic categories of larkspur, plains, low, and t...

  11. 100 years of semiconductor science. The Ukrainian contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytovchenko, V. G.; Strikha, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    How old is semiconductor science? The answer is not obvious even for researchers who worked in this field for their whole life. Mankind has been dealing with semiconductors like silicon for centuries - although not with their electrical properties. The first electrical experiments with semiconductors were performed more than 200 years ago. However, the concept of semiconductors as a separate class of materials, between conductors and insulators, appeared rather late - in the first two decades of the 20th century.

  12. Still Battling the Surf: Teaching English after 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goering, Christian Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on on his role in preparing English teachers. Leading into his twelfth year concerned with the art and science of teaching English, he wondered what exactly he could say or do to help them stick their toes in some uncertain waters. What could he say of an educational context bent on holding people--different by…

  13. Spectroscopic Binaries: Towards the 100-Year Time Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. F.

    2012-04-01

    Good measurements of visual binary stars (position angle and angular separation) have been made for nearly 200 years. Radial-velocity observers have exhibited less patience; when the orbital periods of late-type stars in the catalogue published in 1978 are sorted into bins half a logarithmic unit wide, the modal bin is the one with periods between 3 and 10 days. The same treatment of the writer's orbits shows the modal bin to be the one between 1000 and 3000 days. Of course the spectroscopists cannot quickly catch up the 200 years that the visual observers have been going, but many spectroscopic orbits with periods of decades, and a few of the order of a century, have been published. Technical developments have also been made in `visual' orbit determination, and orbits with periods of only a few days have been determined for certain `visual' binaries. In principle, therefore, the time domains of visual and spectroscopic binaries now largely overlap. Overlap is essential, as it is only by combining both techniques that orbits can be determined in three dimensions, as is necessary for the important objective of determining stellar masses accurately. Nevertheless the actual overlap-objects with accurate measurements by both techniques-remains disappointingly small. There have, however, been unforeseen benefits from the observation of spectroscopic binaries that have unconventionally long orbital periods, not a few of which have proved to be interesting and significant objects in their own right. It has also been shown that binary membership is more common than was once thought (orbits have even been determined for some of the IAU standard radial-velocity stars!); a recent study of the radial velocities of K giants that had been monitored for 45 years found a binary incidence of 30%, whereas a figure of 13.7% was given as recently as 2005 for a similar group.

  14. Evolutionary Lightsailing Missions for the 100-Year Starship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, L.; Garber, D.; Heinsheimer, T.

    Incremental milestones towards interstellar flight can be achieved in this century by building on first steps with lightsailing, the only known technology that might someday take us to the stars. That this is now possible is enabled by achievements of first solar sail flights, the use of nano-technology for miniaturization of spacecraft, advances in information processing and the decoding of our genomes into transportable form. This paper quantifies a series of robotic steps through and beyond the solar system that are practical and would stimulate the development of new technologies in guidance, navigation, materials, communication, sensors, information processing etc. while exploring ever-more distant, exciting space objectives at distances impractical for classical rocket-based technologies. There robotic steps may be considered as precursors to human interstellar flight, but they may also be considered as evolutionary steps that provide for a different future: One of virtual human interstellar flight that may bypass the ideas of the past (big rockets launching heavy people) in favour of those of the future ­ networking amongst the stars with information, and the physical transport of digital and biological genomes.

  15. An Electron Model for the Next 100 Years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylis, William E.

    1997-04-01

    Progress is reported on the eigenspinor model of the electron.(W. E. Baylis, Phys. Rev. A) 45, 4293 (1992). The model, which employs Clifford's geometric algebra(see W. E. Baylis, ed., Clifford (Geometric) Algebras with Applications in Physics, Mathematics, and Engineering), Birkhäuser Boston, 1996. and whose roots can be traced to V. Fock (1929), A. H. Taub (1948), F. Gürsey (1957), P. Rastall (1964), D. Hestenes (1966), and K. Greider (1980), describes the motion and orientation of elementary fermions by the spacetime rotation (Lorentz transformation) that relates the particle frame to the observer. The model helps to bridge the interface between the classical and quantum theories of of the electron and to interpret the geometrical significance of the wave function, its complex phase, the Dirac equation, and its bilinear covariants. Here, implications for the standard Copenhagen interpretation are discussed and shown to alleviate some problems of quantum measurement theory, and an extension to a higher-dimensional description of fermions is suggested.

  16. Technique for estimating depth of 100-year floods in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, Charles R.; Lewis, James G.

    1977-01-01

    Preface: A method is presented for estimating the depth of the loo-year flood in four hydrologic areas in Tennessee. Depths at 151 gaging stations on streams that were not significantly affected by man made changes were related to basin characteristics by multiple regression techniques. Equations derived from the analysis can be used to estimate the depth of the loo-year flood if the size of the drainage basin is known.

  17. UNDERTAKING POSITIVE CONTROL STUDIES AS PART OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING: A REPORT FROM THE ILSI RESEARCH FOUNDATION/RISK SCIENCE INSTITUTE EXPERT WORKING GROUP ON NEURODEVELOPMENTAL ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing involves functional and neurohistological assessments in offspring during and following maternal and/or neonatal exposure. Data from positive control studies are an integral component in developmental neurotoxicity risk assessments. Positive ...

  18. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  19. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    This fact sheet on institutional racism contains statistics on white control of the economy, health, housing, education, the media, and government. It also shows the oppression of minorities in these areas. The areas of wealth, the stock exchange, business, banks, unions, poverty, and unemployment, are discussed in terms of economy. Health matters…

  20. Management Information in Tertiary Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    A college or university's management information system corresponds roughly to the institution's structure, with these elements in descending order in the hierarchy: policy and planning, a planning system, control and coordination, and typical operating systems (payroll, exams, scheduling, library, facilities assignments, and accounting…

  1. Enhancing the Material Control & Accounting Measurement System at the State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after A.I. Leypunsky

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn P.; Bezhunov, Gennady M.; Bogdanov, Sergey A.; Gorbachev, Vyacheslav M.; Ryazanov, Boris G.; Talanov, Vladimir V.

    2012-07-11

    Nuclear material control and accounting (NMCA) system is improving under cooperation with USA national laboratories. Standard reference materials (RMs) and measurement techniques certified at IPPE level are required for: instrument calibration, verification measurements of parameters of items and materials, measurement error estimation, and quality control measurements. We present the main results for development of nuclear RMs for two uranium strata and the results for certification of three measurement techniques (MT) for U-235 mass fraction in uranium and U-235 mass in items. We present the results for developing measurement techniques for Pu-239 in PuO{sub 2}.

  2. Today`s control systems evolved from early pioneers` dreams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    In the last 100 years, power plant controls have evolved from manual operation and simple instruments to automatic state-of-the-art computerized control systems using smart instruments. This article traces the evolution of controls. The topics of the article include early control systems, developments in the early 20th century, Bailey controls, and developments in the late 20th century.

  3. "How to Strike the Right Balance between Quality Assurance and Quality Control in the Perceptions of Individual Lecturers": A Comparison of UK and Dutch Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teelken, Christine; Lomas, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the way lecturers observe, feel restrained by and cope with quality management systems that have been implemented in the higher education systems of the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. As two sides of the same coin, quality enhancement and quality control are of increased significance in European Higher Education…

  4. Establishing daily quality control (QC) in screen-film mammography using leeds tor (max) phantom at the breast imaging unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acaba, K. J. C.; Cinco, L. D.; Melchor, J. N.

    2016-03-01

    Daily QC tests performed on screen film mammography (SFM) equipment are essential to ensure that both SFM unit and film processor are working in a consistent manner. The Breast Imaging Unit of USTH-Benavides Cancer Institute has been conducting QC following the test protocols in the IAEA Human Health Series No.2 manual. However, the availability of Leeds breast phantom (CRP E13039) in the facility made the task easier. Instead of carrying out separate tests on AEC constancy and light sensitometry, only one exposure of the phantom is done to accomplish the two tests. It was observed that measurements made on mAs output and optical densities (ODs) using the Leeds TOR (MAX) phantom are comparable with that obtained from the usual conduct of tests, taking into account the attenuation characteristic of the phantom. Image quality parameters such as low contrast and high contrast details were also evaluated from the phantom image. The authors recognize the usefulness of the phantom in determining technical factors that will help improve detection of smallest pathological details on breast images. The phantom is also convenient for daily QC monitoring and economical since less number of films is expended.

  5. Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) System Upgrades and Performance Testing at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bushmelev, Vadim; Viktorov, Vladimir; Zhikharev, Stanislav; Yuferev, Vladimir; Singh, Surinder Paul; Kuzminski, Jozef; Hogan, Kevin; McKisson, Jacquelin

    2008-01-01

    The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), founded in 1946 at the historic village of Sarov, in Nizhniy Novgorod Oblast, is the largest nuclear research center in the Rosatom complex. In the framework of international collaboration, the United States (US) Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency, in cooperation with US national laboratories, on the one hand, Rosatom and VNIIEF on the other hand, have focused their cooperative efforts to upgrade the existing material protection control and accountability system to prevent unauthorized access to the nuclear material. In this paper we will discuss the present status of material control and accounting (MC&A) system upgrades and the preliminary results from a pilot program on the MC&A system performance testing that was recently conducted at one technical area.

  6. National Institutes of Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Information OppNet NIDB NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Institutes at NIH List of Institutes, Centers & ... be prevented. Pneumonia Causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatments. Learning Disabilities Early interventions offer help with learning problems. ...

  7. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join us! James T. Willerson MD Cardiovascular Seminar Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources ... Education 12th Annual Diabetes Symposium September 17, 2016 Texas Heart Institute Program Director: Mandeep Bajaj, MD Clinical ...

  8. Swimmer-Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This satirical essay proposes an institution of higher learning that would prepare students to become swimmers" and swimming instructors. Curriculum, teaching methods, student selection and evaluation are modelled on certain contemporary teacher-training institutes. (PD)

  9. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  10. Astronomical Institute of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of Athens is the oldest research institute of modern Greece (it faces the Parthenon). The Astronomical Institute (AI) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) started its observational projects in 1847. The modern computer and research center are housed at the Penteli Astronomical Station with major projects and international collaborations focused on extragalactic ...

  11. Quality control concept and recent developments of the light climatic observatory at Arosa: Ozone measuring station of the Swiss Meteorological Institute (LKO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegger, Bruno; Viatte, Pierre; Levrat, Gilbert; Bader, Juerg; Ribordy, Pascale; Schill, Herbert; Staehelin, Johannes

    1994-01-01

    Total ozone observations of two Dobson instruments (D15 and D101, C- and AD wavelength pair observations) and of two Brewer instruments (Br40 and Br72) are currently performed at the LKO at Arosa. A quality control concept is presented in order to make best use of the large number of quasi-simultaneous measurements. The longest ozone series of the world is mainly based on the measurements of the Dobson instrument D15 (wavelength pair C). Since the last years D15 has suffered from instrumental problems. The transformation of the longterm series to the measurements of D101(AD) is described.

  12. 78 FR 27410 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 6, 2013... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; OmniBus Cancer Biology 3 SEP. Date: June...

  13. 76 FR 79200 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... Secretary, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard 7th Floor..., Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National......

  14. Staff perception and institutional reporting: two views of infection control compliance in British Columbia and Ontario three years after an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bryce, E; Copes, R; Gamage, B; Lockhart, K; Yassi, A

    2008-06-01

    Few studies have audited the resources available to infection control (IC) and occupational health (OH) to promote safe work behaviour, whilst comparing audited findings with perceptions by healthcare workers (HCWs). We aimed to determine the IC and OH resources available and compare this with HCWs' perception of resources, following an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). A survey of IC and OH resources and a questionnaire completed by HCWs were compared with on-site observational audits. HCWs believed that plans were available to protect against future SARS-like events but audits revealed that these did not exist in many facilities. Both OH and IC were under-resourced post-SARS, with OH professionals particularly lacking in British Columbia. There is a discrepancy between HCWs' perception of what is available and what is actually accessible in facilities. Experts in IC and OH need to focus on communication. PMID:18485532

  15. 28 CFR 541.41 - Institutional referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Institutional referral. 541.41 Section 541.41 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... alone or together with an inmate's prior history, may warrant consideration for a control unit...

  16. Mapping Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A Typology of Institutional Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), institutions that enroll at least 25% Hispanic students, are institutionally diverse, including a much wider array of institutional types than other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Furthermore, they have distinctive institutional characteristics from those typically emphasized in institutional typologies…

  17. Cosmo-geo-anthropo-logical history and political and deep future events in climate and life evolution conveyed by a physical/virtual installation at a scale of 1 mm per 100 years across Denmark during the COP15 climate summit meeting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    During the COP15 climate summit meeting a physical and virtual installation of time was performed at a linear scale of 1 mm per 100 years. The "track of time" was carefully anchored geographically so that highlights in time history coincided with landmarks of historical and cultural significance to both tourists and the local Danish population; with Big Bang at the site of early royal settlements from the Viking age (13.7 billion years ~ 137 km from now), Earth origin at Kronborg in Elsinore (4.6 bil. Years ~ 46 km), and fish go on land at The Little Mermaid (390 mil. Years ~ 3900 m). The venue of the COP15 meeting coincided with the position of severe global warming, driven by the steady solar constant increase, to be expected 600 million years into the future. Nested in this grand track of time were the Quaternary ice-ages (2.6 mil. years ~ 26 m), human origin as species (100,000 years ~ 1 m), human history (< 10,000 years ~ 100 mm), personal life and the scope of political consequences of voting action (100 years ~ 1 mm). This installation of time involved several media. Highlights in time history and future were installed as a kml-file so that the convenient user interface of Google Earth could be utilized to provide both overview of time and understanding of details and proportions events antropo-geo-cosmo-history. Each Google Earth marker-balloon gave short explanations and linked to "on location" video-narratives. A classical printed text-folder was prepared as a tour guide for those who wanted to actually walk the Phanerozoic (~5 km). Credit-card-shaped graphs of temperature, CO2 and sealevel development and scenarios were prepared to scale for the period 4000 BP to 1000 years into the future. Along the time line from "Fish on land" to the present 3900 chalk marks were placed on the street surface, one for every metre = time span of Man as a species so far. A "NowGate" marking the present was implemented physically as a door frame, where citizens could meet

  18. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy in the Management of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: Long-Term Functional Outcome and Tumor Control at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Batra, Sachin; Karkar, Siddharth; Kapoor, Sumit; Weiss, Stephanie; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Danielle

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCR). Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients with CSMs (16 men [30.2%], 37 women [69.8%], aged 53 {+-} 13.0 years [mean {+-} SD]) were treated by FCR. In 28 patients (52.8%) FCR was performed as first-line treatment and in 25 patients (47.2%) as adjuvant treatment. All patients received FCR with a dose of 52.9 {+-} 1.8 Gy in 29.4 {+-} 1.0 fractions over 6 weeks. Dose per fraction was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered stereotactically in 47 cases (88.7%) and conformally in 6 (11.3%) Results: The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 3-19 years). According to Sekhar's classification, 19 patients (35.8%) were Grade 1-2, 30 patients (56.6%) were Grade 3-4, and 4 patients (7.6%) were Grade 5. Pretreatment tumor volume was determined in 46 patients, and tumor volume was 12.6 {+-} 8.2 cm{sup 3}. In these patients, the distance between tumor and optic apparatus was 1.62 {+-} 1.2 mm. Actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival rates were 98.1% and 95.8%, respectively. Clinical improvement was observed in 31 patients (58.5%), and 20 patients (37.7%) remained unchanged. Radiologic response was observed in 18 patients (30.2%), and 35 patients (66.0%) showed stable lesions. Two patients (3.8%) showed tumor progression during follow-up. Transient morbidity was observed in 3 patients (5.7%) and permanent morbidity in 1 (1.9%). Conclusion: Fractionated conformal radiotherapy affords satisfactory long-term tumor control and low treatment morbidity.

  19. A Comparison of Web-based and Small-Group Palliative and End-of-Life Care Curricula: A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Study at One Institution

    PubMed Central

    Day, Frank C.; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Griffin, Erin; Hoffman, Jerome R.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have compared the effect of web-based eLearning versus small-group learning on medical student outcomes. Palliative and end-of-life (PEOL) education is ideal for this comparison, given uneven access to PEOL experts and content nationally. Method In 2010, the authors enrolled all third-year medical students at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine into a quasi-randomized controlled trial of web-based interactive education (eDoctoring) compared to small-group education (Doctoring) on PEOL clinical content over two months. All students participated in three 3-hour PEOL sessions with similar content. Outcomes included a 24-item PEOL-specific self-efficacy scale with three domains (diagnosis/treatment [Cronbach’s alpha = 0.92, CI: 0.91–0.93], communication/prognosis [alpha = 0.95; CI: 0.93–0.96], and social impact/self-care [alpha = 0.91; CI: 0.88–0.92]); eight knowledge items; ten curricular advantage/disadvantages, and curricular satisfaction (both students and faculty). Results Students were randomly assigned to web-based eDoctoring (n = 48) or small-group Doctoring (n = 71) curricula. Self-efficacy and knowledge improved equivalently between groups: e.g., prognosis self-efficacy, 19%; knowledge, 10–42%. Student and faculty ratings of the web-based eDoctoring curriculum and the small group Doctoring curriculum were equivalent for most goals, and overall satisfaction was equivalent for each, with a trend towards decreased eDoctoring student satisfaction. Conclusions Findings showed equivalent gains in self-efficacy and knowledge between students participating in a web-based PEOL curriculum, in comparison to students learning similar content in a small-group format. Web-based curricula can standardize content presentation when local teaching expertise is limited, but may lead to decreased user satisfaction. PMID:25539518

  20. Revision of FED-STD-209D and MIL-STD-1246B and development of IES (Institute of Environmental Sciences) contamination control recommended practices in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    In the United States of America, numerous organizations are writing standards and recommend practices for contamination control and cleanroom applications. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the Institute of Environmental Sciences (IES), and various US Government agencies are among the organizations with a vested interest in publishing standards and recommended practices on these subjects. In the early years of contamination control and cleanroom technology, significant work was done in the US on standards and recommended practices. Proprietary standards were established by companies and other documents were produced by Federal agencies and technical organizations. In 1982, the IES began to focus on recommended practices, and the US General Services Administration (GSA) commissioned the IES to review and rewrite US Federal Standard 209 (FED-STD-209). The ASTM continues to review and update their standards on cleanroom applications on a periodic basis. Now, in 1990, US military organizations are beginning to review their cleanroom documents as well. This paper will discuss the preparation of IES Recommended Practices and Standards for contamination control and cleanroom applications. It will describe the current status of four IES Recommended Practices and two US Government documents.

  1. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  2. Institutional Inbreeding Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Jean C.; Conrad, Clifton F.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the 1977 Survey of the American Professoriate were used to examine the relationship among institutional origin, productivity, and institutional rewards. When an adjustment was made for time allocation, inbred faculty were found to be more productive but are paid significantly less than noninbred faculty. (Author/BW)

  3. Institutionalism "Old" and "New."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selznick, Philip

    1996-01-01

    Explores the new institutionalism's ethos and direction. Drawing a sharp line between old and new inhibits the contribution of institutional theory to major issues of bureaucracy and social policy. Problems of accountability and responsiveness, public and private bureaucracy, regulation and self-regulation, and management and governance will…

  4. Evaluating Residential Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millham, Spencer

    Drawing on the research experience of the Dartington Social Research Unit, this paper discusses methods and perspectives used in evaluating English residential institutions for children. Work of the Dartington Social Research Unit has involved evaluating aspects of a wide range of institutions, from elite boarding schools to children's homes and…

  5. Understanding Institutional Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terkla, Dawn Geronimo; Pagano, Marian F.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a semantic differential measure to investigate the institutional image of Tufts University (Massachusetts), both internal and external, is reported. The study focused on (1) differences between the current and desired image, and (2) differences among alumni, current student, and other constituencies' views of the institution.…

  6. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  7. Revising the Institutional Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Revision of a college mission statement through a broadly participatory process can provide a new and sharpened sense of direction and priorities and a powerful mechanism for institutional change. Although institutional circumstances and processes may differ, the experience of Wittenberg University (Ohio) serves as an example of a model for…

  8. Profile: Institute of Society, Ethics and the Life Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Daniel

    1971-01-01

    Describes an institute founded to examine moral, ethical, and legal issues raised by possibilities of euthanasia, genetic engineering, behavior control, population control, and improved disease control. Indicates scope of present research. (Editor/AL)

  9. Achieving Cannabis Cessation - Evaluating N-acetylcysteine Treatment (ACCENT): Design and implementation of a multi-site, randomized controlled study in the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Erin A.; Sonne, Susan C.; Winhusen, Theresa; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Ghitza, Udi E.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Matthews, Abigail G.; Sharma, Gaurav; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Vandrey, Ryan G.; Levin, Frances R.; Weiss, Roger D.; Lindblad, Robert; Allen, Colleen; Mooney, Larissa J.; Haynes, Louise; Brigham, Gregory S.; Sparenborg, Steve; Hasson, Albert L.; Gray, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in behavioral interventions for cannabis use disorders, effect sizes remain modest, and few individuals achieve long-term abstinence. One strategy to enhance outcomes is the addition of pharmacotherapy to complement behavioral treatment, but to date no efficacious medications targeting cannabis use disorders in adults through large, randomized controlled trials have been identified. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (NIDA CTN) is currently conducting a study to test the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) versus placebo (PBO), added to contingency management, for cannabis cessation in adults (ages 18–50). This study was designed to replicate positive findings from a study in cannabis-dependent adolescents that found greater odds of abstinence with NAC compared to PBO. This paper describes the design and implementation of an ongoing 12-week, intent-to-treat, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with one follow-up visit four weeks post-treatment. Approximately 300 treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent adults will be randomized to NAC or PBO across six study sites in the United States. The primary objective of this 12-week study is to evaluate the efficacy of twice-daily orally-administered NAC (1200 mg) versus matched PBO, added to contingency management, on cannabis abstinence. NAC is among the first medications to demonstrate increased odds of abstinence in a randomized controlled study among cannabis users in any age group. The current study will assess the cannabis cessation efficacy of NAC combined with a behavioral intervention in adults, providing a novel and timely contribution to the evidence base for the treatment of cannabis use disorders. PMID:25179587

  10. Achieving cannabis cessation -- evaluating N-acetylcysteine treatment (ACCENT): design and implementation of a multi-site, randomized controlled study in the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    McClure, Erin A; Sonne, Susan C; Winhusen, Theresa; Carroll, Kathleen M; Ghitza, Udi E; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Matthews, Abigail G; Sharma, Gaurav; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Vandrey, Ryan G; Levin, Frances R; Weiss, Roger D; Lindblad, Robert; Allen, Colleen; Mooney, Larissa J; Haynes, Louise; Brigham, Gregory S; Sparenborg, Steve; Hasson, Albert L; Gray, Kevin M

    2014-11-01

    Despite recent advances in behavioral interventions for cannabis use disorders, effect sizes remain modest, and few individuals achieve long-term abstinence. One strategy to enhance outcomes is the addition of pharmacotherapy to complement behavioral treatment, but to date no efficacious medications targeting cannabis use disorders in adults through large, randomized controlled trials have been identified. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (NIDA CTN) is currently conducting a study to test the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) versus placebo (PBO), added to contingency management, for cannabis cessation in adults (ages 18-50). This study was designed to replicate positive findings from a study in cannabis-dependent adolescents that found greater odds of abstinence with NAC compared to PBO. This paper describes the design and implementation of an ongoing 12-week, intent-to-treat, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with one follow-up visit four weeks post-treatment. Approximately 300 treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent adults will be randomized to NAC or PBO across six study sites in the United States. The primary objective of this 12-week study is to evaluate the efficacy of twice-daily orally-administered NAC (1200 mg) versus matched PBO, added to contingency management, on cannabis abstinence. NAC is among the first medications to demonstrate increased odds of abstinence in a randomized controlled study among cannabis users in any age group. The current study will assess the cannabis cessation efficacy of NAC combined with a behavioral intervention in adults, providing a novel and timely contribution to the evidence base for the treatment of cannabis use disorders. PMID:25179587

  11. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Video Gallery

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  12. Institutionally based videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Robert Lee; Sager, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of psychiatric care via video-teleconferencing (VTC) technology is thought to have reached a tipping point. As a medical speciality with relatively few material or technical requirements for service delivery, psychiatry has been one of the earliest to embrace the possibility of providing evaluations and treatment at a distance. Such technical infrastructure as is necessary can often be found in the institutions already in existence. It was natural therefore that institutionally based telepsychiatry would lay the foundation for the development of the field. In this article we review the history and development of institutional VTC in a wide variety of clinically supervised settings such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, and forensic settings. We cite evidence supporting institutionally sponsored use and expand on key takeaways for the development and expansion of videoconferencing in these settings. We also speculate on the future direction and development of psychiatric care provided by these arrangements. PMID:26507786

  13. National Institute on Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join Our Mailing List Email The Leader in Aging Research NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and ... broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of ...

  14. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  15. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  16. Institute for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, G.

    1974-01-01

    The functions of the Institute for Science Education (IPN) at Kiel, West Germany, are described. The main activities of the IPN focus on development of curricula for science education and investigation of special problems arising in science teaching. (PEB)

  17. Breaking down institutional barriers: Undergraduate institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper assesses the knowledge base on the undergraduate years, and the critical transition to graduate school or the workplace. The paper addresses the overarching issues associated with the institutional climate of undergraduate colleges and the transition on to the next step. What are the particular dynamics of retaining students in SM&E? How do these differ for various ethnic groups and by discipline? What has been the impact on minority students of curriculum reform and attempts to improve the quality of undergraduate instruction in the sciences and mathematics (especially among the gatekeeper courses)? Do present curriculum reforms and teaching practices reflect what is known about different learning styles of students from different ethnic backgrounds? What do we know about the attitudes and practices of college faculty in mentoring minority students in science and math courses? Has mentoring been a factor for change in campus climate? What do we know about higher education interventions, and why have these programs been more successful in engineering than in science? Can interventions change negative campus climates, or become a precipitating factor institutional change?

  18. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  19. National Cancer Institute Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rosemary S.L. . E-mail: rw26f@nih.gov; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2006-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Perspectives this year presented information on the systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) research projects: (1) being investigated at the NCI's Intramural Center for Cancer Research; (2) funded by NCI's Radiation Research Program and other extramural programs; and (3) the appropriate National Institutes of Health/NCI funding mechanisms applicable to researchers for obtaining funds for STaRT projects.

  20. 31 CFR 540.319 - U.S. financial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 540.319... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.319 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity (including its foreign branches) that is engaged in the business...

  1. 76 FR 19105 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Prevention, Control and...

  2. Information Security Issues in Higher Education and Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Information security threats to educational institutions and their data assets have worsened significantly over the past few years. The rich data stores of institutional research are especially vulnerable, and threats from security breaches represent no small risk. New genres of threat require new kinds of controls if the institution is to prevent…

  3. News Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

  4. Institutional Policy and Its Abuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. G.; Riggs, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the role of institutional policy, cites frequent abuses of institutional policy, and delineates several principles of policy management (development, communication, execution and evaluation). (Author/PG)

  5. Honors and Institutional Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransdell, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Honors colleges and programs often evolve in response to a mandate from boards of regents or trustees. Such mandates can lead to new or accelerated change within the institution, change that in many cases is linked to and represented by honors. Such has been the case at Western Kentucky University (WKU), where the honors program has played a key…

  6. An Institute for Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Janet; Weis, R. Stephen

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses professional development that offers practical tips for elementary teachers to implement in their classrooms right away. The programs at the Institute of Math, Science, and Technology Education at Texas Christian University at Fort Worth, Texas, offer a professional development model. In this successful collaborative, formed…

  7. Instituting the Greater Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Teachers, higher education administrators and financial planners are well acquainted with the work of TIAA-CREF. The insurance and investment company has been a central player in teacher retirement and financial planning for nearly a century. Twelve years ago, the organization spawned the TIAA-CREF Institute, a research-focused arm that brings…

  8. Managing Institutional Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchiori, Gerlinda S.

    1990-01-01

    A managerial process for enhancing the image and public reputation of a higher education institution is outlined. It consists of five stages: market research; data analysis and market positioning; communication of results and recommendations to the administration; development of a global image program; and impact evaluation. (MSE)

  9. Confronting Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keleher, Terry; Johnson, Tammy

    2001-01-01

    The best way to measure institutional racism is to examine effects (statistical outcomes), not intentions. Administrators can actively address racial inequality, collect realistic data, combine equity and quality considerations in all policies, support accountability while resisting high-stakes tests, involve the whole community, and avoid silver…

  10. Institute Born of Gratitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Vin

    1980-01-01

    The Wang Institute of Graduate Studies plans to offer a master's degree in software engineering. The development of an academic program to produce superior, technically qualified managers for the computer industry's software production is discussed. (Journal availability: Datamation, 666 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10103.) (MLW)

  11. A Contested Institutional Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    The College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, Virginia) found itself at a crossroads in 2005. Their long-popular president Timothy J. Sullivan was retiring after 13 years at the helm of the world's second oldest institution of higher education (Petkofsky, 2004). Long known as a bastion of conservatism, William and Mary could now change their…

  12. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE (SEI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is a federally funded research and development center established in 1984 by the U.S. Department of Defense and operated by Carnegie Mellon University. SEI has a broad charter to provide leadership in the practice of software engineering t...

  13. Institutional Effectiveness Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Lynn S.; And Others

    Prepared for discussion at a retreat of the board of trustees of Florida Community College at Jacksonville (FCCJ), this packet of materials identifies 31 indicators of institutional performance and assesses FCCJ in terms of those indicators for which data were available. First, the packet presents a flow chart which illustrates the model used by…

  14. Implementing Sustainable Institutional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Joseph; Johnson, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has found that few institutions of higher education implemented the necessary strategies to make their campuses sustainable (Thompson and Green 2005). Ironically, universities are the segment of society with the most access to the intellectual capital needed to provide sound sustainable practices and measurements. Having top…

  15. Taylor Business Institute, Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Jerry

    The Office of the State Comptroller in New York audited the records and procedures used in administering the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) at Taylor Business Institute (Taylor) for the academic years 1995-96 through 1997-98. Taylor, located in Manhattan, offers both degree programs and diploma programs in Accounting, Business Management,…

  16. Planning for Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Frank W., Comp.; Garthwaite, Elloyse M., Comp.

    Drawing from the experiences of Delgado Community College (DCC) in Louisiana, this manual offers guidance on choosing and implementing an institutional planning system. Section 1 offers introductory comments on planning, educators' reluctance to embrace the management systems of the private sector, and the growing recognition of the importance of…

  17. Institutional Research Bulletin, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The "Institutional Research Bulletin" is a collection of research summaries relating to Kapi'olani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. Highlights from the 1993 volume (September-December) include: (1) the number of students in art classes and programs increased from 1988-1992; (2) the results of a survey about how health students find out about KCC…

  18. Personnel Management Institutes 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Stanley B., Jr.

    This report is a compilation of presentations made at the Personnel Management Institutes held by the New York State School Boards Association in the fall of 1974. Included are the following six presentations: "New Laws Affecting School Boards and School Administration," by Bernard T. McGivern; "How to Prepare for Tenure Hearings, PERB Hearings,…

  19. Leadership in Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunko, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Many questions concerning quality of functioning and effectiveness are connected with the management of education as a professional field in educational organizations. The role of educational leadership in an educational organization raises many questions related to legislative regulations of activities, issues of institutional placement,…

  20. Defense Language Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    Discussed in this Defense Language Institute (DLI) brochure are its intensive language programs' history, and its four schools, which are located in Monterey, California, Washington, D.C., Lackland Air Force Base, and Fort Bliss, Texas. Proficiency levels determined by the DLI and utilization of the audiolingual method are also described.…

  1. One Institution: Six Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Winthrop R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    This expanded issue of the Research Review examines six alternatives to current patterns in the community college. In the first article, the authors offer guidelines for formulating institution-building capabilities, developing curricula, and designing a Personal Development program according to a Life Skills Education model. The second paper…

  2. Asian Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, London (England).

    The Asian Institute of Technology is a notable success for that part of the world where success is not too common. It is an excellent example of not only the initiative and organization of a technical university, but also of the success of a foreign aid program. This report gives details of this organization and accomplishments. (Author)

  3. Summer Youth Forestry Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Gabrielle E.; Neuffer, Tamara; Zobrist, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Youth Forestry Institute (SYFI) was developed to inspire youth through experiential learning opportunities and early work experience in the field of natural resources. Declining enrollments in forestry and other natural resource careers has made it necessary to actively engage youth and provide them with exposure to careers in these…

  4. The branding of institutions.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, S

    1991-02-20

    Institutional operations capitalizing on national foodservice brands have seen sales increase as much as 40%, operators say. But what if operators choose to stay independent and develop their own brands? Our feature presents both business strategies and the concepts that are winning customers. PMID:10109711

  5. Institutions, incentives and the future of fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Ray; Orensanz, J. M. (Lobo); Parma, Ana M.

    2005-01-01

    Fisheries around the world are managed with a broad range of institutional structures. Some of these have been quite disastrous, whereas others have proven both biologically and economically successful. Unsuccessful systems have generally involved either open access, attempts at top-down control with poor ability to monitor and implement regulations, or reliance on consensus. Successful systems range from local cooperatives to strong governmental control, to various forms of property rights, but usually involve institutional systems that provide incentives to individual operators that lead to behaviour consistent with conservation. PMID:15744918

  6. Oprelvekin. Genetics Institute.

    PubMed

    Sitaraman, S V; Gewirtz, A T

    2001-10-01

    Genetics Institute has developed and launched oprelvekin (rhIL-11; Neumega), a recombinant form of human IL-11. In November 1997, the FDA cleared oprelvekin for the prevention of severe thrombocytopenia and the reduction of the need for platelet transfusions following myelosuppressive chemotherapy in susceptible patients with non-myeloid malignancies 12703021. The product was launched at the end of 1997 [312556]. By December 1999, phase III trials for Crohn's disease (CD) were underway [363007]. Genetics Institute had commenced a 150-patient phase II trial for mild-to-moderate CD and mucositis and the company planned to file regulatory procedures for the indication of CD in 1999 [271210]. An oral formulation for this indication has been developed. Oprelvekin is also undergoing phase I clinical trials for colitis [396157], phase II clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis [413835] and clinical trials for psoriasis [299644]. In March 1997, Wyeth-Ayerst became the licensee for Europe, Africa, Latin America and Asia (with the exception of Japan). Genetics Institute holds marketing rights for North America [239273]. In Japan, oprelvekin is being developed by Genetics Institute and Yamanouchi; phase III trials have commenced [295049] and were ongoing in May 2001 [411763]. In April 1996, analysts at Yamaichi estimated launch in 2001 and maximum annual sales of over yen 10 billion [215896]. In January 1998, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter predicted Yamanouchi's share of sales to be yen 1 billion in 2001, rising to yen 2 billion in 2002 [315458]. Sales of oprelvekin were US $34 million for Genetics institute in fiscal 2000 while, in July 2001, Credit Suisse First Boston estimated that this figure will be US $30 million and US $34 million in 2001 and 2002, respectively [416883]. PMID:11890354

  7. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This report outlines the National Space Biomedical Research Institute's (NSBRI) activities during FY 2004, the Institute's seventh year. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  8. Are Schools and Colleges Institutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This paper asks whether schools and colleges should be regarded as institutions as well as organizations, and if so what are the implications. Different conceptions of "institution" are examined including an attempt to distinguish "institution" from "organization". It is suggested that institutions are committed to a…

  9. The Functions of Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saupe, Joe L.

    The nature and purpose of institutional research (IR), forms of research, and the function of IR in the organizational structures of colleges and universities are examined. Institutional research is defined as research conducted within a higher education institution to provide information that supports institutional planning, policy formulation,…

  10. [Symbolizm of medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Dworzański, Wojciech; Dworzańska, Anna; Niezabitowska, Ewa; Stolarek, Małgorzata; Opielak, Grzegorz; Madej, Barbara; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-01-01

    Marketing in health service has become an indispensable tool for creating and maintaining a positive image of medical institutions which to a great extent determines their success on the market. This process entails not only providing professional, reliable and up-to-date patient care but also establishing good reputation among those who already use it and its potential customers. It should be recognizable also for deliverers, investors, competitors, media and particularly for society and local authorities. The key to success is professionalism of personnel and their identification with the mission of the institution and the direction of changes being implemented there. For a complete success and recognition is essential health care facilities, which affects virtually matched the name and symbol, and communication of people responsible for contact with the media. PMID:22400177

  11. Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering has the objectives of supporting in Canada the following activities: improvement of vehicles, propulsion systems, and transportation-related facilities and services; improvements in the design and operation of maritime engineering works; protection of the environment; enhancement of energy flexibility; advancement of firms engaged in manufacturing and resource extraction; and related programs of other government departments and agencies. In 1990-91 the Institute, which had changed its name that year from the Division of Mechanical Engineering, consolidated its research activities from nine laboratories to six programs. Activities in these six programs are described: Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Coastal Zone Engineering, Cold Regions Engineering, Combustion and Fluids Engineering, Ground Transportation Technology, and Machinery and Engine Technology.

  12. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  13. Higher Education in California: Institutional Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hans; Cook, Kevin; Murphy, Patrick; Weston, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, in-state tuition at both the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) has more than tripled. These tuition increases have led many to believe that spending in the state's public higher education systems is out of control. However, a closer look reveals that institutional expenditures in the…

  14. The Changing Nature of Rural Religious Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Photiadis, John; Simoni, Joseph J.

    The contributions to societal integration of the flexible and diversified religious institution of rural Appalachia in the United States were compared and contrasted with the contributions of the more or less monolithic and state-controlled rural church in Greece. It was found that the process of integration of rural society into the larger social…

  15. Gender in American Public Schools: Thinking Institutionally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansot, Elizabeth; Tyack, David

    1988-01-01

    Examines the institutional history of public schools in the United States in the context of gender, and investigates gender practices and policies in the context of formal education. There was far less gender segregation in classrooms under the control of teachers than in informal groups of children outside adult supervision. (BJV)

  16. INSTITUTION - DYNAMAP V.12.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    GDT Institutions represents point locations within New England for common institution landmark types including hospitals, educational institutions, religious institutions, government centers, and cemeteries

  17. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  18. Institutional Repositories: The Experience of Master's and Baccalaureate Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; St. Jean, Beth; Soo, Young Rieh; Yakel, Elizabeth; Kim, Jihyun

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, MIRACLE Project investigators censused library directors at all U.S. academic institutions about their activities planning, pilot testing, and implementing the institutional repositories on their campuses. Out of 446 respondents, 289 (64.8 percent) were from master's and baccalaureate institutions (M&BIs) where few operational…

  19. Institutional Repositories at Small Institutions in America: Some Current Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nykanen, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The research reported in this article was undertaken to determine the level of implementation of institutional repositories (IRs) at small institutions enrolling fewer than 10,000 students. The study analyzed quantitative and qualitative data from IRs at a number of small institutions with the aim of observing relevant patterns and trends that may…

  20. Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Kemparaju, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study of the institutional repositories (IRs) in use in Indian universities and research institutes. Design/methodology/approach: Repositories in various institutions in India were accessed and described in a standardised way. Findings: The 20 repositories studied covered collections of diverse…

  1. Institutional Churn: Institutional Change in United Kingdom Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article considers how higher education institutions change over time, using the United Kingdom system as an exemplar, and focusing on the 15-year period between 1994/95 and 2009/10. While there are many aspects of institutional change worthy of study, the focus here is on how institutions appear to others. Thus, the article examines the…

  2. International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics, and Institutional Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Terrence L.

    2007-01-01

    Scholars have devoted considerable attention to the informational role of international institutions. However, several questions about the informational aspects of institutional behavior remain underexplored: What determines how audiences respond to institutional decisions? Through what channels does information provision affect foreign policy? To…

  3. [Antipsychotics in geriatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present paper approaches the use of antipsychotics in elder people in general, and particularly in geriatric institutions. During the last few years, prescription of antipsychotics in geriatric institutions increased, especially because of the availability of the atypicals, and their use was extended beyond the indications these drugs had been approved for. In dementia they are suggested for treatment of behavioral symptoms, despite having been approved only for cases of aggressiveness and risk of damage. There is a common tendency of perpetuating antipsychotic medication in elder people, with its consequent collateral effects as well. Few years ago, the increase of both risk of cerebrovascular events and of mortality in dementia patients treated with atypical agents was noticed. This generated controversy regarding their use in those kind of patients. Diverse factors associated to caregivers affect the decision of prescribing an antipsychotic in elder people. Non-pharmacological interventions are the first choice when treating behavioral symptoms; pharmacological interventions must take place with the lowest doses possible, with limited durations. PMID:18273435

  4. Draft Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. The Plan's appendices provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Differentiation of Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazenave, P.; Lapointe, S.

    1983-01-01

    Historical and political influences in the trend toward diversification in French universities are traced. Related issues discussed include institutional versus governmental preferences, institutional functions (curriculum, vocational training, research), and implications for the quality and democratization of higher education. (MSE)

  6. Institutional Research with "Smart Machines."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Thomas R.

    1985-01-01

    Artificial intelligence programing for computers is advancing rapidly. The translation of databases into an institutional research knowledge base is explored, including the heuristic knowledge of institutional research experience. (Author/MLW)

  7. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of

  8. Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Paul E.; And Others

    Since the early 1980's, the primary institutional mission of Mount Hood Community College (MHCC) in Gresham, Oregon, has been identified as student success. Toward that end, the college has instituted an ongoing systematic review of instructional program improvement and implemented institutional strategic planning directly linked to budget…

  9. A Primer on Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muffo, John A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Gerald W., Ed.

    The state-of-the-art in 10 areas of institutional research is considered in this collection of 10 articles. Of concern are: student attrition and retention, academic program evaluation, financial issues and economic impacts of higher education, institutional self-study and regional accreditation, peer studies of institutions, statistical packages…

  10. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 2003, the sixth year of the NSBRI's programs. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  11. Improving Institutional Report Card Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Institutional report cards are increasingly being used by higher educational institutions to present academic outcomes to external audiences of prospective students and parents, as well as program and institutional evaluators. While some prospective students are served by national transparency measures most users mine information from the…

  12. HISTORY OF THE LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILL, ARCHIBALD A.

    THIS HISTORY, CONTAINED IN THE 1964 BULLETIN OF THE INDIANA UNIVERSITY LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE, GIVES AN ACCOUNT OF THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE INSTITUTE FROM ITS FOUNDATION (IN 1928) AND EARLY SESSIONS UNDER THE DIRECTORSHIP OF EDGAR H. STURTEVANT. IT OFFERS A CONDENSED, YEAR-BY-YEAR DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTE'S ACTIVITIES, MAKING NOTE OF…

  13. The Karst Waters Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Karst Waters Institute (KWI) is a U.S. research organization that was formed to combine the skills of academic, governmental, and private sector specialists to solve existing karst water problems and anticipate future problems. KWI has been incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation in West Virginia to provide the human expertise and database needed to assist the nation in the preservation and utilization of its water resources. KWI plans to develop a core of resident and visiting scientists from across the nation and overseas, technicians, support staff, and graduate students. Its mission is to conduct research to improve our understanding of karst phenomena, to develop techniques to prevent environmental problems from occurring in karst areas, to assist in rectifying existing environmental problems, and to provide education and training for professionals and the general public on the risks and benefits of karst areas.

  14. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  15. 16 CFR 802.64 - Acquisitions of voting securities by certain institutional investors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... institutional investors. 802.64 Section 802.64 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS... § 802.64 Acquisitions of voting securities by certain institutional investors. (a) Institutional... only in holding controlling interests in institutional investors; or (14) A nonprofit entity within...

  16. After the Asylum? The New Institutional Landscape.

    PubMed

    Topor, Alain; Andersson, Gunnel; Bülow, Per; Stefansson, Claes-Göran; Denhov, Anne

    2016-08-01

    During the last decades services to people with severe mental health problems have gone through important changes. Terms as de-, trans-, reinstitutionalisation and dehospitalisation has been used. The objective of the study was to collected data about the changes in a welfare society about the new institutional landscape after the mental hospital area. Data about interventions from social welfare agencies, psychiatric care, and prisons were collected from local and national register as well as data about cause of death and socio-economic status for 1355 persons treated with a diagnosis of psychosis in a Stockholm area 2004-2008. Psychiatric in-patient care and prisons are marginalized. Different interventions in open care touched a very large number of persons. Social welfare agencies play an increasing role in this context. The total institutions have been replaced by a network of micro-institutions sometimes offering help but also control. PMID:26319756

  17. Institutional analysis for energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Cole, R.J.

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes principles, techniques, and other information for doing institutional analyses in the area of energy policy. The report was prepared to support DOE's Regional Issues Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program. RIIA identifies environmental, health, safety, socioeconomic, and institutional issues that could accompany hypothetical future scenarios for energy consumption and production on a regional basis. Chapter 1 provides some theoretical grounding in institutional analysis. Chapter 2 provides information on constructing institutional maps of the processes for bringing on line energy technologies and facilities contemplated in RIIA scenarios. Chapter 3 assesses the institutional constraints, opportunities, and impacts that affect whether these technologies and facilities would in fact be developed. Chapters 4 and 5 show how institutional analysis can support use of exercises such as RIIA in planning institutional change and making energy policy choices.

  18. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science

  19. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Recognition for teachers The Institute of Physics has continued its programme of recognition for inspiring teachers with nine Teachers Awards in 2000, one at primary level and eight at secondary. The quality and quantity of nominations for secondary awards was very encouraging, especially those nominations made by students, but the number of nominations for teachers in the primary sector was disappointing. The award winners are: Teacher of Primary Science Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Gill Stafford, Greens Norton Church of England Primary School, Towcester, Northants Teachers of Physics (Secondary) John Allen, All Hallows High School, Penwortham, Preston Tim Gamble, Lings Upper School, Northampton Denise Gault, Dalriada School, Ballymoney, Co Antrim Ian Lovat, Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire David Smith, Highgate School, North London Clive Thomas, Newcastle Emlyn Comprehensive School Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Mark Travis, Cape Cornwall School, St Just, Cornwall If you know a teacher in a local primary school who is doing an exceptional job in motivating youngsters and colleagues in the teaching and learning of science, why not consider nominating them for an award? Further details can be obtained from the Institute's Education Department (Steven Chapman) by post or e-mail (schools.education@iop.org .) Annual Congress More details are now available on the various activities at this event taking place on 27 - 30 March 2000 at the Brighton Conference Centre. Among those organized by the Education Department are general science and technology hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 to 12 and more specific physics activities on Static Electricity for older students: * A series of short talks with hands-on demonstrations of music and musical instruments given by musicians, manufacturers and physicists. * A chance for students in years 9 to 13 to experience music making from the professionals' perspective. Mornings, 28 to 30 March

  20. The California Hazards Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    California's abundant resources are linked with its natural hazards. Earthquakes, landslides, wildfires, floods, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, severe storms, fires, and droughts afflict the state regularly. These events have the potential to become great disasters, like the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906, that overwhelm the capacity of society to respond. At such times, the fabric of civic life is frayed, political leadership is tested, economic losses can dwarf available resources, and full recovery can take decades. A patchwork of Federal, state and local programs are in place to address individual hazards, but California lacks effective coordination to forecast, prevent, prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from, the harmful effects of natural disasters. Moreover, we do not know enough about the frequency, size, time, or locations where they may strike, nor about how the natural environment and man-made structures would respond. As California's population grows and becomes more interdependent, even moderate events have the potential to trigger catastrophes. Natural hazards need not become natural disasters if they are addressed proactively and effectively, rather than reactively. The University of California, with 10 campuses distributed across the state, has world-class faculty and students engaged in research and education in all fields of direct relevance to hazards. For that reason, the UC can become a world leader in anticipating and managing natural hazards in order to prevent loss of life and property and degradation of environmental quality. The University of California, Office of the President, has therefore established a new system-wide Multicampus Research Project, the California Hazards Institute (CHI), as a mechanism to research innovative, effective solutions for California. The CHI will build on the rich intellectual capital and expertise of the Golden State to provide the best available science, knowledge and tools for

  1. The Impact of Federal Policies on Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Arthur T., Ed.

    The papers are: "Making Higher Education Policy at the National Level" (Ralph K. Huitt); "Federal Impact and Higher Education Systems" (G. Homer Durham); "External Control and Institutional Governance" (Allan W. Ostar); "Federal Regulations and Institutional Autonomy" (Louis W. Bender); "Making Federalism Work" (Warren G. Hill); "Advice for Policy…

  2. Familial and Institutional Factors: Job Satisfaction for Female Counselor Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander-Albritton, Carrie; Hill, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Job satisfaction based on familial and institutional factors was explored for 157 female counselor educators. Results indicate that female associate professors had lower levels of intrinsic rewards domain after controlling for institutional type. Parental responsibility and partnership status were equivocal, with significant interaction effects…

  3. Integrative Bioengineering Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Eddington, David; Magin,L,Richard; Hetling, John; Cho, Michael

    2009-01-09

    Microfabrication enables many exciting experimental possibilities for medicine and biology that are not attainable through traditional methods. However, in order for microfabricated devices to have an impact they must not only provide a robust solution to a current unmet need, but also be simple enough to seamlessly integrate into standard protocols. Broad dissemination of bioMEMS has been stymied by the common aim of replacing established and well accepted protocols with equally or more complex devices, methods, or materials. The marriage of a complex, difficult to fabricate bioMEMS device with a highly variable biological system is rarely successful. Instead, the design philosophy of my lab aims to leverage a beneficial microscale phenomena (e.g. fast diffusion at the microscale) within a bioMEMS device and adapt to established methods (e.g. multiwell plate cell culture) and demonstrate a new paradigm for the field (adapt instead of replace). In order for the field of bioMEMS to mature beyond novel proof-of-concept demonstrations, researchers must focus on developing systems leveraging these phenomena and integrating into standard labs, which have largely been ignored. Towards this aim, the Integrative Bioengineering Institute has been established.

  4. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of

  5. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Recognition for teachers The Institute of Physics has continued its programme of recognition for inspiring teachers with nine Teachers Awards in 2000, one at primary level and eight at secondary. The quality and quantity of nominations for secondary awards was very encouraging, especially those nominations made by students, but the number of nominations for teachers in the primary sector was disappointing. The award winners are: Teacher of Primary Science Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Gill Stafford, Greens Norton Church of England Primary School, Towcester, Northants Teachers of Physics (Secondary) John Allen, All Hallows High School, Penwortham, Preston Tim Gamble, Lings Upper School, Northampton Denise Gault, Dalriada School, Ballymoney, Co Antrim Ian Lovat, Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire David Smith, Highgate School, North London Clive Thomas, Newcastle Emlyn Comprehensive School Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Mark Travis, Cape Cornwall School, St Just, Cornwall If you know a teacher in a local primary school who is doing an exceptional job in motivating youngsters and colleagues in the teaching and learning of science, why not consider nominating them for an award? Further details can be obtained from the Institute's Education Department (Steven Chapman) by post or e-mail (schools.education@iop.org .) Annual Congress More details are now available on the various activities at this event taking place on 27 - 30 March 2000 at the Brighton Conference Centre. Among those organized by the Education Department are general science and technology hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 to 12 and more specific physics activities on Static Electricity for older students: * A series of short talks with hands-on demonstrations of music and musical instruments given by musicians, manufacturers and physicists. * A chance for students in years 9 to 13 to experience music making from the professionals' perspective. Mornings, 28 to 30 March

  6. Institutional aspects of lake management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Stephen M.; Rumery, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The major barriers to successful lake management are institutional. However, in contrast to the technical and limnological dimensions of lake management, the institutional aspects of managing lakes have received little attention. The institutional factors that are important for successful lake management outcomes are: overlapping areal jurisdiction among governmental units, fragmented functional program responsibilities, ineffective coordination, limited authority, financial constraints, private sector roles, and inadequate public awareness and consensus. The range of typical institutional problems confronting lake management are well illustrated through experiences from the state of Wisconsin, USA. Because lake management programs with institutional shortcomings rarely realize their goals, it is critical to assimilate, evaluate, and apply our experience to date with the institutional arrangements necessary to effectively manage lake resources.

  7. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  8. Institutional Fact Book: Catalyst for an Integrated Institutional Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glynton

    1983-01-01

    Broad understanding of an institution is fundamental to strategic planning, and information and communication are integral parts of this understanding. An institutional fact book used at Georgia State University is discussed both as a basic information system and as a practical communication vehicle. (MLW)

  9. 78 FR 64504 - Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOHSS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Institute) Cancellation:...

  10. PREFACE: Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George; Greene, Laura; Johnson, Peter

    2011-12-01

    In honor of this year's 100th anniversary of the discovery of superconductivity, this special issue of Reports on Progress in Physics is a dedicated issue to the 'iron-based superconductors'—a new class of high-temperature superconductors that were discovered in 2008. This is the first time the journal has generated a 'theme issue', and we provide this to the community to provide a 'snapshot' of the present status, both for researchers working in this fast-paced field, and for the general physics community. Reports on Progress in Physics publishes three classes of articles—comprehensive full Review Articles, Key Issues Reviews and, most recently, Reports on Progress articles that recount the current status of a rapidly evolving field, befitting of the articles in this special issue. It has been an exciting year for superconductivity—there have been numerous celebrations for this centenary recounting the fascinating history of this field, from seven Nobel prizes to life-saving discoveries that brought us medically useful magnetic resonance imaging. The discovery of a completely new class of high-temperature superconductors, whose mechanism remains as elusive as the cuprates discovered in 1986, has injected a new vitality into this field, and this year those new to the field were provided with the opportunity of interacting with those who have enjoyed a long history in superconductivity. Furthermore, as high-density current carriers with little or no power loss, high-temperature superconductors offer unique solutions to fundamental grid challenges of the 21st century and hold great promise in addressing our global energy challenges. The complexity and promise of these materials has caused our community to more freely share our ideas and results than ever before, and it is gratifying to see how we have grown into an enthusiastic global network to advance the field. This invited collection is true to this agenda and we are delighted to have received contributions from many of the world leaders for an initiative that is designed to benefit both newcomers and established researchers in superconductivity.

  11. Institutional Advertising in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Bart

    2000-01-01

    An exploratory study surveyed 59 colleges and universities concerning their advertising practices, specifically media usage, importance of communication objectives for institutional messages, and the importance of audiences targeted for advertising. All major media were used by most of the institutions. Communication objectives mentioned most…

  12. Distributed Learning and Institutional Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Brian L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the following challenges institutions must consider as they enter the new marketplace of distributed learning: library access, faculty workload, faculty incentives, faculty-support structures, intellectual property, articulation agreements, financial aid, pricing, cross-subsidization of programs, institutional loyalty and philanthropy,…

  13. The Institutional Relations Review, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institutional Relations Review, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education's (ACPE) Institutional Relations Review seeks to provide the postsecondary schools in Alaska with information that pertains to the daily involvement with the Alaska Student Loan (ASL) Programs, Institutional Authorization, Compliance Audit functions and other related subjects. Four issues were…

  14. Institutional Vision and Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelman, Robert; Molina, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    Quality academic advising in higher education is the product of a multitude of elements not the least of which is institutional vision. By recognizing and embracing an institution's concept of its capabilities and the kinds of educated human beings it is attempting to cultivate, advisors gain an invaluable apparatus to guide the provision of…

  15. The Institutional Relations Review, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institutional Relations Review, 1998

    1998-01-01

    The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education's (ACPE) Institutional Relations Review seeks to provide the postsecondary schools in Alaska with information that pertains to the daily involvement with the Alaska Student Loan Programs (ASLP), Institutional Authorization, Compliance Audit functions and other related subjects. Four issues were…

  16. Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations" described in this article are provided to colleges and universities to facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive institutional prematriculation immunization policy. In response to changing epidemiology and the introduction of new vaccines, the American College Health…

  17. Managing Enrollments for Institutional Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don

    1985-01-01

    The concept of enrollment management is gaining acceptance as a means of ensuring institutional vitality. Those responsible for enrollment management must have direct responsibility for: student marketing and recruitment, pricing and financial aid, academic and career advising, academic assistance programs, institutional research, orientation,…

  18. Journalism and Institutional Review Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Leon

    2007-01-01

    The author opposes any Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) overseeing the work of journalism professors and journalism students in any academic institution. He argues that the tendency for IRBs to require anonymity for persons interviewed immediately reduces the credibility of any journalistic story. The composition of an IRB is questioned on…

  19. Assessing and Improving Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    Information to promote assessment of organizational effectiveness in colleges and universities is presented, along with an exercise to rank the effectiveness of 10 institutions. The exercise uses three types of criteria to indicate effectiveness: subjective ratings, data about students and activities, and institutional capacity and financial…

  20. Lotka's Law and Institutional Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Praveen; Garg, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of Lotka's Law, negative binomial distribution, and lognormal distribution for institutional productivity in the same way as it is to authors and their productivity. Results indicate that none of the distributions are applicable for institutional productivity in engineering sciences. (Author/LRW)

  1. Protocological Rhetoric: Intervening in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nathan R.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes protocological rhetoric as a conceptual tool for exploring and changing institutions. Protocological rhetoric is an extension of two lines of thought: Porter, Sullivan, Blythe, Grabill, and Miles's institutional critique and Science & Technology Studies's (STS) concept of information infrastructure. As a result,…

  2. Managing the Public Service Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1976-01-01

    Important factors in managing a public service institution include knowing the publics served, phasing out an old program when introducing a new one, defining the roles of administrators and professionals, integrating individuals and the institution, and making the public aware of the value of the service performed. (PF)

  3. Institutional Research and Management Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    In the midst of insistent demands for accountability, self-analysis by all educational institutions has become an urgent necessity. Long-range, comprehensive planning is an essential prerequisite for coping effectively with the rapid changes taking place in education, and institutional research is an essential element in such planning. For an…

  4. Personal and Institutional Data of Institutional Research Activities and Products at Predominantly Black Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, B. Vivian

    Recent trends indicate the increasing concern regarding the broad issue of accountability at institutions of higher education. Because of this, colleges and universities are being forced more and more to base their decisions on hard fact instead of intuition. The institutional research function is instrumental in assisting in this kind of data…

  5. Performance Assessment Institute-NV

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Joesph

    2012-12-31

    The National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment’s intention is to purchase a multi-purpose computer cluster in support of the Performance Assessment Institute (PA Institute). The PA Institute will serve as a research consortium located in Las Vegas Nevada with membership that includes: national laboratories, universities, industry partners, and domestic and international governments. This center will provide a one-of-a-kind centralized facility for the accumulation of information for use by Institutions of Higher Learning, the U.S. Government, and Regulatory Agencies and approved users. This initiative will enhance and extend High Performance Computing (HPC) resources in Nevada to support critical national and international needs in "scientific confirmation". The PA Institute will be promoted as the leading Modeling, Learning and Research Center worldwide. The program proposes to utilize the existing supercomputing capabilities and alliances of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as a base, and to extend these resource and capabilities through a collaborative relationship with its membership. The PA Institute will provide an academic setting for interactive sharing, learning, mentoring and monitoring of multi-disciplinary performance assessment and performance confirmation information. The role of the PA Institute is to facilitate research, knowledge-increase, and knowledge-sharing among users.

  6. Institutional plan -- Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US nuclear electric utility industry established the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in 1979 to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability -- to promote excellence -- in the operation of its nuclear plants. After its formation, the Institute grew from a handful of on-loan personnel in late 1979 to an established work force of more than 400 permanent and on-loan personnel. INPO`s early years were marked by growth and evolution of its programs and organization. The Institute now focuses primarily on the effectiveness and enhancement of established programs and activities. For INPO to carry out its role, it must have the support of its members and participants and a cooperative but independent relationship with the NRC. A basis for that support and cooperation is an understanding of INPO`s role. This Institutional Plan is intended to provide that understanding by defining the Institute`s role and its major programs. This plan considers the existing and projected needs of the industry and the overall environment in which INPO and its members and participants operate.

  7. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  8. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In June 1996, NASA released a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) inviting proposals to establish a National Space Biomedical Research Institute (9-CAN-96-01). This CAN stated that: The Mission of the Institute will be to lead a National effort for accomplishing the integrated, critical path, biomedical research necessary to support the long term human presence, development, and exploration of space and to enhance life on Earth by applying the resultant advances in human knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space. The Institute will be the focal point of NASA sponsored space biomedical research. This statement has not been amended by NASA and remains the mission of the NSBRI.

  9. The Institutional Tour: Some Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeUnes, Arnold

    1984-01-01

    A rationale for using field trips to correctional institutions in an abnormal psychology class is presented. Also discussed are reasons why, over the years, student interest in these field trips has declined. (RM)

  10. The Genesis of the Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansford, R. F.

    The Institute of Navigation was born on 12 March 1947 in the Boardroom of Lloyds Register of Shipping. More will be said of this later, but the birth is well documented and defined.It will surprise no one that the conception is much less easily defined, but it is certainly no less significant a part of the genesis of the Institute. This article is an attempt to outline the early history of the Institute.During 1944 and 1945 an Institute of Navigation was formed in the United States and, in May 1945, it held its first Annual General Meeting with Professor Sam Herrick as its Executive Secretary. Its meetings were attended by the Navigation Specialist on the British Air Commission in Washington (Squadron Leader D. O. Fraser) and duly reported back, through the Commission, to the Air Ministry in the United Kingdom.

  11. American Institute of Biological Sciences

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | Newsroom | Contact Us The American Institute of Biological Sciences is the national scientific organization that promotes ... of science to inform decision-making that advances biology for the benefit of science and society. We ...

  12. Science and the Institutional Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, H. Curtis

    1982-01-01

    Difficulties associated with applying the scientific method to disciplines which deal with man and the societies he creates are discussed. Implications for institutional professions such as librarianship are mentioned. (PP)

  13. Theory institute appoints new head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2008-06-01

    The cosmologist Neil Turok has been appointed as the next executive director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. Turok, who is currently chair of mathematical physics at the University of Cambridge in the UK, will take over the reins in October. The 50- year-old cosmologist described the move as the "opportunity of a lifetime" and says he plans to make the institute "the leading centre in the world for theoretical physics".

  14. Controls Over Foreign Students in U.S. Postsecondary Institutions Are Still Ineffective; Proposed Legislation and Regulations May Correct Problems. Report to the Chairman, Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The recruitment of foreign college students and the controls over foreign students in the United States were reviewed. The General Accounting Office interviewed officials and studied the files of the Department of Education (ED), the Department of State, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). In addition, information was obtained…

  15. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  16. Using ADS for Creating Bibliographies of Research Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egret, D.; Laurenceau, A.; Accomazzi, A.

    2015-04-01

    Institutions often have a need for maintaining "institutional bibliographies," a list of all papers published by individuals affiliated with the institution. Using the Observatoire de Paris (France) as an example, we show how this can be done, using the services of the ADS and other bibliographic databases. In this specific case, we are able to quantify the success rate in creating the extensive list of the scientific output of the institution by each source database. Our analysis helps identify the current limitations and ambiguities in the contents and format of the affiliation/address field, as produced by the authors and modified by journal editors and database managers. We advocate for the development of an authoritative list of astronomical institutions that can be used by the ADS and publishers as a controlled field in order to significantly improve the efficiency of affiliation queries.

  17. Commercial Pesticides Applicator Manual: Industrial, Institutional, Structural and Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzwater, William D.; Renes, Robert

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the industrial, institutional, structural and health related pest control category. The text discusses the use and safety of applying pesticides to control invertebrate and vertebrate pests such as ants,…

  18. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  19. Controlling chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, E.; Spano, M.

    1996-06-01

    The orbital complexity and exponential sensitivity of chaotic systems has the consequence that such systems offer the possibility of being feedback controlled by use of only small perturbations. The potential consequences of this recent realization are being investigated in a broad range of applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. The Appeal of For-Profit Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Vital, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics that students like in for-profit postsecondary institutions are present in many more traditional institutions as well. Yet most students who attend for-profit institutions are not convinced that they can fit into traditional institutions. In this article, the author examines the reasons why for-profit institutions appeal more…