Science.gov

Sample records for 100-year time horizon

  1. Opening the 100-Year Window for Time-Domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan; Tang, Sumin; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    The large-scale surveys such as PTF, CRTS and Pan-STARRS-1 that have emerged within the past 5 years or so employ digital databases and modern analysis tools to accentuate research into Time Domain Astronomy (TDA). Preparations are underway for LSST which, in another 6 years, will usher in the second decade of modern TDA. By that time the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project will have made available to the community the full sky Historical TDA database and digitized images for a century (1890-1990) of coverage. We describe the current DASCH development and some initial results, and outline plans for the ``production scanning'' phase and data distribution which is to begin in 2012. That will open a 100-year window into temporal astrophysics, revealing rare transients and (especially) astrophysical phenomena that vary on time-scales of a decade. It will also provide context and archival comparisons for the deeper modern surveys.

  2. 100 years of relativity. Space-time structure: Einstein and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2005-11-01

    Thanks to Einstein's relativity theories, our notions of space and time underwent profound revisions about a 100 years ago. The resulting interplay between geometry and physics has dominated all of fundamental physics since then. This volume contains contributions from leading researchers, worldwide, who have thought deeply about the nature and consequences of this interplay. The articles take a long-range view of the subject and distill the most important advances in broad terms, making them easily accessible to non-specialists. The first part is devoted to a summary of how relativity theories were born (J. Stachel). The second part discusses the most dramatic ramifications of general relativity, such as black holes (P. Chrusciel and R. Price), space-time singularities (H. Nicolai and A. Rendall), gravitational waves (P. Laguna and P. Saulson), the large scale structure of the cosmos (T. Padmanabhan); experimental status of this theory (C. Will) as well as its practical application to the GPS system (N. Ashby). The last part looks beyond Einstein and provides glimpses into what is in store for us in the 21st century. Contributions here include summaries of radical changes in the notions of space and time that are emerging from quantum field theory in curved space-times (Ford), string theory (T. Banks), loop quantum gravity (A. Ashtekar), quantum cosmology (M. Bojowald), discrete approaches (Dowker, Gambini and Pullin) and twistor theory (R Penrose).

  3. [100 years of ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Nover, A

    1982-12-16

    100 years ago ophthalmology was already an own special sector of medicine. In 1850, when Hermann von Helmholtz invented the ophthalmoscope, the beginning of modern ophthalmology was established. The "Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft" was founded in 1863. From thereon major advances in all divisions of ophthalmology were achieved. Some outstanding personalities and highlights are mentioned.

  4. Tuskegee: 100 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Renelda

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history and accomplishments of Tuskegee Institute over the past 100 years. Highlights the role played by Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. DuBois; discusses the career of the school's retiring president, Luther Foster. Provides information on the new president, Dr. Benjamin Payton, and discusses future directions for the college. (APM)

  5. Time Horizon in Students' Predictions of Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manger, Terje; Teigen, Karl Halvor

    1988-01-01

    Eight and two months before their final exam, 252 undergraduates in Norway stated their expectations and hopes for examination grades. Correlations between expected and obtained grades were low. A shift from optimism to pessimism occurred. Results confirm the time horizon's crucial role in the prediction of academic achievement. (TJH)

  6. Grasping time scales from galactic life cycles to personal life projects at a linear scale of 1 mm per 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    The ambition is to make the citizen (i.e. pupil/student/scholar/voter/journalist/politician) comprehend better and more scientifically all time scales from the lifespan of the universe to the personal life project by a consistent geographical mapping of time at a scale of 1 mm per 100 years. The processes which change earth systems like life, climate, topography and plate tectonics operate at very different timescales. The understanding of these systems is essential not only for students and scholars of earth science but also for pupils, voters and politicians who make decisions of possibly significant consequence to climate and biodiversity not only for our generation but for thousands or even millions of years ahead. With a consistent linear mapping of time to a scale of 1 millimetre per 100 years, historical time (

  7. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large

  8. [100 years' of clinical electrocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Mijo

    2003-01-01

    In 1903 Willem Einthoven published in Pflügers Arch his classic article on the investigation of human electrocardiogram by his string galvanometer. Many historians of medicine, Einthoven also marked that publication as the beginning of clinical electrocardiography. Many investigators like Galvani, Manteucci, Kölliker, Müller, Lipmann, Waller, Ader, Einthoven, Lewis, Wilson and others participated in creation and development of electrocardiogram. From that time electrocardiogram quickly became, and has remained the most essential diagnostic laboratory tool in investigation of heart diseases. The aim of this article is to remind us of the beginning of this part of cardiology 100 years ago. PMID:15209030

  9. Wilson's disease, 100 years later….

    PubMed

    Trocello, J-M; Broussolle, E; Girardot-Tinant, N; Pelosse, M; Lachaux, A; Lloyd, C; Woimant, F

    2013-12-01

    Texts published, in 1912, 100 years ago, by Sir K. Wilson on his eponymous disease in Brain, The Lancet and La Revue Neurologique highlight the relevance of his descriptions in the light of the current knowledge. Wilson's invocation of an "unknown toxin" appears today as a prophetic intuition as the presence of excess copper in the liver was mentioned for the first time a year later whereas the role of copper in this disease was not described until 1929. Progress has been made to better understand the physiology of Wilson's disease (WD). The ATP7B gene implicated in WD is located on chromosome 13 and more than 500 mutations and 100 polymorphisms have been to date identified. The phenotypic expression is highly variable, even within a family. This can partly be explained by environmental factors as nutrition. Modulator genes are also involved in the phenotypic expression of the disease. Most of symptoms observed in WD have already been described in detail by Wilson in 1912, but subsequent progress was made over the following 100 years, helping the physician diagnose WD. Hepatic and neurological symptoms are the most frequent expressions of the disease. Other extrahepatic features include renal manifestations, osteoarticular disorders, myocardial abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, realizing a multisystemic disease. The diagnosis of the disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, biological, radiological and genetic data and new tools (Brain MRI, relative exchangeable copper…) allow reducing delay to diagnosis. Therapeutic findings have also changed the disease prognosis. Treatment is based on the use of copper chelators to promote copper excretion from the body (D-penicillamine and Triethylenetetramine) and zinc salts to reduce copper absorption. Tetratiomolybdate appears to be a promising treatment. While significant progress has been made during this century, many physiological aspects of this disease remain unknown and require further research to

  10. Wilson's disease, 100 years later….

    PubMed

    Trocello, J-M; Broussolle, E; Girardot-Tinant, N; Pelosse, M; Lachaux, A; Lloyd, C; Woimant, F

    2013-12-01

    Texts published, in 1912, 100 years ago, by Sir K. Wilson on his eponymous disease in Brain, The Lancet and La Revue Neurologique highlight the relevance of his descriptions in the light of the current knowledge. Wilson's invocation of an "unknown toxin" appears today as a prophetic intuition as the presence of excess copper in the liver was mentioned for the first time a year later whereas the role of copper in this disease was not described until 1929. Progress has been made to better understand the physiology of Wilson's disease (WD). The ATP7B gene implicated in WD is located on chromosome 13 and more than 500 mutations and 100 polymorphisms have been to date identified. The phenotypic expression is highly variable, even within a family. This can partly be explained by environmental factors as nutrition. Modulator genes are also involved in the phenotypic expression of the disease. Most of symptoms observed in WD have already been described in detail by Wilson in 1912, but subsequent progress was made over the following 100 years, helping the physician diagnose WD. Hepatic and neurological symptoms are the most frequent expressions of the disease. Other extrahepatic features include renal manifestations, osteoarticular disorders, myocardial abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, realizing a multisystemic disease. The diagnosis of the disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, biological, radiological and genetic data and new tools (Brain MRI, relative exchangeable copper…) allow reducing delay to diagnosis. Therapeutic findings have also changed the disease prognosis. Treatment is based on the use of copper chelators to promote copper excretion from the body (D-penicillamine and Triethylenetetramine) and zinc salts to reduce copper absorption. Tetratiomolybdate appears to be a promising treatment. While significant progress has been made during this century, many physiological aspects of this disease remain unknown and require further research to

  11. NETL: The First 100 Years

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory celebrates 100 years of innovative energy technology development. NETL has been a leader in energy technology development. This video takes a look back at the many accomplishments over the past 100 years. These advances benefit the American people, enhance our nation's energy security and protect our natural resources.

  12. Horizons versus singularities in spherically symmetric space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss different kinds of Killing horizons possible in static, spherically symmetric configurations and recently classified as 'usual', 'naked', and 'truly naked' ones depending on the near-horizon behavior of transverse tidal forces acting on an extended body. We obtain the necessary conditions for the metric to be extensible beyond a horizon in terms of an arbitrary radial coordinate and show that all truly naked horizons, as well as many of those previously characterized as naked and even usual ones, do not admit an extension and therefore must be considered as singularities. Some examples are given, showing which kinds of matter are able to create specific space-times with different kinds of horizons, including truly naked ones. Among them are fluids with negative pressure and scalar fields with a particular behavior of the potential. We also discuss horizons and singularities in Kantowski-Sachs spherically symmetric cosmologies and present horizon regularity conditions in terms of an arbitrary time coordinate and proper (synchronous) time. It turns out that horizons of orders 2 and higher occur in infinite proper times in the past or future, but one-way communication with regions beyond such horizons is still possible.

  13. The WSMR Timing System: Toward New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William A.; Stimets, Bob

    1996-01-01

    In 1991, White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) initiated a modernization program for its range timing system. The main focus of this modernization program was to develop a system that was highly accurate, easy to maintain, and portable. The logical decision at the time was to develop a system based solely on Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. Since that time, wsmr has changed its philosophy on how GPS would be utilized for the timing system. This paper will describe WSMR's initial modernization plans for its range timing system and how certain events have led to a modification of these plans.

  14. 100 years of Philips Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delft, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    On Thursday 23 October 1913, a Dutch newspaper published the following advertisement: Hiring: A capable young scientist with a doctorate in physics. Must be a good experimenter. Letters containing information on age, life history and references may be submitted to Philips in Eindhoven. Two days later, a candidate applied: Gilles Holst. At that time, Holst was working in Leiden as an assistant to Heike Kamerlingh Onnes, a recent Nobel Prize winner.

  15. [The cell 100 years ago].

    PubMed

    Vogt, H H

    1975-04-18

    Eduard Strasburgers monograph "On Cell Formation and Cell Division" appeared in Jena in 1875. At that time the existence of the cell nucleus was established, but the scientists were still discussing a possibility of free formation of cells as suggested by Schwann and Schleiden. Nuclear structure and the processes of mitosis were still uninvestigated. The original observations which are reproduced show the first tentative efforts at a generalised description. Comparison with the opinions of Haeckel and Flemming show the uncertainty of cytology in that early phase, because the lack of microscopic technique did not yet permit of any detailed evidence. PMID:805932

  16. Time machines with the compactly determined Cauchy horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, S.

    2014-07-01

    The building of a time machine, if possible at all, requires the relevant regions of spacetime to be compact (that is, physically speaking, free from sources of unpredictability such as infinities and singularities). Motivated by this argument we consider the spacetimes with the compactly determined Cauchy horizons (CDCHs), the defining property of which is the compactness of J-(U) ¯∩J+(S0), where U is an open subset of the Cauchy horizon and S0 is a Cauchy surface of the initial globally hyperbolic region Min. The following two facts are established: (1) Min has no globally hyperbolic maximal extension. This means that, by shaping appropriately a precompact portion of a globally hyperbolic region, one can force the Universe to produce either a closed causal curve, or a quasiregular singularity, whichever it abhors less. (2) Before a CDCH is formed a null geodesic appears which infinitely approaches the horizon returning again and again in the same—arbitrarily small—region. The energy of the photon moving on such a geodesic increases with each passage, or at least falls insufficiently fast. As a result, an observer located in the mentioned region would see a bunch of photons passing through his laboratory with the arbitrarily large total energy. We speculate that this phenomenon may have observable consequences.

  17. Generalized Robertson-Walker Space-Time Admitting Evolving Null Horizons Related to a Black Hole Event Horizon

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A new technique is used to study a family of time-dependent null horizons, called “Evolving Null Horizons” (ENHs), of generalized Robertson-Walker (GRW) space-time (M¯,g¯) such that the metric g¯ satisfies a kinematic condition. This work is different from our early papers on the same issue where we used (1 + n)-splitting space-time but only some special subcases of GRW space-time have this formalism. Also, in contrast to previous work, we have proved that each member of ENHs is totally umbilical in (M¯,g¯). Finally, we show that there exists an ENH which is always a null horizon evolving into a black hole event horizon and suggest some open problems. PMID:27722202

  18. 100 Years of the Physics of Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John

    2013-10-01

    The Child-Langmuir Law (CL), discovered 100 years ago, gives the maximum current that can be transported across a planar diode in the steady state. As a quintessential example of the impact of space-charge shielding near a charged surface, it is central to the studies of high current diodes, such as high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics, electron and ion sources, and high current drivers used in high-energy density physics experiments. CL remains a touchstone of fundamental sheath physics, including contemporary studies of nano-scale quantum diodes and plasmonic devices. Its solid state analog is the Mott-Gurney law, governing the maximum charge injection in solids, such as organic materials and other dielectrics, which is important to energy devices, such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. This paper reviews the important advances in the physics of diodes since the discovery of CL, including virtual cathode formation and extension of CL to multiple dimensions, to the quantum regime, and to ultrafast processes. We will review the influence of magnetic fields, multiple species in bipolar flow, electromagnetic and time dependent effects in both short pulse and high frequency THz limits, and single electron regimes. Transitions from various emission mechanisms (thermionic, field, and photo-emission) to the space charge limited state (CL) will be addressed, especially highlighting important simulation and experimental developments in selected contemporary areas of study. This talk will stress the fundamental physical links between the physics of beams to limiting currents in other areas, such as low temperature plasmas, laser plasmas, and space propulsion. Also emphasized is the role of non-equilibrium phenomena associated with materials and plasmas in close contact. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. Convergence: Human Intelligence The Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    How might human intelligence evolve over the next 100 years? This issue paper explores that idea. First, the paper summarizes five emerging perspectives about human intelligence: Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences theory, Robert Sternberg's triarchic theory of intelligence, Ellen Langer's mindfulness theory, David Perkins' learnable…

  20. Receding Horizon Stabilization and Disturbance Attenuation for Neural Networks With Time-Varying Delay.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Choon Ki; Shi, Peng; Wu, Ligang

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problems of receding horizon stabilization and disturbance attenuation for neural networks with time-varying delay. New delay-dependent conditions on the terminal weighting matrices of a new finite horizon cost functional for receding horizon stabilization are established for neural networks with time-varying or time-invariant delays using single- and double-integral Wirtinger-type inequalities. Based on the results, delay-dependent sufficient conditions for the receding horizon disturbance attenuation are given to guarantee the infinite horizon H∞ performance of neural networks with time-varying or time-invariant delays. Three numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. [100 years since the death of Helmholtz].

    PubMed

    Fodor, F; Karin, H

    1995-01-01

    In September 1994, we celebrated 100 years since Hermann von Helmholtz died. Inventor of the ophthalmoscope, professor in physiology since he was 30 (at Königsberg), Helmholtz also contributed to the development of thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, he made studies on muscular contraction, music, theory, accommodation mechanisms. He also revealed that the interpretation of sounds is done at the level of resonators--represented by perilympha and basilar lamellae which enter in vibration accordingly with the respective sound frequency.

  2. Remembering Robert Goddard's vision 100 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” —such are the goals of most of us.Yet a few always exist who feel called by a higher purpose. Society often owes them a great deal.Robert Hutchins Goddard, whose work made spaceflight possible, found his vision 100 years ago this October as a youth of 17. His family was staying on the farm of a relative, when he was asked to trim the branches of a cherry tree behind the barn.

  3. Deepwater Horizon - Estimating surface oil volume distribution in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, B.; Simecek-Beatty, D.; Leifer, I.

    2011-12-01

    Spill responders to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill required both the relative spatial distribution and total oil volume of the surface oil. The former was needed on a daily basis to plan and direct local surface recovery and treatment operations. The latter was needed less frequently to provide information for strategic response planning. Unfortunately, the standard spill observation methods were inadequate for an oil spill this size, and new, experimental, methods, were not ready to meet the operational demands of near real-time results. Traditional surface oil estimation tools for large spills include satellite-based sensors to define the spatial extent (but not thickness) of the oil, complemented with trained observers in small aircraft, sometimes supplemented by active or passive remote sensing equipment, to determine surface percent coverage of the 'thick' part of the slick, where the vast majority of the surface oil exists. These tools were also applied to DWH in the early days of the spill but the shear size of the spill prevented synoptic information of the surface slick through the use small aircraft. Also, satellite images of the spill, while large in number, varied considerably in image quality, requiring skilled interpretation of them to identify oil and eliminate false positives. Qualified staff to perform this task were soon in short supply. However, large spills are often events that overcome organizational inertia to the use of new technology. Two prime examples in DWH were the application of hyper-spectral scans from a high-altitude aircraft and more traditional fixed-wing aircraft using multi-spectral scans processed by use of a neural network to determine, respectively, absolute or relative oil thickness. But, with new technology, come new challenges. The hyper-spectral instrument required special viewing conditions that were not present on a daily basis and analysis infrastructure to process the data that was not available at the command

  4. 100 years of photometry and radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardis, Jonathan E.

    2001-06-01

    Measurement of light is an old subject, though the past 100 years have seen significant advances. 100 years ago, photometry - the art and science of measuring light as it is perceived by people - had the greater technological importance. Even today SI (the metric system) retains a base unit for photometry, the candela. However, early work at NBS included pivotal projects in the field of radiometry - the measurement of the physical characteristics of light. These included the validation of Planck's newly-minted theory of blackbody radiation, determining the radiation constants with good accuracy, and the definitive analysis of the spectral responsivity of human vision, so as to relate photometry to radiometry. This latter work has only increased in importance over the past 75 years as the definition of the candela has changed and improved. Today, NIST makes radiometric, and hence photometric measurements, with unprecedented precision. Cryogenic radiometers based on the principle of electrical substitution measure optical flux with uncertainties of 0.02%. Additional facilities enable measurement of spectral responsivity, spectral radiance, and spectral irradiance. Novel detectors, such as light-traps, allow the best accuracy to be transferred from the primary standards to routinely-used instruments and to calibration customers. Filtered detectors are used to realize photometric scales, radiation temperature scales, and other specialized measurements. Indeed, the story of the metrology of light is the story of continuous improvement, both driven by and enabled by advances in technology. We touch upon some of these as a prelude to the other talks in this Conference.

  5. [100 years physical therapy and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Heipertz, W

    2001-10-01

    Physical medicine and rehabilitation received powerful impulses from orthopaedic surgery, which organizes its pragmatic and scientific interests since 100 years in its own association. A point of breakthrough was reached at the beginning of the 20th century, when progress in surgical and conservative orthopaedics enabled a comprehensive rehabilitation of physically disabled. On the other hand, the professionalisation of care for the handicapped (Krüppelfürsorge) has decisively supported the advancement of orthopaedics. Next to the storming development of orthopaedic surgery step by step the scientific foundations and clear indications for physiotherapy were achieved. The strategy of treatment was adapted to the increasingly active approach to orthopaedic ailments and traumata. This relates as well to wide ranges of rehabilitation and developed the training of specialists. Orthopaedic surgeons were significantly involved in this development as well as the framing of legal regulations safeguarding the entitlement of the disabled.

  6. The Psychoanalytic Review: 100 years of history.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Alan J

    2013-02-01

    This paper is written in celebration of the centenary of The Psychoanalytic Review and aims to bring to life its entire history-100 years of publication. Almost as old as psychoanalysis itself, established by Jelliffe and White as a nonorthodox journal, and guided by all its subsequent editors, the Review has maintained its original mission: to serve as an open venue for all psychoanalytic perspectives, "a free forum for all." But the history of the Review is not without controversy. Freud made no original contributions to the Review. The paper unveils the Review's, rich history by looking briefly into the lives of some of its editors, the circumstances surrounding the creation of the Review (including pertinent correspondence between Freud and Brill and between Freud and Jelliffe), the years (with their engrossing politics) that followed the establishment of the Review until its merger with the journal Psychoanalysis (the official journal of NPAP), and the years that followed the merger to the present, including some of the important events that reshaped psychoanalysis. The role of the Review in promoting and reflecting almost the entire evolution of psychoanalysis is illustrated throughout. PMID:23421656

  7. Nursing--the next 100 years.

    PubMed

    Collins, S M

    1981-05-01

    This paper sets the scene for future patterns of nursing and nursing education and traces the ways in which the nursing profession has reached the present position. It illustrates the development of nursing over the past 100 years, and examines the key influences which have affected, and are likely to continue to affect, nursing, namely: the Government, the Law and the State; wars and disasters; scientific and technological advances; and people. No attempt has been made to predict or to crystal-gaze, yet the emphasis is firmly placed on the need to plan, to think and to recognize the trends that may determine the future of nursing. Research and education are seen as the tools that will enable nurses to adapt their function to the changing needs of society, whilst preserving the essential or central role of caring. The tapestry--the pattern or web of social relationships, that formed the professional nurse in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, and in the first and second World Wars--presents an unfinished canvas. The present generation of nurses are responsible for continuing to develop that tapestry for future decades, within the framework of the changing social scene of the present day.

  8. Correlation based networks of equity returns sampled at different time horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumminello, M.; di Matteo, T.; Aste, T.; Mantegna, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the planar maximally filtered graphs of the portfolio of the 300 most capitalized stocks traded at the New York Stock Exchange during the time period 2001 2003. Topological properties such as the average length of shortest paths, the betweenness and the degree are computed on different planar maximally filtered graphs generated by sampling the returns at different time horizons ranging from 5 min up to one trading day. This analysis confirms that the selected stocks compose a hierarchical system progressively structuring as the sampling time horizon increases. Finally, a cluster formation, associated to economic sectors, is quantitatively investigated.

  9. 75 FR 79961 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon SONSat the FOSC's request. 75 FR 37712. The rule also confirmed that...; 2050-AG63 Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater.... Oil Spill Response Resources Return Time Several comments noted concerns about the return of assets...

  10. An integral equation representation approach for valuing Russian options with a finite time horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Junkee; Han, Heejae; Kim, Hyeonuk; Kang, Myungjoo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we first describe a general solution for the inhomogeneous Black-Scholes partial differential equation with mixed boundary conditions using Mellin transform techniques. Since Russian options with a finite time horizon are usually formulated into the inhomogeneous free-boundary Black-Scholes partial differential equation with a mixed boundary condition, we apply our method to Russian options and derive an integral equation satisfied by Russian options with a finite time horizon. Furthermore, we present some numerical solutions and plots of the integral equation using recursive integration methods and demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of our method compared to other competing approaches.

  11. Self-regulation predicts risk-taking through people's time horizon.

    PubMed

    Panno, Angelo; Pierro, Antonio; Lauriola, Marco

    2014-06-01

    In the context of decision-making research, people's regulatory orientation mode (i.e., assessment and locomotion modes) has been included among the most prominent individual difference variables, which may potentially account for choice behaviour. Thus, the main objective of our experiment was to investigate the relations between habitual use of regulatory mode and risk-taking through people's time horizon. Risk-taking was appraised using a behavioural measure (i.e., BART) 1 month following evaluation of habitual use of regulatory mode. The findings revealed a significant negative association between the assessment mode and risk-taking through individual differences in time horizon. PMID:24821511

  12. The AOCS publications: a 100 year history

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth of societies and its associated publications is an indicator of how chemistry, a society such as AOCS, and the fats and oils industry have grown over time. During the late 18th century a shift from monographs to chemical periodicals occurred. Since then journals have been the preferred ...

  13. Parisian ruin over a finite-time horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dębicki, Krzysztof; Hashorva, Enkelejd; Ji, LanPeng

    2016-03-01

    For a risk process $R_u(t)=u+ct-X(t), t\\ge 0$, where $u\\ge 0$ is the initial capital, $c>0$ is the premium rate and $X(t),t\\ge 0$ is an aggregate claim process, we investigate the probability of the Parisian ruin \\[ \\mathcal{P}_S(u,T_u)=\\mathbb{P}\\{\\inf_{t\\in[0,S]} \\sup_{s\\in[t,t+T_u]} R_u(s)<0\\}, \\] with a given positive constant $S$ and a positive measurable function $T_u$. We derive asymptotic expansion of $\\mathcal{P}_S(u,T_u)$, as $u\\to\\infty$, for the aggregate claim process $X$ modeled by Gaussian processes. As a by-product, we derive the exact tail asymptotics of the infimum of a standard Brownian motion with drift over a finite-time interval.

  14. Real-time beyond the horizon vessel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roarty, Hugh J.; Smith, Michael; Glenn, Scott M.; Barrick, Donald E.

    2013-05-01

    The marine transportation system (MTS) is a vital component of the United States Economy. Waterborne cargo accounts for more than $742 billion of the nation's economy and creates employment for 13 million citizens. A disruption in this system would have far reaching consequences to the security of the country. The US National High Frequency radar network, which comprises 130 radar stations around the country, became operational in May 2009. It provides hourly measurements of surface currents to the US Coast Guard for search and rescue (SAR). This system has the capability of being a dual use system providing information for environmental monitoring as well as vessel position information for maritime security. Real time vessel detection has been implemented at two of the radar stations outside New York Harbor. Several experiments were conducted to see the amount vessel traffic that the radar could capture. The radars were able to detect a majority of the vessels that are reporting via the Automatic Identification System (AIS) as well as 30 percent of mid to large size vessels that are not reporting via AIS. The radars were able to detect vessels out to 60 km from the coast. The addition of a vessel detection capability to the National HF radar network will provide valuable information to maritime security sector. This dual use capability will fill a gap in the current surveillance of US coastal waters. It will also provide longer-range situational awareness necessary to detect and track smaller size vessels in the large vessel clutter.

  15. World-sheet stability, space-time horizons and cosmic censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we have analyzed the stability and supersymmetry of the heterotic superstring world sheet in the background Friedmann space-time generated by a perfect fluid with energy density ρ and pressure p = ( γ - 1) ρ. The world sheet is tachyon-free within the range 2/3 ≤ γ ≤ ∞, and globally supersymmetric in the Minkowski-space limit ρ = ∞, or when γ = 2/3, which is the equation of state for stringy matter and corresponds to the Milne universe, that expands along its apparent horizon. Here, this result is discussed in greater detail, particularly with regard to the question of horizon structure, cosmic censorship, the TCP theorem, and local world-sheet supersymmetry. Also, we consider the symmetric background space-time generated by a static, electrically (or magnetically) charged matter distribution of total mass and charge Q, and containing a radially directed macroscopic string. We find that the effective string mass m satisfies the inequality m 2 ≥ 0, signifying stability, provided that , which corresponds to the Reissner-Nordström black hole. The case of marginal string stability, m 2 = 0, is the extremal solution , which was shown by Gibbons and Hull to be supersymmetric, and has a marginal horizon. If , the horizon disappears, m 2 < 0, and the string becomes unstable.

  16. Forecasting geomagnetic activity at monthly and annual horizons: Time series models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reikard, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    Most of the existing work on forecasting geomagnetic activity has been over short intervals, on the order of hours or days. However, it is also of interest to predict over longer horizons, ranging from months to years. Forecasting tests are run for the Aa index, which begins in 1868 and provides the longest continuous records of geomagnetic activity. This series is challenging to forecast. While it exhibits cycles at 11-22 years, the amplitude and period of the cycles varies over time. There is also evidence of discontinuous trending: the slope and direction of the trend change repeatedly. Further, at the monthly resolution, the data exhibits nonlinear variability, with intermittent large outliers. Several types of models are tested: regressions, neural networks, a frequency domain algorithm, and combined models. Forecasting tests are run at horizons of 1-11 years using the annual data, and 1-12 months using the monthly data. At the 1-year horizon, the mean errors are in the range of 13-17 percent while the median errors are in the range of 10-14 percent. The accuracy of the models deteriorates at longer horizons. At 5 years, the mean errors lie in the range of 21-23 percent, and at 11 years, 23-25 percent. At the 1 year horizon, the most accurate forecast is achieved by a combined model, but over longer horizons (2-11 years), the neural net dominates. At the monthly resolution, the mean errors are in the range of 17-19 percent at 1 month, while the median errors lie in a range of 14-17 percent. The mean error increases to 23-24 percent at 5 months, and 25 percent at 12 months. A model combining frequency and time domain methods is marginally better than regressions and neural networks alone, up to 11 months. The main conclusion is that geomagnetic activity can only be predicted to within a limited threshold of accuracy, over a given range of horizons. This is consistent with the finding of irregular trends and cycles in the annual data and nonlinear variability in

  17. Revisiting the 100 Year Old Radioactivity Lectures of Frederick Soddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Between 1908 and 1922, Frederick Soddy, MA., FRS (Dr. Lee`s Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Univ. of Oxford) published four editions of a compendium of his experimental lectures delivered at the University of Glasgow, under the title ``The Interpretation of Radium, and the Structure of the Atom''. Professor Soddy taught his students about `radium writing' and the emanation of radium. He presented a radium clock designed by Professor Strutt; showed students `Pleochroic Halos'; and described the separation of `ionium' from its isotope, thorium. The process of constructing a cohesive logic to empirical observations of this newly discovered phenomenon of radioactivity was a challenging one. Some aspects did not stand the test of time. However, revisiting these lectures after 100 years gives us fascinating insight into the mental processes of the early pioneers in radioactivity.

  18. 100 years of sedimentation study by the USGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G. Douglas

    1989-01-01

    On January 15, 1889, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting sediment data on the Rio Grande at Embudo, New Mexico. During the past 100 years the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division (WRD) has collected daily sediment data at more than 1,200 sites. Projects have addressed the problems associated with reservoir construction, agricultural irrigation projects, energy production, and transport and deposition of pollutants sorbed to sediments. The Survey has been active as a charter member of the Federal Interagency Sediment Project and currently has three full-time hydrologists working on the project. The WRD's sediment-research projects have covered a wide variety of subjects from the fundamental theories of resistance to flow and sediment transport in alluvial channels to lunar erosion mechanisms.

  19. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with Random Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyong

    2013-12-15

    This paper examines the continuous-time mean-variance optimal portfolio selection problem with random market parameters and random time horizon. Treating this problem as a linearly constrained stochastic linear-quadratic optimal control problem, I explicitly derive the efficient portfolios and efficient frontier in closed forms based on the solutions of two backward stochastic differential equations. Some related issues such as a minimum variance portfolio and a mutual fund theorem are also addressed. All the results are markedly different from those in the problem with deterministic exit time. A key part of my analysis involves proving the global solvability of a stochastic Riccati equation, which is interesting in its own right.

  20. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-07-31

    Real-time horizon sensing (HS) on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Oxbow Mining Company, Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (United States) and IEC (International) certification.

  1. Technique for estimating depths of 100-year floods in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, Herbert N., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are developed for estimating 100-year flood depths in natural channels of unregulated Pennsylvania streams that drain less than 2,200 square miles. Equations and graphs are presented relating the depth of the 100-year flood above median stage and drainage area in five defined hydrologic areas in the State. Another graph defines the relation between drainage area and median depth of flow over the low point of riffles. Thus 100-year depths on riffles can be estimated by summing depth values derived from two simple relations.

  2. Chert horizons as time-stratigraphic markers in Ordovician and Silurian of eastern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G.J.

    1986-08-01

    Data from numerous measured sections show that distinct chert horizons occur at or near the same stratigraphic intervals in a number of Ordovician and Silurian dolomite sequences in the eastern Great basin of Nevada and Utah. In many cases a shallow-water origin for the chert is inferred because of silicified shelfal fauna and lack of deeper water indicators. The cherty intervals appear to transgress across environmentally controlled lithologic boundaries. This fact, coupled with the regional extent of the chert, suggests that these intervals can be used as time-stratigraphic marker horizons. This concept is useful in assessing the degree of stratigraphic thinning of Upper Silurian strata along a regional unconformity. Although chert is almost ubiquitously present in certain stratigraphic intervals, the abundance of chert-bearing horizons within an individual section varies. By contouring the abundance of chert-bearing intervals within the Silurian system, a well-defined pattern is documented that increases in abundance to the northeast toward the northwestern corner of Utah. The ratio of chert to dolomite within the intervals increases correspondingly. It is suggested that the chert is the result of silica supersaturation from the settling of wind-blow volcanic ash on the Silurian epicontinental sea. The distribution of the chert was largely a function of paleowind currents from an easterly or northerly active volcanic source area.

  3. 100-Year Flood-It's All About Chance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Dinicola, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In the 1960's, the United States government decided to use the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood as the basis for the National Flood Insurance Program. The 1-percent AEP flood was thought to be a fair balance between protecting the public and overly stringent regulation. Because the 1-percent AEP flood has a 1 in 100 chance of being equaled or exceeded in any 1 year, and it has an average recurrence interval of 100 years, it often is referred to as the '100-year flood'. The term '100-year flood' is part of the national lexicon, but is often a source of confusion by those not familiar with flood science and statistics. This poster is an attempt to explain the concept, probabilistic nature, and inherent uncertainties of the '100-year flood' to the layman.

  4. Mean-Variance Hedging on Uncertain Time Horizon in a Market with a Jump

    SciTech Connect

    Kharroubi, Idris; Lim, Thomas; Ngoupeyou, Armand

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we study the problem of mean-variance hedging with a random horizon T∧τ, where T is a deterministic constant and τ is a jump time of the underlying asset price process. We first formulate this problem as a stochastic control problem and relate it to a system of BSDEs with a jump. We then provide a verification theorem which gives the optimal strategy for the mean-variance hedging using the solution of the previous system of BSDEs. Finally, we prove that this system of BSDEs admits a solution via a decomposition approach coming from filtration enlargement theory.

  5. The history of atrial fibrillation: the last 100 years.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, Eric N

    2008-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has had a rich history that has touched the careers of many of the great clinicians and investigators of the 20th century. More recently, there has been an explosion of research into various aspects of the mechanisms and therapy for AF, as evidenced by over 8,000 publications on AF from 2000 to 2007. A century of research and clinical observations, coupled with modern investigative technologies, has enabled modern investigators to have their own "fantastic voyage" as they travel beyond the cell borders into the ionic mechanisms responsible for AF and its many atrial perturbations. One can only imagine the satisfaction of Wenckebach, MacKenzie, and Lewis if they could see how their seeds of wisdom have grown into such sturdy ideas, or how delighted Scherf would be to learn that his ectopic focus theory for AF has been given new life. This paper on 100 years of AF was initially prepared for presentation as the Plenary Lecture at the AFib Summit for Heart Rhythm 2007 in Denver, Colorado. I have tried to provide the reader with some of the most important observations on AF, realizing that it would be impossible to include all or even most of the major research done during this time frame. I apologize to my many colleagues whose research has helped us to understand better the clinical and basic aspects of AF, yet who could not be cited for lack of space.

  6. [The 20th century: 100 years of misfortune and splendor].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliéxer

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century has been one of the most intense and convulsive periods in the History of humanity. A century of paradoxes and contrasts, it began with optimism, it witnessed the apocalypse of two world wars, and finished with unimaginable scientific progress that gave us a new civilization that we cannot yet grasp. In this century, significant events happened that shaped our time and projected their results toward an immediate future. Some of these were providential in understanding man's life, fighting against illnesses and prolonging life, and others were of undeniable social importance for humanity. Some knowledge was based on the work of others. Philosophy was embedded in mathematics, as was science in philosophy, while politics and the economy exercised so decisive an influence in our way of feeling and living that culture and society were affected to the core. Within that century the biggest technological revolution of all the time was also created, as transcendent as it was unimaginable, which put mankind on the road to the stars with the moon landing and in the process created the information society whose signature symbol, the internet, emerged as a new demiurge. However, the 20th century, with all its misfortune and splendor, paradoxes and contrasts, creation and destruction, was the most transcendent in the whole of history and it bequeaths to the future a promising horizon in the search for a renovated meaning of life and a yearning for peaceful coexistence for the whole humanity. PMID:15754756

  7. [The 20th century: 100 years of misfortune and splendor].

    PubMed

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliéxer

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century has been one of the most intense and convulsive periods in the History of humanity. A century of paradoxes and contrasts, it began with optimism, it witnessed the apocalypse of two world wars, and finished with unimaginable scientific progress that gave us a new civilization that we cannot yet grasp. In this century, significant events happened that shaped our time and projected their results toward an immediate future. Some of these were providential in understanding man's life, fighting against illnesses and prolonging life, and others were of undeniable social importance for humanity. Some knowledge was based on the work of others. Philosophy was embedded in mathematics, as was science in philosophy, while politics and the economy exercised so decisive an influence in our way of feeling and living that culture and society were affected to the core. Within that century the biggest technological revolution of all the time was also created, as transcendent as it was unimaginable, which put mankind on the road to the stars with the moon landing and in the process created the information society whose signature symbol, the internet, emerged as a new demiurge. However, the 20th century, with all its misfortune and splendor, paradoxes and contrasts, creation and destruction, was the most transcendent in the whole of history and it bequeaths to the future a promising horizon in the search for a renovated meaning of life and a yearning for peaceful coexistence for the whole humanity.

  8. Optimal Consumption in a Brownian Model with Absorption and Finite Time Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandits, Peter

    2013-04-15

    We construct {epsilon}-optimal strategies for the following control problem: Maximize E[{integral}{sub [0,{tau})}e{sup -{beta}s} dC{sub s}+e{sup -{beta}{tau}}X{sub {tau}}] , where X{sub t}=x+{mu}t+{sigma}W{sub t}-C{sub t}, {tau}{identical_to}inf{l_brace}t>0|X{sub t}=0{r_brace} Logical-And T, T>0 is a fixed finite time horizon, W{sub t} is standard Brownian motion, {mu}, {sigma} are constants, and C{sub t} describes accumulated consumption until time t. It is shown that {epsilon}-optimal strategies are given by barrier strategies with time-dependent barriers.

  9. A receding horizon scheme for discrete-time polytopic linear parameter varying systems in networked architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzè, Giuseppe; Lucia, Walter; Tedesco, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy to address regulation problems for constrained polytopic Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems subject to input and state constraints in which both plant measurements and command signals in the loop are sent through communication channels subject to time-varying delays (Networked Control System (NCS)). The results here proposed represent a significant extension to the LPV framework of a recent Receding Horizon Control (RHC) scheme developed for the so-called robust case. By exploiting the parameter availability, the pre-computed sequences of one- step controllable sets inner approximations are less conservative than the robust counterpart. The resulting framework guarantees asymptotic stability and constraints fulfilment regardless of plant uncertainties and time-delay occurrences. Finally, experimental results on a laboratory two-tank test-bed show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Spring wheat gliadins: Have they changed in 100 years?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been many hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars released in North Dakota during the last 100 years. These cultivars have been improved for various characteristics such as, adaptation to weather conditions, high yield, and good milling and baking quality. The objectives of this study wer...

  11. 100 Years of Commitment to Children: Change and Continuity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima

    The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) is the oldest philanthropy in the nation focused on improving the life prospects of children. This booklet, produced for FCD's centennial, describes the organization's origins and changes during the past 100 years. The booklet's sections, which include photographs, quotes, and a timeline, are: (1) "The…

  12. Women in July Fourth Cartoons: A 100-Year Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katherine; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes the dominance, appearance, and role of women as depicted in newspaper Independence Day political cartoons over a 100-year period. Concludes that woman's place has gradually broadened to include activities beyond wife and mother. Indicates a resistance to changing norms and difficulty in coping with emerging ones. (JMF)

  13. MARKOV: A methodology for the solution of infinite time horizon MARKOV decision processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    Algorithms are described for determining optimal policies for finite state, finite action, infinite discrete time horizon Markov decision processes. Both value-improvement and policy-improvement techniques are used in the algorithms. Computing procedures are also described. The algorithms are appropriate for processes that are either finite or infinite, deterministic or stochastic, discounted or undiscounted, in any meaningful combination of these features. Computing procedures are described in terms of initial data processing, bound improvements, process reduction, and testing and solution. Application of the methodology is illustrated with an example involving natural resource management. Management implications of certain hypothesized relationships between mallard survival and harvest rates are addressed by applying the optimality procedures to mallard population models.

  14. Pluto's Atmosphere at the Time of the New Horizons Flyby from the 29-JUN-2015 Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E.; Skrutskie, M.; Wasserman, L.; Howell, R.; Young, L.; Olkin, C.; Buie, M.

    2015-10-01

    Pluto is expected to occult a star on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the scheduled New Horizons flyby on Pluto on 14-JUL-2015. This occultation should be remarkable for several reasons in addition to its synergy with the spacecraft observations. First, the occulted star is by far the brightest ever to be observed in a Pluto occultation: its V-mag is 12.10 ± 0.03, about ten times brighter than Pluto itself. We are deploying a wide array of telescopes to obtain quality lightcurves at 10 Hz, sufficient to resolve vertical atmospheric structure (e.g., gravity waves) at the 2.5-km scale over a range of radii from about 1195 to 1300 km. Second, we plan to obtain lighcurves in infrared wavelengths near 1.7 μm, where the star's H-mag (about 11) is bright enough to provide useful signal-to-noise ratios, albeit at slower cadences near 1 Hz (about two points per scale height). The combination of simultaneous IR and visible wavelength lightcurves should address the decades-old question: is there haze in Pluto's atmosphere, and if so, what is its opacity? New Horizons should image haze layers in reflected light as the occultation quantifies haze extinction in transmitted light: the combination could potentially let us solve for haze phase functions. Third, the current predicted shadow path is centered over much of New Zealand. We plan to deploy three portable telescopes in New Zealand to locations that are candidates for observing central flashes. If successful, these lightcurves can tell us (a) the oblateness of Pluto's atmosphere and (b) the detailed density gradient profile at radii near 1215 km, which (in turn) is a function of trace abundances of CO and CH4 a few tens of km above Pluto's surface. We will report on lightcurves obtained on 29-JUN- 2015, the column abundance of Pluto's atmosphere just two weeks before the New Horizons flyby, the detection (or not) of haze, and - if central flashes are obtained - the oblateness of Pluto's atmosphere.

  15. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    program began development in 1998 and experienced three major design phases. The final version, termed HS-3, was commissioned in 2000 with the assistance of the DOE-Mining Industry of the Future program, commercialized in 2002, and has been used 14 times in 12 different mines within the United States. The Horizon Sensor has applications in both underground and surface mining operations. This technology is primarily used in the coal industry, but is also used to mine trona and potash. All horizon sensor components have Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) (United States) and IEC (International) certification. Horizon Sensing saves energy by maximizing cutting efficiency, cutting only desired material. This desired material is cleaner fuel, therefore reducing pollutants to the atmosphere when burned and burning more efficiently. Extracting only desired material increases productivity by reducing or eliminating the cleaning step after extraction. Additionally, this technology allows for deeper mining, resulting in more material gained from one location. The remote sensing tool allows workers to operate the machinery away from the hazards of cutting coal, including noise, breathing dust and gases, and coal and rock splintering and outbursts. The HS program has primarily revolved around the development of the technology. However, the end goal of the program has always been the commercialization of the technology and only within the last 2 years of the program has this goal been realized. Real-time horizon sensing on mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing.

  16. Rich versus poor: equality in nursing care 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    The question relating to the importance of the equality of nursing care the rich and poor should receive was raised in a very interesting article in the BJN 100 years ago. Miss EA Stevenson, Late Lady Superintendent of the Sutherland Benefit Nursing Association, highlighted some of the key factors. For example, there was the foundation and growth of organizations for the preservation of health and the cure of disease, the increasing role which the metropolitan and provincial hospitals made, and the foundation of Queen Victoria's institute for providing trained nurses for the sick and poor in their own homes.

  17. Palama Settlement: 100 years of serving a neighborhood's needs.

    PubMed

    Rath, P

    1995-11-01

    The founding of Palama Settlement brought to those who might not be able to afford it public health nurses for maternal care and nutrition, well-baby clinics, tuberculosis clinics, medical and dental clinics, and eventually major support of medical needs during and after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Palama Settlement celebrates its centennial year with many of its early functions assumed by state and private organizations, but it is prepared to enter the next 100 years of service to the community. Palama was founded by James Arthur Rath with the purpose of serving the community; many people today remember their childhood and Palama Settlement.

  18. Progress of Cometary Science in the Past 100 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1999-01-01

    Enormous strides made by cometary science during the 20th century defy any meaningful comparison of its state 100 years ago and now. The great majority of the subfields enjoying much attention nowadays did not exist in the year 1900. Dramatic developments, especially in the past 30-50 years, have equally affected observational and theoretical studies of comets. The profound diversification of observing techniques has been documented by the ever widening limits on the electromagnetic spectrum covered. While the time around 1900 marked an early period of slow and painful experimentation with photographic methods in cometary studies, observations of comets from the x-ray region to the radio waves have by now become routine. Many of the new techniques, and all those involved with the wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, were made possible by another major breakthrough of this century - observing from space. Experiments on dedicated Earth-orbiting satellites as well as several deep-space probes have provided fascinating new information on the nature and makeup of comets. In broader terms, much of the progress has been achieved thanks to fundamental discoveries and major advances in electronics, whose applications resulted in qualitatively new instruments (e.g. radiotelescopes) and sensors or detectors (e.g. CCD arrays). The most universal effect on the entire cometary science, from observing to data handling to quantitative interpretations, has been, as in any other branch of science, due to the introduction of electronic computers, with their processing capabilities not only unheard of, but literally unimaginable, in the age of classical desk calculators. As if all this should not be enough, the today's generations of comet scientists have, in addition, been blessed with nature's highly appreciated cooperation. Indeed, in the span of a dozen years, between 1985 and 1997, we were privileged to witness four remarkable cometary events: (i) a return of Halley

  19. ''Illusion of control'' in Time-Horizon Minority and Parrondo Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satinover, J. B.; Sornette, D.

    2007-12-01

    Human beings like to believe they are in control of their destiny. This ubiquitous trait seems to increase motivation and persistence, and is probably evolutionarily adaptive [J.D. Taylor, S.E. Brown, Psych. Bull. 103, 193 (1988); A. Bandura, Self-efficacy: the exercise of control (WH Freeman, New York, 1997)]. But how good really is our ability to control? How successful is our track record in these areas? There is little understanding of when and under what circumstances we may over-estimate [E. Langer, J. Pers. Soc. Psych. 7, 185 (1975)] or even lose our ability to control and optimize outcomes, especially when they are the result of aggregations of individual optimization processes. Here, we demonstrate analytically using the theory of Markov Chains and by numerical simulations in two classes of games, the Time-Horizon Minority Game [M.L. Hart, P. Jefferies, N.F. Johnson, Phys. A 311, 275 (2002)] and the Parrondo Game [J.M.R. Parrondo, G.P. Harmer, D. Abbott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5226 (2000); J.M.R. Parrondo, How to cheat a bad mathematician (ISI, Italy, 1996)], that agents who optimize their strategy based on past information may actually perform worse than non-optimizing agents. In other words, low-entropy (more informative) strategies under-perform high-entropy (or random) strategies. This provides a precise definition of the “illusion of control” in certain set-ups a priori defined to emphasize the importance of optimization.

  20. Famines in the last 100 years: implications for diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Susanne R; Roseboom, Tessa J; Painter, Rebecca C

    2014-10-01

    Overnutrition is a major cause of diabetes. The contrary situation of undernutrition has also been suggested to increase the risk of the disease. Especially undernutrition during prenatal life has been hypothesized to program the structure and physiology of the fetus in such a way that it is more prone to develop diabetes in later life. Famines over the last 100 years have provided historical opportunities to study later-life health consequences of poor nutritional circumstances in early life. The majority of studies based on famine exposure during prenatal life clearly show that diabetes risk is increased. Postnatal famine exposure in childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood also seems to raise risk for diabetes, although prenatal famine effects seem to be more substantial. These study results not only have implications for the consequences of famines still happening but also for pregnancies complicated by factors mimicking poor nutritional situations.

  1. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Rosalie van Zelm; Mark A.J. Huijbregts; Hans A. van Jaarsveld; Gert Jan Reinds; Dick de Zwart; Jaap Struijs; Dik van de Meent

    2007-02-15

    This paper describes a new approach in life-cycle impact assessment to derive characterization factors for acidification in European forests. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification were calculated, whereas before only steady-state factors were available. The characterization factors indicate the change in the potential occurrence of plant species due to a change in emission, and they consist of a fate and an effect factor. The fate factor combines the results of an atmospheric deposition model and a dynamic soil acidification model. The change in base saturation in soil due to an atmospheric emission change was derived for 20, 50, 100, and 500 year time horizons. The effect factor was based on a dose-response curve of the potential occurrence of plant species, derived from multiple regression equations per plant species. The results showed that characterization factors for acidification increase up to a factor of 13 from a 20 years to a 500 years time horizon. Characterization factors for ammonia are 4.0-4.3 times greater than those for nitrogen oxides (NOx), and characterization factors for sulfur dioxide are 1.4-2.0 times greater than those for NOx. Aggregation of damage due to acidification with other impact categories on the European scale becomes feasible with the applied approach. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Van Zelm, Rosalie; Huijbregts, Mark A J; van Jaarsveld, Hans A; Reinds, Gert Jan; de Zwart, Dick; Struijs, Jaap; van de Meent, Dik

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a new approach in life-cycle impact assessment to derive characterization factors for acidification in European forests. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification were calculated, whereas before only steady-state factors were available. The characterization factors indicate the change in the potential occurrence of plant species due to a change in emission, and they consist of a fate and an effect factor. The fate factor combines the results of an atmospheric deposition model and a dynamic soil acidification model. The change in base saturation in soil due to an atmospheric emission change was derived for 20, 50, 100, and 500 year time horizons. The effect factor was based on a dose-response curve of the potential occurrence of plant species, derived from multiple regression equations per plant species. The results showed that characterization factors for acidification increase up to a factor of 13 from a 20 years to a 500 years time horizon. Characterization factors for ammonia are 4.0-4.3 times greater than those for nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and characterization factors for sulfur dioxide are 1.4-2.0 times greater than those for NO(x). Aggregation of damage due to acidification with other impact categories on the European scale becomes feasible with the applied approach.

  3. 75 FR 37712 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... and sinking of the Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit ``Deepwater Horizon'' on April 20, 2010, causing an... (73 FR 3316). II. Abbreviations AMPD Average Most Probable Discharge CEQ Council on Environmental... Environmental Protection Agency FOSC Federal On-Scene Coordinator FR Federal Register MMPD Maximum Most...

  4. Slope restoration for a 100-year old canal

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, R.L.; Lewis, S.W.; Liebersbach, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Turlock Irrigation District (TID) is located in the northern portion of the fertile San Joaquin Valley of California. TID`s primary water supply is conveyed from the 100-year-old LaGrange Diversion Dam via their historic Upper Main Canal. The original canal was constructed by excavating into slate bedrock for the uphill (cut) bank, and constructing unmortared rock walls and rock fill for the downhill (fill) embankment; the excavation was then lined with concrete. Soil fill raises of the downhill embankment over the last 30 years have reduced the slope stability to unacceptable levels in the steepest embankment areas. In March of 1994, two surficial slides prompted investigation of the long term embankment stability in the Warehouse Slide Area. Based on results of analysis for various stabilization scenarios, TID chose a stabilization method which included: (1) excavation of an access bench below the existing canal, (2) installation of steel pipe piles through the existing rock fill and into the bedrock, (3) construction of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining wall and (4) construction of a soil-cement canal roadway pavement. The design was chosen by the owner because of cost competitiveness compared to other design alternatives and because the construction sequence allowed uninterrupted use of the canal. By using local river cobble for the MSE wall facing material, TID met the desired 50-year design life of the repair while maintaining the area`s historic visual features.

  5. Pedernales oilfield, eastern Venezuela: The first 100 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gluyas, J.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, W.

    1996-08-01

    Petroleum seeps and surface tar mats attracted oil explorers to Pedernales in eastern Venezuela 100 years ago. Commercial production from the Pedernales Field was established by Creole in 1933. In three production periods, broken by WWII and the end of the Creole-Texaco refining contract, Creole and Lagoven produced about 60 MMSTB from about 60 wells in about 60 years. Peak production was in the late 1950s, when the field delivered 12,000 BOPD. Production was stopped in 1986. In March 1993, BP Venezuela acquired the license to reactivate Pedernales on behalf of Lagoven, and BP`s first well in the field was drilled in August 1994. A second was completed in early 1995. The production from each well was sufficiently encouraging for commerciality to be declared in March 1995. Phase 1 of the field reactivation demanded a production rate of 11,500 BOPD. As of now (September, 1995) six wells, including one gas disposal well, have been completed. Wells have been placed using a combination of old well data and mapping based on a close spaced 2D seismic survey shot in early 1994. Results from these first few wells indicate that the required production rate will be achieved despite severely depleted reservoir pressures. This paper tells the story of reactivation and re-evaluation of one of eastern Venezuela`s oldest oilfields.

  6. Overuse syndrome in musicians--100 years ago. An historical review.

    PubMed

    Fry, H J

    Overuse syndrome in musicians was extensively reported 100 years ago. The clinical features and results of treatment, which were recorded in considerable detail, match well the condition that is described today. The medical literature that is reviewed here extends from 1830 to 1911 and includes 21 books and 54 articles from the English language literature, apart from two exceptions; however, the writers of the day themselves reviewed French, German and Italian literature on the subject. The disorder was said to result from the overuse of the affected parts. Two theories of aetiology, not necessarily mutually exclusive, were argued. The central theory regarded the lesion as being in the central nervous system, the peripheral theory implied a primary muscle disorder. No serious case was put forward for a psychogenic origin, though emotional factors were believed to aggravate the condition. Advances in musical instrument manufacture--particularly the development of the concert piano and the clarinet--may have played a part in the prevalence of overuse syndrome in musicians. Total rest from the mechanical use of the hand was the only effective treatment recorded.

  7. Colloquium: 100 years of mass spectrometry: Perspectives and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Simon; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely regarded as the most sensitive and specific general purpose analytical technique. More than a century has passed for MS since the ground-breaking work of Nobel laureate Sir Joseph John Thomson in 1913. This Colloquium aims to (1) give an historical overview of the major instrumentation achievements that have driven mass spectrometry forward in the past century, including those leading up to the initial work of Thomson, (2) provide the nonspecialist with an introduction to MS, and (3) highlight some key applications of MS and explore the current and future trends. Because of the vastness of the subject area and quality of the manifold research efforts that have been undertaken over the last 100 years, which have contributed to the foundations and subsequent advances in mass spectrometry, it should be understood that not all of the key contributions may have been included in this Colloquium. Mass spectrometry has embraced a multitude of scientific disciplines and to recognize all of the achievements is an impossible task, such has been the diverse impact of this invaluable technique. Scientific progress is usually made via the cumulative effort of a large number of researchers; the achievements reported herein are only a representation of that effort.

  8. Emergence of time-horizon invariant correlation structure in financial returns by subtraction of the market mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesi, Christian; Marsili, Matteo; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the emergence of a structure in the correlation matrix of assets’ returns as the time horizon over which returns are computed increases from the minutes to the daily scale. We analyze data from different stock markets (New York, Paris, London, Milano) and with different methods. In addition to the usual correlations, we also analyze those obtained by subtracting the dynamics of the “center of mass” (i.e., the market mode). We find that when the center of mass is not removed the structure emerges, as the time horizon increases, from splitting a single large cluster into smaller ones. By contrast, when the market mode is removed the structure of correlations observed at the daily scale is already well defined at very high frequency ( 5min in the New York Stock Exchange). Moreover, this structure accounts for 80% of the classification of stocks in economic sectors. Similar results, though less sharp, are found for the other markets. We also find that the structure of correlations in the overnight returns is markedly different from that of intraday activity.

  9. The State of Pluto's Bulk Atmosphere at the Time of the New Horizons Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Aaron C.; Barry, T.; Buie, M. W.; Carriazo, C. Y.; Cole, A.; Gault, D.; Giles, B.; Giles, D.; Hartig, K.; Hill, K.; Howell, R. R.; Hudson, G.; Loader, B.; Mackie, J.; Nelson, M.; Olkin, C.; Register, J.; Rodgers, T.; Sicardy, B.; Skrutskie, M.; Verbiscer, A.; Wasserman, L.; Watson, C.; Young, E.; Young, L.; Zalucha, A.

    2015-11-01

    On 29-JUL-2015, our team - plus many critical amateur astronomers - observed a stellar occultation by Pluto from sites in Australia and New Zealand. This event was remarkable for two reasons: it preceded the New Horizons flyby of Pluto by just two weeks, and the occulted star was about 10x brighter than Pluto itself, by far the brightest Pluto occultation event observed to date. The separation of ground sites spanned nearly 900 km with respect to the central chord, allowing a good geometric solution for the shadow path. The lightcurves show some inflection points and broad "fangs" that are characteristic of perturbations in the temperature profile. Preliminary fits show that the temperature profile derived from a 2006 occultation (Young et al. 2008) reproduces the 29-JUN-2015 lightcurves well. Assuming a surface radius of 1187 km for Pluto, we find that the surface pressure is 18 +/- 3 µbar. This pressure indicates that Pluto's surface has not yet started to cool down, despite a decrease in absorbed solar flux of more than 17% since perihelion in 1988. A surface pressure of 18 µbar would correspond to a nitrogen ice surface temperature of 38.0 K.References:Young, E.F., et al. "Vertical Structure in Pluto's Atmosphere from the 2006 June 12 Stellar Occultation," AJ 136 1757-1769 (2008)

  10. Water Stress on U.S. Power Production at Decadal Time Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Kumar, D.; Yun, J.; Short, G.; Klausner, J.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Thermoelectric power production at risk, owing to current and projected water scarcity and rising stream temperatures, is assessed for the continental United States (US) at decadal scales. Regional water scarcity is driven by climate variability and change, as well as by multi-sector water demand. While a planning horizon of zero to about thirty years is occasionally prescribed by stakeholders, the challenges to risk assessment at these scales include the difficulty in delineating decadal climate trends from intrinsic natural or multiple model variability. Current generation global climate or earth system models are not credible at the spatial resolutions of power plants, especially for surface water quantity and stream temperatures, which further exacerbates the assessment challenge. Population changes, which are anyway difficult to project, cannot serve as adequate proxies for changes in the water demand across sectors. The hypothesis that robust assessments of power production at risks are possible, despite the uncertainties, has been examined as a proof of concept. An approach is presented for delineating water scarcity and temperature from climate models, observations and population storylines, as well as for assessing power production at risk by examining geospatial correlations of power plant locations within regions where the usable water supply for energy production happens to be scarcer and warmer. Acknowledgment: Funding provided by US DOE's ARPA-E through Award DE-AR0000374.

  11. [100 years of dermatovenereology in Bosnia-Herzegovina].

    PubMed

    Arslanagić-Mutevelić, N

    1994-01-01

    The beginnings of dermatovenerology in Bosnia and Herzegovina are described in the paper in the chronological order. The first written documents, in an official health institution, date from the year 1846, when the Vakuf's Hospital was built in Sarajevo. In the national pathology the treatment of syphilis was priority, fungus diseases, pioderm, skin diseases and leprosy. In 1894 a modern (at that time) Regional Hospital was built up, opened in Sarajevo, 1894 with a Dermatovenerologic Department (60 beds). VIIIth German Dermatovenerology Congress took place in Sarajevo. The main subjects were: leprosy, pelagra, syphilis. In 1897 the first leprosium was built up here being the only one on the Balkans and this part of Europe. The post World War 2, 15 years were characterized by the prevention of syphilis, fungus diseases, pioderm and parasites. The scientific work started, publications came to existence, the authors originating from Bosnia. Later, the dermatovenerology departments in other towns were established (Mostar, Zenica, Bihać, Foca, Travnik, Bugojno), while Banjaluka and Tuzla, established clinics of their medical faculties, which had been opened in the towns. In 1992, the Dermatovenerology Clinic became one of the units of the Clinical Centre in Sarajevo.

  12. The network and the synapse: 100 years after Cajal.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Ashesh; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2008-02-01

    A century ago, Ramón y Cajal proposed that the brain consisted of huge numbers of neurons that communicated with each other through junctions called synapses. Today we routinely monitor single neuron and single synapse responses, and we have elaborate maps of connections between different regions of the brain. What we lack is a way to bridge these two scales of representing neuronal circuits. The challenges in doing so are formidable: even a small mammalian neuronal circuit has many thousands of neurons and millions of synapses. Can we keep track of individual cells and synapses in this crowd? Here we examine how two recent techniques may complement each other to do so. The recent "Brainbow" method is a way to color-code cells and their projections, so we can see which cells come near each other, but cannot be sure they connect. Functional circuit mapping tells us about connections between cells, but we cannot identify more than a handful at a time. Together these methods may fill in each other's blanks and give us brain wiring diagrams that combine scale and precision. PMID:19404449

  13. [100 years of surgery in the Kosevo Hospital in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Durić, O

    1994-01-01

    The surgery Department of the Regional Hospital was opened on 1st July, 1894 in Sarajevo, what meant the beginnings of European surgery school influence here. The School was in the second half of its activity, better known as "century of surgery". The building, fittings, equipment and staff continued their work here coping the Viennese school achievements. It was headed by the prominent European surgeon, primarius Dr Josef Preindisberger, first assistant to the great personality Dr. Billroth. In the way this institution became a referral centre for two other hospitals in Sarajevo: the Vakuf's and the Military Hospital, but for some 17 more in BH, which were built in the course of ten years. Because of the therapeutic success in the domain of the general surgery and diseases of the eye and according the annual reports, the first 50 beds became insufficient for all those who wanted the treatment. So, the Department was enlarged, in 1905 a new regional Hospital was planned, to act as clinics. The World War 1 stopped the plans. During the period of Kingdom of Yugoslavia, destroyed by war, the Surgery Department continued its work with the doctors educated to continue the work on the pre war level. As a broad pathology basis, but the need of space that time chief surgeon. Primarius Milivoje Kostić worked out in details the former plan of the new hospital building up with a base for clinics. It was accepted as a ten years project, which, to the regrets, did not come to existence to the World War 2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Detection of runaway electrons - a journey 100 years long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot

    2013-04-01

    of the scintillators allow detect CES on Aragats and for the first time prove existence of RREA phenomena.

  15. Nigeria Anopheles Vector Database: An Overview of 100 Years' Research

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia Nkem; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Ademowo, Olusegun George; Bockarie, Moses; Kelly-Hope, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important vectors of malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF), which are major public health diseases in Nigeria. Malaria is caused by infection with a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium and LF by the parasitic worm Wuchereria bancrofti. Updating our knowledge of the Anopheles species is vital in planning and implementing evidence based vector control programs. To present a comprehensive report on the spatial distribution and composition of these vectors, all published data available were collated into a database. Details recorded for each source were the locality, latitude/longitude, time/period of study, species, abundance, sampling/collection methods, morphological and molecular species identification methods, insecticide resistance status, including evidence of the kdr allele, and P. falciparum sporozoite rate and W. bancrofti microfilaria prevalence. This collation resulted in a total of 110 publications, encompassing 484,747 Anopheles mosquitoes in 632 spatially unique descriptions at 142 georeferenced locations being identified across Nigeria from 1900 to 2010. Overall, the highest number of vector species reported included An. gambiae complex (65.2%), An. funestus complex (17.3%), An. gambiae s.s. (6.5%). An. arabiensis (5.0%) and An. funestus s.s. (2.5%), with the molecular forms An. gambiae M and S identified at 120 locations. A variety of sampling/collection and species identification methods were used with an increase in molecular techniques in recent decades. Insecticide resistance to pyrethroids and organochlorines was found in the main Anopheles species across 45 locations. Presence of P. falciparum and W. bancrofti varied between species with the highest sporozoite rates found in An. gambiae s.s, An. funestus s.s. and An. moucheti, and the highest microfilaria prevalence in An. gambiae s.l., An. arabiensis, and An. gambiae s.s. This comprehensive geo-referenced database provides an essential baseline on Anopheles

  16. Global change and water resources in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. C.; Hirsch, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We are in the midst of a continental-scale, multi-year experiment in the United States, in which we have not defined our testable hypotheses or set the duration and scope of the experiment, which poses major water-resources challenges for the 21st century. What are we doing? We are expanding population at three times the national growth rate in our most water-scarce region, the southwestern United States, where water stress is already great and modeling predicts decreased streamflow by the middle of this century. We are expanding irrigated agriculture from the west into the east, particularly to the southeastern states, where increased competition for ground and surface water has urban, agricultural, and environmental interests at odds, and increasingly, in court. We are expanding our consumption of pharmaceutical and personal care products to historic high levels and disposing them in surface and groundwater, through sewage treatment plants and individual septic systems. These substances are now detectable at very low concentrations and we have documented significant effects on aquatic species, particularly on fish reproduction function. We don’t yet know what effects on human health may emerge, nor do we know if we need to make large investments in water treatment systems, which were not designed to remove these substances. These are a few examples of our national-scale experiment. In addition to these water resources challenges, over which we have some control, climate change models indicate that precipitation and streamflow patterns will change in coming decades, with western mid-latitude North America generally drier. We have already documented trends in more rain and less snow in western mountains. This has large implications for water supply and storage, and groundwater recharge. We have documented earlier snowmelt peak spring runoff in northeastern and northwestern States, and western montane regions. Peak runoff is now about two weeks earlier than it was

  17. Morphological response of songbirds to 100 years of landscape change in North America.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, A

    2010-06-01

    Major landscape changes caused by humans may create strong selection pressures and induce rapid evolution in natural populations. In the last 100 years, eastern North America has experienced extensive clear-cutting in boreal areas, while afforestation has occurred in most temperate areas. Based on museum specimens, I show that wings of several boreal forest songbirds and temperate songbirds of non-forest habitats have become more pointed over the last 100 years. In contrast, wings of most temperate forest and early-successional boreal forests species have become less pointed over the same period. In contrast to wing shape, the bill length of most species did not change significantly through time. These results are consistent with the "habitat isolation hypothesis", i.e., songbirds evolved in response to recent changes in the amount of available habitat and associated implications for mobility. Rapid morphological evolution may mitigate, without necessarily preventing, negative consequences of habitat loss caused by humans through direct exploitation or climate change.

  18. Adaptive dynamic programming for finite-horizon optimal control of discrete-time nonlinear systems with ε-error bound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Jin, Ning; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the finite-horizon optimal control problem for discrete-time nonlinear systems using the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) approach. The idea is to use an iterative ADP algorithm to obtain the optimal control law which makes the performance index function close to the greatest lower bound of all performance indices within an ε-error bound. The optimal number of control steps can also be obtained by the proposed ADP algorithms. A convergence analysis of the proposed ADP algorithms in terms of performance index function and control policy is made. In order to facilitate the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithms, neural networks are used for approximating the performance index function, computing the optimal control policy, and modeling the nonlinear system. Finally, two simulation examples are employed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:20876014

  19. Neural network-based finite-horizon optimal control of uncertain affine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiming; Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the finite-horizon optimal control design for nonlinear discrete-time systems in affine form is presented. In contrast with the traditional approximate dynamic programming methodology, which requires at least partial knowledge of the system dynamics, in this paper, the complete system dynamics are relaxed utilizing a neural network (NN)-based identifier to learn the control coefficient matrix. The identifier is then used together with the actor-critic-based scheme to learn the time-varying solution, referred to as the value function, of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation in an online and forward-in-time manner. Since the solution of HJB is time-varying, NNs with constant weights and time-varying activation functions are considered. To properly satisfy the terminal constraint, an additional error term is incorporated in the novel update law such that the terminal constraint error is also minimized over time. Policy and/or value iterations are not needed and the NN weights are updated once a sampling instant. The uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is verified by standard Lyapunov stability theory under nonautonomous analysis. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25720005

  20. Time horizons and substance use among African American youths living in disadvantaged urban areas.

    PubMed

    Cheong, JeeWon; Tucker, Jalie A; Simpson, Cathy A; Chandler, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Transitioning from adolescence to full-fledged adulthood is often challenging, and young people who live in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods face additional obstacles and experience disproportionately higher negative outcomes, including substance abuse and related risk behaviors. This study investigated whether substance use among African Americans ages 15 to 25 (M=18.86 years) living in such areas was related to present-dominated time perspectives and higher delay discounting. Participants (N=344, 110 males, 234 females) living in Deep South disadvantaged urban neighborhoods were recruited using Respondent Driven Sampling, an improved peer-referral sampling method suitable for accessing this hard-to-reach target group. Structured field interviews assessed alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and risk/protective factors, including time perspectives (Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory [ZTPI]) and behavioral impulsivity (delay discounting task). As predicted, substance use was positively related to a greater ZTPI orientation toward present pleasure and a lower tendency to plan and achieve future goals. Although the sample as a whole showed high discounting of delayed rewards, discount rates did not predict substance use. The findings suggest that interventions to lengthen time perspectives and promote enriched views of future possible selves may prevent and reduce substance use among disadvantaged youths. Discontinuities among the discounting and time perspective variables in relation to substance use merit further investigation.

  1. Time horizons and substance use among African American youths living in disadvantaged urban areas.

    PubMed

    Cheong, JeeWon; Tucker, Jalie A; Simpson, Cathy A; Chandler, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Transitioning from adolescence to full-fledged adulthood is often challenging, and young people who live in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods face additional obstacles and experience disproportionately higher negative outcomes, including substance abuse and related risk behaviors. This study investigated whether substance use among African Americans ages 15 to 25 (M=18.86 years) living in such areas was related to present-dominated time perspectives and higher delay discounting. Participants (N=344, 110 males, 234 females) living in Deep South disadvantaged urban neighborhoods were recruited using Respondent Driven Sampling, an improved peer-referral sampling method suitable for accessing this hard-to-reach target group. Structured field interviews assessed alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use and risk/protective factors, including time perspectives (Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory [ZTPI]) and behavioral impulsivity (delay discounting task). As predicted, substance use was positively related to a greater ZTPI orientation toward present pleasure and a lower tendency to plan and achieve future goals. Although the sample as a whole showed high discounting of delayed rewards, discount rates did not predict substance use. The findings suggest that interventions to lengthen time perspectives and promote enriched views of future possible selves may prevent and reduce substance use among disadvantaged youths. Discontinuities among the discounting and time perspective variables in relation to substance use merit further investigation. PMID:24531637

  2. Impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a wormhole space-time with horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Puente, A.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of curvature divergences on physical observers in a black hole space-time, which, nonetheless, is geodesically complete is investigated. This space-time is an exact solution of certain extensions of general relativity coupled to Maxwell’s electrodynamics and, roughly speaking, consists of two Reissner-Nordström (or Schwarzschild or Minkowski) geometries connected by a spherical wormhole near the center. We find that, despite the existence of infinite tidal forces, causal contact is never lost among the elements making up the observer. This suggests that curvature divergences may not be as pathological as traditionally thought.

  3. From Anzac to Afghanistan: have 100 years taught us nothing about the devastation of war?

    PubMed

    Carragee, Eugene J

    2015-12-01

    Commentary On: Atkinson Brigadier (Ret'd) RN, Fraser RD. 100 years-Anzac, Vietnam to now. Spine J 2015:15:2454-6 (in this issue). Robertson PA. Gallipoli 100 years on: a New Zealand perspective. Spine J 2015:15:2457-8 (in this issue).

  4. From Anzac to Afghanistan: have 100 years taught us nothing about the devastation of war?

    PubMed

    Carragee, Eugene J

    2015-12-01

    Commentary On: Atkinson Brigadier (Ret'd) RN, Fraser RD. 100 years-Anzac, Vietnam to now. Spine J 2015:15:2454-6 (in this issue). Robertson PA. Gallipoli 100 years on: a New Zealand perspective. Spine J 2015:15:2457-8 (in this issue). PMID:26698028

  5. Autonomous real-time adaptive management of soil salinity using a receding horizon control algorithm: a pilot-scale demonstration.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonjeong; Harmon, Thomas C

    2011-10-01

    Soil salinization is a potentially negative side effect of irrigation with reclaimed water. While optimization schemes have been applied to soil salinity control, these have typically failed to take advantage of real-time sensor feedback. This study incorporates current soil observation technologies into the optimal feedback-control scheme known as Receding Horizon Control (RHC) to enable successful autonomous control of soil salinization. RHC uses real-time sensor measurements, physically-based state prediction models, and optimization algorithms to drive field conditions to a desired environmental state by manipulating application rate or irrigation duration/frequency. A simulation model including the Richards equation coupled to energy and solute transport equations is employed as a state estimator. Vertical multi-sensor arrays installed in the soil provide initial conditions and continuous feedback to the control scheme. An optimization algorithm determines the optimal irrigation rate or frequency subject to imposed constraints protective of soil salinization. A small-scale field test demonstrates that the RHC scheme is capable of autonomously maintaining specified salt levels at a prescribed soil depth. This finding suggests that, given an adequately structured and trained simulation model, sensor networks, and optimization algorithms can be integrated using RHC to autonomously achieve water reuse and agricultural objectives while managing soil salinization.

  6. 1.3 mm WAVELENGTH VLBI OF SAGITTARIUS A*: DETECTION OF TIME-VARIABLE EMISSION ON EVENT HORIZON SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bolin, David E.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Blundell, Ray; Gurwell, Mark A.; Moran, James M.; Primiani, Rurik; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Plambeck, Richard; Chamberlin, Richard; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Honma, Mareki; Oyama, Tomoaki; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Lamb, James; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2011-02-01

    Sagittarius A*, the {approx}4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole candidate at the Galactic center, can be studied on Schwarzschild radius scales with (sub)millimeter wavelength very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). We report on 1.3 mm wavelength observations of Sgr A* using a VLBI array consisting of the JCMT on Mauna Kea, the Arizona Radio Observatory's Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in Arizona, and two telescopes of the CARMA array at Cedar Flat in California. Both Sgr A* and the quasar calibrator 1924-292 were observed over three consecutive nights, and both sources were clearly detected on all baselines. For the first time, we are able to extract 1.3 mm VLBI interferometer phase information on Sgr A* through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of baselines. On the third night of observing, the correlated flux density of Sgr A* on all VLBI baselines increased relative to the first two nights, providing strong evidence for time-variable change on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii. These results suggest that future VLBI observations with greater sensitivity and additional baselines will play a valuable role in determining the structure of emission near the event horizon of Sgr A*.

  7. 100+ years of instrumental seismology: the example of the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchak, Dmitry; Di Giacomo, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Systematic seismological observations of earthquakes using seismic instruments on a global scale began more than 100 years ago. Since then seismologists made many discoveries about the Earth interior and the physics of the earthquakes, also thanks to major developments in the seismic instrumentation deployed around the world. Besides, since the establishment of the first global networks (Milne and Jesuit networks), seismologists around the world stored and exchanged the results of routine observations (e.g., picking of arrival times, amplitude-period measurements, etc.) or more sophisticated analyses (e.g., moment tensor inversion) in seismological bulletins/catalogues. With a project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), the ISC and the Team of International Experts released a new global earthquake catalogue, the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php), which, differently from previous global seismic catalogues, has the unique feature of covering the entire period of instrumental seismology with locations and magnitude re-assessed using modern approaches for the global earthquakes selected for processing (in the current version approximately 21,000). During the 110 years covered by the ISC-GEM catalogue many seismological developments occurred in terms of instrumentation, seismological practice and knowledge of the physics of the earthquakes. In this contribution we give a brief overview of the major milestones characterizing the last 100+ years of instrumental seismology that were relevant for the production of the ISC-GEM catalogue and the major challenges we faced to obtain a catalogue as homogenous as possible.

  8. The Glacier Peak Tephra: A Continental-Scale Latest Pleistocene Time Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyne-O'Donnell, S.; Cwynar, L. C.; Vincent, J. H.; Spear, R.; Froese, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The latest Pleistocene eruptions of Glacier Peak in the Cascade Range deposited a widespread set of tephras throughout much of western North America within a short time span where they serve as valuable marker layers for inter-site correlation and chronostratigraphical control. We report the detection of these tephras in microscopic form in three lakes along the Eastern Seaboard (Maine and Nova Scotia). These distinct distal lake layers occur as closely spaced couplets which retain the subtle geochemical variation that characterises the proximal Glacier Peak G and B layers. New radiocarbon dates for the tephras also closely corroborate the most recently revised proximal dates for the tephras (ca. 13,700 - 13,400 cal. yr B.P) which found that they are ca. 400 14C yr older than hitherto thought. Their presence this far eastward implies that their deposition spans the intervening continent (>4000 km) and adds to a developing distal tephrostratigraphical framework with applications to studies of latest Pleistocene deglaciation and environmental change, megafaunal extinction and archaeology.

  9. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL NO.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-07-01

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade Horizon Sensor (HS) systems continued this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (ExxonMobil), Mountain Coal Company West Elk Mine (Arch), and Ohio Valley Coal Company (OVC). Monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  10. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL NO.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-07-30

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade Horizon Sensor (HS) systems has been ongoing this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (ExxonMobil), Mountain Coal Company West Elk Mine (Arch), Deserado Mining Company (Blue Mountain Energy), and The Ohio Valley Coal Company (TOVCC). Monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  11. The optimal manufacturing batch size with rework under time-varying demand process for a finite time horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Sarah; Supadi, Siti Suzlin; Omar, Mohd

    2014-07-01

    Rework is one of the solutions to some of the main issues in reverse logistic and green supply chain as it reduces production cost and environmental problem. Many researchers focus on developing rework model, but to the knowledge of the author, none of them has developed a model for time-varying demand rate. In this paper, we extend previous works and develop multiple batch production system for time-varying demand rate with rework. In this model, the rework is done within the same production cycle.

  12. Cryptic loss of montane avian richness and high community turnover over 100 years.

    PubMed

    Tingley, Morgan W; Beissinger, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    Although there are numerous examples of individual species moving up in elevation and poleward in latitude in response to 20th century climate change, how communities have responded is less well understood and requires fully accounting for changes in species-specific detectability over time, which has been neglected in past studies. We use a hierarchical Bayesian occupancy model to examine bird species richness change and turnover along three elevation gradients surveyed 80-100 years apart in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA. Richness declined over the 20th century across all elevations. Turnover was greatest at the highest and the lowest elevations. These findings were only apparent, however, after species' detectability was incorporated into measures of species richness. Further partitioning of species richness changes by elevational life zone showed that numbers of low- and high-elevation species declined, without a concurrent expansion by mid-elevation species. Our results provide empirical evidence for biodiversity loss in protected montane areas during the 20th century and highlight the importance of accounting for detectability in comparisons of species richness over time.

  13. Base (100-year) flood elevations for selected sites in Livingston County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, Rodney E.; Richards, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    The primary criteria for community participation in the National Flood Insurance Program is the adoption and enforcement of floodplain management requirements that minimize the potential for flood damages to existing and proposed development in flood-hazard areas. This report provides base flood elevations (BFE) for a 100-year recurrence-interval flood for use in the management and regulation of 18 flood-hazard areas designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency as approximate Zone A areas in Livingston County, Missouri. The one-dimensional surface-water flow models HEC-RAS and Water-Surface PROfile (WSPRO) were used to compute base (100-year) flood elevations for 18 Zone A sites. The HEC-RAS model was used at BFE sites 1 to 6, 9, 10, and 15 to 18. The WSPRO model was used at BFE sites 7, 8, and 11 to 14. The 18 sites are all located in Livingston County, Missouri, at U.S., State, or County road crossings, and the base flood elevation was determined at the upstream side of each crossing. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 1, 2, and 3 on Shoal Creek at Dawn and Shoal Creek Drainage Ditch near Dawn are 701.0, 701.0, and 696.5 feet, respectively. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 4 and 5 on Indian Branch near Sampsel and a tributary to Indian Branch near Sampsel are 711.7 and 755.4 feet, respectively. Site BFE 6 is located on Honey Creek near Farmersville and the base (100-year) flood elevation for this site is 730.8 feet. One site (BFE 7) is located on No Creek near Farmersville. The base (100-year) flood elevation for this site is 731.3 feet. Site BFE 8 is located on Crooked Creek near Chillicothe and the base (100-year) elevation is 716.4 feet. One site (BFE 9) is located on a tributary to Coon Creek at Chillicothe. The base (100-year) flood elevation for this site is 734.9 feet. Two sites (BFE 10 and 11) are located on Blackwell Branch at Chillicothe. The base (100-year) flood elevation for BFE 10 is 738.9 feet and for BFE 11 is 701

  14. New Horizons in Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Geoffrey Gordon

    1991-02-01

    This thesis collects five papers which treat the theory of horizon thermodynamics and its applications to cosmology. In the first paper I consider general, spherically symmetric spacetimes with cosmological and black hole horizons. I find that a state of thermal equilibrium may exist in classical manifolds with two horizons so long as a matter distribution is present. I calculate the Euclidean action for non-classical manifolds with and without boundary and relate it to the grand canonical weighting factor. I find that the mean thermal energy of the cosmological horizon is negative. In the second paper I derive the first law of thermodynamics for bounded, static, spherically symmetric spacetimes which include a matter distribution and either a black hole or cosmological horizon. I calculate heat capacities associated with matter/horizon systems and find that they may be positive or negative depending on the matter configuration. I discuss the case in which the cosmological constant is allowed to vary and conclude that the Hawking/Coleman mechanisms for explaining the low value of the cosmological constant are not well formulated. In the third paper, co-authored by Jorma Louko, we analyze variational principles for non-smooth metrics. These principles give insight to the problem of constructing minisuperspace path integrals in horizon statistical mechanics and quantum cosmology. We demonstrate that smoothness conditions can be derived from the variational principle as equations of motion. We suggest a new prescription for minisuperspace path integrals on the manifold | D times S^2. In the fourth paper, I examine the contribution of the horizon energy density to black hole temperature. I show the existence of positive heat capacity solutions in the small mass regime. In the fifth paper, co-authored by Diego Pavon we investigate the role of primordial black holes in the very early universe under SU(3) times SU(2) times U (1), SU(5), and their supersymmetric

  15. A Time-Series of Surface Oil Distribution Detected by Satellite SAR During the Deepwater Horizon Blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; Solow, A.; Daneshgar, S.; Beet, A.

    2013-12-01

    Oil discharged as a result of the Deepwater Horizon disaster was detected on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico by synthetic aperture radar satellites from 25 April 2010 until 4 August 2010. SAR images were not restricted by daylight or cloud-cover. Distribution of this material is a tracer for potential environmental impacts and an indicator of impact mitigation due to response efforts and physical forcing factors. We used a texture classifying neural network algorithm for semi-supervised processing of 176 SAR images from the ENVISAT, RADARSAT I, and COSMO-SKYMED satellites. This yielded an estimate the proportion of oil-covered water within the region sampled by each image with a nominal resolution of 10,000 sq m (100m pixels), which was compiled as a 5-km equal area grid covering the northern Gulf of Mexico. Few images covered the entire impact area, so analysis was required to compile a regular time-series of the oil cover. A Gaussian kernel using a bandwidth of 2 d was used to estimate oil cover percent in each grid at noon and midnight throughout the interval. Variance and confidence intervals were calculated for each grid and for the global 12-h totals. Results animated across the impact region show the spread of oil under the influence of physical factors. Oil cover reached an early peak of 17032.26 sq km (sd 460.077) on 18 May, decreasing to 27% of this total on 4 June, following by sharp increase to an overall maximum of 18424.56 sq km (sd 424.726) on 19 June. There was a significant negative correlation between average wind stress and the total area of oil cover throughout the time-series. Correlation between response efforts including aerial and subsurface application of dispersants and burning of gathered oil was negative, positive, or indeterminate at different time segments during the event. Daily totals for oil-covered surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico during 25 April - 9 August 2010 with upper and lower 0.95 confidence limits on estimate. (No oil

  16. Base (100-year) flood elevations for selected sites in Marion County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, Rodney E.; Wilson, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary requirement for community participation in the National Flood Insurance Program is the adoption and enforcement of floodplain management requirements that minimize the potential for flood damages to new construction and avoid aggravating existing flooding conditions. This report provides base flood elevations (BFE) for a 100-year recurrence flood for use in the management and regulation of 14 flood-hazard areas designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency as approximate Zone A areas in Marion County, Missouri. The one-dimensional surface-water flow model, HEC-RAS, was used to compute the base (100-year) flood elevations for the 14 Zone A sites. The 14 sites were located at U.S., State, or County road crossings and the base flood elevation was determined at the upstream side of each crossing. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 1, 2, and 3 on the South Fork North River near Monroe City, Missouri, are 627.7, 579.2, and 545.9 feet above sea level. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 4, 5, 6, and 7 on the main stem of the North River near or at Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri, are 560.5, 539.7, 504.2, and 494.4 feet above sea level. BFE 8 is located on Big Branch near Philadelphia, a tributary to the North River, and the base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 530.5 feet above sea level. One site (BFE 9) is located on the South River near Monroe City, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevation at this site is 619.1 feet above sea level. Site BFE 10 is located on Bear Creek near Hannibal, Missouri, and the base (100-year) elevation is 565.5 feet above sea level. The four remaining sites (BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14) are located on the South Fabius River near Philadelphia and Palmyra, Missouri. The base (100-year) flood elevations for BFE 11, 12, 13, and 14 are 591.2, 578.4, 538.7, and 506.9 feet above sea level.

  17. The Archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism: Documenting 100 Years of Carnegie Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington document more than a century of geophysical and astronomical investigations. Primary source materials available for historical research include field and laboratory notebooks, equipment designs, plans for observatories and research vessels, scientists' correspondence, and thousands of expedition and instrument photographs. Yet despite its history, DTM long lacked a systematic approach to managing its documentary heritage. A preliminary records survey conducted in 2001 identified more than 1,000 linear feet of historically-valuable records languishing in dusty, poorly-accessible storerooms. Intellectual control at that time was minimal. With support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the "Carnegie Legacy Project" was initiated in 2003 to preserve, organize, and facilitate access to DTM's archival records, as well as those of the Carnegie Institution's administrative headquarters and Geophysical Laboratory. Professional archivists were hired to process the 100-year backlog of records. Policies and procedures were established to ensure that all work conformed to national archival standards. Records were appraised, organized, and rehoused in acid-free containers, and finding aids were created for the project web site. Standardized descriptions of each collection were contributed to the WorldCat bibliographic database and the AIP International Catalog of Sources for History of Physics. Historic photographs and documents were digitized for online exhibitions to raise awareness of the archives among researchers and the general public. The success of the Legacy Project depended on collaboration between archivists, librarians, historians, data specialists, and scientists. This presentation will discuss key aspects (funding, staffing, preservation, access, outreach) of the Legacy Project and is aimed at personnel in observatories, research

  18. 100 years of California’s water rights system: patterns, trends and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, Theodore E.; Viers, Joshua H.

    2014-08-01

    For 100 years, California’s State Water Resources Control Board and its predecessors have been responsible for allocating available water supplies to beneficial uses, but inaccurate and incomplete accounting of water rights has made the state ill-equipped to satisfy growing societal demands for water supply reliability and healthy ecosystems. Here, we present the first comprehensive evaluation of appropriative water rights to identify where, and to what extent, water has been dedicated to human uses relative to natural supplies. The results show that water right allocations total 400 billion cubic meters, approximately five times the state’s mean annual runoff. In the state’s major river basins, water rights account for up to 1000% of natural surface water supplies, with the greatest degree of appropriation observed in tributaries to the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and in coastal streams in southern California. Comparisons with water supplies and estimates of actual use indicate substantial uncertainty in how water rights are exercised. In arid regions such as California, over-allocation of surface water coupled with trends of decreasing supply suggest that new water demands will be met by re-allocation from existing uses. Without improvements to the water rights system, growing human and environmental demands portend an intensification of regional water scarcity and social conflict. California’s legal framework for managing its water resources is largely compatible with needed reforms, but additional public investment is required to enhance the capacity of the state’s water management institutions to effectively track and regulate water rights.

  19. A 100 year record of ion chemistry from Agassiz Ice Cap Northern Ellesmere Island NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerner, Roy M.; Fisher, David A.; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko

    Two ice cores from the top of Agassiz Ice Cap, one from a snow scoured and the other from an unscoured zone, cover 80 and 100 yr of snow deposition respectively. The time scale for the cores is based on seasonal ion signals, a known stratigraphic horizon (1962), and a marked volcanic signature of high SO 2-4, representing Katmai (1912). A marked increase in the SO 2-4 and NO -3 ion which began in the middle of the 19th century is compared with the earlier increase in Greenland and attributed to a different combination of aerosol sources. A case is made for dry deposition of ions in winter, based on the continued presence of winter ion peaks at a site that δ18O indicates has almost no winter snow accumulation. This case is supported by the snowfall record at a nearby Automatic Weather Station, which shows there is very little winter snowfall at these sites, and by the fact that different accumulation rates and ion concentrations at each site effect almost the same ion fluxes. There is no evidence in either of the cores for a change in the levels of pollutant NO -3 and SO 2-4 ion concentrations, due to improvement in emission technologies in the western nations, over the last two decades. The lack of change may indicate that Russia is the dominant source for aerosols at this site.

  20. A Tri-centennial Portrait. Minorities and Women 100 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerard, Paul

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that during the next 100 years, progress for women, blacks, the Spanish surnamed, American Indians, and all other minorities--including the poor and the elderly--will depend on how willing they are to coalesce with each other. (Author)

  1. What Would You Look Like If You Were 100 Years Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project inspired by the 100th day of school in which first-grade students created a self-portrait of themselves at 100 years old and wrote an accompanying essay. States that the students drew wrinkles on the faces, age-appropriate clothing, gray or white hair, and even glasses as a finishing touch. (CMK)

  2. 100 Years of Cotton Production, Harvesting and Ginning Systems Engineering: 1907 - 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) celebrated its centennial year during 2007. As part of the ASABE centennial, the authors were asked to describe agricultural engineering accomplishments in U.S. cotton production, harvesting and ginning over the past 100 years. ...

  3. Mechanics of rotating isolated horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Beetle, Christopher; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2001-08-15

    Black hole mechanics was recently extended by replacing the more commonly used event horizons in stationary space-times with isolated horizons in more general space-times (which may admit radiation arbitrarily close to black holes). However, so far the detailed analysis has been restricted to nonrotating black holes (although it incorporated arbitrary distortion, as well as electromagnetic, Yang-Mills, and dilatonic charges). We now fill this gap by first introducing the notion of isolated horizon angular momentum and then extending the first law to the rotating case.

  4. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  5. Creating Long Term Income Streams for the 100 Year Starship Study Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, A. J.

    Development and execution of long term research projects are very dependent on a consistent application of funding to maximize the potential for success. The business structure for the 100 Year Starship Study project should allow for multiple income streams to cover the expenses of the research objectives. The following examples illustrate the range of potential avenues: 1) affiliation with a charitable foundation for creating a donation program to fund a long term endowment for research, 2) application for grants to fund initial research projects and establish the core expertise of the research entity, 3) development of intellectual property which can then be licensed for additional revenue, 4) creation of spinout companies with equity positions retained by the lab for funding the endowment, and 5) funded research which is dual use for the technology goals of the interstellar flight research objectives. With the establishment of a diversified stream of funding options, then the endowment can be funded at a level to permit dedicated research on the interstellar flight topics. This paper will focus on the strategy of creating spinout companies to create income streams which would fund the endowment of the 100 Year Starship Study effort. This technique is widely used by universities seeking to commercially develop and market technologies developed by university researchers. An approach will be outlined for applying this technique to potentially marketable technologies generated as a part of the 100 Year Starship Study effort.

  6. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory: the first 100 years of neurosurgical research.

    PubMed

    Sampath, P; Long, D M; Brem, H

    2000-01-01

    Modern neurosurgery has long had a strong laboratory foundation, and much of this tradition can be traced to the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Founded with the basic goals of investigating the causes and symptoms of disease and establishing the crucial role that surgeons may play in the treatment of disease, the Hunterian laboratory has adhered to these tenets, despite the dramatic changes in neurosurgery that have occurred in the last 100 years. Named for the famous English surgeon John Hunter (1728-1793), the Hunterian laboratory was conceived by William Welch and William Halsted as a special laboratory for experimental work in surgery and pathology. In 1904, Harvey Cushing was appointed by Halsted to direct the laboratory. With the three primary goals of student education, veterinary surgery that stressed surgical techniques, and meticulous surgical and laboratory record-keeping, the laboratory was quite productive, introducing the use of physiological saline solutions, describing the anatomic features and function of the pituitary gland, and establishing the field of endocrinology. In addition, the original development of hanging drop tissue culture, fundamental investigations into cerebrospinal fluid, and countless contributions to otolaryngology by Samuel Crowe all occurred during this "crucible" period. In 1912, Cushing was succeeded by Walter Dandy, whose work on experimental hydrocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid circulation led to the development of pneumoencephalography. The early days of neurosurgery evolved with close ties to general surgery, and so did the Hunterian laboratory. After Dandy began devoting his time to clinical work, general surgeons (first Jay McLean and then, in 1922, Ferdinand Lee) became the directors of the laboratory. Between 1928 and 1942, more than 150 original articles were issued from the Hunterian laboratory; these articles described significant advances in surgery, including pioneering

  7. New Horizons at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    2007-12-01

    New Horizons is NASA's reconnaissance mission to explore the Pluto system and small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). I will describe the mission's history, current status, and instrument suite. I will then describe the Jupiter gravity assist flyby New Horizons conducted in early-mid 2007. This flyby involved over 700 observations in the Jupiter system, and represents the only spacecraft encounter with Jupiter planned to occur between the demise of Galileo in 2003 and the arrival of Juno in 2016. I will focus on results obtained, including the first-ever exploration of a giant planet magnetotail, new compositional observations of icy Galilean satellites, exploration of Jupiter's tenuous ring system, the first high-resolution spacecraft imagery of Jupiter's newly-generated little red spot, and the first-ever time-lapse imagery of an Ionian volcano eruption.

  8. Modeling the Emergent Impacts of Harvesting Acadian Forests over 100+ Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Plug, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    Harvesting strategies and policies for Acadian forest in Nova Scotia, Canada, presently are set using Decision Support Models (DSMs) that aim to maximize the long-term (>100y) value of forests through decisions implemented over short time horizons (5-80 years). However, DSMs typically are aspatial, lack ecological processes and do not treat erosion, so the long-term (>100y) emergent impacts of the prescribed forestry decisions on erosion and vegetation in Acadian forests remain poorly known. To better understand these impacts, we created an equation-based model that simulates the evolution of a ≥4 km2 forest in time steps of 1 y and at a spatial resolution of 3 m2, the footprint of a single mature tree. The model combines 1) ecological processes of recruitment, competition, and mortality; 2) geomorphic processes of hillslope erosion; 3) anthropic processes of tree harvesting, replanting, and road construction under constraints imposed by regulations and cost/benefit ratio. The model uses digital elevation models, parameters (where available), and calibration (where measurements are not available) for conditions presently found in central Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The model is unique because it 1) deals with the impacts of harvesting on an Acadian forest; and 2) vegetation and erosion are coupled. The model was tested by comparing the species-specific biomass of long-term (40 y) forest plot data to simulated results. At the spatial scale of individual 1 ha plots, model predictions presently account for approximately 50% of observed biomass changes through time, but predictions are hampered by the effects of serendipitous "random" events such as single tree windfall. Harvesting increases the cumulative erosion over 3000 years by 240% when compared to an old growth forest and significantly suppresses the growth of Balsam Fir and Sugar Maple. We discuss further tests of the model, and how it might be used to investigate the long-term sustainability of the

  9. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL No.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-04-30

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  10. Spatio-temporal analysis of rainfall trends over a maritime state (Kerala) of India during the last 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Archana; Ajith Joseph, K.; Nair, K. S.

    2014-05-01

    Kerala, a maritime state of India is bestowed with abundant rainfall which is about three times the national average. This study is conducted to have a better understanding of rainfall variability and trend at regional level for this state during the last 100 years. It is found that the rainfall variation in northern and southern regions of Kerala is large and the deviation is on different timescales. There is a shifting of rainfall mean and variability during the seasons. The trend analysis on rainfall data over the last 100 years reveals that there is a significant (99%) decreasing trend in most of the regions of Kerala especially in the month of January, July and November. The annual and seasonal trends of rainfall in most regions of Kerala are also found to be decreasing significantly. This decreasing trend may be related to global anomalies as a result of anthropogenic green house gas (GHG) emissions due to increased fossil fuel use, land-use change due to urbanisation and deforestation, proliferation in transportation associated atmospheric pollutants. We have also conducted a study of the seasonality index (SI) and found that only one district in the northern region (Kasaragod) has seasonality index of more than 1 and that the distribution of monthly rainfall in this district is mostly attributed to 1 or 2 months. In rest of the districts, the rainfall is markedly seasonal. The trend in SI reveals that the rainfall distribution in these districts has become asymmetric with changes in rainfall distribution.

  11. Fascia Research Congress evidence from the 100 year perspective of Andrew Taylor Still.

    PubMed

    Findley, Thomas W; Shalwala, Mona

    2013-07-01

    More than 100 years ago A.T. Still MD founded osteopathic medicine, and specifically described fascia as a covering, with common origins of layers of the fascial system despite diverse names for individual parts. Fascia assists gliding and fluid flow and is highly innervated. Fascia is intimately involved with respiration and with nourishment of all cells of the body, including those of disease and cancer. This paper reviews information presented at the first three International Fascia Research Congresses in 2007, 2009 and 2012 from the perspective of Dr Still, that fascia is vital for organism's growth and support, and it is where disease is sown.

  12. Acute Torsion of the Gallbladder in a 100-Year-Old Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Assad M.; Welling, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Torsion of the gallbladder is rare. However, the surgeon should be aware of it and that unusual presentations in the elderly make early diagnosis very difficult. A 100-year-old white female presented with right-sided abdominal pain and was found to have acute torsion of the gallbladder. The clinical picture, diagnostic tests, and operative findings are outlined. Serial evaluations of the patient's condition and a high index of suspicion are essential elements for prompt recognition and early surgical management. PMID:3999156

  13. Cherishing the past: 100 years of nursing education at the American University of Beirut.

    PubMed

    Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Balian, Sossy A; Arevian, Mary

    2006-10-01

    This article describes the foundation and the development of nursing education at the American University of Beirut, the first professional school in the country and the region, across 100 years (1905-2005). It talks about the early years, pioneering achievements (1905-1940), the school's leadership in nursing from 1940 to 1976, the war years from 1976 to 1993, and postwar global vision (1993-2005). Furthermore, it gives special tribute to the dedication and hard work of the founders, Ms. Jane Elizabeth Van Zandt and Ms. Mary Bliss Dale, and all the directors whose endeavors and wisdom have helped the development of the school from diploma to bachelor and master's programs.

  14. 100 years of Epilepsia: landmark papers and their influence in neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Bruce

    2010-07-01

    As part of the 2009 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Centenary Celebration, a special symposium was dedicated to Epilepsia (100 Years of Epilepsia: Landmark Papers and Their Influence). The Associate Editors were asked to identify a particularly salient and meaningful paper in their areas of expertise. From the content areas of neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry two very interesting papers were identified using quite different ascertainment techniques. One paper addressed the problem of psychosis in temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the other represents the first paper to appear in Epilepsia presenting quantitative assessment of cognitive status in epilepsy. These two papers are reviewed in detail and placed in historical context.

  15. South american geochronology: radiometric time scale for middle to late tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in patagonia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L G; Pascual, R; Curtis, G H; Drake, R E

    1977-03-25

    Radiometric (potassium-argon) age determinations for basalts and tuffs associated with middle to late Tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in Patagonia, southern Argentina, permit refinement of boundaries and hiatuses between beds of Deseadan (early Oligocene) through Friasian (middle to late Miocene) age. At two localities beds of Deseadan age are overlain by basalts, which gave dates of 33.6 and 35.4 million years ago; 34.0 million years ago is tentatively accepted as a terminal date for known Deseadan. At several localities beds of Colhuehuapian age are underlain by basalts, which gave dates ranging from 28.8 to 24.3 million years ago; 25.0 million years is tentatively taken as a basal age for known Colhuehuapian. The paleontological hiatus between known Deseadan and known Colhuehuapian is thus in the order of 9.0 million years. Two tuffs from the Santa Cruz Formation (Santacrucian) gave ages of 21.7 and 18.5 million years. Plagioclase and biotite concentrates of an ignimbrite from the Collón Curá Formation (Friasian) gave ages ranging from 15.4 to 14.0 million years. PMID:17738414

  16. South american geochronology: radiometric time scale for middle to late tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in patagonia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L G; Pascual, R; Curtis, G H; Drake, R E

    1977-03-25

    Radiometric (potassium-argon) age determinations for basalts and tuffs associated with middle to late Tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in Patagonia, southern Argentina, permit refinement of boundaries and hiatuses between beds of Deseadan (early Oligocene) through Friasian (middle to late Miocene) age. At two localities beds of Deseadan age are overlain by basalts, which gave dates of 33.6 and 35.4 million years ago; 34.0 million years ago is tentatively accepted as a terminal date for known Deseadan. At several localities beds of Colhuehuapian age are underlain by basalts, which gave dates ranging from 28.8 to 24.3 million years ago; 25.0 million years is tentatively taken as a basal age for known Colhuehuapian. The paleontological hiatus between known Deseadan and known Colhuehuapian is thus in the order of 9.0 million years. Two tuffs from the Santa Cruz Formation (Santacrucian) gave ages of 21.7 and 18.5 million years. Plagioclase and biotite concentrates of an ignimbrite from the Collón Curá Formation (Friasian) gave ages ranging from 15.4 to 14.0 million years.

  17. Solar wind variations in the 60-100 year period range: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The evidence for and against the reality of a solar wind variation in the period range of 60-100 years is reexamined. Six data sets are reviewed; sunspot numbers, geomagnetic variations, two auroral data sets and two (14)C data sets. These data are proxies for several different aspects of the solar wind and the presence or absence of 60-100 year cyclic behavior in a particular data set does not necessarily imply the presence or absence of this variation in other sets. It was concluded that two different analyses of proxy data for a particular characteristic of the heliospheric solar wind yielded conflicting results. This conflict can be resolved only by future research. It is also definitely confirmed that proxy data for the solar wind in the ecliptic at 1 A.U. undergo a periodic variation with a period of approximately 87 years. The average amplitude and phase of this variation as seen in eleven cycles of proxy data are presented.

  18. Pluto's Atmosphere from the 2015 June 29 Ground-based Stellar Occultation at the Time of the New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, B.; Talbot, J.; Meza, E.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Desmars, J.; Gault, D.; Herald, D.; Kerr, S.; Pavlov, H.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Assafin, M.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Bérard, D.; Kervella, P.; Lecacheux, J.; Lellouch, E.; Beisker, W.; Dunham, D.; Jelínek, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Querel, R.; Yock, P. C.; Cole, A. A.; Giles, A. B.; Hill, K. M.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Harnisch, M.; Jansen, R.; Pennell, A.; Todd, S.; Allen, W. H.; Graham, P. B.; Loader, B.; McKay, G.; Milner, J.; Parker, S.; Barry, M. A.; Bradshaw, J.; Broughton, J.; Davis, L.; Devillepoix, H.; Drummond, J.; Field, L.; Forbes, M.; Giles, D.; Glassey, R.; Groom, R.; Hooper, D.; Horvat, R.; Hudson, G.; Idaczyk, R.; Jenke, D.; Lade, B.; Newman, J.; Nosworthy, P.; Purcell, P.; Skilton, P. F.; Streamer, M.; Unwin, M.; Watanabe, H.; White, G. L.; Watson, D.

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a multi-chord Pluto stellar occultation observed on 2015 June 29 from New Zealand and Australia. This occurred only two weeks before the NASA New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system and serves as a useful comparison between ground-based and space results. We find that Pluto's atmosphere is still expanding, with a significant pressure increase of 5 ± 2% since 2013 and a factor of almost three since 1988. This trend rules out, as of today, an atmospheric collapse associated with Pluto's recession from the Sun. A central flash, a rare occurrence, was observed from several sites in New Zealand. The flash shape and amplitude are compatible with a spherical and transparent atmospheric layer of roughly 3 km in thickness whose base lies at about 4 km above Pluto's surface, and where an average thermal gradient of about 5 K km-1 prevails. We discuss the possibility that small departures between the observed and modeled flash are caused by local topographic features (mountains) along Pluto's limb that block the stellar light. Finally, using two possible temperature profiles, and extrapolating our pressure profile from our deepest accessible level down to the surface, we obtain a possible range of 11.9-13.7 μbar for the surface pressure. Partly based on observations made with the ESO WFI camera at the 2.2 m Telescope (La Silla), under program ID 079.A-9202(A) within the agreement between the ON/MCTI and the Max Planck Society, with the ESO camera NACO at the Very Large Telescope (Paranal), under program ID 089.C-0314(C), and at the Pico dos Dias Observatory/LNA, Brazil.

  19. Are Geodetically and Geologically Constrained Vertical Deformation Models Compatible With the 100-Year Coastal Tide Gauge Record in California?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Sea level change has been continuously recorded along the California coastline at several tide gauge stations for the past 50-100 years. These stations provide a temporal record of sea level change, generally attributed to post-glacial rebound and ocean climate phenomena. However, geological processes, including displacements from large earthquakes, have also been shown to produce sea level variations. Furthermore, the vertical tectonic response to interseismic strain accumulation in regions of major fault bends has been shown to produce uplift and subsidence rates consistent with sea level trends. To investigate the long-term extent and implication of tectonic deformation on sea level change, we compare time series data from California tide gauge stations to model estimates of vertical displacements produced by earthquake cycle deformation. Using a 3-D semi-analytic viscoelastic model, we combine geologic slip rates, geodetic velocities, and historical seismic data to simulate both horizontal and vertical deformation of the San Andreas Fault System. Using this model, we generate a time-series of vertical displacements spanning the 100-year sea level record and compare this to tide gauge data provided by the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Comparison between sea level data and a variety of geologically and geodetically constrained models confirms that the two are highly compatible. Vertical displacements are largely controlled by interseismic strain accumulation, however displacements from major earthquakes are also required to explain varying trends in the sea level data. Models based on elastic plate thicknesses of 30-50km and viscosities of 7x10^1^8-2x10^1^9 Pa-s produce vertical displacements at tide-gauge locations that explain long-term trends in the sea level record to a high degree of accuracy at nearly all stations. However, unmodeled phenomena are also present in the sea level data and require further inspection.

  20. 100 years of Pb deposition and transport in soils in Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In Illinois, atmospheric deposition is one major source of heavy metal inputs to agricultural land. The atmospheric Pb deposition and transport record in agricultural soils in Champaign, Illinois, was established by studying surface and subsurface soil samples collected during the past 100 years from the Morrow Plots on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Pb content in the soil samples was measured and the Ph deposition fluxes were calculated. The Pb content in surface soils increased sharply in the first half of the 20th century, and stayed invariant since. The maximum Pb flux from the atmosphere was estimated to be 27 (??14) ??g cm-2 yr-1 around 1940. The major pollution source for this increase probably was residential coal burning. It was estimated that in 50 yr, more than 50% of the Pb input had been lost from the surface soils.

  1. The Reissner Canard: The first all-metal airplane 100 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Egon

    2012-10-01

    In 1912 Professor Hans Reissner of the Technical University Aachen built a canard-type aeroplane, the world-wide first completely out of metal: although the Reissner Canard initiated a new technology with the Junkers J1 the first to follow in 1915 and 1000 more until now, little is known about the very first steps way back in Aachen. This paper tries to recapture some details of the developments 100 years ago with the aid of early publications and photographs and shed some light on the first wing fabricated out of a corrugated aluminum sheet mounted at the tail of the braced-steel-pipe fuselage to earn its airworthiness in Berlin Johannisthal in 1912.

  2. Sustainable Foods and Medicines Support Vitality, Sex and Longevity for a 100-Year Starship Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. R.

    Extended space flight requires foods and medicines that sustain crew health and vitality. The health and therapeutic needs for the entire crew and their children for a 100-year space flight must be sustainable. The starship cannot depend on resupply or carry a large cargo of pharmaceuticals. Everything in the starship must be completely recyclable and reconstructable, including food, feed, textiles, building materials, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and medicines. Smart microfarms will produce functional foods with superior nutrition and sensory attributes. These foods provide high-quality protein and nutralence (nutrient density), that avoids obesity, diabetes, and other Western diseases. The combination of functional foods, lifestyle actions, and medicines will support crew immunity, energy, vitality, sustained strong health, and longevity. Smart microfarms enable the production of fresh medicines in hours or days, eliminating the need for a large dispensary, which eliminates concern over drug shelf life. Smart microfarms are adaptable to the extreme growing area, resource, and environmental constraints associated with an extended starship expedition.

  3. PREFACE: Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá-Durán, P.; Font, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Lledó, M. A.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Olmo, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the international scientific conference ''Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution''. The conference was devoted to discussing the current state-of-the-art of a wide variety of topics of research in the fields of Gravitation and General Relativity in the ''pre-centennial'' year of General Relativity. The name of the conference was chosen to highlight the importance of the upcoming one hundredth anniversary of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, officially established by the Internal Society on General Relativity and Gravitation in November 25th, 2015. In particular, the conference was organized along three main lines of present-day research and applications of the theory, namely, Relativistic Astrophysics, Mathematical Relativity, and the interface between Gravitation and Quantum Field Theory.

  4. Tree rings record 100 years of hydrologic change within a wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, Thomas M.; Kappel, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrology and tree growth were investigated within a small wetland in the Tully Valley of central New York, about 20 miles south of Syracuse. In late 1994 it was noted that some wetland trees were dying, and local residents reported that flow of a small stream draining the wetland seemingly increased and became more brackish since the mid to late 1980s. The wetland is about 3 miles north of an extensive salt mining operation known to have degraded local water quality, but no effects of mining had been confirmed previously near the wetland. The oldest wetland trees started to grow before the onset of mining in 1889, and thus tree-ring studies were undertaken not only to investi-gate recent hydrologic change within the wetland, but also to search for evidence of any other changes during the last 100 years.

  5. Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916): celebrating 100 years of cellular immunology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Underhill, David M; Gordon, Siamon; Imhof, Beat A; Núñez, Gabriel; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    The year 2016 marks 100 years since the death of Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916), the Russian zoologist who pioneered the study of cellular immunology and who is widely credited with the discovery of phagocytosis, for which he was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. However, his long scientific career spanned many disciplines and has had far-reaching effects on modern immunology beyond the study of phagocytosis. In this Viewpoint article, five leading immunologists from the fields of phagocytosis, macrophage biology, leukocyte migration, the microbiota and intravital imaging tell Nature Reviews Immunology how Metchnikoff's work has influenced past, present and future research in their respective fields.

  6. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g <= 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g <= 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ~0.1-0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  7. 100 Years of British military neurosurgery: on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A G

    2015-01-01

    Death from head injuries has been a feature of conflicts throughout the world for centuries. The burden of mortality has been variously affected by the evolution in weaponry from war-hammers to explosive ordnance, the influence of armour on survivability and the changing likelihood of infection as a complicating factor. Surgery evolved from haphazard trephination to valiant, yet disjointed, neurosurgery by a variety of great historical surgeons until the Crimean War of 1853-1856. However, it was events initiated by the Great War of 1914-1918 that not only marked the development of modern neurosurgical techniques, but our approach to military surgery as a whole. Here the author describes how 100 years of conflict and the input and intertwining relationships between the 20th century's great neurosurgeons established neurosurgery in the United Kingdom and beyond. PMID:26292388

  8. Long term (>100 years) Carbon Sequestration in California Coastal Salt Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. N.; MacDonald, G. M.; Holmquist, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal salt marsh ecosystems rank as one of the ecosystems which sequester the most carbon (C) in the world (Chmura, 2003; Mcleod et al., 2011). California hosts multiple small marsh ecosystems outside of the San Francisco Bay that are limited in geographic extent but still contribute significantly to global soil C. This study evaluates 11 marsh sites along the California coast for annual soil C sequestration rates using 14C, 137Cs, and 210Pb chronologies. Estimates of carbon sequestration for California over the past 100 years from this study average at 49 g C m-2 yr-1. Long term estimates of soil C generally are lower because of natural decomposition of organic C, but this study indicates a persistence of high C storage capacity for coastal marsh systems. These estimates provide valuable insight into the long term capacity for coastal salt marshes to mitigate climate change through sequestration of C.

  9. Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916): celebrating 100 years of cellular immunology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Underhill, David M; Gordon, Siamon; Imhof, Beat A; Núñez, Gabriel; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    The year 2016 marks 100 years since the death of Élie Metchnikoff (1845-1916), the Russian zoologist who pioneered the study of cellular immunology and who is widely credited with the discovery of phagocytosis, for which he was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. However, his long scientific career spanned many disciplines and has had far-reaching effects on modern immunology beyond the study of phagocytosis. In this Viewpoint article, five leading immunologists from the fields of phagocytosis, macrophage biology, leukocyte migration, the microbiota and intravital imaging tell Nature Reviews Immunology how Metchnikoff's work has influenced past, present and future research in their respective fields. PMID:27477126

  10. Beyond the horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, Martin B; Mahato, Manavendra

    2006-05-15

    Cosmic horizons arise in general relativity in the context of black holes and in certain cosmologies. Classically, regions beyond a horizon are inaccessible to causal observers. However, quantum mechanical correlations may exist across horizons that may influence local observations. For the case of de Sitter space, we show how a single particle excitation behind the horizon changes the density matrix governing local observables. As compared to the vacuum state, we calculate the change in the average energy and entropy per unit volume. This illustrates what may be a generic property allowing some features of spacetime beyond a horizon to be inferred.

  11. Hall scrambling on black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Willy; Kundu, Sandipan

    2015-08-01

    We explore the effect of the electrodynamics θ angle on the macroscopic properties of black hole horizons. Using only classical Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory in (3 +1 ) dimensions, in the form of the membrane paradigm, we show that in the presence of the θ term, a black hole horizon behaves as a Hall conductor, for an observer hovering outside. We study how localized perturbations created on the stretched horizon scramble on the horizon by dropping a charged particle. We show that the θ angle affects the way perturbations scramble on the horizon, in particular, it introduces vortices without changing the scrambling time. This Hall scrambling of information is also expected to occur on cosmological horizons.

  12. Finite-Horizon Near-Optimal Output Feedback Neural Network Control of Quantized Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Input Constraint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Zhao, Qiming; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-08-01

    The output feedback-based near-optimal regulation of uncertain and quantized nonlinear discrete-time systems in affine form with control constraint over finite horizon is addressed in this paper. First, the effect of input constraint is handled using a nonquadratic cost functional. Next, a neural network (NN)-based Luenberger observer is proposed to reconstruct both the system states and the control coefficient matrix so that a separate identifier is not needed. Then, approximate dynamic programming-based actor-critic framework is utilized to approximate the time-varying solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman using NNs with constant weights and time-dependent activation functions. A new error term is defined and incorporated in the NN update law so that the terminal constraint error is also minimized over time. Finally, a novel dynamic quantizer for the control inputs with adaptive step size is designed to eliminate the quantization error overtime, thus overcoming the drawback of the traditional uniform quantizer. The proposed scheme functions in a forward-in-time manner without offline training phase. Lyapunov analysis is used to investigate the stability. Simulation results are given to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method. PMID:25794403

  13. Finite-Horizon Near-Optimal Output Feedback Neural Network Control of Quantized Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Input Constraint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Zhao, Qiming; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-08-01

    The output feedback-based near-optimal regulation of uncertain and quantized nonlinear discrete-time systems in affine form with control constraint over finite horizon is addressed in this paper. First, the effect of input constraint is handled using a nonquadratic cost functional. Next, a neural network (NN)-based Luenberger observer is proposed to reconstruct both the system states and the control coefficient matrix so that a separate identifier is not needed. Then, approximate dynamic programming-based actor-critic framework is utilized to approximate the time-varying solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman using NNs with constant weights and time-dependent activation functions. A new error term is defined and incorporated in the NN update law so that the terminal constraint error is also minimized over time. Finally, a novel dynamic quantizer for the control inputs with adaptive step size is designed to eliminate the quantization error overtime, thus overcoming the drawback of the traditional uniform quantizer. The proposed scheme functions in a forward-in-time manner without offline training phase. Lyapunov analysis is used to investigate the stability. Simulation results are given to show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. Flood risk management in the Thames Estuary looking ahead 100 years.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Sarah; Donovan, Bill

    2005-06-15

    The River Thames tidal defences have provided protection against the increasing threat of tidal flooding from the North Sea for more than 2000 years. The flood of 1953 was the catalyst for the construction of the current system of River Thames tidal defences, which includes the Thames Barrier, and has provided one of the best standards of flood defence in the UK for over 20 years. Substantial growth is planned through "Thames Gateway", a regeneration initiative of the United Kingdom government. These new developments will fundamentally change the developed footprint in the Thames Estuary flood-plain, and will be in place for at least the next 100 years. This presents a challenge of planning future defence against a background of uncertainty over climate and other environmental change, while ensuring that correct decisions are made concerning the nature and location of new building in the tidal flood-plain. Through its "Thames Estuary 2100" project, the Environment Agency is developing a long-term strategy for flood risk management in the estuary. Implementation of major construction works on the River Thames could commence from around 2015. Alternatively, it may be decided that minimum works are undertaken to provide security and major investment is delayed until uncertainties over climate change have abated. Whatever long-term option is chosen, this must be preceded by a period of collaboration with the Thames Gateway developments to ensure appropriate and sustainable flood defences are incorporated in new riverside construction. PMID:16191661

  15. [From the regional hospital to the Clinical Center in Sarajevo--100 years of work and development].

    PubMed

    Konjhodzić, F

    1994-01-01

    In the course of the past 100 years of the Regional Hospital, the Clinical Centre now experienced a number of organizational, functional and technological changes. There 6 striking periods: 1. Period of the Regional Hospital in Sarajevo, 1894-1918; 2. General State Hospital, 1919-1940; 3. World War 2, 1941-1945; 4. Clinical Hospital of the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo, 1946-1974; 5. University Medical Centre in Sarajevo, 1974-1992; 6. Clinical Centre of University in Sarajevo, since 1992 to the present days. From the modest building like pavilions, the Regional Hospital in Sarajevo became a modern Clinical Centre, 40 units, Institute of Research Work and the developed secondary and terciary health protection, except cardiosurgery. The Clinical Centre and its staff are the true heroes of the war, who succeed in the past two years to extend over a million of helps, nearly 20,000 surgical operations, over 1,5 million of diagnostic treatments, more than 100,000 psychotherapeutical treatments, more than 3,000 deliveries, etc. All that was performed in the extra-ordinary difficult circumstances, without electricity, the damaged equipment, reduced medical staff and shortage of the medical materials and drugs. The Clinical Centre was awarded by the UN for humanity and human rights, 1983 and the Humanist of the Year in B&H in 1993.

  16. Revisiting extreme storms of the past 100 years for future safety of large water management infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Hossain, Faisal

    2016-07-01

    Historical extreme storm events are widely used to make Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) estimates, which form the cornerstone of large water management infrastructure safety. Past studies suggest that extreme precipitation processes can be sensitive to land surface feedback and the planetary warming trend, which makes the future safety of large infrastructures questionable given the projected changes in land cover and temperature in the coming decades. In this study, a numerical modeling framework was employed to reconstruct 10 extreme storms over CONUS that occurred during the past 100 years, which are used by the engineering profession for PMP estimation for large infrastructures such as dams. Results show that the correlation in daily rainfall for such reconstruction can range between 0.4 and 0.7, while the correlation for maximum 3-day accumulation (a standard period used in infrastructure design) is always above 0.5 for post-1948 storms. This suggests that current numerical modeling and reanalysis data allow us to reconstruct big storms after 1948 with acceptable accuracy. For storms prior to 1948, however, reconstruction of storms shows inconsistency with observations. Our study indicates that numerical modeling and data may not have advanced to a sufficient level to understand how such old storms (pre-1948) may behave in future warming and land cover conditions. However, the infrastructure community can certainly rely on the use of model reconstructed extreme storms of the 1948-present period to reassess safety of our large water infrastructures under assumed changes in temperature and land cover.

  17. Rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa during the past 1,100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuren, Dirk; Laird, Kathleen R.; Cumming, Brian F.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of natural long-term rainfall variability is essential for water-resource and land-use management in sub-humid regions of the world. In tropical Africa, data relevant to determining this variability are scarce because of the lack of long instrumental climate records and the limited potential of standard high-resolution proxy records such as tree rings and ice cores. Here we present a decade-scale reconstruction of rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa over the past 1,100 years, based on lake-level and salinity fluctuations of Lake Naivasha (Kenya) inferred from three different palaeolimnological proxies: sediment stratigraphy and the species compositions of fossil diatom and midge assemblages. Our data indicate that, over the past millennium, equatorial east Africa has alternated between contrasting climate conditions, with significantly drier climate than today during the `Medieval Warm Period' (~ AD 1000-1270) and a relatively wet climate during the `Little Ice Age' (~ AD 1270-1850) which was interrupted by three prolonged dry episodes. We also find strong chronological links between the reconstructed history of natural long-term rainfall variation and the pre-colonial cultural history of east Africa, highlighting the importance of a detailed knowledge of natural long-term rainfall fluctuations for sustainable socio-economic development.

  18. Migration and health in Southern Africa: 100 years and still circulating

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Mark N.; Williams, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Migration has deep historical roots in South and Southern Africa and to this day continues to be highly prevalent and a major factor shaping South African society and health. In this paper we examine the role of migration in the spread of two diseases nearly 100 years apart: tuberculosis following the discovery of gold in 1886 and HIV in the early 1990s. Both cases demonstrate the critical role played by human migration in the transmission and subsequent dissemination of these diseases to rural areas. In both cases, migration acts to assemble in one high-risk environment thousands of young men highly susceptible to new diseases. With poor living and working conditions, these migration destinations act as hot-spots for disease transmission. Migration of workers back to rural areas then serves as a highly efficient means of disseminating these diseases to rural populations. We conclude by raising some more recent questions examining the current role of migration in Southern Africa. PMID:24653964

  19. [Advances in the development of new vaccines against tuberculosis. 100 years after the introduction of BCG].

    PubMed

    Krysztopa-Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Lutyńska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The BCG vaccine used in the world for nearly 100 years protects children against the most severe forms of tuberculosis, but its effectiveness in preventing the most commonly occurring tuberculosis and the one burdened with the highest risk of transmission in adults is very diverse. Contraindications for BCG vaccination include HIV infection and other conditions of immunosuppression. Tuberculosis is a global problem difficult to control because of three main reasons: poor diagnostics in developing countries, long-term therapy or discontinuation of treatment resulting in the emergence of drug-resistant mycobacteria, and the availability of a TB vaccine which only protects children from the most severe forms of tuberculosis. BCG has little to no efficacy in preventing the most common adult pulmonary TB. The development of a more effective vaccine against tuberculosis is undoubtedly still a public health priority in order to improve control of the disease throughout the world. Elimination of TB as a global public health goal by 2050 is particularly ambitious and its achievement depends on the development and application of new intervention measures and newly designed vaccines. Currently, 14 newly developed products are undergoing clinical trials. These include a prophylactic vaccine capable of replacing the current BCG, booster vaccines to increase the effects of BCG, and therapeutic vaccines. The aim of the study is to present the current state of knowledge on cutting-edge research into new vaccines against tuberculosis, their efficacy, immunogenicity and potential use in the future.

  20. Deepwater Horizon Situation Report #5

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-10

    At approximately 11:00 pm EDT April 20, 2010 an explosion occurred aboard the Deepwater Horizon mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) located 52 miles Southeast of Venice, LA and 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, LA. The MODU was drilling an exploratory well and was not producing oil at the time of the incident. The Deepwater Horizon MODU sank 1,500 feet northwest of the well site. Detailed information on response and recovery operations can be found at: http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/

  1. Horizon Report: 2009 Economic Development Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Scott, C.; Smith, R.; Stone, S.

    2009-01-01

    The New Media Consortium's Horizon Project is an ongoing research project that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact in education and other industries around the world over a five-year time period. The chief products of the project are the "Horizon Reports", an annual series of publications that…

  2. Project Horizon: How Utah Is Reducing Recidivism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daimar

    2000-01-01

    Project Horizon, Utah's statute to reduce the economic and social cost of recidivism, shifted funding for correctional education to the state education agency. Parolees who participated in Project Horizon had an 18-20 percent lower recidivism rate than nonparticipants and found post-release jobs 89 percent of the time. (JOW)

  3. Does time heal all wounds? Community attachment, natural resource employment, and health impacts in the wake of the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster.

    PubMed

    Cope, Michael R; Slack, Tim; Blanchard, Troy C; Lee, Matthew R

    2013-05-01

    On April 20, 2010, the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon (BP-DH) oil rig exploded, resulting in the largest marine oil spill in history. In this paper we utilize one-of-a-kind household survey data-the Louisiana Community Oil Spill Survey-to examine the impacts of the BP-DH disaster on the mental and physical health of spill affected residents in coastal Louisiana, with a special focus on the influence of community attachment and natural resource employment. We find that levels of both negative mental and physical health were significantly more pronounced at baseline compared to later time points. We show that greater community attachment is linked to lower levels of negative health impacts in the wake of the oil spill and that the disaster had a uniquely negative impact on households involved in the fishing industry. Further, we find evidence that the relationship between community attachment and mental health is more pronounced at later points in time, and that the negative health impacts on fishers have worsened over time. Implications for research and policy are discussed. PMID:23522000

  4. PREFACE: Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors Celebrating 100 years of superconductivity: special issue on the iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George; Greene, Laura; Johnson, Peter

    2011-12-01

    In honor of this year's 100th anniversary of the discovery of superconductivity, this special issue of Reports on Progress in Physics is a dedicated issue to the 'iron-based superconductors'—a new class of high-temperature superconductors that were discovered in 2008. This is the first time the journal has generated a 'theme issue', and we provide this to the community to provide a 'snapshot' of the present status, both for researchers working in this fast-paced field, and for the general physics community. Reports on Progress in Physics publishes three classes of articles—comprehensive full Review Articles, Key Issues Reviews and, most recently, Reports on Progress articles that recount the current status of a rapidly evolving field, befitting of the articles in this special issue. It has been an exciting year for superconductivity—there have been numerous celebrations for this centenary recounting the fascinating history of this field, from seven Nobel prizes to life-saving discoveries that brought us medically useful magnetic resonance imaging. The discovery of a completely new class of high-temperature superconductors, whose mechanism remains as elusive as the cuprates discovered in 1986, has injected a new vitality into this field, and this year those new to the field were provided with the opportunity of interacting with those who have enjoyed a long history in superconductivity. Furthermore, as high-density current carriers with little or no power loss, high-temperature superconductors offer unique solutions to fundamental grid challenges of the 21st century and hold great promise in addressing our global energy challenges. The complexity and promise of these materials has caused our community to more freely share our ideas and results than ever before, and it is gratifying to see how we have grown into an enthusiastic global network to advance the field. This invited collection is true to this agenda and we are delighted to have received contributions

  5. Caspian tern reproduction in the Saginaw Bay ecosystem following a 100-year flood event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, James P.; Auman, Heidi J.; Kurita, Hiroko; Ludwig, Matthew E.; Campbell, Loraine M.; Giesy, John P.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Jones, Paul; Yamashita, Nobu; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Tatsukawa, Ryo

    1993-01-01

    In the 2 years that followed the 100-year flood incident of September 1986 in the Saginaw River/Bay ecosystem, the reproduction of Caspian terns collapsed and then slowly recovered. Egg viability and fledging rates of hatched chicks were drastically depressed in 1987 and 1988. Eggs from clutches laid later in the year were less viable and chicks hatched from these eggs displayed wasting syndromes and deformities. The post-flood rate of deformities in hatched chicks in 1987–1989 was 163-fold greater than background rates for this population in 1962–1967. Embryonic abnormalities and deformities were found in many embryos recovered from dead eggs. Recently published data on planar toxic chemicals from samples of forage fish, tern eggs, and chicks from water birds nesting in the bay implicate planar dioxin-like PCBs 77 and 126 as the sources of these severe bioeffects. The planar PCB congeners accounted for >98% of TCDD-EQ toxicity in the tern eggs, and several were present at levels near or at the LD95 levels each for chicken eggs. Actual TCDD was about 1% of the TCDD-EQ toxicity. Very rapid buildup rates of PCBs were measured in tern eggs. The calculated toxic potency of PCB recovered from tern eggs was about 15-fold greater than parent aroclor 1242 PCB. Smaller tern species were projected to be much more at risk than the larger Caspian tern due to greater standard metabolic rates. The study supports the view that sediment disturbance and sediment banks of toxic chemicals are major threats to upper trophic level fish-eating species.

  6. An epidemiological review of changes in meningococcal biology during the last 100 years

    PubMed Central

    Abio, Anne; Neal, Keith R; Beck, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess changes in trends of meningococcal disease and strain diversity of Neisseria meningitidis in Europe, South America, and Africa over the last 100 years. Methods Healthcare databases and sources of grey literature were searched in 2012 and records were screened against the protocol eligibility criteria using a three-stage sifting process. Studies included in the review were subject to data extraction. Results were summarised using a narrative approach. Results Serogroup A was the dominant cause of invasive meningococcal disease in Europe before and during World Wars I and II. Whilst serogroup B has been dominant from the 1970s in Europe and the 1980s in South America, outbreaks have emerged associated with serogroups W135 and Y in the twenty-first century. There has been a shift in the age groups affected by invasive meningococcal disease with an increase in incidence among the elderly associated with serogroup Y and a decline in serogroup C among adolescent populations. Recent outbreaks of serogroup W135 have occurred in some countries in South America. The epidemiological trend of invasive meningococcal disease has remained largely static across Africa and dominated by serogroup A although recently serogroups X and W135 have accounted for a large proportion of morbidity and mortality. Conclusion The epidemiology of N. meningitidis has been dynamic in Europe and South America especially over the last 30 years. Routine vaccination with serogroup C vaccines has led to reduced carriage and incidence of invasive meningococcal disease and herd immunity. PMID:24392681

  7. To Humbly Go: Guarding Against Perpetuating Models of Colonization in the 100-Year Starship Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, W. R.

    Past patterns of exploration, colonization and exploitation on Earth continue to provide the predominant paradigms that guide many space programs. Any project of crewed space exploration, especially of the magnitude envisioned by the 100-Year Starship Study, must guard against the hubris that may emerge among planners, crew, and others associated with the project, including those industries and bureaucracies that will emerge from the effort. Maintaining a non-exploitative approach may be difficult in consideration of the century of preparatory research and development and the likely multigenerational nature of the voyage itself. Starting now with mission dreamers and planners, the purpose of the voyage must be cast as one of respectful learning and humble discovery, not of conquest (either actual or metaphorical) or other inappropriate models, including military. At a minimum, the Study must actively build non-violence into the voyaging culture it is beginning to create today. References to exploitive colonization, conquest, destiny and other terms from especially American frontier mythology, while tempting in their propagandizing power, should be avoided as they limit creative thinking about alternative possible futures. Future voyagers must strive to adapt to new environments wherever possible and be assimilated by new worlds both biologically and behaviorally rather than to rely on attempts to recreate the Earth they have left. Adaptation should be strongly considered over terraforming. This paper provides an overview of previous work linking the language of colonization to space programs and challenges the extension of the myth of the American frontier to the Starship Study. It argues that such metaphors would be counter-productive at best and have the potential to doom long-term success and survival by planting seeds of social decay and self-destruction. Cautions and recommendations are suggested.

  8. Time- and Oil-Dependent Transcriptomic and Physiological Responses to Deepwater Horizon Oil in Mahi-Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Embryos and Larvae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elvis Genbo; Mager, Edward M; Grosell, Martin; Pasparakis, Christina; Schlenker, Lela S; Stieglitz, John D; Benetti, Daniel; Hazard, E Starr; Courtney, Sean M; Diamante, Graciel; Freitas, Juliane; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-07-19

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill contaminated the spawning habitats for numerous commercially and ecologically important fishes. Exposure to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of oil from the spill has been shown to cause cardiac toxicity during early developmental stages across fishes. To better understand the molecular events and explore new pathways responsible for toxicity, RNA sequencing was performed in conjunction with physiological and morphological assessments to analyze the time-course (24, 48, and 96 h post fertilization (hpf)) of transcriptional and developmental responses in embryos/larvae of mahi-mahi exposed to WAF of weathered (slick) and source DWH oils. Slick oil exposure induced more pronounced changes in gene expression over time than source oil exposure. Predominant transcriptomic responses included alteration of EIF2 signaling, steroid biosynthesis, ribosome biogenesis and activation of the cytochrome P450 pathway. At 96 hpf, slick oil exposure resulted in significant perturbations in eye development and peripheral nervous system, suggesting novel targets in addition to the heart may be involved in the developmental toxicity of DHW oil. Comparisons of changes of cardiac genes with phenotypic responses were consistent with reduced heart rate and increased pericardial edema in larvae exposed to slick oil but not source oil. PMID:27348429

  9. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  10. Combining Neural Networks with Existing Methods to Estimate 1 in 100-Year Flood Event Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newson, A.; See, L.

    2005-12-01

    Over the last fifteen years artificial neural networks (ANN) have been shown to be advantageous for the solution of many hydrological modelling problems. The use of ANNs for flood magnitude estimation in ungauged catchments, however, is a relatively new and under researched area. In this paper ANNs are used to make estimates of the magnitude of the 100-year flood event (Q100) for a number of ungauged catchments. The data used in this study were provided by the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology's Flood Estimation Handbook (FEH), which contains information on catchments across the UK. Sixteen catchment descriptors for 719 catchments were used to train an ANN, which was split into a training, validation and test data set. The goodness-of-fit statistics on the test data set indicated good model performance, with an r-squared value of 0.8 and a coefficient of efficiency of 79 percent. Data for twelve ungauged catchments were then put through the trained ANN to produce estimates of Q100. Two other accepted methodologies were also employed: the FEH statistical method and the FSR (Flood Studies Report) design storm technique, both of which are used to produce flood frequency estimates. The advantage of developing an ANN model is that it provides a third figure to aid a hydrologist in making an accurate estimate. For six of the twelve catchments, there was a relatively low spread between estimates. In these instances, an estimate of Q100 could be made with a fair degree of certainty. Of the remaining six catchments, three had areas greater than 1000km2, which means the FSR design storm estimate cannot be used. Armed with the ANN model and the FEH statistical method the hydrologist still has two possible estimates to consider. For these three catchments, the estimates were also fairly similar, providing additional confidence to the estimation. In summary, the findings of this study have shown that an accurate estimation of Q100 can be made using the catchment descriptors of

  11. The 2010 Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Smith, R.; Stone, S.

    2010-01-01

    The annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. The…

  12. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  13. Semiclassical ultraextremal horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Matyjasek, Jerzy; Zaslavskii, O.B.

    2005-04-15

    We examine backreaction of quantum massive fields on multiply-degenerate (ultraextremal) horizons. It is shown that, under influence of the quantum backreaction, the horizon of such a kind moves to a new position near which the metric does not change its asymptotics, so the ultraextremal black holes and cosmological spacetimes do exist as self-consistent solutions of the semiclassical field equations.

  14. Geochemical and isotopic time series of oil deposited in Barataria Bay and on Grand Isle, Louisiana, after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, D. B.; Schimmelmann, A.; Rosenheim, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    We present time-series of bulk hydrocarbon geochemical and compound specific isotopic data of oiled and tarry sediment deposits from Grand Isle and Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Samples were taken between 46 days and 694 days after the Macondo well blowout, and analyzed for bulk hydrocarbon stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios, n-alkane and other organic molecular characteristics, ramped pyrolysis stable carbon ratios and radiocarbon content, and compound specific isotope analysis. Bulk and compound specific stable hydrogen isotopes point to slight 2H-enrichment attributable to water washing during transport to Grand Isle and Barataria Bay, followed by more subtle changes after deposition that depended in part on the wave energy available locally. Characterization of the n-alkane distributions through time identified subtle shifts in the dominant n-alkanes from water washing and terrestrial degradation. The loss of high molecular weight n-alkanes and an increase in the unresolved complex mixture after day 337 is consistent with a shift from slight to moderate biodegradation. More significant variations were observed in elemental H:C ratios, whereas bulk stable carbon isotope values showed small increases through time. Ramped pyrolysis analyses illustrated relatively volatile and reactive petroleum-derived components were present during the first year following the spill, but they ultimately became less apparent during later sampling. Isotope results from different ramped pyrolysis components are discussed. Compound specific isotope analysis indicate that a combination of variables (e.g., tidal water washing and biodegradation) may impact degradation during the first 200 days. This period was followed by a mixing of Macondo and non-Macondo hydrocarbons in the environment. In sum, our analyses show the complementary roles of abiotic and biotic factors in degradation of the Deepwater Horizon oil that was deposited in different environments of coastal Louisiana.

  15. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Muddy Creek, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Muddy Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. Forty-three cross sections were surveyed and 14 cross sections were synthesized along a 6.7-mile reach of Muddy Creek. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface flood elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile shows the streambed elevation and the location of one bridge, one culvert, and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  16. A technique for estimating heights reached by the 100-year flood on unregulated, nontidal streams in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coble, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method for estimating the heights reached by floods having a recurrence interval of 100 years is defined for nontidal streams with unregulated flows in North Carolina. The flood heights are the vertical distance between stream stage at median discharge (50 percent duration) and the 100-year flood stage and are defined for streams draining areas between 1 and 10,000 square miles for each of the three physiographic areas in the State. An illustrated example of how the method can be used in conjunction with topographic maps to estimate flood heights and delineate inundated areas by interpolation is given.

  17. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity (5-8 April 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    As part of the celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Conference "Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity" was held in Golm, near Potsdam, Germany, on April 5-8, 2005. The Conference was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (also known as the Albert Einstein Institute), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2005. Conference participants discussed progress made in theoretical and experimental research during the 100 years since the publication of Einstein's famous papers in 1905, the year which has gone down in history as 'Albert Einstein's ANNUS MIRABILIS'.

  18. Parity horizons in shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gabriel

    2016-11-01

    I introduce the notion of a parity horizon, and show that many simple solutions of shape dynamics possess them. I show that the event horizons of the known asymptotically flat black hole solutions of shape dynamics are parity horizons and that this notion of parity implies that these horizons possess a notion of CPT invariance that can in some cases be extended to the solution as a whole. I present three new solutions of shape dynamics with parity horizons and find that not only do event horizons become parity horizons in shape dynamics, but observer-dependent horizons and Cauchy horizons do as well. The fact that Cauchy horizons become (singular) parity horizons suggests a general chronology protection mechanism in shape dynamics that prevents the formation of closed timelike curves.

  19. New Horizons at Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-06-01

    The New Horizons mission has revealed Pluto and its moon Charon to be geologically active worlds. The familiar, yet exotic, landforms suggest that geologic processes operate similarly across the Solar System, even in its cold outer reaches.

  20. Extreme climatic events drive mammal irruptions: regression analysis of 100-year trends in desert rainfall and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Greenville, Aaron C; Wardle, Glenda M; Dickman, Chris R

    2012-01-01

    Extreme climatic events, such as flooding rains, extended decadal droughts and heat waves have been identified increasingly as important regulators of natural populations. Climate models predict that global warming will drive changes in rainfall and increase the frequency and severity of extreme events. Consequently, to anticipate how organisms will respond we need to document how changes in extremes of temperature and rainfall compare to trends in the mean values of these variables and over what spatial scales the patterns are consistent. Using the longest historical weather records available for central Australia – 100 years – and quantile regression methods, we investigate if extreme climate events have changed at similar rates to median events, if annual rainfall has increased in variability, and if the frequency of large rainfall events has increased over this period. Specifically, we compared local (individual weather stations) and regional (Simpson Desert) spatial scales, and quantified trends in median (50th quantile) and extreme weather values (5th, 10th, 90th, and 95th quantiles). We found that median and extreme annual minimum and maximum temperatures have increased at both spatial scales over the past century. Rainfall changes have been inconsistent across the Simpson Desert; individual weather stations showed increases in annual rainfall, increased frequency of large rainfall events or more prolonged droughts, depending on the location. In contrast to our prediction, we found no evidence that intra-annual rainfall had become more variable over time. Using long-term live-trapping records (22 years) of desert small mammals as a case study, we demonstrate that irruptive events are driven by extreme rainfalls (>95th quantile) and that increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfall events are likely to drive changes in the populations of these species through direct and indirect changes in predation pressure and wildfires. PMID:23170202

  1. Midlife muscle strength and human longevity up to age 100 years: a 44-year prospective study among a decedent cohort.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Taina; Masaki, Kamal; He, Qimei; Ross, G Webster; Willcox, Bradley J; White, Lon

    2012-06-01

    We studied prospectively the midlife handgrip strength, living habits, and parents' longevity as predictors of length of life up to becoming a centenarian. The participants were 2,239 men from the Honolulu Heart Program/Honolulu-Asia Aging Study who were born before the end of June 1909 and who took part in baseline physical assessment in 1965-1968, when they were 56-68 years old. Deaths were followed until the end of June 2009 for 44 years with complete ascertainment. Longevity was categorized as centenarian (≥100 years, n = 47), nonagenarian (90-99 years, n = 545), octogenarian (80-89 years, n = 847), and ≤79 years (n = 801, reference). The average survival after baseline was 20.8 years (SD = 9.62). Compared with people who died at the age of ≤79 years, centenarians belonged 2.5 times (odds ratio (OR) = 2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-5.10) more often to the highest third of grip strength in midlife, were never smokers (OR = 5.75 95% CI = 3.06-10.80), had participated in physical activity outside work (OR = 1.13 per daily hour, 95% CI = 1.02-1.25), and had a long-lived mother (≥80 vs. ≤60 years, OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.06-5.01). Associations for nonagenarians and octogenarians were parallel, but weaker. Multivariate modeling showed that mother's longevity and offspring's grip strength operated through the same or overlapping pathway to longevity. High midlife grip strength and long-lived mother may indicate resilience to aging, which, combined with healthy lifestyle, increases the probability of extreme longevity.

  2. [Progress and tradition. 100 years of the congress held by the German Society of Urology: Vienna 1907-Berlin 2007].

    PubMed

    Rathert, P

    2007-09-01

    The history of the German Urological Society and their congress reflects the scientific medical achievements of the last 100 years as well as the political and social structure of the twentieth century with the fantastic medical progress and the tremendous catastrophes. The congress in Berlin in 2007 once again links the urological society with the congress in Vienna of 1907.

  3. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Rosebud Creek, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Rosebud Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. The magnitude of the 100-year flood was determined to range from 2,620 to 3,980 ft3/s, depending on location. Field surveys were made at 149 cross sections along a 39-mile reach of Rosebud Creek. An additional 33 cross sections along the same reach were synthesized. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile also shows the streambed elevation and the location of the bridges and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  4. Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

    1989-01-01

    Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory -- A remarkable first 100 years of tracking eruptions and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babb, Janet L.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the centennial of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). With the support and cooperation of visionaries, financiers, scientists, and other individuals and organizations, HVO has successfully achieved 100 years of continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes. As we celebrate this milestone anniversary, we express our sincere mahalo—thanks—to the people who have contributed to and participated in HVO’s mission during this past century. First and foremost, we owe a debt of gratitude to the late Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., the geologist whose vision and efforts led to the founding of HVO. We also acknowledge the pioneering contributions of the late Frank A. Perret, who began the continuous monitoring of Kīlauea in 1911, setting the stage for Jaggar, who took over the work in 1912. Initial support for HVO was provided by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, which financed the initial cache of volcano monitoring instruments and Perret’s work in 1911. The Hawaiian Volcano Research Association, a group of Honolulu businessmen organized by Lorrin A. Thurston, also provided essential funding for HVO’s daily operations starting in mid-1912 and continuing for several decades. Since HVO’s beginning, the University of Hawaiʻi (UH), called the College of Hawaii until 1920, has been an advocate of HVO’s scientific studies. We have benefited from collaborations with UH scientists at both the Hilo and Mänoa campuses and look forward to future cooperative efforts to better understand how Hawaiian volcanoes work. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated HVO continuously since 1947. Before then, HVO was under the administration of various Federal agencies—the U.S. Weather Bureau, at the time part of the Department of Agriculture, from 1919 to 1924; the USGS, which first managed HVO from 1924 to 1935; and the National Park Service from 1935 to 1947. For 76 of its first 100 years, HVO has been

  6. A Centennial Milestone (1910-2010): 100 Years of Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Anniversaries are appropriate times for reflecting on the past and planning for the future, and in this 100th anniversary year of Sigmund Freud's famous group meeting--a meeting among a large group of prominent mental health professionals that provides a useful marker and arguable "starting point" for contemporary youth suicide prevention efforts,…

  7. Stealing a March in the 21st Century: Accelerating Progress in the 100-Year War Against Tobacco Addiction in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Timothy B.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use in the United States has declined dramatically over the past 50 years, with the prevalence of cigarette smoking falling from about 42% of all adults to less than 20% by 2007. If this rate of decline continues, smoking could be eliminated in the United States by 2047. Framed in military parlance, we may be halfway through a 100-year war against the leading public health killer of our time. We describe factors that have contributed to progress over the last 50 years and identify policy and other initiatives that can contribute to the elimination of tobacco use in the United States. PMID:19443815

  8. [Laminaria--a modern cervix dilatation method with more than a 100-year history].

    PubMed

    Jonasson, A

    1984-06-01

    The author surveys the history and present use of laminaria tents for cervix dilatation, their application for 1st and 2nd trimester induced abortions, combined use with other agents (prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2a) and oxytocin), and complications. Laminaria tents are derived from 2 kinds of seaweed. They were 1st used in the US and Japan, and have been used in Sweden and Denmark for 50-60 years. Due to its hygroscopic quality, laminaria gradually dilates the cervix up to 12-13 mm, 15-16 hours after insertion. In a US study of 15,438 patients undergoing vacuum extraction abortion in the 1st trimester, the use of laminaria was found to result in 1/5 fewer complications than the Hegar method (which led to frequent injuries of the cervix musculature and sustained dilatation 6 weeks later). Combined use of laminaria 12-16 hours before injection of PGF2a reduced abortion time from 17.2 to 9.1 hours in 2nd trimester abortions. Combined use of intraamniotic PGF2a, iv oxytocin, and laminaria also reduced induced abortion time. Dilatation with laminaria 8-12 hours before injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in doses of .5 mg/4 hr or 1.0 mg/8 hr shortened abortion time considerably. The use of PGE2 also produced fewer gastrointestinal side effects than PGF2a. Application of laminaria the day before abortion inducement was found to significantly increase Bishop score values and produced a 75%-87% success rate even with an initial Bishop score of less than 5. Complications in the use of laminaria include difficulty of tent removal, cramps, and menstruation-like symptoms in 8-9% of patients. Laminaria is recommended for nontraumatic cervix dilatation because of reduced abortion time, minimal blood loss, high patient tolerance levels, and relatively low incidence of uterus perforation or cervix lacerations. PMID:6565007

  9. The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano—A '100-year' event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surono; Jousset, Philippe; Pallister, John; Boichu, Marie; Buongiorno, M. Fabrizia; Budisantoso, Agus; Costa, Fidel; Andreastuti, Supriyati; Prata, Fred; Schneider, David; Clarisse, Lieven; Humaida, Hanik; Sumarti, Sri; Bignami, Christian; Griswold, Julie; Carn, Simon; Oppenheimer, Clive; Lavigne, Franck

    2012-10-01

    Merapi volcano (Indonesia) is one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in the world. It is known for frequent small to moderate eruptions, pyroclastic flows produced by lava dome collapse, and the large population settled on and around the flanks of the volcano that is at risk. Its usual behavior for the last decades abruptly changed in late October and early November 2010, when the volcano produced its largest and most explosive eruptions in more than a century, displacing at least a third of a million people, and claiming nearly 400 lives. Despite the challenges involved in forecasting this 'hundred year eruption', we show that the magnitude of precursory signals (seismicity, ground deformation, gas emissions) was proportional to the large size and intensity of the eruption. In addition and for the first time, near-real-time satellite radar imagery played an equal role with seismic, geodetic, and gas observations in monitoring eruptive activity during a major volcanic crisis. The Indonesian Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) issued timely forecasts of the magnitude of the eruption phases, saving 10,000-20,000 lives. In addition to reporting on aspects of the crisis management, we report the first synthesis of scientific observations of the eruption. Our monitoring and petrologic data show that the 2010 eruption was fed by rapid ascent of magma from depths ranging from 5 to 30 km. Magma reached the surface with variable gas content resulting in alternating explosive and rapid effusive eruptions, and released a total of ~ 0.44 Tg of SO2. The eruptive behavior seems also related to the seismicity along a tectonic fault more than 40 km from the volcano, highlighting both the complex stress pattern of the Merapi region of Java and the role of magmatic pressurization in activating regional faults. We suggest a dynamic triggering of the main explosions on 3 and 4 November by the passing seismic waves generated by regional earthquakes on

  10. The Pan American Health Organization’s First 100 Years: Reflections of the Director

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, George A. O.

    2002-01-01

    The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has responded to changing political times and different health challenges and has played a significant role in some of the recent achievements in health in the region of the Americas. Some of the more remarkable health gains of the past 8 years owe their success to the broad principles of equity and Pan-Americanism that guide PAHO’s work. The production and use of scientific–technical information is the fundamental underpinning of the technical cooperation that has facilitated the health work of countries. The future is bright for PAHO’s next century. PMID:12453802

  11. Accuracy assessment of the ERP prediction method based on analysis of 100-year ERP series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Z.; Tissen, V. M.

    2012-12-01

    A new method has been developed at the Siberian Research Institute of Metrology (SNIIM) for highly accurate prediction of UT1 and Pole motion (PM). In this study, a detailed comparison was made of real-time UT1 predictions made in 2006-2011 and PMpredictions made in 2009-2011making use of the SNIIM method with simultaneous predictions computed at the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), USNO. Obtained results have shown that proposed method provides better accuracy at different prediction lengths.

  12. The Martian satellites - 100 years on. [Phobos and Deimos observational history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, G. E.; Michael, W. H., Jr.; Pascu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wilkins, G. A.; Woolfson, M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of Phobos and Deimos, the two satellites of Mars, may provide the best observations yet of the material populating the asteroid belt. Viking observations of Phobos showing crater chains and striations are analyzed, and Mariner-9 photometry exhibiting the albedo of the satellite is discussed. A mass determination for Phobos results in a value of 1.1 times 10 to the 19th power g; the mean density of the satellite is set at about 2 g per cu cm, a value suggesting formation of the satellite from material in the asteroid belt.

  13. The InSiGHT database: utilizing 100 years of insights into Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Plazzer, J P; Sijmons, R H; Woods, M O; Peltomäki, P; Thompson, B; Den Dunnen, J T; Macrae, F

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a historical overview of the online database ( www.insight-group.org/mutations ) maintained by the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours. The focus is on the mismatch repair genes which are mutated in Lynch Syndrome. APC, MUTYH and other genes are also an important part of the database, but are not covered here. Over time, as the understanding of the genetics of Lynch Syndrome increased, databases were created to centralise and share the variants which were being detected in ever greater numbers. These databases were eventually merged into the InSiGHT database, a comprehensive repository of gene variant and disease phenotype information, serving as a starting point for important endeavours including variant interpretation, research, diagnostics and enhanced global collection. Pivotal to its success has been the collaborative spirit in which it has been developed, its association with the Human Variome Project, the appointment of a full time curator and its governance stemming from the well established organizational structure of InSiGHT.

  14. Hamiltonian Systems and Optimal Control in Computational Anatomy: 100 Years Since D'Arcy Thompson.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael I; Trouvé, Alain; Younes, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Anatomy project is the morphome-scale study of shape and form, which we model as an orbit under diffeomorphic group action. Metric comparison calculates the geodesic length of the diffeomorphic flow connecting one form to another. Geodesic connection provides a positioning system for coordinatizing the forms and positioning their associated functional information. This article reviews progress since the Euler-Lagrange characterization of the geodesics a decade ago. Geodesic positioning is posed as a series of problems in Hamiltonian control, which emphasize the key reduction from the Eulerian momentum with dimension of the flow of the group, to the parametric coordinates appropriate to the dimension of the submanifolds being positioned. The Hamiltonian viewpoint provides important extensions of the core setting to new, object-informed positioning systems. Several submanifold mapping problems are discussed as they apply to metamorphosis, multiple shape spaces, and longitudinal time series studies of growth and atrophy via shape splines.

  15. Geophysics contributed to the radical change from classical to modern physics 100 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, W.; Wiederkehr, K. H.

    Several major developments in the 1890s resulted in radical changes in physics. These developments included the discovery of X rays and of uranium radiation, or Becquerel rays, and the confirmation of electricity's substantial character—an idea considered by most physicists at that time as obsolete and without foundation. The first measurements of e/m (negative elementary charge divided by mass of the electron) also were taken and, before the decade was over, the elementary charge of an electron was shown to exist.Research in geophysics, especially the research about the formation of fog and atmospheric electricity, found new paths because of these discoveries. However, work in geophysics also led to the further development of atomic and nuclear physics. It was a give and take situation, benefiting both geophysics and physics.

  16. Atmospheric Circulation Variability in the Tropics and the Northern Hemisphere During the Past 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brönnimann, S.; Fischer, A. M.; Griesser, T.; Stickler, A.

    2009-04-01

    Documenting the variability of the large-scale atmospheric circulation during the past is important in order to better understand - and eventually predict - interannual-to-decadal climate variability. The large-scale tropical circulation features such as the Hadley and Walker cells and the monsoon systems play a particularly important role not only because of the effects within the tropics, but also because of their teleconnections to the extratropics. Here we present time series of large-scale atmospheric circulation indices back to 1900 and compare these with output from a 9-member "all forcings" ensemble calculation by a general circulation model. The indices represent the main features of the zonal mean circulation in the northern hemisphere in boreal winter (such as the Hadley circulation and the subtropical jet) as well as aspects of the regional and large-scale circulation (the Indian monsoon and the Pacific North American pattern, PNA). Back to 1948 the indices are taken from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and are statistically reconstructed based on historical upper-air and surface data prior to 1948. We discuss the interannual-to-decadal variability of the index time series and compare them with possible driving factors, such as El Niño/Southern Oscillation, volcanic eruptions and solar activity. The results show that the interannual variability of the Hadley cell and subtropical jet is well reproduced in the model ensemble mean (and hence potentially predictable), whereas the poleward extent of the Hadley cell and the latitude of the subtropical jet are less well predictable. For all indices, the correlation between observations and model ensemble mean agree favourably well with the correlations between individual ensemble members. We find that the source of predictability is mainly related to ENSO. On the decadal scale small but significant effects of solar variability are found.

  17. Sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to 100 years of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Ruud; Stagge, James; Tallaksen, Lena; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2015-04-01

    Evaporation from the vegetated surface is the largest loss term in many, if not the most, water balance studies on earth. As a consequence, an accurate representation of evaporation fluxes is required for appropriate quantification of surface runoff, the soil moisture budget, transpiration, recharge and groundwater processes. However, despite being a key component of the water balance, evaporation figures are usually associated with large uncertainties, as this term is difficult to measure or estimate by modeling. Many modeling frameworks have used the concept of potential evaporation, often estimated for different vegetation classes by multiplying the evaporation from a reference surface ('reference evaporation') with crop specific scaling factors ('crop factors'). Though this two-step potential evaporation approach undoubtedly has practical advantages, the empirical nature of both reference evaporation methods and crop factors limits its usability in extrapolations under non-stationary climatic conditions. We quantified the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates for different vegetation classes using the two-step approach when calibrated using a non-stationary climate. We used the past century's time series of observed climate, containing non-stationary signals of multi-decadal atmospheric oscillations, global warming, and global dimming/brightening, to evaluate the sensitivity of potential evaporation estimates to the choice and length of the calibration period. We show that using empirical coefficients outside their calibration range may lead to systematic differences between process-based and empirical reference evaporation methods, and systematic errors in estimated potential evaporation components. Our hydrological models are to varying extent regression models, which limits their general applicability, and the estimation of potential evaporation is closely linked to climate variability. With our analysis, we want to raise awareness and to provide a

  18. How Earth works 100 years after Wegener's continental drift theory and IGCP 648

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.; Evans, D. A.; Zhong, S.; Eglington, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    It took half a century for Wegener's continental drift theory to be accepted as a fundamental element of the plate tectonic theory. Another half a century on, we are still unsure of the driving mechanism for plate tectonics: is it dominated by thermal convection, gravitational forces, or by a combination of mechanisms? Nonetheless, breakthroughs in the past decades put us in a position to make a major stride in answering this question. These include: (1) widely accepted cyclic occurrences of supercontinent assembly and break-up (whereas random occurrence of supercontinents was an equal possibility in the 1990s); (2) the discovery of two equatorial and antipodal large low seismic velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate the lower mantle and appear to have been the base for almost all mantle plumes since at the Mesozoic, and of subduction of oceanic slabs all the way to the core-mantle boundary, which together suggesting whole-mantle convection; (3) the recognition of true polar wander (TPW) as an important process in Earth history, likely reflecting Earth's major internal mass redistribution events; and (4) rapidly enhancing computer modelling power enabling us to simulate all aspect of Earth's dynamic inner working. Many new yet often controversial ideas have been proposed, such a possible coupling in time (with an offset) and space between supercontinent cycle and superplume (LLSVP) events which oppose to the idea of static and long-lived LLSVPs, and the orthoversion v.s. introversion or extroversion models for supercontinent transition. To fully utilise these advances as well as the rapidly expanding global geoscience databases to address the question of how Earth works, an UNESCO-IUGS sponsored IGCP project No. 648 was formed to coordinate a global cross-disciplinary effort. We aim to achieve a better understanding of the supercontinent cycle, and examine the relationship between supercontinent cycle and global plume events. We will establish a series of global

  19. 100 Years of Glacier Photographs: Available Online at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballagh, L. M.; Wolfe, J.; Wang, I.; Casey, A.; Fetterer, F.

    2004-12-01

    Historic glacier photographs can be used to study fluctuations in glacier extent over time in response to climate change. Researchers can also use the photographs to approximate changes in glacier terminus location and mass balance. The "Glacier Photograph Collection" at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) contains approximately 5,000 photographs, including both aerial and terrestrial images. NSIDC received funding from the NOAA Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) to digitize a portion of the photographs and make an Online Glacier Photograph Database available. The CDMP's primary objective is to preserve climate data and facilitate access to the data. Although digitizing images is expensive, long-term data preservation is a major benefit. When historic photographs are stored on film, images can easily be scratched or damaged. Scanning the images and having them online makes browsing images easier for users. At present, there are 1,313 glacier photographs available online. Additional photos and metadata are being added. The Online Glacier Photograph Database will date from 1883 to 1995, totaling nearly 3,000 photographs available as high resolution TIFF images and lower resolution reference images and thumbnails by the end of 2004. Maintaining accurate metadata records for each photograph is very important. The database is searchable by various fields, including photographer name, photograph date, glacier name, glacier coordinates, state/province, and keyword.

  20. [100 years of drinking water regulation. Retrospective review, current situation and prospects].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Krasovsky, G N; Egorova, N A; Mikhailova, R I

    2014-01-01

    There is considered the history of the development of legislative requirements to the regulation of the quality of drinking water in different countries and international organizations during the period from 1912 to the present time. In terms of comparative analysis there is analyzed the current state of regulatory frameworks of the Russian Federation, WHO, EU, Finland, the UK, Singapore, Australia, Japan, China, Nigeria, the United States and Canada in the field of providing favorable conditions of population drinking water use. There has been noted the significant progress in standardization of the content of the biogenic elements and chemical pollution of drinking water in the absence of uniform requirements to the composition and properties of drinking water globally, that is bound to the need to take into account the national peculiarities of drinking water supply within the separate countries. As promising directions for improving regulation of drinking water quality there are noted: the development of new standards for prioritized water pollution, periodic review ofstandards after appearance of the new scientific data on the biological action of substances, the use of the concept of risk, the harmonization of the normative values and the assessment of the possibility of introduction into the practice the one more criterion of profitableness of population water use--the bioenergetic state of the water.

  1. [Leprosy in Germany 100 years and the early development of anti-leprosy drugs].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M; Brömmelhaus, H

    2007-10-01

    Leprosy was nearly eliminated in central Europe by the beginning of 18th century. In the 2nd half of the 19th century, leprosy was imported by Lithuanian rural workers immigrating from the Russian empire into East Prussia. At that time, the ways of infection, the bacteria, and essential diagnostic methods were already known, but there was no effective treatment. A leprosarium was founded in 1899 in Memel. Legislation in 1900 and 1904 regulated the fight against the disease. The patients had to be isolated and not allowed to work with others, in contrast to the situation with cutaneous tuberculosis. Patients with lupus vulgaris, which was not infectious, even had suitable jobs in hospitals. In 1907, Antileprol (Bayer) became available, the first industrial preparation developed from chaulmoogra oils, which had been long used in Indian medicine. The situation of patients, however, remained nearly unchanged, up to the middle of the 20th century, when the first effective mycobacteriostatic agents were introduced. PMID:17673959

  2. [The development of radiotherapy in Denmark through 100 years. From radiology to oncology].

    PubMed

    Sell, A

    1996-01-01

    A short review is given of the development of radiotherapy from its early beginning in 1896 to the establishment of the first three radium centres in 1913/14 which caused strong protest from the surgeons. The Radium Foundation was established on private initiative and was, via money collections, able to finance purchase of radium and in the 1930s erection of new buildings for the three centres. Radiotherapy became a basic specialty from 1950. In the beginning of the 1960s megavoltage therapy was introduced and at the same time chemotherapy was becoming interesting for therapy of solid tumours. This caused a centralisation of the patients to the centres for non-surgical therapy resulting in need for building of two centres (Aalborg and Herlev), and a gradual closing down of the decentral treatment with low voltage equipment in the counties. After 1970 the counties became responsible for the health care including running of the hospitals. This caused a return of some of the patients to decentral treatment facilities, usually the biggest hospital in the county and predominantly for adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. The speciality has changed name to oncology in 1987. PMID:11625142

  3. The development of radiotherapy in Denmark during 100 years. From radiology to oncology.

    PubMed

    Sell, A

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy in Denmark is traced from its early inception in 1896 to the first three radium centres in 1913-1914, the establishment of which caused a roar of protests among the surgeons of that time. Private initiative pioneered the Radium Foundation which raised money for radium and financed erection of new buildings for the three centres in the 1930's. Radiotherapy became a separate speciality in 1950. The early 1960s saw the introduction of megavoltage therapy and the first promising results from chemotherapeutic management of solid tumors. The consequent referral of patients to centres for non-surgical therapy created a need for two new centres (Aalborg and Herlev) and called for a gradual closing down of decentralized low-voltage treatment at county level. However, the decentralization of health care in 1970 partly reversed this trend and some patients were therefore referred for decentralized treatment at major county hospitals. Such treatment mainly consisted of adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy, though in a few countries palliative therapy was supported by low-voltage therapy. In 1987 the medical speciality of radiotherapy was officially renamed oncology. PMID:8608024

  4. Turnover of Species and Guilds in Shrub Spider Communities in a 100-Year Postlogging Forest Chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Takashi F; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Disturbance of forests by logging and subsequent forest succession causes marked changes in arthropod communities. Although vegetation cover provides important habitat for arthropods, studies of the changes in their community structure associated with forest succession have been conducted mostly at ground level. To evaluate how forests of different ages contribute to arthropod biodiversity in shrub habitat, spiders were collected from shrubs in 12 forests ranging in age from 1 to 107 yr after logging. We found marked changes in spider community structure about 10 yr after logging: the number of species and individuals declined rapidly after this time. These changes were likely caused by a decrease in shrub cover in association with forest succession. Changes in spider species composition associated with stand age were small in forests at least 11 yr old and were not clustered by forest age. After the exclusion of species of which we sampled only one or two individuals incidentally, just 0.9 ± 0.5 (mean ± SD) species were unique to these older forests. The other 41.2 ± 4.3 species found in these forests were common to both older and young forests, although some of these species in common were found mainly in forests at least 11 yr old. These results suggest that preservation of old-growth forests contributes to the abundance of these common species, although old-growth forests contribute little to species diversity.

  5. [100 years of drinking water regulation. Retrospective review, current situation and prospects].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Krasovsky, G N; Egorova, N A; Mikhailova, R I

    2014-01-01

    There is considered the history of the development of legislative requirements to the regulation of the quality of drinking water in different countries and international organizations during the period from 1912 to the present time. In terms of comparative analysis there is analyzed the current state of regulatory frameworks of the Russian Federation, WHO, EU, Finland, the UK, Singapore, Australia, Japan, China, Nigeria, the United States and Canada in the field of providing favorable conditions of population drinking water use. There has been noted the significant progress in standardization of the content of the biogenic elements and chemical pollution of drinking water in the absence of uniform requirements to the composition and properties of drinking water globally, that is bound to the need to take into account the national peculiarities of drinking water supply within the separate countries. As promising directions for improving regulation of drinking water quality there are noted: the development of new standards for prioritized water pollution, periodic review ofstandards after appearance of the new scientific data on the biological action of substances, the use of the concept of risk, the harmonization of the normative values and the assessment of the possibility of introduction into the practice the one more criterion of profitableness of population water use--the bioenergetic state of the water. PMID:25051731

  6. Firewall or smooth horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ori, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski, and Sully pointed out that for a sufficiently old black hole (BH), the set of assumptions known as the complementarity postulates appears to be inconsistent with the assumption of local regularity at the horizon. They concluded that the horizon of an old BH is likely to be the locus of local irregularity, a "firewall". Here I point out that if one adopts a different assumption, namely that semiclassical physics holds throughout its anticipated domain of validity, then the inconsistency is avoided, and the horizon retains its regularity. In this alternative view-point, the vast portion of the original BH information remains trapped inside the BH throughout the semiclassical domain of evaporation, and possibly leaks out later on. This appears to be an inevitable outcome of semiclassical gravity (if assumed to apply throughout its anticipated domain of validity).

  7. Accumulation of Pharmaceuticals, Enterococcus, and Resistance Genes in Soils Irrigated with Wastewater for Zero to 100 Years in Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Siebe, Christina; Willaschek, Elisha; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Huebner, Johannes; Amelung, Wulf; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Siemens, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Irrigation with wastewater releases pharmaceuticals, pathogenic bacteria, and resistance genes, but little is known about the accumulation of these contaminants in the environment when wastewater is applied for decades. We sampled a chronosequence of soils that were variously irrigated with wastewater from zero up to 100 years in the Mezquital Valley, Mexico, and investigated the accumulation of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, clarithromycin, carbamazepine, bezafibrate, naproxen, diclofenac, as well as the occurrence of Enterococcus spp., and sul and qnr resistance genes. Total concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine increased with irrigation duration reaching 95% of their upper limit of 1.4 µg/kg (ciprofloxacin), 4.3 µg/kg (sulfamethoxazole), and 5.4 µg/kg (carbamazepine) in soils irrigated for 19–28 years. Accumulation was soil-type-specific, with largest accumulation rates in Leptosols and no time-trend in Vertisols. Acidic pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate) were not retained and thus did not accumulate in soils. We did not detect qnrA genes, but qnrS and qnrB genes were found in two of the irrigated soils. Relative concentrations of sul1 genes in irrigated soils were two orders of magnitude larger (3.15×10−3±0.22×10−3 copies/16S rDNA) than in non-irrigated soils (4.35×10−5±1.00×10−5 copies/16S rDNA), while those of sul2 exceeded the ones in non-irrigated soils still by a factor of 22 (6.61×10–4±0.59×10−4 versus 2.99×10−5±0.26×10−5 copies/16S rDNA). Absolute numbers of sul genes continued to increase with prolonging irrigation together with Enterococcus spp. 23S rDNA and total 16S rDNA contents. Increasing total concentrations of antibiotics in soil are not accompanied by increasing relative abundances of resistance genes. Nevertheless, wastewater irrigation enlarges the absolute concentration of resistance genes in soils due to a long-term increase in

  8. Gravitational memory charges of supertranslation and superrotation on Rindler horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Masahiro; Trevison, Jose; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2016-10-01

    In a Rindler-type coordinate system spanned in a region outside of a black hole horizon, we have nonvanishing classical holographic charges as soft hairs on the horizon for stationary black holes. Taking a large black hole mass limit, the spacetimes with the charges are described by asymptotic Rindler metrics. We construct a general theory of gravitational holographic charges for a (1 +3 )-dimensional linearized gravity field in the Minkowski background with Rindler horizons. Although matter crossing a Rindler horizon causes horizon deformation and a time-dependent coordinate shift—that is, gravitational memory—the supertranslation and superrotation charges on the horizon can be defined during and after its passage through the horizon. It is generally proven that holographic states on the horizon cannot store any information about absorbed perturbative gravitational waves. However, matter crossing the horizon really excites holographic states. By using gravitational memory operators, which consist of the holographic charge operators, we suggest a resolution of the no-cloning paradox of quantum information between matter falling into the horizon and holographic charges on the horizon from the viewpoint of the contextuality of quantum measurement.

  9. New Horizons Launch Contingency Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yale; Lear, Matthew H.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Takashima, Naruhisa; Owings, W. Donald

    2007-01-01

    On 19 January 2006 at 2:00 PM EST, the NASA New Horizons spacecraft (SC) was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), FL, onboard an Atlas V 551/Centaur/STAR™ 48B launch vehicle (LV) on a mission to explore the Pluto Charon planetary system and possibly other Kuiper Belt Objects. It carried a single Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). As part of the joint NASA/US Department of Energy (DOE) safety effort, contingency plans were prepared to address the unlikely events of launch accidents leading to a near-pad impact, a suborbital reentry, an orbital reentry, or a heliocentric orbit. As the implementing organization. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had expanded roles in the New Horizons launch contingency effort over those for the Cassini mission and Mars Exploration Rovers missions. The expanded tasks included participation in the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), preparation of contingency plans, coordination of space tracking assets, improved aerodynamics characterization of the RTG's 18 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules, and development of spacecraft and RTG reentry breakup analysis tools. Other JHU/APL tasks were prediction of the Earth impact footprints (ElFs) for the GPHS modules released during the atmospheric reentry (for purposes of notification and recovery), prediction of the time of SC reentry from a potential orbital decay, pre-launch dissemination of ballistic coefficients of various possible reentry configurations, and launch support of an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) on the JHU/APL campus. For the New Horizons launch, JHU/APL personnel at the RADCC and at the EOC were ready to implement any real-time launch contingency activities. A successful New Horizons launch and interplanetary injection precluded any further contingency actions. The New Horizons launch contingency was an interagency effort by several organizations. This paper

  10. The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory -- A remarkable first 100 years of tracking eruptions and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babb, Janet L.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the centennial of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). With the support and cooperation of visionaries, financiers, scientists, and other individuals and organizations, HVO has successfully achieved 100 years of continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes. As we celebrate this milestone anniversary, we express our sincere mahalo—thanks—to the people who have contributed to and participated in HVO’s mission during this past century. First and foremost, we owe a debt of gratitude to the late Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., the geologist whose vision and efforts led to the founding of HVO. We also acknowledge the pioneering contributions of the late Frank A. Perret, who began the continuous monitoring of Kīlauea in 1911, setting the stage for Jaggar, who took over the work in 1912. Initial support for HVO was provided by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, which financed the initial cache of volcano monitoring instruments and Perret’s work in 1911. The Hawaiian Volcano Research Association, a group of Honolulu businessmen organized by Lorrin A. Thurston, also provided essential funding for HVO’s daily operations starting in mid-1912 and continuing for several decades. Since HVO’s beginning, the University of Hawaiʻi (UH), called the College of Hawaii until 1920, has been an advocate of HVO’s scientific studies. We have benefited from collaborations with UH scientists at both the Hilo and Mänoa campuses and look forward to future cooperative efforts to better understand how Hawaiian volcanoes work. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated HVO continuously since 1947. Before then, HVO was under the administration of various Federal agencies—the U.S. Weather Bureau, at the time part of the Department of Agriculture, from 1919 to 1924; the USGS, which first managed HVO from 1924 to 1935; and the National Park Service from 1935 to 1947. For 76 of its first 100 years, HVO has been

  11. 100 Years of Science

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Dick

    2004-07-07

    The last half-century has seen enormous strides in many scientific and technical areas. In fundamental physics previously unrelated fields like weak interactions and electromagnetism have been linked. Cosmology has been probed back to the Big Bang. Computing and communications have moved from minor topics to subjects that dominate the economy. The structure of DNA has been untangled. We may be on the threshold of understanding the origin of life and even discovering life elsewhere in the universe. Several of these diverse topics such as cosmology and fundamental physics are already profoundly coupled. Remarkably, ties exist between all of these subjects. These ties will be reviewed in light of opportunities ahead in the next decades.

  12. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  13. Horizon as critical phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We show that renormalization group flow can be viewed as a gradual wave function collapse, where a quantum state associated with the action of field theory evolves toward a final state that describes an IR fixed point. The process of collapse is described by the radial evolution in the dual holographic theory. If the theory is in the same phase as the assumed IR fixed point, the initial state is smoothly projected to the final state. If in a different phase, the initial state undergoes a phase transition which in turn gives rise to a horizon in the bulk geometry. We demonstrate the connection between critical behavior and horizon in an example, by deriving the bulk metrics that emerge in various phases of the U( N ) vector model in the large N limit based on the holographic dual constructed from quantum renormalization group. The gapped phase exhibits a geometry that smoothly ends at a finite proper distance in the radial direction. The geometric distance in the radial direction measures a complexity: the depth of renormalization group transformation that is needed to project the generally entangled UV state to a direct product state in the IR. For gapless states, entanglement persistently spreads out to larger length scales, and the initial state can not be projected to the direct product state. The obstruction to smooth projection at charge neutral point manifests itself as the long throat in the anti-de Sitter space. The Poincare horizon at infinity marks the critical point which exhibits a divergent length scale in the spread of entanglement. For the gapless states with non-zero chemical potential, the bulk space becomes the Lifshitz geometry with the dynamical critical exponent two. The identification of horizon as critical point may provide an explanation for the universality of horizon. We also discuss the structure of the bulk tensor network that emerges from the quantum renormalization group.

  14. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  15. 100 years of Drosophila research and its impact on vertebrate neuroscience: a history lesson for the future

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, Hugo J; Tong, Chao; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Discoveries in fruit flies have greatly contributed to our understanding of neuroscience. The use of an unparalleled wealth of tools, many of which originated between 1910–1960, has enabled milestone discoveries in nervous system development and function. Such findings have triggered and guided many research efforts in vertebrate neuroscience. After 100 years, fruit flies continue to be the choice model system for many neuroscientists. The combinational use of powerful research tools will ensure that this model organism will continue to lead to key discoveries that will impact vertebrate neuroscience. PMID:20383202

  16. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  17. Estimated 100-year peak flows and flow volumes in the Big Lost River and Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Kjelstrom, L.C.; Berenbrock, C.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide estimates of the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes that could enter the INEL area from the Big Lost River and Brich Creek are needed as input data for models that will be used to delineate the extent of the 100-year flood plain at the INEL. The methods, procedures and assumptions used to estimate the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes are described in this report.

  18. Over 100 years of environmental change recorded by foraminifers and sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-12-01

    The marine microfauna of Mobile Bay has been profoundly influenced by the development and expansion of the primary shipping channel over the last ˜100 years. Foraminifers and sediments from seven box cores with excess lead-210 chronology document that channel dredging and spoil disposal have altered circulation, reduced estuarine mixing, changed sedimentation patterns, and caused a faunal turnover within the bay. Beginning in the late 1800s, changes in estuarine mixing allowed for greater low-pH freshwater influence in the bay, and ultimately began environmental changes that resulted in the loss of calcareous foraminifers. By the early 1900s, box cores throughout Mobile Bay record a ˜100-year trend of increasing calcareous test dissolution that continues to the present. Since the completion of the current shipping channel in the 1950s, restricted tidal flushing and increased terrestrial organic matter, documented by carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, stimulated an increase in agglutinated foraminiferal densities. However, in deeper areas of the bay, hypoxic water has negatively impacted the marine microfauna. Comparisons of the present-day foraminiferal assemblage with foraminifers collected in the early 1970s indicate that the continued biologic loss of calcareous foraminifers in the bay has allowed the introduction of a new agglutinated foraminiferal species into the bay.

  19. Smooth horizons and quantum ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Black holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old black holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is the neglect of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large black hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge distances from the near-horizon zone of old black holes to the early radiation. We give simple estimates to support this viewpoint and show how the Page time and (somewhat more speculative) scrambling time do appear.

  20. Distributed Fusion Receding Horizon Filtering in Linear Stochastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, IlYoung; Kim, DuYong; Kim, YongHoon; Lee, SukJae; Shin, Vladimir

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a distributed receding horizon filtering algorithm for multisensor continuous-time linear stochastic systems. Distributed fusion with a weighted sum structure is applied to local receding horizon Kalman filters having different horizon lengths. The fusion estimate of the state of a dynamic system represents the optimal linear fusion by weighting matrices under the minimum mean square error criterion. The key contribution of this paper lies in the derivation of the differential equations for determining the error cross-covariances between the local receding horizon Kalman filters. The subsequent application of the proposed distributed filter to a linear dynamic system within a multisensor environment demonstrates its effectiveness.

  1. Effects of 100 years wastewater irrigation on resistance genes, class 1 integrons and IncP-1 plasmids in Mexican soil

    PubMed Central

    Jechalke, Sven; Broszat, Melanie; Lang, Friederike; Siebe, Christina; Smalla, Kornelia; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Long-term irrigation with untreated wastewater can lead to an accumulation of antibiotic substances and antibiotic resistance genes in soil. However, little is known so far about effects of wastewater, applied for decades, on the abundance of IncP-1 plasmids and class 1 integrons which may contribute to the accumulation and spread of resistance genes in the environment, and their correlation with heavy metal concentrations. Therefore, a chronosequence of soils that were irrigated with wastewater from 0 to 100 years was sampled in the Mezquital Valley in Mexico in the dry season. The total community DNA was extracted and the absolute and relative abundance (relative to 16S rRNA genes) of antibiotic resistance genes (tet(W), tet(Q), aadA), class 1 integrons (intI1), quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (qacE+qacEΔ1) and IncP-1 plasmids (korB) were quantified by real-time PCR. Except for intI1 and qacE+qacEΔ1 the abundances of selected genes were below the detection limit in non-irrigated soil. Confirming the results of a previous study, the absolute abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples increased significantly over time (linear regression model, p < 0.05) suggesting an increase in bacterial biomass due to repeated irrigation with wastewater. Correspondingly, all tested antibiotic resistance genes as well as intI1 and korB significantly increased in abundance over the period of 100 years of irrigation. In parallel, concentrations of the heavy metals Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cr significantly increased. However, no significant positive correlations were observed between the relative abundance of selected genes and years of irrigation, indicating no enrichment in the soil bacterial community due to repeated wastewater irrigation or due to a potential co-selection by increasing concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:25784901

  2. On the Bartnik mass of apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantoulidis, Christos; Schoen, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we characterize the intrinsic geometry of apparent horizons (outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces) in asymptotically flat spacetimes; that is, the Riemannian metrics on the two sphere which can arise. Furthermore we determine the minimal ADM mass of a spacetime containing such an apparent horizon. The results are conveniently formulated in terms of the quasi-local mass introduced by Bartnik (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2346-8). The Hawking mass provides a lower bound for Bartnik’s quasilocal mass on apparent horizons by way of Penrose’s conjecture on time symmetric slices, proven in 1997 by Huisken and Ilmanen (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 353-437) and in full generality in 1999 by Bray (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 177-267). We compute Bartnik’s mass for all non-degenerate apparent horizons and show that it coincides with the Hawking mass. As a corollary we disprove a conjecture due to Gibbons in the spirit of Thorne’s hoop conjecture (Gibbons 2009 arXiv:0903.1580), and construct a new large class of examples of apparent horizons with the integral of the negative part of the Gauss curvature arbitrarily large.

  3. The History of Parenting Practices: An Overview! Events, Policies and Theories That Have Influenced Parenting Practices over the Last 100 Years. [Videotape and Worksheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    Noting that parenting is a learned experience and that the source of information on parenting has changed considerably over the last 100 years, this videotape examines the history of parent education over the past 100 years, highlighting events influencing family life, policies and legislation to assist families, and parenting theories for each…

  4. Evolving Hořava cosmological horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Mohsen; Mohseni, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    Several sets of radially propagating null congruence generators are exploited in order to form 3-dimensional marginally trapped surfaces, referred to as black hole and cosmological apparent horizons in a Hořava universe. Based on this method, we deal with the characteristics of the 2-dimensional space-like spheres of symmetry and the peculiarities of having trapping horizons. Moreover, we apply this method in standard expanding and contracting FLRW cosmological models of a Hořava universe to investigate the conditions under which the extra parameters of the theory may lead to trapped/anti-trapped surfaces both in the future and in the past. We also include the cases of negative time, referred to as the finite past, and discuss the formation of anti-trapped surfaces inside the cosmological apparent horizons.

  5. New Horizons 20 Years On. Occasional Papers Series: No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Margaret

    New Horizons is a course offered by the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Continuing Education that is aimed at first-time returners to education. In the 20 years since New Horizons was developed for women returners to education and/or employment, it has retained its original developmental outcomes but broadened its target group in response to…

  6. The Horizon Report: 2009 Australia-New Zealand Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Smith, R.; Smythe, T.; Stone, S.

    2009-01-01

    The New Media Consortium's Horizon Project is an ongoing research project that aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry within education around the globe over a five-year time period. The project's central products are the "Horizon Reports", an annual series of…

  7. New Horizons at Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it will communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

  8. Entropy of isolated horizons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rudranil; Kaul, Romesh K.; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2010-07-15

    The decade-old formulation of the isolated horizon classically and within loop quantum gravity, and the extraction of the microcanonical entropy of such a horizon from this formulation, is reviewed, in view of recent renewed interest. There are two main approaches to this problem: one employs an SU(2) Chern-Simons theory describing the isolated horizon degrees of freedom, while the other uses a reduced U(1) Chern-Simons theory obtained from the SU(2) theory, with appropriate constraints imposed on the spectrum of boundary states ''living'' on the horizon. It is shown that both these ways lead to the same infinite series asymptotic in the horizon area for the microcanonical entropy of an isolated horizon. The leading area term is followed by an unambiguous correction term logarithmic in area with a coefficient -(3/2), with subleading corrections dropping off as inverse powers of the area.

  9. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  10. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    PubMed

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  11. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    PubMed

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  12. Technologies on the Horizon: Teachers Respond to the Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles B.; Prater, Alyssa H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' beliefs regarding the integration of technologies from the 2011 K-12 edition of the "Horizon Report" into their local, public school contexts. Teachers read the "Horizon Report" and then participated in an asynchronous, threaded discussion focusing on technologies they…

  13. Regime Shifts in Shallow Lakes: Responses of Cyanobacterial Blooms to Watershed Agricultural Phosphorus Loading Over the Last ~100 Years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaire, J. C.; Taranu, Z. E.; MacDonald, G. K.; Velghe, K.; Bennett, E.; Gregory-Eaves, I.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid changes in ecosystem states have occurred naturally throughout Earth's history. However, environmental changes that have taken place since the start of the Anthropocene may be destabilizing ecosystems and increasing the frequency of regime shifts in response to abrupt changes in external drivers or local intrinsic dynamics. To evaluate the relative influence of these forcers and improve our understanding of the impact of future change, we examined the effects of historical catchment phosphorus loading associated with agricultural land use on lake ecosystems, and whether this caused a shift from a stable, clear-water, regime to a turbid, cyanobacteria-dominated, state. The sedimentary pigments, diatom, and zooplankton (Cladocera) records from a currently clear-water shallow lake (Roxton Pond) and a turbid-water shallow lake (Petit lac Saint-François; PSF) were examined to determine if a cyanobacteria associated pigment (i.e. echinenone) showed an abrupt non-linear response to continued historical phosphorus load index (determined by phosphorus budget) over the last ~100 years. While PSF lake is presently in the turbid-water state, pigment and diatom analyses indicated that both lakes were once in the clear-water state, and that non-linear increases in catchment phosphorus balance resulted in an abrupt transition to cyanobacteria dominated states in each record. These results show that phosphorus loading has resulted in state shifts in shallow lake ecosystems that has been recorded across multiple paleolimnological indicators preserved in the sedimentary record.

  14. Empirical correction for earth sensor horizon radiance variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Sedlak, Joseph; Andrews, Daniel; Luquette, Richard

    1998-01-01

    A major limitation on the use of infrared horizon sensors for attitude determination is the variability of the height of the infrared Earth horizon. This variation includes a climatological component and a stochastic component of approximately equal importance. The climatological component shows regular variation with season and latitude. Models based on historical measurements have been used to compensate for these systematic changes. The stochastic component is analogous to tropospheric weather. It can cause extreme, localized changes that for a period of days, overwhelm the climatological variation. An algorithm has been developed to compensate partially for the climatological variation of horizon height and at least to mitigate the stochastic variation. This method uses attitude and horizon sensor data from spacecraft to update a horizon height history as a function of latitude. For spacecraft that depend on horizon sensors for their attitudes (such as the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe-TOMS-EP) a batch least squares attitude determination system is used. It is assumed that minimizing the average sensor residual throughout a full orbit of data results in attitudes that are nearly independent of local horizon height variations. The method depends on the additional assumption that the mean horizon height over all latitudes is approximately independent of season. Using these assumptions, the method yields the latitude dependent portion of local horizon height variations. This paper describes the algorithm used to generate an empirical horizon height. Ideally, an international horizon height database could be established that would rapidly merge data from various spacecraft to provide timely corrections that could be used by all.

  15. Resolving Lifshitz Horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Wang, Huajia; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Via the AdS/CFT correspondence, ground states of field theories at finite charge density are mapped to extremal black brane solutions. Studies of simple gravity + matter systems in this context have uncovered wide new classes of extremal geometries. The Lifshitz metrics characterizing field theories with non-trivial dynamical critical exponent z {ne} 1 emerge as one common endpoint in doped holographic toy models. However, the Lifshitz horizon exhibits mildly singular behaviour - while curvature invariants are finite, there are diverging tidal forces. Here we show that in some of the simplest contexts where Lifshitz metrics emerge, Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories, generic corrections lead to a replacement of the Lifshitz metric, in the deep infrared, by a re-emergent AdS{sub 2} x R{sup 2} geometry. Thus, at least in these cases, the Lifshitz scaling characterizes the physics over a wide range of energy scales, but the mild singularity is cured by quantum or stringy effects.

  16. The Horizon Report. 2005 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on an ongoing series…

  17. The Horizon Report. 2006 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This third edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on ongoing discussions…

  18. The Horizon Report. 2004 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" details findings of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on an ongoing series of interviews…

  19. Acidophilic denitrifiers dominate the N2O production in a 100-year-old tea orchard soil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Long, Xi-En; Chapman, Stephen J; Yao, Huaiying

    2015-03-01

    Aerobic denitrification is the main process for high N2O production in acid tea field soil. However, the biological mechanisms for the high emission are not fully understood. In this study, we examined N2O emission and denitrifier communities in 100-year-old tea soils with four pH levels (3.71, 5.11, 6.19, and 7.41) and four nitrate concentration (0, 50, 200, and 1000 mg kg(-1) of NO3 (-)-N) addition. Results showed the highest N2O emission (10.1 mg kg(-1) over 21 days) from the soil at pH 3.71 with 1000 mg kg(-1) NO3 (-) addition. The N2O reduction and denitrification enzyme activity in the acid soils (pH <7.0) were significantly higher than that of soils at pH 7.41. Moreover, TRF 78 of nirS and TRF 187 of nosZ dominated in soils of pH 3.71, suggesting an important role of acidophilic denitrifiers in N2O production and reduction. CCA analysis also showed a negative correlation between the dominant denitrifier ecotypes (nirS TRF 78, nosZ TRF 187) and soil pH. The representative sequences were identical to those of cultivated denitrifiers from acidic soils via phylogenetic tree analysis. Our results showed that the acidophilic denitrifier adaptation to the acid environment results in high N2O emission in this highly acidic tea soil.

  20. The protection of Canfranc Internation Railway Sattion against natural risks. Analysis and evaluation of its effectiveness 100 years later.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabregas, S.; Hurtado, R.; Mintegui, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the late XIXth century and early XXth century, the international railway station in Canfranc "Los Arañones" is built in the Central Pyrenees of Huesca in Spain, along the border between France and Spain. Just after starting the construction of the huge station (250 m long), it was found that natural hazards such as flash floods, landslides, falling blocks and avalanches affected it and compromised the safety of users and infrastructures.Quickly, hydrological restoration works were carried out along "Los Arañones" gorgers basins to reduce joint residual risks. Longitudinal and transversal dams for floods, a large reforestation work to prevent against falling blocks, erosion, flooding and regarding avalanches stone walls were built, as well as benches of grit, snow rakes, and "empty dams", which were created as experimental structures to dissipate the energy of the avalanche in the track zone and wich do not exist anywhere else in the world. All the works were carried out mainly by hand, with materials such as stone, cement and iron. Over 2,500,000 holes were made for planting more than 15 different species of trees, and more than 400,000 tons of stone were moved to build more than 12 different kinds of control measures.It is essential to emphasize the empirical nature of these works and Canfranc's function as a "laboratory or field tests", with most of its structures still effective 100 years after its construction. The works involved about 30% of the total cost of the station in the early XX century. Nowadays to have an "equivalent protection" with the current technology, around 100 million euro should be invested. It is also necessary to validate the current effectiveness of such works, its maintenance task and the protective role of the forest.

  1. Are We Under-Estimating Mercury in Soils? Experimental Acidification and Sample Collection Timing Demonstrate Variability in Estimates of Mercury in O-Horizon Soils at a Maine Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, S. J.; Johnson, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Sampling protocols, including sample timing, collection methods, preservation, and preparation, can strongly influence the results of any analysis. Organic soil horizons are a large pool of mercury (Hg) in most temperate, forested sites; minimizing the potential for under- or over- estimates in this medium is critical for discerning the fate and transport of Hg. Detailed guidance is available for ultra-clean and semi-clean handling for Hg sampling in surface waters. However, neither guidance regarding the proper time of year to sample soils nor methodological studies regarding post-sampling preservation and handling were available in the scientific literature for soil Hg sampling. Here we report on pilot work that (1) provides data for Hg in soils (O-horizon) through an entire year, to determine whether seasonality affects Hg estimates; and (2) documents the effect of treating a soil with acidic water prior to preparation and analysis. We collected O-horizon soil samples monthly from a single plot during 2008, and analyzed them for total Hg. Each month, samples were split; half were ‘control’ samples (dried then analyzed) and half were ‘acidified’ (treated with acidic (pH 2.0) ultrapure water prior to drying and analysis). We observed: (1) a three-fold range of Hg values (148-446 ppb) for the control samples (all collected within the same 2-m2 plot), varying across the twelve months in 2008 during which samples were collected; (2) differences of ~15-20% between acidified and control samples; and, (3) an apparent loss of ~100 ppb of Hg (~22%) if acidification of the dry sample was delayed a day or more. Soils collected when the antecedent period had been wet lost Hg when soils were treated with pH 2.0 solution, potentially because soluble Hg in solution could have been leached during acid treatment. This finding may help to explain why researchers have seen large pulses of Hg in streamwater flux during snowmelt. Further, our results may help to inform

  2. Falling through the black hole horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the fate of a small classical object, a "stick", as it falls through the horizon of a large black hole (BH). Classically, the equivalence principle dictates that the stick is affected by small tidal forces, and Hawking's quantum-mechanical model of BH evaporation makes essentially the same prediction. If, on the other hand, the BH horizon is surrounded by a "firewall", the stick will be consumed as it falls through. We have recently extended Hawking's model by taking into account the quantum fluctuations of the geometry and the classical back-reaction of the emitted particles. Here, we calculate the train exerted on the falling stick for our model. The strain depends on the near-horizon state of the Hawking pairs. We find that, after the Page time when the state of the pairs deviates significantly from maximal entanglement (as required by unitarity), the induced strain in our semiclassical model is still parametrically small. This is because the number of the disentangled pairs is parametrically smaller than the BH entropy. A firewall does, however, appear if the number of disentangled pairs near the horizon is of order of the BH entropy, as implicitly assumed in previous discussions in the literature.

  3. On the differentiability order of horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeghy, D.

    2016-06-01

    Let M be a time oriented Lorentzian manifold and H\\subset M a horizon. We will show that the differentiability order of the horizon can change only once along a generator, i.e. the following holds. If γ :I\\to H is a generator, thus, an inextendable past directed light-like geodesic on the horizon, where I=(α ,β ) or [α ,β ), then there exists a unique parameter {t}0\\in [α ,β ] and a positive integer k≥slant 1 such that the following is true. The horizon H is exactly of class {C}k at γ (t), for every t\\in ({t}0,β ), moreover H is only differentiable, but not of class {C}1 at every point γ (t), for which t\\in (α ,{t}0]. Moreover, if γ (α ) is the endpoint of only one generator then for a suitable space-like submanifold R\\subset H the first cut point of R along γ is γ (α ). Furthermore, all the points γ (t), for which t\\in [α ,{t}0], are non-injectivity points of R along γ . Moreover, if H is smooth at an interior point of γ, then H is smooth at every point of γ. MSC 53C50

  4. What happens to Petrov classification, on horizons of axisymmetric dirty black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanatarov, I. V.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2014-02-15

    We consider axisymmetric stationary dirty black holes with regular non-extremal or extremal horizons, and compute their on-horizon Petrov types. The Petrov type (PT) in the frame of the observer crossing the horizon can be different from that formally obtained in the usual (but singular in the horizon limit) frame of an observer on a circular orbit. We call this entity the boosted Petrov type (BPT), as the corresponding frame is obtained by a singular boost from the regular one. The PT off-horizon can be more general than PT on-horizon and that can be more general than the BPT on horizon. This is valid for all regular metrics, irrespective of the extremality of the horizon. We analyze and classify the possible relations between the three characteristics and discuss the nature and features of the underlying singular boost. The three Petrov types can be the same only for space-times of PT D and O off-horizon. The mutual alignment of principal null directions and the generator in the vicinity of the horizon is studied in detail. As an example, we also analyze a special class of metrics with utra-extremal horizons (for which the regularity conditions look different from the general case) and compare their off-horizon and on-horizon algebraic structure in both frames.

  5. Apparent horizons in binary black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre Marie

    Over the last decade, advances in computing technology and numerical techniques have lead to the possible theoretical prediction of astrophysically relevant waveforms in numerical simulations. With the building of gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory, we stand at the epoch that will usher in the first experimental study of strong field general relativity. One candidate source for ground based detection of gravitational waveforms, the orbit and merger of two black holes, is of great interest to the relativity community. The binary black hole problem is the two-body problem in general relativity. It is a stringent dynamical test of the theory. The problem involves the evolution of the Einstein equation, a complex system of non-linear, dynamic, elliptic-hyperbolic equations intractable in closed form. Numerical relativists are now developing the technology to evolve the Einstein equation using numerical simulations. The generation of these numerical I codes is a ``theoretical laboratory'' designed to study strong field phenomena in general relativity. This dissertation reports the successful development and application of the first multiple apparent horizon tracker applied to the generic binary black hole problem. I have developed a method that combines a level set of surfaces with a curvature flow method. This method, which I call the level flow method, locates the surfaces of any apparent horizons in the spacetime. The surface location then is used to remove the singularities from the computational domain in the evolution code. I establish the following set of criteria desired in an apparent horizon tracker: (1)The robustness of the tracker due to its lack of dependence on small changes to the initial guess; (2)The generality of the tracker in its applicability to generic spacetimes including multiple back hole spacetimes; and (3)The efficiency of the tracker algorithm in CPU time. I demonstrate the apparent

  6. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  7. Microbe-mediated transformations of marine dissolved organic matter during 2,100 years of natural incubation in the cold, oxic crust of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Walter, S. R.; Jaekel, U.; Huber, J. A.; Dittmar, T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, oxic seawater from the deep ocean is downwelled into the basaltic crust, supplying the crustal aquifer with an initial inoculum of organic matter and electron acceptors. Studies have shown that fluids circulating within the crust are minimally altered from original seawater, making this subsurface environment a unique natural experiment in which the fate of marine organic matter and the limitations of microbial adaptability in the context of reduced carbon supply can be examined. To make the subsurface crustal aquifer accessible, two CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories have been installed at North Pond, a sediment-filled depression beneath the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. Radiocarbon analysis of dissolved inorganic (DIC) and organic carbon (DOC) in samples recovered from these observatories show uncoupled aging between DOC and DIC with Δ14C values of DOC as low as -933‰ despite isolation from the open ocean for, at most, 2,100 years. This extreme value is part of a general trend of decreasing DOC δ13C and Δ14C values with increasing incubation time within the aquifer. Combined with reduced concentrations of DOC, our results argue for selective microbial oxidation of the youngest, most 13C-enriched components of downwelled DOC, possibly identifying these as characteristics of the more bioavailable fractions of deep-ocean dissolved organic matter. They also suggest that microbial oxidation during low-temperature hydrothermal circulation could be an important sink for aged marine dissolved organic matter.

  8. Quantum correlations across the black hole horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzhold, Ralf; Unruh, William G.

    2010-06-15

    Inspired by the condensed-matter analogues of black holes, we study the quantum correlations across the event horizon reflecting the entanglement between the outgoing particles of the Hawking radiation and their in-falling partners. For a perfectly covariant theory, the total correlation is conserved in time and piles up arbitrary close to the horizon in the past, where it merges into the singularity of the vacuum two-point function at the light cone. After modifying the dispersion relation (i.e., breaking Lorentz invariance) for large k, on the other hand, the light cone is smeared out and the entanglement is not conserved but actually created in a given rate per unit time.

  9. Determination of the 100-year flood plain on Upper Three Runs and selected tributaries, and the Savannah River at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanier, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The 100-year flood plain was determined for Upper Three Runs, its tributaries, and the part of the Savannah River that borders the Savannah River Site. The results are provided in tabular and graphical formats. The 100-year flood-plain maps and flood profiles provide water-resource managers of the Savannah River Site with a technical basis for making flood-plain management decisions that could minimize future flood problems and provide a basis for designing and constructing drainage structures along roadways. A hydrologic analysis was made to estimate the 100-year recurrence- interval flow for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The analysis showed that the well-drained, sandy soils in the head waters of Upper Three Runs reduce the high flows in the stream; therefore, the South Carolina upper Coastal Plain regional-rural-regression equation does not apply for Upper Three Runs. Conse- quently, a relation was established for 100-year recurrence-interval flow and drainage area using streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations on Upper Three Runs. This relation was used to compute 100-year recurrence-interval flows at selected points along the stream. The regional regression equations were applicable for the tributaries to Upper Three Runs, because the soil types in the drainage basins of the tributaries resemble those normally occurring in upper Coastal Plain basins. This was verified by analysis of the flood-frequency data collected from U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 02197342 on Fourmile Branch. Cross sections were surveyed throughout each reach, and other pertinent data such as flow resistance and land-use were col- lected. The surveyed cross sections and computed 100-year recurrence-interval flows were used in a step-backwater model to compute the 100-year flood profile for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The profiles were used to delineate the 100-year flood plain on topographic maps. The Savannah River forms the southwestern border

  10. Unruh effect without Rindler horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaevici, Nistor

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the Unruh effect for a massless scalar field in the two-dimensional Minkowski space in the presence of a uniformly accelerated perfect mirror, with the trajectory of the mirror chosen in such a way that the mirror completely masks the Rindler horizon from the space-time region of interest. We find that the characteristic thermodynamical properties of the effect remain unchanged, i.e. the response of a uniformly co-accelerated Unruh detector and the distribution of the Rindler particles retain their thermal form. However, since in this setup there are no unobserved degrees of freedom of the field, the thermal statistics of the Rindler particles are inconsistent with an initial pure vacuum, which leads us to reconsider the problem for the more physical case when the mirror is inertial in the past. In these conditions we find that the distribution of the Rindler particles is non-thermal even in the limit of infinite acceleration times, but effective thermal statistics can be recovered provided that one is restricted to the expectation values of smeared operators associated with finite norm Rindler states. We explain how the thermal statistics in our problem can be understood in analogy with those in the conventional version of the effect.

  11. Area Theorem and Smoothness of Compact Cauchy Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2015-10-01

    We obtain an improved version of the area theorem for not necessarily differentiable horizons which, in conjunction with a recent result on the completeness of generators, allows us to prove that under the null energy condition every compactly generated Cauchy horizon is smooth and compact. We explore the consequences of this result for time machines, topology change, black holes and cosmic censorship. For instance, it is shown that compact Cauchy horizons cannot form in a non-empty spacetime which satisfies the stable dominant energy condition wherever there is some source content.

  12. Quantum correlations through event horizons: Fermionic versus bosonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Leon, Juan

    2010-03-15

    We disclose the behavior of quantum and classical correlations among all the different spatial-temporal regions of a space-time with an event horizon, comparing fermionic with bosonic fields. We show the emergence of conservation laws for entanglement and classical correlations, pointing out the crucial role that statistics plays in the information exchange (and more specifically, the entanglement tradeoff) across horizons. The results obtained here could shed new light on the problem of information behavior in noninertial frames and in the presence of horizons, giving better insight into the black-hole information paradox.

  13. Simulations of the Greenland ice sheet 100 years into the future with the full Stokes model Elmer/Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddik, H.; Greve, R.; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Gagliardini, O.

    2011-12-01

    the surface precipitation and temperature and the set S (three experiments) applies an amplification factor to change the basal sliding velocity. The experiments are compared to a constant climate control run beginning at present (epoch 2004-1-1 0:0:0) and running up to 100 years holding the climate constant to its present state. The experiments with the amplification factor (Set S) show high sensitivities. Relative to the control run, the scenario with an amplification factor of 3x applied to the sliding velocity produces a Greenland contribution to sea level rise of ~25 cm. An amplification factor of 2.5x produces a contribution of ~16 cm and an amplification factor 2x produces a contribution of ~9 cm. The experiments with the changes to the surface precipitation and temperature (set C) show a contribution to sea level rise of ~4 cm when a factor 1x is applied to the temperature and precipitation anomalies. A factor 1.5x produces a sea level rise of ~8 cm and a factor 2x produces a sea level rise of ~12 cm.

  14. Status of the JPL Horizons Ephemeris System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgini, Jon D.

    2015-08-01

    Since 1996, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory on-line Horizons system has provided open access to the latest JPL orbit solutions through customizable ephemeris generation and searches. Currently, high-precision ephemerides for more than 683,000 objects are available: all known solar system bodies, several dozen spacecraft, system barycenters, and some libration points.Since inception, Horizons has produced 150 million ephemeris products in response to 70.4 million connections by 800,000 unique IP addresses. Recent usage is typically 6000 unique users requesting 4,000,000 ephemeris products per month.Horizons is freely accessible without an account and may be used and automated through any of three interfaces: interactive telnet connection, web-browser form, or by sending e-mail command-files.Asteroid and comet ephemerides are numerically integrated on request using JPL's DASTCOM5 database of initial conditions which is kept current by a separate process; as new measurements and discoveries are reported by the Minor Planet Center, they are automatically processed into new JPL orbit solutions. Radar targets and other objects of high interest have their orbit solutions manually examined and updated into the database.For asteroids and comets, SPK files may be dynamically created using Horizons. This is effectively a recording of the integrator output. The binary files may then be efficiently interpolated by user software to exactly reproduce the trajectory without having to duplicate the numerically integrated n-body dynamical model or PPN equations of motion.Other Horizons output is numerical and in the form of plain-text observer, vector, osculating element, and close-approach tables. More than one hundred quantities can be requested in various time-scales and coordinate systems. For asteroids and comets, statistical uncertainties can be mapped to output times to assess position and motion uncertainties.Horizons is consistent with the DE431 solar system solution

  15. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Lame Deer Creek, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Lame Deer Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. SixtY-six cross sections were Surveyed and 25 cross sections were synthesized along a 9.5-mile reach of Lame Deer Creek. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile shows the streambed elevation and the location of the bridge, culverts, and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  16. The absence of horizon in black-hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-08-01

    With the back-reaction of Hawking radiation taken into consideration, the work of Kawai, Matsuo and Yokokura [1] has shown that, under a few assumptions, the collapse of matter does not lead to event horizon nor apparent horizon. In this paper, we relax their assumptions and elaborate on the space-time geometry of a generic collapsing body with spherical symmetry. The geometry outside the collapsing sphere is found to be approximated by the geometry outside the white-hole horizon, hence the collapsing matter remains outside the Schwarzschild radius. As particles in Hawking radiation are created in the vicinity of the collapsing matter, the information loss paradox is alleviated. Assuming that the collapsing body evaporates within finite time, there is no event horizon.

  17. Dynamical AdS strings across horizons

    DOE PAGES

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murata, Keiju

    2016-03-01

    We examine the nonlinear classical dynamics of a fundamental string in anti-deSitter spacetime. The string is dual to the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in $N = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory. We perturb the string by shaking the endpoints and compute its time evolution numerically. We find that with sufficiently strong perturbations the string continues extending and plunges into the Poincare´ horizon. In the evolution, effective horizons are also dynamically created on the string worldsheet. The quark and antiquark are thus causally disconnected, and the string transitions to two straight strings. The forces acting on the endpoints vanishmore » with a power law whose slope depends on the perturbations. Lastly, the condition for this transition to occur is that energy injection exceeds the static energy between the quark-antiquark pair.« less

  18. Dynamical AdS strings across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murata, Keiju

    2016-03-01

    We examine the nonlinear classical dynamics of a fundamental string in anti-de Sitter spacetime. The string is dual to the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in {N}=4 super Yang-Mills theory. We perturb the string by shaking the endpoints and compute its time evolution numerically. We find that with sufficiently strong perturbations the string continues extending and plunges into the Poincaré horizon. In the evolution, effective horizons are also dynamically created on the string worldsheet. The quark and antiquark are thus causally disconnected, and the string transitions to two straight strings. The forces acting on the endpoints vanish with a power law whose slope depends on the perturbations. The condition for this transition to occur is that energy injection exceeds the static energy between the quark-antiquark pair.

  19. Thermal history of the Sabero Coalfield (Southern Cantabrian Zone, NW Spain) as revealed by apatite fission track analyses from tonstein horizons: implications for timing of coalification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botor, Dariusz; Anczkiewicz, Aneta A.

    2015-10-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) central ages from Carboniferous (Stephanian) tonsteins of the Sabero Coalfield, NW Spain, range from 140.8 ± 7.5 to 65.8 ± 8.1 Ma (Cretaceous), with mean c-axis projected track length values ranging from 12.5 to 13.4 μm. Mean random vitrinite reflectance ( R r) of these samples ranges from 0.91 to 1.20 %, which can be translated into maximum palaeotemperatures of ca. 130 to 180 °C. All analysed samples experienced substantial post-depositional annealing. The considerably younger AFT ages compared to the depositional ages of the samples and R r data indicate the certainty of the occurrence of at least one heating event after the deposition of strata. The unimodal track length distributions, the relatively short mean track length, and the rather low standard deviation (SD) (1.0-1.6 μm) indicate a relatively simple thermal history that could be related to the post-Late Variscan heating event followed by prolonged residence in the apatite partial annealing zone (APAZ). Geological data combined with thermal models of AFT data indicate that Stephanian strata reached the maximum palaeotemperatures in the Permian period, which was therefore the major time of the coalification processes. The Permian magmatic activity was responsible for a high heat flow, which, with the added effect of sedimentary burial, could account for the resetting of the AFT system. It appears that the fault-related hydrothermal activity could have redistributed heat in areas of significant subsidence. Cooling occurred in the Triassic-Cretaceous times after a high heat flow Permian regime. A post-Permian maturation of the Stephanian organic matter is not very likely, since there is no evidence of a high Mesozoic burial that was sufficient to cause a significant increase in the palaeotemperatures. Finally, exhumation and associated erosion rates may possibly have been faster in the Tertiary, causing the present exposure of the studied rocks.

  20. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Big Muddy Creek, Fort Peck Indian Reservation and adjacent area, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Big Muddy Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. The magnitude of the 100-year flood was determined to range from 13,600 to 20,400 ft3/s, depending on location. Field surveys were made at 39 cross sections along a 41-mile reach of Big Muddy Creek. An additional two cross sections along the same reach were synthesized. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile also shows the streambed elevation and the location of the bridges and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  1. Struggles for Perspective: A Commentary on ""One Story of Many to Be Told": Following Empirical Studies of College and Adult Writing through 100 Years of NCTE Journals"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on Kevin Roozen and Karen Lunsford's insightful examination of empirical studies of college and adult writing published in NCTE journals over the last 100 years. One sees in their account the struggles for perspective that marked writing studies in this period, as researchers applied ever wider lenses to the…

  2. Exact event horizon of a black hole merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Martínez, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the event horizon of a binary black hole merger, in the extreme-mass-ratio limit where one of the black holes is much smaller than the other, can be described in an exact analytic way. This is done by tracing in the Schwarzschild geometry a congruence of null geodesics that approaches a null plane at infinity. Its form can be given explicitly in terms of elliptic functions, and we use it to analyze and illustrate the time-evolution of the horizon along the merger. We identify features such as the line of caustics at which light rays enter the horizon, and the critical point at which the horizons touch. We also compute several quantities that characterize these aspects of the merger.

  3. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  4. Combining multiple data sources for the quantification of snow and glacier melt contributions to streamflow over the last 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Kerstin; Freudiger, Daphné S.; Kohn, Irene; Seibert, Jan; Weiler, Markus

    2015-04-01

    High alpine headwater catchments are important source areas for many large rivers. There is considerable interest in understanding and predicting the changing hydrological processes in these catchments due to climatic changes. At the same time, high elevation regions tend to be data scarce. The aim of the study is a re-analysis of the changing contributions of snow and glacier melt to streamflow in the river Rhine over the entire 20th Century. The success of quantifying these contributions across scales and over such a long time period depends on the use of all available information. We present the challenges and benefits of combining multiple regional data sources (i) to analyze these changes empirically and (ii) to constrain hydrological modeling in the headwater basins. The reconstruction of gridded meteorological variables for the period 1901-1950 based on an analogue resampling technique created a consistent meteorological forcing over the entire period. Glacier extents from maps of the early 20th Century defined the starting conditions to bridge the time to existing glacier volume and area change data. The analysis of the co-variability and trends in a set of long time series of climate variables and streamflow in unregulated headwaters provided insight into different phases of changing climate-hydrology relations. These signatures, together with the snow water equivalent maps for the last 30 years produced by the SLF and the collection of all available streamflow records provided important benchmarks for model calibration and validation. This work improves the understanding of climate sensitivity in high mountain environments and demonstrates important challenges when modeling partly compensating effects of a changing climate.

  5. Common Ground: Expanding Our Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michele J.

    In "Common Ground: Dialogue, Understanding, and the Teaching of Composition," Kurt Spellmeyer seeks to familiarize students and teachers with the linguistic and cultural no-man's-land separating them. Reinstating the value of two writing conventions often used by traditional students--expressive and commonplaces--can help expand on the horizons of…

  6. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    ScienceCinema

    Brian Cox

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  7. New Horizons Mission to Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Luis G.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the trajectory that will take the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. Included are photographs of the spacecraft, the launch vehicle, the assembled vehicle as it is being moved to the launch pad and the launch. Also shown are diagrams of the assembled parts with identifying part names.

  8. New Horizons in Education, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kwok Keung, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the May and November 2000 issues of "New Horizons in Education," with articles in English and Chinese. The May issue includes the following articles: "A Key to Successful Environmental Education: Teacher Trainees' Attitude, Behaviour, and Knowledge" (Kevin Chung Wai Lui, Eric Po Keung Tsang, Sing Lai Chan); "Critical…

  9. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Cox

    2010-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  10. Uncertainties of the global-to-regional temperature and precipitation simulations in CMIP5 models for past and future 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lilong; Xu, Jianjun; Powell, Alfred M.; Jiang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Global-to-regional surface temperature and precipitation trends are examined based on the CMIP5 model 100 years of historical simulations and another future 100 years following the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) emission scenario projection. Different from the ensemble mean approach in the previous studies, the probabilistic multimodal ensemble prediction with Gaussian fitting is used to generate probabilistic simulations. The results show that the averaged precipitation increases slightly with global warming, but the response is not globally uniform. Both historical model simulations and the RCP emission scenario projections suffer from large uncertainties in the selected models and the geographic distribution. The spatial distribution of spreads among the multimodal scenario projections is similar to that in the historical simulations, except the magnitude of spread sharply increases and the region expands equatorward and poleward in surface temperature and precipitation, respectively.

  11. [Changes in the therapy of pulpal diseases and periapical lesions according to the articles published in the journal Fogorvosi Szemle during the past 100 years (1908-2008)].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Júlia; Duhaj, Szilvia; Nyárasdy, Ida

    2008-08-01

    Present review makes an attempt to summarize the Hungarian endodontic literature of pulpal and periodontal diseases, published during the past 100 years. The experimental examinations and clinical studies make it possible to follow the changes in the methods and in the medicines, used in the field of pulpal treatment. The overview gives us information about the problem of disinfection, shaping, measuring, and obturation of root canal. PMID:19055128

  12. Optimal investment horizons for stocks and markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, A.; Simonsen, I.; Jensen, M. H.

    2006-10-01

    The inverse statistics is the distribution of waiting times needed to achieve a predefined level of return obtained from (detrended) historic asset prices [I. Simonsen, M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, Eur. Phys. J. 27 (2002) 583; M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, I. Simonsen, Physica A 234 (2003) 338]. Such a distribution typically goes through a maximum at a time coined the optimal investment horizon, τρ*, which defines the most likely waiting time for obtaining a given return ρ. By considering equal positive and negative levels of return, we reported in [M.H. Jensen, A. Johansen, I. Simonsen, Physica A 234 (2003) 338] on a quantitative gain/loss asymmetry most pronounced for short horizons. In the present paper, the inverse statistics for {2}/{3} of the individual stocks presently in the DJIA is investigated. We show that this gain/loss asymmetry established for the DJIA surprisingly is not present in the time series of the individual stocks nor their average. This observation points towards some kind of collective movement of the stocks of the index (synchronization).

  13. Art, the Urban Skyscraper, and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation delineates the historiography and the iconography of my urban public sculptures which use skyscrapers as today's standing stones, markers for horizon astronomy. From 1977 to the present time, my work has engaged the public to “look up and see.” Through ephemeral works in the sky and over the water to large-scale rooftop sculptures in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, and Europe, viewers are oriented to the Milky Way, the summer triangle, and other celestial phenomena. This new urban scale art, transformative in context and gesture, has become part of the new cultural landscape.

  14. Generic isolated horizons and their applications

    PubMed

    Ashtekar; Beetle; Dreyer; Fairhurst; Krishnan; Lewandowski; Wisniewski

    2000-10-23

    The notion of isolated horizons is extended to allow for distortion and rotation. Space-times containing a black hole, itself in equilibrium but possibly surrounded by radiation, satisfy these conditions. The framework has three types of applications: (i) it provides new tools to extract physics from strong field geometry; (ii) it leads to a generalization of the zeroth and first laws of black hole mechanics and sheds new light on the "origin" of the first law; and (iii) it serves as a point of departure for black hole entropy calculations in nonperturbative quantum gravity. PMID:11030951

  15. The Malcolm horizon: History and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Malcolm Horizon, a peripheral vision horizon used in flight simulation, is discussed. A history of the horizon display is presented as well as a brief overview of vision physiology, and the role balance plays is spatial orientation. Avenues of continued research in subconscious cockpit instrumentation are examined.

  16. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  17. Geometric properties of static Einstein-Maxwell dilaton horizons with a Liouville potential

    SciTech Connect

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Shoom, Andrey A.

    2011-05-15

    We study nondegenerate and degenerate (extremal) Killing horizons of arbitrary geometry and topology within the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton model with a Liouville potential (the EMdL model) in d-dimensional (d{>=}4) static space-times. Using Israel's description of a static space-time, we construct the EMdL equations and the space-time curvature invariants: the Ricci scalar, the square of the Ricci tensor, and the Kretschmann scalar. Assuming that space-time metric functions and the model fields are real analytic functions in the vicinity of a space-time horizon, we study the behavior of the space-time metric and the fields near the horizon and derive relations between the space-time curvature invariants calculated on the horizon and geometric invariants of the horizon surface. The derived relations generalize similar relations known for horizons of static four- and five-dimensional vacuum and four-dimensional electrovacuum space-times. Our analysis shows that all the extremal horizon surfaces are Einstein spaces. We present the necessary conditions for the existence of static extremal horizons within the EMdL model.

  18. Black holes or firewalls: A theory of horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Varela, Jaime; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2013-10-01

    We present a quantum theory of black hole (and other) horizons, in which the standard assumptions of complementarity are preserved without contradicting information theoretic considerations. After the scrambling time, the quantum mechanical structure of a black hole becomes that of an eternal black hole at the microscopic level. In particular, the stretched horizon degrees of freedom and the states entangled with them can be mapped into the near-horizon modes in the two exterior regions of an eternal black hole, whose mass is taken to be that of the evolving black hole at each moment. Salient features arising from this picture include (i) the number of degrees of freedom needed to describe a black hole is eA/2lP2, where A is the area of the horizon; (ii) black hole states having smooth horizons, however, span only an eA/4lP2-dimensional subspace of the relevant eA/2lP2-dimensional Hilbert space; (iii) internal dynamics of the horizon is such that an infalling observer finds a smooth horizon with a probability of 1 if a state stays in this subspace. We identify the structure of local operators responsible for describing semiclassical physics in the exterior and interior spacetime regions and show that this structure avoids the arguments for firewalls—the horizon can keep being smooth throughout the evolution. We discuss the fate of infalling observers under various circumstances, especially when the observers manipulate degrees of freedom before entering the horizon, and we find that an observer can never see a firewall by making a measurement on early Hawking radiation. We also consider the presented framework from the viewpoint of an infalling reference frame and argue that Minkowski-like vacua are not unique. In particular, the number of true Minkowski vacua is infinite, although the label discriminating these vacua cannot be accessed in usual nongravitational quantum field theory. An application of the framework to de Sitter horizons is also discussed.

  19. Effective hydraulic properties on a highly heterogeneous soil horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouëlian, A.; Cousin, I.; Frison, A.; Richard, G.

    2009-04-01

    Knowing the soil hydraulic functioning for agricultural practices is more and more important in the context of global change. In that context, soil horizons represent the reference soil volume in term of soil functioning. Nevertheless they can be heterogeneous as for example, stony horizons, cultivated horizons, or also specific weathering horizons like those in Albeluvisol. The determination of effective hydraulic properties in these heterogeneous horizons can not be done by classical laboratory experiments like Multi-Step-Outflow or evaporative Wind experiment. So it remains a real challenge to get the effective hydraulic properties. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology for the determination of effective hydraulic properties of heterogeneous soil horizons based on the knowledge of the: on one hand the 3D soil structure and on the other hand the local hydraulic properties. The studied soil is an Albeluvisol that exhibits some horizons composed by the juxtaposition of two Elementary Pedological Volumes (EPVs); they can be visually distinguished by their colours (ochre and white) and they have differential hydraulic functioning: the clayey ochre ones conduct less water than the loamy white ones. Local hydraulic properties were determined on each type of volumes. The 3D structure of the heterogeneous horizon was obtained by electrical resistivity measurements. Several two-dimensional cuts with different structures were extracted from this 3D block so that we can simulate on them the hydraulic functioning of the horizon by the Hydrus2D software. The equivalent water retention curve was obtained thanks to the additive properties of the water retention curves at the local scale. The equivalent unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the horizon was determined on each 2D cut, which requires the knowledge of the structure. The calculations were done by two methods, a numerical one that simulated the water flow for a constant hydraulic potential, a analytical

  20. Fermion tunneling from dynamical horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Criscienzo, R.; Vanzo, L.

    2008-06-01

    The instability against emission of fermionic particles by the trapping horizon of an evolving black hole is analyzed and confirmed using the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method. This method automatically selects one special expression for the surface gravity of a changing horizon. The results also apply to point masses embedded in an expanding universe. As a bonus of the tunneling method, we gain the insight that the surface gravity still defines a temperature parameter as long as the evolution is sufficiently slow that the black-hole pass through a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states, and that black holes should be semi-classically unstable even in a hypothetical world without bosonic fields.

  1. 100 Years of Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpher, Nancy L.; Wright Ron, D.

    2006-01-01

    One may have heard of reality TV, but what about reality learning? The latter is probably a term one hasn't seen much, although it is in many ways a clearer and more concise name for a concept that in 2006 marks its 100th anniversary: cooperative education, or "co-op." Co-op, a break-through idea pioneered at the University of Cincinnati by Herman…

  2. Celebrating 100 Years of Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    In honor of the Wright brothers' first flight, the article profiles aviation and aerospace technology programs that are training workers in aviation safety and explorations. Looks at programs from Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell, Pima Community College, and Olathe Northwest High School. (JOW)

  3. Penrose inequality and apparent horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2004-12-15

    A spherically symmetric spacetime is presented with an initial data set that is asymptotically flat, satisfies the dominant energy condition, and such that on this initial data M<{radical}(A/16{pi}), where M is the total mass and A is the area of the apparent horizon. This provides a counterexample to a commonly stated version of the Penrose inequality, though it does not contradict the true Penrose inequality.

  4. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  5. Simulation of water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Berenbrock, C.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1997-10-01

    Delineation of areas at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that would be inundated by a 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek is needed by the US Department of Energy to fulfill flood-plain regulatory requirements. Birch Creek flows southward about 40 miles through an alluvium-filled valley onto the northern part of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory site on the eastern Snake River Plain. The lower 10-mile reach of Birch Creek that ends in Birch Creek Playa near several Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities is of particular concern. Twenty-six channel cross sections were surveyed to develop and apply a hydraulic model to simulate water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek. Model simulation of the 100-year peak flow (700 cubic feet per second) in reaches upstream from State Highway 22 indicated that flow was confined within channels even when all flow was routed to one channel. Where the highway crosses Birch Creek, about 315 cubic feet per second of water was estimated to move downstream--115 cubic feet per second through a culvert and 200 cubic feet per second over the highway. Simulated water-surface elevation at this crossing was 0.8 foot higher than the elevation of the highway. The remaining 385 cubic feet per second flowed southwestward in a trench along the north side of the highway. Flow also was simulated with the culvert removed. The exact location of flood boundaries on Birch Creek could not be determined because of the highly braided channel and the many anthropogenic features (such as the trench, highway, and diversion channels) in the study area that affect flood hydraulics and flow. Because flood boundaries could not be located exactly, only a generalized flood-prone map was developed.

  6. Beyond the veil: Inner horizon instability and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Levi, Thomas S.

    2004-11-15

    We show that scalar perturbations of the eternal, rotating Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole should lead to an instability of the inner (Cauchy) horizon, preserving strong cosmic censorship. Because of backscattering from the geometry, plane-wave modes have a divergent stress tensor at the event horizon, but suitable wave packets avoid this difficulty, and are dominated at late times by quasinormal behavior. The wave packets have cuts in the complexified coordinate plane that are controlled by requirements of continuity, single-valuedness, and positive energy. Due to a focusing effect, regular wave packets nevertheless have a divergent stress energy at the inner horizon, signaling an instability. We propose that this instability, which is localized behind the event horizon, is detected holographically as a breakdown in the semiclassical computation of dual conformal field theory (CFT) expectation values in which the analytic behavior of wave packets in the complexified coordinate plane plays an integral role. In the dual field theory, this is interpreted as an encoding of physics behind the horizon in the entanglement between otherwise independent CFTs.

  7. Oil sheen weathering post Deepwater Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, M. Y.; Redmond, M. C.; Reddy, C. M.; Aeppli, C.; Nelson, R. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    A recently published study identified the source of the reoccurred oil sheens close to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster site as a finite contamination most likely derived from tanks and pits on the DWH wreckage itself. Here we use geochemical fingerprinting and microbial community analysis to better understand the fate and weathering processes affecting these surface oils. Both, alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are shown to reflect a linear decrease of hydrocarbon compounds with increasing distance to the DWH wreckage site (equivalent to exposure time on the sea surface). These results indicate that in the early stage of weathering the combined effects of dissolution and evaporation dominate the degradation of these surface oils. Sheen microbial communities were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Flavobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, with low relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria likely to be hydrocarbon degraders (no more than 15% of sequences in each sample). However, some of these Gammaproteobacteria were closely related to putative hydrocarbon degraders observed in abundance in deep water plumes during the primary Deepwater Horizon spill, suggesting that very low levels of biodegradation may be also occurring. This in situ weathering experiment provides new insights in hydrocarbon weathering dynamics and shows how chemical and biological changes can potentially be masked by large evaporative losses of compounds smaller than C18 n-alkanes.

  8. Over 100 years of environmental change recorded by foraminifers and sediments in a large Gulf of Mexico estuary, Mobile Bay, AL, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    The marine microfauna of Mobile Bay has been profoundly influenced by the development and expansion of the primary shipping channel over the last ˜100 years. Foraminifers and sediments from seven box cores with excess lead-210 chronology document that channel dredging and spoil disposal have altered circulation, reduced estuarine mixing, changed sedimentation patterns, and caused a faunal turnover within the bay. Beginning in the late 1800s, changes in estuarine mixing allowed for greater low-pH freshwater influence in the bay, and ultimately began environmental changes that resulted in the loss of calcareous foraminifers. By the early 1900s, box cores throughout Mobile Bay record a ˜ 100-year trend of increasing calcareous test dissolution that continues to the present. Since the completion of the current shipping channel in the 1950s, restricted tidal flushing and increased terrestrial organic matter, documented by carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, stimulated an increase in agglutinated foraminiferal densities. However, in deeper areas of the bay, hypoxic water has negatively impacted the marine microfauna. Comparisons of the present-day foraminiferal assemblage with foraminifers collected in the early 1970s indicate that the continued biologic loss of calcareous foraminifers in the bay has allowed the introduction of a new agglutinated foraminiferal species into the bay.

  9. Comparison of the 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods computed from observed data with the 1995 urban flood-frequency estimating equations for Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, Ernest J.

    1997-01-01

    Flood-frequency relations were computed for 28 urban stations, for 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods and the computations were compared to corresponding recurrence interval floods computed from the estimating equations from a 1995 investigation. Two stations were excluded from further comparisons or analyses because neither station had a significant flood during the period of observed record. The comparisons, based on the student's t-test statistics at the 0.05 level of significance, indicate that the mean residuals of the 25- and 100-year floods were negatively biased by 26.2 percent and 31.6 percent, respectively, at the 26 stations. However, the mean residuals of the 2-year floods were 2.5 percent lower than the mean of the 2-year floods computed from the equations, and were not significantly biased. The reason for this negative bias is that the period of observed record at the 26 stations was a relatively dry period. At 25 of the 26 stations, the two highest simulated peaks used to develop the estimating equations occurred many years before the observed record began. However, no attempt was made to adjust the estimating equations because higher peaks could occur after the period of observed record and an adjustment to the equations would cause an underestimation of design floods.

  10. Gravitational radiations of generic isolated horizons and nonrotating dynamical horizons from asymptotic expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-H.; Wang, C.-H.

    2009-09-15

    Instead of using a three-dimensional analysis on quasilocal horizons, we adopt a four-dimensional asymptotic expansion analysis to study the next order contributions from the nonlinearity of general relativity. From the similarity between null infinity and horizons, the proper reference frames are chosen from the compatible constant spinors for an observer to measure the energy-momentum and flux near quasilocal horizons. In particular, we focus on the similarity of Bondi-Sachs gravitational radiation for the quasilocal horizons and compare our results with Ashtekar-Kirshnan flux formula. The quasilocal energy-momentum and flux of generic isolated horizons and nonrotating dynamical horizons are discussed in this paper.

  11. Topological deformation of isolated horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Liko, Tomas

    2008-03-15

    We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term can have physical effects in four dimensions. Specifically, the entropy of a black hole acquires a correction term that is proportional to the Euler characteristic of the cross sections of the horizon. While this term is constant for a single black hole, it will be a nontrivial function for a system with dynamical topologies such as black-hole mergers: it is shown that for certain values of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter, the second law of black-hole mechanics can be violated.

  12. [Effects of Slope Position and Soil Horizon on Soil Microbial Biomass and Abundance in Karst Primary Forest of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-zhen; Su, Yi-rong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effects of slope position and soil horizon on soil microbial biomass and abundance, chloroform fumigation extraction methods and real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) were adopted to quantify the changes of soil microbial biomass C, N and abundance of bacteria and fungi, respectively. Soil samples were harvested from three horizons along profile, i. e., leaching horizon (A, 0-10 cm), transitional horizon (AB, 30-50 cm) and alluvial horizon (B, 70-100 cm), which were collected from the upper, middle and lower slope positions of a karst primary forest ecosystem. The results showed that slope position, soil horizon and their interaction significantly influenced the soil microbial biomass and abundance (P < 0.05). Different from A horizon, where SMBC was greater in lower than in upper slope position (P < 0.05), SMBC in AB and B horizons were highest in middle slope position. Similarly, SMBN was greater in lower than in upper slope position for A, AB and B horizons. Besides soil bacterial abundance in B horizon and fungal abundance in AB layer, the middle slope position had the highest value for all the three soil horizons (P < 0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that soil organic carbon, available nitrogen and pH were the key factors responsible for SMBC and SMBN variation, respectively, while the important factors responsible for the variation of bacteria abundance were available nitrogen and available phosphorus, and that for fungi abundance variation were available potassium.

  13. Holography beyond the horizon and cosmic censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Thomas S.; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-08-01

    We investigate the description of the region behind the event horizon in rotating black holes in the AdS conformal field theory correspondence, using the rotating Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole as a concrete example. We extend a technique introduced by Kraus, Ooguri, and Shenker, based on analytically continuing amplitudes defined in a Euclidean space, to include rotation. In the rotating case, boundary amplitudes again have two different bulk descriptions, involving either integration only over the regions outside the black holes’ event horizon, or integration over this region and the region between the event horizon and the Cauchy horizon (inner horizon). We argue that generally, the holographic map will relate the field theory to the region bounded by the Cauchy horizons in spacetime. We also argue that these results suggest that the holographic description of black holes will satisfy strong cosmic censorship.

  14. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Seleson, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    A notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with vari- able horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties un- changed. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under homogeneous deformation. These artifacts de- pend on the second derivative of horizon and can be reduced by use of a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress . Bodies with piece- wise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forces by using a technique called a splice between the regions. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.

  15. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium

    DOE PAGES

    Silling, Stewart A.; Littlewood, David J.; Seleson, Pablo

    2015-12-10

    Here, a notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with variable horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties unchanged. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under a homogeneous deformation. These artifacts depend on the second derivative of the horizon and can be reduced by employing a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress. Bodies with piecewise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forcesmore » by using a simpler technique called a splice. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both the partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.« less

  16. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart A.; Littlewood, David J.; Seleson, Pablo

    2015-12-10

    Here, a notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with variable horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties unchanged. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under a homogeneous deformation. These artifacts depend on the second derivative of the horizon and can be reduced by employing a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress. Bodies with piecewise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forces by using a simpler technique called a splice. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both the partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.

  17. Theory underlying the peripheral vision horizon device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral Vision Horizon Device (PVHD) theory states that the likelihood of pilot disorientation in flight is reduced by providing an artificial horizon that provides orientation information to peripheral vision. In considering the validity of the theory, three areas are explored: the use of an artificial horizon device over some other flight instrument; the use of peripheral vision over foveal vision; and the evidence that peripheral vision is well suited to the processing of orientation information.

  18. Horizons of semiclassical black holes are cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2014-06-01

    We calculate, using our recently proposed semiclassical framework, the quantum state of the Hawking pairs that are produced during the evaporation of a black hole (BH). Our framework adheres to the standard rules of quantum mechanics and incorporates the quantum fluctuations of the collapsing shell spacetime in Hawking's original calculation, while accounting for back-reaction effects. We argue that the negative-energy Hawking modes need to be regularly integrated out; and so these are effectively subsumed by the BH and, as a result, the number of coherent negative-energy modes N coh at any given time is parametrically smaller than the total number of the Hawking particles N total emitted during the lifetime of the BH. We find that N coh is determined by the width of the BH wavefunction and scales as the square root of the BH entropy. We also find that the coherent negative-energy modes are strongly entangled with their positive-energy partners. Previously, we have found that N coh is also the number of coherent outgoing particles and that information can be continually transferred to the outgoing radiation at a rate set by N coh . Our current results show that, while the BH is semiclassical, information can be released without jeopardizing the nearly maximal inside-out entanglement and imply that the state of matter near the horizon is approximately the vacuum. The BH firewall proposal, on the other hand, is that the state of matter near the horizon deviates substantially from the vacuum, starting at the Page time. We find that, under the usual assumptions for justifying the formation of a firewall, one does indeed form at the Page time. However, the possible loophole lies in the implicit assumption that the number of strongly entangled pairs can be of the same order of N total .

  19. Horizon entropy with loop quantum gravity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranzetti, Daniele; Sahlmann, Hanno

    2015-06-01

    We show that the spherically symmetric isolated horizon can be described in terms of an SU (2) connection and an su (2)-valued one-form, obeying certain constraints. The horizon symplectic structure is precisely the one of 3d gravity in a first order formulation. We quantize the horizon degrees of freedom in the framework of loop quantum gravity, with methods recently developed for 3d gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant. Bulk excitations ending on the horizon act very similarly to particles in 3d gravity. The Bekenstein-Hawking law is recovered in the limit of imaginary Barbero-Immirzi parameter. Alternative methods of quantization are also discussed.

  20. Spectroscopy of a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The spectroscopy of a weakly isolated horizon has been investigated. We obtain an equally spaced entropy spectrum with its quantum equal to the one given by Bekenstein (Phys Rev D 7:2333, 1973). We demonstrate that the quantization of entropy and area is a generic property of horizons which exists in a wide class of spacetimes admitting weakly isolated horizons. Our method based on the tunneling method also indicates that the entropy quantum of black hole horizons is closely related to Hawking temperature.

  1. Apparent horizon in fluid-gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Plewa, Grzegorz; Spalinski, Michal

    2011-05-15

    This article develops a computational framework for determining the location of boundary-covariant apparent horizons in the geometry of conformal fluid-gravity duality in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, it is shown up to second order and conjectured to hold to all orders in the gradient expansion that there is a unique apparent horizon which is covariantly expressible in terms of fluid velocity, temperature, and boundary metric. This leads to the first explicit example of an entropy current defined by an apparent horizon and opens the possibility that in the near-equilibrium regime there is preferred foliation of apparent horizons for black holes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes.

  2. A MIP Model for Rolling Horizon Surgery Scheduling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Luo, Yong; You, Yang; Cheng, Yuanjun; Shi, Yingkang; Gong, Renrong

    2016-05-01

    Most surgery scheduling is done 1 day in advance. Caused by lack of overall planning, this scheduling scheme often results in unbalanced occupancy time of the operating rooms. So we put forward a rolling horizon mixed integer programming model for the scheduling. Rolling horizon scheduling refers to a scheduling scheme in which cyclic surgical requests are taken into account. Surgical requests are updated daily. The completed surgeries are eliminated, and new surgeries are added to the scheduling list. Considering day-to-day demand for surgery, we develop a non-rolling scheduling model (NRSM) and a rolling horizon scheduling model (RSM). By comparing the two, we find that the quality of surgery scheduling is significantly influenced by the variation in demand from day to day. A rolling horizon scheduling will enable a more flexible planning of the pool of surgeries that have not been scheduled into this main blocks, and hence minimize the idle time of operating rooms. The strategy of the RSM helps balance the occupancy time among operating rooms. Using surgical data from five departments of the West China Hospital (WCH), we generate surgical demands randomly to compare the NRSM and the RSM. The results show the operating rooms' average utilization rate using RSM is significantly higher than when applying NRSM.

  3. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  4. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J.; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N.; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  5. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  6. History of views on the relative positions of Antarctica and South America: A 100-year tango between Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, H.

    2007-01-01

    Discussion of continental drift around Antarctica began nearly 100 years ago. While the Gondwana connections of Antarctica to Africa and Australia have been well defined for decades, the relative pre-drift positions of the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonia continue to be subjects of controversy. Certainly older figures, which showed a paleo-position of the Peninsula crossing over continental crust of the Falkland Plateau or even South Africa or Patagonia, are out of consideration now. But contradictory opinions remain over the relative paleo-position of the Peninsula as a more or less straight prolongation of the Patagonian Andes, versus a position parallel to Patagonia along the Pacific coast. Geological reasons are found for both opinions, but geophysical observations on the adjacent ocean floors, particularly the evolution of the Weddell Sea crust, speak for the last-mentioned reconstruction.

  7. Reconceptualizing Knowledge at the Mathematical Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Mamolo, Ami

    2011-01-01

    This article extends the notion of "knowledge at the mathematical horizon" or "horizon knowledge" introduced by Ball and colleagues as a part of teachers' subject matter knowledge. Our focus is on teachers' mathematical knowledge beyond the school curriculum, that is, on mathematics learnt during undergraduate college or university studies. We…

  8. The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This "2015 Horizon…

  9. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Cynthia E. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the 'Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics' program is to interest young women in grades six through twelve in a variety of careers where mathematics and science are important. Progress in encouraging young women to take courses in mathematics, science, and technological subjects is discussed. Also included are adult, student, and organizational information packets used for 'Expanding Your Horizons' conferences.

  10. The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2014-01-01

    The internationally recognized "NMC Horizon Report" series and regional "NMC Technology Outlooks" are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a 12-year effort established in 2002 that annually identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in every sector of education around the…

  11. The Horizon Report: 2010 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Witchey, H.; Smith, R.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2010-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2010 Horizon…

  12. Estimation of the Horizon in Photographed Outdoor Scenes by Human and Machine

    PubMed Central

    Herdtweck, Christian; Wallraven, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present three experiments on horizon estimation. In Experiment 1 we verify the human ability to estimate the horizon in static images from only visual input. Estimates are given without time constraints with emphasis on precision. The resulting estimates are used as baseline to evaluate horizon estimates from early visual processes. Stimuli are presented for only ms and then masked to purge visual short-term memory and enforcing estimates to rely on early processes, only. The high agreement between estimates and the lack of a training effect shows that enough information about viewpoint is extracted in the first few hundred milliseconds to make accurate horizon estimation possible. In Experiment 3 we investigate several strategies to estimate the horizon in the computer and compare human with machine “behavior” for different image manipulations and image scene types. PMID:24349073

  13. Digital depth horizon compilations of the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent Arctic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Data have been digitized and combined to create four detailed depth horizon grids spanning the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent offshore areas. These map horizon compilations were created to aid in petroleum system modeling and related studies. Topography/bathymetry is extracted from a recent Arctic compilation of global onshore DEM and satellite altimetry and ship soundings offshore. The Lower Cretaceous Unconformity (LCU), the top of the Triassic Shublik Formation, and the pre-Carboniferous acoustic basement horizon grids are created from numerous seismic studies, drill hole information, and interpolation. These horizons were selected because they mark critical times in the geologic evolution of the region as it relates to petroleum. The various horizons clearly show the major tectonic elements of this region including the Brooks Range, Colville Trough, Barrow Arch, Hanna Trough, Chukchi Platform, Nuwuk Basin, Kaktovik Basin, and Canada Basin. The gridded data are available in a variety of data formats for use in regional studies.

  14. Something special at the event horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eune, Myungseok; Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the free-fall energy density of scalar fields semiclassically by employing the trace anomaly on a two-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole with respect to various black hole states in order to clarify whether something special at the horizon happens or not. For the Boulware state, the energy density at the horizon is always negative divergent, which is independent of initial free-fall positions. However, in the Unruh state the initial free-fall position is responsible for the energy density at the horizon and there is a critical point to determine the sign of the energy density at the horizon. In particular, a huge negative energy density appears when the freely falling observer is dropped just near the horizon. For the Hartle-Hawking state, it may also be positive or negative depending on the initial free-fall position, but it is always finite. Finally, we discuss physical consequences of these calculations.

  15. A 100-Year Retrospective Landscape-Level Carbon Budget for the Sooke Lake Watershed, British Columbia: Constraining Estimates of Terrestrial to Aquatic DOC Transfers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smiley, B. P. K.

    2014-12-01

    To address how natural disturbance, forest harvest, and deforestation from reservoir creation affect landscape-level carbon (C) budgets, a retrospective C budget for the 8500 ha Sooke watershed from 1911 - 2012 was developed using historic spatial inventory and disturbance data. Data was input to a spatially-explicit version of the Carbon Budget Model-Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3), an inventory-based C budget model used to simulate forest C dynamics at multiple scales. In 1911 the watershed was dominated by mature/old Douglas-fir forests with aboveground biomass C (ABC) of 262 Mg C/ha and net ecosystem production (NEP) of 0.63 Mg C/ha/yr. Land was cleared around Sooke Lake, a dam built and lake expanded from 370 to 450 ha in 1915, 610 ha in 1970, 670 ha in 1980 and 810 ha in 2002. Along with deforestation, fires and localized harvest occurred from 1920 - 1940, reducing ABC to 189 Mg C/ha, with NEP varying from -1.63 to 0.13 Mg C/ha/yr. Distributed harvest occurred 1954 - 1998, with a minimum ABC of 148 Mg C/ha in 1991. By 2012 ABC (177 Mg C/ha) and NEP (2.29 Mg C/ha/yr) had increased. Over 100 years, 2430 ha forest was cut and replanted and 640 ha deforested. CBM-CFS3 includes transfers of dissolved organic C (DOC) to aquatic systems, however data has not been available to parameterize DOC flux. DOC fluxes are modelled as a fraction of decay loss from humified soil C with a default of 100% of losses to CO2 and 0% to DOC. Stream flow and [DOC] data from 1996 - 2012 for 3 watershed catchments, Rithet, Judge and Council were used to estimate annual DOC fluxes. Rithet, Judge and Council differed both in area % disturbed (logging or fire) over 100 years (39%, 93%, 91%) and in area % mature/old forest (>80yrs in 2012) (67%, 56%, 21%). DOC flux for Rithet and Judge ranged from 0.037 - 0.057 Mg C/ha/yr, Council averaged 0.017 Mg C/ha/yr. Low DOC fluxes were likely due to influences of a small lake in the catchment. Constraining CBM-CFS3 to observed DOC fluxes, required

  16. Gravitational black hole hair from event horizon supertranslations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, Artem; Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Lüst, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    We discuss BMS supertranslations both at null-infinity BMS- and on the horizon {BMS}^{mathscr{H}} for the case of the Schwarzschild black hole. We show that both kinds of supertranslations lead to infinetly many gapless physical excitations. On this basis we construct a quotient algebra mathcal{A}equiv {BMS}^{mathscr{H}}/{BMS}- using suited superpositions of both kinds of transformations which cannot be compensated by an ordinary BMS-supertranslation and therefore are intrinsically due to the presence of an event horizon. We show that transformations in mathcal{A} are physical and generate gapless excitations on the horizon that can account for the gravitational hair as well as for the black hole entropy. We identify the physics of these modes as associated with Bogolioubov-Goldstone modes due to quantum criticality. Classically the number of these gapless modes is infinite. However, we show that due to quantum criticality the actual amount of information-carriers becomes finite and consistent with Bekenstein entropy. Although we only consider the case of Schwarzschild geometry, the arguments are extendable to arbitrary space-times containing event horizons.

  17. Quantification of uncertainties in the 100-year flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station and its application in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Huidae; Bones, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has introduced the concept of the "1-percent plus" flow to incorporate various uncertainties in estimation of the 100-year or 1-percent flow. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no clear directions for calculating the 1-percent plus flow have been defined in the literature. Although information about standard errors of estimation and prediction is provided along with the regression equations that are often used to estimate the 1-percent flow at ungaged sites, uncertainty estimation becomes more complicated when there is a nearby gaged station because regression flows and the peak flow estimate from a gage analysis should be weighted to compute the weighted estimate of the 1-percent flow. In this study, an equation for calculating the 1-percent plus flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station is analytically derived. Also, a detailed process is introduced for calculating the 1-percent plus flow for an ungaged site near a gaged station in Georgia as an example and a case study is performed. This study provides engineers and practitioners with a method that helps them better assess flood risks and develop mitigation plans accordingly.

  18. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs. PMID:26633149

  19. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-12-03

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs.

  20. Evolution of US maize (Zea mays L.) root architectural and anatomical phenes over the past 100 years corresponds to increased tolerance of nitrogen stress.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Galindo-Castañeda, Tania; Schussler, Jeffrey R; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the nitrogen use efficiency of maize is an important goal for food security and agricultural sustainability. In the past 100 years, maize breeding has focused on yield and above-ground phenes. Over this period, maize cultivation has changed from low fertilizer inputs and low population densities to intensive fertilization and dense populations. The authors hypothesized that through indirect selection the maize root system has evolved phenotypes suited to more intense competition for nitrogen. Sixteen maize varieties representing commercially successful lines over the past century were planted at two nitrogen levels and three planting densities. Root systems of the most recent material were 7 º more shallow, had one less nodal root per whorl, had double the distance from nodal root emergence to lateral branching, and had 14% more metaxylem vessels, but total mextaxylem vessel area remained unchanged because individual metaxylem vessels had 12% less area. Plasticity was also observed in cortical phenes such as aerenchyma, which increased at greater population densities. Simulation modelling with SimRoot demonstrated that even these relatively small changes in root architecture and anatomy could increase maize shoot growth by 16% in a high density and high nitrogen environment. The authors concluded that evolution of maize root phenotypes over the past century is consistent with increasing nitrogen use efficiency. Introgression of more contrasting root phene states into the germplasm of elite maize and determination of the functional utility of these phene states in multiple agronomic conditions could contribute to future yield gains.

  1. A 100-year record of changes in water renewal rate in Sermilik fjord and its influence on calving of Helheim glacier, southeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Camilla S.; Schmidt, Sabine; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Straneo, Fiammetta; Grycel, Aleksandra; Hass, Christian H.; Henrik Kjær, Kurt; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Niels; Dyke, Laurence M.; Olsen, Jesper; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2014-08-01

    Here we present a 100 year long proxy record for the renewal rate of the subsurface ocean waters in Sermilik Fjord at the edge of Helheim Glacier, based on investigations of two sediment cores (ER11-24 and ER11-25) obtained from the head of the fjord. By calculating the mean sortable silt (SSbar) in current-sorted melt water plume sediments we find that episodes of increased water renewal rates lasting 3-5 years coincide with a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. This is not surprising as low pressure systems and northeasterly storms are observed more frequently along the east coast of Greenland during positive NAO years as a result of the northward shift in the North Atlantic storm track. Previous studies of sediment cores obtained from the mid-region of the fjord showed that Helheim Glacier destabilization coincides with a negative NAO index. Therefore we conclude that inter-annual variability in storm-induced flushing of Sermilik Fjord and thus the water renewal rate towards the glacier margin is not the controlling factor for inter-annual variability in Helheim Glacier destabilization. Such knowledge may have implications on predictive model studies of ice-ocean interactions and glacier behavior.

  2. Intraspecific variation in fine root respiration and morphology in response to in situ soil nitrogen fertility in a 100-year-old Chamaecyparis obtusa forest.

    PubMed

    Makita, Naoki; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Takanobu; Tanikawa, Toko; Ishii, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    Soil N fertility has an effect on belowground C allocation, but the physiological and morphological responses of individual fine root segments to variations in N availability under field conditions are still unclear. In this study, the direction and magnitude of the physiological and morphological function of fine roots in response to variable in situ soil N fertility in a forest site were determined. We measured the specific root respiration (Rr) rate, N concentration and morphology of fine root segments with 1-3 branching orders in a 100-year-old coniferous forest of Chamaecyparis obtusa. Higher soil N fertility induced higher Rr rates, root N concentration, and specific root length (SRL), and lower root tissue density (RTD). In all fertility levels, the Rr rates were significantly correlated positively with root N and SRL and negatively with RTD. The regression slopes of respiration with root N and RTD were significantly higher along the soil N fertility gradient. Although no differences in the slopes of Rr and SRL relationship were found across the levels, there were significant shifts in the intercept along the common slope. These results suggest that a contrasting pattern in intraspecific relationships between specific Rr and N, RTD, and SRL exists among soils with different N fertility. Consequently, substantial increases in soil N fertility would exert positive effects on organ-scale root performance by covarying the Rr, root N, and morphology for their potential nutrient and water uptake.

  3. Evolution of US maize (Zea mays L.) root architectural and anatomical phenes over the past 100 years corresponds to increased tolerance of nitrogen stress.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Galindo-Castañeda, Tania; Schussler, Jeffrey R; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the nitrogen use efficiency of maize is an important goal for food security and agricultural sustainability. In the past 100 years, maize breeding has focused on yield and above-ground phenes. Over this period, maize cultivation has changed from low fertilizer inputs and low population densities to intensive fertilization and dense populations. The authors hypothesized that through indirect selection the maize root system has evolved phenotypes suited to more intense competition for nitrogen. Sixteen maize varieties representing commercially successful lines over the past century were planted at two nitrogen levels and three planting densities. Root systems of the most recent material were 7 º more shallow, had one less nodal root per whorl, had double the distance from nodal root emergence to lateral branching, and had 14% more metaxylem vessels, but total mextaxylem vessel area remained unchanged because individual metaxylem vessels had 12% less area. Plasticity was also observed in cortical phenes such as aerenchyma, which increased at greater population densities. Simulation modelling with SimRoot demonstrated that even these relatively small changes in root architecture and anatomy could increase maize shoot growth by 16% in a high density and high nitrogen environment. The authors concluded that evolution of maize root phenotypes over the past century is consistent with increasing nitrogen use efficiency. Introgression of more contrasting root phene states into the germplasm of elite maize and determination of the functional utility of these phene states in multiple agronomic conditions could contribute to future yield gains. PMID:25795737

  4. Evolution of US maize (Zea mays L.) root architectural and anatomical phenes over the past 100 years corresponds to increased tolerance of nitrogen stress

    PubMed Central

    York, Larry M.; Galindo-Castañeda, Tania; Schussler, Jeffrey R.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the nitrogen use efficiency of maize is an important goal for food security and agricultural sustainability. In the past 100 years, maize breeding has focused on yield and above-ground phenes. Over this period, maize cultivation has changed from low fertilizer inputs and low population densities to intensive fertilization and dense populations. The authors hypothesized that through indirect selection the maize root system has evolved phenotypes suited to more intense competition for nitrogen. Sixteen maize varieties representing commercially successful lines over the past century were planted at two nitrogen levels and three planting densities. Root systems of the most recent material were 7 º more shallow, had one less nodal root per whorl, had double the distance from nodal root emergence to lateral branching, and had 14% more metaxylem vessels, but total mextaxylem vessel area remained unchanged because individual metaxylem vessels had 12% less area. Plasticity was also observed in cortical phenes such as aerenchyma, which increased at greater population densities. Simulation modelling with SimRoot demonstrated that even these relatively small changes in root architecture and anatomy could increase maize shoot growth by 16% in a high density and high nitrogen environment. The authors concluded that evolution of maize root phenotypes over the past century is consistent with increasing nitrogen use efficiency. Introgression of more contrasting root phene states into the germplasm of elite maize and determination of the functional utility of these phene states in multiple agronomic conditions could contribute to future yield gains. PMID:25795737

  5. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-12-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs.

  6. Impact of 100-year human interventions on the deltaic coastal zone of the Inner Thermaikos Gulf (Greece): a DPSIR framework analysis.

    PubMed

    Karageorgis, Aristomenis P; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Kontogianni, Areti; Skourtos, Michael; Turner, Kerry R; Salomons, Wim

    2006-08-01

    The Axios River delta and the Inner Thermaikos Gulf coastal zone have experienced a long period of human interventions during the past 100 years. A post-evaluation of long run coastal zone changes under the Drivers-Pressures-State-Impacts-Response (DPSIR) conceptual framework is presented. The DPSIR approach is then used to project out into possible futures in order to connect with policy and management options proposed for the improvement of the current conditions and the achievement of sustainable development, in the coastal zone. Socio-economic driving forces with their origins in the end of the 19th century have generated numerous pressures in the coastal environment that changed the state of the environment. In the first part of the last century, there was no coupling between change of state and policy. Due to increasing environmental awareness, a coupling became more apparent over the last thirty years. Human interventions include river route realignment, extensive drainage of the plains, irrigation network, roads and dam constructions. The consequences were positive for the economic development of the area, human health, and navigation for the port of Thessaloniki. In contrast, the manipulation and over-use of natural resources has led to a reduction of wetlands, biodiversity loss, stress on freshwater supplies, and subsidence of coastal areas, aquifer salinization, and rapid coastal erosion. Three plausible future scenarios are utilised in order to investigate the implications of this environmental change process and possible socio-economic consequences. PMID:16779699

  7. Impact of 100-year human interventions on the deltaic coastal zone of the Inner Thermaikos Gulf (Greece): a DPSIR framework analysis.

    PubMed

    Karageorgis, Aristomenis P; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Kontogianni, Areti; Skourtos, Michael; Turner, Kerry R; Salomons, Wim

    2006-08-01

    The Axios River delta and the Inner Thermaikos Gulf coastal zone have experienced a long period of human interventions during the past 100 years. A post-evaluation of long run coastal zone changes under the Drivers-Pressures-State-Impacts-Response (DPSIR) conceptual framework is presented. The DPSIR approach is then used to project out into possible futures in order to connect with policy and management options proposed for the improvement of the current conditions and the achievement of sustainable development, in the coastal zone. Socio-economic driving forces with their origins in the end of the 19th century have generated numerous pressures in the coastal environment that changed the state of the environment. In the first part of the last century, there was no coupling between change of state and policy. Due to increasing environmental awareness, a coupling became more apparent over the last thirty years. Human interventions include river route realignment, extensive drainage of the plains, irrigation network, roads and dam constructions. The consequences were positive for the economic development of the area, human health, and navigation for the port of Thessaloniki. In contrast, the manipulation and over-use of natural resources has led to a reduction of wetlands, biodiversity loss, stress on freshwater supplies, and subsidence of coastal areas, aquifer salinization, and rapid coastal erosion. Three plausible future scenarios are utilised in order to investigate the implications of this environmental change process and possible socio-economic consequences.

  8. New Horizons' Extreme Close-Up of Pluto’s Surface (no audio)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is the most detailed view of Pluto’s terrain you’ll see for a very long time. This mosaic strip – extending across the hemisphere that faced the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Pluto o...

  9. Quasilocal approach to general universal horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Theories of gravity with a preferred foliation usually display arbitrarily fast signal propagation, changing the black hole definition. A new inescapable barrier, the universal horizon, has been defined and many static and spherically symmetric examples have been studied in the literature. Here, we translate the usual definition of the universal horizon in terms of an optical scalar built with the preferred flow defined by the preferred spacetime foliation. The new expression has the advantages of being of quasilocal nature and independent of specific spacetime symmetries in order to be well defined. Therefore, we propose it as a definition for general quasilocal universal horizons. Using the new formalism, we show that there is no universal analog of cosmological horizons for Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker models for any scale factor function, and we also state that quasilocal universal horizons are restricted to trapped regions of the spacetime. Using the evolution equation, we analyze the formation of universal horizons under a truncated Hořava-Lifshitz theory, in spherical symmetry, showing the existence of regions in parameter space where the universal horizon formation cannot be smooth from the center, under some physically reasonable assumptions. We conclude with our view on the next steps for the understanding of black holes in nonrelativistic gravity theories.

  10. New Horizons: Bridge to the Beginning - to Pluto and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Hallau, K. G.; Seaton, P.; Beisser, K.; New Horizons Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    Launched on Jan. 19, 2006, NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. However, New Horizons’ closest approach to Pluto will not occur until July 14, 2015, and the majority of the craft's time over the next 5 years will be spent in "hibernation." The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team, however, will not be hibernating as we wait for New Horizons to reach its destination. With three distinct tools-- Educator Fellows, online learning modules and a planetarium program--the team seeks to excite and engage teachers, students and the public with information about the journey to Pluto and beyond. In the past year, the specially selected educators who participate as New Horizons Educator Fellows have trained more than 1,000 teachers across the U.S. on the New Horizons mission and the science behind it. Thousands more students, parents, educators, and citizens have learned about New Horizons from the mission's scientists, engineers and outreach professionals. New Horizons Fellows also distribute another EPO tool: online learning modules. These classroom-ready learning modules consist of educator guides, student handouts, detailed activities, and potential adaptations for students with special needs or disabilities. Some also offer online interactives to convey complex and dynamic concepts. The modules are web-accessible for both students and teachers, and are aligned with relevant national standards. The third tool is a highly visual way to engage the general public and supplement educational programs: a planetarium program that highlights the New Horizons mission from launch to destination Pluto. This program focuses on the engineering design of the spacecraft, with a focus on the concept of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the unique environment

  11. Horizon supertranslation and degenerate black hole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2016-09-01

    In this note we first review the degenerate vacua arising from the BMS symmetries. According to the discussion in [1] one can define BMS-analogous supertranslation and superrotation for spacetime with black hole in Gaussian null coordinates. In the leading and subleading orders of near horizon approximation, the infinitely degenerate black hole solutions are derived by considering Einstein equations with or without cosmological constant, and they are related to each other by the diffeomorphism generated by horizon supertranslation. Higher order results and degenerate Rindler horizon solutions also are given in appendices.

  12. Black hole entropy and isolated horizons thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Perez, Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    We present a statistical mechanical calculation of the thermodynamical properties of (nonrotating) isolated horizons. The introduction of the Planck scale allows for the definition of a universal horizon temperature (independent of the mass of the black hole) and a well-defined notion of energy (as measured by suitable local observers) proportional to the horizon area in Planck units. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles associated with the system are introduced. Black hole entropy and other thermodynamical quantities can be consistently computed in both ensembles and results are in agreement with Hawking's semiclassical analysis for all values of the Immirzi parameter.

  13. On the thermodynamics of the cosmological apparent horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M. D.

    2015-11-01

    It has been shown by Cai et al. that the apparent horizon of radius r0 in the cosmological Friedmann space-time emits radiation at the temperature T0 = 1/2π r0. Here, we derive this result from the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the wave function of the Universe Ψ, starting from a classical gravitational Lagrangian L that contains a quadratic higher-derivative term R2 , the scalar component of which is non-tachyonic, by application of the horizon hypothesis and definition of the physical three-space on the time-slice dx0 = 0. We also extend our previous analysis of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the wave function Φ of the apparent horizon of the de Sitter space-time to include the case of a more general energy-momentum source, that generates an arbitrary Friedmann space-time, confirming the expression for T0 after application of the ADM formalism.

  14. Innate threat-sensitive foraging: black-tailed deer remain more fearful of wolf than of the less dangerous black bear even after 100 years of wolf absence.

    PubMed

    Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Malcuit, Hélène; Le Saout, Soizic; Martin, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-01

    Anti-predator behaviors often entail foraging costs, and thus prey response to predator cues should be adjusted to the level of risk (threat-sensitive foraging). Simultaneously dangerous predators (with high hunting success) should engender the evolution of innate predator recognition and appropriate anti-predator behaviors that are effective even upon the first encounter with the predator. The above leads to the prediction that prey might respond more strongly to cues of dangerous predators that are absent, than to cues of less dangerous predators that are actually present. In an applied context this would predict an immediate and stronger response of ungulates to the return of top predators such as wolves (Canis lupus) in many parts of Europe and North America than to current, less threatening, mesopredators. We investigated the existence of innate threat-sensitive foraging in black-tailed deer. We took advantage of a quasi-experimental situation where deer had not experienced wolf predation for ca. 100 years, and were only potentially exposed to black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested the response of deer to the urine of wolf (dangerous) and black bear (less dangerous). Our results support the hypothesis of innate threat-sensitive foraging with clear increased passive avoidance and olfactory investigation of cues from wolf, and surprisingly none to black bear. Prey which have previously evolved under high risk of predation by wolves may react strongly to the return of wolf cues in their environments thanks to innate responses retained during the period of predator absence, and this could be the source of far stronger non-consumptive effects of the predator guild than currently observed. PMID:24288079

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments/soils of different wetlands along 100-year coastal reclamation chronosequence in the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingqing; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Gao, Zhaoqin; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-06-01

    PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) were determined in sediment/soil profiles to a depth of 30 cm from three different wetlands (i.e., ditch wetlands, riparian wetlands and reclaimed wetlands) of the Pearl River Estuary to elucidate their levels, distribution and toxic risks along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation. All detected PCB congeners and the total 15 PCBs (∑15 PCBs) decreased with depth along sediment/soil profiles in these three wetlands. The ∑15 PCBs concentrations ranged from 17.68 to 169.26 ng/g in surface sediments/soils. Generally, old wetlands tended to have higher PCB concentrations than younger ones. The dominant PCB congeners at all sampling sites were light PCB homologues (i.e., tetra-CBs and tri-CBs). According to the sediment quality guideline, the average PCB concentrations exceeded the threshold effects level (TEL, 21.6 ng/g) at most of the sampling sites, exhibiting possible adverse biological effects, which were dominantly caused by light PCB congeners. The total toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations of 10 dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) detected at all sampling sites ranged from 0.04 to 852.7 (10(-3) ng/g), mainly affected by PCB126. Only DL-PCB concentrations in ditch and riparian wetland sediments with 40-year reclamation histories (i.e., D40 and Ri40) exhibited moderate adverse biological effects according to SQGQ values. Principal component analysis indicated that PCBs in three wetland sediments/soils mainly originated from Aroclor 1016, 1242, and 1248. Correlation analysis showed that sediment/soil organic carbon content had a significant correlation with the concentrations of several PCB congeners (P < 0.05), whereas no significant correlations were observed between any PCBs congeners and grain size or aggregate content (P > 0.05).

  16. Innate threat-sensitive foraging: black-tailed deer remain more fearful of wolf than of the less dangerous black bear even after 100 years of wolf absence.

    PubMed

    Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Malcuit, Hélène; Le Saout, Soizic; Martin, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-01

    Anti-predator behaviors often entail foraging costs, and thus prey response to predator cues should be adjusted to the level of risk (threat-sensitive foraging). Simultaneously dangerous predators (with high hunting success) should engender the evolution of innate predator recognition and appropriate anti-predator behaviors that are effective even upon the first encounter with the predator. The above leads to the prediction that prey might respond more strongly to cues of dangerous predators that are absent, than to cues of less dangerous predators that are actually present. In an applied context this would predict an immediate and stronger response of ungulates to the return of top predators such as wolves (Canis lupus) in many parts of Europe and North America than to current, less threatening, mesopredators. We investigated the existence of innate threat-sensitive foraging in black-tailed deer. We took advantage of a quasi-experimental situation where deer had not experienced wolf predation for ca. 100 years, and were only potentially exposed to black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested the response of deer to the urine of wolf (dangerous) and black bear (less dangerous). Our results support the hypothesis of innate threat-sensitive foraging with clear increased passive avoidance and olfactory investigation of cues from wolf, and surprisingly none to black bear. Prey which have previously evolved under high risk of predation by wolves may react strongly to the return of wolf cues in their environments thanks to innate responses retained during the period of predator absence, and this could be the source of far stronger non-consumptive effects of the predator guild than currently observed.

  17. Fractionation, transfer, and ecological risks of heavy metals in riparian and ditch wetlands across a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in an estuary of China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Wen, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinhui

    2015-06-01

    The effect of reclamation on heavy metal concentrations and the ecological risks in ditch wetlands (DWs) and riparian wetlands (RWs) across a 100-year chronosequence in the Pearl River Estuary of China was investigated. Concentrations of 4 heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in soil and plant samples, and sequential extracts of soil samples were determined, using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry. Results showed that heavy metal concentrations were higher in older DW soils than in the younger ones, and that the younger RW soils contained higher heavy metal concentrations compared to the older ones. Although the increasing tendency of heavy metal concentrations in soil was obvious after wetland reclamation, the metals Cu, Pb, and Zn exhibited low or no risks to the environment based on the risk assessment code (RAC). Cd, on the other hand, posed a medium or high risk. Cd, Pb, and Zn were mainly bound to Fe-Mn oxide, whereas most of Cu remained in the residual phase in both ditch and riparian wetland soils, and the residual proportions generally increased with depth. Bioconcentration and translocation factors for most of these four heavy metals significantly decreased in the DWs with older age (p<0.05), whereas they increased in the RWs with younger age (p<0.05). The DW soils contained higher concentrations of heavy metals in the organic fractions, whereas there were more carbonate and residual fractions in the RW soils. The non-bioavailable fractions of Cu and Zn, and the organic-bound Cd and Pb significantly inhibited plant growth.

  18. Horizon Entropy from Quantum Gravity Condensates.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-27

    We construct condensate states encoding the continuum spherically symmetric quantum geometry of a horizon in full quantum gravity, i.e., without any classical symmetry reduction, in the group field theory formalism. Tracing over the bulk degrees of freedom, we show how the resulting reduced density matrix manifestly exhibits a holographic behavior. We derive a complete orthonormal basis of eigenstates for the reduced density matrix of the horizon and use it to compute the horizon entanglement entropy. By imposing consistency with the horizon boundary conditions and semiclassical thermodynamical properties, we recover the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for any value of the Immirzi parameter. Our analysis supports the equivalence between the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy interpretation and the Boltzmann (statistical) one. PMID:27284642

  19. Horizon Entropy from Quantum Gravity Condensates.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-27

    We construct condensate states encoding the continuum spherically symmetric quantum geometry of a horizon in full quantum gravity, i.e., without any classical symmetry reduction, in the group field theory formalism. Tracing over the bulk degrees of freedom, we show how the resulting reduced density matrix manifestly exhibits a holographic behavior. We derive a complete orthonormal basis of eigenstates for the reduced density matrix of the horizon and use it to compute the horizon entanglement entropy. By imposing consistency with the horizon boundary conditions and semiclassical thermodynamical properties, we recover the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for any value of the Immirzi parameter. Our analysis supports the equivalence between the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy interpretation and the Boltzmann (statistical) one.

  20. Pluto Time

    NASA Video Gallery

    If you stood on Pluto at noon and looked around, the landscape would be illuminated about as brightly as on Earth soon after sunset. The team for NASA's New Horizons mission dubbed this "Pluto Time...

  1. 100 Years of benthic foraminiferal history on the inner Texas shelf inferred from fauna and stable isotopes: Preliminary results from two cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Josiah; Grossman, Ethan L.; Carlin, Joseph A.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2012-04-01

    Coastal regions, such as the Texas-Louisiana shelf, are subject to seasonal hypoxia that strongly depends on the magnitude of freshwater discharge from local and regional river systems. We have determined benthic foraminiferal fauna and isotopic compositions in two 210Pb dated box cores (BR4 and BR5) to examine the evidence for nearshore hypoxia and freshwater discharge on the Texas shelf during the last 100 years. The 210Pb chronologies of both cores reveal sedimentation rates of 0.2 and 0.1 cm yr-1, translating to ˜60 and ˜90 year records. The fauna of both cores were almost exclusively composed of Ammonia parkinsoniana and Elphidium excavatum, indicating euryhaline ambient waters. The Ammonia-Elphidium (A-E) index, a qualitative measure of low oxygen conditions, shows an increase from values between 20 and 50 to near 100 in both cores, suggesting low oxygen conditions between 1960 and the core top. Between 1950 and 1960 (9-10 cm), low A-E values in BR4 coincide with high δ18O and δ13C values greater than 0‰ and -1‰ respectively. This event corresponds to severe drought (the Texas Drought of Record) over the Brazos River drainage basin and considerably reduced river discharge from 1948 to 1957. High A-E values prior to this event imply low-oxygen conditions were prevalent prior to anthropogenic exacerbation of Louisiana shelf hypoxia and at least since the dredging of a new Brazos River delta in 1929. Elphidium excavatum δ13C values are very low (-4‰) and indicative of significant vital effect. The δ13C values of A. parkinsoniana average -3‰ and exhibit little variability, most likely reflecting pore waters influenced by aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The association of lowered Brazos River discharge with more oxygenated shelf bottom waters suggests Brazos River discharge and shelf hypoxia are linked, but the influence of Mississippi-Atchafalaya discharge can also contribute to shelf stratification.

  2. Dynamical formation of horizons in recoiling D-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, N. E.; Nanopoulos, D. V.

    2000-10-15

    A toy calculation of string or D-particle interactions within a world-sheet approach indicates that quantum recoil effects -- reflecting the gravitational back reaction on space-time foam due to the propagation of energetic particles -- induces the appearance of a microscopic event horizon, or ''bubble,'' inside which stable matter can exist. The scattering event causes this horizon to expand, but we expect quantum effects to cause it to contract again, in a ''bounce'' solution. Within such ''bubbles,'' massless matter propagates with an effective velocity that is less than the velocity of light in vacuo, which may lead to observable violations of Lorentz symmetry that may be tested experimentally. The conformal invariance conditions in the interior geometry of the bubbles select preferentially 3 for the number of the spatial dimensions, corresponding to a consistent formulation of the interaction of D3-branes with recoiling D particles, which are allowed to fluctuate independently only on the D3-brane hypersurface.

  3. Dynamical formation of horizons in recoiling D-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, N. E.; Nanopoulos, D. V.

    2000-10-01

    A toy calculation of string or D-particle interactions within a world-sheet approach indicates that quantum recoil effects-reflecting the gravitational back reaction on space-time foam due to the propagation of energetic particles-induces the appearance of a microscopic event horizon, or ``bubble,'' inside which stable matter can exist. The scattering event causes this horizon to expand, but we expect quantum effects to cause it to contract again, in a ``bounce'' solution. Within such ``bubbles,'' massless matter propagates with an effective velocity that is less than the velocity of light in vacuo, which may lead to observable violations of Lorentz symmetry that may be tested experimentally. The conformal invariance conditions in the interior geometry of the bubbles select preferentially 3 for the number of the spatial dimensions, corresponding to a consistent formulation of the interaction of D3-branes with recoiling D particles, which are allowed to fluctuate independently only on the D3-brane hypersurface.

  4. Possible New Horizons Fundamental Contribution to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft (S. Alan Stern, PI) is now past Pluto, and in our poster we explore the possibility of making observations, using the NH P-Alice ultraviolet spectrometer, of the cosmic diffuse ultraviolet background radiation, particularily at high northern and southern Galactic latitudes. In the paper, "The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation," by Richard Conn Henry, Jayant Murthy, James Overduin, Joshua Tyler, ApJ, 798:14 (25pp), 2015 January 1, we demonstrated the existence of a second component of the diffuse far ultraviolet background radiation beyond that provided by dust-scattered starlight. The critical question is, does that second component (of unknown origin) extend shortward of the Lyman limit of 912 Å? If it does, then it seems likely that we have discovered the source of the reionization of the Universe that occurred some time after recombination. As things stand at the moment, there is no known source that has been demonstrated to be capable of performing the reionization: reionization that clearly did occur. Our current understanding of P-Alice suggests that it may well be capable of demonstrating the presence (or absence) of such ionizing cosmic diffuse radiation. At low Galactic latitudes, all such radiation would be totally erased by the presence, in large quantities, of interstellar neutral hydrogen; this will allow us to test the reality of any such flux that we may discover at higher Galactic latitudes.

  5. New geometries for black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    We construct several classes of worldvolume effective actions for black holes by integrating out spatial sections of the worldvolume geometry of asymptotically flat black branes. This provides a generalisation of the blackfold approach for higher-dimensional black holes and yields a map between different effective theories, which we exploit by obtaining new hydrodynamic and elastic transport coefficients via simple integrations. Using Euclidean minimal surfaces in order to decouple the fluid dynamics on different sections of the worldvolume, we obtain local effective theories for ultraspinning Myers-Perry branes and helicoidal black branes, described in terms of a stress-energy tensor, particle currents and non-trivial boost vectors. We then study in detail and present novel compact and non-compact geometries for black hole horizons in higher-dimensional asymptotically flat space-time. These include doubly-spinning black rings, black helicoids and helicoidal p-branes as well as helicoidal black rings and helicoidal black tori in D ≥ 6.

  6. Investment horizon heterogeneity and wavelet: Overview and further research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Anindya; De, Anupam; Gunasekaran, Angappa; Dubey, Rameshwar

    2015-07-01

    Wavelet based multi-scale analysis of financial time series has attracted much attention, lately, from both the academia and practitioners from all around the world. The unceasing metamorphosis of the discipline of finance from its humble beginning as applied economics to the more sophisticated depiction as applied physics and applied psychology has revolutionized the way we perceive the market and its complexities. One such complexity is the presence of heterogeneous horizon agents in the market. In this context, we have performed a generous review of different aspects of horizon heterogeneity that has been successfully elucidated through the synergy between wavelet theory and finance. The evolution of wavelet has been succinctly delineated to bestow necessary information to the readers who are new to this field. The migration of wavelet into finance and its subsequent branching into different sub-divisions have been sketched. The pertinent literature on the impact of horizon heterogeneity on risk, asset pricing and inter-dependencies of the financial time series are explored. The significant contributions are collated and classified in accordance to their purpose and approach so that potential researcher and practitioners, interested in this subject, can be benefited. Future research possibilities in the direction of "agency cost mitigation" and "synergy between econophysics and behavioral finance in stock market forecasting" are also suggested in the paper.

  7. Looking for event horizons using UV-IR relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James P.; Ross, Simon F.

    2001-05-01

    A primary goal in holographic theories of gravity is to study the causal structure of spacetime from the field theory point of view. This is a particularly difficult problem when the spacetime has a nontrivial causal structure, such as a black hole. We attempt to study causality through the UV-IR relation between field theory and spacetime quantities, which encodes information about bulk position. We study the UV-IR relations for charged black hole spacetimes in the AdS-CFT correspondence. We find that the UV-IR relations have a number of interesting features, but find little information about the presence of a horizon in the bulk. The scale of Wilson loops is simply related to radial position, whether or not there is a horizon. For time-dependent probes, the part of the history near the horizon only affects the late-time behavior of field theory observables. Static supergravity probes have a finite scale size related to radial position in generic black holes, but there is an interesting logarithmic divergence as the temperature approaches zero.

  8. The Astrophysical Signatures of Black Holes: The Horizon, The ISCO, The Ergosphere and The Light Circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.

    Three advanced instruments planned for a near future ( LOFT, GRAVITY, THE EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE) provide unprecedented angular and time resolutions, which allow to probe regions in the immediate vicinity of black holes. We may soon be able to search for the signatures of the super-strong gravity that is characteristic to black holes: the event horizon, the ergosphere, the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), and the photon circle. This review discusses a few fundamental problems concerning these theoretical concepts.

  9. Io’s active volcanoes during the New Horizons era: Insights from New Horizons imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Lopes, R. M.; Howell, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    In February 2007, the New Horizons spacecraft flew by the Jupiter system, obtaining images of Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), a four-color (visible to near infrared) camera, obtained 17 sets of images. The Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), a high-resolution panchromatic camera, obtained 190 images, including many of Io eclipsed by Jupiter. We present a complete view of the discrete point-like emission sources in all images obtained by these two instruments. We located 54 emission sources and determined their brightnesses. These observations, the first that observed individual Ionian volcanoes on short timescales of seconds to minutes, demonstrate that the volcanoes have stable brightnesses on these timescales. The active volcanoes Tvashtar (63N, 124W) and E. Girru (22N, 245W) were observed by both LORRI and MVIC, both in the near-infrared (NIR) and methane (CH4) filters. Tvashtar was additionally observed in the red filter, which allowed us to calculate a color temperature of approximately 1200 K. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the volcanoes frequently active during the Galileo era continued to be active during the New Horizons flyby. We found that none of the seven volcanoes observed by New Horizons multiple times over short timescales showed substantial changes on the order of seconds and only one, E. Girru exhibited substantial variation over minutes to days, increasing by 25% in just over an hour and decreasing by a factor of 4 over 6 days. Observations of Tvashtar are consistent with a current eruption similar to previously observed eruptions and are more consistent with the thermal emission of a lava flow than the fire fountains inferred from the November 1999 observations. These data also present new puzzles regarding Ionian volcanism. Since there is no associated surface change or low albedo feature that could be identified nearby, the source of the emission from

  10. 78 FR 70976 - Horizons ETFs Management (USA) LLC and Horizons ETF Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... will include both institutional and retail investors.\\21\\ The price at which Shares trade will be... COMMISSION Horizons ETFs Management (USA) LLC and Horizons ETF Trust; Notice of Application November 21, 2013... management investment companies to issue shares (``Shares'') redeemable in large aggregations...

  11. Star-Paths, Stones and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Archaeoastronomers tend to approach ancient monuments focusing on the landscape and the horizon calendar events of sun and moon and, due to problems with precession, generally ignore the movement of the stars. However, locating the position of solar calendar points on the horizon can have other uses apart from calendar and/or cosmological purposes. This paper firstly suggests that the stars do not need to be ignored. By considering the evidence of the Phaenomena, a sky poem by Aratus of Soli, a third century BC Greek poet, and his use of second millennium BC star lore fragments, this paper argues that the stars were a part of the knowledge of horizon astronomy. Aratus' poem implied that the horizon astronomy of the late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods included knowledge of star-paths or 'linear constellations' that were defined by particular horizon calendar events and other azimuths. Knowledge of such star-paths would have enabled navigation and orientation, and by using permanent markers, constructed or natural, to define these paths, they were immune to precession as the stones could redefine a star-path for a future generation. Finally the paper presents other possible intentions behind the diverse orientation of passage tombs and some megalithic sites.

  12. Flying by Ear: Blind Flight with a Music-Based Artificial Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Brian D.; Brungart, Douglas S.; Dallman, Ronald C.; Yasky, Richard J., Jr.; Romigh, Griffin

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in actual flight operations to evaluate an audio artificial horizon display that imposed aircraft attitude information on pilot-selected music. The first experiment examined a pilot's ability to identify, with vision obscured, a change in aircraft roll or pitch, with and without the audio artificial horizon display. The results suggest that the audio horizon display improves the accuracy of attitude identification overall, but differentially affects response time across conditions. In the second experiment, subject pilots performed recoveries from displaced aircraft attitudes using either standard visual instruments, or, with vision obscured, the audio artificial horizon display. The results suggest that subjects were able to maneuver the aircraft to within its safety envelope. Overall, pilots were able to benefit from the display, suggesting that such a display could help to improve overall safety in general aviation.

  13. New Horizons Educator Fellowship Program: Taking You to Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Beisser, K.; Hallau, K. G.

    2011-12-01

    The New Horizons Educator Fellowship Program (NHEFP), originally based on the MESSENGER Fellows Program, is a public outreach initiative for motivated volunteers across the nation. These volunteers are master teachers who communicate the excitement of NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto and information about recent discoveries to teachers, students, and people in their local communities. Many of the Fellows utilize their experiences and knowledge as members of other programs such as MESSENGER Fellows, Heliophysics Educator Ambassadors, Solar System Educators and Ambassadors to promote the mission thorough professional development workshops incorporating themes, activities, and recent discoveries with other NASA programs to present a well-rounded view of our Solar System. Unlike teacher-volunteer programs tied to missions that take place closer to Earth, the time between New Horizons' launch and its closest approach to Pluto is 9.5 years, with the spacecraft in hibernation for most of its voyager. NHEFP has maintained a core group of Fellows who, through periodic face-to-face or remote training, have taken advantage of opportunities for networking, sharing of ideas in best practices, activities, and presenting and keeping audiences interested in the mission during its long journey to Pluto. This involvement has been key to the program's success.

  14. Grid today, clouds on the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiers, Jamie

    2009-04-01

    By the time of CCP 2008, the largest scientific machine in the world - the Large Hadron Collider - had been cooled down as scheduled to its operational temperature of below 2 degrees Kelvin and injection tests were starting. Collisions of proton beams at 5+5 TeV were expected within one to two months of the initial tests, with data taking at design energy ( 7+7 TeV) foreseen for 2009. In order to process the data from this world machine, we have put our "Higgs in one basket" - that of Grid computing [The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), in: Proceedings of the Conference on Computational Physics 2006 (CCP 2006), vol. 177, 2007, pp. 219-223]. After many years of preparation, 2008 saw a final "Common Computing Readiness Challenge" (CCRC'08) - aimed at demonstrating full readiness for 2008 data taking, processing and analysis. By definition, this relied on a world-wide production Grid infrastructure. But change - as always - is on the horizon. The current funding model for Grids - which in Europe has been through 3 generations of EGEE projects, together with related projects in other parts of the world, including South America - is evolving towards a long-term, sustainable e-infrastructure, like the European Grid Initiative (EGI) [The European Grid Initiative Design Study, website at http://web.eu-egi.eu/]. At the same time, potentially new paradigms, such as that of "Cloud Computing" are emerging. This paper summarizes the results of CCRC'08 and discusses the potential impact of future Grid funding on both regional and international application communities. It contrasts Grid and Cloud computing models from both technical and sociological points of view. Finally, it discusses the requirements from production application communities, in terms of stability and continuity in the medium to long term.

  15. Hair-brane ideas on the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Emil J.; Niehoff, Ben E.

    2015-11-01

    We continue an examination of the microstate geometries program begun in arXiv:1409.6017, focussing on the role of branes that wrap the cycles which degenerate when a throat in the geometry deepens and a horizon forms. An associated quiver quantum mechanical model of minimally wrapped branes exhibits a non-negligible fraction of the gravitational entropy, which scales correctly as a function of the charges. The results suggest a picture of AdS3/CFT2 duality wherein the long string that accounts for BTZ black hole entropy in the CFT description, can also be seen to inhabit the horizon of BPS black holes on the gravity side.

  16. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  17. East Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A high point on the distant eastern rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon in this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 8, 2009, during the 1,821st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 34 kilometers (21 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  18. North Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A northern portion of the rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon of this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 7, 2009, during the 1,820st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  19. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Through the presentation of its Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics career education conferences for secondary school young women, the Math/Science Network continues its efforts to remove the educational, psychological, and cultural barriers which prevent women from entering math-and science-based careers. The Expanding Your Horizons conferences were presented on 77 college, university and high school campuses across the United States. This year, these unique one day conferences reached 15,500 students, 3,000 parents and educators, and involved 3,000 career women who volunteered their services as conference planners, workshop leaders, speakers, and role models.

  20. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  1. Evidence for a sedimentary siloxane horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Tevault, D.E.

    1986-07-01

    Selected samples from two Puget Sound sediment cores have been analyzed for poly(organo)siloxanes(silicones). One core was 60 years old at 30-cm depth (ages by lead-210 dating) and showed no evidence for silicones there. The second, 15 years old at depth, exhibited silicones at depth. Clearly shown is evidence for a siloxane horizon in theses two cores, with the presence of the horizon directly related to the fact that silicones have been in widespread use only since World War II. All samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. 10 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Find Your College's Strategic Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing tough times. As leaders watch the economy jump back to life and recognize this as a time of opportunity, they also realize that recovery in the public sector lags behind. Community colleges expecting to emerge from reduction stronger and better positioned will need to operate outside of a conventional business…

  3. Do Forest Age and Soil Depth Affect Carbon and Nitrogen Adsorption in Mineral Horizons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, P. G.; Lovett, G. M.; Fuss, C. B.; Goodale, C. L.; Lang, A.; Fahey, T.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral soils retain large amounts of organic matter through sorption on the surfaces of mineral soils, the largest pools of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the forests of the northeastern U.S. In addition to determining organic matter storage, adsorption and desorption processes are important controllers of runoff chemistry. We are studying adsorption dynamics of mineral soils collected from a chronosequence of hardwood forest sites in the White Mountains, NH to determine how soils vary in their DOM adsorption capacities as a function of effective C and N saturation. We hypothesize that forest age determines proximity to saturation because young forests may need to mine soil organic matter (SOM) in mineral soils to obtain nitrogen to meet growth demands, while the soils of older forests have had time to reaccumulate SOM, eventually reaching C and N saturation. Consequently, we expect adsorption capacities to first increase with forest age in young forests, as the trees mine C and N from mineral surfaces. They will then decrease with forest age in older forests as mining slows and C and N begin to re-accumulate. Batch experiments were conducted with mineral soil samples and dilutions of forest floor leachate. However, preliminary results from a mature forest site (about 100 years old), which we predicted to be a low point of C and N saturation from decades of mining, contradict expectations. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) adsorption in its shallow mineral soil layers (0-3 cm below E or A horizons) are lower than younger sites ranging from 20 to about 40 years old. In addition to forest age, soil depths also affect N retention dynamics in forest soils. We hypothesized that deeper mineral soils might have greater adsorption capacities due to the fact that they are exposed to less DOC and DON leaching from organic layers and therefore less saturated. Results from the same mature forest site confirm this. Soils from 3-10 cm depth have more potential to adsorb DOC and

  4. Membrane viewpoint on black holes: Properties and evolution of the stretched horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1986-02-01

    This paper derives the ``membrane formalism'' for black holes. The membrane formalism rewrites the standard mathematical theory of black holes in a language and notation which (we hope) will facilitate research in black-hole astrophysics: The horizon of a black hole is replaced by a surrogate ``stretched horizon,'' which is viewed as a 2-dimensional membrane that resides in 3-dimensional space and evolves in response to driving forces from the external universe. This membrane, following ideas of Damour and Znajek, is regarded as made from a 2-dimensional viscous fluid that is electrically charged and electrically conducting and has finite entropy and temperature, but cannot conduct heat. The interaction of the stretched horizon with the external universe is described in terms of familiar laws for the horizon's fluid, e.g., the Navier-Stokes equation, Ohm's law, a tidal-force equation, and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Because these laws have familiar forms, they are likely to help astrophysicists understand intuitively and compute quantitatively the behaviors of black holes in complex external environments. Previous papers have developed and elucidated electromagnetic aspects of the membrane formalism for time-independent rotating holes. This paper derives the full formalism for dynamical, evolving holes, with one exception: In its present form the formalism is not equipped to handle horizon caustics, where new generators attach themselves to the horizon.

  5. Near-horizon circular orbits and extremal limit for dirty rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    We consider generic rotating axially symmetric "dirty" (surrounded by matter) black holes. Near-horizon circular equatorial orbits are examined in two different cases of near-extremal (small surface gravity κ ) and exactly extremal black holes. This has a number of qualitative distinctions. In the first case, it is shown that such orbits can lie as close to the horizon as one wishes on suitably chosen slices of space-time when κ →0 . This generalizes the observation of T. Jacobson [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 187001 (2011), 10.1088/0264-9381/28/18/187001] made for the Kerr metric. If a black hole is extremal (κ =0 ), circular on-horizon orbits are impossible for massive particles but, in general, are possible in its vicinity. The corresponding black hole parameters determine also the rate with which a fine-tuned particle on the noncircular near-horizon orbit asymptotically approaches the horizon. Properties of orbits under discussion are also related to the Bañados-Silk-West effect of high energy collisions near black holes. Impossibility of the on-horizon orbits in question is manifestation of kinematic censorship that forbids infinite energies in collisions.

  6. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  7. New Concepts on the Educational Horizon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrist, Robert S.; Mitchell, Edna

    Four dimensions in education provide a basis for discussing future horizons: (1) curriculum development, (2) teacher education, (3) administration and organization, and (4) research and development. These areas are interdependent, and one cannot be improved or changed without affecting the other areas. Within these areas, some of the broad changes…

  8. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  9. Gateway's Horizon: A Center of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Jayne; Colony, Lee

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Gateway Technical College's Horizon Center for Transportation Technology, located in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which was the product of collaboration with business and industry, community support and a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) grant. The center, which opened this fall, is a prime example of a sustainable community…

  10. Agriculture’s Ethical Horizon, book review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roughly 6.5 billion people inhabit the earth, but over 1 billion people regularly go hungry. This food shortfall poses an ethical dilemma for agriculture, and Agriculture's Ethical Horizon grapples with this dilemma. It argues that agricultural productivity has been the quintessential value of agr...

  11. Vegetarianism. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of a series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This unit examines the vegetarian diet as a viable alternative, and at the same time, it introduces the topics of protein and vitamin B12. It contains a page of teaching suggestions, a pre-test for the…

  12. 78 FR 54298 - Horizons ETFs Management (USA) LLC and Horizons ETF Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ..., or treasury bills. 2. Horizons, a Delaware limited liability company registered with the Commission... investment company from suspending the right of redemption or postponing the date of payment of...

  13. The Pluto System As Seen By New Horizons Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Pluto system as NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft saw it in July 2015. This animation, made with real images taken by New Horizons, begins with Pluto flying in for its close-up on July 14; we then...

  14. SETAC launches global horizon scanning/research prioritization project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SETAC World Council is pleased to announce the initiation of a Global Horizon Scanning and Prioritization Project aimed at identifying geographically specific research needs to address stressor impacts on environmental quality. In recent years, horizon scanning and research ...

  15. Prediction horizon effects on stochastic modelling hints for neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Drossu, R.; Obradovic, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between stochastic models and neural network (NN) approaches to time series modelling. Experiments on a complex real life prediction problem (entertainment video traffic) indicate that prior knowledge can be obtained through stochastic analysis both with respect to an appropriate NN architecture as well as to an appropriate sampling rate, in the case of a prediction horizon larger than one. An improvement of the obtained NN predictor is also proposed through a bias removal post-processing, resulting in much better performance than the best stochastic model.

  16. Rindler-like Horizon in Spherically Symmetric Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinbo; He, Tangmei; Zhang, Jingyi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the Rindler-like horizon in a spherically symmetric spacetime is proposed. It is showed that just like the Rindler horizon in Minkowski spacetimes, there is also a Rindler-like horizon to a family of special observers in general spherically symmetric spacetimes. The entropy of this type of horizon is calculated with the thin film brick-wall model. The significance of entropy is discussed. Our results imply some connection between Bekeinstein-Hawking entropy and entanglement entropy.

  17. Destination pluto: New horizons performance during the approach phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Sarah H.; Rogers, Gabe D.; Guo, Yanping; Kirk, Madeline N.; Weaver, Harold A.; Owen, William M.; Jackman, Coralie D.; Bauman, Jeremy; Pelletier, Frederic; Nelson, Derek; Stanbridge, Dale; Dumont, Phillip J.; Williams, Bobby; Stern, S. Alan; Olkin, Cathy B.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly

    2016-11-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft began its journey to the Pluto-Charon system on January 19, 2006 on-board an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. As the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program, the objective of the New Horizons mission is to perform the first exploration of ice dwarfs in the Kuiper Belt, extending knowledge of the solar system to include the icy "third zone" for the first time. Arriving at the correct time and correct position relative to Pluto on July 14, 2015 depended on the successful execution of a carefully choreographed sequence of events. The Core command sequence, which was developed and optimized over multiple years and included the highest-priority science observations during the closest approach period, was contingent on precise navigation to the Pluto-Charon system and nominal performance of the guidance and control (G&C) subsystem. The flyby and gravity assist of Jupiter on February 28, 2007 was critical in placing New Horizons on the path to Pluto. Once past Jupiter, trajectory correction maneuvers (TCMs) became the sole source of trajectory control since the spacecraft did not encounter any other planetary bodies along its flight path prior to Pluto. During the Pluto approach phase, which formally began on January 15, 2015, optical navigation images were captured primarily with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager to refine spacecraft and Pluto-Charon system trajectory knowledge, which in turn was used to design TCMs. Orbit determination solutions were also used to update the spacecraft's on-board trajectory knowledge throughout the approach phase. Nominal performance of the G&C subsystem, accurate TCM designs, and high-quality orbit determination solutions resulted in final Pluto-relative B-plane arrival conditions that facilitated a successful first reconnaissance of the Pluto-Charon system.

  18. Through the looking glass: why the `cosmic horizon' is not a horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Kwan, Juliana; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-06-01

    The present standard model of cosmology, Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), contains some intriguing coincidences. Not only are the dominant contributions to the energy density approximately of the same order at the present epoch, but we also note that contrary to the emergence of cosmic acceleration as a recent phenomenon, the time-averaged value of the deceleration parameter over the age of the Universe is nearly zero. Curious features like these in ΛCDM give rise to a number of alternate cosmologies being proposed to remove them, including models with an equation of state w = -1/3. In this paper, we examine the validity of some of these alternate models and we also address some persistent misconceptions about the Hubble sphere and the event horizon that lead to erroneous conclusions about cosmology. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI: http://www.thecci.org), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: pimvanoirschot@gmail.com

  19. Cosmo-geo-anthropo-logical history and political and deep future events in climate and life evolution conveyed by a physical/virtual installation at a scale of 1 mm per 100 years across Denmark during the COP15 climate summit meeting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm Jacobsen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    During the COP15 climate summit meeting a physical and virtual installation of time was performed at a linear scale of 1 mm per 100 years. The "track of time" was carefully anchored geographically so that highlights in time history coincided with landmarks of historical and cultural significance to both tourists and the local Danish population; with Big Bang at the site of early royal settlements from the Viking age (13.7 billion years ~ 137 km from now), Earth origin at Kronborg in Elsinore (4.6 bil. Years ~ 46 km), and fish go on land at The Little Mermaid (390 mil. Years ~ 3900 m). The venue of the COP15 meeting coincided with the position of severe global warming, driven by the steady solar constant increase, to be expected 600 million years into the future. Nested in this grand track of time were the Quaternary ice-ages (2.6 mil. years ~ 26 m), human origin as species (100,000 years ~ 1 m), human history (< 10,000 years ~ 100 mm), personal life and the scope of political consequences of voting action (100 years ~ 1 mm). This installation of time involved several media. Highlights in time history and future were installed as a kml-file so that the convenient user interface of Google Earth could be utilized to provide both overview of time and understanding of details and proportions events antropo-geo-cosmo-history. Each Google Earth marker-balloon gave short explanations and linked to "on location" video-narratives. A classical printed text-folder was prepared as a tour guide for those who wanted to actually walk the Phanerozoic (~5 km). Credit-card-shaped graphs of temperature, CO2 and sealevel development and scenarios were prepared to scale for the period 4000 BP to 1000 years into the future. Along the time line from "Fish on land" to the present 3900 chalk marks were placed on the street surface, one for every metre = time span of Man as a species so far. A "NowGate" marking the present was implemented physically as a door frame, where citizens could meet

  20. Polarimetry with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Doeleman, Sheperd; Fish, Vincent L.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Kosowsky, Michael; Wardle, John F. C.; Lu, Rusen

    2014-06-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is an effort to develop millimeter and submillimeter VLBI to image nearby black holes at resolutions comparable to their event horizons. Past work with the EHT has measured compact emission on such scales for Sgr A* and M87, and has also measured sub-parsec structure in more distant quasars. Polarimetry with the EHT enables a powerful extension of this work, mapping magnetic field structures via the highly polarized synchrotron emission. Polarization is also an excellent probe of rapid variability, especially for Sgr A*, and can convey rich astrometric information even with incomplete imaging. We report on results from our 2013 campaign, which demonstrate a sharp increase in the linear polarization fraction and variability with increasing baseline, and we demonstrate that current EHT data can potentially achieve microarcsecond relative astrometry of flaring regions on timescales of minutes.

  1. Horizon ratio bound for inflationary fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam

    2003-09-26

    We demonstrate that the gravity wave background amplitude implies a robust upper bound on the wavelength-to-horizon ratio at the end of inflation: lambda/H(-1) less than or approximately equal e(60), as long as the cosmic energy density does not drop faster than radiation subsequent to inflation. This limit implies that N, the number of e-folds between horizon exit and the end of inflation for wave modes of interest, is less, similar 60 plus a model-dependent factor-for vast classes of slow-roll models, N less than or approximately equal 67. As an example, this bound solidifies the tension between observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and chaotic inflation with a phi(4) potential by closing the escape hatch of large N (<62). PMID:14525296

  2. Horizon ratio bound for inflationary fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam

    2003-09-26

    We demonstrate that the gravity wave background amplitude implies a robust upper bound on the wavelength-to-horizon ratio at the end of inflation: lambda/H(-1) less than or approximately equal e(60), as long as the cosmic energy density does not drop faster than radiation subsequent to inflation. This limit implies that N, the number of e-folds between horizon exit and the end of inflation for wave modes of interest, is less, similar 60 plus a model-dependent factor-for vast classes of slow-roll models, N less than or approximately equal 67. As an example, this bound solidifies the tension between observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and chaotic inflation with a phi(4) potential by closing the escape hatch of large N (<62).

  3. "I want to be 100 years old, but I smoke too much": Exploring the gap between positive aging goals and reported preparatory actions in different social circumstances.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Preparing for positive aging is shaped by the social context a person lives in. The present qualitative study explores and compares representations about preparatory actions in precarious workers (i.e., with temporary job contracts and insecure pension plans) and individuals with secure pension plans living in Germany. It also examines, the discrepancy between what middle-aged persons think they should be doing in preparation and what they report doing for aging well. Findings from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews conducted here show that people who have insecure pension plans tend to see themselves as social networkers and optimists, while those with secure pension plans see themselves as social activists and careful planners of old age. All participants value an active, healthy body but manage to do little in order to attain it due to lacking time and discipline. In accordance with the socioemotional selectivity theory, perceiving a short-time perspective makes precarious individuals focus on emotional goals, while financially secure individuals value social goals. Implications for practice and policy change are discussed.

  4. "I want to be 100 years old, but I smoke too much": Exploring the gap between positive aging goals and reported preparatory actions in different social circumstances.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Catrinel; Flick, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Preparing for positive aging is shaped by the social context a person lives in. The present qualitative study explores and compares representations about preparatory actions in precarious workers (i.e., with temporary job contracts and insecure pension plans) and individuals with secure pension plans living in Germany. It also examines, the discrepancy between what middle-aged persons think they should be doing in preparation and what they report doing for aging well. Findings from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews conducted here show that people who have insecure pension plans tend to see themselves as social networkers and optimists, while those with secure pension plans see themselves as social activists and careful planners of old age. All participants value an active, healthy body but manage to do little in order to attain it due to lacking time and discipline. In accordance with the socioemotional selectivity theory, perceiving a short-time perspective makes precarious individuals focus on emotional goals, while financially secure individuals value social goals. Implications for practice and policy change are discussed. PMID:26568214

  5. Quantum amplification effect in a horizon fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Mohammad H.

    2010-05-15

    The appearance of a few unevenly spaced bright flashes of light on top of Hawking radiation is the sign of the amplification effect in black hole horizon fluctuations. Previous studies on this problem suffer from the lack of considering all emitted photons in the theoretical spectroscopy of these fluctuations. In this paper, we include all of the physical transition weights and present a consistent intensity formula. This modifies a black hole radiation pattern.

  6. Transformation of polymetallic dust in the organic horizon of Al-Fe-humus podzol (field experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyanguzova, I. V.; Goldvirt, D. K.; Fadeeva, I. K.

    2015-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with an X-ray spectral microanalysis showed that the ash matter from the organic horizons (after ignition) of control and experimental plots mainly (>85%) consists of different soil-forming minerals and iron oxides (particularly magnetite). From 10% to 15% of particles in the organic horizon of Al-Fe-humus podzol (Albic Rustic Podzol) of the experimental plot were represented by polymetallic ball-shaped dust particles that were preserved in the soil without significant transformation for 14 years after their artificial application. The total contents of Cu, Pb, As, and Ni in the organic horizon on the experimental plot were 22-100 times higher than those in the control; the contents of Zn and Fe were 2-5 times higher. The sequence of chemical elements according to their total contents in the samples of control and experimental plots was different. The portion of available forms of heavy metal (Ni, Cu, and Co) compounds extractable with 1.0 M HCl averaged 20-30% of their total contents in the soil. More than 80% of acid-soluble forms of heavy metals were concentrated in the organic horizon of contaminated podzol soil, which represents the biogeochemical barrier to the migration of pollutants down the soil profile. Durable fixation of heavy metals in the organic horizon and their weak migration into the mineral soil layers significantly hamper the processes of self-purification of contaminated soils.

  7. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  8. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  9. Emergent horizons and causal structures in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-09-01

    The open string metric arises kinematically in studying fluctuations of open string degrees of freedom on a D-brane. An observer, living on a probe D-brane, can send signals through the spacetime by using such fluctuations on the probe, that propagate in accordance with a metric which is conformal to the open string metric. Event horizons can emerge in the open string metric when one considers a D-brane with an electric field on its worldvolume. Here, we emphasize the role of and investigate, in details, the causal structure of the resulting open string event horizon and demonstrate, among other things, its close similarities to an usual black hole event horizon in asymptotically AdS-spaces. To that end, we analyze relevant geodesics, Penrose diagrams and various causal holographic observables for a given open string metric. For analytical control, most of our calculations are performed in an asymptotically AdS3-background, however, we argue that the physics is qualitatively the same in higher dimensions. We also discuss how this open string metric arises from an underlying D-brane configuration in string theory.

  10. Is the Gravitational-Wave Ringdown a Probe of the Event Horizon?

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Vitor; Franzin, Edgardo; Pani, Paolo

    2016-04-29

    It is commonly believed that the ringdown signal from a binary coalescence provides a conclusive proof for the formation of an event horizon after the merger. This expectation is based on the assumption that the ringdown waveform at intermediate times is dominated by the quasinormal modes of the final object. We point out that this assumption should be taken with great care, and that very compact objects with a light ring will display a similar ringdown stage, even when their quasinormal-mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole. In other words, universal ringdown waveforms indicate the presence of light rings, rather than of horizons. Only precision observations of the late-time ringdown signal, where the differences in the quasinormal-mode spectrum eventually show up, can be used to rule out exotic alternatives to black holes and to test quantum effects at the horizon scale. PMID:27176511

  11. Neural network-based finite horizon stochastic optimal control design for nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    The stochastic optimal control of nonlinear networked control systems (NNCSs) using neuro-dynamic programming (NDP) over a finite time horizon is a challenging problem due to terminal constraints, system uncertainties, and unknown network imperfections, such as network-induced delays and packet losses. Since the traditional iteration or time-based infinite horizon NDP schemes are unsuitable for NNCS with terminal constraints, a novel time-based NDP scheme is developed to solve finite horizon optimal control of NNCS by mitigating the above-mentioned challenges. First, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to approximate the control coefficient matrix that is subsequently utilized in conjunction with the critic and actor NNs to determine a time-based stochastic optimal control input over finite horizon in a forward-in-time and online manner. Eventually, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded with ultimate bounds being a function of initial conditions and final time. Moreover, the approximated control input converges close to optimal value within finite time. The simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:25720004

  12. Miklós Konkoly Thege (1842-1916). 100 Years of Observational Astronomy and Astrophysics - A collection of papers on the history of Observational Astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    2001-10-01

    This book results from presentations and discussions by a group of astronomers and historians during a three-day workshop held at Tihany (Hungary), on 13-15 August 1999. This meeting - the second forum dedicated to the rise of observational astrophysics in the nineteenth and early twentieth century - coincided with the centenary of Hungary's national observatory. The basic principle of this series of meetings is to reflect on the work and personality of a single individual or of a group of persons, at the same time avoiding the really dominant figures that typify the age. The series focuses on key people who epitomize a way of thinking and working, that has in turn formed many of the ideas by which we do astrophysical research today. Hence the evocation of the scientific spirit of the era under consideration is attempted. Such a leading key person undoubtedly was Miklós Konkoly Thege. A superb instrumentalist and observer, Konkoly became the founding father of Hungarian astronomy through the establishment of his private observatory that later became the Royal Hungarian Ógyalla Observatory, the precursor of the modern Konkoly Observatory. The workshop was organized at the occasion of the centennial anniversary of Konkoly Observatory. The book outlines five major themes. The first part describes the birth of observational astrophysics in Hungary and focuses on historical aspects of 19th century Hungarian astronomy from three different viewpoints: the historical narrative based on historical facts, the perspective as seen by an expert in historical instrumentation, and a discussion of the socio-political consequences of nineteenth-century developments for our present times. The second part analyses the birth of observational astrophysics in countries with which Konkoly and his collaborators had close contacts: Japan, South Africa and France. The third part of the book discusses the establishment of the discipline of photometry worldwide. An important aspect of 19th

  13. Miklós Konkoly Thege (1842-1916). 100 Years of Observational Astronomy and Astrophysics. A collection of papers on the history of Observational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    This book results from presentations and discussions by a group of astronomers and historians during a three-day workshop held at Tihany (Hungary), on 13-15 August 1999. This meeting - the second forum dedicated to the rise of observational astrophysics in the nineteenth and early twentieth century - coincided with the centenary of Hungary's national observatory. The basic principle of this series of meetings is to reflect on the work and personality of a single individual or of a group of persons, at the same time avoiding the really dominant figures that typify the age. The series focuses on key people who epitomize a way of thinking and working, that has in turn formed many of the ideas by which we do astrophysical research today. Hence the evocation of the scientific spirit of the era under consideration is attempted. Such a leading key person undoubtedly was Miklós Konkoly Thege. A superb instrumentalist and observer, Konkoly became the founding father of Hungarian astronomy through the establishment of his private observatory that later became the Royal Hungarian Ogyalla Observatory, the precursor of the modern Konkoly Observatory. The workshop was organized at the occasion of the centennial anniversary of Konkoly Observatory. The book outlines five major themes. The first part describes the birth of observational astrophysics in Hungary and focuses on historical aspects of 19th-century Hungarian astronomy from three different viewpoints: the historical narrative based on historical facts, the perspective as seen by an expert in historical instrumentation, and a discussion of the socio-political consequences of nineteenth-century developments for our present times. The second part analyses the birth of observational astrophysics in countries with which Konkoly and his collaborators had close contacts: Japan, South Africa and France. The third part of the book discusses the establishment of the discipline of photometry worldwide. An important aspect of 19th

  14. Book Review: 100 years of observational astronomy and astrophysics : homage to Miklos Konkoly Thege / C. Sterken, 2001 / Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    Miklós Konkoly Thege (1842-1916) was a wealthy Hungarian nobleman who established a private observatory at Ógyalla, nowadays a state institution known as the Konkoly Observatory. This interesting book is the proceedings of a workshop held in 1999 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Astronomical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, based on the Konkoly Observatory. There are five parts to the book. The first is about the history of the Konkoly Observatory and its activities. Konkoly Thege was very active in instrumental matters - his book Praktische Anleitung ... (1883) was influential during the period when astrophysics was undergoing its first period of rapid development, and a copy of it exists in the SAAO collection. Konkoly was a pioneer in astronomical photometry and spectroscopy and made use of the Zöllner visual photometer as well as the schraffierkassette method for photographic photometry. The second part of the book is concerned with early astrophysics in various countries. The article on Japanese astronomy around 1899 (by M Takeuti) deals with a period not covered by articles in English. At this time, Japan was still recovering from the two centuries of isolation imposed by the Edo Shogunate, and research astronomy was just beginning. CD Laney's Astronomy in the Dismal Swamp, a quirky collection of stories about the Royal Observatory, Cape, follows. Other chapters deal with the Marseille Observatory and the French astronomer Jules Janssen (1824-1907). Two articles by J Hearnshaw and K Staubermann deal with the history of astronomical photometry in the third part. The fourth part is about early female astronomers and the difficulties they faced, including paragraphs on Dorothea Klumpke (who married Isaac Roberts), Agnes Clerke, Maria Mitchell and the famous ladies of the Harvard Observatory who worked on spectral classification and the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. Most of the last part is a fascinating

  15. Arsenic and associated trace-elements in groundwater from the Chaco-Pampean plain, Argentina: results from 100 years of research.

    PubMed

    Nicolli, Hugo B; Bundschuh, Jochen; Blanco, María Del C; Tujchneider, Ofelia C; Panarello, Héctor O; Dapeña, Cristina; Rusansky, Jorge E

    2012-07-01

    by lithology-mineralogy, soils-geomorphology, actual climate and paleoclimates, hydraulic parameters, and residence time of groundwaters. PMID:22647392

  16. Use of microcomputer in mapping depth of stratigraphic horizons in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Thomas G.

    1982-01-01

    REGIONAL MAPPER is a menu-driven system in the BASIC language for computing and plotting (1) time, depth, and average velocity to geologic horizons, (2) interval time, thickness, and interval velocity of stratigraphic intervals, and (3) subcropping and onlapping intervals at unconformities. The system consists of three programs: FILER, TRAVERSER, and PLOTTER. A control point is a shot point with velocity analysis or a shot point at or near a well with velocity check-shot survey. Reflection time to and code number of seismic horizons are filed by digitizing tablet from record sections. TRAVERSER starts at a point of geologic control and, in traversing to another, parallels seismic events, records loss of horizons by onlap and truncation, and stores reflection time for geologic horizons at traversed shot points. TRAVERSER is basically a phantoming procedure. Permafrost thickness and velocity variations, buried canyons with low-velocity fill, and error in seismically derived velocity cause velocity anomalies that complicate depth mapping. Two depths to the top of the pebble is based shale are computed for each control point. One depth, designated Zs on seismically derived velocity. The other (Zw) is based on interval velocity interpolated linearly between wells and multiplied by interval time (isochron) to give interval thickness. Z w is computed for all geologic horizons by downward summation of interval thickness. Unknown true depth (Z) to the pebble shale may be expressed as Z = Zs + es and Z = Zw + ew where the e terms represent error. Equating the two expressions gives the depth difference D = Zs + Zw = ew + es A plot of D for the top of the pebble shale is readily contourable but smoothing is required to produce a reasonably simple surface. Seismically derived velocity used in computing Zs includes the effect of velocity anomalies but is subject to some large randomly distributed errors resulting in depth errors (es). Well-derived velocity used in computing Zw

  17. Testing numerically the null Cauchy horizon singularity inside Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior; Khanna, Gaurav; Zenginoĝlu, Anil

    2015-04-01

    The Cauchy horizon inside a Kerr black hole develops an instability that transforms it into a curvature singularity. Perturbative analyses are consistent with the picture arising from fully nonlinear simulations of spherical charged black holes: this singularity is deformational weak and null for early retarded times. Despite much interest in this long-standing problem, no numerical simulations of the interior of a perturbed Kerr black hole have been done to date. Here, we report on preliminary results obtained from a linear simulation of the evolution of the fields under the collapse of a test wave packet. We use recent developments to a Teukolsky equation solver, which use (event) horizon-penetrating, hyperboloidal coordinates, which compactify null infinity and penetrate through both horizons. This numerical technology allows us to penetrate through the event horizon, and probe the fields on the approach to the Cauchy horizon singularity. We study the behavior of the Weyl scalars ψ0 and ψ4 and of the curvature scalar RαβγδRαβγδ , and confront our results with those of perturbation analysis. Our results may be useful when planning fully nonlinear numerical studies of rotating black hole interiors.

  18. The quantum nonthermal radiation and horizon surface gravity of an arbitrarily accelerating black hole with electric charge and magnetic charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhi-Kun; Pan, Wei-Zhen; Yang, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, we discuss the quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics near an event horizon by studying the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of a scalar particle in curved space-time, and obtain the event horizon surface gravity and the Hawking temperature on that event horizon. The results show that there is a crossing of particle energy near the event horizon. We derive the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels. It is also found that the Hawking temperature of a black hole depends not only on the time, but also on the angle. There is a problem of dimension in the usual tortoise coordinate, so the present results obtained by using a correct-dimension new tortoise coordinate transformation may be more reasonable.

  19. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Woods, W. W.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Retherford, K. D.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Tsang, C.; Versteeg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. Preliminary analysis yields a surface pressure of about 10 microbars, smaller than expected. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters.

  20. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine Glaciers: A new reference horizon for dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.; Blumthaler, M.; Eisner, H.

    In profiles taken of old snow on Alpine glaciers, a new reference horizon for dating has been discovered in the form of atmospheric fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The dating method is based on the known time of deposition of the fission products immediately after the Chernobyl accident on April 26, 1986. In future, this reference horizon may be used for the determination of net accumulation over a long period. The peak value of gross beta activity from the Chernobyl accident is of the same order of magnitude as the peak value from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests in 1963.

  1. Transport of four pharmaceuticals in different horizons of three soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Svatkova, Paula; Klement, Ales; Jaksik, Ondrej; Golovko, Oksana; Fer, Miroslav; Kocarek, Martin; Nikodem, Antonin; Grabic, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, which varies in different soil types and the horizons of these soil types, has a significant impact on water flow and contaminant transport in soils. Transport of many contaminants is in addition strongly influenced by their sorption on soil particles. Transport of four pharmaceuticals (sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, atenolol and carbamazepine) was studied in soil columns (a diameter of 10.5 cm and a height of 13 cm) taken from all diagnostic horizons of three different soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem and Haplic Cambisol). The irrigation by water contaminated by a mixture of all four compounds followed by ponding infiltration of distilled water was simulated and water outflow and solute concentrations from the bottom of the soil sample was monitored in time. The highest infiltration rates were observed for soil samples from the Bt horizons of the Greyic Phaeozem that exhibited prismatic structure, followed by rates observed in the Ap horizons of the Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem and Haplic Cambisol (due to their granular soil structure and presence of root channels). The lowest infiltration rate was measured for the Bw horizon of the Haplic Cambisol, which had a poorly developed soil structure and a low fraction of macropores. Compound discharge was however also highly affected by their sorption on solids. The highest mobility was observed for sulfamethoxazole followed by carbamazepine atenolol and trimethoprim, which corresponds to measured sorption isotherms. Mobility of ionizable compounds in different soil samples was influenced by pH (i.e. degree and form of their ionization) and sites available for absorption. Mobility of sulfamethoxazole decreased with decreasing pH (i.e. the largest sorption measured in horizons of the Haplic Cambisol). While mobility of atenolol and trimethoprim decreased with increasing base cation saturation, and with increasing organic matter content for carbamazepine. As result of both affects (i.e. soil

  2. Implications of the sedimentology and isotope geochemistry of calcic horizons in the Pliocene-Early Pleistocene St. David Fm. , Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science); Wang, Y.; Cerling, T.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Two types of calcic horizons occur in pedogenically modified alluvial mudstones of the Plio-Pleistocene St. David Fm.: (1) nodular-carbonate zones (stage 2 morphology) with downward decreasing carbonate abundance, located below leached red muds; (2) massive to nodular zones (stage 3) with sharp bases, upward decrease in carbonate abundance, associated with variably leached muds typically exhibiting green mottles. Type 1 horizons are traceable for hundreds of meters; type 2 horizons vary in thickness and carbonate content over distances as short at 15 m. and are laterally contiguous with pond deposits. Type 1 horizons are interpreted as vadose aridosol calcic horizons, whereas type 2 horizons are partly gleyed hydromorphic soils with calcite derived from groundwater as well as from leaching within the soil. O and C isotopic compositions of age-equivalent 1 and 2 carbonates are similar suggesting that type 2 calcite formed in the unsaturated zone, probably in the capillary fringe above the water table. These latter horizons define a limited time of elevated water table, which corresponds to a cooler/wetter climate and higher sedimentation rates. If the distinction between these two soil types was not made, the greater morphological maturity'' of type 2 horizons would lead to misinterpretation of more arid climatic conditions or lower sedimentation rates. Type 1 horizons occur within parallel piedmont-facies belts representing channel/channel margin and floodplain deposition. Paleosols are morphologically similar, although floodplain soils are more clay rich. C-isotope analyses suggest, however, different vegetational histories for the two depositional tracts that reflect different responses of channel-margin and floodplain settings to increasing seasonality of precipitation during the late Pliocene.

  3. Celebrate North Dakota's First 100 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lowell

    1989-01-01

    This issue of "Insights" celebrates North Dakota's centennial. The information and activities it contains were meant for classroom use by teachers from North Dakota during the centennial year, but could provide others with a glimpse of that state's history. A fact sheet on "North Dakota Centennial Dates" gives a brief explanation of the important…

  4. Leadership: reflections over the past 100 years.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Mary B; Arendt, Susan W

    2004-03-01

    Leadership, viewed by the American Dietetic Association as the ability to inspire and guide others toward building and achieving a shared vision, is a much written-about topic. Research on leadership has addressed the topic using many different approaches, from a very simplistic definition of traits to a more complex process involving interactions, emotions, and learning. Thousands of books and papers have been published on the topic of leadership. This review paper will provide examples of the varying foci of the writings on this topic and includes references for instruments used to measure leadership traits and behaviors. Research is needed to determine effective strategies for preparing dietitians to be effective leaders and assume leadership positions. Identifying ways to help dietitians better reflect on their leadership experiences to enhance their learning and leadership might be one strategy to explore.

  5. Leadership: reflections over the past 100 years.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Mary B; Arendt, Susan W

    2014-05-01

    Leadership, viewed by the American Dietetic Association as the ability to inspire and guide others toward building and achieving a shared vision, is a much written-about topic. Research on leadership has addressed the topic using many different approaches, from a very simplistic definition of traits to a more complex process involving interactions, emotions, and learning. Thousands of books and papers have been published on the topic of leadership. This review paper will provide examples of the varying foci of the writings on this topic and includes references for instruments used to measure leadership traits and behaviors. Research is needed to determine effective strategies for preparing dietitians to be effective leaders and assume leadership positions. Identifying ways to help dietitians better reflect on their leadership experiences to enhance their learning and leadership might be one strategy to explore.

  6. 100 Years Werner Heisenberg: Works and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenfuß, Dietrich; Lüst, Dieter; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2003-09-01

    Over 40 renowned scientists from all around the world discuss the work and influence of Werner Heisenberg. The papers result from the symposium held by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Heisenberg's birth, one of the most important physicists of the 20th century and cofounder of modern-day quantum mechanics. Taking atomic and laser physics as their starting point, the scientists illustrate the impact of Heisenberg's theories on astroparticle physics, high-energy physics and string theory right up to processing quantum information.

  7. Analysis of 100 Years of Curriculum Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelting-Gibson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen historical and contemporary curriculum designs were analyzed for elements of assessment that support student learning and inform instructional decisions. Educational researchers are purposely paying attention to the role assessment plays in a well-designed planning and teaching process. Assessment is a vital component to educational…

  8. Dairy innovations over the past 100 Years.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H

    2009-09-23

    The dairy industry in the United States has undergone many changes over the past century. Adulteration and contamination of milk were rampant before the passage and enforcement of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, and the introduction and eventual acceptance of certified and pasteurized milk have provided consumers with a consistently safe product. Homogenization and advances in the packaging and transport of milk gradually took hold, improving the milk supply. Other developments included the concentration of milk and whey, lactose-reduced milk, and the popularization of yogurt. Consumers have benefited from advances in butter packaging, low-fat ice cream, cheese manufacture, and yogurt technology, which has helped create the large demand for dairy products in the United States. Current trends and issues, including the increasing popularity of organic and artisanal products and the use of rBST, will shape the future of the dairy industry. PMID:19719132

  9. The Flexner Report ― 100 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report of 1910 transformed the nature and process of medical education in America with a resulting elimination of proprietary schools and the establishment of the biomedical model as the gold standard of medical training. This transformation occurred in the aftermath of the report, which embraced scientific knowledge and its advancement as the defining ethos of a modern physician. Such an orientation had its origins in the enchantment with German medical education that was spurred by the exposure of American educators and physicians at the turn of the century to the university medical schools of Europe. American medicine profited immeasurably from the scientific advances that this system allowed, but the hyper-rational system of German science created an imbalance in the art and science of medicine. A catching-up is under way to realign the professional commitment of the physician with a revision of medical education to achieve that purpose. PMID:21966046

  10. Human Fetal Behavior: 100 Years of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Low, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews literature on human fetal behavior. Includes descriptions of coupling of body movements and fetal heart rate and behavior maturation from conception to term. Discusses use of stimulus-induced behavior to examine sensory and cognitive development, and spontaneous and stimulus-induced behavior to assess fetal well-being. Notes research focus…

  11. A 100-year perspective on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Szurszewski, J H

    1998-03-01

    This contribution to the centennial commemorative issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology identifies some of the important studies of spontaneous electrical and motor activity in the gastrointestinal tract published in the Journal between 1898 and 1996. Emphasis is given to the contributions made by Walter B. Cannon, Walter C. Alvarez, Emil Bozler, C. Ladd Prosser, and James Christensen.

  12. Beam Line: 100 years of elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, A.; Weinberg, S.; Quigg, C.; Riordan, M.; Panofsky, W. K. H.

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  13. [The Einthoven's electrocardiograph after 100 years].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, A; Iturralde, P

    2001-01-01

    The initial studies about the "irritability" of animal tissues by iatrophysic and iatromechanic scientists are reviewed. These studies led to discover the so called animal electricity envisaged by Luigi Galvani in the XVIII century and demonstrated by Carlo Matteucci and his followers in the XIX. Beginning with the Galvani's "reoscopic" frog, which allowed to assess the electrical current in a qualitative sense, it was possible to arrive, at the beginnings of the XX century, to the string electrocardiograph presented by Willem Einthoven in 1901. This opened the way that led to fabrication of ever more sophisticated instruments until the present systems of endocardial mapping by magnetic technology or by multipolar catheters, which permit to quickly identify the site of origin or the spreading ways of a tachycardia for their ablation with radio-frequency. Intracardiac echocardiography is also employed to define the anatomy of right atrium, during intracardiac cartography, in order to establish the most adequate sites for ablation. On the other hand, a logic i.e. rational, method for the interpretation of results from the electrical exploration of the heart has been developed. This one was introduced by Frank N. Wilson in Ann Arbor and has been fittingly applied by Demetrio Sodi Pallares in Mexico. Important diagnostic advances and notable therapeutic inferences have been derived from these latter developments.

  14. A 100-year perspective on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Szurszewski, J H

    1998-03-01

    This contribution to the centennial commemorative issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology identifies some of the important studies of spontaneous electrical and motor activity in the gastrointestinal tract published in the Journal between 1898 and 1996. Emphasis is given to the contributions made by Walter B. Cannon, Walter C. Alvarez, Emil Bozler, C. Ladd Prosser, and James Christensen. PMID:9565541

  15. Spinoff 2003: 100 Years of Powered Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Today, NASA continues to reach milestones in space exploration with the Hubble Telescope, Earth-observing systems, the Space Shuttle, the Stardust spacecraft, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the International Space Station, the Mars rovers, and experimental research aircraft these are only a few of the many initiatives that have grown out of NASA engineering know-how to drive the Agency s missions. The technical expertise gained from these programs has transferred into partnerships with academia, industry, and other Federal agencies, ensuring America stays capable and competitive. With Spinoff 2003, we once again highlight the many partnerships with U.S. companies that are fulfilling the 1958 Space Act stipulation that NASA s vast body of scientific and technical knowledge also benefit mankind. This year's issue showcases innovations such as the cochlear implant in health and medicine, a cockpit weather system in transportation, and a smoke mask benefiting public safety; many other products are featured in these disciplines, as well as in the additional fields of consumer/home/recreation, environment and resources management, computer technology, and industrial productivity/ manufactacturing technology. Also in this issue, we devote an entire section to NASA s history in the field of flight and showcase NASA s newest enterprise dedicated to education. The Education Enterprise will provide unique teaching and learning experiences for students and teachers at all levels in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The Agency also is committed, as never before, to engaging parents and families through NASA s educational resources, content, and opportunities. NASA s catalyst to intensify its focus on teaching and learning springs from our mission statement: to inspire the next generation of explorers as only NASA can.

  16. [The Einthoven's electrocardiograph after 100 years].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, A; Iturralde, P

    2001-01-01

    The initial studies about the "irritability" of animal tissues by iatrophysic and iatromechanic scientists are reviewed. These studies led to discover the so called animal electricity envisaged by Luigi Galvani in the XVIII century and demonstrated by Carlo Matteucci and his followers in the XIX. Beginning with the Galvani's "reoscopic" frog, which allowed to assess the electrical current in a qualitative sense, it was possible to arrive, at the beginnings of the XX century, to the string electrocardiograph presented by Willem Einthoven in 1901. This opened the way that led to fabrication of ever more sophisticated instruments until the present systems of endocardial mapping by magnetic technology or by multipolar catheters, which permit to quickly identify the site of origin or the spreading ways of a tachycardia for their ablation with radio-frequency. Intracardiac echocardiography is also employed to define the anatomy of right atrium, during intracardiac cartography, in order to establish the most adequate sites for ablation. On the other hand, a logic i.e. rational, method for the interpretation of results from the electrical exploration of the heart has been developed. This one was introduced by Frank N. Wilson in Ann Arbor and has been fittingly applied by Demetrio Sodi Pallares in Mexico. Important diagnostic advances and notable therapeutic inferences have been derived from these latter developments. PMID:11692816

  17. Black hole thermodynamics from Euclidean horizon constraints.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2007-07-13

    To explain black hole thermodynamics in quantum gravity, one must introduce constraints to ensure that a black hole is actually present. I show that for a large class of black holes, such "horizon constraints" allow the use of conformal field theory techniques to compute the density of states, reproducing the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in a nearly model-independent manner. One standard string theory approach to black hole entropy arises as a special case, lending support to the claim that the mechanism may be "universal." I argue that the relevant degrees of freedom are Goldstone-boson-like excitations arising from the weak breaking of symmetry by the constraints. PMID:17678209

  18. Peripheral Vision Horizon Display (PVHD). Corrected Copy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A Canadian invention, the peripheral vision horizon display (PVHD), shows promise in alleviating vertigo or disorientation in pilots flying under instrument conditions and easing the piloting task when flying in weather or other conditions requiring close attention to aircraft attitude instruments. A diversity of research and applied work was being done to investigate and validate the benefits of the PVHD during the years immediately preceding this conference. Organizers of the conference were able to assemble a group of outstanding presenters representing academic, industrial, and military. The theoretical foundation and applied use of the PVHD are discussed, and results from operational tests are presented.

  19. An uneventful horizon in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almheiri, Ahmed; Sully, James

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the possibility of firewalls in the Einstein-dilaton gravity model of CGHS. We use the results of the numerical simulation carried out by Ashtekar et al. to demonstrate that firewalls are absent and the horizon is drama free. We show that the lack of a firewall is consistent because the model does not satisfy one of the postulates of black hole complementarity. In particular, we elaborate on previous work showing that the Hawking radiation is not pure, and is completely entangled with a long-lived remnant beyond the last ray.

  20. Astrophysical Black Holes: Evidence of a Horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica

    In this Lecture Note we first follow a short account of the history of the black hole hypothesis. We then review on the current status of the search for astrophysical black holes with particular attention to the black holes of stellar origin. Later, we highlight a series of observations that reveal the albeit indirect presence of supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei, with mention to forthcoming experiments aimed at testing directly the black hole hypothesis. We further focus on evidences of a black hole event horizon in cosmic sources.

  1. European scientists' proposals for HORIZON 2000+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-10-01

    This programme, which has been given the name Horizon 2000+, will be presented to the press at 0900h on Monday 17 October 1994 at ESA Headquarters in Paris by Professor Lodewijk Woltjer, who chaired the committee of European scientific community representatives set up to consider the proposals submitted, and Professor Roger Bonnet, ESA's Science Programme Director. Journalists wishing to attend this press breakfast are requested to complete and return the attached form, if possible by fax: (33.1) 42.73.76.90.

  2. Black hole thermodynamics from Euclidean horizon constraints.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2007-07-13

    To explain black hole thermodynamics in quantum gravity, one must introduce constraints to ensure that a black hole is actually present. I show that for a large class of black holes, such "horizon constraints" allow the use of conformal field theory techniques to compute the density of states, reproducing the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in a nearly model-independent manner. One standard string theory approach to black hole entropy arises as a special case, lending support to the claim that the mechanism may be "universal." I argue that the relevant degrees of freedom are Goldstone-boson-like excitations arising from the weak breaking of symmetry by the constraints.

  3. Prolate horizons and the Penrose inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Tippett, Benjamin K.

    2009-05-15

    The Penrose inequality has so far been proven in cases of spherical symmetry and in cases of zero extrinsic curvature. The next simplest case worth exploring would be nonspherical, nonrotating black holes with nonzero extrinsic curvature. Following Karkowski et al.'s construction of prolate black holes, we define initial data on an asymptotically flat spacelike 3-surface with nonzero extrinsic curvature that may be chosen freely. This gives us the freedom to define the location of the apparent horizon such that the Penrose inequality is violated. We show that the dominant energy condition is violated at the poles for all cases considered.

  4. Preferential Flow Paths Allow Deposition of Mobile Organic Carbon Deep into Soil B Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chadwick, O.; Kramer, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Most of our understanding of soil carbon (C) dynamics derives from the top 10 to 20 cm, although globally the majority of the bulk soil C pool is found below those depths. Mineral associated C in deep soil is more stable than that held in surface horizons, and its long-term persistence may contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic C. Carbon can enter deep soil horizons in multiple ways: through biologically-mediated or abiotic physical mixing, illuviation, root inputs, or through a physical disturbance that would cause the burial of an originally shallow organic horizon. In this study, we investigated the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the transport and stabilization of soil C in tropical rainforest volcanic soils, where high rainfall, a highly productive forest, and dominance of highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals contribute to large soil C stocks at depth with long mean residence times. DOM plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils, including nutrient transfer within and across ecosystems. Carbon storage in these soils is linked to movement of both DOC and particulate organic C along infiltration pathways. Climate and soil mineralogical properties create the right conditions for C to be pumped from the organic horizons where microbial activity is highest, to deep mineral horizons, where the potential for stabilization is greatest. High rainfall preserves hydrated short-range order minerals that are subject to strong shrinkage during occasional drought periods. The resulting cracks in subsurface B horizons become pathways for DOM complexed with Fe and Al moving in soil solution during subsequent wet periods. Preferential flow of these organically rich solutes and/or colloids moves C to depth where C, Fe and Al are preferentially deposited on near-vertical crack surfaces and along near-horizonal flow surfaces at horizon boundaries. Long-term deposition forms discontinuous Fe- and OM-cemented lamella that serve to

  5. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  6. One-Dimensional Infinite Horizon Nonconcave Optimal Control Problems Arising in Economic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavski, Alexander J.

    2011-12-15

    We study the existence of optimal solutions for a class of infinite horizon nonconvex autonomous discrete-time optimal control problems. This class contains optimal control problems without discounting arising in economic dynamics which describe a model with a nonconcave utility function.

  7. Dynamical horizons: energy, angular momentum, fluxes, and balance laws.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Krishnan, Badri

    2002-12-23

    Dynamical horizons are considered in full, nonlinear general relativity. Expressions of fluxes of energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves across these horizons are obtained. Fluxes are local, the energy flux is positive, and change in the horizon area is related to these fluxes. The flux formulas also give rise to balance laws analogous to the ones obtained by Bondi and Sachs at null infinity and provide generalizations of the first and second laws of black-hole mechanics. PMID:12484807

  8. Radiation from quantum weakly dynamical horizons in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Pranzetti, Daniele

    2012-07-01

    We provide a statistical mechanical analysis of quantum horizons near equilibrium in the grand canonical ensemble. By matching the description of the nonequilibrium phase in terms of weakly dynamical horizons with a local statistical framework, we implement loop quantum gravity dynamics near the boundary. The resulting radiation process provides a quantum gravity description of the horizon evaporation. For large black holes, the spectrum we derive presents a discrete structure which could be potentially observable.

  9. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-11-01

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions u and w. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution w(0)=0 is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalized ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cutoff goes to infinity, u(0){yields}{infinity}, w(0){yields}-{infinity} such that u(0)+w(0){yields}-1. Furthermore w and u are not multiplicatively renormalizable. Relaxing the gap equation allows w(0)=0 with u(0){yields}-1. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, F(0,{lambda}), goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cutoff. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the F(0,{lambda})=3 solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cutoffs lie in the range 1-3 GeV{sup -1}. We show that the renormalized ghost dressing function should be finite and nonzero at zero momentum and can be reliably estimated on the lattice up to powers of the lattice spacing; from published data on a 80{sup 4} lattice at {beta}=5.7 we obtain F{sub R}(0,{mu}=1.5 GeV){approx_equal}2.2.

  10. Energy and information near black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freivogel, Ben

    2014-07-01

    The central challenge in trying to resolve the firewall paradox is to identify excitations in the near-horizon zone of a black hole that can carry information without injuring a freely falling observer. By analyzing the problem from the point of view of a freely falling observer, I arrive at a simple proposal for the degrees of freedom that carry information out of the black hole. An infalling observer experiences the information-carrying modes as ingoing, negative energy excitations of the quantum fields. In these states, freely falling observers who fall in from infinity do not encounter a firewall, but freely falling observers who begin their free fall from a location close to the horizon are ``frozen'' by a flux of negative energy. When the black hole is ``mined,'' the number of information-carrying modes increases, increasing the negative energy flux in the infalling frame without violating the equivalence principle. Finally, I point out a loophole in recent arguments that an infalling observer must detect a violation of unitarity, effective field theory, or free infall.

  11. Cool horizons lead to information loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Borun D.

    2013-10-01

    There are two evidences for information loss during black hole evaporation: (i) a pure state evolves to a mixed state and (ii) the map from the initial state to final state is non-invertible. Any proposed resolution of the information paradox must address both these issues. The firewall argument focuses only on the first and this leads to order one deviations from the Unruh vacuum for maximally entangled black holes. The nature of the argument does not extend to black holes in pure states. It was shown by Avery, Puhm and the author that requiring the initial state to final state map to be invertible mandates structure at the horizon even for pure states. The proof works if black holes can be formed in generic states and in this paper we show that this is indeed the case. We also demonstrate how models proposed by Susskind, Papadodimas et al. and Maldacena et al. end up making the initial to final state map non-invertible and thus make the horizon "cool" at the cost of unitarity.

  12. Extended symmetries at the black hole horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, Laura; Giribet, Gaston; González, Hernán A.; Pino, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    We prove that non-extremal black holes in four-dimensional general relativity exhibit an infinite-dimensional symmetry in their near horizon region. By prescribing a physically sensible set of boundary conditions at the horizon, we derive the algebra of asymptotic Killing vectors, which is shown to be infinite-dimensional and includes, in particular, two sets of supertranslations and two mutually commuting copies of the Witt algebra. We define the surface charges associated to the asymptotic diffeomorphisms that preserve the boundary conditions and discuss the subtleties of this definition, such as the integrability conditions and the correct definition of the Dirac brackets. When evaluated on the stationary solutions, the only non-vanishing charges are the zero-modes. One of them reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of Kerr black holes. We also study the extremal limit, recovering the NHEK geometry. In this singular case, where the algebra of charges and the integrability conditions get modified, we find that the computation of the zero-modes correctly reproduces the black hole entropy. Furthermore, we analyze the case of three spacetime dimensions, in which the integrability conditions notably simplify and the field equations can be solved analytically to produce a family of exact solutions that realize the boundary conditions explicitly. We examine other features, such as the form of the algebra in the extremal limit and the relation to other works in the literature.

  13. Energy and information near black hole horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben

    2014-07-01

    The central challenge in trying to resolve the firewall paradox is to identify excitations in the near-horizon zone of a black hole that can carry information without injuring a freely falling observer. By analyzing the problem from the point of view of a freely falling observer, I arrive at a simple proposal for the degrees of freedom that carry information out of the black hole. An infalling observer experiences the information-carrying modes as ingoing, negative energy excitations of the quantum fields. In these states, freely falling observers who fall in from infinity do not encounter a firewall, but freely falling observers who begin their free fall from a location close to the horizon are ''frozen'' by a flux of negative energy. When the black hole is ''mined,'' the number of information-carrying modes increases, increasing the negative energy flux in the infalling frame without violating the equivalence principle. Finally, I point out a loophole in recent arguments that an infalling observer must detect a violation of unitarity, effective field theory, or free infall.

  14. Geochemical analyses of the Late Devonian ``Kellwasser Event'' stratigraphic horizon at Steinbruch Schmidt (F.R.G.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, George R.; Orth, Charles J.; Quintana, Leonard R.; Gilmore, James S.; Olsen, Edward J.

    We report here the absence of an Ir anomaly in an exceptionally complete stratigraphic sequence across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in the Rhenish Slate Mountains of the Federal Republic of Germany. There exists no anomaly either at the Kellwasser Event mass extinction horizon (Uppermost gigas-Lower triangularis Subzonal interval), or at the subzonal horizon where an Ir anomaly was reported in the Canning Basin strata in Australia. No sharp negative Carbon-13 shift is seen at the biological crisis horizon, which could be indicative of the collapse of phytoplanktion productivity. On the contrary, a sudden increase of Carbon-13 ratios is seen at the critical horizon, suggesting that either a bloom in phytoplankton activity or upwelling occurred in this interval of time. Such events might have been local phenomena, however, as a comparable Carbon-13 signature has not yet been found outside of Europe.

  15. Cosmic censorship: Formation of a shielding horizon around a fragile horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-01-01

    The weak cosmic censorship conjecture asserts that spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes, invisible to distant observers. This conjecture, put forward by Penrose more than four decades ago, is widely believed to be one of the basic principles of nature. However, a complete proof of this hypothesis is still lacking and the validity of the conjecture has therefore remained one of the most important open questions in general relativity. In this study we analyze a gedanken experiment that is designed to challenge cosmic censorship by trying to overcharge a Reissner-Nordström black hole: a charged shell is lowered adiabatically into the charged black hole. The mass energy delivered to the black hole can be redshifted by letting the dropping point of the shell approach the black-hole horizon. On the other hand, the electric charge of the shell is not redshifted by the gravitational field of the black hole. It therefore seems, at first sight, that the charged shell is not hindered from entering the black hole, overcharging it and removing its horizon. However, in the present study we prove that the exposure of a naked singularity to distant observers is actually excluded due to the formation of a new (and larger) horizon around the original black hole. Moreover, we shall prove that this new horizon is already formed before the charged shell crosses the original black-hole horizon. This result, which seems to have been previously overlooked, guarantees the validity of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture in this type of gedanken experiments.

  16. Criticality and surface tension in rotating horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified horizon thermodynamics and the associated criticality for rotating black hole spacetimes. Namely, we show that under a virtual displacement of the black hole horizon accompanied by an independent variation of the rotation parameter, the radial Einstein equation takes a form of a ‘cohomogeneity two’ horizon first law, δ E=Tδ S+{{Ω }}δ J-σ δ A, where E and J are the horizon energy (an analogue of the Misner-Sharp mass) and the horizon angular momentum, Ω is the horizon angular velocity, A is the horizon area, and σ is the surface tension induced by the matter fields. For fixed angular momentum, the above equation simplifies and the more familiar (cohomogeneity one) horizon first law δ E=Tδ S-Pδ V is obtained, where P is the pressure of matter fields and V is the horizon volume. A universal equation of state is obtained in each case and the corresponding critical behavior is studied.

  17. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  18. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  19. Criticality and surface tension in rotating horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified horizon thermodynamics and the associated criticality for rotating black hole spacetimes. Namely, we show that under a virtual displacement of the black hole horizon accompanied by an independent variation of the rotation parameter, the radial Einstein equation takes a form of a ‘cohomogeneity two’ horizon first law, δ E=Tδ S+{{Ω }}δ J-σ δ A, where E and J are the horizon energy (an analogue of the Misner–Sharp mass) and the horizon angular momentum, Ω is the horizon angular velocity, A is the horizon area, and σ is the surface tension induced by the matter fields. For fixed angular momentum, the above equation simplifies and the more familiar (cohomogeneity one) horizon first law δ E=Tδ S-Pδ V is obtained, where P is the pressure of matter fields and V is the horizon volume. A universal equation of state is obtained in each case and the corresponding critical behavior is studied.

  20. Perturbations of the Kerr spacetime in horizon-penetrating coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Manuela; Khanna, Gaurav; Laguna, Pablo; Pullin, Jorge; Ryan, Michael P.

    2001-04-01

    We derive the Teukolsky equation for perturbations of a Kerr spacetime when the spacetime metric is written in either ingoing or outgoing Kerr-Schild form. We also write explicit formulae for setting up the initial data for the Teukolsky equation in the time domain in terms of a 3-metric and an extrinsic curvature. The motivation of this work is to have in place a formalism to study the evolution in the `close limit' of two recently proposed solutions to the initial-value problem in general relativity that are based on Kerr-Schild slicings. A perturbative formalism in horizon-penetrating coordinates is also very desirable in connection with numerical relativity simulations using black hole `excision'.

  1. Attitude Determination by Using Horizon and Sun Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Allen K. H.; French, Larry A.

    1993-01-01

    The Pointing and Alignment Workstation (PAWS) developed by Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) has successfully supported the first and second Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1, 2) spacelab missions for NASA. The primary PAWS objective was to provide realtime pointing information to instruments whose line of-sight is dependent on Shuttle attitude and to study/quantify the causes and effects of Shuttle and payload pointing errors. In addition to Shuttle IMU attitude information, PAWS used atmospheric science sensors data to determine the spacecraft attitude. PAWS successfully achieved these goals by acquiring and processing data during the ATLAS 1, 2 mission. This paper presents the attitude determination algorithm real time processing, and results of post mission analysis. The findings of this study include the quality of the horizon sensor and IMU measurements as well as accuracy of attitude processor algorithm.

  2. Contingency Horizon: on Private Events and the Analysis of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Leigland, Sam

    2014-05-01

    Skinner's radical behaviorism incorporates private events as biologically based phenomena that may play a functional role with respect to other (overt) behavioral phenomena. Skinner proposed four types of contingencies, here collectively termed the contingency horizon, which enable certain functional relations between private events and verbal behavior. The adequacy and necessity of this position has met renewed challenges from Rachlin's teleological behaviorism and Baum's molar behaviorism, both of which argue that all "mental" phenomena and terminology may be explained by overt behavior and environment-behavior contingencies extended in time. A number of lines of evidence are presented in making a case for the functional characteristics of private events, including published research from behavior analysis and general experimental psychology, as well as verbal behavior from a participant in the debate. An integrated perspective is offered that involves a multiscaled analysis of interacting public behaviors and private events. PMID:27274956

  3. Near-horizon geometry and warped conformal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Hamid; Detournay, Stéphane; Grumiller, Daniel; Oblak, Blagoje

    2016-03-01

    We provide boundary conditions for three-dimensional gravity including boosted Rindler spacetimes, representing the near-horizon geometry of non-extremal black holes or flat space cosmologies. These boundary conditions force us to make some unusual choices, like integrating the canonical boundary currents over retarded time and periodically identifying the latter. The asymptotic symmetry algebra turns out to be a Witt algebra plus a twisted u(1) current algebra with vanishing level, corresponding to a twisted warped CFT that is qualitatively different from the ones studied so far in the literature. We show that this symmetry algebra is related to BMS by a twisted Sugawara construction and exhibit relevant features of our theory, including matching micro- and macroscopic calculations of the entropy of zero-mode solutions. We confirm this match in a generalization to boosted Rindler-AdS. Finally, we show how Rindler entropy emerges in a suitable limit.

  4. The atmosphere of Pluto as observed by New Horizons.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, G Randall; Stern, S Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Summers, Michael E; Strobel, Darrell F; Hinson, David P; Kammer, Joshua A; Parker, Alex H; Steffl, Andrew J; Linscott, Ivan R; Parker, Joel Wm; Cheng, Andrew F; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten H; Greathouse, Thomas K; Retherford, Kurt D; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J; Woods, William W; Singer, Kelsi N; Tsang, Constantine C C; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M; Wong, Michael L; Yung, Yuk L; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F; Tyler, G Leonard

    2016-03-18

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. Whereas the lower atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 200 kilometers) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N2) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 1800 kilometers or so), whereas methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), and ethane (C2H6) are abundant minor species and likely feed the production of an extensive haze that encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales. PMID:26989258

  5. The atmosphere of Pluto as observed by New Horizons.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, G Randall; Stern, S Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B; Weaver, Harold A; Young, Leslie A; Summers, Michael E; Strobel, Darrell F; Hinson, David P; Kammer, Joshua A; Parker, Alex H; Steffl, Andrew J; Linscott, Ivan R; Parker, Joel Wm; Cheng, Andrew F; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten H; Greathouse, Thomas K; Retherford, Kurt D; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J; Woods, William W; Singer, Kelsi N; Tsang, Constantine C C; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M; Wong, Michael L; Yung, Yuk L; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F; Tyler, G Leonard

    2016-03-18

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. Whereas the lower atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 200 kilometers) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N2) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 1800 kilometers or so), whereas methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), and ethane (C2H6) are abundant minor species and likely feed the production of an extensive haze that encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales.

  6. The atmosphere of Pluto as observed by New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall; Stern, S. Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Summers, Michael E.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Hinson, David P.; Kammer, Joshua A.; Parker, Alex H.; Steffl, Andrew J.; Linscott, Ivan R.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Slater, David C.; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Throop, Henry; Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Woods, William W.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Schindhelm, Eric; Lisse, Carey M.; Wong, Michael L.; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhu, Xun; Curdt, Werner; Lavvas, Panayotis; Young, Eliot F.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Bagenal, F.; Grundy, W. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Moore, J. M.; Spencer, J. R.; Andert, T.; Andrews, J.; Banks, M.; Bauer, B.; Bauman, J.; Barnouin, O. S.; Bedini, P.; Beisser, K.; Beyer, R. A.; Bhaskaran, S.; Binzel, R. P.; Birath, E.; Bird, M.; Bogan, D. J.; Bowman, A.; Bray, V. J.; Brozovic, M.; Bryan, C.; Buckley, M. R.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Bushman, S. S.; Calloway, A.; Carcich, B.; Conard, S.; Conrad, C. A.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Custodio, O. S.; Ore, C. M. Dalle; Deboy, C.; Dischner, Z. J. B.; Dumont, P.; Earle, A. M.; Elliott, H. A.; Ercol, J.; Ernst, C. M.; Finley, T.; Flanigan, S. H.; Fountain, G.; Freeze, M. J.; Green, J. L.; Guo, Y.; Hahn, M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hamilton, S. A.; Hanley, J.; Harch, A.; Hart, H. M.; Hersman, C. B.; Hill, A.; Hill, M. E.; Holdridge, M. E.; Horanyi, M.; Howard, A. D.; Howett, C. J. A.; Jackman, C.; Jacobson, R. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Kang, H. K.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusnierkiewicz, D.; Lauer, T. R.; Lee, J. E.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Lunsford, A. W.; Mallder, V. A.; Martin, N.; McComas, D. J.; McNutt, R. L.; Mehoke, D.; Mehoke, T.; Melin, E. D.; Mutchler, M.; Nelson, D.; Nimmo, F.; Nunez, J. I.; Ocampo, A.; Owen, W. M.; Paetzold, M.; Page, B.; Pelletier, F.; Peterson, J.; Pinkine, N.; Piquette, M.; Porter, S. B.; Protopapa, S.; Redfern, J.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S. J.; Rogers, G.; Rose, D.; Runyon, K.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Schenk, P.; Sepan, B.; Showalter, M. R.; Soluri, M.; Stanbridge, D.; Stryk, T.; Szalay, J. R.; Tapley, M.; Taylor, A.; Taylor, H.; Umurhan, O. M.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Versteeg, M. H.; Vincent, M.; Webbert, R.; Weidner, S.; Weigle, G. E.; White, O. L.; Whittenburg, K.; Williams, B. G.; Williams, K.; Williams, S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. Whereas the lower atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 200 kilometers) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N2) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes of less than 1800 kilometers or so), whereas methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), and ethane (C2H6) are abundant minor species and likely feed the production of an extensive haze that encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state - over seasonal or geologic time scales.

  7. Shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Zachary; Zengel, Scott; Baker, Mary; Steinhoff, Marla; Fricano, Gail; Rouhani, Shahrokh; Michel, Jacqueline

    2016-06-15

    We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline. We present new simplified oil exposure classes for both beaches and coastal wetland habitats derived from this database integrating both intensity and persistence of oiling on the shoreline over time. We document oiling along 2113km out of 9545km of surveyed shoreline, an increase of 19% from previously published estimates and representing the largest marine oil spill in history by length of shoreline oiled. These data may be used to generate maps and calculate summary statistics to assist in quantifying and understanding the scope, extent, and spatial distribution of shoreline oil exposure as a result of the DWH incident. PMID:27098990

  8. Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Health Care Horizon.

    PubMed

    Hart, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Changes in health care-including a growing emphasis on quality, outcomes, and lower costs-are transforming the delivery of care and creating a knowledge gap that continuing education must bridge. As clinicians and health leaders spend less time in hospital settings, educational activities are likely to extend their reach, for instance through online education distributed on laptops, tablets, or smartphones. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, MD, PhD, explored this shift in his 2016 keynote to the World Congress for Continuing Professional Development: "Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Health Care Horizon." This article describes some of the main trends in health care that Dr. Emanuel foresees, focusing on the implications of the changing role of hospitals for innovation in continuing education. PMID:27584062

  9. Shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Zachary; Zengel, Scott; Baker, Mary; Steinhoff, Marla; Fricano, Gail; Rouhani, Shahrokh; Michel, Jacqueline

    2016-06-15

    We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline. We present new simplified oil exposure classes for both beaches and coastal wetland habitats derived from this database integrating both intensity and persistence of oiling on the shoreline over time. We document oiling along 2113km out of 9545km of surveyed shoreline, an increase of 19% from previously published estimates and representing the largest marine oil spill in history by length of shoreline oiled. These data may be used to generate maps and calculate summary statistics to assist in quantifying and understanding the scope, extent, and spatial distribution of shoreline oil exposure as a result of the DWH incident.

  10. Overview of the New Horizons Science Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, H. A.; Gibson, W. C.; Tapley, M. B.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2008-10-01

    The New Horizons mission was launched on 2006 January 19, and the spacecraft is heading for a flyby encounter with the Pluto system in the summer of 2015. The challenges associated with sending a spacecraft to Pluto in less than 10 years and performing an ambitious suite of scientific investigations at such large heliocentric distances (>32 AU) are formidable and required the development of lightweight, low power, and highly sensitive instruments. This paper provides an overview of the New Horizons science payload, which is comprised of seven instruments. Alice provides moderate resolution (˜3 10 Å FWHM), spatially resolved ultraviolet (˜465 1880 Å) spectroscopy, and includes the ability to perform stellar and solar occultation measurements. The Ralph instrument has two components: the Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), which performs panchromatic (400 975 nm) and color imaging in four spectral bands (Blue, Red, CH4, and NIR) at a moderate spatial resolution of 20 μrad/pixel, and the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which provides spatially resolved (62 μrad/pixel), near-infrared (1.25 2.5 μm), moderate resolution ( λ/ δ λ˜240 550) spectroscopic mapping capabilities. The Radio Experiment (REX) is a component of the New Horizons telecommunications system that provides both radio (X-band) solar occultation and radiometry capabilities. The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) provides high sensitivity ( V<18), high spatial resolution (5 μrad/pixel) panchromatic optical (350 850 nm) imaging capabilities that serve both scientific and optical navigation requirements. The Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) instrument measures the density and speed of solar wind particles with a resolution Δ E/ E<0.4 for energies between 25 eV and 7.5 keV. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) measures energetic particles (protons and CNO ions) in 12 energy channels spanning 1 1000 keV. Finally, an instrument designed and

  11. Regenerative PN ranging experience with New Horizons during 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. R.; Haskins, C. B.; DeBoy, C. C.

    The New Horizons mission to Pluto is the first deep space mission to include the capability of supporting regenerative PN ranging. During the current phase of the mission, sequential tone ranging supports the mission navigation requirements but regenerative ranging will expand the conditions (antenna selection, integration time, etc.) over which ranging will be successful during any extended mission following the Pluto fly-by, to objects in the Kuiper belt. Experience with regenerative ranging is being obtained now in preparation for its use in an extended mission. During most of 2012, New Horizons was in a hibernation state. Tracking was conducted between late April and early July. Six regenerative ranging passes were performed to bookend this interval; 2 at the beginning and 4 at the end. During that time, the distance between the spacecraft and Earth was in excess of 22 Astronautical Units (AU) and the Pr/No levels were below 15 dB-Hz. A seventh regenerative ranging pass was performed in May at a higher signal level in order to test the acquisition of the ranging code by the spacecraft during a variety of conditions. The consistency of the regenerative range measurements with the adjacent sequential tone ranging measurements has been demonstrated and serves as a check on the calibration of the regenerative ranging system conditions. The range measurement precision has been shown to follow the predictions that are based on the uplink and downlink signal power. The regenerative ranging system has been shown to acquire the uplink ranging code with and without a commanded reset and regardless of the noise bandwidth setting of the system. This paper will present the data that was obtained during 2012 and will describe the analysis results for the regenerative ranging experience during 2012.

  12. The High Intensity Horizon at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's high intensity horizon is 'Project-X' which is a US led initiative with strong international participation that aims to realize a next generation proton source that will dramatically extend the reach of Intensity Frontier research. The Project-X research program includes world leading sensitivity in long-baseline and short-baseline neutrino experiments, a rich program of ultra-rare muon and kaon decays, opportunities for next-generation electric dipole moment experiments and other nuclear/particle physics probes, and a platform to investigate technologies for next generation energy applications. A wide range of R&D activities has supported mission critical accelerator subsystems, such as high-gradient superconducting RF accelerating structures, efficient RF power systems, cryo-modules and cryogenic refrigeration plants, advanced beam diagnostics and instrumentation, high-power targetry, as well as the related infrastructure and civil construction preparing for a construction start of a staged program as early as 2017.

  13. Black Hole Observations - Towards the Event Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzen, Silke

    Black Holes are probably the most elusive solutions of Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Despite numerous observations of the direct galactic environment and indirect influence of astrophysical black holes (e.g. jets, variable emission across the wavelength spectrum, feedback processes, etc.) -- a direct proof of their existence is still lacking. This article highlights some aspects deduced from many observations and concentrates on the experimental results with regard to black holes with masses from millions to billions of solar masses. The focus will be on the challenges and remaining questions. The Event Horizon Telescopce (EHT) project to image the photon sphere of Sgr A* and its potential is briefly sketched. This instrumental approach shall lead to highest resolution observations of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*).

  14. Opportunity Spies 'Endurance' on the Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows the eastern plains that stretch beyond the small crater where the rover landed. In the distance, the rim of a larger crater dubbed 'Endurance' can be seen.

    This color mosaic was taken on the 32nd martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission and spans 20 degrees of the horizon. It was taken while Opportunity was parked at the north end of the outcrop, in front of the rock region dubbed 'El Capitan' and facing east.

    The features seen at the horizon are the near and far rims of 'Endurance,' the largest crater within about 6 kilometers (4 miles) of the lander. Using orbital data from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, scientists estimated the crater to be 160 meters (175 yards) in diameter, and about 720 meters (half a mile) away from the lander.

    The highest point visible on 'Endurance' is the highest point on the far wall of the crater; the sun is illuminating the inside of the far wall.

    Between the location where the image was taken at 'El Capitan' and 'Endurance' are the flat, smooth Meridiani plains, which scientists believe are blanketed in the iron-bearing mineral called hematite. The dark horizontal feature near the bottom of the picture is a small, five-meter (16-feet) crater, only 50 meters (164 feet) from Opportunity's present position. When the rover leaves the crater some 2 to 3 weeks from now, 'Endurance' is one of several potential destinations.

  15. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  16. New Horizons Risk Communication Strategy, Planning, Implementation, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Sandra A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the risk communication goals, strategy, planning process and product development for the New Horizons mission, including lessons from the Cassini mission that were applied in that effort, and presents lessons learned from the New Horizons effort that could be applicable to future missions.

  17. The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition" is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have…

  18. The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2014-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within every sector of education in some 65…

  19. The NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams, S.; Cummins, M.

    2012-01-01

    The internationally recognized "NMC Horizon Report" series and regional "NMC Technology Outlooks" are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in education around the globe. This volume, the "NMC…

  20. NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON NEW YORK SKYLINE AND ALMOST IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HORIZON THE TWIN TOWERS OF THE VERRAZANO-NARROWS BRIDGE - Outerbridge Crossing Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  1. A Fusion of Horizons: Students' Encounters with "Will and Wave"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, James L.

    2006-01-01

    In a case study, I applied philosophical hermeneutic principles in an advanced level EFL writing class in Taiwan. A "fusion of horizons" occurs at the junction of two intertwined interpretations: one from our socio-historical tradition and the other from our experience of novel phenomena. I explored students' hermeneutic horizons in relation to…

  2. The NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams, S.; Haywood, K.

    2011-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium. (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This volume, "The…

  3. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Cummins, M.; Estrada V.; Freeman, A.; Ludgate, H.

    2013-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This…

  4. The Horizon Report: 2010 Australia-New Zealand Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Smith, R.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2010-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2010 Horizon…

  5. The formation of frangipane horizons and their influence on physical-chemical properties of soils from glass houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipov, F.; Bulgariu, D.; Avarvarei, I.

    2009-04-01

    reduction of the accessibility of these for cultivated vegetables, and have important consequences on the productivity and on the quality of obtained products. Under these conditions, in the same time with the formation of frangipane horizons, the fast degradation of physical-mechanical and chemical properties of antrosols occurs. The conditions for the frangipane horizons formation are not yet elucidated. Ours experimental results indicate that the formation of frangipane horizons in soils from glass houses is first determined by the intensive technologies used for vegetables cultivation, by the application of a supra-dimensional irrigation system, the maintaining of high and relatively constants humidity state and temperatures (in comparison with un-protected soils). The nature of parental material has also, an important influence on the physical-chemical and mineralogical properties of frangipane horizons and these control the formation and spatial extension rates of these horizons. Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from Romanian Ministry of Education and Research (Project PNCDI 2-D5 no. 51045/07).

  6. Observations of the Geometry of Horizon-Based Optical Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John; Robinson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Orion Project has sparked a renewed interest in horizon-based optical navigation(OPNAV) techniques for spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system. Some approaches have begun to explore the geometry of horizon-based OPNAV and exploit the fact that it is a conic section problem. Therefore, the present paper focuses more deeply on understanding and leveraging the various geometric interpretations of horizon-based OPNAV. These results provide valuable insight into the fundamental workings of OPNAV solution methods, their convergence properties, and associated estimate covariance. Most importantly, the geometry and transformations uncovered in this paper lead to a simple and non-iterative solution to the generic horizon-based OPNAV problem. This represents a significant theoretical advancement over existing methods. Thus, we find that a clear understanding of geometric relationships is central to the prudent design, use, and operation of horizon-based OPNAV techniques.

  7. The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: What Happened and Why

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Roland N.

    2011-01-05

    The Deepwater Horizon disaster was the largest oil spill in US history, and the second largest spill in the world. 11 men lost their lives in the explosion and fire. Although the impacts of the spill were evident to large numbers of people, its causes were harder to see. This lecture will focus on the technical aspects of the events that led to the spill itself: what happened on the rig before, during and after the event, up to the time the rig sank. As with many engineering disasters, the accident was due to a sequence of failures, including both technical systems and procedural issues. Although the causes were complex and interacting, the lecture will focus on four main problems: (1) the failure of the cement and casing seal, (2) the failure to recognize and respond to hydrocarbon flow into the riser, (3) the ignition of hydrocarbons on the rig, and (4) the failure of the blow-out preventer (BOP) to seal the well. The lecture will conclude with some suggestions as to how events such as the Deepwater Horizon disaster can be avoided in the future. (Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and was the Chairman of Petroleum Engineering from 1995 to 2006. He holds BE, PhD and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science. Horne is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and is also an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers.)

  8. Horizon of quantum black holes in various dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Cavalcanti, Rogerio T.; Giugno, Andrea; Mureika, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    We adapt the horizon wave-function formalism to describe massive static spherically symmetric sources in a general (1 + D)-dimensional space-time, for D > 3 and including the D = 1 case. We find that the probability PBH that such objects are (quantum) black holes behaves similarly to the probability in the (3 + 1) framework for D > 3. In fact, for D ≥ 3, the probability increases towards unity as the mass grows above the relevant D-dimensional Planck scale mD. At fixed mass, however, PBH decreases with increasing D, so that a particle with mass m ≃mD has just about 10% probability to be a black hole in D = 5, and smaller for larger D. This result has a potentially strong impact on estimates of black hole production in colliders. In contrast, for D = 1, we find the probability is comparably larger for smaller masses, but PBH < 0.5, suggesting that such lower dimensional black holes are purely quantum and not classical objects. This result is consistent with recent observations that sub-Planckian black holes are governed by an effective two-dimensional gravitation theory. Lastly, we derive Generalised Uncertainty Principle relations for the black holes under consideration, and find a minimum length corresponding to a characteristic energy scale of the order of the fundamental gravitational mass mD in D > 3. For D = 1 we instead find the uncertainty due to the horizon fluctuations has the same form as the usual Heisenberg contribution, and therefore no fundamental scale exists.

  9. Horizon sensor errors calculated by computer models compared with errors measured in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, K. A.; Hogan, R.; Andary, J.

    1982-01-01

    Using a computer program to model the earth's horizon and to duplicate the signal processing procedure employed by the ESA (Earth Sensor Assembly), errors due to radiance variation have been computed for a particular time of the year. Errors actually occurring in flight at the same time of year are inferred from integrated rate gyro data for a satellite of the TIROS series of NASA weather satellites (NOAA-A). The predicted performance is compared with actual flight history.

  10. Receding horizon control of nonlinear systems: A control Lyapunov function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadbabaie, Ali

    With the advent of faster and cheaper computers, optimization based control methodologies have become a viable candidate for control of nonlinear systems. Over the past twenty years, a group of such control schemes have, been successfully used in the process control industry where the processes are either intrinsically stable or have very large time constants. The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework for synthesis of a class of optimization based control schemes, known as receding horizon control techniques for nonlinear systems such as unmanned aerial vehicles. It is well known that unconstrained infinite horizon optimal control may be used to construct a stabilizing controller for a nonlinear system. In this thesis, we show that similar stabilization results may be achieved using unconstrained finite horizon optimal control. The key idea is to approximate the tail of the infinite horizon cost-to-go using, as terminal cost, an appropriate control Lyapunov function (CLF). A CLF can be thought of as generalization of the concept of a Lyapunov function to systems with inputs. Roughly speaking, the terminal CLF should provide an (incremental) upper bound on the cost. In this fashion, important stability characteristics may be retained without the use of terminal constraints such as those employed by a number of other researchers. The absence of constraints allows a significant speedup in computation. Furthermore, it is shown that in order to guarantee stability, it suffices to satisfy an improvement property, thereby, relaxing the requirement, that truly optimal trajectories be found. We provide a complete analysis of the stability and region of attraction/operation properties of receding horizon control strategies that utilize finite horizon approximations in the proposed class. It is shown that the guaranteed region of operation contains that of the CLF controller and may be made as large as desired by increasing the optimization horizon

  11. Multiple microtektite horizons in upper Eocene marine sediments: No evidence for mass extinctions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.; D'Hondt, S.; Vallier, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    Microtektites have been recovered from three horizons in eight middle Eocene to middle Oligocene marine sediment sequences. Five of these occurrences are coeval and of latest Eocene age (37.5 to 38.0 million years ago); three are coeval and of early late Eocene age (38.5 to 39.5 million years ago); and three are of middle Oligocene age (31 to 32 million years ago). In addition, rare probable microtektites have been found in sediments with ages of about 36.0 to 36.5 million years. The microtektite horizon at 37.5 to 38.0 million years can be correlated with the North American tektite-strewn field, which has a fission track age (minimum) of 34 to 35 million years and a paleomagnetic age of 37.5 to 38.0 million years. There is no evidence for mass faunal extinctions at any of the microtektite horizons. Many of the distinct faunal changes that occurred in the middle Eocene to middle Oligocene can be related to the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet and the associated cooling phenomena and intensification of bottom currents that led to large-scale dissolution of calcium carbonate and erosion, which created areally extensive hiatuses in the deep-sea sediment records. The occurrence of microtektite horizons of several ages and the lack of evidence for faunal extinctions suggest that the effects of extraterrestrial bolide impacts may be unimportant in the biologic realm during middle Eocene to middle Oligocene time.

  12. Multiple microtektite horizons in upper eocene marine sediments: no evidence for mass extinctions.

    PubMed

    Keller, G; D'Hondt, S; Vallier, T L

    1983-07-01

    Microtektites have been recovered from three horizons in eight middle Eocene to middle Oligocene marine sediment sequences. Five of these occurrences are coeval and of latest Eocene age (37.5 to 38.0 million years ago); three are coeval and of early late Eocene age (38.5 to 39.5 million years ago); and three are of middle Oligocene age (31 to 32 million years ago). In addition, rare probable microtektites have been found in sediments with ages of about 36.0 to 36.5 million years. The microtektite horizon at 37.5 to 38.0 million years can be correlated with the North American tektite-strewn field, which has a fission track age (minimum) of 34 to 35 million years and a paleomagnetic age of 37.5 to 38.0 million years. There is no evidence for mass faunal extinctions at any of the microtektite horizons. Many of the distinct faunal changes that occurred in the middle Eocene to middle Oligocene can be related to the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet and the associated cooling phenomena and intensification of bottom currents that led to large-scale dissolution of calcium carbonate and erosion, which created areally extensive hiatuses in the deep-sea sediment records. The occurrence of microtektite horizons of several ages and the lack of evidence for faunal extinctions suggest that the effects of extraterrestrial bolide impacts may be unimportant in the biologic realm during middle Eocene to middle Oligocene time.

  13. 76 FR 55427 - Horizon Technology Finance Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION Horizon Technology Finance Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application August 31, 2011. AGENCY...(a) of the Act. Applicants: Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (the ``Company''), Horizon Technology Finance Management LLC (the ``Investment Adviser''), Longview SBIC GP LLC (the ``General...

  14. Horizon News Function and Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum Flux Near Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Huei

    2008-09-01

    From the 'quasi-local' definition of horizons, e.g. isolated horizon and dynamical horizon, the consequence quasi-local energy-momentum near horizons can be observed by using the idea of frame alignment. In particular, we find the horizon news function from the asymptotic expansion near horizons and use this to describe the gravitational flux and change of mass of a black hole.

  15. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  16. Spacetimes foliated by nonexpanding and Killing horizons: Higher dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jerzy; Szereszewski, Adam; Waluk, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    The theory of nonexpanding horizons (NEHs) geometry and the theory of near-horizon geometries (NHGs) are two mathematical relativity frameworks generalizing the black hole theory. From the point of view of the NEHs theory, a NHG is just a very special case of a spacetime containing a NEH of many extra symmetries. It can be obtained as the Horowitz limit of a neighborhood of an arbitrary extremal Killing horizon. An unexpected relation between the two of them was discovered in the study of spacetimes foliated by a family of NEHs. The class of four-dimensional NHG solutions (either vacuum or coupled to a Maxwell field) was found as a family of examples of spacetimes admitting a NEH foliation. In the current paper, we systematically investigate geometries of the NEHs foliating a spacetime for arbitrary matter content and in arbitrary spacetime dimensions. We find that each horizon belonging to the foliation satisfies a condition that may be interpreted as an invitation for a transversal NEH to exist and to admit the structure of an extremal isolated horizon. Assuming the existence of a transversal extremal isolated horizon, we derive all the spacetime metrics satisfying the vacuum Einstein's equations. In this case, the NEHs become bifurcated Killing horizons.

  17. Horizon shells and BMS-like soldering transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We revisit the theory of null shells in general relativity, with a particular emphasis on null shells placed at horizons of black holes. We study in detail the considerable freedom that is available in the case that one solders two metrics together across null hypersurfaces (such as Killing horizons) for which the induced metric is invariant under translations along the null generators. In this case the group of soldering transformations turns out to be infinite dimensional, and these solderings create non-trivial horizon shells containing both massless matter and impulsive gravitational wave components. We also rephrase this result in the language of Carrollian symmetry groups. To illustrate this phenomenon we discuss in detail the example of shells on the horizon of the Schwarzschild black hole (with equal interior and exterior mass), uncovering a rich classical structure at the horizon and deriving an explicit expression for the general horizon shell energy-momentum tensor. In the special case of BMS-like soldering supertranslations we find a conserved shell-energy that is strikingly similar to the standard expression for asymptotic BMS supertranslation charges, suggesting a direct relation between the physical properties of these horizon shells and the recently proposed BMS supertranslation hair of a black hole.

  18. Large Dust Devil on Horizon, Sol 468

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This movie clip shows a large, distant dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- as a dark shape on the horizon near the right side of the images. This dust devil was about 5 kilometers (3 miles) away from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, and may have been up to 200 meters or yards in diameter. Smaller dust devils closer to the rover appear bright against the dark ground. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 468th martian day, or sol (April 27, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames.

    Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright 'hollows,' which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

  19. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  20. Entanglement, tensor networks and black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Vilaplana, J.; Prior, J.

    2014-11-01

    We elaborate on a previous proposal by Hartman and Maldacena on a tensor network which accounts for the scaling of the entanglement entropy in a system at a finite temperature. In this construction, the ordinary entanglement renormalization flow given by the class of tensor networks known as the Multi Scale Entanglement Renormalization Ansatz (MERA), is supplemented by an additional entanglement structure at the length scale fixed by the temperature. The network comprises two copies of a MERA circuit with a fixed number of layers and a pure matrix product state which joins both copies by entangling the infrared degrees of freedom of both MERA networks. The entanglement distribution within this bridge state defines reduced density operators on both sides which cause analogous effects to the presence of a black hole horizon when computing the entanglement entropy at finite temperature in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The entanglement and correlations during the thermalization process of a system after a quantum quench are also analyzed. To this end, a full tensor network representation of the action of local unitary operations on the bridge state is proposed. This amounts to a tensor network which grows in size by adding succesive layers of bridge states. Finally, we discuss on the holographic interpretation of the tensor network through a notion of distance within the network which emerges from its entanglement distribution.

  1. New Horizons Investigation of Pluto's Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, H. A., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Pluto has four small moons: Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra, in orderof their distance from Pluto. All were discovered using theHubble Space Telescope (HST): Nix and Hydra in 2005 (1), Kerberos in2011 (2), and Styx in 2012 (3). The New Horizons (NH) mission has provided the first opportunity toperform spatially resolved imaging and spectroscopic measurements ofPluto's small moons, thereby giving direct measurements of theirsizes, shapes, surface albedo and color variations, surface composition,and snapshots of their rotational states. In addition, an extensive andsystematic set of unresolved panchromatic brightness measurements of thesmall moons over a six month period (January-July 2015) was obtained byNH, which provides additional information on their shapes and more preciseinformation on their rotational states. Here we review the results obtained to date by NH on the propertiesof Pluto's small moons. We compare those results to the propertiesof other small bodies in the solar system, and we address how thenew NH results bear on the origin and evolution of the Pluto system. (1) H. A. Weaver et al., Discovery of two new satellites of Pluto Nature 439, 943 (2006).(2) M. R. Showalter et al., New satellite of (134340) Pluto: S/2011 (134340), IAU Circ. 9221 (2011).(3) M. R. Showalter et al., New satellite of (134340) Pluto: S/2011 (134340), IAU Circ. 9253 (2012).

  2. Carbonate horizons, paleosols, and lake flooding cycles: Beds I and II of Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Carys E; Marshall, Jim D; Stanistreet, Ian G

    2012-08-01

    This study documents the petrology and stable isotope geochemistry of carbonates from six horizons from Beds I and II of Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. The studied succession, immediately below and above Tuff IF, consists of interbedded waxy and earthy claystones with discrete carbonate horizons and thin sandstones. The succession was deposited in response to repeated flooding and withdrawal of a saline-alkaline lake. The carbonates and their overlying disconformities are important because they help define the surfaces on which hominin activity took place and allow very high-resolution correlation of geographically separated levels of hominin exploitation. The range of different carbonates includes unambiguous land-surface and pedogenic features including calcified rootmat horizons, rhizocretions, and micritic nodules, together with less determinate sparry calcite nodules. Stellate nodules are interpreted as pseudomorphs after sulfate-roses. The carbonate nodules are synsedimentary features, truncated by fluvial and other erosional surfaces. The isotopic composition of the carbonates is variable with δ(18)O ranging from -7.0‰ to -4.3‰, and δ(13)C from -8.5‰ to -1.6‰. A covariant increase in δ(13)C and δ(18)O repeats in each carbonate horizon and in individual nodules (inner to outer layers): it reflects the evolution of synsedimentary groundwaters. At times of low lake level, the carbonates started to precipitate from meteoric waters with low isotopic values and continued to form as lake levels rose and the waters became increasingly saline. Some of the samples have a last-stage cement of strontium rich dolomite, which supports late-stage flooding by the saline-alkaline lake. Previous studies of carbonate horizons from Olduvai have interpreted carbon isotope values in terms of changes in C(3) and C(4) plants that colonized the land surface. This study demonstrates that in some instances the isotope values from carbonates deposited in these lake marginal

  3. Horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2011.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Bardsley, Sarah; Bennun, Leon; Clout, Mick; Côté, Isabelle M; Depledge, Michael H; Dicks, Lynn V; Dobson, Andrew P; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Impey, Andrew J; Lawton, John H; Lickorish, Fiona; Lindenmayer, David B; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Nally, Ralph Mac; Madgwick, Jane; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Prior, Stephanie V; Redford, Kent H; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Spalding, Mark; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    This review describes outcomes of a 2010 horizon-scanning exercise building upon the first exercise conducted in 2009. The aim of both horizon scans was to identify emerging issues that could have substantial impacts on the conservation of biological diversity, and to do so sufficiently early to encourage policy-relevant, practical research on those issues. Our group included professional horizon scanners and researchers affiliated with universities and non- and inter-governmental organizations, including specialists on topics such as invasive species, wildlife diseases and coral reefs. We identified 15 nascent issues, including new greenhouse gases, genetic techniques to eradicate mosquitoes, milk consumption in Asia and societal pessimism. PMID:21126797

  4. Conformal techniques in cosmology: Conformal Killing horizons and cosmological black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph

    This study investigates the use of conformal Killing horizons in time dependent black hole spacetimes, particularly expanding black holes in a FLRW universe. It examines the use of conformal techniques to generate these cosmological black hole models. The role played by conformal techniques in generating black holes with non-spherical event horizons is also studied. The concept of conformal Killing horizons is investigated through a generalization of some theorems involving Killing horizons, such as the strong rigidity theorem and the weak rigidity theorem. The surface gravity on conformal Killing horizons is defined and a generalization of the first law of black hole physics is obtained. A cosmological black hole spacetime which admits a conformal Killing horizon, is obtained by applying a time dependent conformal transformation on the Schwarzschild metric. The result is an asymptotically Einstein-de Sitter black hole spacetime that satisfies Einstein's field equations, with the matter content described by a non-comoving heat conducting fluid. Being time dependent, unlike previous cosmological black holes, this solution is the first example of a dynamical cosmological black hole which forms ab initio with the big bang singularity. Physical quantities such as the surface gravity and other effects like perihelion precession, light bending and circular geodesics are studied in this spacetime and compared to their counterparts in the gravitational field of the isolated Schwarzschild black hole. No changes in the structure of null geodesics are recorded, but significant differences are obtained for timelike geodesics, particularly a reduction in the perihelion precession and the non-existence of circular timelike orbits. Other differences are evident after constructing a maximal extension followed by a Penrose diagram for this spacetime. This solution is also expressed in the Newman-Penrose formalism. Finally a infinite cylindrical black hole is obtained by applying a

  5. "Far Horizons" -- Near-space Exploration At The Adler Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.; Friedman, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four years, the Adler Planetarium has developed a diverse suite of educational activities involving hands-on scientific exploration via our "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning program. These efforts largely have been focused on increasing excitement and motivation for learning outside of school time, and include middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and an active public volunteer program. In 2010, our programs were dedicated to the memory of renowned Chicago adventurer and explorer Steve Fossett. In 2011, in continued tribute to Steve Fossett, we further expand our out-of-school time programs with a summer workshop designed to enable high school teachers to form and advise student high-altitude ballooning clubs. This model program will be developed as one element of our ongoing partnership with the Air Force Academy High School in Chicago. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

  6. Ionospheric sounding in support of over-the-horizon radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Haines, D. M.; Bibl, K.; Galkin, I.; Huang, X.; Kitrosser, D. F.; Sales, G. S.; Scali, J. L.

    1997-07-01

    Precise coordinate registration for HF over-the-horizon (OTH) radar applications requires accurate knowledge of the ionospheric structure. In the mid-1980s Digisonde 256 systems were deployed in the American sector to provide this information from strategically located sites via telephone lines to the user. The mid-1990s saw the development of a new advanced system, the Digisonde portable sounder, or DPS, now being deployed in Australia in support of the Australian OTH radar system. A summary of the new features provided by the DPS is as follows: low radio frequency power (300 W); narrow transmission bandwidth; advanced automatic scaling; and control and data access via the Internet. The availability of real-time electron density profiles as function of time from a network of stations makes it possible to calculate the three-dimensional electron density distribution in the region of interest using Fourier transform techniques. The resulting density maps are the basis for the OTH radar coordinate registration. The DPS uses Doppler interferometry to determine the development of ionospheric irregularities.

  7. Parallel adaptive event horizon finder for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    With Advanced LIGO detecting the gravitational waves emitted from a pair of merging black holes in late 2015, we have a new perspective into the strong field regime of binary black hole systems. Event horizons are the defining features of such black hole spacetimes. We introduce a new code for locating event horizons in numerical simulations based on a Delaunay triangulation on a topological sphere. The code can automatically refine arbitrary regions of the event horizon surface to find and explore features such as the hole in a toroidal event horizon, as discussed in our companion paper. We also investigate various ways of integrating the geodesic equation and find evolution equations that can be integrated efficiently with high accuracy.

  8. Universal properties of the near-horizon optical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Warnick, C. M.

    2009-03-01

    Making use of the fact that the optical geometry near a static nondegenerate Killing horizon is asymptotically hyperbolic, we investigate some universal features of black-hole horizons. Applying the Gauss-Bonnet theorem allows us to establish some general properties of gravitational lensing, valid for all black holes. Hyperbolic geometry allows us to find rates for the loss of scalar, vector, and fermionic “hair” as objects fall quasistatically towards the horizon, extending previous results for Schwarzschild to all static Killing horizons. In the process we find the Liénard-Wiechert potential for hyperbolic space and calculate the force between electrons mediated by neutrinos, extending the flat space result of Feinberg and Sucher. We further demonstrate how these techniques allow us to derive the exact Copson-Linet potential due to a point charge in a Schwarzschild background in a simple fashion.

  9. Universal properties of the near-horizon optical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G. W.; Warnick, C. M.

    2009-03-15

    Making use of the fact that the optical geometry near a static nondegenerate Killing horizon is asymptotically hyperbolic, we investigate some universal features of black-hole horizons. Applying the Gauss-Bonnet theorem allows us to establish some general properties of gravitational lensing, valid for all black holes. Hyperbolic geometry allows us to find rates for the loss of scalar, vector, and fermionic ''hair'' as objects fall quasistatically towards the horizon, extending previous results for Schwarzschild to all static Killing horizons. In the process we find the Lienard-Wiechert potential for hyperbolic space and calculate the force between electrons mediated by neutrinos, extending the flat space result of Feinberg and Sucher. We further demonstrate how these techniques allow us to derive the exact Copson-Linet potential due to a point charge in a Schwarzschild background in a simple fashion.

  10. Schwarzschild horizon dynamics and SU(2) Chern-Simons theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Romesh K.; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-15

    We discuss the effect of different choices in partial gauge fixing of bulk local Lorentz invariance, on the description of the horizon degrees of freedom of a Schwarzschild black hole as an SU(2) Chern-Simons theory with specific sources. A classically equivalent description in terms of an ISO(2) Chern-Simons theory is also discussed. Further, we demonstrate that both of these descriptions can be partially gauge fixed to a horizon theory with U(1) local gauge invariance, with the solder form sources being subject to extra constraints in directions orthogonal to an internal vector field left invariant by U(1) transformations. Seemingly disparate approaches on characterization of the horizon theory for the Schwarzschild black hole (as well as spherical isolated horizons in general) are thus shown to be equivalent physically.

  11. Horizon Based Orientation Estimation for Planetary Surface Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouyssounouse, X.; Nefian, A. V.; Deans, M.; Thomas, A.; Edwards, L.; Fong, T.

    2016-01-01

    Planetary rovers navigate in extreme environments for which a Global Positioning System (GPS) is unavailable, maps are restricted to relatively low resolution provided by orbital imagery, and compass information is often lacking due to weak or not existent magnetic fields. However, an accurate rover localization is particularly important to achieve the mission success by reaching the science targets, avoiding negative obstacles visible only in orbital maps, and maintaining good communication connections with ground. This paper describes a horizon solution for precise rover orientation estimation. The detected horizon in imagery provided by the on board navigation cameras is matched with the horizon rendered over the existing terrain model. The set of rotation parameters (roll, pitch yaw) that minimize the cost function between the two horizon curves corresponds to the rover estimated pose.

  12. Note on electrical and thermodynamic properties of isolated horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gerui; Wu, Xiaoning; Gao, Sijie

    2015-03-01

    The electrical laws and Carnot cycle of isolated horizons (IH) are investigated in this paper. We establish Ohm's law and Joule's law of isolated horizons and find that the conceptual picture of black holes (membrane paradigm) can also apply to this kind of quasilocal black holes. We also investigate the geometrical properties near nonrotating IHs and find that under the first-order approximation of r , there exist a Killing vector ∂∂u/ and a Hamiltonian conjugate to it, so this vector can be thought to be a physical observer. We calculate the energy as measured at infinity of a particle at rest outside a nonrotating IH, and we use this result to construct a reversible Carnot cycle with the isolated horizon as a cold reservoir, which confirms the thermodynamic nature of isolated horizons.

  13. The Cauchy horizon singularity inside Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    The numerical technology that allows for the careful evolution of linearized fields inside Kerr black holes and the study of their behavior approaching the Cauchy horizon singularity includes a number of interesting aspects. The latter include compactified hyperboloidal coordinates and foliation, mixed type hyperbolic-elliptic PDE, and initial data evolution where all equal-coordinate hypersurfaces are spacelike. We review the need for the numerical technology that allows for the solution of the spin-2 Teukolsky equation inside Kerr black holes, and discuss the main features thereof. We present new results about the numerical properties of the Cauchy horizon singularity and their correspondence with the predictions of perturbative analysis. We then discuss present directions of study, which include the sub-dominant azimuthal modes, approaching the Cauchy horizon singularity along timelike directions, approaching the Marolf-Ori (``outflying'') singularity and the studying the fields along the Cauchy horizon.

  14. Entanglement entropy of a black hole and isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Shuangqi; Zhao, Ren

    2013-02-01

    Using Unruh-Verlinde temperature obtained by entropic force, we directly calculate partition functions of quantum field in Schwarzschild spacetime via quantum statistical method and derive the expression of the black hole statistical entropy. In our calculation the lower limit of integral is the location of isolated horizon introduced in loop quantum gravity and the upper limit of integral is infinity. So the obtained entropy is the statistical entropy from isolated horizon to the infinite. In our calculation there are not the cutoff and approximation. The results showed that, as long as proper Immirzi parameters are selected, the entropy obtained by loop quantum gravity is consistent with the quantum statistical entropy outside the black hole horizon. Therefore the black hole entropy is a quantum entanglement entropy outside the isolated horizon.

  15. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2015.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Clout, Mick; Depledge, Michael; Dicks, Lynn V; Dinsdale, Jason; Entwistle, Abigail C; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona A; Monk, Kathryn A; Ockendon, Nancy; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Rockström, Johan; Spalding, Mark D; Tonneijck, Femke H; Wintle, Bonnie C

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our sixth annual horizon scan, which aims to identify phenomena that may have substantial effects on the global environment, but are not widely known or well understood. A group of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist identified 15 topics via an iterative, Delphi-like process. The topics include a novel class of insecticide compounds, legalisation of recreational drugs, and the emergence of a new ecosystem associated with ice retreat in the Antarctic. PMID:25433442

  16. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2013.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Bardsley, Sarah; Clout, Mick; Depledge, Michael H; Dicks, Lynn V; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona; Margerison, Ceri; Monk, Kathryn A; Norris, Kenneth; Peck, Lloyd S; Prior, Stephanie V; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Spalding, Mark D; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of our fourth annual horizon-scanning exercise, which aims to identify topics that increasingly may affect conservation of biological diversity. The 15 issues were identified via an iterative, transferable process by a team of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist. The 15 topics include the commercial use of antimicrobial peptides, thorium-fuelled nuclear power, and undersea oil production. PMID:23219597

  17. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2013.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Bardsley, Sarah; Clout, Mick; Depledge, Michael H; Dicks, Lynn V; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona; Margerison, Ceri; Monk, Kathryn A; Norris, Kenneth; Peck, Lloyd S; Prior, Stephanie V; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Spalding, Mark D; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of our fourth annual horizon-scanning exercise, which aims to identify topics that increasingly may affect conservation of biological diversity. The 15 issues were identified via an iterative, transferable process by a team of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist. The 15 topics include the commercial use of antimicrobial peptides, thorium-fuelled nuclear power, and undersea oil production.

  18. Supertranslations and Superrotations at the Black Hole Horizon.

    PubMed

    Donnay, Laura; Giribet, Gaston; González, Hernán A; Pino, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to nonextremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of supertranslations. This group is generated by a semidirect sum of Virasoro and Abelian currents. The charges associated with the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of a stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon.

  19. Supertranslations and Superrotations at the Black Hole Horizon.

    PubMed

    Donnay, Laura; Giribet, Gaston; González, Hernán A; Pino, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to nonextremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of supertranslations. This group is generated by a semidirect sum of Virasoro and Abelian currents. The charges associated with the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of a stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon. PMID:26991167

  20. Optical Navigation Preparations for New Horizons Pluto Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, William M., Jr.; Dumont, Philip J.; Jackman, Coralie D.

    2012-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto and its satellites in July 2015. As was the case for the Voyager encounters with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, mission success will depend heavily on accurate spacecraft navigation, and accurate navigation will be impossible without the use of pictures of the Pluto system taken by the onboard cameras. We describe the preparations made by the New Horizons optical navigators: picture planning, image processing algorithms, software development and testing, and results from in-flight imaging.

  1. Runge-Kutta Discretizations of Infinite Horizon Optimal Control Problems with Steady-State Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diele, F.; Marangi, C.; Ragni, S.

    2009-08-01

    Direct numerical approximation of a continuous-time infinite horizon control problem, requires to recast the model as a discrete-time, finite-horizon control model. The quality of the optimization results can be heavily degraded if the discretization process does not take into account features of the original model to be preserved. Restricting their attention to optimal growh problems with a steady state, Mercenier and Michel in [1] and [2], studied the conditions to be imposed for ensuring that discrete first-order approximation models have the same steady states as the infinite-horizon continuous-times counterpart. Here we show that Mercenier and Michel scheme is a first order partitioned Runge-Kutta method applied to the state-costate differential system which arises from the Pontryagin maximum principle. The main consequence is that it is possible to consider high order schemes which generalize that algorithm by preserving the steady-growth invariance of the solutions with respect to the discretization process. Numerical examples show the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed methods when applied to the classical Ramsey growth model.

  2. Deformation of codimension-2 surfaces and horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li-Ming

    2011-03-01

    The deformation equation of a spacelike submanifold with an arbitrary codimension is given by a general construction without using local frames. In the case of codimension-1, this equation reduces to the evolution equation of the extrinsic curvature of a spacelike hypersurface. In the more interesting case of codimension-2, after selecting a local null frame, this deformation equation reduces to the well known (cross) focusing equations. We show how the thermodynamics of trapping horizons is related to these deformation equations in two different formalisms: with and without introducing quasilocal energy. In the formalism with the quasilocal energy, the Hawking mass in four dimension is generalized to higher dimension, and it is found that the deformation of this energy inside a marginal surface can be also decomposed into the contributions from matter fields and gravitational radiation as in the four dimension. In the formalism without the quasilocal energy, we generalize the definition of slowly evolving future outer trapping horizons proposed by Booth to past trapping horizons. The dynamics of the trapping horizons in FLRW universe is given as an example. Especially, the slowly evolving past trapping horizon in the FLRW universe has close relation to the scenario of slow-roll inflation. Up to the second order of the slowly evolving parameter in this generalization, the temperature (surface gravity) associated with the slowly evolving trapping horizon in the FLRW universe is essentially the same as the one defined by using the quasilocal energy.

  3. Rotating Killing horizons in generic F( R) gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2016-10-01

    We discuss various properties of rotating Killing horizons in generic F( R) theories of gravity in dimension four for spacetimes endowed with two commuting Killing vector fields. Assuming there is no curvature singularity anywhere on or outside the horizon, we construct a suitable (3+1)-foliation. We show that similar to Einstein's gravity, we must have T_{ab}k^ak^b=0 on the Killing horizon, where k^a is a null geodesic tangent to the horizon. For axisymmetric spacetimes, the effective gravitational coupling ˜ F'^{-1}(R) should usually depend upon the polar coordinate and hence need not necessarily be a constant on the Killing horizon. We prove that the surface gravity of such a Killing horizon must be a constant, irrespective of whether F'(R) is a constant there or not. We next apply these results to investigate some further basic features. In particular, we show that any hairy solution for the real massive vector field in such theories is clearly ruled out, as long as the potential of the scalar field generated in the corresponding Einstein's frame is a positive definite quantity.

  4. 1,3:2,4-Dibenzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) and its derivatives--efficient, versatile and industrially-relevant low-molecular-weight gelators with over 100 years of history and a bright future.

    PubMed

    Okesola, Babatunde O; Vieira, Vânia M P; Cornwell, Daniel J; Whitelaw, Nicole K; Smith, David K

    2015-06-28

    Dibenzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) has been a well-known low-molecular-weight gelator of organic solvents for over 100 years. As such, it constitutes a very early example of a supramolecular gel--a research field which has recently developed into one of intense interest. The ability of DBS to self-assemble into sample-spanning networks in numerous solvents is predicated upon its 'butterfly-like' structure, whereby the benzylidene groups constitute the 'wings' and the sorbitol backbone the 'body'--the two parts representing the molecular recognition motifs underpinning its gelation mechanism, with the nature of solvent playing a key role in controlling the precise assembly mode. This gelator has found widespread applications in areas as diverse as personal care products and polymer nucleation/clarification, and has considerable potential in applications such as dental composites, energy technology and liquid crystalline materials. Some derivatives of DBS have also been reported which offer the potential to expand the scope and range of applications of this family of gelators and endow the nansocale network with additional functionality. This review aims to explain current trends in DBS research, and provide insight into how by combining a long history of application, with modern methods of derivatisation and analysis, the future for this family of gelators is bright, with an increasing number of high-tech applications, from environmental remediation to tissue engineering, being within reach.

  5. Integrating horizon scanning and strategic risk prioritisation using a weight of evidence framework to inform policy decisions.

    PubMed

    Garnett, K; Lickorish, F A; Rocks, S A; Prpich, G; Rathe, A A; Pollard, S J T

    2016-08-01

    Poor connection between data on emerging issues and credible policy decisions continues to challenge governments, and is only likely to grow as demands on time and resources increase. Here we summarise recent efforts to integrate horizon scanning and risk prioritisation approaches to better connect emerging issues to the political discourse on environmental and food-related issues. Our categorisation of insights including potential future risks and opportunities to inform policy discussions has emerged from a structured three-year programme of horizon scanning for a UK pan-governmental futures partnership led by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). Our efforts to integrate horizon scanning and risk prioritisation, utilising a qualitative weight of evidence framework, has created a systematic process for identifying all signals of potential future change with significant impact for the strategic mission and underlying values of policy actors. Our approach encourages an exploration of factors out of the control of organisations, recognising that resilience depends on the flexibility of management strategies and the preparedness to deal with a variety of unexpected outcomes. We discuss how this approach addresses key cultural and evaluative challenges that policy actors have had in embedding horizon scanning in evidence-based policy processes, and suggest further developments to build confidence in the use of horizon scanning for strategic planning. PMID:27093126

  6. Black Hole Event Horizons and Advection-Dominated Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The XMM data on black-hole X-ray novae are only now becoming available and they have so far not been included in any publications. This work is part of a larger project that makes use of both XMM and Chandra data. Our first publication on the Chandra results is the following: "New Evidence for Black Hole Event Horizons from Chandra" by M.R. Garcia, J.E. McClintock, R. Narayan, P. Callanan, D. Barret and S. Murray (2001, ApJ, 553, L47). Therein we present the luminosities of the two black-hole X-ray novae, GRO J0422+22 and 4U1 543-47, which were observed by Chandra. These results are combined with the luminosities of four additional black-hole X-ray novae, which were observed as part of a Chandra GTO program (PI: S. Murray). The very low, but nonzero, quiescent X-ray luminosities of these black hole binaries is very difficult to understand in the context of standard viscous accretion disk theory. The principal result of this work is that X-ray novae that contain black hole primaries are about 100 times fainter that X-ray novae that contain neutron star primaries. This result had been suggested in earlier work, but the present work very firmly establishes this large luminosity difference. The result is remarkable because the black-hole and the neutron-star systems are believed to be similar in many respects. Most importantly, the mass transfer rate from the secondary star is believed to be very comparable for the two kinds of systems for similar orbital periods. The advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model provides a natural framework for understanding the extraordinarily low luminosities of the black hole systems and the hundred-fold greater luminosities of the neutron star systems. The chief feature of an ADAF is that the heat energy in the accreting gas is trapped in the gas and travels with it, rather than being radiated promptly. Thus the accreting gas reaches the central object with a huge amount of thermal energy. If the accretor is a black hole, the

  7. Extending the search for neutrino point sources with IceCube above the horizon.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Botner, O; Bradley, L; Braun, J; Breder, D; Carson, M; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hasegawa, Y; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Imlay, R L; Inaba, M; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Knops, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lennarz, D; Lundberg, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miyamoto, H; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Patton, S; Paul, L; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Potthoff, N; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schukraft, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terranova, C; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tooker, J; Tosi, D; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wiedemann, A; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S

    2009-11-27

    Point source searches with the IceCube neutrino telescope have been restricted to one hemisphere, due to the exclusive selection of upward going events as a way of rejecting the atmospheric muon background. We show that the region above the horizon can be included by suppressing the background through energy-sensitive cuts. This improves the sensitivity above PeV energies, previously not accessible for declinations of more than a few degrees below the horizon due to the absorption of neutrinos in Earth. We present results based on data collected with 22 strings of IceCube, extending its field of view and energy reach for point source searches. No significant excess above the atmospheric background is observed in a sky scan and in tests of source candidates. Upper limits are reported, which for the first time cover point sources in the southern sky up to EeV energies. PMID:20366087

  8. A dynamic scheduling method of Earth-observing satellites by employing rolling horizon strategy.

    PubMed

    Dishan, Qiu; Chuan, He; Jin, Liu; Manhao, Ma

    2013-01-01

    Focused on the dynamic scheduling problem for earth-observing satellites (EOS), an integer programming model is constructed after analyzing the main constraints. The rolling horizon (RH) strategy is proposed according to the independent arriving time and deadline of the imaging tasks. This strategy is designed with a mixed triggering mode composed of periodical triggering and event triggering, and the scheduling horizon is decomposed into a series of static scheduling intervals. By optimizing the scheduling schemes in each interval, the dynamic scheduling of EOS is realized. We also propose three dynamic scheduling algorithms by the combination of the RH strategy and various heuristic algorithms. Finally, the scheduling results of different algorithms are compared and the presented methods in this paper are demonstrated to be efficient by extensive experiments.

  9. Extending the search for neutrino point sources with IceCube above the horizon

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

    2009-11-20

    Point source searches with the IceCube neutrino telescope have been restricted to one hemisphere, due to the exclusive selection of upward going events as a way of rejecting the atmospheric muon background. We show that the region above the horizon can be included by suppressing the background through energy-sensitive cuts. This approach improves the sensitivity above PeV energies, previously not accessible for declinations of more than a few degrees below the horizon due to the absorption of neutrinos in Earth. We present results based on data collected with 22 strings of IceCube, extending its field of view and energy reach for point source searches. No significant excess above the atmospheric background is observed in a sky scan and in tests of source candidates. Upper limits are reported, which for the first time cover point sources in the southern sky up to EeV energies.

  10. Radiometric performance results of the New Horizons' ALICE UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Scherrer, John; Stern, S. Alan

    2005-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and calibration results of the New Horizons' ALICE flight model. This ALICE is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W), ultraviolet spectrograph based on the ALICE instrument now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft. Its primary job will be to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition can be determined for the first time. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. Detailed radiometric performance results of the ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  11. [Mapping stakeholders' preferences in prioritization criteria for horizon scanning in healthcare technologies].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Aline do; Vidal, Avila Teixeira; Almeida, Rosimary Terezinha de

    2016-08-01

    Filtration and prioritization are two basics steps in horizon scanning systems. This article aimed to map stakeholders' preferences in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) regarding filtration and prioritization criteria. Two filtration criteria (time horizon and innovation) and eight prioritization criteria (relevance to epidemiology, health policies, and clinical practice; potential impact on SUS budget, healthcare providers' costs, and mortality; safety; and legal, ethical, and social aspects) were selected. Multiple correspondence analysis was used to map stakeholders' preferences within and between groups. Two groups were more homogeneous and determinant for selection of prioritization criteria. Stakeholders' professional experience had more influence than institutional affiliations. The approach showed transparent criteria selection and analysis of stakeholders' individual preferences. PMID:27487444

  12. Einstein Revisited - Gravity in Curved Spacetime Without Event Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiter, Darryl

    2000-04-01

    In terms of covariant derivatives with respect to flat background spacetimes upon which the physical curved spacetime is imposed (1), covariant conservation of energy momentum requires, via the Bianchi Identity, that the Einstein tensor be equated to the matter energy momentum tensor. However the Einstein tensor covariantly splits (2) into two tensor parts: (a) a term proportional to the gravitational stress energy momentum tensor, and (b) an anti-symmetric tensor which obeys a covariant 4-divergence identity called the Freud Identity. Hence covariant conservation of energy momentum requires, via the Freud Identity, that the Freud tensor be equal to a constant times the matter energy momentum tensor. The resultant field equations (3) agree with the Einstein equations to first order, but differ in higher orders (4) such that black holes are replaced by "red holes" i.e., dense objects collapsed inside of their photon orbits with no event horizons. (1) Rosen, N., (1963), Ann. Phys. v22, 1; (2) Rund, H., (1991), Alg. Grps. & Geom. v8, 267; (3) Yilmaz, Hl, (1992), Nuo. Cim. v107B, 946; (4) Roberstson, S., (1999),Ap.J. v515, 365.

  13. Air quality implications of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Atlas, Elliot L.; Bahreini, Roya; Blake, Donald R.; Brioude, Jerome; de Gouw, Joost A.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Frost, Gregory J.; Holloway, John S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Langridge, Justin M.; Lueb, Rich A.; McKeen, Stuart A.; Meagher, James F.; Meinardi, Simone; Neuman, J. Andrew; Nowak, John B.; Parrish, David D.; Peischl, Jeff; Perring, Anne E.; Pollack, Ilana B.; Roberts, James M.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Spackman, J. Ryan; Warneke, Carsten; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, a wide range of gas and aerosol species were measured from an aircraft around, downwind, and away from the DWH site. Additional hydrocarbon measurements were made from ships in the vicinity. Aerosol particles of respirable sizes were on occasions a significant air quality issue for populated areas along the Gulf Coast. Yields of organic aerosol particles and emission factors for other atmospheric pollutants were derived for the sources from the spill, recovery, and cleanup efforts. Evaporation and subsequent secondary chemistry produced organic particulate matter with a mass yield of 8 ± 4% of the oil mixture reaching the water surface. Approximately 4% by mass of oil burned on the surface was emitted as soot particles. These yields can be used to estimate the effects on air quality for similar events as well as for this spill at other times without these data. Whereas emission of soot from burning surface oil was large during the episodic burns, the mass flux of secondary organic aerosol to the atmosphere was substantially larger overall. We use a regional air quality model to show that some observed enhancements in organic aerosol concentration along the Gulf Coast were likely due to the DWH spill. In the presence of evaporating hydrocarbons from the oil, NOx emissions from the recovery and cleanup operations produced ozone. PMID:22205764

  14. An Experiment to Detect Lunar Horizon Glow with the Lunar Orbit Laser Altimeter Laser Ranging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Barker, Michael; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; McClanahan, Timothy P.; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-04-01

    Lunar horizon glow (LHG) was an observation by the Apollo astronauts of a brightening of the horizon around the time of sunrise. The effect has yet to be fully explained or confirmed by instruments on lunar orbiting spacecraft despite several attempts. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft carries the laser altimeter (LOLA) instrument which has a 2.5 cm aperture telescope for Earth-based laser ranging (LR) mounted and bore-sighted with the high gain antenna (HGA). The LR telescope is connected to LOLA by a fiber-glass cable to one of its 5 detectors. For the LGH experiments the LR telescope is pointed toward the horizon shortly before lunar sunrise with the intent of observing any forward scattering of sunlight due to the presence of dust or particles in the field of view. Initially, the LR telescope is pointed at the dark lunar surface, which provides a measure of the dark count, and moves toward the lunar limb so as to measure the brightness of the sky just above the lunar limb immediately prior to lunar sunrise. At no time does the sun shine directly into the LR telescope, although the LR telescope is pointed as close to the sun as the 1.75-degree field of view permits. Experiments show that the LHG signal seen by the astronauts can be detected with a four-second integration of the noise counts.

  15. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  16. Genesis of petroduric and petrocalcic horizons in Latinamerica volcanic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantin, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Introduction. In Latinamerica, from Mexico to Chile, there are indurated volcanic soils horizons, named 'tepetate' in Mexico or cangahua in the Andes Mountains. Apart from original volcanic tuffs, these horizons were produced by pedogenesis: either through a former weathering of volcanic ash layers into fragic and later to petrocalcic horizons; or after a former soil formation through a second process of transformation from clayey volcanic soils to silicified petroduric horizons. This oral presentation will briefly deal with the formation of petroduric horizons in Mexico and petrocalcic horizon in Ecuador. Petroduric horizon genesis in Mexico. A soil climato-toposequence, near to Veracruz (Rossignol & Quantin, 1997), shows downwards an evolution from a ferralic Nitisol to a petroduric Durisol. A Durisol profile comports these successive horizons: at the top A and Eg, then columnar Btg-sim, laminar Bt-sim , prismatic Bsim, plinthite Cg, over andesite lava flow. Among its main features are especially recorded: clay mineralogy, microscopy and HRTEM. These data show: an increase in cristobalite at the expenses of 0.7 nm halloysite in Egsiltans, laminar Bt-sim, around or inside the columns or prisms of Btg-sim and Bsimhorizons. HRTEM (Elsass & al 2000) on ultra thin sections reveals an 'epigenesis' of clay sheets by amorphous silica, to form successively A-opal, Ct-opal and microcrystalline cristobalite. From these data and some groundwater chemical analyses, a scenario of duripan formation from a past clayey Nitisol is inferred: clay eluviation-illuviation process? alternate redoximorphy? clay degradation, Al leaching and Si accumulation, to form successively A-opal, Ct-opal and cristobalite. Petrocalcic horizon genesis in Ecuador. A soil climato-toposequence on pyroclastic flows, near to Bolivar in Ecuador (Quantin & Zebrowski, 1997), shows downwards the evolution from fragic-eutric-vitric Cambisols to petrocalcic-vitric Phaeozems, at the piedmont under semi

  17. Intrinsic geometry of a tidally deformed Kerr horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The intrinsic metric of a tidally deformed black-hole horizon can be presented in a coordinate system adapted to the horizon's null generators, with one coordinate acting as a running parameter along each generator, and two coordinates acting as constant generator labels. The metric is invariant under reparametrizations of the generators, and as such the horizon's intrinsic geometry is known to be gauge invariant. We consider a Kerr black hole deformed by a slowly-evolving external tidal field, and describe the intrinsic geometry of its event horizon in terms of the electric and magnetic tidal moments that characterize the tidal environment. When the black hole is slowly rotating, the horizon's geometry can be described in terms of a deviation from an otherwise spherical surface, and the deformation can be characterized by gauge invariant Love numbers. Some aspects of this tidal deformation have direct analogues in Newtonian physics. Some do not, and I will describe the similarities and differences between the tidal deformation of rotating black holes in general relativity and rotating fluid bodies in Newtonian physics.

  18. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto’s Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, David P.; Linscott, Ivan; Tyler, Len; Bird, Mike; Paetzold, Martin; Strobel, Darrell; Summers, Mike; Woods, Will; Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Olkin, Cathy; Young, Leslie; Ennico, Kimberly; Gladstone, Randy; Greathouse, Tommy; Kammer, Josh; Parker, Alex; Parker, Joel; Retherford, Kurt; Schindhelm, Eric; Singer, Kelsi; Steffl, Andrew; Tsang, Con; Versteeg, Maarten

    2015-11-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto’s lower atmosphere. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters. This work is supported by the NASA New Horizons Mission.

  19. New Horizons: Overview of Results From and Plans After the Exploration of The Pluto System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Young, Leslie; Ennico, Kimberly; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, John R.; McKinnon, William B.; Grundy, Will; Gladstone, Randy; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Bagenal, Fran; Summers, Michael; New Horizons Team

    2016-10-01

    Essentially all of the data from the New Horizons Pluto system flyby that culminated in July 2015 is expected to be on Earth by the time of this meeting. As of mid-June 2016, about 75% of those data have been received. All near encounter observations downlinked so far have been examined and were determined to be successful; engineering data from the remaining observations yet to be downlinked indicates they were all successful as well. The first Planetary Data System (PDS) Pluto system delivery has been made; a second PDS delivery is planned for October, with still more deliveries leading to complete and final dataset archiving by late 2017. Numerous scientific results have been obtained, and over 40 scientific papers have been published or submitted by mid-June 2016. This invited review will examine the most interesting geological, compositional, atmospheric, and plasma results obtained about Pluto, Charon and their small moons, and will go on to explore the implications of key results for understanding dwarf planets in general and the origin of the Pluto system in specific. New Horizons is healthy and operating nominally. If its Kuiper Belt Extended Mission is approved, numerous KBO and heliospheric observations are planned for 2016 and beyond, including the very close flyby of the cold, classical KBO 2014 MU69 on 1 January 2019. We summarize these and other plans for New Horizons.

  20. Stationary holographic plasma quenches and numerical methods for non-killing horizons.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Pau; Wiseman, Toby

    2013-04-26

    We explore use of the harmonic Einstein equations to numerically find stationary black holes where the problem is posed on an ingoing slice that extends into the interior of the black hole. Requiring no boundary conditions at the horizon beyond smoothness of the metric, this method may be applied for horizons that are not Killing. As a nontrivial illustration we find black holes which, via AdS-CFT, describe a time-independent CFT plasma flowing through a static spacetime which asymptotes to Minkowski in the flow's past and future, with a varying spatial geometry in between. These are the first nonperturbative examples of stationary black holes which do not have Killing horizons. When the CFT spacetime slowly varies, the CFT stress tensor derived from gravity is well described by viscous hydrodynamics. For fast variation it is not, and the solutions are stationary analogs of dynamical quenches, with the plasma being suddenly driven out of equilibrium. We find evidence these flows become unstable for sufficiently strong quenches, and speculate the instability may be turbulent.