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Sample records for 103mrh spin-density wave

  1. Spin Density Wave Phase Diagram in Thin Cr(110) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli; Freelon, B. K.; Koh, H.; Rossnagel, K.; Kevan, S. D.

    2004-03-01

    Using angle-resolved photoemission, we have mapped the antiferromagnetic phase diagram of Cr(110) thin films grown on Mo(110) and W(110) substrates systematically as a function of both film thickness and temperature. We find commensurate and incommensurate spin density wave and paramagnetic phases that are separated by nearly continuous transitions. We determine how the spin density wave band gap evolves near the Fermi level through these phases. Our results suggest a simple model to explain the delicate interplay between commensurate and incommensurate phases that involves a balance between spin density wave stabilization energy and surface and interface magnetic anisotropies.

  2. Electro-gravity spin density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikov, A. G.

    dimension N) under the Conformal Gauge Theory of Gravity (CGTG), here is considered an exact cosmological solution with Friedman’s asymptotic in the form of conformal flat Fock’s metrics at large times, describing the stage of decay on a cold dust-like medium of do-not-interacting-among-themselves particles and a light-like isotropic radiation. It is shown that at high times, indeed, the process of enlarging the space-time in the model metrics Friedman conformal is equivalent to Minkowski space with a gradient torsion trace in the CGTG Newtonian limit, accompanied by a polarization effect separation of electric charges induced by an electric field E⇀F is manifested in the formation of plasma-like medium with a zero complete electric charge, that in the later stages of evolution is identical to the Fock’s model of a cold dust-like medium of do-not-interacting-among-themselves particles moving here with the same speed. The trace of torsion on the CGTG formula is freezing into an electromagnetic field spin tensor trace density and E⇀F defined inside a spherical surface, moving at the speed of light, on which experiencing a gap. Therefore, this decision takes the form of an electro-gravity spin density wave, as performed in kinematic and dynamic close connection conditions for theorems on spin shock waves with spin flip at the front of the wave, moving at the speed of light in a vacuum. The theoretical dependence of electro-gravity wave energy output from the size of the emitting object is received. When applied to GRBs, this can give a new mechanism of nonthermal gamma rays production.

  3. Spin density waves in dilute CuMn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W. ); Tsunoda, Y. )

    1993-05-15

    Neutron scattering studies on concentrated CuMn alloys show static spin density waves (SDW) that are incommensurate with the lattice and which become dynamic above the freezing temperature [ital T][sub [ital f

  4. Spin density waves in dilute CuMn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W. ); Tsunoda, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies on concentrated CuMn alloys show static spin density waves (SDW) that are incommensurate with the lattice and which become dynamic above the freezing temperature T[sub f] with a dispersion relation that is essentially vertical. We have examined the existence of both the static and the dynamic SDW in dilute CuMn alloys where the Mn atoms may be separated beyond the range of SDW stability. There is no such cutoff range in the Overhauser SDW model where the transition temperature is simply linear with concentration, but a recent calculation by loffe and Feigel'man gives magnetic order that does depend on an interaction range and the density of spins on the lattice. For CuMn alloys, they obtain spin-glass ordering at low Mn concentration with a crossover to short-range helical order near 10% Mn. Our neutron scattering measurements were made on single crystals of CuMn alloys containing 1.4 and 3.0% Mn. Elastic scans along <1[zeta]0> at temperatures well below T[sub f] yield the same type of intensity distribution as that previously observed for the more concentrated alloys and show the existence of static SDW at dilutions down to 1.4% Mn. Inelastic scans in the same Q region for the Cu-3% Mn alloy clearly show the presence of dynamic SDW at temperatures up to T/T[sub f] = 7.5. These results favor the SDW model of Overhauser as the best description of the magnetic order in dilute CuMn alloys.

  5. Spin density waves in dilute CuMn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.; Tsunoda, Y.

    1992-12-01

    Neutron scattering studies on concentrated CuMn alloys show static spin density waves (SDW) that are incommensurate with the lattice and which become dynamic above the freezing temperature T{sub f} with a dispersion relation that is essentially vertical. We have examined the existence of both the static and the dynamic SDW in dilute CuMn alloys where the Mn atoms may be separated beyond the range of SDW stability. There is no such cutoff range in the Overhauser SDW model where the transition temperature is simply linear with concentration, but a recent calculation by loffe and Feigel`man gives magnetic order that does depend on an interaction range and the density of spins on the lattice. For CuMn alloys, they obtain spin-glass ordering at low Mn concentration with a crossover to short-range helical order near 10% Mn. Our neutron scattering measurements were made on single crystals of CuMn alloys containing 1.4 and 3.0% Mn. Elastic scans along <1{zeta}0> at temperatures well below T{sub f} yield the same type of intensity distribution as that previously observed for the more concentrated alloys and show the existence of static SDW at dilutions down to 1.4% Mn. Inelastic scans in the same Q region for the Cu-3% Mn alloy clearly show the presence of dynamic SDW at temperatures up to T/T{sub f} = 7.5. These results favor the SDW model of Overhauser as the best description of the magnetic order in dilute CuMn alloys.

  6. Local spin-density-wave order inside vortex cores in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Vivek; Koshelev, Alexei E.

    2015-08-13

    Coexistence of antiferromagnetic order with superconductivity in many families of newly discovered iron-based superconductors has renewed interest to this old problem. Due to competition between the two types of order, one can expect appearance of the antiferromagnetism inside the cores of the vortices generated by the external magnetic field. The structure of a vortex in type II superconductors holds significant importance from the theoretical and the application points of view. In this paper, we consider the internal vortex structure in a two-band s± superconductor near a spin-density-wave instability. We treat the problem in a completely self-consistent manner within the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism. We study the structure of the s± superconducting order and magnetic field-induced spin-density-wave order near an isolated vortex. Finally, we examine the effect of this spin-density-wave state inside the vortex cores on the local density of states.

  7. Field-induced spin-density wave in (TMTSF)2NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignolles, David; Audouard, Alain; Nardone, Marc; Brossard, Luc; Bouguessa, Sabrina; Fabre, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    Interlayer magnetoresistance of the Bechgaard salt (TMTSF)2NO3 is investigated up to 50 T under pressures of a few kilobars. This compound, the Fermi surface of which is quasi-two-dimensional at low temperature, is a semimetal under pressure. Nevertheless, a field-induced spin-density wave is evidenced at 8.5 kbars above ˜20T . This state is characterized by a drastically different spectrum of the quantum oscillations compared to the low-pressure spin-density wave state.

  8. Spin density wave fluctuations and p-wave pairing in Sr2RuO4.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jia-Wei; Rice, T M; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2013-04-19

    Recently, a debate has arisen over which of the two distinct parts of the Fermi surface of Sr(2)RuO(4) is the active part for the chiral p-wave superconductivity exhibited. Early theories proposed p-wave pairing on the two-dimensional γ band, whereas a recent proposal focuses on the one-dimensional (α, β) bands whose nesting pockets are the source of the strong incommensurate spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We apply a renormalization group theory to study quasi-one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard chains and explain the form of SDW fluctuations, reconciling the absence of long-range order with their nesting Fermi surface. The mutual exclusion of p-wave pairing and SDW fluctuations in repulsive Hubbard chains favors the assignment of the two-dimensional γ band as the source of p-wave pairing.

  9. Electrical effects of spin density wave quantization and magnetic domain walls in chromium.

    PubMed

    Kummamuru, Ravi K; Soh, Yeong-Ah

    2008-04-17

    The role of magnetic domains (and the walls between domains) in determining the electrical properties of ferromagnetic materials has been investigated in great detail for many years, not least because control over domains offers a means of manipulating electron spin to control charge transport in 'spintronic' devices. In contrast, much less attention has been paid to the effects of domains and domain walls on the electrical properties of antiferromagnets: antiferromagnetic domains show no net external magnetic moment, and so are difficult to manipulate or probe. Here we describe electrical measurements on chromium--a simple metal and quintessential spin density wave antiferromagnet--that show behaviour directly related to spin density wave formation and the presence of antiferromagnetic domains. Two types of thermal hysteresis are seen in both longitudinal and Hall resistivity: the first can be explained by the quantization of spin density waves due to the finite film thickness (confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements) and the second by domain-wall scattering of electrons. We also observe the striking influence of the electrical lead configuration (a mesoscopic effect) on the resistivity of macroscopic samples in the spin density wave state. Our results are potentially of practical importance, in that they reveal tunable electrical effects of film thickness and domain walls that are as large as the highest seen for ferromagnets.

  10. Spin-wave excitations in the spin-density wave state of doped iron pnictides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar

    2017-10-18

    We investigate spin-wave excitations in the spin-density wave state of doped iron pnictides within a five-orbital model. We find that the excitations along ([Formula: see text])  →  ([Formula: see text]) are very sensitive to dopings whereas they do not exhibit a similar sensitivity along ([Formula: see text])  →  ([Formula: see text]). Secondly, the ellipticity of the elliptical ring-like excitations around ([Formula: see text]) is also very much dependent on doping. Thirdly, the spin-wave spectral weight shifts towards the low-energy region as it moves away from zero doping. We find several features to be in qualitative agreement with the inelastic neutron-scattering measurements for the doped pnictides.

  11. Field-induced spin-density wave beyond hidden order in URu2Si2.

    PubMed

    Knafo, W; Duc, F; Bourdarot, F; Kuwahara, K; Nojiri, H; Aoki, D; Billette, J; Frings, P; Tonon, X; Lelièvre-Berna, E; Flouquet, J; Regnault, L-P

    2016-10-20

    URu2Si2 is one of the most enigmatic strongly correlated electron systems and offers a fertile testing ground for new concepts in condensed matter science. In spite of >30 years of intense research, no consensus on the order parameter of its low-temperature hidden-order phase exists. A strong magnetic field transforms the hidden order into magnetically ordered phases, whose order parameter has also been defying experimental observation. Here, thanks to neutron diffraction under pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T, we identify the field-induced phases of URu2Si2 as a spin-density-wave state. The transition to the spin-density wave represents a unique touchstone for understanding the hidden-order phase. An intimate relationship between this magnetic structure, the magnetic fluctuations and the Fermi surface is emphasized, calling for dedicated band-structure calculations.

  12. Unconventional spin-density wave in Bechgaard salt (TMTSF)2NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basletić, Mario; Korin-Hamzić, Bojana; Maki, Kazumi; Tomić, Silvia

    2007-02-01

    Among many Bechgaard salts, (TMTSF)2NO3 , where TMTSF denotes tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene, exhibits very anomalous low-temperature properties. Unlike the case of the conventional spin-density wave (SDW), (TMTSF)2NO3 undergoes the SDW transition at TC≈9.5K and the low-temperature quasiparticle excitations are gapless. Also, it is known that (TMTSF)2NO3 does not exhibit superconductivity even under pressure, while a field-induced SDW is found in (TMTSF)2NO3 only for P=8.5kbar and B>20T . Here we show that both the angle-dependent magnetoresistance data and the nonlinear Hall resistance of (TMTSF)2NO3 at ambient pressure are interpreted satisfactorily in terms of an unconventional spin-density wave. Based on these facts, we propose a new phase diagram for Bechgaard salts.

  13. Field-induced spin-density wave beyond hidden order in URu2Si2

    PubMed Central

    Knafo, W.; Duc, F.; Bourdarot, F.; Kuwahara, K.; Nojiri, H.; Aoki, D.; Billette, J.; Frings, P.; Tonon, X.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Flouquet, J.; Regnault, L.-P.

    2016-01-01

    URu2Si2 is one of the most enigmatic strongly correlated electron systems and offers a fertile testing ground for new concepts in condensed matter science. In spite of >30 years of intense research, no consensus on the order parameter of its low-temperature hidden-order phase exists. A strong magnetic field transforms the hidden order into magnetically ordered phases, whose order parameter has also been defying experimental observation. Here, thanks to neutron diffraction under pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T, we identify the field-induced phases of URu2Si2 as a spin-density-wave state. The transition to the spin-density wave represents a unique touchstone for understanding the hidden-order phase. An intimate relationship between this magnetic structure, the magnetic fluctuations and the Fermi surface is emphasized, calling for dedicated band-structure calculations. PMID:27762260

  14. Field-induced spin-density wave beyond hidden order in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knafo, W.; Duc, F.; Bourdarot, F.; Kuwahara, K.; Nojiri, H.; Aoki, D.; Billette, J.; Frings, P.; Tonon, X.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Flouquet, J.; Regnault, L.-P.

    2016-10-01

    URu2Si2 is one of the most enigmatic strongly correlated electron systems and offers a fertile testing ground for new concepts in condensed matter science. In spite of >30 years of intense research, no consensus on the order parameter of its low-temperature hidden-order phase exists. A strong magnetic field transforms the hidden order into magnetically ordered phases, whose order parameter has also been defying experimental observation. Here, thanks to neutron diffraction under pulsed magnetic fields up to 40 T, we identify the field-induced phases of URu2Si2 as a spin-density-wave state. The transition to the spin-density wave represents a unique touchstone for understanding the hidden-order phase. An intimate relationship between this magnetic structure, the magnetic fluctuations and the Fermi surface is emphasized, calling for dedicated band-structure calculations.

  15. Upper bounds of spin-density wave energies in the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, F.; Bernu, B.; Baguet, L.; Holzmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Studying the jellium model in the Hartree-Fock approximation, Overhauser has shown that spin-density waves (SDWs) can lower the energy of the Fermi gas, but it is still unknown whether these SDWs are actually relevant for the phase diagram. In this paper, we give a more complete description of SDW states. We show that a modification of the Overhauser ansatz explains the behavior of the jellium at high density compatibly with previous Hartree-Fock simulations.

  16. Spin-density-wave antiferromagnetism of Cr in Fe/Cr(001) superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fullerton, E.E.; Bader, S.D.; Robertson, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave (SDW) order of Cr layers in Fe/Cr(001) superlattices was investigated by neutron scattering. For Cr thickness 51-190 {Angstrom}, a transverse SDW is formed for all temperatures below Neel temperature with a single wavevector Q normal to the layers. A coherent magnetic structure forms with the nodes of the SDW near the Fe-Cr interfaces. For thinner Cr layers, the magnetic scattering can be described by commensurate antiferromagnetic order.

  17. Local spin-density-wave order inside vortex cores in multiband superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Mishra, Vivek; Koshelev, Alexei E.

    2015-08-13

    Coexistence of antiferromagnetic order with superconductivity in many families of newly discovered iron-based superconductors has renewed interest to this old problem. Due to competition between the two types of order, one can expect appearance of the antiferromagnetism inside the cores of the vortices generated by the external magnetic field. The structure of a vortex in type II superconductors holds significant importance from the theoretical and the application points of view. In this paper, we consider the internal vortex structure in a two-band s± superconductor near a spin-density-wave instability. We treat the problem in a completely self-consistent manner within the quasiclassicalmore » Eilenberger formalism. We study the structure of the s± superconducting order and magnetic field-induced spin-density-wave order near an isolated vortex. Finally, we examine the effect of this spin-density-wave state inside the vortex cores on the local density of states.« less

  18. Field-induced spin density wave and spiral phases in a layered antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Stone, Matthew B.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Garlea, Vasile O.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Here we determine the low-field ordered magnetic phases of the S=1 dimerized antiferromagnet Ba3Mn2O8 using single crystal neutron diffraction. We find that for magnetic fields between μ0H=8.80 T and 10.56 T applied along themore » $$1\\bar{1}0$$ direction the system exhibits spin density wave order with incommensurate wave vectors of type (η,η,ε). For μ0H > 10.56 T, the magnetic order changes to a spiral phase with incommensurate wave vectors only along the [hh0] direction. For both field induced ordered phases, the magnetic moments are lying in the plane perpendicular to the field direction. Finally, the nature of these two transitions is fundamentally different: the low-field transition is a second order transition to a spin-density wave ground state, while the one at higher field, toward the spiral phase, is of first order.« less

  19. Field-induced spin density wave and spiral phases in a layered antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Matthew B.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Garlea, Vasile O.; Grenier, B.; Ressouche, E.; Samulon, Eric C.; Fisher, Ian R.

    2015-07-28

    Here we determine the low-field ordered magnetic phases of the S=1 dimerized antiferromagnet Ba3Mn2O8 using single crystal neutron diffraction. We find that for magnetic fields between μ0H=8.80 T and 10.56 T applied along the $1\\bar{1}0$ direction the system exhibits spin density wave order with incommensurate wave vectors of type (η,η,ε). For μ0H > 10.56 T, the magnetic order changes to a spiral phase with incommensurate wave vectors only along the [hh0] direction. For both field induced ordered phases, the magnetic moments are lying in the plane perpendicular to the field direction. Finally, the nature of these two transitions is fundamentally different: the low-field transition is a second order transition to a spin-density wave ground state, while the one at higher field, toward the spiral phase, is of first order.

  20. The η-Pairing Superconductivity in Spin-Density Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    X, M. Qiu; Z, J. Wang

    1993-10-01

    In this letter, we propose a modified attractive Hubbard model at half filling that can exhibit superconductivity through η-pairing mechanism in spin-density wave representation and derive a concise relationship between the energy disparity and the single-particle energy spectrum. This relationship, in the two limits of U, clearly shows that the system does not display superconductivity for very low doping concentration. but demonstrates superconductivity when the doping concentration exceeds a certain critical value. This conclusion is in qualitative agreement with the familiar experiments on high-Tc superconductivity.

  1. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A.; Fawcett, E.; Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G.

    1992-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  2. High-energy spin-density-wave correlated fluctuations in paramagnetic Cr + 5 at. % V

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, S.A. . Dept. of Physics); Fawcett, E. . Dept. of Physics); Elmiger, M.W.; Shirane, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic fluctuations, termed spin-density-wave (SDW) paramagnons, in the nearly antiferromagnetic alloy Cr + 5 at.%V are extended up in energy to about 80 MeV. These fluctuating spin-spin correlations occur at incommensurate positions, corresponding to the SDW wavevector Q. Their characteristic energy is at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the magnetic fluctuations seen in the paramagnetic phase of pure Cr, but their intensity is more than two orders of magnitude smaller. We find that the dynamic susceptibility decreases by about 50% between temperature T = 10K and 300K.

  3. Superconductivity and magnetic field induced spin density waves in the (TMTTF)2X family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balicas, L.; Behnia, K.; Kang, W.; Canadell, E.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Jérome, D.; Ribault, M.; Fabre, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements in the quasi one dimensional (Q-1-D) organic conductor (TMTTF)2Br at pressures up to 26 kbar, clown to 0.45 K in magnetic fields up to 19 T along the c^{ast} direction. It is found that a superconducting ground state is stabilized under 26 kbar at T_C = 0.8 K. No magnetic field induced spin density wave (FISDW) transitions are observed below 19T unlike other Q-1-D superconductors pertaining to the selenium series. The computed amplitude of the interchain coupling along transverse directions is unable to explain the missing; FISDW instability.

  4. Nodal quasiparticles and the onset of spin-density-wave order in cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir; Vicari, Ettore

    2008-07-11

    We present a theory for the onset of spin-density-wave order in the superconducting ground state of the cuprates. We compute the scaling dimensions of allowed perturbations of a "relativistic" fixed point with O4 x O(3) symmetry, including those associated with the fermionic nodal Bogoliubov quasiparticles. Analyses of up to six loops show that all perturbations with square lattice symmetry are likely irrelevant. We demonstrate that the fermion spectral functions are primarily damped by the coupling to fluctuations of a composite field with Ising nematic order. A number of other experimental implications are also discussed.

  5. Physics in Superconductors with a Spin Density Wave: Quasiclassical Description of a two-band Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Andreas; Volkov, Anatoly; Efetov, Konstantin

    2014-03-01

    Using a simple model of a two-band superconductor with a spin density wave we investigate the physics in the coexistence regime of the two order parameters, i.e., the spin density wave (SDW) and the superconductivity (SC). We use the quasiclassical Green's functions approach. Our findings concern, i.a., the Knight shift, the proximity and the Josephson effects, and the time and spatial dependence of the magnetic order parameter near the quantum critical point. In particular we find a solution of the stationary equation which describes a domain wall in the magnetic structure. In the center of the domain wall we find a local enhancement of SC. Investigating the stability of a uniform commensurate SDW we obtain the values of the doping parameter at which the first order transition into the state with m = 0 takes place or to the state with an inhomogeneous SDW occurs. We appreciate the financial support from the DFG by the Project EF 11/8-1.

  6. Controlling Spin-Density Wave Periodicity in Thin Cr1-x Vx Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupin, Oleg; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chromium is an itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin-density wave (SDW) ground state driven by a nesting of Fermi surface sheets around the Gamma and H points of the Brillouin zone. Periodicity of the SDW plays an important role in mediating magnetic interactions in magnetic multilayer structures providing a giant magnetoresistance effect and potentially interesting for application in spintronic devices. Therefore control of SDW in thin chromium films is of the high importance. It requires a detailed understanding of phenomena related to stabilization of SDW. We used angle-resolved photoemission to characterize spin-density wave and Fermi surface topology in thin Cr1-x Vx films as a function of the film thickness, temperature, composition and hydrogen surface coverage. A key feature of our results is the ability to control the magnetic structure of thin films of Cr with an external perturbation: balancing the surface energetic interactions favored commensurate state of SDW vs. the energy associated with Fermi surface topology stabilizing SDW incommensurate phase in the bulk.

  7. Electronic and magnetic properties of spiral spin-density-wave states in transition-metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer, M.; Ruiz-Díaz, P.; Pastor, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of one-dimensional (1D) 3 d transition-metal nanowires are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The relative stability of collinear and noncollinear (NC) ground-state magnetic orders in V, Mn, and Fe monoatomic chains is quantified by computing the frozen-magnon dispersion relation Δ E (q ⃗) as a function of the spin-density-wave vector q ⃗. The dependence on the local environment of the atoms is analyzed by varying systematically the lattice parameter a of the chains. Electron correlation effects are explored by comparing local spin-density and generalized-gradient approximations to the exchange and correlation functional. Results are given for Δ E (q ⃗) , the local magnetic moments μ⃗i at atom i , the magnetization-vector density m ⃗(r ⃗) , and the local electronic density of states ρi σ(ɛ ) . The frozen-magnon dispersion relations are analyzed from a local perspective. Effective exchange interactions Ji j between the local magnetic moments μ⃗i and μ⃗j are derived by fitting the ab initio Δ E (q ⃗) to a classical 1D Heisenberg model. The dominant competing interactions Ji j at the origin of the NC magnetic order are identified. The interplay between the various Ji j is revealed as a function of a in the framework of the corresponding magnetic phase diagrams.

  8. Visualizing the microscopic coexistence of spin density wave and superconductivity in underdoped NaFe₁₋xCoxAs.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Zhou, Xiaodong; Ruan, Wei; Wang, Aifeng; Chen, Xianhui; Lee, Dung-Hai; Wang, Yayu

    2013-01-01

    Although the origin of high temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides is still under debate, it is widely believed that magnetic interactions or fluctuations have a crucial role in triggering Cooper pairing. A key issue regarding the iron pnictide phase diagram is whether long-range magnetic order can coexist with superconductivity microscopically. Here we use scanning tunnelling microscopy to investigate the local electronic structure of underdoped NaFe1-xCoxAs near the spin density wave and superconducting phase boundary. Spatially resolved spectroscopy directly reveals both the spin density wave and superconducting gaps at the same atomic location, providing compelling evidence for the microscopic coexistence of the two phases. The strengths of the two orders are shown to anti-correlate with each other, indicating the competition between them. This work implies that Cooper pairing in the iron pnictides can occur when portions of the Fermi surface are already gapped by the spin density wave order.

  9. Tunneling spectroscopy of normal metals with charge-density or spin-density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gabovich, A.M.; Voitenko, A.I.

    1995-09-01

    Tunneling current-voltage characteristics (CVC) are calculated for symmetrical and nonsymmetrical junctions made up of metals with charge-density or spin-density waves and a distortion of the Fermi-surface nesting sections described by the order parameter {Sigma}. For the symmetrical junction the CVC are odd functions of the bias voltage {ital V} and do not depend on the sign of {Sigma}. The differential conductivities have root singularities at {ital eV}={Sigma} and jumps at {ital eV}=2{Sigma}. For the nonsymmetrical junction the CVC depend on the sign of {Sigma}. Relevant differential conductivities are nonsymmetrical, with one branch being smooth and another having a root singularity at {ital eV}={Sigma}. A qualitative agreement exists with the tunneling and point-contact spectroscopy measurements for layered dichalcogenides, NbSe{sub 3}, and URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}.

  10. Influence of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave on the magnetoresistance of Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Yeong-Ah; Kummamuru, Ravi

    2007-03-01

    We have performed magnetotransport measurements on Cr films that are 350, 56, 43 and 18 nm thick. The magnetoresistance with the field perpendicular to the film plane shows a clear increase below the Neel temperature and is accompanied by an anomalous negative magnetoresistance at the Neel temperature. The orbital magnetoresistance satisfies the Kohler's rule in the paramagnetic state but violates it in the Neel state. The Hall resistance shows temperature dependence in the paramagnetic state, which was previously suggested to be indicative of a pseudogap [1]. We explain the above phenomena by the evolution of the electronic structure due to the formation of antiferromagnetic spin density wave, the influence of antiferromagnetic domain walls, and the existence of more than one scattering time. [1] ``Quantum phase transition in a common metal'', A. Yeh, Y-A. Soh, J. Brooke, G. Aeppli, T. F. Rosenbaum, and S. M. Hayden, Nature (London) 419, 459 (2002).

  11. Quantum oscillations in the anomalous spin density wave state of FeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Daniel J.; Eckberg, Chris; Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Limin; Hodovanets, Halyna; Graf, Dave; Parker, David; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-08-01

    Quantum oscillations in the binary antiferromagnetic metal FeAs are presented and compared to theoretical predictions for the electronic band structure in the anomalous spin density wave state of this material. Demonstrating a method for growing single crystals out of Bi flux, we utilize the highest quality FeAs to perform torque magnetometry experiments up to 35 T, using rotations of field angle in two planes to provide evidence for one electron and one hole band in the magnetically ordered state. The resulting picture agrees with previous experimental evidence for multiple carriers at low temperatures, but the exact Fermi surface shape differs from predictions, suggesting that correlations play a role in deviation from ab initio theory and cause up to a fourfold enhancement in the effective carrier mass.

  12. Polarization in a Rashba strip coupled with a spiral spin density wave.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Lang

    2010-06-02

    The magnetoelectric effect in a Rashba strip is studied, which is coupled to a spiral spin density wave (SDW). The polarization, if it can be induced, must be perpendicular to the plane constructed by the helix axis and the wavevector of the SDW. With a gate voltage on the strip varied, the polarization fluctuates quickly and can be switched from a positive to a negative value or vice versa. Furthermore, reversing either the helix axis or the wavevector leads to the reversal of polarization. The main contributions to the polarization come from the eigenstates in the vicinity of the von Hove singularities. At half-filling, contributions from different eigenstates offset each other exactly. With the Rashba spin-orbit coupling increased, the averaged polarization displays an oscillatory behavior due to the spin precession, whereas with the exchange coupling increased, the averaged polarization increases first then decreases. Considering the size effect on the polarization, the spin precession length is an important characteristic length.

  13. Dynamical spin-density waves in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Qu, Chunlei; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic spin-orbit (SO) coupling, an important ingredient for quantum simulation of many exotic condensed matter physics, has recently attracted considerable attention. The static and dynamic properties of a SO-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) have been extensively studied in both theory and experiment. Here we numerically investigate the generation and propagation of a dynamical spin-density wave (SDW) in a SO-coupled BEC using a fast moving Gaussian-shaped barrier. We find that the SDW wavelength is sensitive to the barrier's velocity while varies slightly with the barrier's peak potential or width. We qualitatively explain the generation of SDW by considering a rectangular barrier in a one-dimensional system. Our results may motivate future experimental and theoretical investigations of rich dynamics in the SO-coupled BEC induced by a moving barrier.

  14. ^77Se NMR in the Spin Density Wave state of (TMTSF)_2PF_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valfells, S.; Kuhns, P.; Kleinhammes, A.; Moulton, W.; Brooks, J. S.; Anzai, H.; Takasaki, S.; Yamada, J.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured the linewidth, T1 and T2 of the ^77Se nuclei in the quasi-1D conductor (TMTSF)_2PF6 above and below the Spin Density Wave transition temperature, T_SDW ≈ 12 K, at ambient pressure. We observe four distinct lines at T>T_SDW attributable to four non-equivalent Selenium sites and shifted by Δ ω / ω ≈ 0.7, 1.9, 3.8 and 4.5 × 10^4, respectively; they broaden to form a single, broad (≈ 900 kHz) line below T_SDW. The data, however, show no evidence of additional phase transitions at T

  15. Switching dynamics of the spin density wave in superconducting CeCoIn5

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Duk Y.; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Bauer, Eric D.; ...

    2017-06-21

    The ordering wave vector Q of a spin density wave (SDW), stabilized within the superconducting state of CeCoIn5 in a high magnetic field, has been shown to be hypersensitive to the direction of the field. Q can be switched from a nodal direction of the d-wave superconducting order parameter to a perpendicular node by rotating the in-plane magnetic field through the antinodal direction within a fraction of a degree. In this paper, we address the dynamics of the switching of Q. We use a free-energy functional based on the magnetization density, which describes the condensation of magnetic fluctuations of nodalmore » quasiparticles, and show that the switching process includes closing of the SDW gap at one Q and then reopening the SDW gap at another Q perpendicular to the first one. The magnetic field couples to Q through the spin-orbit interaction. Our calculations show that the width of the hysteretic region of switching depends linearly on the deviation of magnetic field from the critical field associated with the SDW transition, consistent with our thermal conductivity measurements. Finally, the agreement between theory and experiment supports our scenario of the hypersensitivity of the Q phase on the direction of magnetic field, as well as the magnon condensation as the origin of the SDW phase in CeCoIn5.« less

  16. Competing spin density wave, collinear, and helical magnetism in Fe1 +xTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, C.; Rodriguez, E. E.; Bourges, P.; Ewings, R. A.; Cao, H.; Chi, S.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Green, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The Fe1 +xTe phase diagram consists of two distinct magnetic structures with collinear order present at low interstitial iron concentrations and a helical phase at large values of x with these phases separated by a Lifshitz point. We use unpolarized single-crystal diffraction to confirm the helical phase for large interstitial iron concentrations and polarized single-crystal diffraction to demonstrate the collinear order for the iron-deficient side of the Fe1 +xTe phase diagram. Polarized neutron inelastic scattering shows that the fluctuations associated with this collinear order are predominately transverse at low-energy transfers, consistent with a localized magnetic moment picture. We then apply neutron inelastic scattering and polarization analysis to investigate the dynamics and structure near the boundary between collinear and helical orders in the Fe1 +xTe phase diagram. We first show that the phase separating collinear and helical orders is characterized by a spin density wave with a single propagation wave vector of (˜0.45 , 0, 0.5). We do not observe harmonics or the presence of a charge density wave. The magnetic fluctuations associated with this wave vector are different from the collinear phase, being strongly longitudinal in nature and correlated anisotropically in the (H ,K ) plane. The excitations preserve the C4 symmetry of the lattice but display different widths in momentum along the two tetragonal directions at low-energy transfers. While the low-energy excitations and minimal magnetic phase diagram can be understood in terms of localized interactions, we suggest that the presence of the density wave phase implies the importance of electronic and orbital properties.

  17. Spin density waves predicted in zigzag puckered phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xianlong; Zeng, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    The pursuit of controlled magnetism in semiconductors has been a persisting goal in condensed matter physics. Recently, Vene (phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene) has been predicted as a new class of 2D-semiconductor with suitable band gap and high carrier mobility. In this work, we investigate the edge magnetism in zigzag puckered Vene nanoribbons (ZVNRs) based on the density functional theory. The band structures of ZVNRs show half-filled bands crossing the Fermi level at the midpoint of reciprocal lattice vectors, indicating a strong Peierls instability. To remove this instability, we consider two different mechanisms, namely, spin density wave (SDW) caused by electron-electron interaction and charge density wave (CDW) caused by electron-phonon coupling. We have found that an antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating state defined by SDW is the ground state of ZVNRs. In particular, SDW in ZVNRs displays several surprising characteristics:1) comparing with other nanoribbon systems, their magnetic moments are antiparallelly arranged at each zigzag edge and almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; 2) comparing with other SDW systems, its magnetic moments and band gap of SDW are unexpectedly large, indicating a higher SDW transition temperature in ZVNRs; 3) SDW can be effectively modified by strains and charge doping, which indicates that ZVNRs have bright prospects in nanoelectronic device.

  18. Spin density waves predicted in zigzag puckered phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xianlong; Zeng, Zhi

    2016-04-15

    The pursuit of controlled magnetism in semiconductors has been a persisting goal in condensed matter physics. Recently, Vene (phosphorene, arsenene and antimonene) has been predicted as a new class of 2D-semiconductor with suitable band gap and high carrier mobility. In this work, we investigate the edge magnetism in zigzag puckered Vene nanoribbons (ZVNRs) based on the density functional theory. The band structures of ZVNRs show half-filled bands crossing the Fermi level at the midpoint of reciprocal lattice vectors, indicating a strong Peierls instability. To remove this instability, we consider two different mechanisms, namely, spin density wave (SDW) caused by electron-electron interaction and charge density wave (CDW) caused by electron-phonon coupling. We have found that an antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating state defined by SDW is the ground state of ZVNRs. In particular, SDW in ZVNRs displays several surprising characteristics:1) comparing with other nanoribbon systems, their magnetic moments are antiparallelly arranged at each zigzag edge and almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; 2) comparing with other SDW systems, its magnetic moments and band gap of SDW are unexpectedly large, indicating a higher SDW transition temperature in ZVNRs; 3) SDW can be effectively modified by strains and charge doping, which indicates that ZVNRs have bright prospects in nanoelectronic device.

  19. Bilayer honeycomb lattice with ultracold atoms: Multiple Fermi surfaces and incommensurate spin density wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Santanu; Sensarma, Rajdeep

    2016-12-01

    We propose an experimental setup using ultracold atoms to implement a bilayer honeycomb lattice with Bernal stacking. In the presence of a potential bias between the layers and at low densities, fermions placed in this lattice form an annular Fermi sea. The presence of two Fermi surfaces leads to interesting patterns in Friedel oscillations and RKKY interactions in the presence of impurities. Furthermore, a repulsive fermion-fermion interaction leads to a Stoner instability towards an incommensurate spin density wave order with a wave vector equal to the thickness of the Fermi sea. The instability occurs at a critical interaction strength which goes down with the density of the fermions. We find that the instability survives interaction renormalization due to vertex corrections and discuss how this can be seen in experiments. We also track the renormalization group flows of the different couplings between the fermionic degrees of freedom, and find that there are no perturbative instabilities, and that Stoner instability is the strongest instability which occurs at a critical threshold value of the interaction. The critical interaction goes to zero as the chemical potential is tuned towards the band bottom.

  20. Quantum critical properties of a metallic spin-density-wave transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Max H.; Schattner, Yoni; Berg, Erez; Trebst, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We report on numerically exact determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the onset of spin-density-wave (SDW) order in itinerant electron systems captured by a sign-problem-free two-dimensional lattice model. Extensive measurements of the SDW correlations in the vicinity of the phase transition reveal that the critical dynamics of the bosonic order parameter are well described by a dynamical critical exponent z =2 , consistent with Hertz-Millis theory, but are found to follow a finite-temperature dependence that does not fit the predicted behavior of the same theory. The presence of critical SDW fluctuations is found to have a strong impact on the fermionic quasiparticles, giving rise to a dome-shaped superconducting phase near the quantum critical point. In the superconducting state we find a gap function that has an opposite sign between the two bands of the model and is nearly constant along the Fermi surface of each band. Above the superconducting Tc, our numerical simulations reveal a nearly temperature and frequency independent self-energy causing a strong suppression of the low-energy quasiparticle weight in the vicinity of the hot spots on the Fermi surface. This indicates a clear breakdown of Fermi liquid theory around these points.

  1. The spin density wave state in (TMTSF)2X under large electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Michael J.

    We have developed a technique to study the conductivity of materials in the limit of large electric fields. The materials that this study focused on are susceptible to damage due to Joule heating in large DC currents. This technique allows the application of electric fields as large as several hundred volts/cm without sample destruction. The duration of the applied current pulses is user selectable and ranges from 10 mus to several hundred seconds. Measurements were conducted with square pulses of duration 300 mus. We have applied this technique to the study of the family of compounds known as the Bechgaard salts ((TMTSF)2X). The material (TMTSF)2PF6 at ambient pressure exhibits metallic behavior above 12 K. Below 12 K the material enters an insulating caused by the formation of a spin density wave (SDW). Below 12 K, it has been observed that the application of small electric fields causes an increase in the conductivity. We have observed that these materials exhibit negative differential resistance when subjected to large electric fields. We have shown that the observed effects are due to self heating of the sample.

  2. Double-Q spin-density wave in iron arsenide superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Allred, J. M.; Taddei, K. M.; Bugaris, D. E.; ...

    2016-01-25

    Elucidating the nature of the magnetic ground state of iron-based superconductors is of paramount importance in unveiling the mechanism behind their high temperature superconductivity. Until recently, it was thought that superconductivity emerges only from an orthorhombic antiferromagnetic stripe phase, which can in principle be described in terms of either localized or itinerant spins. However, we recently reported that tetragonal symmetry is restored inside the magnetically ordered state of certain hole-doped compounds, revealing the existence of a new magnetic phase at compositions close to the onset of superconductivity. Here, we present Mossbauer data that show that half of the iron sitesmore » in this tetragonal phase are non-magnetic, establishing conclusively the existence of a novel magnetic ground state with a non-uniform magnetization that is inconsistent with localized spins. Instead, this state is naturally explained as the interference between two commensurate spin density waves, a rare example of collinear double-Q magnetic order. Finally, our results demonstrate the itinerant character of the magnetism of the iron pnictides, and the primary role played by magnetic degrees of freedom in determining their phase diagram.« less

  3. Double-Q spin-density wave in iron arsenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, J. M.; Taddei, K. M.; Bugaris, D. E.; Krogstad, M. J.; Lapidus, S. H.; Chung, D. Y.; Claus, H.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Brown, D. E.; Kang, J.; Fernandes, R. M.; Eremin, I.; Rosenkranz, S.; Chmaissem, O.; Osborn, R.

    2016-01-25

    Elucidating the nature of the magnetic ground state of iron-based superconductors is of paramount importance in unveiling the mechanism behind their high temperature superconductivity. Until recently, it was thought that superconductivity emerges only from an orthorhombic antiferromagnetic stripe phase, which can in principle be described in terms of either localized or itinerant spins. However, we recently reported that tetragonal symmetry is restored inside the magnetically ordered state of certain hole-doped compounds, revealing the existence of a new magnetic phase at compositions close to the onset of superconductivity. Here, we present Mossbauer data that show that half of the iron sites in this tetragonal phase are non-magnetic, establishing conclusively the existence of a novel magnetic ground state with a non-uniform magnetization that is inconsistent with localized spins. Instead, this state is naturally explained as the interference between two commensurate spin density waves, a rare example of collinear double-Q magnetic order. Finally, our results demonstrate the itinerant character of the magnetism of the iron pnictides, and the primary role played by magnetic degrees of freedom in determining their phase diagram.

  4. Electron states and the spin density wave phase diagram in Cr(1 1 0) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli; Freelon, B. K.; Koh, H.; Bostwick, A.; Rossnagel, K.; Schmid, Andreas; Kevan, S. D.

    2005-04-01

    Chromium films offer an excellent system to study the impact of dimensional confinement on physical properties associated with the spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state observed in bulk materials. These properties are also of some technological importance since chromium is a common component of thin film magnetic structures. We prepared chromium (1 1 0) films of high crystalline quality on a W(1 1 0) substrate with a wedge-shaped thickness profile so that the impact of confinement can be systematically studied. We have characterized these films using a combination of low-energy electron diffraction and microscopy as well as high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We have probed the Fermi surface and the nesting vectors therein that are relevant to the SDW ground state. We find these to predict accurately the observed bulk SDW periodicity. We have also characterized the SDW periodicity in the film directly by measuring the splitting between backfolded bands, and we find that this periodicity deviates markedly from the bulk periodicity for thinner films at higher temperatures. We have systematically mapped the SDW incommensurability and phase diagram as a function of both film thickness and temperature. We find commensurate and incommensurate phases that are separated by nearly continuous transitions. Our results suggest a simple model to explain the delicate interplay between commensurate and incommensurate phases that involves a balance between SDW stabilization energy and surface and interface energetics.

  5. Optical observation of spin-density-wave fluctuations in Ba122 iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Dai, Y. M.; Xiao, H.; Shen, B.; Ye, Z. R.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Feng, D. L.; Wen, H. H.; Qiu, X. G.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.

    2016-08-01

    In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping, and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba1 -xKxFe2As2 , Ba (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 , and BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 ]. Intriguingly, we find that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature T* much higher than the SDW transition temperature TSDW. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, T* is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.

  6. Incommensurate Spin Density Wave state in metamagnetic Fe3Ga4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Cao, Huibo; Dos Santos, António; McCandless, Greg; Chan, Julia; Karki, Amar; Jin, Rongying; Ditusa, John

    Fe3Ga4 displays a rich competition between magnetic states without structural transitions: a ferromagnetic(FM) ground state transitions to an antiferromagnetic(AFM) intermediate state above 68 K followed by a reemergence of the FM state above room temprature(T). The reentrance of the FM state hints of a coupling of the magnetic degrees of freedom to other modes. To explore the nature of the magnetic states, we have performed extensive single crystal neutron diffraction measurements over a wide range of T and pressure. These measurements revealed two very different magnetic states with the low T FM state having magnetic moments along the c-axis while we discovered that the AFM state is in an incommensurate spin density wave(SDW) order with moments mostly along the a-axis. However, there is still considerable non-collinear and non-coplanar contributions along the b- and c-axial directions. This non-coplanar moment is likely to be the origin of the very large anomalous Hall effect(HE) including a substantial topological HE that we discovered in Fe3Ga4. Study of the effect of hydrostatic pressure indicates a reduction of the Tc and a destabilization of the SDW phase.

  7. Competing orders and spin density wave instabilities in FeAs-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan Lin

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of superconductivity with Tc up to 55 K in layered FeAs-based compounds has generated tremendous interest in the scientific community. Except for relatively high Tc, the Fe pnictides display many interesting properties. Among others, the presence of competing orders is one of the most intriguing phenomena. In the early stage of our study on the compounds, we identified a spin-density-wave (SDW) ordered state for the parent compound with a stripe (or collinear) type spin structure based on the transport, specific heat, optical spectroscopy measurements and the first- principle calculations. The proposed spin structure from a nesting of the Fermi surfaces is confirmed by subsequent neutron experiments. However, it could also be explained by a local superexchange picture. In this talk I shall focus on our recent optical data on single crystal samples, trying to address the debating issue about itinerant or localized approaches to the SDW order. We found that the undoped compounds are quite metallic with relatively high plasma frequencies above TSDW. Upon entering the SDW ordered state, a large part of the Drude component is removed by the gapping of Fermi surfaces. Meanwhile, the carrier scattering rate is even more dramatically reduced. Those observations favor an itinerant description for the driving mechanism of SDW instability. Nevertheless, our experiments also indicate that Fe pnictides are not simple metals. A high energy gap-like feature is present even above TSDW, which seems to be linked with the antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. For the superconducting samples, a superconducting pairing energy gap is clearly observed in the far-infrared reflectance measurement. The Ferrell-Glover- Tinkham sum rule is satisfied at a low energy scale. Work done in collaboration with: G. F. Chen, J. L. Luo, Z. Fang, X. Dai, W. Z. Hu, J. Dong, G. Li, Z. Li, P. Dai, J. Lynn, H. Q. Yuang, J. Singleton.

  8. Transport properties of disordered iron-pnictides in case of coexistence between superconducting and spin-density wave order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanovski, Dushko; Vavilov, Maxim

    2012-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the transport properties of a dirty multi-band superconductor in the case when both superconducting and spin-density wave orders coexist. We focus on differential conductance spectra of normal metal-superconductor junctions. In pure SC phase, we demonstrate that the interband impurity scattering broadens the coherent peak near the superconducting gap and significantly reduces its height even at relatively low scattering rates. This broadening is consistent with a number of recent experiments performed for both tunnel junctions and larger diffusive contacts. We further analyze the effect of the SDW order parameter on the differential conductance and other transport properties in the coexistence phase.

  9. Ferroelectricity Induced by Acentric Spin-Density Waves in YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Chapon, L.C.; Radaelli, P.G.; Blake, G.R.; Park, S.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2006-03-10

    The commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures of the magnetoelectric system YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}, as determined from neutron diffraction, were found to be spin-density waves lacking a global center of symmetry. We propose a model, based on a simple magnetoelastic coupling to the lattice, which enables us to predict the polarization based entirely on the observed magnetic structure. Our data accurately reproduce the temperature dependence of the spontaneous polarization, particularly its sign reversal at the commensurate-incommensurate transition.

  10. Vestigial chiral and charge orders from bidirectional spin-density waves: Application to the iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M.; Kivelson, S. A.; Berg, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments in optimally hole-doped iron arsenides have revealed a novel magnetically ordered ground state that preserves tetragonal symmetry, consistent with either a charge-spin density wave (CSDW), which displays a nonuniform magnetization, or a spin-vortex crystal (SVC), which displays a noncollinear magnetization. Here we show that, similarly to the partial melting of the usual stripe antiferromagnet into a nematic phase, either of these phases can also melt in two stages. As a result, intermediate paramagnetic phases with vestigial order appears: a checkerboard charge density wave for the CSDW ground state, characterized by an Ising-like order parameter, and a remarkable spin-vorticity density wave for the SVC ground state—a triplet d -density wave characterized by a vector chiral order parameter. We propose experimentally detectable signatures of these phases, show that their fluctuations can enhance the superconducting transition temperature, and discuss their relevance to other correlated materials.

  11. Quantum critical response at the onset of spin-density-wave order in two-dimensional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Hofman, Diego M.; Metlitski, Max A.; Sachdev, Subir

    2011-09-01

    We study the frequency dependence of the electron self-energy and the optical conductivity in a recently developed field theory of the spin-density-wave quantum phase transition in two-dimensional metals. We focus on the interplay between the Fermi surface “hot spots” and the remainder of the “cold” Fermi surface. Scattering of electrons off the fluctuations of the spin-density-wave order parameter, φ, is strongest at the hot spots; we compute the conductivity due to this scattering in a rainbow approximation. We point out the importance of composite operators, built of products of the primary electron or φ fields: These have important effects also away from the hot spots. The simplest composite operator, φ2, leads to deviations from Landau Fermi-liquid behavior on the entire Fermi surface. We also find an intermediate frequency window in which the cold electrons lose their quasiparticle form due to effectively one-dimensional scattering processes. The latter processes are part of umklapp scattering, which leads to singular contributions to the optical conductivity at the lowest frequencies at zero temperature.

  12. Boundary-induced spin-density waves in linear Heisenberg antiferromagnetic spin chains with S ≥1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Dayasindhu; Kumar, Manoranjan; Soos, Zoltán G.

    2016-10-01

    Linear Heisenberg antiferromagnets (HAFs) are chains of spin-S sites with isotropic exchange J between neighbors. Open and periodic boundary conditions return the same ground-state energy per site in the thermodynamic limit, but not the same spin SG when S ≥1 . The ground state of open chains of N spins has SG=0 or S , respectively, for even or odd N . Density-matrix renormalization-group calculations with different algorithms for even and odd N are presented up to N =500 for the energy and spin densities ρ (r ,N ) of edge states in HAFs with S =1 , 3/2, and 2. The edge states are boundary-induced spin density waves (BI-SDWs) with ρ (r ,N ) ∝(-1) r -1 for r =1 ,2 ,...,N . The SDWs are in phase when N is odd, are out of phase when N is even, and have finite excitation energy Γ (N ) that decreases exponentially with N for integer S and faster than 1 /N for half integer S . The spin densities and excitation energy are quantitatively modeled for integer S chains longer than 5 ξ spins by two parameters, the correlation length ξ and the SDW amplitude, with ξ =6.048 for S =1 and 49.0 for S =2 . The BI-SDWs of S =3 /2 chains are not localized and are qualitatively different for even and odd N . Exchange between the ends for odd N is mediated by a delocalized effective spin in the middle that increases |Γ (N )| and weakens the size dependence. The nonlinear sigma model (NL σ M ) has been applied to the HAFs, primarily to S =1 with even N , to discuss spin densities and exchange between localized states at the ends as Γ (N ) ∝(-1) Nexp(-N /ξ ) . S =1 chains with odd N are fully consistent with the NL σ M ; S =2 chains have two gaps Γ (N ) with the same ξ as predicted whose ratio is 3.45 rather than 3; the NL σ M is more approximate for S =3 /2 chains with even N and is modified for exchange between ends for odd N .

  13. Unconventional Electronic Reconstruction in Undoped (Ba,Sr)Fe2As2 Across the Spin Density Wave Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.

    2010-06-02

    Through a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of the iron pnictide compounds (Ba,Sr)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, we show that the electronic structures of these compounds are significantly reconstructed across the spin density wave transition, which cannot be described by a simple folding scenario of conventional density wave ordering. Moreover, we find that LDA calculations with an incorporated suppressed magnetic moment of 0.5{mu}{sub B} can match well the details in the reconstructed electronic structure, suggesting that the nature of magnetism in the pnictides is more itinerant than local, while the origin of suppressed magnetic moment remains an important issue for future investigations.

  14. Enhancement of the London Penetration Depth in Pnictides at the Onset of Spin-Density-Wave Order under Superconducting Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, A.; Vavilov, M. G.; Khodas, M.; Chubukov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Recent measurements of the doping dependence of the London penetration depth λ(x) at low T in clean samples of isovalent BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 at T≪Tc [Hashimoto et al., Science 336, 1554 (2012)SCIEAS0036-8075] revealed a peak in λ(x) near optimal doping x=0.3. The observation of the peak at T≪Tc, points to the existence of a quantum critical point beneath the superconducting dome. We associate such a quantum critical point with the onset of a spin-density-wave order and show that the renormalization of λ(x) by critical magnetic fluctuations gives rise to the observed feature. We argue that the case of pnictides is conceptually different from a one-component Galilean invariant Fermi liquid, for which correlation effects do not cause the renormalization of the London penetration depth at T=0.

  15. Theory of an inherent spin-density-wave instability due to vortices in superconductors with strong Pauli effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenta M.; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2011-04-01

    A spin-density-wave (SDW) instability mechanism enhanced by vortices under fields is proposed to explain the high field and low-temperature phase in CeCoIn5. In the vortex state strong Pauli effect and nodal gap conspire to enhance the momentum-resolved density of states over the normal state value exclusively along the nodal direction, providing a favorable nesting condition for SDW with Q=(2kF,2kF,0.5) only at high fields (H). We can consistently understand observed mysteries of the field-induced SDW confined below Hc2, such as facts that Q is directed to the nodal direction independent of H, SDW diminishes under tilting field from the ab plane, and the SDW transition line in (H,T) has a positive slope.

  16. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  17. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  18. Magnetic and charge structures in itinerant-electron magnets: Coexistence of multiple spin-density and charge-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Fusayoshi J.

    2002-06-01

    A theory of Kondo lattices is applied to studying possible magnetic and charge structures of itinerant-electron antiferromagnets. Even helical spin structures can be stabilized when the nesting of the Fermi surface is not sharp and the superexchange interaction, which arises from the virtual exchange of pair excitations across the Mott-Hubbard gap, is mainly responsible for magnetic instability. Sinusoidal spin structures or spin-density waves (SDW's) are only stabilized when the nesting of the Fermi surface is sharp enough or when an exchange interaction arising from that of pair excitations of quasiparticles is mainly responsible for magnetic instability. In particular, multiple SDW's are stabilized when their incommensurate ordering wave numbers +/-Q are multiple; magnetizations of different +/-Q components are orthogonal to each other in double and triple SDW's when magnetic anisotropy is weak enough. Unless +/-2Q are commensurate, charge-density waves (CDW's) with +/-2Q coexist with SDW's with +/-Q. Because the quenching of magnetic moments by the Kondo effect or local quantum spin fluctuations depends on local numbers of electrons, the phase of CDW's or electron densities is such that magnetic moments are large where the quenching is weak. It is proposed that the so-called stripe order must be the coexisting state of double incommensurate SDW's and CDW's in tetragonal cuprate-oxide high temperature superconductors, in particular, those with the square CuO2 lattices.

  19. Incommensurate spin density wave as a signature of spin-orbit coupling and precursor of topological superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Aaron; Wu, P.-K.; Kao, Y.-J.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-12-01

    On a square lattice, the Hubbard model at half filling reduces to the Heisenberg model and exhibits antiferromagnetism. When doped away from half filling this model gives rise to d -wave superconductivity. This behavior is reminiscent of the phenomenology of the cuprate family with their high Tcd -wave superconductivity and their antiferromagnetic parent compound. It is therefore interesting to study an extension of the Hubbard model which includes spin orbit coupling. We have previously studied this model away from half filling [see, for example, Farrell and Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035112 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.035112] and found that the addition of spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field leads to topological superconductivity with d +i d pairing function. In this paper we are interested in the `parent compound' of this state. Namely, we study the half filling, strong coupling limit of the square lattice Hubbard model with spin orbit coupling and Zeeman field. The strong coupling expansion of the model is a spin model which contains compass anisotropy and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction on top of the usual Heisenberg term. We analyze this spin model classically and find an incommensurate spin density wave (ISDW) for low Zeeman fields. This ISDW has a wave vector Q ⃗ which deviates from (π ,π ) by an amount which is proportional to the spin-orbit coupling and can therefore serve as a signature. We study the stability of the ISDW phase using spin wave theory and find a stable and an unstable region. At higher but moderate Zeeman fields we find a tilted antiferromagnet and a ferromagnet at high Zeeman fields.

  20. The interfacial effects on the spin density wave in FeSe/SrTiO3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Yuan; Tan, Shiyong; Xiang, Hongjun; Feng, D. L.; Gong, Xin-Gao

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the signs of both superconducting transition temperature beyond 60 K and spin density wave (SDW) have been observed in FeSe thin film on SrTiO3 substrate, which suggests a strong interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. With the first-principles calculations, we find that the substrate-induced tensile strain tends to stabilize the SDW state in FeSe thin film by enhancing of the next-nearest-neighbor superexchange antiferromagnetic interaction bridged through Se atoms. On the other hand, we find that when there are oxygen vacancies in the substrate, the significant charge transfer from the substrate to the first FeSe layer would suppress the magnetic order there, and thus the high-temperature superconductivity could occur. In addition, the stability of the SDW is lowered when FeSe is on a defect-free STO substrate due to the redistribution of charges among the Fe 3d-orbitals. Normally, heavy electron doping would kill superconductivity as it suppresses the spin fluctuations as well, but the expanded lattice constants in this system enhance the magnetism and thus preserve the superconductivity. Our results build a foundation for the further exploration of the superconductivity and magnetism in this novel superconducting interface. The work was partially supported by the Special Funds for Major State Basic Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) and the National Basic Research Program of China.

  1. Topological charge-density and spin-density waves in InAs/GaSb quantum wells under an in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lun-Hui; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Liu, Chao-Xing; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Zhou, Yi

    2017-08-01

    We study interaction effect of quantum spin Hall state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells under an in-plane magnetic field by using the self-consistent mean field theory. We construct a phase diagram as a function of intralayer and interlayer interactions, and identify two novel phases, a charge-/spin-density wave phase and an exciton condensate phase. The charge-/spin-density wave phase is topologically nontrivial with helical edge transport at the boundary, while the exciton condensate phase is topologically trivial. The Zeeman effect is strongly renormalized due to interaction in certain parameter regimes of the system, leading to a much smaller g factor, which may stabilize the helical edge transport.

  2. Topological defects in systems with two competing order parameters: Application to superconductors with charge- and spin-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Andreas; Volkov, Anatoly F.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations we study nonhomogeneous states in systems with two order parameters (OPs). Superconductors with a superconducting OP Δ and a charge- or spin-density wave with amplitude W are examples of such systems. When one OP, say Δ , has a form of a topological defect, like, e.g., a vortex or domain wall between the domains with the phases 0 and π , the other OP W is determined by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and is localized at the center of the defect. We consider in detail the domain-wall defect for Δ and show that the shape of the associated solution for W depends on temperature and doping (or on the curvature of the Fermi surface) μ . It turns out that, provided the temperature or doping level is close to some discrete values Tn and μn, the spatial dependence of the function W (x ) is determined by the form of the eigenfunctions of the linearized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The spatial dependence of W0 corresponding to the ground state has the form of a soliton, while other possible solutions Wn(x ) have nodes. The inverse situation when W (x ) has the form of a topological defect and Δ (x ) is localized at the center of this defect is also possible. In particular, we predict a surface or interfacial superconductivity in a system where a superconductor is in contact with a material that suppresses W . This superconductivity should have rather unusual temperature dependence existing only in certain intervals of temperature. Possible experimental realizations of such nonhomogeneous states of OPs are discussed.

  3. Interplay between spin-density wave and 3 d local moments with random exchange in a molecular conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Genta; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Komatsu, Tokutaro; Imakubo, Tatsuro; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-pressure transport measurements on the anion-mixed molecular conductors (DIETSe)2M Br2Cl2 [DIETSe = diiodo(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene; M =Fe , Ga]. They undergo a metal-insulator (M-I) transition below 9 K at ambient pressure, which is suppressed by applying pressure, indicating a spin-density-wave (SDW) transition caused by a nesting instability of the quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) Fermi surface, as observed in the parent compounds (DIETSe)2M Cl4 (M =Fe , Ga). In the metallic state, the existence of the Q1D Fermi surface is confirmed by observing the Lebed resonance. The critical pressures of the SDW, Pc, of the M Br2Cl2 (M =Fe , Ga) salts are significantly lower than those of the the M Cl4 (M = Fe, Ga) salts, suggesting chemical pressure effects. Above Pc, field-induced SDW transitions appear, as evidenced by kink structures in the magnetoresistance (MR) in both salts. The FeBr2Cl2 salt also shows antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering of d spins at 4 K, below which significant spin-charge coupling is observed. A large positive MR change up to 150% appears above the spin-flop field at high pressure. At low pressure, in particular below Pc, a dip or kink structure appears in MR at the spin-flop field, which shows unconventionally large hysteresis at low temperature (T <1 K). The hysteresis region clearly decreases with increasing pressure towards Pc, strongly indicating that the coexisting SDW plays an important role in the enhancement of magnetic hysteresis besides the random exchange interaction.

  4. Field-controlled spin-density-wave order and quantum critically in Sr3 Ru2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Stephen

    The quasi-2D metamagnetic perovskite metal Sr3Ru2O7 has been an enigma for the last decade. The application of a large magnetic field of 8T parallel to the c-axis creates a new phase at low temperatures. This phase shows ``electronic nematic'' properties in that strong anisotropy its resistivity can be created by tilting the field away from the c-axis. In addition, measurement of transport and thermodynamic properties suggest that the phase is at the centre of a quantum critical region. Here we use neutron scattering to show that the magnetic field actually induces spin-density-wave magnetic order in the proximity of a metamagnetic critical endpoint. In fact, Sr3Ru2O7 can be tuned through two magnetically-ordered SDW states which exist over relatively small ranges in field (< 0.4 T). Their origin is probably due to the electronic fine structure near the Fermi energy. The magnetic field direction is shown to control the SDW domain populations which naturally explains the strong resistivity anisotropy or ''electronic nematic'' behaviour observed in this material. We find that Sr3Ru2O7 is also unique in that its the quantum critical region is controlled by overdamped incommensurate low-energy spin fluctuations with a diverging relaxation time. The low-energy electronic properties reflect the presence of these fluctuations and, in particular, the field-dependent low-temperature specific heat is proportional to the spin relaxation rate. [Based on C. Lester, S. Ramos, R. S. Perry at el. Natural Materials 14, 373 (2015).

  5. Anisotropy and field-dependence of the spin-density-wave dynamics in the quasi one-dimensional conductor (TMTSF)2PF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, P.; Petukhov, K.; Dressel, M.; Biskup, N.; Vuletić, T.; Tomić, S.

    2005-07-01

    The anisotropic and non-linear transport properties of the quasi one-dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF)2PF6 have been studied by dc, radiofrequency, and microwave methods. Microwave experiments along all three axes reveal that collective transport, which is considered to be the fingerprint of the spin-density-wave condensate, also occurs in the perpendicular b' direction. The pinned mode resonance is present in the a and b'-axes response, but not along the least conducting c* direction. The ac-field threshold, above which the spin-density-wave response is non-linear, strongly decreases as the temperature drops below 4 K. With increasing strength of the microwave electric field and of the radiofrequency signal, the pinned mode and the screened phason loss-peak shift to lower frequencies. In the non-linear regime, in addition to the phason relaxation mode with Arrhenius-like resistive decay, an additional mode with very long and temperature-independent relaxation time appears below 4 K. We attribute the new process to short-wavelength excitations associated with discommensurations of the spin density wave close to commensurability.

  6. Stabilization of the spin density wave structure with rare-earth substitution in Ca3Co2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anil; Yusuf, S. M.; Meena, S. S.; Ritter, Clemens

    2013-03-01

    We report the structural and magnetic properties of rare-earth substituted spin-chain compounds Ca2.75R0.25Co2O6 (R = Dy and Lu). The Rietveld refinement of neutron and x-ray powder diffraction patterns confirms the single-phase formation of both compounds in the rhombohedral structure (space group R3¯c). The derived values (from the analysis of the neutron diffraction patterns at 50 K) of the bond-valence sum indicate a reduction in the oxidation state of the cobalt ions at the trigonal prism (TP) site (6a) with R substitution, which is further supported by low temperature neutron diffraction [where a zero value of the ordered moment at the 6b site and a reduction in the values of the maximum ordered moment at the TP site have been observed] and dc magnetization studies. In the neutron diffraction patterns, additional Bragg peaks appear for both compounds below Néel temperature (TN) of ˜16 K, indicating the onset of an antiferromagnetic ordering of cobalt spin chains on the triangular lattice. The magnetic structure corresponds to a spin density wave (SDW) structure [with a propagation vector k={0,0,1.02}], having c axis as a direction of both moment and modulation. For both compounds, the refined values of the ordered moment at the 18e, 6b, and 6a sites are ˜0.03(2),0.02(2), and 4.2 (2) μB, respectively. Unlike the parent compound Ca3Co2O6, no temperature dependence as well as no time dependence in the intensity of the strongest antiferromagnetic reflection (10 τ), corresponding to the propagation vector k = {0, 0, 1.02}, has been observed down to 1.5 K confirming that the SDW structure is stabilized by the substitution with rare-earth ions. The stabilization of the SDW structure and the observed decrease in the values of TN could be due to a decrease in the value of positive FM intrachain exchange interaction J with the rare-earth substitution in a system with competing intrachain and interchain exchange interactions.

  7. Metal-ligand delocalization and spin density in the CuCl{sub 2} and [CuCl{sub 4}]{sup 2−} molecules: Some insights from wave function theory

    SciTech Connect

    Giner, Emmanuel Angeli, Celestino

    2015-09-28

    The aim of this paper is to unravel the physical phenomena involved in the calculation of the spin density of the CuCl{sub 2} and [CuCl{sub 4}]{sup 2−} systems using wave function methods. Various types of wave functions are used here, both variational and perturbative, to analyse the effects impacting the spin density. It is found that the spin density on the chlorine ligands strongly depends on the mixing between two types of valence bond structures. It is demonstrated that the main difficulties found in most of the previous studies based on wave function methods come from the fact that each valence bond structure requires a different set of molecular orbitals and that using a unique set of molecular orbitals in a variational procedure leads to the removal of one of them from the wave function. Starting from these results, a method to compute the spin density at a reasonable computational cost is proposed.

  8. Shape of spin density wave versus temperature in AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Ba, Eu): A Mössbauer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błachowski, A.; Ruebenbauer, K.; Żukrowski, J.; Rogacki, K.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.

    2011-04-01

    Parent compounds AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Ba, Eu) of the 122 family of the iron-based superconductors have been studied by Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range 4.2-˜300 K. Spin density waves (SDW) have been found with some confidence. They are either incommensurate with the lattice period or the ratio of the respective periods is far away from the ratio of small integers. SDW shape is very unconventional (i.e., differs from the sinusoidal shape). Magnetic order starts with lowered temperature as narrow sheets of the significant electron spin density separated by areas with very small spin density. Magnetic sheets are likely to be ordered in the alternate antiferromagnetic fashion as the material as a whole behaves similarly to the collinear antiferromagnet. A further lowering of temperature simply expands sheet thickness leading to the near triangular SDW. Finally, sheets fill the whole available space and the almost rectangular shape of the SDW is reached. The substantial maximum amplitude of SDW appears at the temperature just below the magnetic onset temperature, and this maximum amplitude increases slightly with lowering temperature. The square root from the mean squared hyperfine field behaves versus temperature according to the universality class (1,2) (i.e., with the electronic spin space having dimensionality equal to unity and the real space having dimensionality equal to 2). The more or less pronounced tail above transition temperature due to the development of incoherent SDW is seen.

  9. Role of anion ordering and effective pressure in the field-induced spin-density-wave phase of (TMTSF)2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamidate, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Nomura, K.; Sasaki, T.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetoresistance and Hall resistance measurements were conducted in the field-induced spin-density-wave (FISDW) phase of (TMTSF)2ReO4 above 1.0 GPa, with an anion ordering specified by Q_\\text{AO}=(0, 1/2, 1/2) . The quantized Hall resistance shows the sequence N = 0, 1, 2, -2, 4, -4, -6, -8, \\cdots , with decreasing field that is successfully explained by the “extended standard model”. Consequently, we demonstrate that the difference between the chemical and hydrostatic pressures is linked to the appearance of the peculiar FISDW phase of the TMTSF salts with Q_\\text{AO}=(0, 1/2, *) .

  10. High-pressure ultrasonic study of the commensurate-incommensurate spin-density-wave transition in an antiferromagnetic Cr-0.3 at. % Ru alloy single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cankurtaran, M.; Saunders, G. A.; Wang, Q.; Ford, P. J.; Alberts, H. L.

    1992-12-01

    A comprehensive experimental study has been made of the elastic and nonlinear acoustic behavior of a dilute Cr alloy as it undergoes a commensurate (C)-incommensurate (I) spin-density-wave transition. Simultaneous measurements of the temperature dependence of ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear 10-MHz ultrasonic waves propagated along both the [100] and the [110] direction of Cr-0.3 at. % Ru alloy single crystal have been made in the temperature range 200-300 K. The temperature dependence of ultrasonic attenuation for each mode is characterized by a spikelike peak centered at TCI (=238.6 K) (on cooling) and at TIC (=255.6 K) (on warming). The velocities of both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic waves exhibit a large and steep increase at TCI on cooling and a similar drop at TIC on warming with a pronounced hysteresis between TIC and TCI. These observations show that the transition between the commensurate and incommensurate phases is first order. Measurements of the effects of hydrostatic pressure (up to 0.15 GPa) on the velocities of ultrasonic waves, which were made at several fixed temperatures between 248 and 297 K, show similar features: a steep increase at PCI (increasing pressure) and a similar drop at PIC (decreasing pressure) with a well-defined hysteresis. Both TCI and TIC increase strongly and approximately linearly with pressure, the mean values of dTCI/dP and dTIC/dP being (333+/-3) K/GPa and (277+/-5) K/GPa, respectively. The pressure and temperature dependencies of the anomalies in the ultrasonic wave velocity have been used to locate both the C-I and I-C boundaries on the magnetic P-T phase diagram. There is a triple point (at about 315 K and 0.22 GPa) where the paramagnetic, commensurate, and incommensurate spin-density-wave phases coexist. Results for the complete sets of the elastic stiffness tensor components and their hydrostatic pressure derivatives have been used to evaluate the acoustic-mode Gr

  11. Complex Field-Induced States in Linarite PbCuSO4(OH)2 with a Variety of High-Order Exotic Spin-Density Wave States.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, B; Schäpers, M; Wolter, A U B; Drechsler, S-L; Reehuis, M; Hoffmann, J-U; Büchner, B; Studer, A J; Rule, K C; Ouladdiaf, B; Süllow, S; Nishimoto, S

    2016-01-29

    Low-temperature neutron diffraction and NMR studies of field-induced phases in linarite are presented for magnetic fields H∥b axis. A two-step spin-flop transition is observed, as well as a transition transforming a helical magnetic ground state into an unusual magnetic phase with sine-wave-modulated moments ∥H. An effective J[over ˜]_{1}-J[over ˜]_{2} single-chain model with a magnetization-dependent frustration ratio α_{eff}=-J[over ˜]_{2}/J[over ˜]_{1} is proposed. The latter is governed by skew interchain couplings and shifted to the vicinity of the ferromagnetic critical point. It explains qualitatively the observation of a rich variety of exotic longitudinal collinear spin-density wave, SDW_{p}, states (9≥p≥2).

  12. Opening a nodal gap by fluctuating spin-density wave in lightly doped La2 -xSrxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapon, Itzik; Ellis, David S.; Drachuck, Gil; Bazalitski, Galina; Weschke, Eugen; Schierle, Enrico; Strempfer, Jörg; Niedermayer, Christof; Keren, Amit

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether the spin or charge degrees of freedom are responsible for the nodal gap in underdoped cuprates by performing inelastic neutron scattering and x-ray diffraction measurements on La2 -xSrxCuO4 , which is on the edge of the antiferromagnetic phase. We found that a fluctuating incommensurate spin-density wave (SDW) with a bottom part of an hourglass dispersion exists even in this magnetic sample. The strongest component of these fluctuations diminishes at the same temperature where the nodal gap opens. X-ray scattering measurements on the same crystal show no signature of a charge-density wave (CDW). Therefore, we suggest that the nodal gap in the electronic band of this cuprate opens due to fluctuating SDW with no contribution from CDW.

  13. Spin-density-wave-induced anomalies in the optical conductivity of AFe2As2, (A=Ca, Sr, Ba) single-crystalline iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnukha, A.; Pröpper, D.; Larkin, T. I.; Sun, D. L.; Li, Z. W.; Lin, C. T.; Wolf, T.; Keimer, B.; Boris, A. V.

    2013-11-01

    We report the complex dielectric function of high-quality AFe2As2, (A=Ca, Sr, Ba) single crystals with TN≈150K, 200K, and 138K, respectively, determined by broadband spectroscopic ellipsometry at temperatures 10≤T≤300K and wave numbers from 100cm-1 to 52000cm-1. In CaFe2As2 we identify the optical spin-density-wave gap 2ΔSDW≈1250cm-1. The 2ΔSDW/(kBTN) ratio, characterizing the strength of the electron-electron coupling in the spin-density-wave state, amounts to ≈12 in CaFe2As2, significantly larger than the corresponding values for the SrFe2As2 and BaFe2As2 compounds: 8.7 and 5.3, respectively. We further show that, similarly to the Ba-based compound, two characteristic SDW energy gaps can be identified in the infrared-conductivity spectra of both SrFe2As2 and CaFe2As2 and investigate their detailed temperature dependence in all three materials. This analysis reveals the existence of an anomaly in CaFe2As2 at a temperature T*≈80K, well below the Néel temperature of this compound, which implies weak coupling between the two SDW subsystems. The coupling between the two subsystems evolves to intermediate in the Sr-based and strong in the Ba-based material. The temperature dependence of the infrared phonons reveals clear anomalies at the corresponding Néel temperatures of the investigated compounds. In CaFe2As2, the phonons exhibit signatures of SDW fluctuations above TN and some evidence for anomalies at T*. Investigation of all three materials in the visible spectral range reveals a spin-density-wave-induced suppression of two absorption bands systematically enhanced with decreasing atomic number of the intercalant. A dispersion analysis of the data in the entire spectral range clearly shows that CaFe2As2 is significantly more metallic than the other two compounds. Our results single out CaFe2As2 in the class of ThCr2Si2-type iron-based materials by demonstrating the existence of two weakly coupled and extremely metallic electronic subsystems.

  14. Evolution from unconventional spin density wave to superconductivity and a pseudogaplike phase in NaFe(1-x)Co(x)As.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Cai, Peng; Wang, Aifeng; Ruan, Wei; Ye, Cun; Chen, Xianhui; You, Yizhuang; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Yayu

    2012-07-20

    We report the doping, temperature, and spatial evolutions of the electronic structure of NaFe(1-x)Co(x)As studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. In the parent state we directly observe the spin density wave gap, which exhibits unconventional features that are incompatible with simple Fermi surface nesting. The optimally doped sample has a single superconducting gap, but in the overdoped regime a novel pseudogaplike feature emerges. The pseudogaplike phase coexists with superconductivity in the ground state, persists well into the normal state, and shows strong spatial variations. The characteristics of the three distinct electronic states revealed here shed important new lights on the microscopic models for the iron-based superconductors.

  15. Incommensurate spin-density wave and magnetic lock-in transition in CaFe{sub 4}As{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Todorov, I. S.; Chung, D. Y.; Castellan, J.-P.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Toledano, P.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; Univ. of Picardie; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic structure for the recently synthesized iron-arsenide compound CaFe4As3 has been studied by neutron-powder diffraction. Long-range magnetic order is detected below 85 K, with an incommensurate modulation described by the propagation vector k=(0,?,0), ??0.39. Below ?25 K, our measurements detect a first-order phase transition where ? locks into the commensurate value 3/8. A model of the magnetic structure is proposed for both temperature regimes, based on Rietveld refinements of the powder data and symmetry considerations. The structures correspond to longitudinal spin-density waves with magnetic moments directed along the b axis. A Landau analysis captures the change in thermodynamic quantities observed at the two magnetic transitions, in particular, the drop in resistivity at the lock-in transition.

  16. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior at the onset of incommensurate 2kF charge- or spin-density wave order in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Tobias; Metzner, Walter

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the influence of quantum critical fluctuations on single-particle excitations at the onset of incommensurate 2kF charge- or spin-density wave order in two-dimensional metals. The case of a single pair of hot spots at high symmetry positions on the Fermi surface needs to be distinguished from the case of two hot spot pairs. We compute the fluctuation propagator and the electronic self-energy perturbatively in leading order. The energy dependence of the single-particle decay rate at the hot spots obeys non-Fermi-liquid power laws, with an exponent 2/3 in the case of a single hot spot pair, and exponent one for two hot spot pairs. The prefactors of the linear behavior obtained in the latter case are not particle-hole symmetric.

  17. Evidence of spin-density-wave order in RFeAsO1-xFx from measurements of thermoelectric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiak, M.; Plackowski, T.; Bukowski, Z.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.

    2009-06-01

    Data on the magnetothermopower and specific heat of three compounds belonging to “1111” oxypnictides family are reported. One specimen (SmAsFeO0.8F0.2) is a superconductor with Tc=53K , while two others (SmAsFeO and NdAsFeO) are nonsuperconducting parent compounds. Our results confirm that spin-density-wave (SDW) order is present in SmAsFeO and NdAsFeO. In these two samples a strict connection between the thermoelectric power and electronic specific heat is found in the vicinity of SDW transition, which indicates that the chemical potential of charge carriers strongly depends on temperature in this region. Low-temperature data suggest presence of significant contribution magnon drag to the thermoelectric power.

  18. Raman scattering study of spin-density-wave-induced anisotropic electronic properties in A Fe2As2 (A =Ca , Eu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.-L.; Yin, Z. P.; Ignatov, A.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, Janusz; Sefat, Athena S.; Ding, H.; Richard, P.; Blumberg, G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-resolved and temperature-dependent Raman scattering study of A Fe2As2 (A =Ca , Eu). In the spin-density-wave phase, spectral weight redistribution is observed in the fully symmetric and nonsymmetric scattering channels at different energies. An anisotropic Raman response is observed in the fully symmetric channel in spontaneously detwinned CaFe2As2 samples. We calculate the orbital-resolved electronic structures using a combination of density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory. We identify the electronic transitions corresponding to these two spectral features and find that the anisotropic Raman response originates from the lifted degeneracy of the dx z /y z orbitals in the broken-symmetry phase.

  19. Measurement of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements along with a partial wave analysis for gammap → po using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mike

    This work presents measurements of differential cross sections, dsigma/dcos qwCM , and spin density matrix elements, r0MM' , for the reaction gammap → po in the energy range 1.72 GeV< s <2.84 GeV. The data were collected at Jefferson Lab, using the CLAS detector, as part of the g11a run period in 2004. Our r0MM' measurements vastly increase the precision of the world's data and extend the large angle measurements by over 400 MeV in s . Our data confirms that for s < 2.1 GeV, the forward angle (small |t|) production amplitude is dominated by t-channel pi0 exchange. At higher energies, existing non-resonant models do a poor job of describing our data. In particular, u-channel models fail to reproduce our highest energy backwards r0MM' measurements. A mass-independent partial wave analysis has also been performed. Near threshold, the dominant resonance contributions extracted are the **** F15 (1680) and *** D 13(1700). Together with the t-channel pi0 exchange, these three waves provide a remarkably good description of our differential cross section and spin density matrix element measurements for s < 2 GeV. Strong, but not conclusive, evidence for the **** G17(2190) has also been extracted. Improved non-resonant models may be necessary to irrefutably show whether this state contributes to o photoproduction. Evidence for missing resonances is suggestive, but inconclusive without theoretical input.

  20. Quasiparticle relaxation dynamics in spin-density-wave and superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertelj, T.; Kusar, P.; Kabanov, V. V.; Stojchevska, L.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Weyeneth, S.; Mihailovic, D.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the quasiparticle (QP) relaxation and low-energy electronic structure in undoped SmFeAsO and near-optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 single crystals-exhibiting spin-density wave (SDW) ordering and superconductivity, respectively-using pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy. In the undoped single crystals a single relaxation process is observed, showing a remarkable critical slowing down of the QP relaxation dynamics at the SDW transition temperature TSDW≃125K . In the superconducting (SC) crystals multiple relaxation processes are present with distinct SC-state quasiparticle recombination dynamics exhibiting a BCS-like T -dependent superconducting gap, and a pseudogap (PG)-like feature with an onset above 180 K indicating the existence of a pseudogap of magnitude 2ΔPG≃120meV above Tc . From the pump-photon energy dependence we conclude that the SC state and PG relaxation channels are independent, implying the presence of two separate electronic subsystems. We discuss the data in terms of spatial inhomogeneity and multiband scenarios, finding that the latter is more consistent with the present data.

  1. Negative quantum Hall effect in field-induced spin-density-wave states: Dependence on shape of the quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2009-08-01

    The successive transitions of the field-induced spin-density wave, which is labeled by the quantum number N of the Hall conductivity and the nesting vector, are known to depend on the shape of the quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface. We study the condition for the appearance of the negative N states, where the quantized Hall conductivity changes the sign. We obtain the phase diagram for the negative N states in the parameter space of the higher harmonics in the Fermi surface ( tb' , t3 , and t4 ) to be stabilized with and without the periodic anion potential V in the perpendicular direction to the conducting axis, which are the cases in (TMTSF)2ClO4 and (TMTSF)2PF6 , respectively. The negative N phase is shown to be stabilized for the smaller values of t3 and t4 in the case of the finite V . Comparing with the experiment by Matsunaga [J. Phys. IV 131, 269 (2005)], where the quantum Hall effect is observed in (TMTSF)2ClO4 with various cooling rates, we obtain the parameter regions of t3 and t4 for (TMTSF)2ClO4 ( 0.06≲t3/tb'≲0.23 , 0≲t4/tb'≲0.08 , and V/tb'≲2.0 ).

  2. Selective substitution of Cr in CaFe{sub 4}As{sub 3} and its effect on the spin density wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, I.; Chung, D. Y.; Claus, H.; Gray, K. E.; Li, Q.; Schlueter, J.; Bakas, T.; Douvalis, A.; Gutmann, M.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Ioannina; Rutherford Appleton Lab.

    2010-08-11

    Single crystals of CaCr{sub 0.84}Fe{sub 3.16}As{sub 3}, a Cr substituted analog of CaFe{sub 4}As{sub 3}, were grown from Sn flux and characterized with single crystal neutron diffraction. CaCr{sub 0.84}Fe{sub 3.16}As{sub 3} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma with a three-dimensional framework, where Fe, Cr, and As form a covalent channel-like network with Ca{sup 2+} cations residing in the channels. CaCr{sub 0.84}Fe{sub 3.16}As{sub 3} has a unit cell of a = 12.057(4) {angstrom}, b = 3.7374(13) {angstrom}, and c = 11.694(3) {angstrom}, as determined by room temperature single crystal neutron diffraction (R{sub 1} = 0.0747, wR{sub 2} = 0.1825). Structural data was also collected at 10 K. The single crystal neutron data showed that Cr selectively occupies a particular metal site, Fe(4). The antiferromagnetic transition associated with spin density wave (SDW) in the parent compound is preserved and shifts from 96 to 103 K with the selective Cr doping. Moessbauer, magnetic, and electrical resistivity measurements are reported.

  3. Interface-induced superconductivity and strain-dependent spin density waves in FeSe/SrTiO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shiyong; Zhang, Yan; Xia, Miao; Ye, Zirong; Chen, Fei; Xie, Xin; Peng, Rui; Xu, Difei; Fan, Qin; Xu, Haichao; Jiang, Juan; Zhang, Tong; Lai, Xinchun; Xiang, Tao; Hu, Jiangping; Xie, Binping; Feng, Donglai

    2013-07-01

    The record superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) for the iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTS) has long been 56 K. Recently, in single-layer FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates, indications of a new record of 65 K have been reported. Using in situ photoemission measurements, we substantiate the presence of spin density waves (SDWs) in FeSe films--a key ingredient of Fe-HTS that was missed in FeSe before--and we find that this weakens with increased thickness or reduced strain. We demonstrate that the superconductivity occurs when the electrons transferred from the oxygen-vacant substrate suppress the otherwise pronounced SDWs in single-layer FeSe. Beyond providing a comprehensive understanding of FeSe films and directions to further enhance its T(c), we map out the phase diagram of FeSe as a function of lattice constant, which contains all the essential physics of Fe-HTS. With the simplest structure, cleanest composition and single tuning parameter, monolayer FeSe is an ideal system for testing theories of Fe-HTS.

  4. Dynamic competition between spin-density wave order and superconductivity in underdoped Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe2As2.

    PubMed

    Yi, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, Z-K; Ding, X; Chu, J-H; Kemper, A F; Plonka, N; Moritz, B; Hashimoto, M; Mo, S-K; Hussain, Z; Devereaux, T P; Fisher, I R; Wen, H H; Shen, Z-X; Lu, D H

    2014-04-25

    An intriguing aspect of unconventional superconductivity is that it always appears in the vicinity of other competing phases, whose suppression brings the full emergence of superconductivity. In the iron pnictides, these competing phases are marked by a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition and a collinear spin-density wave (SDW) transition. There has been macroscopic evidence for competition between these phases and superconductivity as the magnitude of both the orthorhombicity and magnetic moment are suppressed in the superconducting state. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on detwinned underdoped Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe2As2, we observe a coexistence of both the SDW gap and superconducting gap in the same electronic structure. Furthermore, our data reveal that following the onset of superconductivity, the SDW gap decreases in magnitude and shifts in a direction consistent with a reduction of the orbital anisotropy. This observation provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the dynamic competition between superconductivity and both SDW and electronic nematic orders in these materials.

  5. High-field magnetoresistance of the Bechgaard salt (TMTSF)[sub 2]NO[sub 3]: Quantum oscillations in the spin-density-wave state and phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Audouard, A.; Goze, F.; Ulmet, J.; Brossard, L.; Askenazy, S. , Laboratoire de Physique des Solides , Complexe Scientifique de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse ); Fabre, J. )

    1994-11-01

    The transverse magnetoresistance of the Bechgaard salt (TMTSF)[sub 2]NO[sub 3] has been measured up to 37 T at ambient pressure in the temperature range from 2 to 77 K. When the magnetic field is parallel to the lowest conductivity direction [ital c][sup *] and for temperatures higher than [similar to]12 K, the data can be accounted for by a power law, the exponent of which decreases as the anion ordering takes place. At lower temperatures, the magnetic field increases the spin-density-wave (SDW) transition temperature, in overall agreement with theoretical predictions for the imperfect-nesting case. Two oscillation series, both linked to the SDW state, have been observed in the 2--10 K range. Their temperature-independent frequencies, measured from 2 to 8 K, are at (63[plus minus]2) and (248[plus minus]5) T, respectively. These oscillations have been studied (at 4.2 K) as a function of the field direction. They were found to deviate from the two-dimensional model since, in particular, their behavior differs according to whether the field is tilted on one side of the [ital c][sup *] direction or on the other. The oscillation data are discussed on the basis of recent calculations of Yakovenko.

  6. Nonperturbative effects of the periodic potential on the field-induced spin-density wave and the sign of the quantum Hall effect in the quasi-one-dimensional conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2007-06-01

    We show that in (TMTSF)2ClO4 the field-induced spin-density wave (FISDW) with negative quantum number (N=-2) of the nesting vector is stabilized in some region in the parameters of magnetic field and the strength of the anion potential, which corresponds to the very recently observed phase diagram of (TMTSF)2ClO4 in the parameter plane of magnetic field vs cooling rate by Matsunaga [J. Phys. IV 131, 269 (2005)]. The spin-density wave is induced by the magnetic field in the quasi-one-dimensional conductors such as (TMTSF)2PF6 and (TMTSF)2ClO4 . The wave vector of the FISDW is quantized and the Hall conductivity is quantized corresponding to the quantum number (N) of the wave vector. In (TMTSF)2ClO4 , the ordering of the anion ClO4 makes the periodic potential, which has been known to drastically affect the FISDW. We study the instability to the FISDW by taking the eigenstates in the magnetic field numerically, with the periodic potential being treated nonperturbatively. We obtain the phase diagram of the quantum number N for FISDW in the quasi-one-dimensional systems in the parameter plane of magnetic field and the strength of the periodic potential, which can be controlled by the cooling rate.

  7. Ultrafast melting of spin density wave order in BaFe2As2 observed by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with extreme-ultraviolet higher harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Okazaki, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Someya, T.; Okada, M.; Koshiishi, K.; Fujisawa, M.; Kanai, T.; Ishii, N.; Nakajima, M.; Eisaki, H.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Itatani, J.; Fujimori, A.; Shin, S.

    2017-04-01

    The transient single-particle spectral function of BaFe2As2 , a parent compound of iron-based superconductors, has been studied by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an extreme-ultraviolet laser generated by higher harmonics from Ar gas, which enables us to investigate the dynamics in the entire Brillouin zone. We observed electronic modifications from the spin density wave (SDW) ordered state within ˜1 ps after the arrival of a 1.5 eV pump pulse. We observed optically excited electrons at the zone center above EF at 0.12 ps, and their rapid decay. After the fast decay of the optically excited electrons, a thermalized state appears and survives for a relatively long time. From a comparison with the density-functional theory band structure for the paramagnetic and SDW states, we interpret the experimental observations as the melting of the SDW. Exponential decay constants for the thermalized state to recover back to the SDW ground state are ˜0.60 ps both around the zone center and the zone corner.

  8. Distinct itinerant spin-density waves and local-moment antiferromagnetism in an intermetallic ErPd2Si2 single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Feng; Cao, Chongde; Wildes, Andrew; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schmalzl, Karin; Hou, Binyang; Regnault, Louis-Pierre; Zhang, Cong; Meuffels, Paul; Löser, Wolfgang; Roth, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the nature of magnetism, itinerant or localized, remains a major challenge in condensed-matter science. Purely localized moments appear only in magnetic insulators, whereas itinerant moments more or less co-exist with localized moments in metallic compounds such as the doped-cuprate or the iron-based superconductors, hampering a thorough understanding of the role of magnetism in phenomena like superconductivity or magnetoresistance. Here we distinguish two antiferromagnetic modulations with respective propagation wave vectors at Q± = (H ± 0.557(1), 0, L ± 0.150(1)) and QC = (H ± 0.564(1), 0, L), where (H, L) are allowed Miller indices, in an ErPd2Si2 single crystal by neutron scattering and establish their respective temperature- and field-dependent phase diagrams. The modulations can co-exist but also compete depending on temperature or applied field strength. They couple differently with the underlying lattice albeit with associated moments in a common direction. The Q± modulation may be attributed to localized 4f moments while the QC correlates well with itinerant conduction bands, supported by our transport studies. Hence, ErPd2Si2 represents a new model compound that displays clearly-separated itinerant and localized moments, substantiating early theoretical predictions and providing a unique platform allowing the study of itinerant electron behavior in a localized antiferromagnetic matrix. PMID:25608949

  9. Special relativity and reduced spin density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Gonera, Cezary; Kosinski, Piotr; Maslanka, Pawel

    2004-09-01

    We derive the general formula for Lorentz-transformed spin density matrix. It is shown that an appropriate Lorentz transformation can produce totally unpolarized state out of pure one. Further properties, as depurification by an arbitrary Lorentz boost and its relation to the localization properties are also discussed.

  10. Spin density in first-row diatomic hydrides from the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassolov, Vitaly A.; Chipman, Daniel M.

    1995-12-01

    The delta function and Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) operators are compared for calculation of electronic spin density at the nucleus. New methods are designed and implemented for evaluation of the difficult molecular integrals over the HSF operator. Calculations are carried out with wave functions that include spin polarization effects using Gaussian basis sets and, to estimate the complete basis set limit, with a seminumerical procedure. Results are reported for the diatomic hydrides CH, NH, and OH in their ground states. While the HSF operator gives much better total densities at the heavy atoms, the delta function and HSF operators are found to perform overall about equally well for spin densities.

  11. Spreading out spin density in polyphenalenyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Georges; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2017-10-05

    As suggested by simple topological arguments, monoradical arrangements of properly-oriented polycondensed phenalenyl units can produce highly-delocalized spin distributions. This work examines under which geometrical conditions and to which extent these flat distributions take place. UDFT calculations performed on various instances gathering up to 19 such fused phenalene units confirm the spin-density spreading over entire conjugated skeletons. This occurs, however, with more or less uniformity depending on the compacity of the arrangement, and simple linear stretches do not actually support the delocalized picture. Thermodynamic stability of the radicals is assessed, which follows their delocalization degree. Monocations and monoanions derived from these delocalized radicals are expected to support likewise delocalized charges, as checked by various calculations on corresponding closed-shell ions. Altogether, these attributes might lead to possible applications in organic design, electronic devices, and spintronics.

  12. Charge- and spin-density modulations in semiconductor quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minchul; Bruder, Christoph

    2005-07-01

    We investigate static charge- and spin-density modulation patterns along a ferromagnet-semiconductor single-junction quantum wire in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. Coherent scattering theory is used to calculate the charge and spin densities in the ballistic regime. The observed oscillatory behavior is explained in terms of the symmetry of the charge and spin distributions of eigenstates in the semiconductor quantum wire. Also, we discuss the condition that these charge- and spin-density oscillations can be observed experimentally.

  13. Density functional theory with alternative spin densities: application to magnetic systems with localized spins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Angel J; Pérez-Jordá, José M; Illas, Francesc

    2004-01-01

    A new method to improve the excess spin density obtained from unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions in terms of natural orbitals is proposed. Using this modified excess spin density to evaluate the correlation energy by means of density functionals leads to large improvements in the computed magnetic coupling constants of several materials without need to modify the exchange contribution. This is important because it reconciles the density functional theory description with the one provided by multi-determinant wave functions. Using the present approach, the leading contribution to the magnetic coupling constant arises from electron correlation effects. The performance of the new method is illustrated on various materials including high-critical-temperature superconductors parent compounds.

  14. Spin density distributions and g values in semiquinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhananda, B. S.

    1983-12-01

    From a study of several semiquinone systems, we have shown that their g values can be expressed in terms of the π-electron spin densities on the oxygens by a linear equation. This suggests the possibility of estimating the spin densities on the oxygens directly from the g values in similar systems. The spin density distribution used in establishing such a relation had been determined with the help of a new set of Q parameters for the 13C and 17O hyperfine splittings associated with the C'2CO fragment. Recognition of the existence of hydrogen bonds in solvents such as water or ethanol, by introducing an additional parameter QOOH is a new feature of this work. Q0OH=6.0 G in water or ethanol. QOOH=0 in aprotic solvents. Reliability of our Q parameters and the spin density distributions determined with their help, has been demonstrated by comparing the predicted and the observed hyperfine splittings/spin densities, not only in semiquinones, but also in 2,4,6 tri-t-butyl phenoxy radical and in benzophenone potassium ketyl. (Other authors have recommended substantially different sets of Q parameters.) It has been possible to estimate QCCC'=22.2 G, for sp3 hybridized C″ as in -C″H3, using the spin density distribution in durosemiquinone (DSQ-). Spin densities in DSQ- in ethanol were obtained with the help of our g values. Our value of QCCC″ is considerably less than the theoretical estimate of Strauss and Fraenkel, but is consistent with the predictions of Fessenden.

  15. Goedel cosmology in Riemann-Cartan spacetime with spin density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the Goedel metric for a rotating cosmology is compatible with the self-consistent formulation of the Einstein-Cartan metric-torsion theory for a spinning fluid. In the model presented, the only changes are that the cosmological constant becomes slightly more negative, and the sense of rotation is flipped. If the Goedel model were a viable model, experimentally it would be difficult to distinguish between the two models unless the spin density could be measured directly.

  16. Goedel cosmology in Riemann-Cartan spacetime with spin density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the Goedel metric for a rotating cosmology is compatible with the self-consistent formulation of the Einstein-Cartan metric-torsion theory for a spinning fluid. In the model presented, the only changes are that the cosmological constant becomes slightly more negative, and the sense of rotation is flipped. If the Goedel model were a viable model, experimentally it would be difficult to distinguish between the two models unless the spin density could be measured directly.

  17. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- Tc superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recenmore » tly it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the d-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the d-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-Tcsuperconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-Tcsuperconductors.« less

  18. Spin Density Matrices for Nuclear Density Functionals with Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce; Giraud, Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Within the context of the radial density functional [1], we apply the spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics [2] to nuclear physics. The vector part of the SDM defines a ``hedgehog'' situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. Thus, looking for the vector profile of the SDM could be used as a test for parity violation in nuclei. The difference between the scalar profile and the vector profile of the SDM will be illustrated by a toy model. [4pt] [1] B. G. Giraud, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014307 (2008).[0pt] [2] A. Goerling, Phys. Rev. A 47, 2783 (1993).

  19. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements in {gamma}p --> p {omega} using CLAS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Vernarsky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort towards a ''complete'' experiment for the ω meson, we present studies from an experiment with an unpolarized target and a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c), carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beam. Both circular and linear polarizations are explored. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the {omega}. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method.

  20. First Measurements of the 1̂, 2̂, and 3̂ Spin Density Matrix Elements in γp ->pφ using CLAS at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernarsky, Brian

    2012-10-01

    In an effort towards a ``complete'' experiment for the φ meson, we present studies from two experiments with unpolarized targets, one using a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c) and one using a linearly polarized photon beam (g8b), both carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiments were analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit to the cross section with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beams. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the φ. First measurements of the 1̂, 2̂, and 3̂ spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method. As a check, we compare to another method, Schilling's method, which fits the decay angular distribution with a function that uses the spin density matrix elements as parameters.

  1. Influence of the local-spin-density correlation functional on the stability of bcc ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Clougherty, D. P.; MacLaren, J. M.; Albers, R. C.; Wang, C. S.

    1991-10-01

    The influence of local-spin-dependent correlation effects on the predicted stable ground-state phase of iron is reexamined with use of general-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave calculations. Differences in the form of the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair (VWN) local-spin-density functional used in previous studies are noted, since in previous studies significant additional approximations were made with respect to those of Vosko, Wilk, and Nusan [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] and of MacLaren, Clougherty, and Albers [Phys. Rev. B 42, 3205 (1990)]. While the results of previous linear muffin-tin orbital calculations using the VWN functional predict a bcc ferromagnetic ground state, the present calculations show that the VWN spin-correlation effects fail to stabilize a bcc ground state. Considerable sensitivity to the form of the spin interpolation is found.

  2. Spin-density distribution in the tetragonal cluster compound Cu4OCl6daca4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharko, O.; Brown, P. J.; Mys'Kiv, M.

    2010-05-01

    The spin-density distribution in Cu4OCl6daca4 (daca=diallylcyanamide) , a system containing tetrahedra of Cu2+ ions, has been determined using single-crystal polarized neutron diffraction at temperature 10 K and magnetic field 9 T. The data have been analyzed both with a spherical atom model and using a maximum entropy reconstruction. The magnetic moment on the Cu2+ ion is reduced to 0.35(1)μB and significant delocalization of spin density [0.16(3)μB] is found within the Cu4OCl6 core. The experimental spin-density distribution is compared with the predictions of ab initio density-functional calculations.

  3. Spin-density distribution in the partially magnetized organic quantum magnet F2PNNNO

    SciTech Connect

    Zheludev, Andrey I; Garlea, Vasile O; Nishihara, S.; Hosokoshi, Y.; Cousson, Alain; Gukasov, Arsen; Inoue, K.

    2007-01-01

    Polarized neutron diffraction experiments on an organic magnetic material reveal a highly skewed distribution of spin density within the magnetic molecular unit. The very large magnitude of the observed effect is due to quantum spin fluctuations. The data are in quantitative agreement with direct diagonalization results for a model spin Hamiltonian, and provide insight on the actual microscopic origin of the relevant exchange interactions.

  4. Metal-insulator transition and local moment formation: A spin-density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, A.; Leroux-Hugon, P.

    1980-01-01

    A more thorough description of the metal-insulator transition in correlated systems including local moment formation may be achieved through the spin-density functional method when compared to the Hubbard model. We have applied this method to doped semiconductors and found a transition between an insulating phase with local moments and a metallic one without moments.

  5. Optimized unrestricted Kohn-Sham potentials from ab initio spin densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Jacob, Christoph R.; Reiher, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the exchange-correlation potential from accurate ab initio electron densities can provide insights into the limitations of the currently available approximate functionals and provide guidance for devising improved approximations for density-functional theory (DFT). For open-shell systems, the spin density is introduced as an additional fundamental variable in spin-DFT. Here, we consider the reconstruction of the corresponding unrestricted Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials from accurate ab initio spin densities. In particular, we investigate whether it is possible to reconstruct the spin exchange-correlation potential, which determines the spin density in unrestricted KS-DFT, despite the numerical difficulties inherent to the optimization of potentials with finite orbital basis sets. We find that the recently developed scheme for unambiguously singling out an optimal optimized potential [Ch. R. Jacob, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 244102 (2011), 10.1063/1.3670414] can provide such spin potentials accurately. This is demonstrated for two test cases, the lithium atom and the dioxygen molecule, and target (spin) densities from full configuration interaction and complete active space self-consistent field calculations, respectively.

  6. Correlated states in linear polyenes, radicals, and ions: Exact PPP transition moments and spin densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasesha, S.; Soos, Z. G.

    1984-04-01

    The low-lying eigenstates ψn of the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model for polyenes with N≤11 carbons are found exactly as linear combinations of nonorthogonal covalent and ionic valence-bond (VB) diagrams. We extend diagrammatic VB theory to normalize ψn efficiently and to evaluate exactly transition moments, spin densities, and other matrix elements within subspaces of fixed total spin S. Charge orthogonality in the VB basis results in a block-diagonal overlap matrix whose evaluation is rapid for linear combinations of over 105 diagrams. We obtain S=0 and 1 states of all-trans decapentaene (N=Ne =10), S=1/2 states of nonatetraenyl (N=Ne =9), S=0 states of its anion and cation, and spin densities through undecapentaenyl (N=Ne =11), all with standard molecular PPP parameters. Correlation effects on excitation energies, on transition moments, and on spin densities are contrasted with one-electron Hückel results and compared with data on finite polyenes and polyacetylene. Standard PPP parameters successfully describe the 2 1Ag and 1 1Bu excitations of alternating even polyenes, their reduced oscillator strengths, the 1 1A↔1 1B transition of regular odd anions, and the nearly uniform negative and positive spin densities of regular polyene radicals.

  7. Testing for parity violation in nuclei using spin density matrices for nuclear density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B. R.; Giraud, B. G.

    2015-06-01

    The spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics is revisited for nuclear physics, in the context of the radial density functional theory. The vector part of the SDM defines a ‘hedgehog’ situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. A toy model is given as an illustrative example.

  8. Spin density and orbital optimization in open shell systems: A rational and computationally efficient proposal.

    PubMed

    Giner, Emmanuel; Angeli, Celestino

    2016-03-14

    The present work describes a new method to compute accurate spin densities for open shell systems. The proposed approach follows two steps: first, it provides molecular orbitals which correctly take into account the spin delocalization; second, a proper CI treatment allows to account for the spin polarization effect while keeping a restricted formalism and avoiding spin contamination. The main idea of the optimization procedure is based on the orbital relaxation of the various charge transfer determinants responsible for the spin delocalization. The algorithm is tested and compared to other existing methods on a series of organic and inorganic open shell systems. The results reported here show that the new approach (almost black-box) provides accurate spin densities at a reasonable computational cost making it suitable for a systematic study of open shell systems.

  9. Estimation of fiber orientation and spin density distribution by diffusion deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Wedeen, Van Jay; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2011-04-01

    A diffusion deconvolution method is proposed to apply deconvolution to the diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF) and calculate the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF), which is defined as the orientation distribution of the fiber spin density. The dODF can be obtained from q-space imaging methods such as q-ball imaging (QBI), diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), and generalized q-sampling imaging (GQI), and thus the method can be applied to various diffusion sampling schemes. A phantom study was conducted to compare the angular resolution of the fODF with the dODF, and the in vivo datasets were acquired using single-shell, two-shell, and grid sampling schemes, which were then reconstructed by QBI, GQI, and DSI, respectively. The phantom study showed that the fODF significantly improved the angular resolution over the dODF at 45- and 60-degree crossing angles. The in vivo study showed consistent fODF regardless of the applied sampling schemes and reconstruction methods, and the ability to resolve crossing fibers was improved in reduced sampling condition. The fiber spin density obtained from deconvolution showed a higher contrast-to-noise ratio than the fractional anisotropy (FA) mapping, and further application on tractography showed that the fiber spin density can be used to determine the termination of fiber tracts. In conclusion, the proposed deconvolution method is generally applicable to different q-space imaging methods. The calculated fODF improves the angular resolution and also provides a quantitative index of fiber spin density to refine fiber tracking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spin Density Distribution in Open-Shell Transition Metal Systems: A Comparative Post-Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory, and Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the CuCl2 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Caffarel, Michel; Giner, Emmanuel; Scemama, Anthony; Ramírez-Solís, Alejandro

    2014-12-09

    We present a comparative study of the spatial distribution of the spin density of the ground state of CuCl2 using Density Functional Theory (DFT), quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), and post-Hartree-Fock wave function theory (WFT). A number of studies have shown that an accurate description of the electronic structure of the lowest-lying states of this molecule is particularly challenging due to the interplay between the strong dynamical correlation effects in the 3d shell and the delocalization of the 3d hole over the chlorine atoms. More generally, this problem is representative of the difficulties encountered when studying open-shell metal-containing molecular systems. Here, it is shown that qualitatively different results for the spin density distribution are obtained from the various quantum-mechanical approaches. At the DFT level, the spin density distribution is found to be very dependent on the functional employed. At the QMC level, Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) results are strongly dependent on the nodal structure of the trial wave function. Regarding wave function methods, most approaches not including a very high amount of dynamic correlation effects lead to a much too high localization of the spin density on the copper atom, in sharp contrast with DFT. To shed some light on these conflicting results Full CI-type (FCI) calculations using the 6-31G basis set and based on a selection process of the most important determinants, the so-called CIPSI approach (Configuration Interaction with Perturbative Selection done Iteratively) are performed. Quite remarkably, it is found that for this 63-electron molecule and a full CI space including about 10(18) determinants, the FCI limit can almost be reached. Putting all results together, a natural and coherent picture for the spin distribution is proposed.

  11. Existence of minimizers for Kohn-Sham within the local spin density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontier, David

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to extend the work by Anantharaman and Cancès (2009 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré (C) 26 2425-55) and prove the existence of minimizers for the spin-polarized Kohn-Sham model in the presence of a magnetic field within the local spin density approximation. We show that for any magnetic field that vanishes at infinity, the existence of minimizers is ensured for neutral or positively charged systems. The proof relies on classical concentration-compactness techniques.

  12. Self-consistent Goedel cosmology with spin-density in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the Goedel metric (GM) for a rotating cosmology is compatible with the self-consistent formulation of the Einstein-Cartan (EC) metric-torsion theory for a spinning fluid. The proposed calculation shows, within the context of an EC theory, how to self-consistently incorporate a perfect fluid with spin density into the GM without changing the metric. It is found that the only changes produced in the GM parameters in connection with a spinning fluid are that the cosmological constant becomes slightly more negative and the sense of rotation is flipped 180 deg.

  13. Thermoelectric transport and spin density of graphene nanoribbons with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinjun; Sun, Guo-Ya

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper, we have theoretically investigated thermoelectric transport properties of armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons with Rashba spin-orbit interaction, as well as dephasing scattering processes by applying the nonequilibrium Green function method. Behaviors of electronic and thermal currents, as well as thermoelectric coefficients are studied. It is found that both electronic and thermal currents decrease, and thermoelectric properties been suppressed, with increasing strength of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. We have also studied spin split and spin density induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the graphene nanoribbons.

  14. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  15. Self-consistent Goedel cosmology with spin-density in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the Goedel metric (GM) for a rotating cosmology is compatible with the self-consistent formulation of the Einstein-Cartan (EC) metric-torsion theory for a spinning fluid. The proposed calculation shows, within the context of an EC theory, how to self-consistently incorporate a perfect fluid with spin density into the GM without changing the metric. It is found that the only changes produced in the GM parameters in connection with a spinning fluid are that the cosmological constant becomes slightly more negative and the sense of rotation is flipped 180 deg.

  16. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (CM) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide CM energy bins, each subdivided into cos(theta_CM) bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive omega photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  17. Ionization potentials of cobalt and nickel ions in the local-spin-density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S. ); Kestner, N.R. )

    1990-06-15

    In this article we report on the ionization potentials of all configurations of the Co{sup {ital n}+} and Ni{sup {ital n}+} ions obtained via transition-state calculations using local-spin-density (LSD) potentials. The calculations were performed numerically with and without modifications of the local exchange potential for fractional occupation numbers. When the exchange potential is corrected for noninteger occupation numbers, a more consistent picture of the ionization process is obtained than that given by the LSD Kohn-Sham exchange. The agreement with experimental results is also significantly improved.

  18. Spin-density-functional theory for imbalanced interacting Fermi gases in highly elongated harmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao Xianlong; Asgari, Reza

    2008-03-01

    We numerically study imbalanced two component Fermi gases with attractive interactions in highly elongated harmonic traps. An accurate parametrization formula for the ground state energy is presented for a spin-polarized attractive Gaudin-Yang model. Our studies are based on an accurate microscopic spin-density-functional theory through the Kohn-Sham scheme which employs the one-dimensional homogeneous Gaudin-Yang model with a Luther-Emery-liquid ground-state correlation as a reference system. A Thomas-Fermi approximation is examined incorporating the exchange-correlation interaction. By studying the charge and spin density profiles of the system based on these methods, we gain a quantitative understanding of the role of attractive interactions and polarization on the formation of the two-shell structure, with the coexisted Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov-type phase in the center of the trap and either the BCS superfluid phase or the normal phase at the edges of the trap. Our results are in good agreement with the recent theoretical consequences.

  19. Do Spin State and Spin Density Affect Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Saouma, Caroline T.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions in chemical and biological systems has prompted much interest in establishing and understanding the underlying factors that enable this reactivity. Arguments have been advanced that the electronic spin state of the abstractor and/or the spin-density at the abstracting atom are critical for HAT reactivity. This is consistent with the intuition derived from introductory organic chemistry courses. Herein we present an alternative view on the role of spin state and spin-density in HAT reactions. After a brief introduction, the second section introduces a new and simple fundamental kinetic analysis, which shows that unpaired spin cannot be the dominant effect. The third section examines published computational studies of HAT reactions, which indicates that the spin state affects these reactions indirectly, primarily via changes in driving force. The essay concludes with a broader view of HAT reactivity, including indirect effects of spin and other properties on reactivity. It is suggested that some of the controversy in this area may arise from the diversity of HAT reactions and their overlap with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. PMID:24416504

  20. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyeva, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-05-21

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a {pi}-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  1. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a π-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  2. Time-dependent spin-density-functional-theory description of He+-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Matthew; Kirchner, Tom; Engel, Eberhard

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical total cross-section results for all ionization and capture processes in the He+-He collision system are presented in the approximate impact energy range of 10-1000 keV/amu. Calculations were performed within the framework of time-dependent spin-density functional theory. The Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation was used to determine an accurate exchange-correlation potential in the exchange-only limit. The results of two models, one where electron translation factors in the orbitals used to calculate the potential are ignored and another where partial electron translation factors are included, are compared with available experimental data as well as a selection of previous theoretical calculations.

  3. Alkali-metal electron spin density shift induced by a helium nanodroplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-04-01

    Helium (He) nanodroplets provide a cold and virtually unperturbing environment for the study of weakly bound molecules and van der Waals aggregates. High resolution microwave spectroscopy and the detection of electron spin transitions in doped He droplets have recently become possible. Measurements of hyperfine-resolved electron spin resonance in potassium (39K) and rubidium (85Rb) atoms on the surface of He droplets show small line shifts relative to the bare atoms. These shifts were recorded for all 2I + 1 components (I is the nuclear spin) of a transition at high accuracy for He droplets ranging in size from 1000 to 15,000 He atoms. Evaluation of the spectra yields the influence of the He environment on the electron spin density at the alkali-metal nucleus. A semi-empirical model is presented that shows good qualitative agreement with the measured droplet size dependent increase of Fermi contact interaction at the nuclei of dopant K and Rb.

  4. The dipole moment of the spin density as a local indicator for phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, D.; Schmitz-Antoniak, C.; Warland, A.; Darbandi, M.; Haldar, S.; Bhandary, S.; Eriksson, O.; Sanyal, B.; Wende, H.

    2014-01-01

    The intra-atomic magnetic dipole moment - frequently called 〈Tz〉 term - plays an important role in the determination of spin magnetic moments by x-ray absorption spectroscopy for systems with nonspherical spin density distributions. In this work, we present the dipole moment as a sensitive monitor to changes in the electronic structure in the vicinity of a phase transiton. In particular, we studied the dipole moment at the Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites of magnetite as an indicator for the Verwey transition by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and density functional theory. Our experimental results prove that there exists a local change in the electronic structure at temperatures above the Verwey transition correlated to the known spin reorientation. Furthermore, it is shown that measurement of the dipole moment is a powerful tool to observe this transition in small magnetite nanoparticles for which it is usually screened by blocking effects in classical magnetometry. PMID:25041757

  5. The dipole moment of the spin density as a local indicator for phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, D; Schmitz-Antoniak, C; Warland, A; Darbandi, M; Haldar, S; Bhandary, S; Eriksson, O; Sanyal, B; Wende, H

    2014-07-21

    The intra-atomic magnetic dipole moment - frequently called ⟨Tz⟩ term - plays an important role in the determination of spin magnetic moments by x-ray absorption spectroscopy for systems with nonspherical spin density distributions. In this work, we present the dipole moment as a sensitive monitor to changes in the electronic structure in the vicinity of a phase transiton. In particular, we studied the dipole moment at the Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) sites of magnetite as an indicator for the Verwey transition by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and density functional theory. Our experimental results prove that there exists a local change in the electronic structure at temperatures above the Verwey transition correlated to the known spin reorientation. Furthermore, it is shown that measurement of the dipole moment is a powerful tool to observe this transition in small magnetite nanoparticles for which it is usually screened by blocking effects in classical magnetometry.

  6. Electrically tunable spin polarization in silicene: A multi-terminal spin density matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Son-Hsien

    2016-05-01

    Recent realized silicene field-effect transistor yields promising electronic applications. Using a multi-terminal spin density matrix approach, this paper presents an analysis of the spin polarizations in a silicene structure of the spin field-effect transistor by considering the intertwined intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit couplings, gate voltage, Zeeman splitting, as well as disorder. Coexistence of the stagger potential and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling results in spin precession, making any in-plane polarization directions reachable by the gate voltage; specifically, the intrinsic coupling allows one to electrically adjust the in-plane components of the polarizations, while the Rashba coupling to adjust the out-of-plan polarizations. Larger electrically tunable ranges of in-plan polarizations are found in oppositely gated silicene than in the uniformly gated silicene. Polarizations in different phases behave distinguishably in weak disorder regime, while independent of the phases, stronger disorder leads to a saturation value.

  7. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  8. Density functional study of EPR parameters and spin-density distribution of azurin and other blue copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Remenyi, Christian; Reviakine, Roman; Kaupp, Martin

    2007-07-19

    Modern density functional methods have been used to study spin-density distribution, g tensors, as well as Cu and ligand hyperfine tensors for azurin models, for two more blue copper proteins plastocyanin and stellacyanin, and for small model complexes. The aim was to establish a consistent computational protocol that provides a realistic description of the EPR parameters as probes of the spin-density distribution between metal and coordinated ligands in copper proteins. In agreement with earlier conclusions for plastocyanin, hybrid functionals with appreciable exact-exchange admixtures, roughly around 50%, provide the best overall agreement with all parameters. Then the bulk of the spin density is almost equally shared by the copper atom and the sulfur atom of the equatorial cysteine ligand, and the best values are obtained for copper, histidine nitrogen, and cysteine beta-proton hyperfine couplings, as well as for g(parallel). Spin-orbit effects on the EPR parameters may be appreciable and have to be treated carefully to obtain agreement with experiment. Most notably, spin-orbit effects on the (65)Cu hyperfine coupling tensors in blue copper sites are unusually large compared to more regularly coordinated Cu(II) complexes with similar spin density on copper. In addition to the often emphasized high covalency of the Cu-S(Cys) bond, the characteristically small A(parallel) component of blue copper proteins is shown to derive to a large part from a near-cancellation between negative first-order (Fermi contact and dipolar) and unusually large positive second-order (spin-orbital) contributions. The large spin-orbit effects relate to the distorted tetrahedral structures. Square planar dithiolene complexes with similar spin density on copper exhibit much more negative A(parallel) values, as the cancellation between nonrelativistic and spin-orbit contributions is less complete. Calculations on a selenocysteine-substituted variant of azurin have provided further insight

  9. Spin-density functional theory treatment of He+-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Matthew; Kirchner, Tom; Engel, Eberhard

    2016-09-01

    The He+-He collision system presents an interesting challenge to theory. On one hand, a full treatment of the three-electron dynamics constitutes a massive computational problem that has not been attempted yet; on the other hand, simplified independent-particle-model based descriptions may only provide partial information on either the transitions of the initial target electrons or on the transitions of the projectile electron, depending on the choice of atomic model potentials. We address the He+-He system within the spin-density functional theory framework on the exchange-only level. The Krieger-Li-Iafrate (KLI) approximation is used to calculate the exchange potentials for the spin-up and spin-down electrons, which ensures the correct asymptotic behavior of the effective (Kohn-Sham) potential consisting of exchange, Hartree and nuclear Coulomb potentials. The orbitals are propagated with the two-center basis generator method. In each time step, simplified versions of them are fed into the KLI equations to calculate the Kohn-Sham potential, which, in turn, is used to generate the orbitals in the next time step. First results for the transitions of all electrons and the resulting charge-changing total cross sections will be presented at the conference. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  10. Density versus spin-density functional in DFT+U and DFT+DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew; Marianetti, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The construction of multi-variable effective action theories such as DFT+U and DFT+DMFT requires the choice of a local subspace of correlated orbitals and an additional variable being either the charge density or spin density. This talk examines the differences between using charge-only and spin-dependent exchange-correlation functionals with the aim of providing guidance for constructing more sophisticated beyond-density functional theories. The widely used spin-dependent approximations to the exchange-correlation functional are found to lead to a large and in some cases unphysical effective exchange coupling within the correlated subspace. Additionally, the differences between Wannier and Projector based definitions of the correlated orbitals are examined, and only small differences are found provided that the orbitals are orthonormal and strongly localized. These results are documented in the context of the rare earth nickelates. This work is supported under the Grant DOE-ER-046169 and under the FAME grant, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  11. Calculations with the quasirelativistic local-spin-density-functional theory for high-Z atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Whitehead, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    The generalized-exchange local-spin-density-functional theory (LSD-GX) with relativistic corrections of the mass velocity and Darwin terms has been used to calculate statistical total energies for the neutral atoms, the positive ions, and the negative ions for high-Z elements. The effect of the correlation and relaxation correction on the statistical total energy is discussed. Comparing the calculated results for the ionization potentials and electron affinities for the atoms (atomic number Z from 37 to 56 and 72 to 80) with experiment, shows that for the atoms rubidium to barium both the LSD-GX and the quasirelativistic LSD-GX, with self-interaction correction, Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic's Fermi-hole parameters (Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)), and Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair's correlation correction (Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)), are very good methods for calculating ionization potentials and electron affinities. For the atoms hafnium to mercury the relativistic effect has to be considered.

  12. Waveform measurement of charge- and spin-density wavepackets in a chiral Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashisaka, M.; Hiyama, N.; Akiho, T.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2017-06-01

    In contrast to a free-electron system, a Tomonaga-Luttinger (TL) liquid in a one-dimensional (1D) electron system hosts charge and spin excitations as independent entities. When an electron is injected into a TL liquid, it transforms into charge- and spin-density wavepackets that propagate at different group velocities and move away from each other. This process, known as spin-charge separation, is the hallmark of TL physics. While spin-charge separation has been probed in momentum- or frequency-domain measurements in various 1D systems, waveforms of separated excitations, which are a direct manifestation of the TL behaviour, have been long awaited to be measured. Here, we present a waveform measurement for the pseudospin-charge separation process in a chiral TL liquid comprising quantum Hall edge channels. The charge- and pseudospin-density waveforms are captured by utilizing a spin-resolved sampling scope that records the spin-up or -down component of the excitations. This experimental technique provides full information for time evolution of the 1D electron system, including not only propagation of TL eigenmodes but also their decay in a practical device.

  13. Ytterbium monopnictides under high pressure and high temperature: Structural and electronic properties studied using local spin density approximation and Hubbard corrections approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Verma, U. P.

    2014-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of ytterbium monopnictides YbX (X = N, P) compounds have been investigated using full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals approach within the framework of density functional theory. The local spin-density approximation along with Hubbard- U corrections and spin-orbit coupling have been used for correct prediction of electronic properties. At ambient conditions ytterbium monopnictides stabilize in NaCl ( B1) structure. Also, the equilibrium properties, viz., lattice constants ( a), bulk modulus ( B 0) and its pressure derivative ( B 0 ') and total energy ( E 0) have been calculated in three other phases namely CsCl ( B2), zinc blende ( B3) and body centred tetragonal. Under compression, both YbN and YbP undergo first-order structural transition from B1 to B2 phase at 164.0 and 33.7 GPa of pressure, respectively. Obtained results show that YbX is semi-metallic in B1 phase and metallic in B2 phase. Thermal parameters such as Gruneisen parameter, Debye temperature, specific heat, thermal expansion coefficient and entropy have been determined as a function of pressure and temperature. The calculated lattice and other parameters are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical values reported earlier.

  14. Analytical O (αs) corrections to the beam frame double-spin density matrix elements of e+e-→t t ¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldamäe, L.; Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    We provide analytical results for the O (αs) corrections to the double-spin density matrix elements in the reaction e+e-→t t ¯ . These concern the elements l l , l t , l n , t t , t n , and n n of the double-spin density matrix elements where l , t , n stand for longitudinal, transverse and normal orientations with respect to the beam frame spanned by the electron and the top quark momentum.

  15. Resonance-theoretic calculation of the ground state spin density of the pπ-system of edge atoms on graphene nanodots and nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2008-12-01

    By the resonance-theoretic method zigzag graphene nanoribbons are predicted to have an antiferromagnetic ground state with a Mulliken spin density of 0.33 on the edge atoms and the armchair graphene nanoribbons are predicted to have a nonmagnetic ground state. Similar calculations predict that sawtooth graphene nanoribbons have a weakly antiferromagnetic ground state with edge atoms having a Mulliken spin density of 0.16 on the edge atoms.

  16. Effects of interaction and polarization on spin-charge separation: A time-dependent spin-density-functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianlong, Gao

    2010-03-01

    We calculate the nonequilibrium dynamic evolution of a one-dimensional system of two-component fermionic atoms after a strong local quench by using a time-dependent spin-density-functional theory. The interaction quench is also considered to see its influence on the spin-charge separation. It is shown that the charge velocity is larger than the spin velocity for the system of on-site repulsive interaction (Luttinger liquid), and vise versa for the system of on-site attractive interaction (Luther-Emery liquid). We find that both the interaction quench and polarization suppress the spin-charge separation.

  17. Electronic structure and spatial distribution of the spin density of shallow nitrogen donors in the SiC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzafarova, M. V.; Il'in, I. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Mokhov, E. N.; Soltamov, V. A.; Baranov, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    The discovery of unique magnetooptical properties of paramagnetic centers in silicon carbide, which make it possible to control spins of small arrays of centers of atomic sizes to single centers at room temperatures, using the techniques of optical detection of the magnetic resonance, posed a number of problems, among which one of the main ones is the creation of conditions under which spin relaxation effects are minimized. As studies of properties of spin nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond showed, the main contribution to spin relaxation is made by the interaction with nitrogen donors, being a major impurity in diamond. A similar problem exists for silicon carbide, since nitrogen donors are also basic background impurities. The objective of this work is to study the spatial distribution of the spin density of nitrogen donors in two basic silicon carbide polytypes, i.e., 4 H-SiC and 6 H-SiC, to use this information for minimizing the interaction of nitrogen donors with paramagnetic centers in silicon carbide. The results of the study are analyzed by magnetic resonance methods; the spin density distribution on the nearest coordination spheres of nitrogen donors occupying carbon sites in silicon carbide is determined. It is concluded that paramagnetic centers in the 4 H-SiC polytype, including silicon vacancies, can be more stable to the interactions with unpaired donor electrons, since electrons are not localized on the coordination sphere closest to the paramagnetic center in this case.

  18. Zero-field-splitting and π-electron spin densities in the lowest excited triplet state of oligothiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennati, M.; Németh, K.; Surján, P. R.; Mehring, M.

    1996-09-01

    The electronic properties of thiophene oligomers (nT, n=2-8) have been investigated in the lowest excited triplet state. Theoretical calculations of the zero field splitting parameters and of the π-electron spin density have been performed and compared with previous experimental EPR results. The calculations are based on a simple π-electron (one-electron-per-site) model including electron-electron interaction at the extended Hubbard level. Optimized bond lengths result from making them self-consistent to the corresponding bond orders via Coulson's relationship. The calculated D values decrease from D=0.0959 cm-1 for n=2 to D=0.0597 cm-1 for n=8, in agreement with EPR data. The measured as well as the calculated E values are rather small. Furthermore, we found that ZFS parameters are affected by the torsion angles between the thiophene rings. The chain length dependence of D can be rationalized comparing π-electron spin density calculations and computed bond length distortions. These clearly indicate that the triplet excitation reaches a finite extension over about four thiophene rings.

  19. Spin density wave (SDW) transition in Ru doped BaFeAs2 investigated by AC steady state calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K.; Sharma, Shilpam; Sundar, C. S.; Bharathi, A.

    2015-06-01

    Heat capacity measurements were done on sub-micron sized BaFe2-xRuxAs2 single crystals using thin film membrane based the AC steady state calorimetry technique. Noticeable thermal hysteresis is observed in the heat capacity of the BaFe2-xRuxAs2 during cooling and warming cycles, indicating first order nature of the SDW transition.

  20. Spin density wave (SDW) transition in Ru doped BaFeAs{sub 2} investigated by AC steady state calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vinod, K. Sharma, Shilpam; Sundar, C. S.; Bharathi, A.

    2015-06-24

    Heat capacity measurements were done on sub-micron sized BaFe{sub 2−x}Ru{sub x}As{sub 2} single crystals using thin film membrane based the AC steady state calorimetry technique. Noticeable thermal hysteresis is observed in the heat capacity of the BaFe{sub 2−x}Ru{sub x}As{sub 2} during cooling and warming cycles, indicating first order nature of the SDW transition.

  1. Coherent charge and spin density waves in underdoped HgBa2CuO4+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongseop A.; Xin, Yizhou; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Chan, M. K.

    2017-03-01

    Charge order in cuprate superconductors appears to be a universal characteristic, often associated with pseudogap behavior in the normal state. The central question is whether such charge ordering or the pseudogap are required for the existence of high temperature superconductivity and embody its mechanism. An important but phenomenological approach to this question is to examine whether these phenomena extend over various members of the cuprate family. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on oxygen chain-ordered single crystals of YBa2Cu3O6+y (Y123) have demonstrated temperature and magnetic field induced charge ordering that was confirmed in x-ray experiments. In the present work on high-quality single crystals of the tetragonal compound, HgBa2CuO4+δ , we use 17O NMR to investigate the interplay between charge and spin order deduced from the full quadrupolar-split NMR spectrum over a wide range of temperature and magnetic field. We have found evidence for a coherent modulation of charge and spin order in this compound. However, neither temperature nor magnetic field induced ordering was observed and we infer that this aspect of high temperature superconductivity is not universal.

  2. Charge and Spin Density Perturbation on Iron Nuclei by Non-Magnetic Impurities Substituted on the Iron Sites in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błachowski, A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper is aimed at the review of the charge and spin density perturbation on the iron nucleus in the bcc iron-based binary alloys containing as the impurity either 4d (Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd) or 5d (Os, Ir, Au) metals. Additionally, Ga was used as such impurity as well. Measurements were performed by means of the 57Fe transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. Powder X-ray diffraction data for alloys investigated show linear dependence of the lattice constant versus impurity concentration. The Mössbauer data were treated assuming random distribution of the impurity over the iron sites and additive effect for the charge density perturbation, and additive in the algebraic sense effect for the corresponding spin density perturbation. Hence, the effect of impurity depends solely on the distance between impurity and the iron nucleus under above assumptions. It has been found that impurities being further away than a third or in some cases as the second neighbor do not contribute directly to the charge and spin perturbation. On the other hand, they have usually some minor effect on the average charge and spin density. Generally, the perturbation to either charge or spin density has some oscillatory character versus distance from the impurity. The phase and period of the charge oscillation is vastly different from the phase and period of the spin oscillation in the majority of cases. Substitution of the impurities with the increasing number of 4d or 5d electrons leads to the lowering of the electron density on the iron nucleus and causes decreased band spin density on this nucleus. Subsequent impurities donate more and more d-type electrons to the band, and the latter screen more and more effectively s-like electrons. Hence, the density of the s-like electrons on the iron nucleus diminishes. Impurities with 5d electrons have generally stronger effect on the charge and spin density perturbation than impurities with 4d electrons.

  3. Planar-Chiral 1,1'-Diboryl Metallocenes: Diastereoselective Synthesis from Boryl Cyclopentadienides and Spin Density Analysis of a Diborylcobaltocene.

    PubMed

    Lerayer, Emmanuel; Renaut, Patrice; Brandès, Stéphane; Cattey, Hélène; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul; Bouhadir, Ghenwa; Bourissou, Didier; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2017-02-20

    The reaction of nonsubstituted alkali metal cyclopentadienides with haloboranes leads to ∼90:10 mixtures of isomeric diene products that can be deprotonated to give simple boryl cyclopentadienides. We extended this transformation to the sterically hindered lithium tert-butylcyclopentadienide 1 using FBMes2 (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and ClBCy2 as electrophiles. The boryl group is selectively introduced in the remote position to minimize steric congestion. The new boryl dienes are obtained as mixtures of isomers, and subsequent deprotonation with MeLi or LiHMDS affords the lithium 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienides 5a,b in yields over 95%. Direct assembling of tert-butylated boryl cyclopentadienides with MCl2 (M = Fe, Co) selectively leads to 1,1'-planar chiral ferrocenes 6a,b and cobaltocene 7. To shed light into the diastereoselective formation of 6a, DFT calculations were performed. The potential energy surface was scrutinized so as to identify and compare its diastereoisomers and conformers. This stereoselectivity is attributed to minimized steric repulsions between the tert-butyl and the BMes2 groups in the eclipsed conformation of the racemic diastereoisomers. The X-ray structures of boryl diene 2a and diboryl ferrocene 6a are reported. The electronic structure of cobaltocene 7 was analyzed by EPR and DFT calculations. The spin density of this unique open-shell complex is mainly localized on the Co center, but significant spin density is also found on the boron atoms, indicating substantial delocalization of the unpaired electron over the Lewis acid moieties. Consistently, the singly occupied molecular orbital is a combination of a Co-centered 3d orbital with π(BC) orbitals on each CpBMes2 rings. There is only weak, if any, direct M···B interaction in 6 and 7.

  4. The quasirelativistic contact interaction and effective electron and spin densities at the nucleus: A model based on weighting the electron density with the finite Gaussian nucleus model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malček, Michal; Bučinský, Lukáš; Biskupič, Stanislav; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-01

    The Infinite Order Two Component quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock contact and effective electron/spin densities of Cu, Ag, Au atoms and the chemical shifts of HgF2, Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ are presented. The effective densities for the Gaussian nucleus model based on the weighted product of electron/spin density with the Gaussian distribution of the nucleus are reported for the first time. The effective (average) electron density obtained via the derivative of the energy of the system with respect to the size of the nucleus is shown for comparison. The finite-field difference method to obtain the derivative of the energy is also considered.

  5. Singlet-triplet energy gaps for diradicals from fractional-spin density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Johnson, Erin R; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao

    2011-01-13

    Open-shell singlet diradicals are difficult to model accurately within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT). These methods are hampered by spin contamination because the KS determinant wave function is neither a pure spin state nor an eigenfunction of the S(2) operator. Here we present a theoretical foray for using single-reference closed-shell ground states to describe diradicals by fractional-spin DFT (FS-DFT). This approach allows direct, self-consistent calculation of electronic properties using the electron density corresponding to the proper spin eigenfunction. The resulting FS-DFT approach is benchmarked against diradical singlet-triplet gaps for atoms and small molecules. We have also applied FS-DFT to the singlet-triplet gaps of hydrocarbon polyacenes.

  6. Singlet-Triplet Energy Gaps for Diradicals from Fractional-Spin Density-Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Johnson, E. R.; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, W. T.

    2010-12-09

    Open-shell singlet diradicals are difficult to model accurately within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory (DFT). These methods are hampered by spin contamination because the KS determinant wave function is neither a pure spin state nor an eigenfunction of the S2 operator. Here we present a theoretical foray for using single-reference closed-shell ground states to describe diradicals by fractional-spin DFT (FS-DFT). This approach allows direct, self-consistent calculation of electronic properties using the electron density corresponding to the proper spin eigenfunction. The resulting FS-DFT approach is benchmarked against diradical singlet-triplet gaps for atoms and small molecules. We have also applied FS-DFT to the singlet-triplet gaps of hydrocarbon polyacenes.

  7. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the d-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the d-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-Tcsuperconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-Tcsuperconductors.

  8. Enhanced coherent control of carrier and spin density in a zinc-blende semiconductor by cascaded second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Martin J.; Bhat, R. D. R.; Pan, X. Y.; van Driel, H. M.; Sipe, J. E.; Smirl, Arthur L.

    2005-05-01

    Phase- and polarization-dependent optical processes involving pulses with frequencies ω and 2ω can be used to independently control electron and spin density in zinc-blende semiconductors such as GaAs. One such process is quantum interference control (QUIC) where interference between transition amplitudes associated with one- and two-photon absorption alters the carrier/spin generation rate. A second process, which has been acknowledged but not utilized, is cascaded second-harmonic (CASH) generation in which phase-dependent upconversion/downconversion between the two pulses modulates the 2ω pulse intensity and/or polarization and hence modulates the carrier or spin generation rate by single-photon absorption at 2ω. Here we report the use of (110)-oriented GaAs /AlGaAs quantum wells with a 500-nmAlGaAs buffer layer to enhance CASH and to allow independent control of spin and carrier densities. Experiments conducted with 100-fs pulses at 775 and 1550nm or at 715 and 1430nm, with different polarization states and with different sample orientations, show how QUIC and CASH processes vary with excitation frequency and demonstrate the dominant role played by CASH. We point the way to achieving nearly 100% control through CASH.

  9. Exact-exchange spin-density functional theory of Wigner localization and phase transitions in quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Thorsten; Siegmund, Marc; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-08-24

    We apply exact-exchange spin-density functional theory in the Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation to interacting electrons in quantum rings of different widths. The rings are threaded by a magnetic flux that induces a persistent current. A weak space and spin symmetry breaking potential is introduced to allow for localized solutions. As the electron-electron interaction strength described by the dimensionless parameter r(S) is increased, we observe-at a fixed spin magnetic moment-the subsequent transition of both spin sub-systems from the Fermi liquid to the Wigner crystal state. A dramatic signature of Wigner crystallization is that the persistent current drops sharply with increasing r(S). We observe simultaneously the emergence of pronounced oscillations in the spin-resolved densities and in the electron localization functions indicating a spatial electron localization showing ferrimagnetic order after both spin sub-systems have undergone the Wigner crystallization. The critical r(S)(c) at the transition point is substantially smaller than in a fully spin-polarized system and decreases further with decreasing ring width. Relaxing the constraint of a fixed spin magnetic moment, we find that on increasing r(S) the stable phase changes from an unpolarized Fermi liquid to an antiferromagnetic Wigner crystal and finally to a fully polarized Fermi liquid.

  10. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for γp → φp from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab; Meyer, Curtis A.

    2011-10-01

    Preliminary differential cross-sections and the ρMM'0 spin density matrix elements (SDME) for the reaction γρ → φp for both charged- (φ → K+K-) and neutral-mode (φ → KL0KS0) topologies obtained from CLAS are presented. Our kinematic coverage is from near production threshold (√s ˜1.97 GeV) to (√s = 2.84 GeV), with a wide coverage in the production angle. As seen in previous LEPS results, the differential cross-sections show a localized "bump" between (√s ˜2 and 2.2 GeV that is not expected from a simple Pomeron exchange picture. Comparisons between the charged- and neutral-mode results and possible effects from the K+Λ(1520) channel are discussed. Our SDME results confirm the well-known deviations from t-channel helicity conservation (TCHC) for Pomeron exchange, but s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) is also seen to be broken.

  11. Controlling electron transfer dynamics in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules by increasing unpaired spin density on the bridge.

    PubMed

    Chernick, Erin T; Mi, Qixi; Vega, Amy M; Lockard, Jenny V; Ratner, Mark A; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2007-06-21

    A t-butylphenylnitroxide (BPNO*) stable radical is attached to an electron donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system having well-defined distances between the components: MeOAn-6ANI-Ph(BPNO*)-NI, where MeOAn=p-methoxyaniline, 6ANI=4-(N-piperidinyl)naphthalene-1,8-dicarboximide, Ph=phenyl, and NI=naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide). MeOAn-6ANI, BPNO*, and NI are attached to the 1, 3, and 5 positions of the Ph bridge, respectively. Time-resolved optical and EPR spectroscopy show that BPNO* influences the spin dynamics of the photogenerated triradical states 2,4(MeOAn+*-6ANI-Ph(BPNO*)-NI-*), resulting in slower charge recombination within the triradical, as compared to the corresponding biradical lacking BPNO*. The observed spin-spin exchange interaction between the photogenerated radicals MeOAn+* and NI-* is not altered by the presence of BPNO*. However, the increased spin density on the bridge greatly increases radical pair (RP) intersystem crossing from the photogenerated singlet RP to the triplet RP. Rapid formation of the triplet RP makes it possible to observe a biexponential decay of the total RP population with components of tau=740 ps (0.75) and 104 ns (0.25). Kinetic modeling shows that the faster decay rate is due to rapid establishment of an equilibrium between the triplet RP and the neutral triplet state resulting from charge recombination, whereas the slower rate monitors recombination of the singlet RP to ground state.

  12. Multicenter Validation of Spin-Density Projection-Assisted R2-MRI for the Noninvasive Measurement of Liver Iron Concentration

    PubMed Central

    St Pierre, Tim G; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Elalfy, Mohsen; Al Jefri, Abdullah; Al Zir, Kusai; Daar, Shahina; Habr, Dany; Kriemler-Krahn, Ulrike; Taher, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based techniques for assessing liver iron concentration (LIC) have been limited by single scanner calibration against biopsy. Here, the calibration of spin-density projection-assisted (SDPA) R2-MRI (FerriScan®) in iron-overloaded β-thalassemia patients treated with the iron chelator, deferasirox, for 12 months is validated. Methods SDPA R2-MRI measurements and percutaneous needle liver biopsy samples were obtained from a subgroup of patients (n = 233) from the ESCALATOR trial. Five different makes and models of scanner were used in the study. Results LIC, derived from mean of MRI- and biopsy-derived values, ranged from 0.7 to 50.1 mg Fe/g dry weight. Mean fractional differences between SDPA R2-MRI- and biopsy-measured LIC were not significantly different from zero. They were also not significantly different from zero when categorized for each of the Ishak stages of fibrosis and grades of necroinflammation, for subjects aged 3 to <8 versus ≥8 years, or for each scanner model. Upper and lower 95% limits of agreement between SDPA R2-MRI and biopsy LIC measurements were 74 and −71%. Conclusion The calibration curve appears independent of scanner type, patient age, stage of liver fibrosis, grade of necroinflammation, and use of deferasirox chelation therapy, confirming the clinical usefulness of SDPA R2-MRI for monitoring iron overload. Magn Reson Med 71:2215–2223, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23821350

  13. Spin density in YTiO3: I. Joint refinement of polarized neutron diffraction and magnetic x-ray diffraction data leading to insights into orbital ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibalin, I. A.; Yan, Z.; Voufack, A. B.; Gueddida, S.; Gillon, B.; Gukasov, A.; Porcher, F.; Bataille, A. M.; Morini, F.; Claiser, N.; Souhassou, M.; Lecomte, C.; Gillet, J.-M.; Ito, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakurai, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Hoffmann, C. M.; Wang, X. P.

    2017-08-01

    Orbital ordering below 30 K was previously observed in the ferromagnetic YTiO3 compound both by polarized neutron diffraction (PND) and x-ray magnetic diffraction (XMD). In this paper we report a procedure for the joint refinement of a unique spin-density model based on both PND and XMD data. The distribution of the unpaired 3 d electron of titanium is clearly seen on the magnetization density reconstructed by the maximum entropy method from the PND data collection at 5 K. The Ti3+ 3 d orbital populations obtained by joint model refinement are discussed in terms of the orbital ordering scheme. Small but significant magnetic moments on apical oxygen O1 and yttrium atoms are found. The agreement between experimental and theoretical spin densities obtained using density functional theory is discussed.

  14. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the Qb semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the Qa site.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2011-04-13

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites, using samples of (15)N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe(2+) exchanged for diamagnetic Zn(2+), prepared in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the Q(A) SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J.2007, 92, 671-682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6-5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the Q(B) SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T ≈ 5.2, 3.7 MHz and T ≈ 1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the Q(B) site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the Q(B) SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T = 5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 N(δ)H···O(4) (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T = 3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the Q(B) site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the Q(A) site, consistent with available experimental data for (13)C and (17)O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for Q

  15. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the QB semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the QA site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Narasimhulu, Kupala V.; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O’Malley, Patrick J.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the QA and QB sites, using samples of 15N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe2+ exchanged for diamagnetic Zn2+, prepared in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the QA SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J. 2007, 92, 671–682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6–5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the QB SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T~5.2, 3.7 MHz and T~1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the QB site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the QB SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T=5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 NδH…O4 (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T =3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the QB site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the QA site, consistent with available experimental data for 13C and 17O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for QB function and comparisons with the QA site are discussed

  16. Inelastic light scattering by electrons in GaAs quantum wires: Spin-density, charge-density and single-particle excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeller, A.; Goñi, A. R.; Pinczuk, A.; Weiner, J. S.; Calleja, J. M.; Dennis, B. S.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    In inelastic light scattering experiments we observe for the first time clearly resolved one dimensional (1D) intersubband spin-density excitations. Together with new structure at energies close to the 2D intersubband transitions, these observations display the formation of 1D subbands. The depolarization shift ( Wdep) and the excitonic shift ( Wxc) can be deduced approximately from our experiments. These shifts are of special interest because they are related to the direct and exchange-correlation terms of the electron-electron interaction. We find ratios of the shifts ( Wxc/ Wdep) of up to 55%.

  17. Insights on spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms in crystals of azido copper(II) dinuclear complexes through the electron spin density Source Function.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Carlo; Macetti, Giovanni; Lo Presti, Leonardo

    2017-08-01

    The Source Function (SF) tool was applied to the analysis of the theoretical spin density in azido Cu(II) dinuclear complexes, where the azido group, acting as a coupler between the Cu(II) cations, is linked to the metal centres either in an end-on or in an end-end fashion. Results for only the former structural arrangement are reported in the present paper. The SF highlights to which extent the magnetic centres contribute to determine the local spin delocalization and polarization at any point in the dimetallic complex and whether an atom or group of atoms of the ligands act in favour or against a given local spin delocalization/polarization. Ball-and-stick atomic SF percentage representations allow for a visualization of the magnetic pathways and of the specific role played by each atom along these paths, at given reference points. Decomposition of SF contributions in terms of a magnetic and of a relaxation component provides further insight. Reconstruction of partial spin densities by means of the Source Function has for the first time been introduced. At variance with the standard SF percentage representations, such reconstructions offer a simultaneous view of the sources originating from specific subsets of contributing atoms, in a selected molecular plane or in the whole space, and are therefore particularly informative. The SF tool is also used to evaluate the accuracy of the analysed spin densities. It is found that those obtained at the unrestricted B3LYP DFT level, relative to those computed at the CASSCF(6,6) level, greatly overestimate spin delocalization to the ligands, but comparatively underestimate magnetic connection (spin transmission) among atoms, along the magnetic pathways. As a consequence of its excessive spin delocalization, the UB3LYP method also overestimates spin polarization mechanisms between the paramagnetic centres and the ligands. Spin delocalization measures derived from the refinement of Polarized Neutron Diffraction data seem in

  18. Density functional calculations of spin-wave dispersion curves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Leonard; Niu, Qian

    1998-03-01

    Extending the density functional method of Kubler et al( J. Kubler et al, J. Phys. F 18, 469 (1983) and J. Phys. Condens. Matter 1, 8155 (1989). ) for calcuating spin density wave ground states (but not making their atomic sphere approximation which requires a constant spin polarization direction in each WS sphere) we dicuss the calculation of frozen spin-wave eigenfunctions and their total energies. From these and the results of Niu's talk, we describe the calculation of spin-wave frequencies.

  19. Density functional versus spin-density functional and the choice of correlated subspace in multivariable effective action theories of electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2015-07-01

    Modern extensions of density functional theory such as the density functional theory plus U and the density functional theory plus dynamical mean field theory require choices, including selection of variable (charge vs spin density) for the density functional and specification of the correlated subspace. This paper examines these issues in the context of the "plus U" extensions of density functional theory, in which additional correlations on specified correlated orbitals are treated using a Hartree-Fock approximation. Differences between using charge-only or spin-density-dependent exchange-correlation functionals and between Wannier and projector-based definitions of the correlated orbitals are considered on the formal level and in the context of the structural energetics of the rare-earth nickelates. It is demonstrated that theories based on spin-dependent exchange-correlation functionals can lead to large and in some cases unphysical effective on-site exchange couplings. Wannier and projector-based definitions of the correlated orbitals lead to similar behavior near ambient pressure, but substantial differences are observed at large pressures. Implications for other beyond density functional methods such as the combination of density functional and dynamical mean field theory are discussed.

  20. Conduction-electron spin resonance and spin-density fluctuations of CoS2-xSex (x≤0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadulla, F.

    2011-10-01

    I report the observation of conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) in the paramagnetic phase of weak itinerant ferromagnet (WIFM) CoS2. The observation of a narrow Lorentzian line above TC is interpreted as a signature of long-wavelength exchange-enhanced spin-density fluctuations, whose amplitude increases up to T* ≈ 2 TC. I propose that this temperature marks a characteristic energy scale below which strong exchange interactions between spin fluctuations determine the spin lifetime. This study shows that the characteristic parameters of CESR are very sensitive to electronic correlations and can be very useful in the study of the spin interactions and relaxation in itinerant electron systems in the intermediate coupling regime.

  1. Electron Spin Density on the N-Donor Atoms of Cu(II)-(Bis)oxamidato Complexes As Probed by a Pulse ELDOR Detected NMR.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Azar; Zaripov, Ruslan; Salikhov, Kev; Voronkova, Violeta; Vavilova, Evgeniya; Abdulmalic, Mohammad A; Rüffer, Tobias; Büchner, Bernd; Kataev, Vladislav

    2015-10-29

    We have applied the pulse ELDOR detected NMR (EDNMR) technique to determine the tensors of the transferred Cu (S = 1/2) - (14)N (I = 1) hyperfine (HF) interaction in single crystals of diamagnetically diluted mononuclear o-phenylenebis(N(R)-oxamide) complexes of [(n)Bu4N]2[Cu(opboR2)] (R = Et 1, (n)Pr 2) (1%) in a host lattice of [(n)Bu4N]2[Ni(opboR2)] (R = Et 3, (n)Pr 4) (99%) (1@3 and 2@4)). To facilitate the analysis of our EDNMR data and to analyze possible manifestations of the nuclear quadrupole interaction in the EDNMR spectra, we have treated a model electron-nuclear system of the coupled S = 1/2 and I = 1 spins using the spin density matrix formalism. It appears that this interaction yields a peculiar asymmetry of the EDMR spectra that manifests not only in the shift of the positions of the EDNMR lines that correspond to the forbidden EPR transitions, as expected, but also in the intensities of the EDNMR lines. The symmetric shape of the experimental spectra suggests the conclusion that, in the studied complexes, the quadrupole interaction is negligible. This has simplified the analysis of the spectra. The HF tensors of all four N donor atoms could be accurately determined. On the basis of the HF tensors, an estimate of the spin density transferred from the central paramagnetic Cu(II) ion to the N donor atoms reveals its unequal distribution. We discuss possible implications of our estimates for the magnetic exchange paths and interaction strengths in respective trinuclear complexes [Cu3(opboR2) (pmdta)2](NO3)2 (R = Et 6, (n)Pr 7).

  2. Chiral symmetry and density waves in quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, E.; Tatsumi, T.

    2005-06-01

    A density wave in quark matter is discussed at finite temperature, which occurs along with the chiral condensation, and is described by a dual standing wave in scalar and pseudoscalar condensates on the chiral circle. The mechanism is quite similar to that for the spin density wave suggested by Overhauser and entirely reflects many-body effects. It is found within a mean-field approximation for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model that the chiral-condensed phase with the density wave develops at a high-density region just outside the usual chiral-transition line in phase diagram. A magnetic property of the density wave is also elucidated.

  3. Bi-exponential proton transverse relaxation rate (R2) image analysis using RF field intensity-weighted spin density projection: potential for R2 measurement of iron-loaded liver.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul R; Chua-anusorn, Wanida; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2003-06-01

    A bi-exponential proton transverse relaxation rate (R(2)) image analysis technique has been developed that enables the discrimination of dual compartment transverse relaxation behavior in systems with rapid transverse relaxation enhancement. The technique is particularly well suited to single spin-echo imaging studies where a limited number of images are available for analysis. The bi-exponential R(2) image analysis is facilitated by estimation of the initial proton spin density signal within the region of interest weighted by the RF field intensities. The RF field intensity-weighted spin density map is computed by solving a boundary value problem presented by a high spin density, long T(2) material encompassing the region for analysis. The accuracy of the bi-exponential R(2) image analysis technique is demonstrated on a simulated dual compartment manganese chloride phantom system with relaxation rates and relative population densities between the two compartments similar to the bi-exponential transverse relaxation behavior expected of iron loaded liver. Results from analysis of the phantoms illustrate the potential of bi-exponential R(2) image analysis with RF field intensity-weighted spin density projection for quantifying transverse relaxation enhancement as it occurs in liver iron overload.

  4. Transverse spin current in the s-wave/p-wave Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Chan, K S; Lin, Zijing; Wang, J

    2011-10-19

    We report a theoretical study on spin transport in the hybrid Josephson junction composed of singlet s-wave and triplet p-wave superconductor. The node of the triplet pair potential is considered perpendicular to the interface of the junction. Based on a symmetry analysis, we predict that there is no net spin density at the interface of the junction but instead a transverse mode-resolved spin density can exist and a nonzero spin current can flow transversely along the interface of the junction. The predictions are numerically demonstrated by means of the lattice Matsubara Green's function method. It is also shown that, when a normal metal is sandwiched in between two superconductors, both spin current and transverse mode-resolved spin density are only residing at two interfaces due to the smearing effect of the multimode transport. Our findings are useful for identifying the pairing symmetry of the p-wave superconductor and generating spin current. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  5. Implication of nonintegral occupation number and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the local-spin-density approximation applied to finite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S.

    1989-02-01

    In electronic-structure calculations for finite systems using the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, it is assumed that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation should obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics. In order to comply with this assumption for some of the transition-metal atoms, a nonintegral occupation number is used which also minimizes the total energy. It is shown here that for finite systems it is not necessary that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation obey FD statistics. It is also shown that the Kohn-Sham exchange potential used in all LSD models is correct only for integer occupation number. With a noninteger occupation number the LSD exchange potential will be smaller than that given by the Kohn-Sham potential. Ab initio self-consistent spin-polarized calculations have been performed numerically for the total energy of an iron atom. It is found that the ground state belongs to the 3d/sup 6/4s/sup 2/ configuration. The ionization potentials of all the Fe/sup n//sup +/ ions are reported and are in agreement with experiment.

  6. Gauge invariant gluon spin operator for spinless nonlinear wave solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Kim, Youngman; Pak, D. G.; Tsukioka, Takuya; Zhang, P. M.

    2017-04-01

    We consider nonlinear wave type solutions with intrinsic mass scale parameter and zero spin in a pure SU(2) quantum chromodynamics (QCD). A new stationary solution which can be treated as a system of static Wu-Yang monopole dressed in off-diagonal gluon field is proposed. A remarkable feature of such a solution is that it possesses a finite energy density everywhere. All considered nonlinear wave type solutions have common features: presence of the mass scale parameter, nonvanishing projection of the color fields along the propagation direction and zero spin. The last property requires revision of the gauge invariant definition of the spin density operator which is supposed to produce spin one states for the massless vector gluon field. We construct a gauge invariant definition of the classical gluon spin density operator which is unique and Lorentz frame independent.

  7. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L)more » $$K\\bar{K}$$ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with p$$K\\bar{K}$$ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.« less

  8. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp →ϕp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp →ϕp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s ) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the ϕ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the ϕ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (ϕ →K+K-) and neutral- (ϕ →KS0KL0) KK ¯ decay modes of the ϕ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K- track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed ϕ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-modes, respectively. Possible effects from K+Λ* channels with pKK ¯ final states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive ϕ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  9. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) $K\\bar{K}$ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with p$K\\bar{K}$ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  10. Communication: spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and MS = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH2CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  11. Vibronic Characteristics and Spin-Density Distributions in Bacteriochlorins as Revealed by Spectroscopic Studies of 16 Isotopologues. Implications for Energy- and Electron-Transfer in Natural Photosynthesis and Artificial Solar-Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Diers, James R; Tang, Qun; Hondros, Christopher J; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bocian, David F

    2014-06-26

    Vibronic characteristics and spin-density distributions in the core bacteriochlorin macrocycle were revealed by spectroscopic and theoretical studies of 16 isotopologues. The vibrational modes in copper bacteriochlorin isotopologues were examined via resonance Raman and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The resonance Raman spectra exhibit an exceptional sparcity of vibronically active modes of the core macrocycle, in contrast with the rich spectra of the natural bacteriochlorophylls. The Qy-excitation resonance Raman spectrum is dominated by a single mode at 727 cm(-1), which calculations suggest is due to a symmetrical accordion-like deformation of the five-atom Cm(CaNCa)pyrroleCm portion of the ring core. This deformation also dominates the vibronic features in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The spin-density distributions in the π-cation radical of the zinc bacteriochlorin isotopologues were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The spectra indicate a significant electron/spin density (ρ ∼ 0.1) on each meso-carbon atom. This observation contradicts the predictions of early calculations that have been assumed to be correct for nearly four decades. Collectively, these findings have implications for how the structural features that characterize natural bacteriochlorophylls might influence energy- and electron-transfer processes in photosynthesis and alter the thinking on the design of synthetic, bacteriochlorin-based arrays for solar-energy conversion.

  12. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    wavelengths, or can lead to spin waves that are characterized by a square root dependence on the wave number at long wavelength. The author also presents new results for spin waves in a fermi liquid that has a spin density wave in its ground state. A spin density wave is characterized by a spiral magnetization in the ground state, and is observed to occur in materials such as MnSi.

  13. Kohn-Sham calculations with self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density exchange-correlation energy functional for atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiqiang; Krieger, J. B.; Li, Yan; Iafrate, G. J.

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the accuracy of the local-spin-density approximation with orbital-density-dependent self-interaction correction (LSDSIC) as proposed by Perdew and Zunger within a Kohn-Sham approach in which electrons with a given spin projection all move in a single optimized effective potential (OEP). We have also studied the accuracy of the Krieger-Li-Iafrate (KLI) approximation to the OEP for the same energy functional in order to assess its applicability to systems in which the integral equation for the OEP cannot be reduced to a one-dimensional problem, e.g., molecules. Self-consistent Kohn-Sham LSDSIC calculations have been performed for atoms with atomic number Z=1-20 in the exchange-only case for the total energy, the highest-occupied orbital energy ɛm, and the expectation value of r2. In addition, the structure of the resulting exchange potential is examined and compared with the exact exchange-only density-functional theory (OEP method with Hartree-Fock exchange-energy functional) results. Furthermore, we display ɛm, the ionization potential I, and the electron affinity A when both exchange and correlation energy effects are included. Finally, we also consider the results of evaluating the LSDSIC energy functional by employing the exact (in the central-field approximation) single particle orbitals as proposed by Harrison. We find that the LSDSIC energy functional generally leads to calculated values that are superior to those provided by the LSD approximation and that the KLI approximation yields results in excellent agreement with the corresponding exact OEP results for this energy functional. In particular, quantities strongly related to the behavior of the valence electrons are nearly identical in both the OEP and KLI calculations, i.e., the difference between the and ɛm is less than 0.2% on average, while the difference between the calculated I is less than 0.2 millihartree on average with the corresponding difference of only 0

  14. Spin-density matrix elements for γp→K*0Σ+ at Eγ=1.85-3.0 GeV with evidence for the κ(800) meson exchange.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S H; Hicks, K; Ahn, J K; Nakano, T; Ahn, D S; Chang, W C; Chen, J Y; Daté, S; Ejiri, H; Fujimura, H; Fujiwara, M; Fukui, S; Gohn, W; Hotta, T; Imai, K; Ishikawa, T; Joo, K; Kato, Y; Kohri, H; Kon, Y; Lee, H S; Maeda, Y; Miyabe, M; Mibe, T; Morino, Y; Muramatsu, N; Nakatsugawa, Y; Niiyama, M; Noumi, H; Oh, Y; Ohashi, Y; Ohta, T; Oka, M; Parker, J; Rangacharyulu, C; Ryu, S Y; Sawada, T; Sugaya, Y; Sumihama, M; Tsunemi, T; Uchida, M; Ungaro, M; Yosoi, M

    2012-03-02

    The exclusive reaction γp→K(+)π(-)Σ(+) was measured for the first time using linearly polarized photons at beam energies from 1.85 to 2.96 GeV. Angular distributions in the rest frame of the K(+)π(-) system were fitted to extract spin-density matrix elements of the K(*0) decay. The measured parity spin asymmetry shows that natural-parity exchange is dominant in this reaction. This result clearly indicates the need for t-channel exchange of the κ(800) scalar meson.

  15. Spin density distribution of an organic high-spin molecule, biphenyl-3,3‧-bis(phenylmethylene), as studied by 1H-ENDOR and a UHF Hubbard calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Masayuki; Teki, Yoshio; Takui, Takeji; Kinoshita, Takamasa; Itoh, Koichi

    1990-10-01

    The π-spin density distribution in the first-excited triplet state of biphenyl-3,3'-bis(phenylmethylene) has been determined by single-crystal 1H-ENDOR. This organic high-spin molecule is unusual in that it violates the well-established spin prediction based on a simple MO theory plus Hund's rule. This unique spin alignment has been clarified as being due to spin correlation in view of the spin distribution observed as well as calculated using a UHF generalized Hubbard model.

  16. Communication: Spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: Analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Dipayan Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and M{sub S} = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH{sub 2}CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  17. Torsion as a source of expansion in a Bianchi type-I universe in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan theory of a perfect fluid with spin density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradas, James C.; Fennelly, Alphonsus J.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a generalized (or 'power law') inflationary phase arises naturally and inevitably in a simple (Bianchi type-I) anisotropic cosmological model in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan gravitation theory with the improved stress-energy-momentum tensor with the spin density of Ray and Smalley (1982, 1983). This is made explicit by an analytical solution of the field equations of motion of the fluid variables. The inflation is caused by the angular kinetic energy density due to spin. The model further elucidates the relationship between fluid vorticity, the angular velocity of the inertially dragged tetrads, and the precession of the principal axes of the shear ellipsoid. Shear is not effective in damping the inflation.

  18. Torsion as a source of expansion in a Bianchi type-I universe in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan theory of a perfect fluid with spin density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradas, James C.; Fennelly, Alphonsus J.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a generalized (or 'power law') inflationary phase arises naturally and inevitably in a simple (Bianchi type-I) anisotropic cosmological model in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan gravitation theory with the improved stress-energy-momentum tensor with the spin density of Ray and Smalley (1982, 1983). This is made explicit by an analytical solution of the field equations of motion of the fluid variables. The inflation is caused by the angular kinetic energy density due to spin. The model further elucidates the relationship between fluid vorticity, the angular velocity of the inertially dragged tetrads, and the precession of the principal axes of the shear ellipsoid. Shear is not effective in damping the inflation.

  19. 63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance study of Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)Cu(1-x)Ni(x)O(4): Ni-induced spin density oscillation and modification of the low energy spin fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Williams, G V M; Jurkutat, M; Rybicki, D; Haase, J

    2011-02-23

    We report the results from a (63)Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the electron-doped high temperature superconducting cuprate (HTSC) Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)Cu(1-x)Ni(x)O(4). We find that Ni induces a magnetic broadening of the (63)Cu NMR spectra that can be interpreted in terms of an induced spin density oscillation about the Ni site, similar to that reported from (63)Cu NMR measurements on the hole-doped HTSCs when Zn is partially substituted for Cu. There is also an additional temperature-dependent contribution to the (63)Cu spin-lattice relaxation rate that can be interpreted in terms of an Ni-induced modification of the low energy spin fluctuations. Furthermore, the spin fluctuations are intrinsically spatially inhomogeneous and additional inhomogeneities are induced by Ni.

  20. Direct Observation of Spin- and Charge-Density Waves in a Luttinger Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin; Marcum, Andrew; Mawardi Ismail, Arif; Fonta, Francisco; O'Hara, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    At low energy, interacting fermions in one dimension (e.g. electrons in quantum wires or fermionic atoms in 1D waveguides) should behave as Luttinger liquids. In stark contrast to Fermi liquids, the low-energy elementary excitations in Luttinger liquids are collective sound-like modes that propagate independently as spin-density and/or charge-density (i.e. particle-density) waves with generally unequal, and interaction-dependent, velocities. Here we aim to unambiguously confirm this hallmark feature of the Luttinger liquid - the phenomenon of spin-charge separation - by directly observing in real space the dynamics of spin-density and ``charge''-density waves excited in an ultracold gas of spin-1/2 fermions confined in an array of 1D optical waveguides. Starting from a two-component mixture of 6 Li atoms harmonically confined along each of the 1D waveguides, we excite low lying normal modes of the trapped system - namely the spin dipole and density dipole and quadrupole modes - and measure their frequency as a function of interaction strength. Luttinger liquid theory predicts that the spin dipole frequency is strongly dependent on interaction strength whereas the density dipole and quadrupole mode frequencies are relatively insensitive. We will also discuss extending our approach to exciting localized spin density and particle density wavepackets which should propagate at different velocities. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  1. Interplay between charge density wave and antiferromagnetic order in GdNiC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, N.; Shimomura, S.; Mikami, K.; Nogami, Y.; Nakao, H.; Onodera, H.

    2017-02-01

    The correlation between the charge density wave (CDW) and f local moments is observed in GdNiC2 by means of x-ray diffraction in a magnetic field. Various kinds of electronic states exist in the magnetic field. The intensity of the CDW peak changes in the successive transitions and the commensurate-incommensurate transition of the CDW takes place as well. The successive transitions are explained in terms of a cooperative effect of the Peierls instability and the spin Friedel oscillation, in which the antiferromagnetic order of the f local moments is coupled to the spin density wave coexisting with the CDW of the conduction electron.

  2. Charge controlled changes in the cluster and spin dynamics of Sc3N@C80(CF3)2: the flexible spin density distribution and its impact on ESR spectra.

    PubMed

    Popov, Alexey A; Dunsch, Lothar

    2011-05-21

    Cluster and spin dynamics of a Sc(3)N@C(80)(CF(3))(2) derivative are studied by DFT in different charge states, from -3 to +1. For the neutral Sc(3)N@C(80)(CF(3))(2), static DFT computations of many cluster conformers as well as Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) show that addition of two CF(3) groups to Sc(3)N@C(80) significantly changes dynamics of the Sc(3)N cluster: instead of free rotation as in Sc(3)N@C(80), the cluster in Sc(3)N@C(80)(CF(3))(2) exhibits only hindered motions. Similar cluster dynamics is found in the mono- and trianions of Sc(3)N@C(80)(CF(3))(2), while free rotation of the cluster is found in the cation. In the radical species, motions of the cluster dramatically change spin-density distribution. Spin populations of the metal atoms and the carbon cage are followed along the BOMD trajectories to reveal the details of the spin-flow. (45)Sc ESR hyperfine coupling constants integrated over BOMD trajectories are found to be substantially different from the results of static DFT computations, which emphasizes that cluster dynamics should be taken into account for reliable predictions of spectroscopic properties. © The Owner Societies 2011

  3. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  4. Optical and Hall conductivities of a thermally disordered two-dimensional spin-density wave : two-particle response in the pseudogap regime of electron-doped high-T{sub c} superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.; Millis, A. J.

    2011-03-18

    We calculate the frequency-dependent longitudinal ({sigma}{sub xx}) and Hall ({sigma}{sub xy}) conductivities for two-dimensional metals with thermally disordered antiferromagnetism using a generalization of a theoretical model, involving a one-loop quasistatic fluctuation approximation, which was previously used to calculate the electron self-energy. The conductivities are calculated from the Kubo formula, with current vertex function treated in a conserving approximation satisfying the Ward identity. In order to obtain a finite dc limit, we introduce phenomenologically impurity scattering, characterized by a relaxation time {tau}. {sigma}{sub xx}({Omega}) satisfies the f-sum rule. For the infinitely peaked spin-correlation function, {chi}(q){proportional_to}{delta}(q-Q), we recover the expressions for the conductivities in the mean-field theory of the ordered state. When the spin-correlation length {zeta} is large but finite, both {sigma}{sub xx} and {sigma}{sub xy} show behaviors characteristic of the state with long-range order. The calculation runs into difficulty for {Omega} {approx}< 1/{tau}. The difficulties are traced to an inaccurate treatment of the very-low-energy density of states within the one-loop quasistatic approximation for the self-energy. The results for {sigma}{sub xx}({Omega}) and {sigma}{sub xy}({Omega}) are qualitatively consistent with data on electron-doped cuprates when {Omega} > 1/{tau}.

  5. Alternative route to charge density wave formation in multiband systems.

    PubMed

    Eiter, Hans-Martin; Lavagnini, Michela; Hackl, Rudi; Nowadnick, Elizabeth A; Kemper, Alexander F; Devereaux, Thomas P; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Analytis, James G; Fisher, Ian R; Degiorgi, Leonardo

    2013-01-02

    Charge and spin density waves, periodic modulations of the electron, and magnetization densities, respectively, are among the most abundant and nontrivial low-temperature ordered phases in condensed matter. The ordering direction is widely believed to result from the Fermi surface topology. However, several recent studies indicate that this common view needs to be supplemented. Here, we show how an enhanced electron-lattice interaction can contribute to or even determine the selection of the ordering vector in the model charge density wave system ErTe(3). Our joint experimental and theoretical study allows us to establish a relation between the selection rules of the electronic light scattering spectra and the enhanced electron-phonon coupling in the vicinity of band degeneracy points. This alternative proposal for charge density wave formation may be of general relevance for driving phase transitions into other broken-symmetry ground states, particularly in multiband systems, such as the iron-based superconductors.

  6. Alternative route to charge density wave formation in multiband systems

    PubMed Central

    Eiter, Hans-Martin; Lavagnini, Michela; Hackl, Rudi; Nowadnick, Elizabeth A.; Kemper, Alexander F.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Analytis, James G.; Fisher, Ian R.; Degiorgi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Charge and spin density waves, periodic modulations of the electron, and magnetization densities, respectively, are among the most abundant and nontrivial low-temperature ordered phases in condensed matter. The ordering direction is widely believed to result from the Fermi surface topology. However, several recent studies indicate that this common view needs to be supplemented. Here, we show how an enhanced electron–lattice interaction can contribute to or even determine the selection of the ordering vector in the model charge density wave system ErTe3. Our joint experimental and theoretical study allows us to establish a relation between the selection rules of the electronic light scattering spectra and the enhanced electron–phonon coupling in the vicinity of band degeneracy points. This alternative proposal for charge density wave formation may be of general relevance for driving phase transitions into other broken-symmetry ground states, particularly in multiband systems, such as the iron-based superconductors. PMID:23248317

  7. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-07-27

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here in this study we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

  8. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-10-01

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

  9. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; ...

    2015-07-27

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here in this study we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviourmore » of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.« less

  10. Electronic structures and spin density distributions of BrO2 and (HO)2BrO radicals. Mechanisms for avoidance of hypervalency and for spin delocalization and spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Camasta, Cory

    2013-10-21

    The results are reported of an ab initio study of bromine dioxide BrO2, 1, and of the T-shaped trans- and cis-dihydroxides 2 and 3 of dihydrogen bromate (HO)2BrO. The thermochemistry has been explored of potential synthetic routes to (HO)2BrO involving water addition to BrO2, hydroxyl addition to bromous acid HOBrO, 4, protonation/reduction of bromic acid HOBrO2, 5, via tautomers 6-8 of protonated bromic acid, and by reduction/protonation of bromic acid via radical anion [HOBrO2](-), 9. The potential energy surface analyses were performed at the MP2(full)/6-311G* level (or better) and with the consideration of aqueous solvation at the SMD(MP2(full)/6-311G*) level (or better), and higher-level energies were computed at levels up to QCISD(full,T)/6-311++G(2df,2pd)//MP2. The addition of RO radical to bromous acid or bromite esters and the reduction of protonated bromic acid or protonated bromate esters are promising leads for possible synthetic exploration. Spin density distributions and molecular electrostatic potentials were computed at the QCISD(full)/6-311G*//MP2(full)/6-311G* level to characterize the electronic structures of 1-3. Both radicals employ maximally occupied (pseudo) π-systems to transfer electron density from bromine to the periphery. While the formation of the (3c-5e) π-system suffices to avoid hypervalency in 1, the formation of the (4c-7e) π-system in 2 or 3 still leaves the bromine formally hypervalent and (HO)2BrO requires delocalization of bromine density into σ*-SMOs over the trans O-Br-O moiety. Molecular orbital theory is employed to describe the mechanisms for the avoidance of hypervalency and for spin delocalization and spin polarization. The (4c-7e) π-system in 2 is truly remarkable in that it contains five π-symmetric spin molecular orbitals (SMO) with unique shapes.

  11. Density wave like transport anomalies in surface doped Na2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlawat, Kavita; Singh, Yogesh

    2017-05-01

    We report that the surface conductivity of Na2IrO3 crystal is extremely tunable by high energy Ar plasma etching and can be tuned from insulating to metallic with increasing etching time. Temperature dependent electrical transport for the metallic samples show signatures of first order phase transitions which are consistent with charge or spin density wave like phase transitions predicted recently. Additionally, grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) reveal that the room temperature surface structure of Na2IrO3 does not change after plasma etching.

  12. Roles of Hund's rule coupling in excitonic density-wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2014-12-01

    Excitonic density-wave states realized by the quantum condensation of electron-hole pairs (or excitons) are studied in the two-band Hubbard model with Hund's rule coupling and the pair hopping term. Using the variational cluster approximation, we calculate the grand potential of the system and demonstrate that Hund's rule coupling always stabilizes the excitonic spin-density-wave state and destabilizes the excitonic charge-density-wave state and that the pair hopping term enhances these effects. The characteristics of these excitonic density-wave states are discussed using the calculated single-particle spectral function, density of states, condensation amplitude, and pair coherence length. Implications of our results in the materials' aspects are also discussed.

  13. Modulated spin helicity stabilized by incommensurate orbital density waves in a quadruple perovskite manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. D.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Bombardi, A.; Martin, C.; Chapon, L. C.; Radaelli, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Through a combination of neutron diffraction and Landau theory we describe the spin ordering in the ground state of the quadruple perovskite manganite CaMn7O12 —a magnetic multiferroic supporting an incommensurate orbital density wave that onsets above the magnetic ordering temperature, TN 1=90 K. The multi-k magnetic structure in the ground state was found to be a nearly-constant-moment helix with modulated spin helicity, which oscillates in phase with the orbital occupancies on the Mn3 + sites via trilinear magneto-orbital coupling. Our phenomenological model also shows that, above TN 2=48 K, the primary magnetic order parameter is locked into the orbital wave by an admixture of helical and collinear spin density wave structures. Furthermore, our model naturally explains the lack of a sharp dielectric anomaly at TN 1 and the unusual temperature dependence of the electrical polarization.

  14. Time-Correlated Soliton Tunneling in Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John H.; Wijesinghe, Asanga Iroshan; Tang, Zhongjia; Guloy, Arnold M.

    2011-03-01

    In the quantum sine-Gordon model of a pinned charge or spin density wave, the electrostatic energy generated by charged soliton domain walls leads to a Coulomb blockade threshold electric field for quantum soliton-antisoliton pair creation. This field can be much smaller than the classical depinning field, since the quantum instability occurs as soon as the formerly lowest energy potential well rises to become a metastable well, or ``false vacuum.'' The analogy to time-correlated single electron tunneling and comparison to recent experimental results, as well as broader implications of the proposed tunneling process, are briefly discussed. This work was supported by the State of Texas though the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston and the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program, and by NIH R21CA133153 and ARRA supplement 3R21CA133153-03S, and by the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and DoE Basic Energy Sciences.

  15. Quantum mechanisms of density wave transport

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Wijesinghe, Asanga I.

    2012-01-01

    We report on new developments in the quantum picture of correlated electron transport in charge and spin density waves. The model treats the condensate as a quantum fluid in which charge soliton domain wall pairs nucleate above a Coulomb blockade threshold field. We employ a time-correlated soliton tunneling model, analogous to the theory of time-correlated single electron tunneling, to interpret the voltage oscillations and nonlinear current-voltage characteristics above threshold. An inverse scaling relationship between threshold field and dielectric response, originally proposed by Grüner, emerges naturally from the model. Flat dielectric and other ac responses below threshold in NbSe3 and TaS3, as well as small density wave phase displacements, indicate that the measured threshold is often much smaller than the classical depinning field. In some materials, the existence of two distinct threshold fields suggests that both soliton nucleation and classical depinning may occur. In our model, the ratio of electrostatic charging to pinning energy helps determine whether soliton nucleation or classical depinning dominates. PMID:22711979

  16. Superconducting pairing and density-wave instabilities in quasi-one-dimensional conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, J. C.; Duprat, R.; Bourbonnais, C.; Dupuis, N.

    2006-04-01

    Using a renormalization group approach, we determine the phase diagram of an extended quasi-one-dimensional electron gas model that includes interchain hopping, nesting deviations, and both intrachain and interchain repulsive interactions. d -wave superconductivity, which dominates over the spin-density-wave (SDW) phase at large nesting deviations, becomes unstable to the benefit of a triplet f -wave phase for a weak repulsive interchain backscattering term g1⊥>0 , despite the persistence of dominant SDW correlations in the normal state. Antiferromagnetism becomes unstable against the formation of a charge-density-wave state when g1⊥ exceeds some critical value. While these features persist when both Umklapp processes and interchain forward scattering (g2⊥) are taken into account, the effect of g2⊥ alone is found to frustrate nearest-neighbor interchain d - and f -wave pairing and instead favor next-nearest-neighbor interchain singlet or triplet pairing. We argue that the close proximity of SDW and charge-density-wave phases, singlet d -wave, and triplet f -wave superconducting phases in the theoretical phase diagram provides a possible explanation for recent puzzling experimental findings in the Bechgaard salts, including the coexistence of SDW and charge-density-wave phases and the possibility of a triplet pairing in the superconducting phase.

  17. Magnetic catalysis and axionic charge density wave in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bitan; Sau, Jay D.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals can support a chiral-symmetry-breaking, fully gapped, charge-density-wave order even for sufficiently weak repulsive electron-electron interactions, when placed in strong magnetic fields. In the former systems, due to the natural momentum space separation of Weyl nodes the ordered phase lacks the translational symmetry and represents an axionic phase of matter, while that in a Dirac semimetal (neglecting the Zeeman coupling) is only a trivial insulator. We present the scaling of this spectral gap for a wide range of subcritical (weak) interactions as well as that of the diamagnetic susceptibility with the magnetic field. A similar mechanism for charge-density-wave ordering at weak coupling is shown to be operative in double- and triple-Weyl semimetals, where the dispersion is linear (quadratic and cubic, respectively) for the z (planar) component(s) of the momentum. We here also address the competition between the charge-density-wave and a spin-density-wave orders, both of which breaks the chiral symmetry and leads to gapped spectrum, and show that at least in the weak coupling regime the former is energetically favored. The anomalous surface Hall conductivity, role of topological defects such as axion strings, existence of one-dimensional gapless dispersive modes along the core of such defects, and anomaly cancellation through the Callan-Harvey mechanism are discussed.

  18. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  19. Crossover from spin waves to diffusive spin excitations in underdoped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2 As2

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, G S; Fernandes, R M; Pratt, D K; Thaler, A; Ni, N; Marty, K; Christianson, A D; Lumsden, M D; Sales, B C; Sefat, A S; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Kreyssig, A; Goldman, A I; McQueeney, R J

    2014-05-01

    Using inelastic neutron scattering, we show that the onset of superconductivity in underdoped Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 coincides with a crossover from well-defined spin waves to overdamped and diffusive spin excitations. This crossover occurs despite the presence of long-range stripe antiferromagnetic order for samples in a compositional range from x=0.04 to 0.055, and is a consequence of the shrinking spin-density wave gap and a corresponding increase in the particle-hole (Landau) damping. The latter effect is captured by a simple itinerant model relating Co doping to changes in the hot spots of the Fermi surface. We argue that the overdamped spin fluctuations provide a pairing mechanism for superconductivity in these materials.

  20. Nonlinear Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-23

    Similarity in the asymptotic behavior of collision-free hydromagnetic waves and water waves, New York Univ., Courant Inst. Math. Sci., Res. Report NYO -90 L...Long solitary waves in lakes and • estuaries, propagating on the thermocline separating two shallow layers of fluid of almost equal densities, are

  1. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  2. Skyrmions in a Density-Wave State: A Mechanism for Chiral Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Hsu, Chen-Hsuan

    Broken symmetry states characterizing density waves of higher angular momentum in correlated electronic systems are intriguing objects. In the scheme of characterization by angular momentum, conventional charge and spin density waves correspond to zero angular momentum. Here we explore a class of exotic density wave states that have topological properties observed in recently discovered topological insulators. These rich topological density wave states deserve closer attention in not only high temperature superconductors but in other correlated electron states, as in heavy fermions, of which an explicit example will be discussed. The state discussed has non-trivial charge 2e skyrmionic spin texture. These skyrmions can condense into a charged superfluid. Alternately, they can fractionalize into merons and anti-merons. The fractionalized particles that are confined in skyrmions in the insulating phase, can emerge at a deconfined quantum critical point, which separates the insulating and the superconducting phases. These fractional particles form a two-component spin-singlet chiral (dx2-y2 ± idxy) wave superconducting state that breaks time reversal symmetry. Possible connections of this exotic order to the superconducting state in the heavy-fermion material URu2Si2 are suggested. The direct evidence of such a chiral superconducting state is polar Kerr effect that was observed recently.

  3. Jupiter Wave

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-13

    Scientists spotted a rare wave in Jupiter North Equatorial Belt that had been seen there only once before in this false-color close-up from NASA Hubble Telescope. In Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt, scientists spotted a rare wave that had been seen there only once before. It is similar to a wave that sometimes occurs in Earth's atmosphere when cyclones are forming. This false-color close-up of Jupiter shows cyclones (arrows) and the wave (vertical lines). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19659

  4. Making waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Traveling waves propagating along surfaces play an important role for intracellular organization. Such waves can appear spontaneously in reaction-diffusion systems, but only few general criteria for their existence are known. Analyzing the dynamics of the Min proteins in Escherichia coli, Levine and Kessler (2016 New J. Phys. 18 122001) now identified a new mechanism for the emergence of traveling waves that relies on conservation laws. From their analysis one can expect traveling waves to be a generic feature of systems made of proteins that have a cytoplasmic and a membrane-bound state.

  5. Gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautman, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    Historical remarks on early theoretical work on the subject. Very early on, Einstein introduced the notion of gravitational waves, but later became convinced that they did not exist as a physical phenomenon. Exact solutions of Einstein’s equations representing waves were found by a number of authors, contributing to their final acceptance as part of physics.

  6. Nonlinear Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    following surprising situation. Namely associated with the integrable nonlinear Schrodinger equations are standard numerical schemes which exhibit at...36. An Initial Boundary Value Problem for the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equations , A.S. Fokas, Physica D March 1989. 37. Evolution Theory, Periodic... gravity waves and wave excitation phenomena related to moving pressure distributions; numerical approximation and computation; nonlinear optics; and

  7. Microfluidic waves

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s−1 result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  8. Third Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Third Wave is a Christian charity based in Derby (England) that offers training in vocational skills, preindustrial crafts, horticultural and agricultural skills, environmental education, and woodland survival skills to disadvantaged people at city and farm locations. Third Wave employs a holistic approach to personal development in a community…

  9. Spin Densities in Flavin Analogs within a Flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Jesús Ignacio; Frago, Susana; Lans, Isaías; Alonso, Pablo Javier; García-Rubio, Inés; Medina, Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Characterization by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques of several variants of Anabaena flavodoxin, where the naturally occurring FMN cofactor is substituted by different analogs, makes it possible to improve the details of the spin distribution map in the isoallosazine ring in its semiquinone state. The analyzed variants were selected to monitor the effects of intrinsic changes in the flavin ring electronic structure, as well as perturbations in the apoflavodoxin-flavin interaction, on the spin populations. When these effects were analyzed together with the functional properties of the different flavodoxin variants, a relationship between spin population and biochemical parameters, as the reduction potential, could be envisaged. PMID:26840722

  10. QMMM Methods for the Spin Density in Heme Compound I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallar, Victor

    2007-12-01

    Mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics methods (QMMM) offer a valuable computational tool for understanding the spin delocalization in highly reactive enzymatic intermediates. Compound I, an oxyferryl heme intermediate has been particularly difficult to characterize. In particular, the nature of the third unpaired electron appears to be highly dependent of the heme local environment. Here we show some examples of application of QM/MM methods to different compound I intermediate in cytochromes and peroxidases.

  11. Spin Densities in Flavin Analogs within a Flavoprotein.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Jesús Ignacio; Frago, Susana; Lans, Isaías; Alonso, Pablo Javier; García-Rubio, Inés; Medina, Milagros

    2016-02-02

    Characterization by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques of several variants of Anabaena flavodoxin, where the naturally occurring FMN cofactor is substituted by different analogs, makes it possible to improve the details of the spin distribution map in the isoallosazine ring in its semiquinone state. The analyzed variants were selected to monitor the effects of intrinsic changes in the flavin ring electronic structure, as well as perturbations in the apoflavodoxin-flavin interaction, on the spin populations. When these effects were analyzed together with the functional properties of the different flavodoxin variants, a relationship between spin population and biochemical parameters, as the reduction potential, could be envisaged. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  13. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  14. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  15. ASTER Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-06

    The pattern on the right half of this image of the Bay of Bengal is the result of two opposing wave trains colliding. This ASTER sub-scene, acquired on March 29, 2000, covers an area 18 kilometers (13 miles) wide and 15 kilometers (9 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The visible and near-infrared bands highlight surface waves due to specular reflection of sunlight off of the wave faces. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02662

  16. Cusped-gaussian wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Sara; Steiner, Erich

    The single-excitation configuration interaction method is used to calculate the spin density at the nucleus in the Li atom and the LiH+ molecular ion. A variety of cusped-gaussian, all-gaussian and Slater function basis sets are compared. It is shown that whilst it is difficult to obtain reliable values for the spin density with conventional gaussian basis sets, the cusped-gaussian basis can give values of the properties at a nucleus that are very similar to those obtained with a Slater function basis. It is shown that it is essential for accurate work to ensure that the basis is highly flexible in the region close to a nucleus.

  17. Coexistence of the spini-density-wave and superconductivity in the Ba1-xKxFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Wei; Chen, H; Ren, Y; Qiu, Y; Liu, R; Wu, G H; Wu, T; Xie, Y L; Wang, F; Huang, Q; Chen, X H

    2008-01-01

    The relation between the spin-density-wave (SDW) and superconducting order is a central topic in current research on the FeAs-based high T{sub c} superconductors. Conflicting results exist in the LaFeAs(O,F)-class of materials, for which whether the SDW and superconductivity are mutually exclusive or they can coexist has not been settled. Here we show that for the (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} system, the SDW and superconductivity can coexist in an extended range of compositions. The availability of single crystalline samples and high value of the energy gaps would make the materials a model system to investigate the high T{sub c} ferropnictide superconductivity.

  18. Composite Fermion Hofstadter Problem: Partially Polarized Density Wave States in the ν = 2/5 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the ν = 2/5 state is unpolarized at zero Zeeman energy, while it is fully polarized at large Zeeman energies. A novel state with a charge/spin density wave order for composite fermions is proposed to exist at intermediate values of the Zeeman coupling for ν = 2/5. This state has half the maximum possible polarization, and can be extended to other incompressible fractions. A Hartree-Fock calculation based on the new approach for all fractional quantum Hall states developed by R. Shankar and the author is used to demonstrate the stability of this state to single-particle excitations and to compute gaps. A very recent experiment shows direct evidence for this state.

  19. Composite fermion hofstadter problem: partially polarized density wave states in the nu = 2/5 fractional quantum hall effect

    PubMed

    Murthy

    2000-01-10

    It is well known that the nu = 2/5 state is unpolarized at zero Zeeman energy, while it is fully polarized at large Zeeman energies. A novel state with a charge/spin density wave order for composite fermions is proposed to exist at intermediate values of the Zeeman coupling for nu = 2/5. This state has half the maximum possible polarization, and can be extended to other incompressible fractions. A Hartree-Fock calculation based on the new approach for all fractional quantum Hall states developed by R. Shankar and the author is used to demonstrate the stability of this state to single-particle excitations and to compute gaps. A very recent experiment shows direct evidence for this state.

  20. Modulation of short waves by long waves. [ocean wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, A. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Wave-tank experiments were performed to investigate the cyclic short-wave energy changes, related in phase to an underlying long wave, which occur during active generation of the short-wave field by wind. Measurements of time series of the short-wave slope were made by a laser-optical system, where the basic long-wave parameters were controlled and wind speeds were accurately reproducible. The short-wave slope variances were found to exhibit cyclic variations that are related to the phase of the long wave. The variations result from two combined effects: (1) the short wave frequency is varied by the long-wave orbital velocity; (2) the energy of the short waves is modulated by the actions of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic couplings that operate on the short waves in a manner related to the long-wave phase.

  1. Making WAVES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindes, Victoria A.; Hom, Keri; Brookshaw, Keith

    About 46% of high school graduates enrolled in California State Universities need remedial courses in both math and English to prepare them for college level. These students typically earned B averages in their high school math and English classes. In order to address this issue, Shasta College launched Operation WAVES (Win by Achieving Valuable…

  2. Wave Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica, Sergio

    In this article I will review some results, in collaboration with Colm Connaughton, Christophe Josserand, Antonio Picozzi, and Yves Pomeau [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 263901 (2005)], on the large-scale condensation of classical waves by considering the defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model.

  3. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  4. Rings and Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-30

    Saturn A ring is decorated with several kinds of waves. NASA Cassini spacecraft has captured a host of density waves, a bending wave, and the edge waves on the edge of the Keeler gap caused by the small moon Daphnis.

  5. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  6. Gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-07-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  7. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  8. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  9. CMS-Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program CMS-Wave CMS-Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind -wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward...estimates. The model can be coupled to the Boussinesq wave model BOUSS-2D for port and harbor applications. CMS-Wave, a phase-averaged spectral wind -wave

  10. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  11. Capillary rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Shats, M; Punzmann, H; Xia, H

    2010-03-12

    We report the first observation of extreme wave events (rogue waves) in parametrically driven capillary waves. Rogue waves are observed above a certain threshold in forcing. Above this threshold, frequency spectra broaden and develop exponential tails. For the first time we present evidence of strong four-wave coupling in nonlinear waves (high tricoherence), which points to modulation instability as the main mechanism in rogue waves. The generation of rogue waves is identified as the onset of a distinct tail in the probability density function of the wave heights. Their probability is higher than expected from the measured wave background.

  12. Nonlinear Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-27

    con- €"" straints:’. *’Permanent address: Dipartimento di Fisica . Universita di Roma 1. 00185 u 11lia. tr(a U(x)) = 0. (7a. 2469 1. Math,. PyS. 26 (10...Tenenblat Universidade de Brasilia Departamento de Matematica Brasilia, Brasil September 1985 , - . Abstract The generalized wave equation and generalized...Permanent addrems: Dipartimento di Fisica . Universita di Roma t3 U, 0. Roma. Italy The linear limit of i3) provides the most general solution ot 2614 J. MatM

  13. Wave Dissipation and Balance - NOPP Wave Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    processes that affect wind-generated ocean gravity waves. The various dissipative processes that contribute to the spectral wave evolution are isolated...over mature ocean surface wave spectra. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 34:3345–2358, 2004. K. Hasselmann. On the non-linear energy transfer in a gravity wave...P. Giovanangeli. Air flow structure over short- gravity breaking water waves. Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 126:477–705, 2008. doi: 10.1007/s10546-007

  14. CMS-Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  15. Waves at Navigation Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    upgrades the Coastal Modeling System’s ( CMS ) wave model CMS -Wave, a phase-averaged spectral wave model, and BOUSS-2D, a Boussinesq-type nonlinear wave...provided by this work unit address these critical needs of the Corps’ navigation mission. Description Issue Addressed CMS -Wave application at Braddock...Bay, NY WaveNet application in Gulf of Mexico CMS -Wave and BOUSS-2D are two numerical wave models, and WaveNet and TideNet are two web-based

  16. ASTER Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The pattern on the right half of this image of the Bay of Bengal is the result of two opposing wave trains colliding. This ASTER sub-scene, acquired on March 29, 2000, covers an area 18 kilometers (13 miles) wide and 15 kilometers (9 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The visible and near-infrared bands highlight surface waves due to specular reflection of sunlight off of the wave faces.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels

  17. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  18. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  19. Ice Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Ice Waves - May 21st, 2001 Description: Along the southeastern coast of Greenland, an intricate network of fjords funnels glacial ice to the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer melting season, newly calved icebergs join slabs of sea ice and older, weathered bergs in an offshore slurry that the southward-flowing East Greenland Current sometimes swirls into stunning shapes. Exposed rock of mountain peaks, tinted red in this image, hints at a hidden landscape. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  20. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown.

  1. Gravitational-wave astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, W. H.; Thorne, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    The significance of experimental evidence for gravitational waves is considered for astronomy. Properties, generation, and astrophysical sources of the waves are discussed. Gravitational wave receivers and antennas are described. A review of the Weber experiment is presented.

  2. Auroral plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    A review is given of auroral plasma wave phenomena, starting with the earliest ground-based observations and ending with the most recent satellite observations. Two types of waves are considered, electromagnetic and electrostatic. Electromagnetic waves include auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, ELF noise bands, and low-frequency electric and magnetic noise. Electrostatic waves include upper hybrid resonance emissions, electron cyclotron waves, lower hybrid waves, ion cyclotron waves and broadband electrostatic noise. In each case, a brief overview is given describing the observations, the origin of the instability, and the role of the waves in the physics of the auroral acceleration region.

  3. Dispersive wave emission from wave breaking.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    We show that pulses undergoing wave breaking in nonlinear weakly dispersive fibers radiate, owing to phase-matching (assisted by higher-order dispersion) of linear dispersive waves with the shock-wave front. Our theoretical results perfectly explain the radiation observed recently from pulses propagating in the normal dispersion (i.e., nonsolitonic) regime.

  4. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  5. Waving Goodbye

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-30

    Before NASA's Cassini entered its Grand Finale orbits, it acquired unprecedented views of the outer edges of the main ring system. For example, this close-up view of the Keeler Gap, which is near the outer edge of Saturn's main rings, shows in great detail just how much the moon Daphnis affects the edges of the gap. Daphnis creates waves in the edges of the gap through its gravitational influence. Some clumping of ring particles can be seen in the perturbed edge, similar to what was seen on the edges of the Encke Gap back when Cassini arrived at Saturn in 2004. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 3 degrees above the ring plane. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 18,000 miles (30,000 kilometers) from Daphnis and at a Sun-Daphnis-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 69 degrees. Image scale is 581 feet (177 meters) per pixel. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 16, 2017. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21329

  6. Phonons, Atoms, and Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, John S.

    1977-01-01

    Discussed are how the thermal vibrations of a solid are described in terms of lattice waves, how these waves interact with other waves, or with themselves, and how one is led from such a description in terms of waves to the concept of a phonon. (Author/MA)

  7. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  8. Fracture interface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Boliang; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    1996-01-01

    Interface waves on a single fracture in an elastic solid are investigated theoretically and numerically using plane wave analysis and a boundary element method. The finite mechanical stiffness of a fracture is modeled as a displacement discontinuity. Analysis for inhomogeneous plane wave propagation along a fracture yields two dispersive equations for symmetric and antisymmetric interface waves. The basic form of these equations are similar to the classic Rayleigh equation for a surface wave on a half-space, except that the displacements and velocities of the symmetric and antisymmetric fracture interface waves are each controlled by a normalized fracture stiffness. For low values of the normalized fracture stiffness, the symmetric and antisymmetric interface waves degenerate to the classic Rayleigh wave on a traction-free surface. For large values of the normalized fracture stiffness, the antisymmetric and symmetric interface waves become a body S wave and a body P wave, respectively, which propagate parallel to the fracture. For intermediate values of the normalized fracture stiffness, both interface waves are dispersive. Numerical modeling performed using a boundary element method demonstrates that a line source generates a P-type interface wave, in addition to the two Rayleigh-type interface waves. The magnitude of the normalized fracture stiffness is observed to control the velocities of the interface waves and the partitioning of seismic energy among the various waves near the fracture.

  9. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  10. Finsler p p -waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Andrea; Pabst, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present Finsler gravitational waves. These are a Finslerian version of the well-known p p -waves, generalizing the very special relativity line element. Our Finsler p p -waves are an exact solution of Finslerian Einstein's equations in vacuum and describe gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic background.

  11. Coupled commensurate charge density wave and lattice distortion in Na2Ti2P n2O (P n =As ,Sb ) determined by x-ray diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N. R.; Johnson, R. D.; Princep, A. J.; Gannon, L. A.; Ma, J.-Z.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Li, H.; Shi, M.; Nowell, H.; Baker, P. J.; Shi, Y. G.; Ding, H.; Luo, J.; Guo, Y. F.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2016-09-01

    We report single-crystal x-ray-diffraction measurements on Na2Ti2P n2O (P n =As ,Sb ) which reveal a charge superstructure that appears below the density wave transitions previously observed in bulk data. From symmetry-constrained structure refinements we establish that the associated distortion mode can be described by two propagation vectors q1=(1 /2 ,0 ,l ) and q2=(0 ,1 /2 ,l ) with l =0 (Sb) or l =1 /2 (As) and primarily involves in-plane displacements of the Ti atoms perpendicular to the Ti-O bonds. We also present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, which show band folding and backbending consistent with a density wave with the same wave-vectors q1 and q2 associated with Fermi-surface nesting, and muon-spin relaxation data, which show no indication of spin density wave order. The results provide direct evidence for phonon-assisted charge density wave order in Na2Ti2P n2O and fully characterize a proximate ordered phase that could compete with superconductivity in doped BaTi2Sb2O .

  12. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  13. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  14. Robust s± -wave superconductivity against multi-impurity in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. X.; Zhang, S. C.; Gao, Y.; Ren, W.

    2015-04-01

    Effects of disorder on electron-doped iron pnictides are investigated systematically based on self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Multiply impurities with same scattering potential (SP) are randomly distributed in a square lattice. Probability distribution functions of normalized order parameters for different impurity concentrations δimp , different electron doping concentrations δ are investigated for given SPs. Samples are found to be very robust against weak SP, in which order parameters do not have qualitative change even at very large δimp . While strong SP is able to easily break down the order parameters. For moderate SP, variations of order parameters on and around impurities strongly depend on δ , however the distribution functions of normalized order parameters have similar behavior as δimp increases. Compared with superconducting (SC) order, the magnetic order is more sensitive to multi-impurity effect. The spatial spin density wave pattern has already been destroyed before the system loses its superconductivity. Dependence of SC order on temperature is similar to that of impurity-free case, with the critical temperature being remarkably suppressed for high δimp .

  15. Structure and magnetism of bulk Fe and Cr: from plane waves to LCAO methods.

    PubMed

    Soulairol, R; Fu, Chu-Chun; Barreteau, C

    2010-07-28

    Magnetic, structural and energetic properties of bulk Fe and Cr were studied using first-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT). We aimed to identify the dependence of these properties on key approximations of DFT, namely the exchange-correlation functional, the pseudopotential and the basis set. We found a smaller effect of pseudopotentials (PPs) on Fe than on Cr. For instance, the local magnetism of Cr was shown to be particularly sensitive to the potentials representing the core electrons, i.e. projector augmented wave and Vanderbilt ultrasoft PPs predict similar results, whereas standard norm-conserving PPs tend to overestimate the local magnetic moments of Cr in bcc Cr and in dilute bcc FeCr alloys. This drawback is suggested to be closely correlated to the overestimation of Cr solution energy in the latter system. On the other hand, we point out that DFT methods with very reduced localized basis sets (LCAO: linear combination of atomic orbitals) give satisfactory results compared with more robust plane-wave approaches. A minimal-basis representation of '3d' electrons comes to be sufficient to describe non-trivial magnetic phases including spin spirals in both fcc Fe and bcc Cr, as well as the experimental magnetic ground state of bcc Cr showing a spin density wave (SDW) state. In addition, a magnetic 'spd' tight binding model within the Stoner formalism was proposed and validated for Fe and Cr. The respective Stoner parameters were obtained by fitting to DFT data. This efficient semiempirical approach was shown to be accurate enough for studying various collinear and non-collinear phases of bulk Fe and Cr. It also enabled a detailed investigation of different polarization states of SDW in bcc Cr, where the longitudinal state was suggested to be the ground state, consistent with existing experimental data.

  16. Instability of Wave Trains and Wave Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanin, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, ababanin@swin.edu.au Design criteria in ocean engineering, whether this is one in 50 years or one in 5000 years event, are hardly ever based on measurements, and rather on statistical distributions of relevant metocean properties. Of utmost interest is the tail of distribution, that is rare events such as the highest waves with low probability. Engineers have long since realised that the superposition of linear waves with narrow-banded spectrum as depicted by the Rayleigh distribution underestimates the probability of extreme wave heights and crests, which is a critical shortcoming as far as the engineering design is concerned. Ongoing theoretical and experimental efforts have been under way for decades to address this issue. Typical approach is the treating all possible waves in the ocean or at a particular location as a single ensemble for which some comprehensive solution can be obtained. The oceanographic knowledge, however, now indicates that no single and united comprehensive solution is available. We would expect the probability distributions of wave height to depend on a) whether the waves are at the spectral peak or at the tail; b) on wave spectrum and mean steepness in the wave field; c) on the directional distribution of the peak waves; d) on whether the waves are in deep water, in intermediate depth or in shallow water; e) on wave breaking; f) on the wind, particularly if it is very strong, and on the currents if they have suitable horizontal gradients. Probability distributions in the different circumstances according to these groups of conditions should be different, and by combining them together the inevitable scatter is introduced. The scatter and the accuracy will not improve by increasing the bulk data quality and quantity, and it hides the actual distribution of extremes. The groups have to be separated and their probability

  17. Weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.M.; Brio, M.; Kruse, M.T.; Zank, G.P.

    1999-06-01

    Equations describing weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interactions in one Cartesian space dimension are discussed. For wave propagation in uniform media, the wave interactions of interest consist of: (a) three-wave resonant interactions in which high frequency waves, may evolve on long space and time scales if the wave phases satisfy the resonance conditions; (b) Burgers self-wave steepening for the magnetoacoustic waves, and (c) mean wave field effects, in which a particular wave interacts with the mean wave field of the other waves. For wave propagation in non-uniform media, further linear wave mixing terms appear in the equations. The equations describe four types of resonant triads: slow-fast magnetosonic wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-entropy wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-magnetosonic wave interaction; and magnetosonic-entropy wave interaction. The formalism is restricted to coherent wave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Wave Dissipation and Balance - NOPP Wave Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    ocean with the atmosphere, land and solid Earth. Waves also define in many ways the appearance of the ocean seen by remote- sensing instruments. Beyond...waves, sediments and remote sensing systems, and to improve our forecasting and hindcasting capacity of these phenomena from the global ocean to the...feedback on the wave model quality APPROACH AND WORK PLAN By combining theoretical advances with numerical models, remote sensing and field

  19. Competing electronic instabilities of extended Hubbard models on the honeycomb lattice: A functional renormalization group calculation with high-wave-vector resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Peña, D. Sánchez; Lichtenstein, J.; Honerkamp, C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quantum many-body instabilities for electrons on the honeycomb lattice at half filling with extended interactions, motivated by a description of graphene and related materials. We employ a recently developed fermionic functional renormalization group scheme, which allows for highly resolved calculations of wave-vector dependences in the low-energy effective interactions. We encounter the expected anti-ferromagnetic spin density wave for a dominant on-site repulsion between electrons, and charge order with different modulations for dominant pure nth nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions. Novel instabilities towards incommensurate charge density waves take place when nonlocal density interactions among several bond distances are included simultaneously. Moreover, for more realistic Coulomb potentials in graphene including enough nonlocal terms there is a suppression of charge order due to competition effects between the different charge ordering tendencies, and if the on-site term fails to dominate, the semimetallic state is rendered stable. The possibility of a topological Mott insulator being the favored tendency for dominating second-nearest-neighbor interactions is not realized in our results with high momentum resolution.

  20. ULF Waves at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.-H.; Boardsen, S. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the observed characteristics of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves at Mercury. It shows how field-aligned propagating ULF waves at Mercury can be generated by externally driven fast compressional waves (FWs) via mode conversion at the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Then, the chapter reviews the interpretation that the strong magnetic compressional waves near and its harmonics observed with 20 of Mercury's magnetic equator could be the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) mode. A recent statistical study of ULF waves at Mercury based on MESSENGER data reported the occurrence and polarization of the detected waves. The chapter further introduces the field line resonance and the electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves to explain such waves, and shows that both theories can partially explain the observations.

  1. Fracture channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  2. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  3. Are there waves in elastic wave turbulence?

    PubMed

    Mordant, Nicolas

    2008-06-13

    An thin elastic steel plate is excited with a vibrator and its local velocity displays a turbulentlike Fourier spectrum. This system is believed to develop elastic wave turbulence. We analyze here the motion of the plate with a two-point measurement in order to check, in our real system, a few hypotheses required for the Zakharov theory of weak turbulence to apply. We show that the motion of the plate is indeed a superposition of bending waves following the theoretical dispersion relation of the linear wave equation. The nonlinearities seem to efficiently break the coherence of the waves so that no modal structure is observed. Several hypotheses of the weak turbulence theory seem to be verified, but nevertheless the theoretical predictions for the wave spectrum are not verified experimentally.

  4. Wave Meteorology and Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some mountain wave turbulence and operational hazards while soaring. Maps, photographs, and satellite images of the meteorological phenomena are included. Additionally, photographs of aircraft that sustained mountain wave damage are provided.

  5. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  6. Explosive Line Wave Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    curvature produced by each line wave generator. Piezoelectric pins were used for an additional assessment of the explosive lens design...to a visual assessment of the wave curvature from the high speed camera images, the explosive lens design was also evaluated using piezoelectric pins...High Explosive Firing Complex (HEFC). The various explosive line wave generators were taped vertically on a supporting board and the detonation wave

  7. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  8. The Iowa wave machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffron, John D.; Greenslade, Thomas B.; Stille, Dale

    2010-03-01

    Wave machines are a staple of demonstration lectures, and a good pair of wave machines can make the idea of transverse and longitudinal waves clearly evident to students. The demonstration apparatus collection of the University of Iowa contains examples of transverse and longitudinal wave machines that will be of interest to readers of The Physics Teacher. These machines probably date from about 1925 and may have been locally produced. You too can build them.

  9. Coronal heating by waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    Alfven waves or Alfvenic surface waves carry enough energy into the corona to provide the coronal energy requirements. Coronal loop resonances are an appealing means by which large energy fluxes enter active region loops. The wave dissipation mechanism still needs to be elucidated, but a Kolmogoroff turbulent cascade is fully consistent with the heating requirements in coronal holes and active region loops.

  10. Waves of Hanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Guillermo

    2003-03-01

    A spatially extended model of the hantavirus infection in deer mice is analyzed. Traveling waves solutions of the infected and susceptible populations are studied in different regimes, controlled by an environmental parameter. The wave of infection is shown to lag behind the wave of susceptible population, and the delay between the two is analyzed numerically and through a piecewise linearization.

  11. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown. Previously announced in STAR as N84-17728

  12. Spin flux and magnetic solitons in an interacting two-dimensional electron gas: Topology of two-valued wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Sajeev; Golubentsev, Andrey

    1995-01-01

    It is suggested that an interacting many-electron system in a two-dimensional lattice may condense into a topological magnetic state distinct from any discussed previously. This condensate exhibits local spin-1/2 magnetic moments on the lattice sites but is composed of a Slater determinant of single-electron wave functions which exist in an orthogonal sector of the electronic Hilbert space from the sector describing traditional spin-density-wave or spiral magnetic states. These one-electron spinor wave functions have the distinguishing property that they are antiperiodic along a closed path encircling any elementary plaquette of the lattice. This corresponds to a 2π rotation of the internal coordinate frame of the electron as it encircles the plaquette. The possibility of spinor wave functions with spatial antiperiodicity is a direct consequence of the two-valuedness of the internal electronic wave function defined on the space of Euler angles describing its spin. This internal space is the topologically, doubly-connected, group manifold of SO(3). Formally, these antiperiodic wave functions may be described by passing a flux which couples to spin (rather than charge) through each of the elementary plaquettes of the lattice. When applied to the two-dimensional Hubbard model with one electron per site, this new topological magnetic state exhibits a relativistic spectrum for charged, quasiparticle excitations with a suppressed one-electron density of states at the Fermi level. For a topological antiferromagnet on a square lattice, with the standard Hartree-Fock, spin-density-wave decoupling of the on-site Hubbard interaction, there is an exact mapping of the low-energy one-electron excitation spectrum to a relativistic Dirac continuum field theory. In this field theory, the Dirac mass gap is precisely the Mott-Hubbard charge gap and the continuum field variable is an eight-component Dirac spinor describing the components of physical electron-spin amplitude on each of

  13. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  14. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  15. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  16. Waves of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F. G. W.; Charlier, R. H.

    1981-06-01

    Possible means for harnessing the energy contained in ocean waves are considered. Problems associated with the low-grade nature of wave energy and the rate at which wave crests approach are pointed out, and simple devices already in use for the supply of energy to bell buoys, whistle buoys and lighted buoys are noted. Attention is then given to wave energy conversion systems based on the focusing of waves onto a narrow ramp leading to a reservoir from which water is released to power a turbine generator; a slightly submerged circular shell which directs waves into its center cavity where waves act to turn a turbine (the Dam-Atoll); a long vertical pipe with an internal valve allowing water to move in an upward direction (the Isaacs wave-energy pump); a turbine located at the bottom of an open-topped pipe (the Masuda buoy); a completely submerged closed air chamber from which runs a large pipe open to the sea; a wave piston which acts by the compression of air to drive a turbine; a massive structure with upper and lower reservoirs (the Russel rectifier); and devices which consist of floating or submerged objects which transfer wave energy to pumps (the Salter duck and Cockerell raft.) It is concluded that although wave-powered generators are not likely to become competitive in the near future or provide more than a small portion of world demand, they may be found useful under special conditions.

  17. Martian atmospheric lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirraglia, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 9 television pictures of Mars extensive mountain lee wave phenomenon in the northern mid-latitudes during winter were evaluated. The characteristic wave length of the lee waves is readily observable, and in a few cases the boundaries of the wave patterns, as well as the wave length, are observed. The cloud patterns resulting from the waves generated by the flow across a mountain or crater are shown to be dependent upon the velocity profile of the air stream and the vertical stability of the atmosphere. Using the stability as inferred by the temperature structure obtained from the infrared spectrometer data, a two layer velocity model of the air stream is used in calculations based on the theory of mountain lee waves. Results yield magnitudes generally in agreement with various other circulation models.

  18. [F-waves].

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Massart, N; Kaux, J-F; Bouquiaux, O

    2011-12-01

    F-waves result from the discharge of the motoneurons following their antidromic activation. The F-wave appears, as an indirect (the F-wave latency decreases when the stimulation site moves away from the muscular detection) and late response (occurring after the M response). In practice, the most useful parameter is the F-wave minimal latency, provided that at least seven distinct F-waves are evoked. When the analysis is relative either to the controlateral side, or to a former examination, this parameter is one of most sensitive in electroneuromyography. F-wave evocation implies conduction along the entire peripheral nervous system, and particularly its proximal part, which is not investigated by nervous trunks conduction velocity studies. Thus, F wave study is the most useful in plexopathies and polyradiculonevritis. In the early phase of Guillain-Barré syndrome, their absence may be the unique sign indicative of proximal conduction blocks.

  19. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  20. Partial wave analysis of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} and the search for nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Dey, B; Dickson, R.; Krahn, Z.; McCracken, M. E.; Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Careccia, S. L.; Dodge, G. E.; Guler, N.; Klein, A.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C. S.; Niroula, M. R.; Seraydaryan, H.; Tkachenko, S.

    2009-12-15

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high-precision spin-density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of {omega}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel {pi}{sup 0} exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F{sub 15}(1680) and D{sub 13}(1700) near threshold, as well as the G{sub 17}(2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J{sup P}=5/2{sup +} state around 2 GeV, a ''missing'' state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  1. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation Lengths of a S-wave Superconductors in the Presence of a Weak Constant External Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzali, R.; Fahimi, S.; Dehghan, M.

    2017-05-01

    By considering a s-wave Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor, as a many body system, subject to a weak constant external potential, U, using perturbed linearized Gorkov equations at zero temperature and calculating perturbed Green's functions up to the first approximation, we obtain the two-particle space-spin density matrix of the system. Then, we investigate the effect of the potential on bipartite entanglement (via concurrence) of electron spins of a Cooper pair and also quantum discord in terms of the potential and the relative distance of electrons of a Cooper pair, r. At some fixed values of r, concurrence is zero and does not change until U increases and receives to a special value. Specially, quantum entanglement length and quantum correlation length (in which quantum discord becomes zero) with respect to the potential are derived. We result that by increasing the potential, these lengths are increased. At higher values of U, quantum correlation length is not very sensitive to changes in U. Finally, the relation between these lengths is given.

  2. Partial wave analysis of the reaction γp→pω and the search for nucleon resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2009-12-30

    We performed an event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction γ p -> p ω on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high precision spin density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of omega-> π+ π - π0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel π0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F[15](1680) and D[13](1700) near threshold, as wellmore » as the G[17](2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J(P)=5/2+ state around 2 GeV, a "missing" state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.« less

  3. Linear Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenough, Justin

    Elastic waves propagating in simple media manifest a surprisingly rich collection of phenomena. Although some can't withstand the complexities of Earth's structure, the majority only grow more interesting and more important as remote sensing probes for seismologists studying the planet's interior. To fully mine the information carried to the surface by seismic waves, seismologists must produce accurate models of the waves. Great strides have been made in this regard. Problems that were entirely intractable a decade ago are now routinely solved on inexpensive workstations. The mathematical representations of waves coded into algorithms have grown vastly more sophisticated and are troubled by many fewer approximations, enforced symmetries, and limitations. They are far from straightforward, and seismologists using them need a firm grasp on wave propagation in simple media. Linear Elastic Waves, by applied mathematician John G. Harris, responds to this need.

  4. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  5. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  6. Millimeter Wave Ocular Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-20

    illustrates the rabbit head in holder by photography (a), thermography (b) and thermographic profile (c). The temperature of the cornea was measured using an...and graphs of profiles of the 40 temperatures difference (final-initial) of the rabbit cornea heated by the focused beam of millimeter waves from the...antenna. 5. Cooling of the cornea by air flow. 43 6. Temperature as a function of power applied using 45 continuous wave millimeter waves of

  7. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  8. WaveNet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User- Interface (GUI) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran , Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications...Grays Harbor, WA; Cape Canaveral, FL. WaveNet is employs a Google Map interface to query, select, and display data for a given geographic region

  9. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  10. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation.

  11. Internal waves, Andaman Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-236-044 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- These internal waves in the Andaman Sea, west of Burma, were photographed from 115 nautical miles above Earth by the crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) mission. The internal waves smooth out some of the capillary waves at the surface in bands and travel along the density discontinuity at the bottom of the mixed layer depth. There is little evidence of the internal waves at the surface. They are visible in the Space Shuttle photography because of sunglint, which reflects off the water.

  12. Evidence of a short-range incommensurate d-wave charge order from a fermionic two-loop renormalization group calculation of a 2D model with hot spots

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Vanuildo S de; Freire, Hermann

    2014-09-15

    The two-loop renormalization group (RG) calculation is considerably extended here for the two-dimensional (2D) fermionic effective field theory model, which includes only the so-called “hot spots” that are connected by the spin-density-wave (SDW) ordering wavevector on a Fermi surface generated by the 2D t−t{sup ′} Hubbard model at low hole doping. We compute the Callan–Symanzik RG equation up to two loops describing the flow of the single-particle Green’s function, the corresponding spectral function, the Fermi velocity, and some of the most important order-parameter susceptibilities in the model at lower energies. As a result, we establish that–in addition to clearly dominant SDW correlations–an approximate (pseudospin) symmetry relating a short-range incommensurated-wave charge order to the d-wave superconducting order indeed emerges at lower energy scales, which is in agreement with recent works available in the literature addressing the 2D spin-fermion model. We derive implications of this possible electronic phase in the ongoing attempt to describe the phenomenology of the pseudogap regime in underdoped cuprates.

  13. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  14. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  15. Power from Ocean Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the utilization of surface ocean waves as a potential source of power. Simple and large-scale wave power devices and conversion systems are described. Alternative utilizations, environmental impacts, and future prospects of this alternative energy source are detailed. (BT)

  16. Power from Ocean Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the utilization of surface ocean waves as a potential source of power. Simple and large-scale wave power devices and conversion systems are described. Alternative utilizations, environmental impacts, and future prospects of this alternative energy source are detailed. (BT)

  17. Thermal-Wave Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosencwaig, Allan

    1982-01-01

    Thermal features of and beneath the surface of a sample can be detected and imaged with a thermal-wave microscope. Various methodologies for the excitation and detection of thermal waves are discussed, and several applications, primarily in microelectronics, are presented. (Author)

  18. Waves at Navigation Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    channels, ports and harbors, and coastal beaches . It conducts basic research on the coupling of wave and flow models to calculate waves and...TX; Matagorda Bay, TX; Hilo Harbor, HI; Kikiaola Harbor, HI; Dana Point Harbor, CA; Pillar Point Harbor, CA (Figure 3); Ocean Beach , CA; Noyo

  19. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  20. Waves in polar lows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orimolade, A. P.; Furevik, B. R.; Noer, G.; Gudmestad, O. T.; Samelson, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    In a rather stationary fetch, one would not expect large waves in polar low situations. However, the picture changes when one considers a moving fetch. The significant wave heights that may be associated with the recorded polar lows on the Norwegian continental shelf from December 1999 to October 2015 are estimated using a one-dimensional parametric wave model. A comparison of the measured and the forecasted significant wave heights in two recent polar low cases in the Barents Sea is presented. The estimated significant wave heights show that the values could have been up to and above 9 m. The forecasted significant wave heights considerably underestimated the measured significant wave heights in the two recent polar low cases that are considered. Furthermore, a generalization of the fetch-limited wave equation in polar lows is proposed, which allows the wind field to vary in space and time, and is shown to give results that are consistent with the one-dimensional parametric model.

  1. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  2. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  3. Gravitational waves from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  4. Supergranular waves revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfellner, Jan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent

    2017-08-01

    Solar supergranules remain a mysterious phenomenon, half a century after their discovery. One particularly interesting aspect of supergranulation is its wave-like nature detected in Fourier space. Using SDO/HMI local helioseismology and granulation tracking, we provide new evidence for supergranular waves. We also discuss their influence on the evolution of the network magnetic field using cork simulations.

  5. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  6. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  7. Search for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.

    The current status of the experimental search for gravitational waves is reviewed here. The emphasis is on the Japanese TAMA project. We started operation of the TAMA300 laser interferometric detector in 1999, and are now collecting and analyzing observational data to search for gravitational wave signals.

  8. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  9. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  10. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  11. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  12. Sculpting Waves (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    In electronics controlling and manipulating flow of charged carriers has led to design of numerous functional devices. In photonics, by analogy, this is done through controlling photons and optical waves. However, the challenges and opportunities are different in these two fields. Materials control waves, and as such they can tailor, manipulate, redirect, and scatter electromagnetic waves and photons at will. Recent development in condensed matter physics, nanoscience, and nanotechnology has made it possible to tailor materials with unusual parameters and extreme characteristics and with atomic precision and thickness. One can now construct structures much smaller than the wavelengths of visible light, thus ushering in unprecedented possibilities and novel opportunities for molding fields and waves at the nanoscale with desired functionalities. At such subwavelength scales, sculpting optical fields and waves provides a fertile ground for innovation and discovery. I will discuss some of the exciting opportunities in this area, and forecast some future directions and possibilities.

  13. Experiments on excitation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. C.

    Recent trends in the experimentation on chemical and biochemical excitation waves are presented. In the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is the most suitable chemical laboratory system for the study of wave propagation in excitable medium, the efficient control of wave dynamics by electrical fields and by light illumination is illustrated. In particular, the effects of a feedback control are shown. Further new experiments in this system are concerned with three-dimensional topologies and boundary effects. Important biological applications are found in the aggregation of slime mould amoebae, in proton waves during oscillatory glycolysis, and in waves of spreading depression in neuronal tissue as studied by experiments in chicken retina. Numerical simulations with appropriate reaction-diffusion models complement a large number of these experimental findings.

  14. Gravity-Wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishchuk, Leonid Petrovich

    The article concerns astronomical phenomena , related with discovery of gravitational waves of various nature: 1) primordial (relic) gravitational waves, analogous to MWBR 2) gravitational waves due to giant collisions in the Universe between 2a) Macroscopic black Holes in the centers of Galaxies 2b) Tidal disruption of neutron stars by Black holes 2c) deformations of the space-time by stellar mass Black Holes moving near giant Black Holes in the centers of Galaxies 2d) Supernovae phenomena 2e) accretion phenomena on Black Holes and Neutron stars. The Earth based interferometric technics (LIGO Project) to detect gravitational waves is described as well as the perspectiva for a space Laser Interferometric Antena (LISA)is discussed. The article represents a modified text of the Plenary talk "Gravity-Wave astronomy" given at the XI International gravitational Conference (July 1986, Stockholm, Sweden).

  15. Theory of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre; Novak, Jérôme

    The existence of gravitational radiation is a natural prediction of any relativistic description of the gravitational interaction. In this chapter, we focus on gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. First, we introduce those mathematical concepts that are necessary to properly formulate the physical theory, such as the notions of manifold, vector, tensor, metric, connection and curvature. Second, we motivate, formulate and then discuss Einstein's equation, which relates the geometry of spacetime to its matter content. Gravitational waves are later introduced as solutions of the linearized Einstein equation around flat spacetime. These waves are shown to propagate at the speed of light and to possess two polarization states. Gravitational waves can interact with matter, allowing for their direct detection by means of laser interferometers. Finally, Einstein's quadrupole formulas are derived and used to show that nonspherical compact objects moving at relativistic speeds are powerful gravitational wave sources.

  16. Holographic tunneling wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Gabriele; Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    The Hartle-Hawking wave function in cosmology can be viewed as a decaying wave function with anti-de Sitter (AdS) boundary conditions. We show that the growing wave function in AdS familiar from Euclidean AdS/CFT is equivalent, semiclassically and up to surface terms, to the tunneling wave function in cosmology. The cosmological measure in the tunneling state is given by the partition function of certain relevant deformations of CFTs on a locally AdS boundary. We compute the partition function of finite constant mass deformations of the O( N ) vector model on the round three sphere and show this qualitatively reproduces the behaviour of the tunneling wave function in Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and a massive scalar. We find the amplitudes of inhomogeneities are not damped in the holographic tunneling state.

  17. Project GlobWave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busswell, Geoff; Ash, Ellis; Piolle, Jean-Francois; Poulter, David J. S.; Snaith, Helen; Collard, Fabrice; Sheera, Harjit; Pinnock, Simon

    2010-12-01

    The ESA GlobWave project is a three year initiative, funded by ESA and CNES, to service the needs of satellite wave product users across the globe. Led by Logica UK, with support from CLS, IFREMER, SatOC and NOCS, the project will provide free access to satellite wave data and products in a common format, both historical and in near real time, from various European and American SAR and altimeter missions. Building on the successes of similar projects for Sea Surface Temperature and ocean colour, the project aims to stimulate increased use and analysis of satellite wave products. In addition to common-format satellite data the project will provide comparisons with in situ measurements, interactive data analysis tools and a pilot spatial wave forecast verification scheme for operational forecast production centres. The project will begin operations in January 2010, with direction from regular structured user consultation.

  18. Standing Waves on a Shoestring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Describes the construction of a wave generator used to review the algebraic relationships of wave motion. Students calculate and measure the weight needed to create tension to generate standing waves at the first eight harmonics. (MDH)

  19. Spatial equation for water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    A compact spatial Hamiltonian equation for gravity waves on deep water has been derived. The equation is dynamical and can describe extreme waves. The equation for the envelope of a wave train has also been obtained.

  20. Dynamics of baroclinic wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1989-01-01

    The research carried out in the past year dealt with nonlinear baroclinic wave dynamics. The model consisted of an Eady baroclinic basic state and uneven Elkman dissipation at the top and bottom boundaries with/without slopes. The method of solution used a truncated spectral expansion with three zonal waves and one or two meridional modes. Numerical experiments were performed on synoptic scale waves or planetary scale waves with/without wave-wave interaction.

  1. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  2. Ambient seismic wave field.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    The ambient seismic wave field, also known as ambient noise, is excited by oceanic gravity waves primarily. This can be categorized as seismic hum (1-20 mHz), primary microseisms (0.02-0.1 Hz), and secondary microseisms (0.1-1 Hz). Below 20 mHz, pressure fluctuations of ocean infragravity waves reach the abyssal floor. Topographic coupling between seismic waves and ocean infragravity waves at the abyssal floor can explain the observed shear traction sources. Below 5 mHz, atmospheric disturbances may also contribute to this excitation. Excitation of primary microseisms can be attributed to topographic coupling between ocean swell and seismic waves on subtle undulation of continental shelves. Excitation of secondary microseisms can be attributed to non-linear forcing by standing ocean swell at the sea surface in both pelagic and coastal regions. Recent developments in source location based on body-wave microseisms enable us to estimate forcing quantitatively. For a comprehensive understanding, we must consider the solid Earth, the ocean, and the atmosphere as a coupled system.

  3. Global Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    After the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named ``EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal loop. Such a two-wave paradigm was proposed more than 13 years ago, and now is being recognized by more and more colleagues. In this paper, we review how various controversies can be resolved in the two-wave framework and how important it is to have two different names for the two types of coronal waves.

  4. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  5. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  6. Shoaling internal solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, B. R.; Barrett, K. J.; Ivey, G. N.

    2013-09-01

    The evolution and breaking of internal solitary waves in a shallow upper layer as they approach a constant bottom slope is examined through laboratory experiments. The waves are launched in a two-layer fluid through the standard lock-release method. In most experiments, the wave amplitude is significantly larger than the depth of the shallow upper layer so that they are not well described by Korteweg-de Vries theory. The dynamics of the shoaling waves are characterized by the Iribarren number, Ir, which measures the ratio of the topographic slope to the square root of the characteristic wave slope. This is used to classify breaking regimes as collapsing, plunging, surging, and nonbreaking for increasing values of Ir. For breaking waves, the maximum interface descent, Hi⋆, is predicted to depend upon the topographic slope, s, and the incident wave's amplitude and width, Asw and Lsw, respectively, as Hi⋆≃4sAswLsw. This prediction is corroborated by our experiments. Likewise, we apply simple heuristics to estimate the speed of interface descent, and we characterize the speed and range of the consequent upslope flow of the lower layer after breaking has occurred.

  7. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  8. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  9. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  10. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  11. Propagation of Moreton Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzong; Kitai, Reizaburo; Narukage, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuma; Ueno, Satoru; Shibata, Kazunari; Wang, Jingxiu

    2011-06-01

    With the Flare-Monitoring Telescope (FMT) and Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) at Hida observatory of Kyoto University, 13 events of Moreton waves were captured at Hα center, Hα ±0.5 Å, and Hα ±0.8 Å wavebands since 1997. With such samples, we have studied the statistical properties of the propagation of Moreton waves. Moreton waves were all restricted in sectorial zones with a mean value of 92°. However, their accompanying EIT waves, observed simultaneously with SOHO/EIT at extreme-ultraviolet wavelength, were very isotropic with a quite extended scope of 193°. The average propagation speeds of the Moreton waves and the corresponding EIT waves were 664 km s-1 and 205 km s-1, respectively. Moreton waves propagated either under large-scale close magnetic flux loops, or firstly in the sectorial region where two sets of magnetic loops separated from each other and diverged, and then stopped before the open magnetic flux region. The location swept by Moreton waves had a relatively weak magnetic field as compared to the magnetic fields at their sidewalls. The ratio of the magnetic flux density between the sidewall and the path falls in the range of 1.4 to 3.7 at a height of 0.01 solar radii. Additionally, we roughly estimated the distribution of the fast magnetosonic speed between the propagating path and sidewalls in an event on 1997 November 3, and found a relatively low-fast magnetosonic speed in the path. We also found that the propagating direction of Moreton waves coincided with the direction of filament eruption in a few well-observed events. This favors an interpretation of the ``Piston'' model, although further studies are necessary for any definitive conclusion.

  12. Demonstration of Shear Waves, Lamb Waves, and Rayleigh Waves by Mode Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces an experiment that can be demonstrated in the classroom to show that shear waves, Rayleigh waves, and Lamb waves can be easily generated and observed by means of mode conversion. (Author/CS)

  13. Circular rogue wave clusters.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2011-11-01

    Using the Darboux transformation technique and numerical simulations, we study the hierarchy of rational solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that can be considered as higher order rogue waves in this model. This analysis reveals the existence of rogue wave clusters with a high level of symmetry in the (x,t) plane. These structures arise naturally when the shifts in the Darboux scheme are taken to be eigenvalue dependent. We have found single-shell structures where a central higher order rogue wave is surrounded by a ring of first order peaks on the (x,t) plane.

  14. Towards Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    This chapter is meant to introduce the reader to the forthcoming network of second-generation interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, at a time when their construction is close to completion and there is the ambition to detect gravitational waves for the first time in the next few years and open the way to gravitational wave astronomy. The legacy of first-generation detectors is discussed before giving an overview of the technology challenges that have been faced to make advanced detectors possible. The various aspects outlined here are then discussed in more detail in the subsequent chapters of the book.

  15. Dangerous Electric Waves,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-06

    AD-All 283 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFR OH F/6 19/5 DANGEROUS ELECTRIC WAVES,(U) JAN 82 F X IANCHENG UNCLASS IFI ED FTO-ID(RS)T-O 891...TECHNOLOGY DIVISION DANGEROUS ELECTRIC WAVES by Feng Xiancheng FEB 2 1982 A Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 82 02 01 070 AlH...FTD -ID(H ST-0891-81 EDITED TANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0891-81 6 January 1982 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-81-C-002058 DANGEROUS ELECTRIC WAVES

  16. Rogue waves in baroclinic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Da-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Feng, Yu-Jie; Xue, Long; Sun, Yu-Hao

    2017-05-01

    We investigate an AB system, which can be used to describe marginally unstable baroclinic wave packets in a geophysical fluid. Using the generalized Darboux transformation, we obtain higher-order rogue wave solutions and analyze rogue wave propagation and interaction. We obtain bright rogue waves with one and two peaks. For the wave packet amplitude and the mean-flow correction resulting from the self-rectification of the nonlinear wave, the positions and values of the wave crests and troughs are expressed in terms of a parameter describing the state of the basic flow, in terms of a parameter responsible for the interaction of the wave packet and the mean flow, and in terms of the group velocity. We show that the interaction of the wave packet and mean flow and also the group velocity affect the propagation and interaction of the amplitude of the wave packet and the self-rectification of the nonlinear wave.

  17. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  18. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves.

  19. Wave Dissipation and Balance - NOPP Wave Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    with a common structure , and now estimating the “cumulative term” with the breaking probabilities used for the main dissipation term. This has led to a...captured by the new parameterizations, but that will require the analysis of more detailed measurement campaigns Ardhuin et al. (2011b). These result have...much more flat bias as a function of wave height (figure 1). A detailed case study of the February 2011 storm Quirin, in the North Atlantic, has shown

  20. Measurement of high frequency waves using a wave follower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    High frequency waves were measured using a laser-optical sensor mounted on a wave follower. Measured down-wind wave slope spectra are shown to be wind speed dependent; the mean square wave-slopes are generally larger than those measured by Cox and Munk (1954) using the sun glitter method.

  1. Resonance wave pumping with surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Gharib, Morteza; Violeau, Damien; Caltech-ENPC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The valveless impedance pump enables the production or amplification of a flow without the use of integrated mobile parts, thus delaying possible failures. It is usually composed of fluid-filled flexible tubing, closed by solid tubes. The flexible tube is pinched at an off-centered position relative to the tube ends. This generates a complex wave dynamic that results in a pumping phenomenon. It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies of the system results in a strong pulsating flow. A case of a free surface wave pump is investigated. The resonance wave pump is composed of a rectangular tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free surface and a recirculation rectangular section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle placed at an off-center position above the submerged plate is controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Similar to the case of valveless impedance pump, we observed that near resonance frequencies strong pulsating flow is generated with almost no oscillations. A linear theory is developed to pseudo-analytically evaluate these frequencies. In addition, larger scale applications were simulated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic codes.

  2. Wave Separation, Wave Intensity, the Reservoir-Wave Concept, and the Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio: Presumptions and Principles.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Nico; Segers, Patrick; Westerhof, Berend E

    2015-07-01

    Wave separation analysis and wave intensity analysis (WIA) use (aortic) pressure and flow to separate them in their forward and backward (reflected) waves. While wave separation analysis uses measured pressure and flow, WIA uses their derivatives. Because differentiation emphasizes rapid changes, WIA suppresses slow (diastolic) fluctuations of the waves and renders diastole a seemingly wave-free period. However, integration of the WIA-obtained forward and backward waves is equal to the wave separation analysis-obtained waves. Both the methods thus give similar results including backward waves spanning systole and diastole. Nevertheless, this seemingly wave-free period in diastole formed the basis of both the reservoir-wave concept and the Instantaneous wave-Free Ratio of (iFR) pressure and flow. The reservoir-wave concept introduces a reservoir pressure, Pres, (Frank Windkessel) as a wave-less phenomenon. Because this Windkessel model falls short in systole an excess pressure, Pexc, is introduced, which is assumed to have wave properties. The reservoir-wave concept, however, is internally inconsistent. The presumed wave-less Pres equals twice the backward pressure wave and travels, arriving later in the distal aorta. Hence, in contrast, Pexc is minimally affected by wave reflections. Taken together, Pres seems to behave as a wave, rather than Pexc. The iFR is also not without flaws, as easily demonstrated when applied to the aorta. The ratio of diastolic aortic pressure and flow implies division by zero giving nonsensical results. In conclusion, presumptions based on WIA have led to misconceptions that violate physical principles, and reservoir-wave concept and iFR should be abandoned. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  4. Inventing the Wave Catchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Arthur

    1983-01-01

    Physicists and engineers advance the state of several arts in the design of gravitational-wave detection equipment. Provides background information and discusses the equipment (including laser interferometer), its use, and results of several experimental studies. (JN)

  5. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  6. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  7. Nonspreading Wave Packets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, M. V.; Balazs, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains properties of the Airy packet that show that quantum wave functions correspond to a family of orbits and not to a single particle. Introducing the Airy packet into elementary quantum mechanics courses is recommended. (HM)

  8. Traveling-wave photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  9. Gravitational waves: Stellar palaeontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; Farmer, Alison

    2017-07-01

    A third gravitational-wave signal has been detected with confidence, produced again by the merger of two black holes. The combined data from these detections help to reveal the histories of the stars that left these black holes behind.

  10. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  11. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  12. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  13. Nonlinear thermal surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1984-09-01

    It is shown that density profile modifications near a plasma surface can survive at moving localized spots because of the radiation pressure of leaking wave field fluctuations. The properties of these luminous surface cavitons are studied.

  14. Heat Wave Safety Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a ... care for heat- related emergencies … ❏ Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes. ❏ ...

  15. Internal Ocean Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-17

    The false-color VNIR image from NASA Terra spacecraft was acquired off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction.

  16. Pan and Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-08

    The shepherd moon Pan orbits Saturn in the Encke gap while the A ring surrounding the gap displays wave features created by interactions between the ring particles and Saturnian moons in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  17. Saturn's quasiperiodic magnetohydrodynamic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, J. N.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Kivelson, M. G.; Chen, C. H. K.; Provan, G.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Achilleos, N.; Sorba, A. M.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    Quasiperiodic ˜1 h fluctuations have been recently reported by numerous instruments on board the Cassini spacecraft. The interpretation of the sources of these fluctuations has remained elusive to date. Here we provide an explanation for the origin of these fluctuations using magnetometer observations. We find that magnetic field fluctuations at high northern latitudes are Alfvénic, with small amplitudes (˜0.4nT), and are concentrated in wave packets similar to those observed in Kleindienst et al. (2009). The wave packets recur periodically at the northern magnetic oscillation period. We use a magnetospheric box model to provide an interpretation of the wave periods. Our model results suggest that the observed magnetic fluctuations are second harmonic Alfvén waves standing between the northern and southern ionospheres in Saturn's outer magnetosphere.

  18. Inventing the Wave Catchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Arthur

    1983-01-01

    Physicists and engineers advance the state of several arts in the design of gravitational-wave detection equipment. Provides background information and discusses the equipment (including laser interferometer), its use, and results of several experimental studies. (JN)

  19. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  20. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Donald

    1991-04-01

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang.

  1. Wave Propagation Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, Kathleen; Petersson, Anders; Nilsson, Stefan; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  2. Kinematics Under Wind Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    components of the total velocity field, negligible measurement noise, and a completely linear wave field. Yefimov and Khristoforov (1971) have investigated...The directional spreading of the real wave field must also be considered ([82] and [3]). Yefimov and Khristoforov concluded that the spectrum of the...different. As observed by Yefimov and Khristoforov the upper linit of high coherence decreased with increasing depth (Figure 9). The horizontal

  3. Near Shore Wave Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    given the offshore wave conditions . OBJECTIVES We hypothesize that the wave-induced kinematic, sediment and morphologic processes are nonlinearly... WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School,Department of Oceanography,Monterey,CA,93943 8...basis of our process modeling and analysis work . In addition, the comprehensive Delft3D morphology model was acquired from the Dutch and is being assessed

  4. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  5. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  6. Edge wave visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Nguyen, Truong X.

    1991-01-01

    Scattering mechanisms that involve edge waves are addressed. The behavior of edge waves and their interaction with flat, perfectly conducting plates are depicted in the time domain through a visualization of surface currents that flow on the surface, as an incident Gaussian pulse of energy washes over the surface. Viewing these surface currents allows a very clear physical interpretation and appreciation of the scattering process.

  7. Millimeter Wave Nonreciprocal Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-03

    gradients of the dc bias field saturation magnetization , or magnetic anisotrophy can control mode properties of magnetostatic waves (MSW) propagating in...measures microwave magnetic field patterns of magnetostatic waves in LPE- YIG thin films has been developed. The probe’s sensing element is either a... magnetic resonance mode of a YIG sphere. Theoretical analyses show that there is a critical ratio between the -4-Ai p. , , . , l!~ mj radius of the

  8. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results.

  9. WaveNet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    interface to display data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran , Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for...Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User- Interface (GUI) data management tool developed for the Corps’ coastal...Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per

  10. J Wave Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Yan, Gan-Xin

    2009-01-01

    The J wave, also referred to as an Osborn wave, is a deflection immediately following the QRS complex of the surface ECG. When partially buried in the R wave, the J wave appears as a J point elevation or ST segment elevation. Several lines of evidence have been advanced suggesting that arrhythmias associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferior leads or mid- to lateral precordial leads, Brugada syndrome (BrS) as well arrhythmias associated with hypothermia and the acute phase of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), are mechanistically linked to abnormalities in the manifestation of the transient outward current (Ito)-mediated J wave. Although BrS and early repolarization syndrome (ERS) differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J wave manifestation, they can be considered to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression that we propose be termed J wave syndromes. This review attempts to summarize our current state of knowledge concerning J-wave syndromes, bridging basic and clinical aspects. We propose to divide ERS into three subtypes: Type 1, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in the lateral precordial leads, is prevalent among healthy male athletes and rarely seen in VF survivors; Type 2, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in the inferior or infero-lateral leads, is associated with a higher level of risk; whereas Type 3, displaying an ER pattern globally in the inferior, lateral and right precordial leads, is associated with the highest level of risk for development of malignant arrhythmias and is often associated with VF storms. PMID:20153265

  11. Wind Generated Rogue Waves in an Annular Wave Flume.

    PubMed

    Toffoli, A; Proment, D; Salman, H; Monbaliu, J; Frascoli, F; Dafilis, M; Stramignoni, E; Forza, R; Manfrin, M; Onorato, M

    2017-04-07

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of a wind-generated wave field and the spontaneous formation of rogue waves in an annular flume. Unlike many experiments on rogue waves where waves are mechanically generated, here the wave field is forced naturally by wind as it is in the ocean. What is unique about the present experiment is that the annular geometry of the tank makes waves propagating circularly in an unlimited-fetch condition. Within this peculiar framework, we discuss the temporal evolution of the statistical properties of the surface elevation. We show that rogue waves and heavy-tail statistics may develop naturally during the growth of the waves just before the wave height reaches a stationary condition. Our results shed new light on the formation of rogue waves in a natural environment.

  12. Observed Seismic Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataille, K.

    2008-05-01

    A feature that has been observed for many decades in a variety of instruments, without a solid explanation, is a signal with a shape of a "bump" in velocity records, especially near small earthquakes. This signal arrives at times close to the S wave and has commonly being argued by some to be a nonlinear effect of the instrument (Aki and Richards, 1980), while by others as to be a real earth motion due to an unknown wave propagation phenomena. Here we propose that these observations are seismic solitary waves. The seismic solitary wave arises from an equation that describes the propagation of Love waves within a general nonlinear media. For a specific "bump-like" solution, the dispersive and nonlinear effects balance each other, allowing its propagation without distortion for long distances. Solitary waves have been observed in a variety of physical systems, including the ocean, but so far it has not been recognized in the seismological literature. The theory and modelling of several observations from different instruments will be presented.

  13. A simple wave driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kağan Temiz, Burak; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the wheel starts to turn at a constant angular speed. A rod that is fixed on the wheel turns at the same constant angular speed, too. A tight string that the wave will be created on is placed at a distance where the rod can touch the string. During each rotation of the wheel, the rod vibrates the string up and down. The vibration frequency of this rod equals the wheel’s rotation frequency, and this frequency value can be measured easily with a small magnet and a bicycle speedometer. In this way, the frequency of the waves formed in the rope can also be measured.

  14. Ocean wave electric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.R.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating electricity from ocean waves. It consists of: 1.) a hollow buoyant duck positioned in the path of waves including a core about the center axis of which the duck rotates, a lower chamber portion having liquid therein and an upper chamber portion having air therein. The air is alternately compressed and expanded by the liquid in the chamber during the rotational motion of the duck caused by waves. A turbine mounted in the upper portion of the duck is driven by the compressed and expanded air. A generator is coupled to the turbine and operated to produce electrical energy and an air bulb; 2.) a spine having a transverse axial shaft anchoring the spine to the ocean floor. The upper portion of the spine engages the duck to maintain the duck in position. The spine has a curved configuration to concentrate and direct wave energy. The spine configuration acts as a scoop to increase the height of wave peaks and as a foil to increase the depth of wave troughs.

  15. Surfing a magnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Quere, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Surfing is a free surface sport in which the athlete rides a wave standing on a board. However, any object plunged into the water or put on its surface is not always captured by an approaching wave, just like the classic example of a fisching float. So, a particle can be captured or not by a wave. Two regimes are defined: surf (captured) and drift (not captured). We focus on the question of the transition between these two regimes. Here we address the question with a magnetic wave. We have developed an experimental setup which allows the control of all relevant physical parameters. Liquid oxygen, which is paramagnetic and undergoes Leidenfrost effect, can be used to ensure magnetic and frictionless particles. A permanent magnet in translatory movement allows us to create a definite magnetic wave. We discuss the motion of oxygen drops deposited on an smooth and horizontal surface above an approaching magnet. First we show the existence of a critical speed below which drops are captured and determine how it depends on the velocity and intensity of the magnetic wave. Then we experimentally investigate the parameters that would affect the movement of drops in each regime. Finally, models have been developed to interpret magnetic drops motion and guarantee an efficient control.

  16. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  17. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  18. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  19. Rain waves-wind waves interaction application to scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharif, C.; Giovanangeli, J. P.; Bliven, L.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of a rain wave pattern by longer waves has been studied. An analytical model taking into account capillarity effects and obliquity of short waves has been developed. Modulation rates in wave number and amplitude have been computed. Experiments were carried out in a wave tank. First results agree with theoretical models, but higher values of modulation rates are measured. These results could be taken into account for understanding the radar response from the sea surface during rain.

  20. Wave Momentum Flux Parameter: A Descriptor for Nearshore Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-16

    characterizing the wave nonlinearity. D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Coastal structures; Iribarren number; Nonlinear waves; Solitary...Local Iribarren number, n tanaffiffiffiffiffiffi H=L p Deepwater Iribarren number, no tanaffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi Ho=Lo p or...solitary waves, although there are some definitions for solitary wave length which would allow use of the other wave parameters.2. The Iribarren number One

  1. Flow generated by surfaces waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzmann, Horst; Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua; Shats, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Trajectories of fluid parcels on the surface have been described analytically for progressing irrotational waves, where particles move in the direction of wave propagation. Waves in the laboratory and in nature are more complex due to the development of instabilities that render ideal planar 2D propagating waves into complex 3D waves. The motion of particles in such waves is not well understood. In this talk I will present experiments in the short wavelength gravity-capillary range that demonstrate the generation of surface flows by propagating waves driven by a vertically oscillating plunger. At low amplitude, in a quasi-linear wave regime, buoyant particle tracers move in the direction of the wave propagation. At high wave amplitude, modulation instability (or Benjamin-Feir instability) renders the planer wave front into wave packets. This affects the macroscopic flow such that floaters drift against the direction of the wave, towards the plunger wave source [1]. The role of surface vorticity generation by waves will be discussed. Reference: Punzmann H., Francois N., Xia H., Falkovich G. and Shats M.; Generation and reversal of surface flows by propagating waves, Nature Physics 10, 658-663 (2014).

  2. Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Eugene Valentinovich

    As the worldwide aviation fleet continues to age, methods for accurately predicting the presence of structural flaws, such as hidden corrosion and disbonds, that compromise air worthiness become increasingly necessary. Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. In addition, human inspection process tends to be highly subjective, slow and prone to errors. The only practical alternative to traditional inspection routine is a software expert system capable of interpreting data with minimum error and maximum speed and reliability. Such a system would use the laws of guided wave propagation and material parameters to help signal processing algorithms automatically extract information from digitized waveforms. This work discusses several practical approaches to building such an expert system. The next step in the inspection process is data interpretation, and imaging is the most natural way to represent two-dimensional structures. Unlike conventional ultrasonic C-scan imaging that requires access to the whole inspected area, tomographic algorithms work with data collected over the perimeter of the sample. Combined with the ability of Lamb waves to travel over large distances, tomography becomes the method of choice for solving NDE problems. This work explores different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on the thickness, the traveltimes of the fundamental modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspected region. Lamb waves cannot penetrate through holes and other strongly scattering defects and the assumption of straight wave paths, essential for many tomographic algorithms

  3. Invariants of 4-wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, A.; Ferapontov, E.

    1993-05-01

    We give a complete description of one-dimensional 4-wave resonance interactions in which some extra quantities (besides momentum, energy, number of quasiparticles) are conserved. In this way we obtain new consideration laws for the kinetic equations for waves. In particular, we consider waves in optical fibers, the system of four resonantly interacting wave packets, long wave interactions of annihilation-creation type, various wave systems with quadratic dispersion laws. The results can be important for various problems concerning nonlinear wave dynamics, e.g. for nonlinear optics of waveguides.

  4. Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

  5. Continuation of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Engel, Harald

    2007-04-01

    We describe a new numerical method of computing rigidly rotating spiral waves, which is based on solving the Neumann boundary-value problem for the radius-dependent angular Fourier modes. Utilizing the established continuation engine AUTO, our method is simple in implementation and can be easily modified to suit a particular reaction-diffusion system. Since the method does not involve direct simulations of the reaction-diffusion system, unstable branches of rigidly rotating spiral waves can be computed as well. We illustrate our method by computing single- and multi-armed spirals in the Barkley model. Continuation of single-armed spirals displays nearly identical results with the Barkley’s continuation code STEADY. The dependence of spiral waves on the geometry of the medium reproduces the results of numerical simulations reported before in [A.M. Pertsov, E.A. Ermakova, A.V. Panfilov, Rotating spiral waves in a modified Fitz-Hugh-Nagumo model, Physica D 14 (1) (1984) 117-124], revealing, however, some subtle details like non-monotonous dependence of the rotation frequency on the disc radius and the existence of an unstable rotating solution that separates coexisting free and pinned spirals. We demonstrate that on bounded discs, spiral waves are accompanied by boundary spots - slowly rotating solutions which are localized near the outer boundary of the disc. Boundary spots are shown to be closely related to one- and two-dimensional unstable critical solutions, such as unstable pulses in one dimension and critical fingers in two dimensions, which separate spiral waves from shrinking wave segments.

  6. Nonstationary distributions of wave intensities in wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeontaek; Jo, Sanggyu; Kwon, Young-Sam; Nazarenko, Sergey

    2017-09-01

    We obtain a general solution for the probability density function (PDF) of wave intensities in non-stationary wave turbulence. The solution is expressed in terms of the initial PDF and the wave action spectrum satisfying the wave-kinetic equation. We establish that, in the absence of wave breaking, the wave statistics converge to a Gaussian distribution in forced-dissipated wave systems while approaching a steady state. Also, we find that in non-stationary systems, if the statistic is Gaussian initially, it will remain Gaussian for all time. Generally, if the statistic is not initially Gaussian, it will remain non-Gaussian over the characteristic nonlinear evolution time of the wave spectrum. In freely decaying wave turbulence, substantial deviations from Gaussianity may persist infinitely long.

  7. Longitudinal shear wave and transverse dilatational wave in solids.

    PubMed

    Catheline, S; Benech, N

    2015-02-01

    Dilatation wave involves compression and extension and is known as the curl-free solution of the elastodynamic equation. Shear wave on the contrary does not involve any change in volume and is the divergence-free solution. This letter seeks to examine the elastodynamic Green's function through this definition. By separating the Green's function in divergence-free and curl-free terms, it appears first that, strictly speaking, the longitudinal wave is not a pure dilatation wave and the transverse wave is neither a pure shear wave. Second, not only a longitudinal shear wave but also a transverse dilatational wave exists. These waves are shown to be a part of the solution known as coupling terms. Their special motion is carefully described and illustrated.

  8. Potential changes of wave steepness and occurrence of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta M.; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Wave steepness is an important characteristic of a sea state. It is also well established that wave steepness is one of the parameter responsible for generation of abnormal waves called also freak or rogue waves. The study investigates changes of wave steepness in the past and future wave climate in the North Atlantic. The fifth assessment report IPCC (2013) uses four scenarios for future greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere called Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). Two of these scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 have been selected to project future wave conditions in the North Atlantic. RCP 4.5 is believed to achieve the political target of a maximum global mean temperature increase of 2° C while RPC 8.5 is close to 'business as usual' and expected to give a temperature increase of 4° C or more. The analysis includes total sea, wind sea and swell. Potential changes of wave steepness for these wave systems are shown and compared with wave steepness derived from historical data. Three historical data sets with different wave model resolutions are used. The investigations show also changes in the mean wind direction as well as in the relative direction between wind sea and swell. Consequences of wave steepness changes for statistics of surface elevation and generation of rogue waves are demonstrated. Uncertainties associated with wave steepness projections are discussed.

  9. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  10. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2012-03-01

    If two black holes collide in a vacuum, can they be observed? Until recently, the answer would have to be "no." After all, how would we observe them? Black holes are "naked" mass: pure mass, simple mass, mass devoid of any matter whose interactions might lead to the emission of photons or neutrinos, or any electromagnetic fields that might accelerate cosmic rays or leave some other signature that we could observe in our most sensitive astronomical instruments. Still, black holes do have mass. As such, they interact—like all mass—gravitationally. And the influence of gravity, like all influences, propagates no faster than that universal speed we first came to know as the speed of light. The effort to detect that propagating influence, which we term as gravitational radiation or gravitational waves, was initiated just over 50 years ago with the pioneering work of Joe Weber [1] and has been the object of increasingly intense experimental effort ever since. Have we, as yet, detected gravitational waves? The answer is still "no." Nevertheless, the accumulation of the experimental efforts begun fifty years ago has brought us to the point where we can confidently say that gravitational waves will soon be detected and, with that first detection, the era of gravitational wave astronomy—the observational use of gravitational waves, emitted by heavenly bodies—will begin. Data analysis for gravitational wave astronomy is, today, in its infancy and its practitioners have much to learn from allied fields, including machine learning. Machine learning tools and techniques have not yet been applied in any extensive or substantial way to the study or analysis of gravitational wave data. It is fair to say that this owes principally to the fields relative youth and not to any intrinsic unsuitability of machine learning tools to the analysis problems the field faces. Indeed, the nature of many of the analysis problems faced by the field today cry-out for the application of

  11. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  12. Rupture, waves and earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  13. Rupture, waves and earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    UENISHI, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but “extraordinary” phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable. PMID:28077808

  14. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  15. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  16. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  17. Pilot-Wave Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article reviews experimental evidence indicating that the walking droplets exhibit certain features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic, quantum realm. It then reviews theoretical descriptions of this hydrodynamic pilot-wave system that yield insight into the origins of its quantum-like behavior. Quantization arises from the dynamic constraint imposed on the droplet by its pilot-wave field, and multimodal statistics appear to be a feature of chaotic pilot-wave dynamics. I attempt to assess the potential and limitations of this hydrodynamic system as a quantum analog. This fluid system is compared to quantum pilot-wave theories, shown to be markedly different from Bohmian mechanics and more closely related to de Broglie's original conception of quantum dynamics, his double-solution theory, and its relatively recent extensions through researchers in stochastic electrodynamics.

  18. Spin-wave diode

    DOE PAGES

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; ...

    2015-12-28

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound statesmore » in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. As a result, these findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.« less

  19. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-02-11

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  20. Bent Marshak waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Hammer, J. H.

    2006-11-15

    Radiation-driven heat waves (Marshak waves) are ubiquitous in astrophysics and terrestrial laser-driven high-energy density plasma physics experiments. Generally, the equations describing Marshak waves are so nonlinear, that solutions involving more than one spatial dimension require simulation. However, in this paper it is shown that one may analytically solve the problem of the two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a Marshak wave, bounded by lossy walls, using an asymptotic expansion in a parameter related to the wall albedo and a simplification of the heat front equation of motion. Three parameters determine the nonlinear evolution: a modified Markshak diffusion constant, a smallness parameter related to the wall albedo, and the spacing of the walls. The final nonlinear solution shows that the Marshak wave will be both slowed and bent by the nonideal boundary. In the limit of a perfect boundary, the solution recovers the original diffusion-like solution of Marshak. The analytic solution will be compared to a limited set of simulation results and experimental data.

  1. Bent Marshak Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hammer, J H

    2005-10-11

    Radiation driven heat waves (Marshak Waves) are ubiquitous in astrophysics and terrestrial laser driven high energy density plasma physics (HEDP) experiments. Generally, the equations describing Marshak waves are so nonlinear, that solutions involving more than one spatial dimension require simulation. However, in this paper we show how one may analytically solve the problem of the two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a Marshak wave, bounded by lossy walls, using an asymptotic expansion in a parameter related to the wall albedo and a simplification of the heat front equation of motion. Three parameters determine the nonlinear evolution, a modified Markshak diffusion constant, a smallness parameter related to the wall albedo, and the spacing of the walls. The final nonlinear solution shows that the Marshak wave will be both slowed and bent by the non-ideal boundary. In the limit of a perfect boundary, the solution recovers the original diffusion-like solution of Marshak. The analytic solution will be compared to a limited set of simulation results and experimental data.

  2. Waves in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGourty, L.; Rideout, K.

    2005-12-01

    "Waves in Motion" This teaching unit was created by Leslie McGourty and Ken Rideout under the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at MIT Haystack Observatory during the summer of 2005. The RET program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of this teaching unit are to deepen students' understanding about waves, wave motion, and the electromagnetic spectrum as a whole. Specifically students will comprehend the role radio waves play in our daily lives and in the investigation of the universe. The lessons can be used in a high school physics, earth science or astronomy curriculum. The unit consists of a series of interlocking lectures, activities, and investigations that can be used as stand alone units to supplement a teacher's existing curriculum, as an independent investigation for a student, or as a long exploration into radio astronomy with a theme of waves in space: how and where they carry their information. Special emphasis is given to the Relativity theories in honor of the "World Year of Physics" to celebrate Einstein's 1905 contributions. The lessons are currently being implemented at the high school level, the preliminary results of which will be presented. At the end of the academic year, the units will be evaluated and updated, reflecting student input and peer review after which they will be posted on the internet for teachers to use in their classrooms.

  3. Rupture, waves and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Normally, an earthquake is considered as a phenomenon of wave energy radiation by rupture (fracture) of solid Earth. However, the physics of dynamic process around seismic sources, which may play a crucial role in the occurrence of earthquakes and generation of strong waves, has not been fully understood yet. Instead, much of former investigation in seismology evaluated earthquake characteristics in terms of kinematics that does not directly treat such dynamic aspects and usually excludes the influence of high-frequency wave components over 1 Hz. There are countless valuable research outcomes obtained through this kinematics-based approach, but "extraordinary" phenomena that are difficult to be explained by this conventional description have been found, for instance, on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake, and more detailed study on rupture and wave dynamics, namely, possible mechanical characteristics of (1) rupture development around seismic sources, (2) earthquake-induced structural failures and (3) wave interaction that connects rupture (1) and failures (2), would be indispensable.

  4. Magnetic Black Hole Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-09

    This cartoon shows how magnetic waves, called Alfvén S-waves, propagate outward from the base of black hole jets. The jet is a flow of charged particles, called a plasma, which is launched by a black hole. The jet has a helical magnetic field (yellow coil) permeating the plasma. The waves then travel along the jet, in the direction of the plasma flow, but at a velocity determined by both the jet's magnetic properties and the plasma flow speed. The BL Lac jet examined in a new study is several light-years long, and the wave speed is about 98 percent the speed of light. Fast-moving magnetic waves emanating from a distant supermassive black hole undulate like a whip whose handle is being shaken by a giant hand, according to a study using data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array. Scientists used this instrument to explore the galaxy/black hole system known as BL Lacertae (BL Lac) in high resolution. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19822

  5. Tango waves in a bidomain model of fertilization calcium waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue-Xian

    2003-12-01

    Fertilization of an egg cell is marked by one or several Ca 2+ waves that travel across the intra-cellular space, called fertilization Ca 2+ waves. Patterns of Ca 2+ waves observed in mature or immature oocytes include traveling fronts and pulses as well as concentric and spiral waves. These patterns have been studied in other excitable media in physical, chemical, and biological systems. Here, we report the discovery of a new wave phenomenon in the numerical study of a bidomain model of fertilization Ca 2+ waves. This wave is a front that propagates in a back-and-forth manner that resembles the movement of tango dancers, thus is called a tango wave. When the medium is excitable, a forward-moving tango wave can generate traveling pulses that propagate down the space without reversal. The study shows that the occurrence of tango waves is related to spatial inhomogeneity in the local dynamics. This is tested and confirmed by simulating similar waves in a medium with stationary spatial inhomogeneity. Similar waves are also obtained in a FitzHugh-Nagumo system with a linear spatial ramp. In both the bidomain model of Ca 2+ waves and the FitzHugh-Nagumo system, the front is stable when the slope of a linear ramp is large. As the slope decreases beyond a critical value, front oscillations occur. The study shows that tango waves facilitate the dispersion of localized Ca 2+. Key features of the bidomain model underlying the occurrence of tango waves are revealed. These features are commonly found in egg cells of a variety of species. Thus, we predict that tango waves can occur in real egg cells provided that a slowly varying inhomogeneity does occur following the sperm entry. The observation of tango wave-like waves in nemertean worm and ascidian eggs seems to support such a prediction.

  6. Spin densities for Ni, Pt_3Cr, and Pd_3Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Hung T.; Lu, Z. W.; Klein, Barry M.

    1997-03-01

    Recent ab-initio calculations^1 demonstrated that the L12 ordering in Pt_3Cr is a direct consequence of spin-polarization, i.e., magnetic moment formation in the L12 structure stabilizes it over its rival DO_22 structure (which is more stable in a non magnetic calculation). Here we present calculations of the magnetic structures of Pt_3Cr and Pd_3Cr in the L12 structure. We use fcc Ni calculations as a benchmark system since its magnetic structure has been well studied experimentally and theoretically. Our LSDA-calculated Ni magnetic structure factors are in good accord with experiment as well as with previous theoretical results. Our calculated magnetic structure factors for Pt_3Cr are in fair agreement with experiment.^2 The calculated local magnetic moment at the Pt site ( ~ 0) differs somewhat from the early experimental estimate of -0.27 μB ^2 but is, however, closer to the recent circular X-ray dichroism experimental value^3 of -0.1 μ_B. We also find that the contribution of the orbital polarization to the Pt-site local moment is negligible. We will also show magnetic structure factors of Pd_3Cr in the L12 structure, for which no experimental data are yet available for comparison. Work supported by a grant from Sandia National Laboratories ^1Z. W. Lu, B. M. Klein, A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1320 (1995). ^2S. K. Burke, et al., J. of Magn. Magn. Mat. 15, 505 (1980). ^3H. Maruyama, et al, J. of Magn. Magn. Mat. 140, 43 (1995).

  7. Raychaudhuri equation in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan theory with spin-density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Krisch, Jean P.; Ray, John R.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1988-01-01

    The physical implications of the Raychaudhuri equation for a spinning fluid in a Riemann-Cartan spacetime is developed and discussed using the self-consistent Lagrangian based formulation for the Einstein-Cartan theory. It was found that the spin-squared terms contribute to expansion (inflation) at early times and may lead to a bounce in the final collapse. The relationship between the fluid's vorticity and spin angular velocity is clarified and the effect of the interaction terms between the spin angular velocity and the spin in the Raychaudhuri equation investigated. These results should prove useful for studies of systems with an intrinsic spin angular momentum in extreme astrophysical or cosmological problems.

  8. Optical Polarization Möbius Strips and Points of Purely Transverse Spin Density.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas; Neugebauer, Martin; Leuchs, Gerd; Banzer, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Tightly focused light beams can exhibit complex and versatile structured electric field distributions. The local field may spin around any axis including a transverse axis perpendicular to the beams' propagation direction. At certain focal positions, the corresponding local polarization ellipse can even degenerate into a perfect circle, representing a point of circular polarization or C point. We consider the most fundamental case of a linearly polarized Gaussian beam, where-upon tight focusing-those C points created by transversely spinning fields can form the center of 3D optical polarization topologies when choosing the plane of observation appropriately. Because of the high symmetry of the focal field, these polarization topologies exhibit nontrivial structures similar to Möbius strips. We use a direct physical measure to find C points with an arbitrarily oriented spinning axis of the electric field and experimentally investigate the fully three-dimensional polarization topologies surrounding these C points by exploiting an amplitude and phase reconstruction technique.

  9. Change in electron and spin density upon electron transfer to haem.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Mikael P; Blomberg, Margareta R A; Sundholm, Dage; Wikström, Mårten

    2002-02-15

    Haems are the cofactors of cytochromes and important catalysts of biological electron transfer. They are composed of a planar porphyrin structure with iron coordinated at the centre. It is known from spectroscopy that ferric low-spin haem has one unpaired electron at the iron, and that this spin is paired as the haem receives an electron upon reduction (I. Bertini, C. Luchinat, NMR of Paramagnetic Molecules in Biological Systems, Benjamin/Cummins Publ. Co., Menlo Park, CA, 1986, pp. 165-170; H.M. Goff, in: A.B.P. Lever, H.B. Gray (Eds.), Iron Porphyrins, Part I, Addison-Wesley Publ. Co., Reading, MA, 1983, pp. 237-281; G. Palmer, in: A.B.P. Lever, H.B. Gray (Eds.), Iron Porphyrins, Part II, Addison-Wesley Publ. Co., Reading, MA, 1983, pp. 43-88). Here we show by quantum chemical calculations on a haem a model that upon reduction the spin pairing at the iron is accompanied by effective delocalisation of electrons from the iron towards the periphery of the porphyrin ring, including its substituents. The change of charge of the iron atom is only approx. 0.1 electrons, despite the unit difference in formal oxidation state. Extensive charge delocalisation on reduction is important in order for the haem to be accommodated in the low dielectric of a protein, and may have impact on the distance dependence of the rates of electron transfer. The lost individuality of the electron added to the haem on reduction is another example of the importance of quantum mechanical effects in biological systems.

  10. Galaxy Formation from a Low-Spin Density Perturbation in a CDM Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Daisuke

    1999-12-01

    In order to understand the formation process of elliptical galaxies which are not rotationally supported, we carried out numerical simulations of galaxy formation from a density perturbation with a rotation corresponding to a small spin parameter. The three-dimensional TREE N-Body/SPH simulation code used included dark matter and gas dynamics, radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, and metal enrichment. The initial condition was a slowly rotating, top-hat over-dense sphere on which the perturbations expected in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe were superposed. By means of a stellar-population synthesis, we calculated the surface-brightness profile, the metallicity distribution, and the photometric properties of the end-product, and found that these properties quantitatively agree with the observed properties of bright elliptical galaxies. Thus, we conclude that, in a CDM universe, a proto-galaxy having a spin-parameter as small as 0.02 evolves into an elliptical galaxy.

  11. Polarized proton spin density images the tyrosyl radical locations in bovine liver catalase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Oliver; Jouve, Hélène M.; Stuhrmann, Heinrich B.

    2016-01-01

    A tyrosyl radical, as part of the amino acid chain of bovine liver catalase, supports dynamic proton spin polarization (DNP). Finding the position of the tyrosyl radical within the macromolecule relies on the accumulation of proton polarization close to it, which is readily observed by polarized neutron scattering. The nuclear scattering amplitude due to the polarization of protons less than 10 Å distant from the tyrosyl radical is ten times larger than the amplitude of magnetic neutron scattering from an unpaired polarized electron of the same radical. The direction of DNP was inverted every 5 s, and the initial evolution of the intensity of polarized neutron scattering after each inversion was used to identify those tyrosines which have assumed a radical state. Three radical sites, all of them close to the molecular centre and the haem, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369, the radical state of which had previously been proven by electron paramagnetic resonance. PMID:28461894

  12. Neural field theory of nonlinear wave-wave and wave-neuron processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Roy, N.

    2015-06-01

    Systematic expansion of neural field theory equations in terms of nonlinear response functions is carried out to enable a wide variety of nonlinear wave-wave and wave-neuron processes to be treated systematically in systems involving multiple neural populations. The results are illustrated by analyzing second-harmonic generation, and they can also be applied to wave-wave coalescence, multiharmonic generation, facilitation, depression, refractoriness, and other nonlinear processes.

  13. Hysteretic Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon; Juric, Damir

    2016-11-01

    We study with numerical simulations the two-dimensional Faraday waves in two immiscible incompressible fluids when the lower fluid layer is shallow. After the appearance of the well known subharmonic stationary waves, a further instability is observed while the control parameter passes a secondary threshold. A new state then arises, composed of stationary waves with about twice the original pattern amplitude. The bifurcation presents hysteresis: there exists a finite range of the control parameter in which both states are stable. By means of a simple stress balance, we show that a change of the shear stress can explain this hysteresis. Our predictions based on this model are in agreement with our numerical results. Project funded by FONDECYT Grants 1130354, 3140522 and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF- 2014R1A2A1A11051346). Computations supported by the supercomputing infrastructures of the NLHPC (ECM-02) and GENCI (IDRIS).

  14. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  15. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  16. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  17. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  18. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  19. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  20. The Juno Waves Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kirchner, D. L.; Mokrzycki, B. T.; Averkamp, T. F.; Robison, W. T.; Piker, C. W.; Sampl, M.; Zarka, P.

    2017-07-01

    Jupiter is the source of the strongest planetary radio emissions in the solar system. Variations in these emissions are symptomatic of the dynamics of Jupiter's magnetosphere and some have been directly associated with Jupiter's auroras. The strongest radio emissions are associated with Io's interaction with Jupiter's magnetic field. In addition, plasma waves are thought to play important roles in the acceleration of energetic particles in the magnetosphere, some of which impact Jupiter's upper atmosphere generating the auroras. Since the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere is a major objective of the Juno mission, it is appropriate that a radio and plasma wave investigation is included in Juno's payload. This paper describes the Waves instrument and the science it is to pursue as part of the Juno mission.

  1. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  2. Communication at millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, A. K.; Christopher, P. F.

    The advantage and disadvantages of millimeter waves for terrestrial and satellite communications are enumerated. Atmospheric attenuation is discussed in detail, with brief attention given to signal loss in particulates, sandstorms, snow, hail, and fog. Short closed forms are then found for gaseous attenuation on ground-satellite paths. An exponential rain loss probability density function is used in generating atmospheric loss at arbitrary required availability. It is pointed out that this loss (as a function of frequency) can be used to pick optimum carrier frequencies as a function of location, required availability, elevation angle, and system cost. An estimate is made of the rate-of-change of millimeter wave device availability. Special attention is given to GaAs FETs, not only because they will be useful, but because one phase of their millimeter wave performance is predictable: their noise performance as a function of frequency can be estimated with the aid of a Fukui equation.

  3. Discrete wave equation upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2017-01-01

    We present homogenisation technique for the uniformly discretised wave equation, based on the derivation of an effective equation for the low-wavenumber component of the solution. The method produces a down-sampled, effective medium, thus making the solution of the effective equation less computationally expensive. Advantages of the method include its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, the applicability to any uniformly discretised wave equation in one, two or three dimensions, and the absence of any constraints on the medium properties. We illustrate our method with a numerical example of wave propagation through a one-dimensional multiscale medium, and demonstrate the accurate reproduction of the original wavefield for sufficiently low frequencies.

  4. Solitary water wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, W.; Guyenne, P.; Hammack, J.; Henderson, D.; Sulem, C.

    2006-05-01

    This article concerns the pairwise nonlinear interaction of solitary waves in the free surface of a body of water lying over a horizontal bottom. Unlike solitary waves in many completely integrable model systems, solitary waves for the full Euler equations do not collide elastically; after interactions, there is a nonzero residual wave that trails the post-collision solitary waves. In this report on new numerical and experimental studies of such solitary wave interactions, we verify that this is the case, both in head-on collisions (the counterpropagating case) and overtaking collisions (the copropagating case), quantifying the degree to which interactions are inelastic. In the situation in which two identical solitary waves undergo a head-on collision, we compare the asymptotic predictions of Su and Mirie [J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980)] and Byatt-Smith [J. Fluid Mech. 49, 625 (1971)], the wavetank experiments of Maxworthy [J. Fluid Mech. 76, 177 (1976)], and the numerical results of Cooker, Weidman, and Bale [J. Fluid Mech. 342, 141 (1997)] with independent numerical simulations, in which we quantify the phase change, the run-up, and the form of the residual wave and its Fourier signature in both small- and large-amplitude interactions. This updates the prior numerical observations of inelastic interactions in Fenton and Rienecker [J. Fluid Mech. 118, 411 (1982)]. In the case of two nonidentical solitary waves, our precision wavetank experiments are compared with numerical simulations, again observing the run-up, phase lag, and generation of a residual from the interaction. Considering overtaking solitary wave interactions, we compare our experimental observations, numerical simulations, and the asymptotic predictions of Zou and Su [Phys. Fluids 29, 2113 (1986)], and again we quantify the inelastic residual after collisions in the simulations. Geometrically, our numerical simulations of overtaking interactions fit into the three categories of Korteweg-deVries two

  5. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  6. Human waves in stadiums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, I.; Helbing, D.; Vicsek, T.

    2003-12-01

    Mexican wave first widely broadcasted during the 1986 World Cup held in Mexico, is a human wave moving along the stands of stadiums as one section of spectators stands up, arms lifting, then sits down as the next section does the same. Here we use variants of models originally developed for the description of excitable media to demonstrate that this collective human behaviour can be quantitatively interpreted by methods of statistical physics. Adequate modelling of reactions to triggering attempts provides a deeper insight into the mechanisms by which a crowd can be stimulated to execute a particular pattern of behaviour and represents a possible tool of control during events involving excited groups of people. Interactive simulations, video recordings and further images are available at the webpage dedicated to this work: http://angel.elte.hu/wave.

  7. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  8. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  9. Extreme driven ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The excitation of large amplitude, strongly nonlinear ion acoustic waves from trivial equilibrium by a chirped frequency drive is discussed. Under certain conditions, after passage through the linear resonance in this system, the nonlinearity and the variation of parameters work in tandem to preserve the phase-locking with the driving wave via excursion of the excited ion acoustic wave in its parameter space, yielding controlled growth of the wave amplitude. We study these autoresonant waves via a fully nonlinear warm fluid model and predict the formation of sharply peaked (extreme) ion acoustic excitations with local ion density significantly exceeding the unperturbed plasma density. The driven wave amplitude is bound by the kinetic wave-breaking, as the local maximum fluid velocity of the wave approaches the phase velocity of the drive. The Vlasov-Poisson simulations are used to confirm the results of the fluid model, and Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied for analyzing the evolution of autoresonant ion acoustic waves.

  10. The Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Heliophysics wave data are currently not easily searchable by computers, making identifying pertinent wave data features for analyses and cross comparisons difficult and laborious. Since wave data analysis requires specialized knowledge about waves, which spans the spectrum of microphysics to macrophysics, researchers having varied expertise cannot easily use wave data. To resolve these difficulties and to allow wave data to contribute more fully to Heliophysics research, we are developing a Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) whose goal is to enable all Heliophysics wave data to become searchable, understandable and usable by the Heliophysics community. The VWO objective is to enable search of multiple and distributed wave data (from both active and passive measurements). This presentation provides and overview of the VWO, a new VxO component within the emerging distributed Heliophysics data and model environment.

  11. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  12. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Heliophysics wave data are currently not easily searchable by computers, making identifying pertinent wave data features for analyses and cross comparisons difficult and laborious. Since wave data analysis requires specialized knowledge about waves, which spans the spectrum of microphysics to macrophysics, researchers having varied expertise cannot easily use wave data. To resolve these difficulties and to allow wave data to contribute more fully to Heliophysics research, we are developing a Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) whose goal is to enable all Heliophysics wave data to become searchable, understandable and usable by the Heliophysics community. The VWO objective is to enable search of multiple and distributed wave data (from both active and passive measurements). This presentation provides and overview of the VWO, a new VxO component within the emerging distributed Heliophysics data and model environment.

  15. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Francesco A

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N2 and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C2. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu2O2(2+) core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  16. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  17. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  18. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  19. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  20. Triangular rogue wave cascades.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2012-11-01

    By numerically applying the recursive Darboux transformation technique, we study high-order rational solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that appear spatiotemporally as triangular arrays of Peregrine solitons. These can be considered as rogue wave cascades and complement previously discovered circular cluster forms. In this analysis, we reveal a general parametric restriction for their existence and investigate the interplay between cascade and cluster forms. As a result, we demonstrate how to generate many more hybrid rogue wave solutions, including semicircular clusters that resemble claws.

  1. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  2. Mechanics, Waves and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Jain, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; Acknowledgement; 1. Energy, mass, momentum; 2. Kinematics, Newton's laws of motion; 3. Circular motion; 4. The principle of least action; 5. Work and energy; 6. Mechanics of a system of particles; 7. Friction; 8. Impulse and collisions; 9. Central forces; 10. Dimensional analysis; 11. Oscillations; 12. Waves; 13. Sound of music; 14. Fluid mechanics; 15. Water waves; 16. The kinetic theory of gases; 17. Concepts and laws of thermodynamics; 18. Some applications of thermodynamics; 19. Basic ideas of statistical mechanics; Bibliography; Index.

  3. Alaska Wave Data Index

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    13. Directional wave spectra: 14a. Con. wind data: Y 14b. Location sensor: Narwhal Island 14c. Period of record: 07/78-10/78 isa. Con. current data: Y... Narwhal Island 14c. Period of record: 07/78-10/78 15a. Con. current data: Y 15b. Location meters: S. of Cross Island & W of Stockton Island at Newport...10. Sample: 11. Burst sampling: 12. Burst Interval: 13. Directional wave spectra: 14a. Con. wind data: Y 14b. Location sensor: Narwhal Island 14c

  4. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  5. Theory of Detonation Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-05-04

    and progresses through .an explosive. Such a theory must explain how the head of the detonation wave initiates· the reaction (and the detonation ... theory of detonation is based on the assumption that the actual value of 9’ is this lower limit Cf1 ! This is tho so-called hypothesis of’ Chapman and...DEVELOP!i!ENT Progress Report on 11 Theory of Detonation Waves 11 to April 1, 1942 by John von Nounr.n Institute for Adv&nccd Study Princeton

  6. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  7. Quantum wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeri, M. B.; Putterman, S. J.; Garcia, A.; Roberts, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear quantum kinetic equation for the interaction of sound waves is solved via analytic and numerical techniques. In the classical regime energy cascades to higher frequency (ω) according to the steady-state power law ω-3/2. In the quantum limit, the system prefers a reverse cascade of energy which follows the power law ω-6. Above a critical flux, a new type of spectrum appears which is neither self-similar nor close to equilibrium. This state of nonlinear quantum wave turbulence represents a flow of energy directly from the classical source to the quantum degrees of freedom.

  8. Making Waves (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-06

    magnetohydrodynamic shocks at the Sun for an eruptive event on 22 September 2011. In brief, in this event the lateral expansion of a coronal mass ejection drove a...acceleration at a solar shock wave: a driving plasmoid or coronal mass ejection (CME); a propagating coronal bright front at the leading edge of the...lower frequencies at a rate of ~0.5 MHz s–1 (ref. 2). The causative disturbance, later identified as a magnetohydrodynamic shock wave, propagates

  9. Leapfrogging Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, N.; Hänninen, R.; Salman, H.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2016-12-01

    Two vortex rings can form a localized configuration whereby they continually pass through one another in an alternating fashion. This phenomenon is called leapfrogging. Using parameters suitable for superfluid helium-4, we describe a recurrence phenomenon that is similar to leapfrogging, which occurs for two coaxial straight vortex filaments with the same Kelvin wave mode. For small-amplitude Kelvin waves we demonstrate that our full Biot-Savart simulations closely follow predictions obtained from a simplified model that provides an analytical approximation developed for nearly parallel vortices. Our results are also relevant to thin-cored helical vortices in classical fluids.

  10. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  11. Caustics for spherical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia; Motohashi, Hayato

    2017-03-01

    We study the development of caustics in shift-symmetric scalar field theories by focusing on simple waves with an S O (p )-symmetry in an arbitrary number of space dimensions. We show that the pure Galileon, the DBI-Galileon, and the extreme-relativistic Galileon naturally emerge as the unique set of caustic-free theories, highlighting a link between the caustic-free condition for simple S O (p )-waves and the existence of either a global Galilean symmetry or a global (extreme-)relativistic Galilean symmetry.

  12. The role of Biot slow waves in electroseismic wave phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pride, Steven R; Garambois, Stéphane

    2002-02-01

    The electromagnetic fields that are generated as a spherical seismic wave (either P or S) traverses an interface separating two porous materials are numerically modeled both with and without the generation of Biot slow waves at the interface. In the case of an incident fast-P wave, the predicted electric-field amplitudes when slow waves are neglected can easily be off by as much as an order of magnitude. In the case of an incident S wave, the error is much smaller (typically on the order of 10% or less) because not much S-wave energy gets converted into slow waves. In neglecting the slow waves, only six plane waves (reflected and transmitted fast-P, S, and EM waves) are available with which to match the eight continuity conditions that hold at each interface. This overdetermined problem is solved by placing weights on the eight continuity conditions so that those conditions that are most important for obtaining the proper response are emphasized. It is demonstrated that when slow waves are neglected, it is best to also neglect the continuity of the Darcy flow and fluid pressure across an interface. The principal conclusion of this work is that to properly model the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated at an interface by an incident seismic wave, the full Biot theory that allows for generation of slow waves must be employed.

  13. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  14. Rogue wave observation in a water wave tank.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N P; Akhmediev, N

    2011-05-20

    The conventional definition of rogue waves in the ocean is that their heights, from crest to trough, are more than about twice the significant wave height, which is the average wave height of the largest one-third of nearby waves. When modeling deep water waves using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the most likely candidate satisfying this criterion is the so-called Peregrine solution. It is localized in both space and time, thus describing a unique wave event. Until now, experiments specifically designed for observation of breather states in the evolution of deep water waves have never been made in this double limit. In the present work, we present the first experimental results with observations of the Peregrine soliton in a water wave tank.

  15. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  16. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Torrezan, Antonio C; Woskov, Paul P

    2006-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine.

  17. Generating electromagnetic waves from gravity waves in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P. A.; O'Farrell, S.

    2009-05-15

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys. Rev. D 62, 101501(R) (2000)].

  18. Island-trapped Waves, Internal Waves, and Island Circulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    model of the depth-integrated flow for the world ocean allowing for island circulations . Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn., 45:89–112, 1989. J. MacKinnon...Mountain waves in the deep ocean . Nature, 501:321–322, 2013. M. Nikurashin and R. Ferrari. Overturning circulation driven by breaking internal waves...Island-trapped waves, internal waves, and island circulation T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California

  19. Localized coherence of freak waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifah, Arnida L.; van Groesen, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates in detail a possible mechanism of energy convergence leading to freak waves. We give examples of a freak wave as a (weak) pseudo-maximal wave to illustrate the importance of phase coherence. Given a time signal at a certain position, we identify parts of the time signal with successive high amplitudes, so-called group events, that may lead to a freak wave using wavelet transform analysis. The local coherence of the critical group event is measured by its time spreading of the most energetic waves. Four types of signals have been investigated: dispersive focusing, normal sea condition, thunderstorm condition and an experimental irregular wave. In all cases presented in this paper, it is shown that a high correlation exists between the local coherence and the appearance of a freak wave. This makes it plausible that freak waves can be developed by local interactions of waves in a wave group and that the effect of waves that are not in the immediate vicinity is minimal. This indicates that a local coherence mechanism within a wave group can be one mechanism that leads to the appearance of a freak wave.

  20. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water.

  1. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  2. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  3. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  4. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  5. Submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Ward, John (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In an embodiment, a submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver includes a finline ortho-mode transducer comprising thin tapered metallic fins deposited on a thin dielectric substrate to separate a vertically polarized electromagnetic mode from a horizontally polarized electromagnetic mode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  6. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  7. Nonclassical Matter Wave Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Broglie to Heisenberg ”, invited talk, Alexander von Humboldt 18th Symposium, “100 Years Werner Heisenberg --- Works and Impact”, Bamberg, Germany, 2001...From de Broglie waves to Heisenberg ferromagnets”, Fortschritte der Physik 50, 664 (2002). 17. C. P. Search, H. Pu, W. Zhang, B. P. Anderson and P

  8. Oblique dust density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  9. Resonant Alfven Wave Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameiri, Eliezer

    1999-11-01

    Much of the theory of the Alfven wave resonance phenomenon was developed for a tokamak configuration where the magnetic field winds around the torus without entering the boundary. Thus, boundary conditions did not have to be considered.( J. Tataronis and W. Grossmann, Z. Phys. 261), 203 (1973). In most space plasma situations such as the magnetosphere or the Sun, as well as in the scrape-off layer of a divertor tokamak, this is not the case. When boundary conditions are considered, it is generally assumed for simplicity that the boundary is perfectly conducting, which implies that the Alfven wave bounce frequencies are real and the resonance phenomenon can be detected by some singularity in the equations. The nature of the singularity is usually described in terms of a Frobenius series.( A.N. Wright and M.J. Thompson, Phys. Plamsas 1), 691 (1994). In this work we consider resistive boundaries, which imply that the fast wave eigenfrequency is real, but the Alfven frequency is not. Thus, there is no exact resonance and no singularity in the equations. The solution of the problem is carried out asymptotically by finding an exact Laplace integral representation for the solution and then matching various regions. The energy transferred to the Alfven wave appears to be rather small.

  10. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  11. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  12. Waves and Crops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses wave patterns on the surfaces of ripening wheat and barley crops when the wind is moderately strong. Examines the structure of the turbulence over such natural surfaces and conditions under which the crop may be damaged by the wind. (JR)

  13. Gravitational waves from technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Kouvaris, Chris

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the production and possible detection of gravitational waves stemming from the electroweak phase transition in the early universe in models of minimal walking technicolor. In particular we discuss the two possible scenarios in which one has only one electroweak phase transition and the case in which the technicolor dynamics allows for multiple phase transitions.

  14. ``Lurching waves'' in DPGraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, R. Dean; Inan, Nader

    2003-10-01

    Introductory treatments of waves usually emphasize undamped traveling waves and ideal standing waves with perfect nodes. Those are just special cases from a larger class of waves in which the crests perform a characteristic ``lurching'' or ``galloping'' motion. The variation of a terminal reflection coefficient and the constant for damping in propagation generates a continuum of more realistic behaviors that connect the special, simple cases. Attempts to develop this larger class verbally and mathematically might seem abstract and complicated, but the use of kinetic computer graphics in an interactive mode makes their introduction straightforward. Preliminary observations and explorations with these images can then lead naturally to a mathematical treatment at a level appropriate for the audience. Software from DPGraph has been particularly convenient for the development of the figures. The fact that programming must be done using analytic expressions and no iterations is a valuable constraint; it forces the user to stay close to fundamentals in the physics and mathematics. Exploratory studies then encourage the programmer to ask analytic questions that might not have been considered otherwise. Several representative figures will be presented. [Work supported by the Paul S. Veneklasen Research Foundation and the CSULB Scholarly and Creative Activities Committee.

  15. Fast Deflagration Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Fendell (1970) to finite Mach numbers, and uncovered the existence of very slow deflagration waves. JI.. -2- 2. The governing equations The governing...FlapmSI,$ Cambridge University Press. 2. Buckmaster, J. 1976. The quenching of deflagration vaves. Combust. Flme. 26, 151-162. 3. Bush, W.B. & Fendell , F.E

  16. Waves and Crops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses wave patterns on the surfaces of ripening wheat and barley crops when the wind is moderately strong. Examines the structure of the turbulence over such natural surfaces and conditions under which the crop may be damaged by the wind. (JR)

  17. Coded excitation plane wave imaging for shear wave motion detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2015-07-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave SNR compared with conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2 to 4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (body mass index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue.

  18. Gravitational-Wave Detection (ii). Current Gravitational Wave Detector Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2005-11-01

    The workshop session C1ii was focused on the results of recent operating detectors. 10 speakers presented the latest results of each experiments: ALLEGRO, GEO, LIGO, TAMA and VIRGO experiments. There were reports about searches for gravitational waves in analysis of observation data. The results are of no detection of gravitational waves, but observational upper-limits of gravitational waves are improved.

  19. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree–Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree–Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard–Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga–Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  20. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard-Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  1. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2015-09-01

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard-Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  2. Quantum wave packet revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (‘minipackets’ or ‘clones’) is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum wave packet construction leading to the existence of revivals and fractional revivals, in systems with one (or more) quantum number(s), as well as discussing how information on the classical period and revival time is encoded in the energy eigenvalue spectrum. We discuss a number of one-dimensional model systems which exhibit revival behavior, including the infinite well, the quantum bouncer, and others, as well as several two-dimensional integrable quantum billiard systems. Finally, we briefly review the experimental evidence for wave packet revivals in atomic, molecular, and other systems, and related revival phenomena in condensed matter and optical systems.

  3. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  4. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  5. Transformation method and wave control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Hu, Jin; Hu, Geng-Kai

    2010-12-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient way to control wave propagation by materials. The transformed relations for field and material during a transformation are essential to fulfill this method. We propose a systematic method to derive the transformed relations for a general physic process, the constraint conditions are obtained by considering geometrical and physical constraint during a mapping. The proposed method is applied to Navier's equation for elastodynamics, Helmholtz's equation for acoustic wave and Maxwell's equation for electromagnetic wave, the corresponding transformed relations are derived, which can be used in the framework of transformation method for wave control. We show that contrary to electromagnetic wave, the transformed relations are not uniquely determined for elastic wave and acoustic wave, so we have a freedom to choose them differently. Using the obtained transformed relations, we also provide some examples for device design, a concentrator for elastic wave, devices for illusion acoustic and illusion optics are conceived and validated by numerical simulations.

  6. Are Rogue Waves Really Unexpected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    An unexpected wave is defined by Gemmrich & Garrett (2008) as a wave that is much taller than a set of neighboring waves. Their definition of "unexpected" refers to a wave that is not anticipated by a casual observer. Clearly, unexpected waves defined in this way are predictable in a statistical sense. They can occur relatively often with a small or moderate crest height, but large unexpected waves that are rogue are rare. Here, this concept is elaborated and statistically described based on a third-order nonlinear model. In particular, the conditional return period of an unexpected wave whose crest exceeds a given threshold is developed. This definition leads to greater return periods or on average less frequent occurrences of unexpected waves than those implied by the conventional return periods not conditioned on a reference threshold. Ultimately, it appears that a rogue wave that is also unexpected would have a lower occurrence frequency than that of a usual rogue wave. As specific applications, the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events are examined in detail. Both waves appeared without warning and their crests were nearly $2$-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ wave crests, and thus unexpected. The two crest heights are nearly the same as the threshold~$h_{0.3\\cdot10^{6}}\\sim1.6H_{s}$ exceeded on average once every~$0.3\\cdot 10^{6}$ waves, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. In contrast, the Andrea and WACSIS events, as both rogue and unexpected, would occur slightly less often and on average once every~$3\\cdot10^{6}$ and~$0.6\\cdot10^6$ waves respectively.

  7. Observations of running penumbral waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Stein, A.

    1972-01-01

    Quiet sunspots with well-developed penumbrae show running intensity waves with period running around 300 sec. The waves appear connected with umbral flashes of exactly half the period. Waves are concentric, regular, with velocity constant around 10 km/sec. They are probably sound waves and show intensity fluctuation in H alpha centerline or wing of 10 to 20%. The energy is tiny compared to the heat deficit of the umbra.

  8. Modeling Seismic Noise Body Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Farra, V.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary microseismic noise is generated by non-linear interactions between ocean waves at the ocean surface. The sources correspond to pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic waves in the ocean, which are then converted into P, SV, and Rayleigh waves in the deeper Earth layers. Rayleigh waves are the most energetic noise signal but body wave amplitude can be extracted using beamforming analysis. We analyze several typhoons recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network and we show that the detected P-wave amplitudes are frequency dependent. In order to understand the body wave generation mechanism, we model the P-wave amplitude. The sources are the power spectral density of the pressure derived from the ocean wave interaction model. They are distributed along the ocean surface and they are frequency dependent. We then compute the site effect of the ocean layer upon body waves generated by the noise sources. The site effect can be described as the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean that are then converted to P waves at the ocean-crust interface. It varies with frequency and ocean depth. Finally we compute the propagation from the source area to the network by taking into account seismic attenuation and geometrical spreading. We show that the modeled P-wave amplitude reproduce well the frequency dependent variations of the measured P-wave. This frequency dependent effect is due to both the source and site effect. We define the effective source as the product of the power spectral density of the pressure close to the surface and the site effect. We show that its maximum is consistent with the source location obtained by back projecting the slowness derived from the beamforming analysis. Finally, we show that body wave analysis enable to efficiently constrain the amount of sources generated by ocean wave reflected at the coast.

  9. Locally homogeneous pp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globke, Wolfgang; Leistner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We show that every n-dimensional locally homogeneous pp-wave is a plane wave, provided it is indecomposable and its curvature operator, when acting on 2-forms, has rank greater than one. As a consequence we obtain that indecomposable, Ricci-flat locally homogeneous pp-waves are plane waves. This generalises a classical result by Jordan, Ehlers and Kundt in dimension 4. Several examples show that our assumptions on indecomposability and the rank of the curvature are essential.

  10. Extreme events in Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael; Xia, Hua

    2014-05-01

    Observations of extreme wave events in the ocean are rare due to their low statistical probability. In the laboratory however, the evolution of extreme wave events can be studied in great detail with high spatial and temporal resolution. The reported surface wave experiments in the short wavelength gravity-capillary range aim to contribute to the understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms for rogue wave generation. In this talk, we report on extreme wave events in parametrically excited Faraday waves. Faraday waves appear if a fluid is accelerated (normal to the fluid surface) above a critical threshold. A variety of novel tools have been deployed to characterize the 2D surface elevation. The results presented show spatio-temporal and statistical data on the surface wave conditions leading up to extreme wave events. The peak in wave amplitude during such an event is shown to exceed six times the standard deviation of the average wave field with significantly increased statistical probability compared to the background wave field [1]. The experiments also show that parametrically excited waves can be viewed as assembles of oscillons [2] (or oscillating solitons) where modulation instability seems to play a crucial role in their formation. More detailed studies on the oscillon dynamics reveal that the onset of an increased probability of extreme wave events correlates with the increase in the oscillons mobility and merger [3]. Reference: 1. Xia H., Maimbourg T., Punzmann H., and Shats M., Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples, Physical Review Letters 109, 114502 (2012) 2. Shats M., Xia H., and Punzmann H., Parametrically excited water surface ripples as ensembles of oscillons, Physical Review Letters 108, 034502 (2012) 3. Shats M., Punzmann H., Xia H., Capillary rogue waves, Physical Review Letters, 104, 104503 (2010)

  11. Evaluation of ADCP Wave Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    pitch , roll , and heave motions that can place a ship’s stability in jeopardy (Beal, 1991). Wave conditions can also change rapidly and this can...measure the horizontal buoy displacements (yielding wave direction). Another type of buoy known as a “ pitch and roll buoy” (Longuet-Higgins et al...1963) measures tilt angles or pitch and roll to calculate wave direction. Newer buoys use global positioning systems (GPS) to obtain wave height and

  12. ULF waves in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazue )

    1991-01-01

    Research efforts in the area of magnetospheric ULF waves in the 1987-1990 period are reviewed. Attention is given to externally excited hydromagnetic waves including field line resonance, the global cavity mode, bow-shock-associated upstream waves, and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. Consideration is given to internally excited Pc 4-5 pulsations and the role of these pulsations in the diffusion of ring-current ions based on the observed properties of the pulsations. 154 refs.

  13. ULTRASONIC MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR SURFACE WAVE AND PLATE WAVE INSPECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2010-02-22

    A complete ultrasonic measurement model for surface and plate wave inspections is obtained, where all the electrical, electromechanical, and acoustic/elastic elements are explicitly described. Reciprocity principles are used to describe the acoustic/elastic elements specifically in terms of an integral of the incident and scattered wave fields over the surface of the flaw. As with the case of bulk waves, if one assumes the incident surface waves or plate waves are locally planar at the flaw surface, the overall measurement model reduces to a very modular form where the far-field scattering amplitude of the flaw appears explicitly.

  14. Nonlinear Waves on Stochastic Support: Calcium Waves in Astrocyte Syncytia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.; Cornell-Bell, A. H.

    Astrocyte-signaling has been observed in cell cultures and brain slices in the form of Calcium waves. Their functional relevance for neuronal communication, brain functions and diseases is, however, not understood. In this paper, the propagation of intercellular calcium waves is modeled in terms of waves in excitable media on a stochastic support. We utilize a novel method to decompose the spatiotemporal patterns into space-time clusters (wave fragments). Based on this cluster decomposition, a statistical description of wave patterns is developed.

  15. Modelling seismic noise body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Éléonore; Gualtieri, Lucia; Farra, Veronique; Capdeville, Yann; Schimmel, Martin; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Morelli, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Secondary microseismic noise is generated by non-linear interactions between ocean waves at the ocean surface. We present the theory for computing the site effect of the ocean layer upon body waves generated by noise sources distributed along the ocean surface. We show that the ocean site effect can be described as the constructive interference of multiply reflected P-waves in the ocean that are then converted to either P-waves or SV-waves at the ocean-crust interface.The site effect varies strongly with period and ocean depth and that it is is stronger for P-waves than for S-waves. We validate our computation by comparing the theoretical noise body-wave sources with the sources inferred from beamforming analysis of the three seismogram components recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. We use rotated traces for the beamforming analysis, and we show that we clearly detect P-waves generated by ocean gravity wave interactions along the track of typhoon Ioke (September 2006). We model the variability of the recorded P-waves associated with the typhon. We do not detect the corresponding SV-waves, and we demonstrate that this is because their amplitude is too weak to be detected.

  16. Energy in a String Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  17. Cardiac R-wave detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.

    1968-01-01

    Cardiac R wave detector obtains the systolic contraction signal of the human heart and uses it as a reference signal for the heart-assist pump cycle. It processes the electrocardiac signal /QRS wave complex/ of the natural heart in a sequence of operations which essentially elimates all components from the input signal except the R wave.

  18. Energy in a String Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  19. Spin flux and magnetic solitons in an interacting two-dimensional electron gas: Topology of two-valued wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    John, S.; Golubentsev, A. )

    1995-01-01

    For a topological antiferromagnet on a square lattice, with the standard Hartree-Fock, spin-density-wave decoupling of the on-site Hubbard interaction, there is an exact mapping of the low-energy one-electron excitation spectrum to a relativistic Dirac continuum field theory. In this field theory, the Dirac mass gap is precisely the Mott-Hubbard charge gap and the continuum field variable is an eight-component Dirac spinor describing the components of physical electron-spin amplitude on each of the four sites of the elementary plaquette in the original Hubbard model. Within this continuum model we derive explicitly the existence of hedgehog Skyrmion textures as local minima of the classical magnetic energy. These magnetic solitons carry a topological winding number [mu] associated with the vortex rotation of the background magnetic moment field by a phase angle 2[pi][mu] along a path encircling the soliton. Such solitons also carry a spin flux of [mu][pi] through the plaquette on which they are centered. The [mu]=1 hedgehog Skyrmion describes a local transition from the topological (antiperiodic) sector of the one-electron Hilbert space to the nontopological sector. We derive from first principles the existence of deep level localized electronic states within the Mott-Hubbard charge gap for the [mu]=1 and 2 solitons. The spectrum of localized states is symmetric about [ital E]=0 and each subgap electronic level can be occupied by a pair of electrons in which one electron resides primarily on one sublattice and the second electron on the other sublattice. It is suggested that flux-carrying solitons and the subgap electronic structure which they induce are important in understanding the physical behavior of doped Mott insulators.

  20. Looking for radio waves with a simple radio wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto (Stray Cats), Norihiro

    2011-11-01

    I created a simple device that can detect radio waves in a classroom. In physics classes I tell students that we live in a sea of radio waves. They come from TV, radio, and cell phone signals as well as other sources. Students don't realize this because those electromagnetic waves are invisible. So, I wondered if I could come up with a way to detect the waves and help students to understand them better. Electromagnetic wave meters, which measure intensity of radio waves quantitatively, are commercially available. However, to students most of these are black boxes, and at the introductory level it is more effective to detect radio waves in a simpler way. This paper describes my device and how I have used it in my classes.