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Sample records for 10be exposure dating

  1. 10Be surface exposure dating of rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Tyrol, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kerschner, H.; Maisch, M.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Schluchter, C.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of Lateglacial and Holocene climate change research, rock glaciers (creeping mountain permafrost) also play an important role. They are phenomena of discontinuous alpine permafrost and as such good indicators for the mean annual air temperature for the period they are active. We have 10Be surface exposure dated boulders from two relict rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Austria. This is the type area for a postulated mid-Holocene cold period called the Larstig oscillation. The period of activity was suggested to be of similar age as the mid-Holocene Frosnitz advance of glaciers in the Venediger Mountains farther to the east (Patzelt and Bortenschlager, 1973). For rock glaciers of this size to be active at 2200 m a.s.l. in Larstig valley would have required a significant drop in temperatures, thus a marked mid-Holocene cold pulse, for at least several centuries at around 7.0 ka. In contrast, our exposure dates show that the rock glaciers stabilized during the early Preboreal (Ivy-Ochs et al., submitted). We see no distinct pattern with respect to exposure age and boulder location on the rock glaciers. This implies that for our site the blocks did not acquire inherited 10Be during exposure in the free rock face, in the talus at the base of the slope, or during transport on the rock glaciers. Our data point to final stabilization of the Larstigtal rock glaciers in the earliest Holocene and not in the middle Holocene. Combined with data from other archives (Nicolussi et al., 2005), there appears to have been no time window in the middle Holocene long enough for rock glaciers of the size and at the elevation of the Larstig site to have formed. Ivy-Ochs, S., Kerschner, H., Maisch, M., Christl, M., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier variations in the European Alps. Quaternary Science Reviews (submitted). Nicolussi, K., Kaufmann, M., Patzelt, G., van der Plicht, J., Thurner, A., 2005. Holocene tree-line variability in the Kauner

  2. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  3. Deglaciation and landscape history around Annapurna, Nepal, based on 10Be surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Roland; Zech, Michael; Kubik, Peter W.; Kharki, Krishna; Zech, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    The High Himalaya is a key area for tectonic, geomorphological and climate studies, because of its extreme relief and location at the transition zone between areas with abundant monsoonal precipitation and the arid/semiarid Tibetan Plateau. We present 10Be surface exposure ages on 22 boulders from the Annapurna area in Nepal. The ages improve understanding of the Late Quaternary landscape history and the geomorphological processes operating in this part of the Himalaya. Although our study is reconnaissance in nature, it highlights the importance of catastrophic events, such as landslides and debris flows, for denudation of high mountains. Holocene exposure ages for the Dhampu-Chooya landslide (˜4.1 ± 0.6 ka) and for 600 m of alluviation in Kali Gandaki Valley (˜2.1 ± 0.6 ka), for example, indicate the frequent occurrence and extent of catastrophic events and their implications for natural hazards. We also offer an explanation for the differences in Late Quaternary glacial chronologies at closely spaced study sites in the Nepal Himalaya. Topographically controlled and spatially variable precipitation in the Himalaya determines the sensitivity of glaciers to changes in temperature and precipitation. Accordingly, some glaciers advanced in-phase with Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, whereas others reached their maximum extent at times of increased monsoonal precipitation during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and the early Holocene.

  4. Advances in cosmogenic surface exposure dating: Using combined in situ 14C-10Be analysis for deglaciation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippe, Kristina; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kober, Florian; Christl, Marcus; Fogwill, Christopher; Turney, Chris; Rood, Dylan; Lupker, Maarten; Schlücher, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides are routinely used to investigate deglaciation histories by exposure dating of rock surfaces after glacier retreat. For bedrock surfaces that have been efficiently eroded by glacier ice, the most commonly applied cosmogenic 10Be isotope has proven to give reliable estimates of the integrated time of surface exposure since major ice decay. Due to its long half-life (~1.4 Ma), however, 10Be does not record short episodes of intermittent surface cover, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance, which might have interrupted the general deglaciation trend. To detect such cases of "complex exposure", 10Be-based dating can be combined with the analysis of the short-lived (5730 a) in situ cosmogenic 14C nuclide. We present two examples, in which combined in situ 14C-10Be analysis has been successfully applied to reconstruct in detail post-LGM surface exposures histories - in the Swiss Alps [1] and in Antarctica [2]. In a study on the Gotthard Pass, Central Swiss Alps, in situ 14C-10Be exposure dating was combined with extensive mapping of glacial erosional features. Data from both cosmogenic nuclides are in overall good agreement with each other confirming continuous exposure of the Gotthard Pass area throughout the Holocene. Some slightly younger in situ 14C ages compared to the corresponding 10Be ages are interpreted to result from partial surface shielding due to snow cover. Constraining the average Holocene snow depth from the in situ 14C data allowed to apply an appropriate snow shielding correction for the 10Be exposure ages. Integration of the snow-corrected exposure ages with field observations provided a detailed chronology of a progressive downwasting of ice from the maximum LGM ice volume with a gradual reorganization of the ice flow pattern and a southward migration of the ice divide. In a study on the evolution and reorganization of ice streams entering the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the last deglaciation, ice sheet modelling was

  5. Timing of terminal Pleistocene deglaciation at high elevations in southern and central British Columbia constrained by 10Be exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Clague, John J.; Heyman, Jakob

    2014-09-01

    The Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) covered most of British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory at the local Last Glacial Maximum (lLGM) during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 2. However, its subsequent demise is not well understood, particularly at high elevations east of its ocean-terminating margin. We present 10Be exposure ages from two high-elevation sites in southern and central British Columbia that help constrain the time of initial deglaciation at these sites. We sampled granodiorite erratics at elevations of 2126-2230 m a.s.l. in the Marble Range and 1608-1785 m a.s.l. in the Telkwa Range at the western margin of the Interior Plateau. The erratics at both sites are near ice-marginal meltwater channels that delineate the local ice surface slope and thus the configuration of the ice sheet during deglaciation. The locations of the erratics and their relations to meltwater channels ensure that the resulting 10Be ages date CIS deglaciation and not the retreat of local montane glaciers. Our sample sites emerged above the surface of the CIS as its divide migrated westward from the Interior Plateau to the axis of the Coast Mountains. Two of the four samples from the summit area of the Marble Range yielded apparent exposure ages of 14.0 ± 0.7 and 15.2 ± 0.8 ka. These ages are 1.8-3.0 ka younger than the well-established lLGM age of ca 17 ka for the Puget lobe of the CIS in Washington State; they are 1.7 ka younger than the lLGM age for the Puget lobe if a snow-shielding correction to their uncertainty-weighted mean age is applied. The other two samples yielded much older apparent exposure ages (20.6 ± 1.4 and 33.0 ± 1.5 ka), indicating the presence of inherited isotopes. Four samples collected from the summit area of the Telkwa Range in the Hazelton Mountains yielded well clustered apparent exposure ages of 10.1 ± 0.6, 10.2 ± 0.7, 10.4 ± 0.5, and 11.5 ± 1.1 ka. Significant present-day snow cover introduces a large uncertainty in the apparent exposure ages from

  6. Surface exposure dating with cosmogenic 10Be of Late Holocene rock avalanches onto glaciers in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deline, Philip; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W.

    2013-04-01

    Rock avalanching represents a potential high risk for growing infrastructure and people living in high mountain areas. This hazardous process is due to steep slopes, high relief, intensive rock fracturing, seismicity, paraglacial control, periglacial climatic conditions and the presence and interaction of snow, glaciers, and permafrost. The timing of rock avalanche recurrence intervals and the recognition of their spatial extension are essential. Very steep and elevated slopes on the Italian flank of the Mont Blanc massif are prone to rock avalanches (RAs) which travel onto glaciers. Whereas small RAs occurred in the Glacier du Miage basin during the 20th Century (the latest in July 2012), large RAs (volume > 1 M m3) travelled repeatedly onto Glaciers de Triolet, Frébouge, and la Brenva during the late Holocene The nature of the granitic deposit which largely overlaps the bottom of the upper Val Ferret over 2 km has been discussed since the 19th century. This extensive deposit was attributed to either glacial, or a September 12th 1717 AD rock avalanche, or a complex mixture of glacial, earlier RA and 1717 RA origin. Surface exposure dating of 16 boulders of the deposit shows that the 1717 RA, covering the whole upper Ferret valley floor, was one of the largest late Holocene RAs of the Alps, with a rock volume of 10-15 M m3 and a likely similar volume of glacier ice travelling more than 7 km downvalley. Two main RA deposits are lying downstream of the Glacier de Frébouge: a sheet of granite boulders with an open-work structure covers the south side of the Val Ferret, which ran > 100 m up the opposite metasedimentary side of the valley; a smaller RA deposit is located at the south and east margins of the large Frébouge polygenic fan. Surface exposure dating of 7 granite boulders of these deposits could in particular confirm whether the larger RA occurred sometime between 991 and 1154 AD, as suggested by a radiocarbon-dated piece of wood. Large RAs (volume > 2 M m3

  7. 10Be dating of Neogene halite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmaker, Reuven; Lazar, Boaz; Beer, Jürg; Christl, Marcus; Tepelyakov, Natalya; Stein, Mordechai

    2013-12-01

    Direct radioactive dating of ancient halite formations is difficult because this mineral typically lacks conventionally datable material. We describe an attempt to date Neogene halite using the cosmogenic isotope 10Be (T1/2 = 1.39 Ma). We dated marine-derived salt deposits from the Sedom and Amora (The Hebrew forms of Sodom and Gomorrah) Formations, Dead Sea basin, Israel. To verify whether Be is incorporated into marine halite we measured the stable isotope 9Be, 7Be (the short lived “cosmogenic brother” of 10Be having T1/2 = 53.3 d), and 10Be in evaporation pans of sea-salt production plants. The data suggest that seawater beryllium is incorporated into the halite with a halite-brine distribution coefficient, (KD) of about unity. A 10Be/9Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of ∼2-6 Ma. The 10Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of 3-5 Ma. This age is consistent with previous estimates of the Sedom Formation age. Furthermore, this age lies in the same range of 10Be in situ ages obtained on the lacustrine Erq El Ahmer Formation located in the northern Jordan Valley. This may imply that during the Mid Pliocene the Sedom Lagoon, the water-body that deposited the Sedom Formation, might have been already disconnected from the open sea.

  8. The deep accumulation of 10Be at Utsira, southwestern Norway: Implications for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating in peripheral ice sheet landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, Jason P.; Goehring, Brent M.; Mangerud, Jan; Svendsen, John Inge

    2016-09-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is a widely used method for constraining past ice sheet histories. We scrutinize a recently published data set of cosmogenic 10Be data from erratic boulders in Norway used to constrain the deglaciation of the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet to 20 ka. Our model of the 10Be inventory in glacial surfaces leads us to conclude that the chronology may be afflicted by the deep subsurface accumulation of 10Be during long-lasting ice-free periods that resulted in 10Be ages >10% too old. We suggest that the majority of the dated erratic boulders contain a uniform level of inherited muon-produced 10Be and were derived from bedrock depths >2.5 m and most likely ~4 m. The implication of our finding is that for landscapes that experience long ice-free periods between brief maximum glacial phases, glacial erosion of >5 m is required to remove detectable traces of inherited 10Be.

  9. Mid-late Pleistocene glacial evolution in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica, constraints from cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of glacial erratic cobbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guocheng; Huang, Feixin; Yi, Chaolu; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Weijian; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-08-01

    Glacial histories from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) provide keys to understanding correlations between the EAIS and global climate. They are especially helpful in the assessment of global sea level change, and as a means of quantifying the magnitude of past glacial activity and the rate at which ice responded to climate change. Given the significance of EAIS glacial histories, it is imperative that more glacial chronologic data for this region be obtained, especially for the mid-to-late Pleistocene. We report cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating results from glacially transported cobbles embedded in blue-ice moraine material at Mount Harding, the Grove Mountains, EAIS. Forty exotic cobbles sampled along two profiles (A and B) on this blue-ice moraine present apparent exposure-ages ranging from 7.2 to 542.2 ka. We explore this scattered dataset by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify statistically significant trends in the data. We identify a correlation between exposure-age and distance of the cobbles from Mount Harding. In profile A, cobbles further from Mount Harding yield older exposure-ages than those that are relatively close. In profile B, cobbles closer to Mount Harding are found to have relatively older exposure-ages. In term of glacial history we suggest that the direction of ice flow changed during the period from ∼60 to 200 ka, and that multiple glacial fluctuations occurred in the mid-late Pleistocene.

  10. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  11. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault, from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan

    SciTech Connect

    der Woerd, J v; Klinger, Y; Sieh, K; Tapponnier, P; Ryerson, F; M?riaux, A

    2006-01-13

    We determine the long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault in the southeastern Indio Hills using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al isotopes to date an offset alluvial fan surface. Field mapping complemented with topographic data, air photos and satellite images allow to precisely determine piercing points across the fault zone that are used to measure an offset of 565 {+-} 80 m. A total of twenty-six quartz-rich cobbles from three different fan surfaces were collected and dated. The tight cluster of nuclide concentrations from 19 samples out of 20 from the offset fan surface implies a simple exposure history, negligible prior exposure and erosion, and yield an age of 35.5 {+-} 2.5 ka. The long-term slip rate of the San Andreas Fault south of Biskra Palms is thus 15.9 {+-} 3.4 mm/yr. This rate is about 10 mm/yr slower than geological (0-14 ka) and short-term geodetic estimates for this part of the San Andreas Fault implying changes in slip rate or in faulting behavior. This result puts new constraints on the slip rate of the San Jacinto and on the Eastern California Shear Zone for the last 35 ka. Our study shows that more sites along the major faults of southern California need to be targeted to better constrain the slip-rates over different time scales.

  12. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Barnard, P.L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, K.; Caffee, M.W.; Derbyshire, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a-1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a-1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (???300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a-1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western

  13. 10Be cosmic-ray exposure dating of moraines and rock avalanches in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps): Evidence of two glacial advances during the Late Glacial/Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenet, Marie; Brunstein, Daniel; Jomelli, Vincent; Roussel, Erwan; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Mokadem, Fatima; Biette, Melody; Robert, Vincent; Léanni, Laëtitia

    2016-09-01

    Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) dating of moraines allow glacier fluctuations and past climate change reconstructions. In the French Alps, there is a lack of moraine dating for the Late Glacial/Holocene transition period. Here we present a chronology of glacier advances in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps - Massif des Ecrins) based on 10Be CRE dating. CRE ages of moraines of 13.0 ± 1.1 ka and 12.4 ± 1.5 ka provide evidence for two stages of glacial advance or standstill at the end of the Late Glacial. The CRE dating of a rock avalanche deposit at 12.2 ± 1.5 ka is attributed to post-glacial debuttressing and reveals rapid deglaciation at the end of the Late Glacial. A CRE age of 7.1 ± 0.7 ka of a second mass-wasting, whose triggering factor is unidentified so far, indicates that up to an altitude of 2300 m a.s.l., the valley was ice-free as of ∼7 kyr at the latest. The re-evaluation of 21 moraine 10Be CRE ages from nine glacial valleys across the Alps shows multiple glacial advances occurring at the Late Glacial/Holocene transition. These results lead to a re-evaluation of the importance of cooling events during the Allerød and the Younger Dryas in the Alps.

  14. Inner gorges incision history: A proxy for deglaciation? Insights from Cosmic Ray Exposure dating (10Be and 36Cl) of river-polished surfaces (Tinée River, SW Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Petit, C.; Saillard, M.; Braucher, R.; Bourlès, D.; Darnault, R.; Cassol, D.

    2017-01-01

    10Be and 36Cl Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating performed on river polished surfaces of river gorges in a mountain-to-sea river system in the French SW Alps highlights transient erosional events involving incision rates >10 mm a-1. These events took place during the last two major deglaciation phases following (1) the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 16-14 ka, (2) the Younger Dryas at 8-11 ka, and during the warm and humid Holocene climatic optimum at 4-5 ka. These periods of high incision rates (3- > 30 mma-1) alternated with periods of low incision rates (<1 mm a-1), which probably correspond to a long-term equilibrium between incision and relative uplift. The Alpine river staircase shape profiles evidence local and transient responses that are ascribed to cumulate disequilibrium after the long-time-spanned glaciations. After each glaciation, rivers rush down to get closer to their equilibrium profile. Incision is amplified both by the sediment discharge due to the erosion of moraines and by landslides triggered by the glacier retreat.

  15. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  16. Extremely eroded or incredibly young - 10Be depth profile dating of moraines in the Swiss Midlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Zech, Roland; Haghipour, Negar; Gnägi, Christian; Christl, Markus; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Veit, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    During the Pleistocene, glaciers advanced repeatedly from the Alps into the Swiss Midlands. The exact extent and timing are still under debate, even for the last glacial advances. Decalcification depths, for example, increase from west to east in the western Swiss Midlands and have been interpreted to indicate that the Valais (Rhone) glacier may have been less extensive during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 20 ka than assumed so far [1]. In an attempt to provide more quantitative age control, we applied 10Be depth profile dating [2] on moraines at two locations. Steinhof has previously been dated to the global LGM based on exposure ages from four boulders [3], and Niederbuchsiten presumably lies outside the last glacial ice extent [1]. The 10Be concentrations at both sites decrease consistently with depth, but are very similar. Assuming only a few decimeters of erosion since moraine deposition, we obtain apparent exposure ages of ~20 ka. Niederbuchsiten would thus be unexpectedly young, implying a much more extensive extent of the LGM glacier than assumed so far. Alternatively, if the till at Niederbuchsiten was deposited during or before the penultimate glaciation (>130 ka), the surprisingly low 10Be concentrations indicate several meters of erosion during the last glacial cycle and/or the Holocene, which seems to be at odds with the deep and intensive soil formation. References: [1] Bitterli et al. (2011) Geologischer Atlas der Schweiz, Blatt 1108. [2] Hidy et al. (2010) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 11, doi:10.1029/2010GC003084. [3] Ivy- Ochs et al. (2004) Ecl. Geol. Helv. 97, 47-55.

  17. In situ 10Be-26Al exposure ages at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C.P.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Arnold, J.R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of dating the surface exposure of rocks from in situ production of 10Be and 26Al has been applied to determine the age of Meteor Crater, Arizona. A lower bound on the crater age of 49,200 ?? 1,700 years has been obtained by this method. ?? 1991.

  18. Late Pleistocene glacial chronology of the Retezat Mts, Southern Carpathians, using 10Be exposure ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Kern, Zoltán; Urdea, Petru; Braucher, Régis; Madarász, Balázs; Schimmelpfennig, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Our knowledge on the timing of glacial advances in the Southern Carpathians is limited. Recently, some attempts have been made to develop an improved temporal framework for the glaciations of the region using cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating. However, glacial chronology of the Romanian Carpathians remains contradictory. E.g. the timing of the maximum ice advance appears to be asynchronous within the area and also with other dated glacial events in Europe. Main objective of our study is to utilize cosmogenic in situ produced 10Be dating to disentangle the contradictions of the Southern Carpathian Late Pleistocene glacial chronology. Firstly, previously published 10Be data are recalculated in accordance with the new half-life, standardization and production rate of 10Be. The recalculated 10Be exposure ages of the second largest (M2) moraines in the Retezat Mts. appear to be ca. 19-24% older than exposure ages calculated by Reuther et al. (2007, Quat. Int. 164-165, 151-169). This contradicts the earlier conclusions suggesting post LGM age of M2 glacial advance and suggests that M2 moraines can be connected to the end of the LGM with final stabilization possibly at the beginning of the Late Glacial. We emphasize that it is ambiguous to correlate directly the exposure-dated glacier chronologies with millennial scale climate changes due to uncertainties in sample collection and in computation of exposure ages from measured nuclide concentrations. New 10Be samples were collected in order to determine the 10Be exposure age of moraines outside the most prominent generation (M2) including the largest and oldest moraine (M1) and the landforms connected to the smallest ice advances (M4), which remained undated so far. The new exposure ages of M2 moraines are well in harmony with the recalculated ages of Reuther at al. (2007). 10Be exposure age of boulders on the smallest moraine suggest that the last glaciers disappeared in the area during the Late Glacial, indicating no

  19. Last Glacial Maximum Dated by Means of 10Be in the Maritime Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, D. E.; Spagnolo, M.; Federici, P.; Pappalardo, M.; Ribolini, A.; Cyr, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Relatively few exposure dates of LGM moraines boulders are available for the European Alps, and none on the southern flank. Ponte Murato (PM) is a frontal moraine at 860 m asl in the Gesso Basin (Maritime Alps, SW European Alps). The PM moraine dams the 157 km2 Gesso della Barra Valley and it represents the lowermost frontal moraine of the entire Gesso Valley, near the outlet of the valley in the Po Plain. Its ELA, determined from the paleo- shape of the supposed Gesso della Barra glacier, is 1746 m asl. Tetti Bandito (TB) is a small and badly preserved glacial deposit, tentatively attributed to a lateral-frontal moraine, that is positioned 5 km downvalley from the PM deposit at 800 m asl. There are no other glacial deposits downvalley from the TB moraine in the Gesso Basin or farther NE in the piedmont region of the upper Po Plain. Boulders sampled on the PM and on the TB moraine crests gave a 10Be cosmogenic age of respectively 16300 ± 880 ka (average value) and 18798 ± 973 ka. This result constrains the PM frontal moraine within the LGM interval but also suggests that the maximum expansion of the Gesso Basin glacier was more downvalley at some point during the last glaciation. If the TB is a lateral-frontal moraine as supposed, the two TB and PM moraines would represent the outer and inner moraine crests of the same LGM stadial, with the outer moraine much less pronounced than the inner moraine, similarly to the maximalstand and the hochstand described in the Eastern Alps (Van Husen, 1997). Within this perspective, the PM and TB dates are consistent with a European Alps LGM corresponding to MIS 2 (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004). This study of the Maritime Alps moraines is also in agreement with the Upper Würm climatic theory (Florineth and Schlüchter, 2000) of a stronger influence of the W and SW incoming humid airflows in the European Alps, differently from the nearby Vosges and Pyrenees mountain chains where more dry conditions were probably responsible for a very

  20. Cosmogenic 10Be Exposure Age for the Cut Bank Creek terminal moraine, Glacier National Park, MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, B.; Laabs, B. J.; Leonard, E. M.; Caffee, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    Mountain glaciers are highly sensitive to temperature and precipitation with geologic records that are superb proxies of climate change. In the Rocky Mountains of the western United States, abundant records of Late Pleistocene glaciation provide an opportunity for understanding paleoclimate throughout this region, especially in places where the chronology of glaciation is precisely known. Cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating has been widely applied to glacial deposits in the Rocky Mountains, providing precise numerical ages and improving the understanding of glacial chronologies in this region. Despite these improvements, the chronology of the last Pleistocene glaciation of the northernmost Rocky Mountains is not completely understood. Cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating was applied to the Cut Bank Creek valley in the Lewis Range of the Northern Rocky Mountains, where a discrete mountain glacier deposited a broad terminal moraine during the last Pleistocene glaciation. Exposure ages of eight quartzite and sandstone boulders at the crest of the ice-distal sector of the terminal moraine indicate that abandonment occurred at 15.6 ± 0.8 ka. This age is consistent with age limits of several terminal moraines elsewhere in the Northern Rocky Mountains, suggesting that the last Pleistocene glaciation culminated in this region after the global Last Glacial Maximum.

  1. Age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus determined with (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Bin; Granger, Darryl E

    2009-03-12

    The age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus, commonly known as 'Peking Man', has long been pursued, but has remained problematic owing to the lack of suitable dating methods. Here we report cosmogenic (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating of quartz sediments and artefacts from the lower strata of Locality 1 in the southwestern suburb of Beijing, China, where early representatives of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus were discovered. This study marks the first radioisotopic dating of any early hominin site in China beyond the range of mass spectrometric U-series dating. The weighted mean of six meaningful age measurements, 0.77 +/- 0.08 million years (Myr, mean +/- s.e.m.), provides the best age estimate for lower cultural layers 7-10. Together with previously reported U-series dating of speleothem calcite and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy, as well as sedimentological considerations, these layers may be further correlated to S6-S7 in Chinese loess stratigraphy or marine isotope stages (MIS) 17-19, in the range of approximately 0.68 to 0.78 Myr ago. These ages are substantially older than previously supposed and may imply early hominin's presence at the site in northern China through a relatively mild glacial period corresponding to MIS 18.

  2. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160-220 ka.

  3. 10Be depth-profile dating of glaciofluvial sediments in the northern Alpine Foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claude, Anne; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kubik, Peter; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Dehnert, Andreas; Rahn, Meinert; Schlüchter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    10Be depth-profile dating is based on the fact that nuclide production is decreasing as an exponential function of depth. This method requires collecting at least four sediment samples in a vertical profile. The obtained nuclide concentrations are plotted against depth and fitted depth-profiles to the measured dataset. The age is then calculated based on the best-fit. The requirements for this method are the following: sampling geological units in artificial outcrops with minimum thickness of soil (less than around 80 cm), preferably with a flat-topped landform in order to guarantee that the uppermost surface of the deposit remains as unmodified as possible and is related to a defined geomorphologic process. Additionally at least one sample, preferably three, from the uppermost one meter of the profile as the exponential decrease mainly occurs around this depth. No sample is collected from the overlying soil. In this study, we aim to establish the chronology of the oldest Quaternary sediments in the northern Alpine Foreland using depth-profile dating with 10Be. These ages contribute to the understanding of the Quaternary landscape evolution of the Alpine Foreland. Here, we unravel the chronology of five sites at different morphostratigraphic positions: Mandach and Ängi (canton Aargau), Stadlerberg and Irchel (canton Zurich) and Rechberg (Germany, 4 km from the border to Switzerland). All sites are abandoned gravel pits and at each site we collected between four and seven sediment samples. First results yielded chronologies between 0.8 and 2 Ma for these glaciofluvial deposits. Our study shows that this relatively new method is successful when the geological setting matches the methodological requirements.

  4. Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Early and Latest Holocene Moraines on Nevado Salcantay in the Southern Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the southwest flank of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m; ~13°S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru. The field area is situated 25 km due south of the archaeological site of Machu Picchu. Outer and inner moraines in the sequence were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated ~5 km and ~3 km, respectively, from their headwall on the Salcantay summit massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of granitic boulders sampled on the Salcantay moraines is underway and has provided the first numerical ages for these deposits. Initial results indicate ages of 8.1 ± 0.1 10Be ka for the outer moraine and 200 ± 20 10Be years for the sharp-crested inner moraine. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator (version 2.0) and expressed with respect to the Lal- Stone production rate scaling scheme using the standard atmosphere. The outer and inner moraine ages correspond to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene, respectively. Further 10Be dating of the mapped moraines and similar deposits observed in adjacent drainages on Nevado Salcantay is anticipated to yield a high-resolution chronology of valley glaciation in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes. The new results bridge an important gap between existing Andean glacier records to the north and south, and complement available ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby expanding spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of Holocene climate change in the tropical Andes. Notably, the inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined in northern mid- and high latitude glacier records, and suggests considerable expansion of valley glaciers in the southern Peruvian Andes during this climatic minimum. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the initial results also demonstrate

  5. Extent of the last ice sheet in northern Scotland tested with cosmogenic 10Be exposure ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, W.M.; Hall, A.M.; Ballantyne, C.K.; Binnie, S.; Kubik, P.W.; Freeman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The extent of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) in northern Scotland is disputed. A restricted ice sheet model holds that at the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ca. 23-19 ka) the BIIS terminated on land in northern Scotland, leaving Buchan, Caithness and the Orkney Islands ice-free. An alternative model implies that these three areas were ice-covered at the LGM, with the BIIS extending offshore onto the adjacent shelves. We test the two models using cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of erratic boulders and glacially eroded bedrock from the three areas. Our results indicate that the last BIIS covered all of northern Scotland during the LGM, but that widespread deglaciation of Caithness and Orkney occurred prior to rapid warming at ca. 14.5 ka. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 26Al - 10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochron burial dating in combination with luminescence dating of two Danube terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Braumann, Sandra; Lüthgens, Christopher; Fiebig, Markus; Häuselmann, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary sediment record in the Vienna Basin is influenced by two main factors: (1) the tectonic development of a pull apart basin along a sinistral strike slip fault system between the Eastern Alps and the West Carpathians and by (2) strongly varying sediment supply during the Plio- and Pleistocene. From the Late Pannonian (8.8 Ma) onward a large-scale regional uplift (Decker et al., 2005) controls terrace formation in the Vienna Basin. The main sediment supply into the Vienna Basin originates from the Danube, and subordinately from tributaries to the south such as Piesting, Fischa, Leitha and from the north by the river March. Today the Danube forms a large floodplain that is bordered to the north by one large Pleistocene terrace, the Gänserndorf Terrace that is situated 17 m above todays water level. Farther to the east a smaller terrace, the Schlosshof Terrace, reaches 25 m above todays water level. These terrace levels are tilted by movement of underlying blocks (Peresson, 2006). Both, the Schlosshof and Gänserndorf terraces consist of successions of up to 2 m thick gravel beds with intercalated sand layers or -lenses that may locally reach thicknesses up to 0.8 m. At each terrace one gavel pit was selected to calculate the time of terrace deposition by luminescence dating in combination with 26Al/10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochrone dating (Balco and Rovery, 2008). Five quartz stones from the base of each terrace were physically and chemically processed to obtain Al and Be oxides for Acceleration Mass Spectrometry. Sand samples for luminescence dating were taken above the cosmogenic nuclide samples from the closest suitable sand body. Decker et al., 2005. QSR 24, 307-322 Peresson, 2006 Geologie der österreichischen Bundesländer Niederösterreich 255-258 Balco and Rovey, 2008. AJS 908, 1083-1114 Thanks to FWF P 23138-N19, OMAA 90öu17

  7. The CREp program, a fully parameterizable program to compute exposure ages (3He, 10Be)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L.; Blard, P. H.; Lave, J.; Delunel, R.; Balco, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decades, cosmogenic exposure dating permitted major advances in Earth surface sciences, and particularly in paleoclimatology. Yet, exposure age calculation is a dense procedure. It requires numerous choices of parameterization and the use of an appropriate production rate. Nowadays, Earth surface scientists may either calculate exposure ages on their own or use the available programs. However, these programs do not offer the possibility to include all the most recent advances in Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating. Notably, they do not propose the most recent production rate datasets and they only offer few possibilities to test the impact of the atmosphere model and the geomagnetic model on the computed ages. We present the CREp program, a Matlab © code that computes CRE ages for 3He and 10Be over the last 2 million years. The CREp program includes the scaling models of Lal-Stone in the "Lal modified" version (Balco et al., 2008; Lal, 1991; Stone, 2000) and the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). For any of these models, CREP allows choosing between the ERA-40 atmosphere model (Uppala et al., 2005) and the standard atmosphere (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1976). Regarding the geomagnetic database, users can opt for one of the three proposed datasets: Muscheler et al. 2005, GLOPIS-75 (Laj et al. 2004) and the geomagnetic framework proposed in the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). They may also import their own geomagnetic database. Importantly, the reference production rate can be chosen among a large variety of possibilities. We made an effort to propose a wide and homogenous calibration database in order to promote the use of local calibration rates: CREp includes all the calibration data published until July 2015 and will be able to access an updated online database including all the newly published production rates. This is crucial for improving the ages accuracy. Users may also choose a global production rate or use their own data

  8. 10Be concentrations of Red soils in Southwest Japan and its possibility of dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maejima, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nakano, C.

    2004-08-01

    10Be concentrations of six Red soils distributed in Southwest Japan ranged from 0.8 × 108 to 2.7 × 109 atoms g-1, and minimum absolute ages were estimated by inventory of meteoric 10Be. The results are follows: Red soils on Toyota derived from granite (⩽25 ka), Kashii derived from Tertiary shale (⩽24 ka), Akiyoshidai derived from limestone (⩽110 ka), Okinawa Island derived from Kunigami gravel bed (⩽9 ka) and Ogasawara Island derived from agglomerate and Boninite (⩽22 and ⩽7 ka) were obtained, respectively. Soil age except with Akiyoshidai indicated younger age. It suggested that the loss of 10Be from the soil was caused by leaching of 10Be or by soil erosion, and 10Be is susceptible to leaching out from these Red soils under the humid climate condition such as Southwest Japan.

  9. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  10. Dating offset fans along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault using cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, A.; Schwartz, D.P.; Finkel, R.; Clemmens, S.; Hanks, T.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in samples collected from exposed boulders (n = 20) and from buried sediment (n = 3) from offset fans along the San Andreas fault near Little Rock, California, yielded ages, ranging from 16 to 413 ka, which increase with distance from their source at the mouth of Little Rock Creek. In order to determine the age of the relatively younger fans, the erosion rate of the boulders and the cosmogenic nuclide inheritance from exposure prior to deposition in the fan were established. Cosmogenic nuclide inheritance values that range between 8.5 ?? 103 and 196 ?? 103 atoms 10Be g-1 quartz were determined by measuring the concentrations and ratios of 10Be and 26Al in boulders (n = 10) and fine sediment (n = 7) at the outlet of the present active stream. Boulder erosion rate, ranging between 17 and 160 mm k.y.-1, was estimated by measuring 10Be and 26Al concentrations in nearby bedrock outcrops (n = 8). Since the boulders on the fans represent the most resistant rocks in this environment, we used the lowest rate for the age calculations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine ages of 16 ?? 5 and 29 ?? 7 ka for the two younger fan surfaces. Older fans (older than 100 ka) were dated by analyzing 10Be and 26Al concentrations in buried sand samples. The ages of the three oldest fans range between 227 ?? 242 and 413 ?? 185 ka. Although fan age determinations are accompanied by large uncertainties, the results of this study show a clear trend of increasing fan ages with increasing distance from the source near Little Rock Creek and provide a long-term slip rate along this section of the San Andreas fault. Slip rate along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault for the past 413 k.y. can be determined in several ways. The average slip rate calculated from the individual fan ages is 4.2 ?? 0.9 cm yr-1. A linear regression through the data points implies a slip rate of 3.7 ?? 1.0 cm yr-1. A most probable slip rate of 3.0 ?? 1.0 cm yr-1 is

  11. Dating Plio-Pleistocene glacial sediments using the cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides 10Be and 26Al

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balco, G.; Stone, J.O.H.; Jennings, C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides 26Al and 10Be to date Plio-Pleistocene glacial sediment sequences. These two nuclides are produced in quartz at a fixed ratio, but have different decay constants. If a sample is exposed at the surface for a time and then buried by overburden and thus removed from the cosmic-ray flux, the 26Al/10Be ratio is related to the duration of burial. We first attempted to date pre-Wisconsinan tills by measuring 26Al and 10Be in fluvial sediments beneath them and applying the method of "burial dating," which previous authors have used to date river sediment carried into caves. This method, however, requires simplifying assumptions about the 26Al and 10Be concentrations in the sediment at the time of burial. We show that these assumptions are not valid for river sediment in glaciated regions. 26Al and 10Be analyses of such sediment do not provide accurate ages for these tills, although they do yield limiting ages in some cases. We overcome this difficulty by instead measuring 26Al and 10Be in quartz from paleosols that are buried by tills. We use a more general mathematical approach to determine the initial nuclide concentrations in the paleosol at the time it was buried, as well as the duration of burial. This technique provides a widely applicable improvement on other means of dating Plio-Pleistocene terrestrial glacial sediments, as well as a framework for applying cosmogenic-nuclide dating techniques in complicated stratigraphic settings. We apply it to pre-Wisconsinan glacial sediment sequences in southwest Minnesota and eastern South Dakota. Pre-Wisconsinan tills underlying the Minnesota River Valley were deposited 0.5 to 1.5 Ma, and tills beneath the Prairie Coteau in eastern South Dakota and adjacent Minnesota were deposited 1 to 2 Ma.

  12. 10Be dating reveals early-middle Holocene age of the Drygalski Moraines in central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronauer, Sandra L.; Briner, Jason P.; Kelley, Samuel E.; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    We reconstruct the history of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin on the Nuussuaq Peninsula in central West Greenland through the Holocene using lake sediment analysis and cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating of the prominent Drygalski Moraines. Erratics perched on bedrock outboard of the Drygalski Moraines constrain local deglaciation to ∼9.9 ± 0.6 ka (n = 2). Three Drygalski Moraine crests yield mean 10Be ages of 8.6 ± 0.4 ka (n = 2), 8.5 ± 0.2 ka (n = 3), and 7.6 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) from outer to inner. Perched erratics between the inner two moraines average 7.8 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) and are consistent with the moraine ages. Sediments from a proglacial lake with a catchment area extending an estimated 2 km beneath (inland of) the present ice sheet terminus constrain an ice sheet minimum extent from 5.4 ka to 0.6 ka. The moraine chronology paired with the lake sediment stratigraphy reveals that the ice margin likely remained within ∼2 km of its present position from ∼9.9 to 5.4 ka. This unexpected early Holocene stability, preceded by rapid ice retreat and followed by minimum ice extent between ∼5.4 and 0.6 ka, contrasts with many records of early Holocene warmth and the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation maximum. We suggest ice margin stability may instead be tied to adjacent ocean temperatures, which reached an optimum in the middle Holocene.

  13. Dating chert using in-situ produced 10Be: Possible complications revealed on landslide scarps through a comparison with 36Cl applied to coexisting limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerathe, Swann; Braucher, Régis; Lebourg, Thomas; Leani, Leatitia; Manetti, Michel; Bourles, Didier

    2013-04-01

    This abstract and presentation highlights potential complications that may arise while using in situ produced 10Be to date diagenetic silica (chert)exposure or burial event. The initiation and evolution of large gravitational collapses in sedimentary rocks were constrained using cosmic ray exposure dating. Because these collapses occurred in a stratigraphic level composed of chert (diagenetic silica) concretions interbedded in limestone layers, their development was studied by performing in situ-produced 36Cl and 10Be concentration measurements in both the limestone and coexisting diagenetic silica (chert), respectively. Following the routinely used decontamination and preparation protocols for 10Be produced in diagenetic silica, large discrepancies were observed with exposure ages determined by 36Cl within carbonate for samples originating from the same scarp. While 36Cl exposure ages were clustered as expected for a unique single gravitational event, 10Be exposure ages were scattered along the same studied scarps. To determine the origin of such a bias, petrological investigations were carried out for chert (diagenetic silica). Thin sections highlighted a complex mineralogical texture characterized by remnant silicified ooids showing calcitic cores, calcite inclusions and a dominant amorphous hydrated silica (grain > 20 μm). To decipher and characterize the potential origins of the excess measured 10Be within diagenetic silica, all samples were first reprocessed following the routine decontamination protocol (HCL-H2SiF6 leachings and three partial HF dissolutions) but starting from three different grain size fractions (GS1: 1000-500, GS2: 500-250 and GS3: 250-50 μm). The resulting concentrations clearly showed a decreasing 10Be content as a function of the grain size, but still yielded 10Be exposure ages significantly higher than 36Cl counterparts. Because potential adsorption of 10Be at the surface of amorphous silica grains was suspected, partial dissolution

  14. Shortening rates across the foothills of the Western Kunlun (Xinjiang, China) inferred from geomorphic measurements and cosmogenic 10Be dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudroy, T.; van der Woerd, J.; Li, H.; Barrier, L.; Tapponnier, P.; Simoes, M.; Thuizat, R.; Pan, J.; Si, J.; Xu, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Western Kunlun, which bounds north-western Tibetan Plateau, is one of the largest mountain range of Asia, with altitudes peaking at 6500-7500 m asl, and crustal thicknesses of up to ~70 km. North of the plateau, in the foreland of the range, an active fold-and-thrust belt extends 200 km into the Tarim basin, but remains poorly documented regarding amounts of shortening or deformation rates. We discuss the distribution of deformation on the basis of a study of specific foreland folds and faults using high resolution satellite imagery, digital elevation models, seismic reflection data, on-site topographic measurements and cosmogenic isotope dating. South of Hotan city, the 250 km-long Tekelike Fault - the mountain-front thrust that dips beneath the 45 km-wide, 5400m-high Tekelike Range, a basement ramp-anticline - cuts and offsets terraces abandoned by the Karakash River. 10Be concentrations of surface and sub-surface samples from these terraces upper-most deposits yield an exposure age of about 100 kyr for the upper terrace that lies 140 m above the present river bed, implying an incision rate of 1.4 mm/yr. Assuming a dip of 45 +/-15° and neglecting changes in river dynamics over this time period, this age would imply a minimum, average shortening rate of 1.4 +/- 0.7 mm/yr across the thrust. Farther North, 100 to 200 km-long WNW-ESE trending anticlines deform the thick Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary series lying in the foreland of the range. The 150 km-long, 35 km-wide Yecheng-Pishan anticline folds Plio-Quaternary molasses. Drainages crossing this growing anticline have abandoned flights of inset terraces on the sides of wind-gaps. The maximum elevation of the highest terrace above local drainage is about 350m. Near Pishan city, flat, well-preserved terrace surfaces are covered by thin loess, in turn capped by loose gravel pavement. On the uppermost two terraces of this valley, 70 and 120 meters-high, cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in surface and sub

  15. Constraints on the last deglaciation of the Ross Sea Sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) from 10Be dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, N. S.; Clark, P. U.; Kurz, M. D.; Marcott, S. A.; Caffee, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present new 10Be surface exposure ages from glacial erratic boulders from several locations in McMurdo Sound in order to constrain the deglacial history of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Previous model and field data indicate that the present day Ross Ice Shelf was a grounded ice sheet, with the grounding line extending to near the continental shelf edge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the timing and rate of the last deglaciation of the Ross Sea Sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet remain uncertain. We sampled granitic and basaltic erratic boulders for dating with the cosmogenic nuclides 10Be and 3He; in situ 14C dating will be used to assess complex burial histories. The 10Be ages on erratics near or at the upper limit of Ross Sea Drift that do not appear to have inheritance range from 17 to 26 ka. 10Be ages from erratics below the limit of the (LGM) Ross Sea Drift suggest final deglaciation by ~11 ka. New 10Be ages from more highly weathered glacial deposits above the Ross Sea drift near Blue Glacier suggest an age range of 141 to 171 ka.

  16. Examination of surface exposure age of Antarctic moraines using in situ produced [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.T.; Edmond, J.M. ); Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F. ); Kurz, M.D.; Brook, E.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Concentrations of [sup 10]Be (t[sub 1/2] = 1.5 [times] 10[sup 6]y) and [sup 26]Al (t[sub 1/2] = 0.72 [times] 10[sup 6]y) have been determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in a suite of quartz samples taken from sandstone boulders in several moraines in Arena Valley, a dry valley adjacent to the Taylor Glacier in the Quatermain Mountains, Southern Victoria Land, East Antarctica. These isotopes are produced in surficial quartz by cosmic ray spallation of O and Si. The concentrations in these samples ranged from 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5] to 3.0 [times] 10[sup 7] at g[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and from 9.4 [times] 10[sup 6] to 1.2 [times] 10[sup 8] at g[sup [minus]1] for [sup 26]Al, depending upon the extent of exposure at the surface. Production rates of 17[sub [minus]4][sup +16] at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and 113[sub [minus]16][sup +54] at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 26]Al at 1300 m and 87[degree]S and a [sup 26]Al:[sup 10]Be production ratio of 6.5[sub [minus]1.3][sup +1.3] were calculated from the data. These values correspond to sea-level production rates at high geomagnetic latitude of 6.4 at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] and 41.7 at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al, respectively, consistent with determinations based on [approximately]11 Ky glacially polished surfaces in the Sierra Nevada in California. These production rates imply exposure ages for the various moraines ranging from 50 Ky to 2.5 My, in accordance with other geological evidence. The [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al ages of these rocks compare favorably with those found using a similar dating method based on in situ production of [sup 3]He.

  17. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  18. Understanding complex exposure history of Mount Hampton, West Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 10Be in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, Ana; Rodes, Angel; Stuart, Finlay; Smellie, John

    2016-04-01

    Combining stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides is an established tool for revealing the complexities of long-term landscape development. To date most studies have concentrated on 21Ne and 10Be in quartz. We have combined different chemical protocols for extraction of cosmogenic 10Be from olivine, and measured concentrations in olivine from lherzolite xenoliths from the peak of Mount Hampton (~3,200 m), an 11 Ma shield volcano on the West Antarctic rift flank. We combine this data with cosmogenic 3He (and 21Ne) in the olivines in order to unravel the long-term environmental history of the region. The mean 3He/21Ne ratio (1.98 ± 0.22) is consistent with the theoretical value and previous determinations. 10Be/3He ratios (0.012 to 0.018) are significantly lower than the instantaneous production ratio (~0.045). The data are consistent with 1-3 Ma of burial. The altitude of the volcano rules out over-topping of the peak by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet only possible burial could be generated by the growth of an ice cap although this contradicts the absence of evidence for ice cover. The 3He-10Be data can also be generated during episodic erosion of the volcanic ash over the last few million years. The data requires a minimum depth of 1 to 2.5 m for the samples during a minimum age of 5 Ma and maximum long-term erosion rate of ~0.5 m/Ma with at least one erosive episode reflecting short-term erosion rate of ~7 m/Ma that would have brought the samples into the surface during the last ~350 ka. Erosion in this type of landscape could be related to interglacial periods where cryostatic erosion can occur generating an increase in the erosion rate. This study shows that episodic erosion can produce stable-radioactive cosmogenic isotope systematics that are similar to those generated by exposure-burial cycles.

  19. Determination, by 10Be Cosmogenic Dating, of Slip-rates on the Karakorum Fault (Tibet) and Paleoclimatic Evolution Since 200 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, M.; Tapponnier, P.; van der Woerd, J.; Finkel, R. C.; Ryerson, F. J.; Li, H.; Liu, Q.

    2006-12-01

    The millennial slip-rate along the Karakorum Fault, main right-lateral strike-slip fault north of the Himalayas, and its role in the kinematics of the present-day deformation of Tibet, are debated. Recent InSAR data suggest that it is barely active (1 ± 3 mm/yr). Surface exposure dating (10Be) of 266 quartz-rich samples collected on 8 lateral moraines crests and on 6 fans or terraces south of Bangong Lake in Western Tibet indicate instead that it slips at least five, and more likely ten times as fast. The geomorphic features we studied are offset by the fault by amounts that range between ~9 and ~1500 m. Offsets were measured both in the field and from retro-deformation of high-resolution satellite images (Ikonos, Corona, Spot and Landsat 7). Multiple samples (10 on average) were collected from each surface to assess exposure age variability and dispersion. From the Indus bend at Chaxikang to Mount Kailas, the slip-rate values obtained with different inferences vary from >11.8 ± 4.7 mm/yr to >14.3 ± 4.2 mm/yr. The cosmogenic exposure ages we obtain show good correlation with global climate changes in the last 200 000 years, as recorded by different climatic proxies (Specmap, Vostock, Marine Oxygen Isotopes, Guliya ice cap). The distribution of ages suggests for instance that the maximum glacial advances recorded by moraine emplacement occurred when the climate was coldest, during the LGM (~20 ka), the late MIS-3 (~40 ka), and MIS-6 (~140 ka). About 70% of moraine sample ages are younger than 50 ka with peaks during the LGM (15 to 30 ka, 45%) and the MIS-3 (35 to 50 ka, 28%). The view that the LGM advance was a minor event in the Western Himalayas may thus only reflect insufficient sampling. With few exceptions, most of the fans we dated have been emplaced during post-glacial warming and in the early Holocene. Such correlations imply that there is little bias in our cosmogenic exposure age measurements.

  20. 10Be surface exposure ages on the late-Pleistocene and Holocene history of Linnébreen on Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusche, Melissa; Winsor, Kelsey; Carlson, Anders E.; Marcott, Shaun A.; Rood, Dylan H.; Novak, Anthony; Roof, Steven; Retelle, Michael; Werner, Alan; Caffee, Marc; Clark, Peter U.

    2014-04-01

    Arctic glaciers were sensitive to past changes in high-latitude winter precipitation and summer temperature. Here we develop a late-Pleistocene to Holocene history for Linnébreen (Linné Glacier) in western Svalbard using 10Be surface exposure ages on isolated erratic and moraine boulders. We show that Linnébreen had separated from the larger ice sheet over Svalbard and was retreating up valley around the start of the Younger Dryas cold period. We attribute this retreat during a cold period on Svalbard to moisture starvation of Linnébreen from advanced sea ice and/or elevated shortwave boreal summer insolation that overwhelmed any reduction in sensible heat. After an ice-free period during the early to middle Holocene, Linnébreen reformed sometime after 4.6 ± 0.2 ka, and was at a position roughly equivalent to its Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum extent before it began to retreat at 1.6 ± 0.2 ka. Comparison with calibrated 14C dates from three other glaciers could suggest that this period of ice retreat at ˜1.6 ka could be regional in extent. Linnébreen occupied the pre-LIA moraine when there was an increased ratio of cold Arctic-sourced relative to warm Atlantic-sourced waters around Svalbard and advanced sea ice. The retreat of Linnébreen at ˜1.6 ka was concurrent with the increased presence of warm Atlantic waters around Svalbard and attendant sea-ice retreat. These coincident changes in ocean temperatures, sea-ice extent, and Linnébreen moraine age could imply a climatic forcing of the pre-LIA advance and retreat of Linnébreen. Summer temperatures, rather than changes in precipitation, would then be dominant in driving ice retreat, although the possibility of stochastic glacier-margin variability cannot be excluded. Our data therefore suggest that Linnébreen may have responded differently to past changes in sea-ice extent that could depend on the background climate state (deglacial climate vs. late-Holocene climate), which highlights the complexity in

  1. 10Be exposure age chronology of the last glaciation in the Krkonoše Mountains, Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Braucher, Régis; Traczyk, Andrzej; Laetitia, Léanni; AsterTeam

    2014-02-01

    A new chronology of the last glaciation is established for the Krkonoše (Giant) Mountains, Central Europe, based on in-situ produced 10Be in moraine boulders. Exposure ages and Schmidt Hammer rebound values obtained for terminal moraines on the northern and southern flank of the mountains suggest that the oldest preserved moraines represent early phases of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Large moraines at the outlet of the Snowy Cirques (Śnieżne Kotły) and in the middle part of the Úpa (Obří důl) trough were deposited around 21 ka while a series of smaller moraines above the LGM deposits represent readvances that occurred no later than 18.1 ± 0.6 ka, 15.7 ± 0.5 ka, 13.5 ± 0.5 ka and 12.9 ± 0.7 ka. An exposure age of 13.8 ± 0.4 ka obtained for protalus ramparts at the foot of the Úpská jáma Cirque headwall indicates that glaciers advanced only in north- to east-facing cirques during the Lateglacial. The last glacier fluctuation was synchronous with the Younger Dryas cold event. The timing of local glacier advances during the last glacial episode correlates with the late Weichselian glacier phases in the Alps and in the Bavarian/Bohemian Forest.

  2. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of tors and erratics, Cairngorm Mountains, Scotland: Timescales for the development of a classic landscape of selective linear glacial erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, W.M.; Hall, A.M.; Mottram, R.; Fifield, L.K.; Sugden, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of tors within glaciated regions has been widely cited as evidence for the preservation of relic pre-Quaternary landscapes beneath protective covers of non-erosive dry-based ice. Here, we test for the preservation of pre-Quaternary landscapes with cosmogenic surface exposure dating of tors. Numerous granite tors are present on summit plateaus in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland where they were covered by local ice caps many times during the Pleistocene. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al data together with geomorphic relationships reveal that these landforms are more dynamic and younger than previously suspected. Many Cairngorm tors have been bulldozed and toppled along horizontal joints by ice motion, leaving event surfaces on tor remnants and erratics that can be dated with cosmogenic nuclides. As the surfaces have been subject to episodic burial by ice, an exposure model based upon ice and marine sediment core proxies for local glacial cover is necessary to interpret the cosmogenic nuclide data. Exposure ages and weathering characteristics of tors are closely correlated. Glacially modified tors and boulder erratics with slightly weathered surfaces have 10Be exposure ages of about 15 to 43 ka. Nuclide inheritance is present in many of these surfaces. Correction for inheritance indicates that the eastern Cairngorms were deglaciated at 15.6 ?? 0.9 ka. Glacially modified tors with moderate to advanced weathering features have 10Be exposure ages of 19 to 92 ka. These surfaces were only slightly modified during the last glacial cycle and gained much of their exposure during the interstadial of marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 5 or earlier. Tors lacking evidence of glacial modification and exhibiting advanced weathering have 10Be exposure ages between 52 and 297 ka. Nuclide concentrations in these surfaces are probably controlled by bedrock erosion rates instead of discrete glacial events. Maximum erosion rates estimated from 10Be range from 2.8 to 12.0 mm/ka, with

  3. Dating of prehistoric caves sediments and flints using 10Be and 26Al in quartz from Tabun Cave (Israel): Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaretto, E.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hui, S. K.; Kaufman, A.; Paul, M.; Weiner, S.

    2000-10-01

    There is an important need to develop additional dating methods beyond the 14C limit and independent of thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We propose to apply the method of burial dating to prehistoric sites using the decay of in situ produced radioisotopes 10Be and 26Al. The Tabun Cave, Mt. Carmel (Israel) has a sedimentary sequence which represents the type section for about the last 800,000 years in the Levant. The sediments in the cave are mainly of aeolian origin and are rich in quartz. Flint tools are also found in the sediments. Sediment samples and flint tools were selected from the same layer. Physical and chemical procedures to extract 10Be and 26Al atoms from the quartz fraction of the sediments and from the flint samples were developed, while measuring the natural Al levels as a monitor of the atmospheric component of the cosmogenic nuclides. AMS measurements were performed at the 14UD Pelletron Koffler Accelerator Laboratory, Weizmann Institute, and sensitivities of the order of 1×10 -14, in isotopic abundances for both 10Be and 26Al respectively (corresponding to ˜5 × 10 5 atoms) were obtained. First, measurements of a number of Tabun Cave sediment samples and flints show that 10Be and 26Al analyses have the potential for dating prehistoric cave sediments, provided problems relating to the presence of relatively large amounts of stable Al can be solved, as well as obtaining a better understanding of the burial history of the flints prior to being brought into the cave.

  4. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of glaciations in the Frankland Range, southwest Tasmania reveal a limited MIS-2 ice advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, Kevin; Fink, David; McConnell, Anne

    2017-02-01

    New mapping of the glacial geomorphology coupled with 10Be and 26Al exposure age dating of moraines on the flanks of the Frankland Range in south west Tasmania indicate that glacier extent during MIS-2 was far smaller than during earlier glaciations with the ice cover being confined to only the uppermost cirques of the range. Moraines further down the range flanks, ∼50-150 m lower in altitude than the MIS-2 dated advance, indicate that glaciers were only slightly larger during earlier glaciations and, depending on the interpretation of their exposure ages, may range from MIS 7 to MIS 12. These older moraines are nested inside the maximum ice limits of an even more ancient and extensive glaciation, defined by degraded valley floor moraines and coalescing glacio-fluvial fans that remain undated but appear no younger than MIS 12. Patterns of glacial erosion and moraine deposition on the Frankland Range suggest that the more recent glaciations were increasingly influenced by the erosional morphology initiated by earlier glaciers. Microclimatic differences resulting from this earlier glacial topography were particularly influential determinants of glaciation during MIS 2. These results are consistent with emerging evidence from studies of other ranges in southwest Tasmania.

  5. Recent Contractile Deformation in the Forearc of Southern Peru: A Geomorphologic Analysis And 10Be Surface Exposure Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S.; Farber, D. L.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R.

    2007-12-01

    . Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages from a set of three distinct abandoned terraces in the Pampa Cabeza de Vaca region yield ages ranging from ~35-550ky and incision rates of ~0.04-0.09mm/yr. Thus, the contractile deformation within this region has been active for at least the last 500ky and is plausibly presently active. The documentation of recent contractile deformation within the forearc of southern Peru stylistically contrasts with previously held view active deformation in this region is dominated by extensional topographic collapse. Moreover, active shortening within the Peruvian forearc bears on our models of how the Altiplano plateau is currently being maintained along the western margin. Indeed, by identifying and quantifying active deformation within the Peruvian forearc, we can begin to address the potential links between surface processes related to climate and active tectonics, and the dynamics of the lithosphere.

  6. Recent Contractile Deformation in the Forearc of Southern Peru: A Geomorphologic Analysis And 10Be Surface Exposure Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S.; Farber, D. L.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R.

    2004-12-01

    . Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages from a set of three distinct abandoned terraces in the Pampa Cabeza de Vaca region yield ages ranging from ~35-550ky and incision rates of ~0.04-0.09mm/yr. Thus, the contractile deformation within this region has been active for at least the last 500ky and is plausibly presently active. The documentation of recent contractile deformation within the forearc of southern Peru stylistically contrasts with previously held view active deformation in this region is dominated by extensional topographic collapse. Moreover, active shortening within the Peruvian forearc bears on our models of how the Altiplano plateau is currently being maintained along the western margin. Indeed, by identifying and quantifying active deformation within the Peruvian forearc, we can begin to address the potential links between surface processes related to climate and active tectonics, and the dynamics of the lithosphere.

  7. 10Be dating of river terraces of Santo Domingo river, on Southeastern flank of the Mérida Andes, Venezuela: Tectonic and climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Oswaldo; Vassallo, Riccardo; Audemard, Franck; Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Oropeza, Javier; Yepez, Santiago; Carcaillet, Julien; Alvarado, Miguel; Carrillo, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we discuss the first cosmogenic 10Be dating of river terraces located in the lower reaches of the Santo Domingo river (Southeastern flank of the Mérida Andes, Western Venezuela). The geomorphic observations and dating allowed the restoration of the temporal evolution of incision rate, which was analysed in terms of tectonic, climatic and geomorphic processes. The long-term incision rate in the area has been constantly around 1.1 mm/a over the last 70 ka. Taking into account the geologic and geomorphologic setting, this value can be converted into the Late Pleistocene uplift rate of the Southeastern flank of the Mérida Andes. Our results show that the process of terraces formation in the lower reaches of the Santo Domingo river occurred at a higher frequency (103-104 years) than a glacial/interglacial cycle (104-105 years). According to the global and local climate curve, these terraces were abandoned during warm to cold transitions.

  8. 10Be dating of the end of low-altitude rock glacier activity in the Alps - evidence for cold conditions during the early Preboreal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschner, Hanns; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Large relict rock glacier complexes are conspicious features in the Alps. Their occurence can roughly be subdivided into a "lower rock glacier belt", which reaches down to about 1900 m a.s.l., an "intermediate rock glacier belt" with rock glacier snouts at around present-day timberline (approx. 2200 m a.s.l) in the central Alps and an "upper rock glacier belt" at similar altitudes as presently active rock glaciers. All these rock glaciers indicate the former presence of discontinuous permafrost at their respective altitudes and are good indicators for the mean annual air temperature during their active period. The end of rock glacier activity at a given altitude marks also the end of the existence of permafrost conditions. Experience from the Alps shows that it may take about a century until the surface of a rock glacier is stabilized, Hence, if it is possible to date the surface of a relict rock glacier with 10Be, we get a close date for the end of permafrost activity at the altitude of the rock glacier. From the difference between the altitude of the relict rock glacier and presently active rock glaciers, the rise of mean annual air temperature can be calculated. Relict rock glaciers at present-day timberline at Julierpass (Swiss Alps) and at Larstigtal (Austrian Alps) gave ages in the order of 10.5 ka BP for surface stabilization. Both rock glaciers, which belong to the "intermediate rock glacier belt", developed from lateral moraines and scree slopes. They started to move into former glacier beds after ice recession from the Younger Dryas "Egesen" advance. Their age indicates that climatic conditions favouring permafrost existence about 300 - 400 m below 20th century permafrost occurence prevailed during most of the Preboreal. Taken together with the Kartell glacier advance (10.8 ka) they show that rapid climatic warming at the Younger Dryas / Holocene boundary was followed by more unstable climatic conditions and and somewhat slower warming until full Holocene

  9. Pleistocene uplift, climate and morphological segmentation of the Northern Chile coasts (24°S-32°S): Insights from cosmogenic 10Be dating of paleoshorelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinod, Joseph; Regard, Vincent; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Aguilar, German; Guillaume, Benjamin; Carretier, Sébastien; Cortés-Aranda, Joaquín; Leanni, Laetitia; Hérail, Gérard

    2016-12-01

    We present new cosmogenic (10Be) exposure ages obtained on Pleistocene marine abrasion shore terraces of Northern Chile between 24°S and 32°S in order to evaluate the temporal and spatial variability of uplift rates along the coastal forearc. Both the dispersion of cosmogenic concentrations in samples from the same terrace and data obtained in vertical profiles show that onshore erosion rates, following emergence of paleoshorelines, approached 1 m/Myr. Therefore, minimum ages calculated without considering onshore erosion may be largely underestimated for Middle Pleistocene terraces. The elevation of the last interglacial (MIS-5) paleoshoreline is generally between 25 and 45 m amsl, suggesting that the entire coast of the study area has been uplifting during the Upper Pleistocene at rates approaching 0.3 mm/yr. Available ages for Middle Pleistocene terraces suggest similar uplift rates, except in the Altos de Talinay area where uplift may have been accelerated by the activity of the Puerto Aldea Fault. The maximum elevation of Pleistocene paleoshorelines is generally close to 250 m and there is no higher older Neogene marine sediment, which implies that uplift accelerated during the Pleistocene following a period of coastal stability or subsidence. We observe that the coastal morphology largely depends on the latitudinal climatic variability. North of 26.75°S, the coast is characterized by the presence of a high scarp associated with small and poorly preserved paleoshorelines at its foot. The existence of the coastal scarp in the northern part of the study area is permitted by the hyper-arid climate of the Atacama Desert. This particular morphology may explain why paleoshorelines evidencing coastal uplift are poorly preserved between 26.75°S and 24°S despite Upper Pleistocene uplift rates being comparable with those prevailing in the southern part of the study area.

  10. Preliminary Vertical Slip Rate for the West Tahoe Fault from six new Cosmogenic 10Be Exposure Ages of Late Pleistocene Glacial Moraines at Cascade Lake, Lake Tahoe, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, I. K. D.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Kent, G. M.; Owen, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The West Tahoe Fault is the primary range bounding fault of the Sierra Nevada at the latitude of Lake Tahoe. It is a N-NW striking, east dipping normal fault that has a pronounced onshore quaternary scarp extending from highway 50 southwest of Meyers, CA to Emerald Bay. At Cascade Lake, the fault cuts and progressively offsets late Pleistocene right lateral moraines. The fault vertically offsets the previously mapped Tahoe moraine ~83 m and the Tioga moraine ~23 m, measured from lidar data. Seventeen samples were collected for 10Be cosmogenic age analysis from boulders on both the hanging and footwalls of the fault along the crests of these moraines.We report here the initial analysis of 6 of these boulders and currently await processing of the remainder. The 10Be exposure ages of 3 boulders each on the younger Tioga and older Tahoe moraines range from 12.7 +/- 1.6 to 20.7 +/- 3.3 ka and 13.3 +/- 2.1 to 72.5 +/- 8.8 ka, respectively. Using the oldest ages as minima, these preliminary results suggest that the slip rate has averaged ~1 mm/yr since the penultimate glaciation, in accord with estimates of previous workers, and place additional bounds on the age of glaciation in the Lake Tahoe basin. The Last Glacial Maxima and penultimate glaciation near Lake Tahoe thus appear to coincide with the Tioga and Tahoe II glaciations of the Eastern Sierra.

  11. Application of the authigenic 10Be/ 9Be dating method to continental sediments: Reconstruction of the Mio-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence in the early hominid fossiliferous areas of the northern Chad Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L.; Braucher, Régis; Arnold, Maurice; Duringer, Philippe; Jolivet, Marc; Moussa, Abderamane; Deschamps, Pierre; Roquin, Claude; Carcaillet, Julien; Schuster, Mathieu; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2010-08-01

    The concentrations of atmospheric cosmogenic 10Be normalized to the solubilized fraction of its stable isotope 9Be have been measured in the authigenic phase leached from silicated continental sediments deposited since the upper Miocene in the northern Chad Basin. This method is validated by the systematic congruence with the biochronological estimations based on the fossil mammal evolutive degree of faunal assemblages. The fifty-five authigenic 10Be/ 9Be ages obtained along 12 logs distributed along two West-East cross sections that encompass best representative Mio-Pliocene outcrops including paleontological sites show a systematic stratigraphic decrease when considering all studied sedimentary facies extending from the Pleistocene up to 8 Ma and allow performing geologic correlations otherwise impossible in the studied area. The resulting global sequence evidences and temporally specifies the succession of the main paleoenvironments that have developed in this region since the Miocene. Under the special conditions encountered in the northern Chad Basin, this study demonstrates that the authigenic 10Be/ 9Be ratio may be used as a dating tool of continental sedimentary deposits from 1 to 8 Ma. The half-life of 10Be theoretically allowing dating up to 14 Ma, it may have fundamental implications on important field research such as paleoclimatology and, through the dating of fossiliferous deposits in paleontology and paleoanthropology.

  12. Deglaciation of Antarctica since the Last Glacial Maximum - what can we learn from cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David

    2015-04-01

    Ice volume changes at the coastal margins of Antarctica during the global LGM are uncertain. The little evidence available suggests that behaviour of the East and West Antarctic Ice Sheets are markedly different and complex. It is hypothesised that during interglacials, thinning of the Ross Ice Shelf, a more open-water environment and increased precipitation, allowed outlet glaciers draining the Transantarctic Mnts and fed by interior Ice Sheets to advance during moist warmer periods, out of phase with colder arid periods. In contrast, glacier dynamics along the vast coastal perimeter of East Antarctica is strongly influenced by Southern Ocean conditions. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al chronologies, although restricted to ice-free oasis and mountains flanking drainage glaciers, has become an invaluable, if not unique, tool to quantify spatial and temporal Pleistocene ice sheet variability over the past 2 Ma. Despite an increasing number of well documented areas, extracting reliable ages from glacial deposits in polar regions is problematic. Recycling of previously exposed/ buried debris and continual post-depositional modification leads to age ambiguities for a coeval glacial landform. More importantly, passage of cold-based ice can leave a landform unmodified resulting in young erratics deposited on ancient bedrock. Advances in delivering in-situ radiocarbon to routine application offer some relief. Exposure ages from different localities throughout East Antarctica (Framnes Mnts, Lutzow-Holm Bay, Vestfold Hills) and West Antarctica (Denton Ranges, Hatherton Glacier, Shackleton Range) highlight some of the new findings. This talk presents results which quantify the magnitude and timing of paleo-ice sheet thickness changes, questions the validity of an Antarctic LGM and discusses the complexities encountered in the often excessive spread in exposure ages.

  13. Application of the authigenic 10Be/9Be dating method to continental sediments: reconstruction of the Mio-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence in the early hominid fossiliferous areas of the northern Chad Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebatard, Anne-Elisabeth; Bourlès, Didier L.; Arnold, Maurice; Duringer, Philippe; Schuster, Mathieu; Jolivet, Marc; Braucher, Régis; Taisso Mackaye, Hassan; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were normalized to the solubilised fraction of its stable isotope 9Be in the authigenic component leached from continental deposits in order to date siliceous sediments deposited since the upper Miocene in the Djurab Desert in the northern Chad Basin. The demonstrated systematic strong agreement between the biochronological estimations and the calculated authigenic 10Be/9Be ages strongly suggests not only that the initial authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio can be constrained using appropriate Holocene deposits, but also that this ratio remained relatively constant over the studied time period (i.e. ~ 1 to 8 Ma). In addition, the validity of the calibration demonstrates that the sedimentary levels deposited in the Chadian Basin during wet periods accompanied by major lacustrine extension in an area otherwise characterized by a recurrent desert climate since at least 8 Ma have remained closed to gain or loss of beryllium other than by radioactive decay in spite of cycles of inundation and desiccation. Fifty-five new or revaluated (using the new published 10Be half-life) authigenic 10Be/9Be deposition ages were obtained along twelve logs distributed out of two West-East cross sections that encompass best representative Mio-Pliocene outcrops including paleontological localities. These authigenic 10Be/9Be deposition ages show a systematic stratigraphic decrease when considering all studied sedimentary facies extending from the Pleistocene up to 8 Ma and allow performing geologic correlations otherwise impossible in the studied area. The resulting global sequence evidences and temporally specifies the succession of the main paleoenvironments that have developed in this region since the Miocene. Under the special conditions encountered in the northern Chad Basin, this study demonstrates that the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio may be used as a dating tool of continental sedimentary

  14. Cosmogenic Nuclides 10Be-21Ne Burial Dating of Middle Miocene Sedimentary Formation of the Hongliu Valley in Southern Ningxia Basin: A Case of Isotopic Geochronology Study for the Cenozoic Sedimentary Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Huiping; Wang, Weitao; Pang, Jianzhang; Zheng, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Chronology studies for the Cenozoic sedimentary strata based on the magnetostratigraphy cannot afford the unique chronological sequences in the absence of absolute ages from biostratigraphy or volcanic ash chronology. In situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides provide a powerful tool for the sediment dating based on the time-dependent concentration ratio of two nuclides, which are produced in the same mineral but with different half-lives. Thereinto,10Be-26Al is the most widely used nuclide pairs, of which the available dating range spans the Plio-Pleistocene. But the coupling of 10Be with the stable nuclide 21Ne would significantly improve the burial dating range up to the middle Miocene, which is promising in revolutionizing the chronology study for the Late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentary sequences. We have applied 10Be-21Ne pair for dating the middle Miocene sediments of the Hongliu Valley in southern Ningxia basin. Two major features of the sediments are involved in our study: (1) sediments originated from the steady erosion of the source area, and (2) the burial depth of our sample after deposition is time dependent due to the gradual accumulation of sediments into basin. The post-burial nuclide production is estimated to be less than 3%, including the contribution by muon interactions, of the total nuclide concentrations measured in our sample. Our 10Be-21Ne analysis demonstrates the age of the burial sample is 12.4(+0.6/-0.4) Ma, and the erosion rate at the source area is 0.26±0.01 cm ka-1. The sample's burial age is consistent with the age constraint set by the Hongliugou Formation (16.7-5.4 Ma) which we collected the sample in. Vertebrate fossils of Platybelodon tongxinensis with an age between 12 and 15 Ma exhumated along with our sample further verifies the reliability of our dating results for the middle Miocene sediments.This study has shown the improved age range of cosmogenic-nuclide burial dating method by incorporating the stable nuclide 21Ne, and has

  15. Violence exposure and teen dating violence among African American youth.

    PubMed

    Black, Beverly M; Chido, Lisa M; Preble, Kathleen M; Weisz, Arlene N; Yoon, Jina S; Delaney-Black, Virginia; Kernsmith, Poco; Lewandowski, Linda

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the relationships between exposure to violence in the community, school, and family with dating violence attitudes and behaviors among 175 urban African American youth. Age, gender, state support and experiences with neglect, school violence, and community violence were the most significant predictors of acceptance of dating violence. Experiences with community violence and age were important predictors of dating violence perpetration and victimization. Findings highlight the importance of planning prevention programs that address variables affecting attitudes and behaviors of high-risk youth who have already been exposed to multiple types of violence.

  16. Beryllium-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of Quaternary landforms in Death Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Lewis A.; Frankel, Kurt L.; Knott, Jeffrey R.; Reynhout, Scott; Finkel, Robert C.; Dolan, James F.; Lee, Jeffrey

    2011-02-01

    Quaternary alluvial fans, and shorelines, spits and beach bars were dated using 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure methods in Death Valley. The 10Be TCN ages show considerable variance on individual surfaces. Samples collected in the active channels date from ~ 6 ka to ~ 93 ka, showing that there is significant 10Be TCN inheritance within cobbles and boulders. This suggests that the predominantly bedrock hillslopes erode very slowly and sediment is transferred very gradually in most regions within Death Valley. Comparisons of 10Be TCN ages on alluvial fan surfaces with chronostratigraphies based on soil development and optically stimulated luminescence dating show that minimum 10Be TCN ages within sample sets on individual surfaces most closely approximate to the age of landforms that are younger than ~ 70 ka. Alluvial fan surfaces older than ~ 70 ka have begun to undergo sufficient erosion such that the majority of 10Be TCN ages for datasets on individual surfaces probably underestimate the true age of the surface due to erosion and exhumation of fresh cobbles and boulders. The spread of 10Be TCN ages for beach bars near Beatty Junction and shorelines ~ 8 km south of Furnace Creek is large, ranging from ~ 119 ka to ~ 385 ka and ~ 109 ka to ~ 465 ka, respectively. New and previously published luminescence ages and soil development suggest that these landforms may have formed during marine isotope stage (MIS) 2 (~ 22-18 ka), but these younger ages may reflect elluviation of material into the bar deposit long after deposition, and hence the younger ages do not record the true antiquity of the landforms. This disparity between dates determined by different dating methods and the large spread of TCN ages suggests that the cobbles and boulders have considerable inherited 10Be concentrations, suggesting that the clasts have been derived from older shorelines or associated landforms. These results highlight the problems associated with using

  17. The Lesser Himalaya stripped naked: tecto-climatic induced fluvial response during the Quaternary inferred from in situ 10Be exposure ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swander, Z.; Dosseto, A.; Fink, D.; Mifsud, C.

    2011-12-01

    Deciphering a catchment's response to climatic and tectonic forcings requires a spatially extensive geochronology of aggradation-degradation. The Alaknanda River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, constitutes an ideal area for studying this question. From its glacial headwaters sourcing sediment from 7,000+ meter peaks, fueled by glacial meltwater and the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) that annually brings the river to sustained flood levels; the Alaknanda River transports a tremendous volume of sediment to the fertile floodplain and delta of the Ganga River. Seven study sites lie within a 200km tectonically active stretch of the river valley transecting the Lesser Himalayan lithological units; demarcated by the Main Central and Main Boundary Thrusts. Twenty bedrock strath surface exposure ages, spreading over two orders of magnitude (102-104 years), were established by measuring the cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentration of beryllium-10. A majority of the bedrock exposure ages support a prior hypothesis for climate driven onset of early-mid Holocene erosion, which resulted in the cessation of catchment-wide fluvial aggradation period at 8ka (Juyal et al. 2010) and culminated with renewed incision of underlying bedrock. Incision rates have a narrow range of 3-7 mm×yr-1 suggesting spatial uniformity, and agree largely with previous estimates (4 mm×yr-1; Barnard et al. 2001).

    When comparing the Holocene aggradation-degradation transition to paleoclimate records from the Guliya Ice Core (Thompson et al. 1997), an apparent correlation exists with the waxing and waning of the ISM as postulated by Juyal et al. (2010). However, preceding the Last Glacial Maximum, a sustained decline in the ISM strength coincided with both periods of active alluvial deposition and erosion. Two episodes of valley wide aggradation occur during extensive regional glaciation 49-25ka, and

  18. Testing a luminescence surface-exposure dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliganic, Luke A.; Meyer, Michael; Gehring, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has shown that the relationship between the luminescence signal (optically stimulated [OSL] and infra-red stimulated [IRSL]) and depth into a rock surface can be used to estimate the length of time since that rock surface has been exposed to sunlight (Sohbati et al., 2012), thus serving as a means for surface-exposure dating. Despite the potential of this new dating tool, few published studies have tested or used this technique. Here, we present the results of two tests of the method. First, we perform laboratory bleaching experiments using two unexposed bedrock samples of different lithologies (granite and quartzite). Sub-samples were bleached for various durations (0 to 100,000 s) in a solar simulator, and IRSL/OSL-depth profiles were measured and fitted using the model of Sohbati et al. (2012). Results of fitting for each sub-sample were then compared. Second, we used a granite boulder from a known age moraine (1850 CE) to test the reproducibility of bleaching depth curves. Multiple cores were collected from the same ~5 cm2 surface area of the boulder, and IRSL-depth profiles were measured and modelled. While our systematic tests confirm the general physical basis of luminescence surface-exposure dating method, we found unexpected scatter in both adjacent bleaching depth curves and the fitting parameters of isochronous rock surfaces for some of our samples. Potential sources of error, including small-scale lithological variabilities and implications for accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. Sohbati, R., Murray, A.S., Chapot, M.S., Jain, M., Pederson, J. (2012) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating. Journal of Geophysical Research 117 (B9), B09202. doi.org/10.1029/2012JB009383.

  19. A note of caution on the use of boulders for exposure dating of depositional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Hetzel, R.; Kuhlmann, J.; Ramos, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Exposure dating of boulders has been widely applied to determine the age of depositional surfaces under the assumption that the pre-depositional nuclide component in most boulders is negligible (e.g. Bierman et al., 1995; van der Woerd et al., 2006). Here we present a case study on fluvial terraces at the active mountain front of the eastern Andes, where this assumption is clearly invalid, because sandstone boulders (n = 13) at two sites contain a highly variable inherited 10Be component and have apparent 10Be ages that exceed the age of the respective surface by up to 93 ka. Likewise, boulders from active stream channels (n = 5) contain a substantial inherited 10Be component, equivalent to 5-48 ka of exposure. The age of the fluvial terraces is well determined by 10Be depth profiles on sand samples, which allow to correct for the pre-depositional nuclide component. At site 1, three terraces have 10Be ages of 3.20 ± 0.42 ka (T2), 11.11 ± 0.87 ka (T3), and 16.0 ± 1.1 ka (T4). The age of T3 is furthermore confirmed by a calibrated 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 ka BP. At site 2, terrace T3 has an age of 13.5 ± 2.1 ka (derived on a 10Be depth profile), while boulders indicate apparent ages from 14 to 31 ka. The average inherited 10Be concentration of sand grains - determined from depth profiles and stream sediments - is small and equivalent to 1-3 ka of exposure, whereas the mean inheritance of the boulders is an order of magnitude higher. This causes great caution by determining erosion rates. The huge contrast is related to the different provenance and transport history of sand and boulders. While the sand is derived from rapidly eroding Miocene sediments exposed near the mountain front, the boulders originate from Triassic sandstones in the internal part of the fold-and-thrust belt. On their way to the mountain front the boulders were temporarily stored and irradiated in alluvial fans that are currently reworked. Sediment deposition in intramontane basins and

  20. 36Chlorine exposure dating of a terminal moraine in the Galicica Mountains, Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromig, R.; Mechernich, S.; Ribolini, A.; Dunai, T. J.; Wagner, B.

    2015-12-01

    The glaciation history of the Balkan Peninsula is subject of research since the late 19th century. To date, only a few moraines on the Balkan Peninsula are dated, mainly using 10Be exposure dating applied on quartz bearing rocks. Since large parts of the Balkan Peninsula mountains are composed of carbonatic rocks, absolute age dating is restricted to 36Cl exposure dating, which, to date, was not conducted in this region yet. So far, an absolute chronological control in limestone-dominated areas is limited to U-series minimum ages of calcitic cements. In order to obtain more information about the timing of the glaciation history on the Balkan Peninsula, we investigated a terminal moraine in a NNE-facing cirque in the Galicica Mountains (40°56´N, 20°49´E) in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The cirque comprises a series of nested moraine ridges at the base of the cirque wall, with the largest one being sampled. Samples from five limestone boulders in crest position (≈ 2050 m a.s.l.) were taken and pre-treated for AMS measurement at the University of Cologne. Three preliminary ages point to a moraine formation in the course of a late Pleistocene glaciation, either Last Glacial Maximum or Younger Dryas. The data were discussed concerning corrections for topographic shielding, snow cover, inheritance, and erosion. However, five AMS re-measurements are currently in progress in order to refine the correlation of the moraine formation to a specific glacial period. The resulting ages will be compared to sediments of the adjacent Lakes Ohrid and Prespa, which represent valuable climatic and environmental archives. Several studies on these sediments were carried out in order to reconstruct relative changes in temperature and moisture availability. Moreover, the inferred moraine formation ages will be compared to glaciation reconstructions of other mountainous regions on the Balkan Peninsula to improve the knowledge on past climatic conditions.

  1. Iraqi American refugee youths' exposure to violence: relationship to attitudes and peers' perpetration of dating violence.

    PubMed

    Black, Beverly M; Chiodo, Lisa M; Weisz, Arlene N; Elias-Lambert, Nada; Kernsmith, Poco D; Yoon, Jina S; Lewandowski, Linda A

    2013-02-01

    This exploratory study examines the relationships between exposure to violence in the community, school, home and dating relationships among Iraqi American youth. As Iraqi American youth are traditionally not allowed to date, dating violence measures focused on attitudes about and perceptions of abuse occurring in the relationships of friends. The number of friends known who were secretly dating was the most significant predictor of acceptability of dating violence and perceived prevalence of abuse. Youth who experienced child abuse perceived higher rates of dating violence among their peers. Findings highlight the complexities of prevention and intervention of teen dating violence within secretive relationships.

  2. Glacial history of the Haizishan Plateau reconstructed from geomorphology, exposure dating and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ping; Seguinot, Julien; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2014-05-01

    The Haizishan Plateau is a low-relief formerly glaciated highland located at a crossroads of continental climate on the Tibetan Plateau and the south-west Asian monsoon. It is surrounded by deeply-cut glacial and fluvial valleys on its flanks, deep basins, and high mountain peaks. Using geomorphological mapping, 10Be exposure dating, and numerical glacier modelling we provide a detailed reconstruction of the Haizishan Plateau glacial history. An ice cap measuring almost 4 000 km2 formed at or before marine oxygen isotope stage 6 (with minimum ages of 102.3±10.0 - 183.6±17.0 ka), and, with a slightly smaller extent, during the global last glacial maximum (21.6±2.0 ka). The dating results are consistent with geomorphology in showing a pattern of patchy glacial erosion on the Haizishan Plateau. Modelling results also support this inference through a patchy pattern of basal temperatures on the plateau surface, and warm-based ice at outlet valleys. Finally, our simulations show that only ca. 3 °C of cooling is required for glacial inception and expansion of the ice cap to its geomorphologically inferred maximum extent, which is consistent with glacial modelling results obtained at other locations on the Tibetan Plateau and consistent with climate modelling.

  3. Precise Surface Exposure Dating of Early Holocene and Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.; Taggart, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have established precise ages of two glacial events in the tropical Andean highlands of southern Peru. The field site is located on the flanks of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl; 13°20'S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba. A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the south face of Salcantay. Well-defined outer and inner moraines were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated 5 km and 3 km, respectively, from their head on the Salcantay massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders on the outer (n = 7) and inner (n = 7) moraine crests expands upon initial age control for these deposits and improves substantially on the precision of earlier 10Be measurements. The new results yield mean ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka for the outer moraine and 195 ± 24 years for the inner moraine, corresponding to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator with Lal-Stone production rate scaling and the default height-pressure relationship. The inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined from northern mid- and high latitude records, and indicates considerable expansion of glaciers heading on Nevado Salcantay during this climatic minimum. Recent geomorphic mapping has identified similar sequences of moraines in adjacent drainages on and near Salcantay, suggesting a broader regional signal of two prominent Holocene glacial events in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes; 10Be dating of these additional moraines is underway. Our new glacier chronologies complement ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby increasing spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of climate change in the tropical Andes during the Holocene. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the results also demonstrate a newly- developed capability of 10Be exposure

  4. Dating of Holocene lateral moraines in the western Southern Alps, New Zealand, applying Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Research on Holocene mountain glacier chronologies has recently intensified due to the importance of mountain glaciers as key indicators for past and present climate change. This progress is closely connected with major improvements in modern dating techniques and the application of multi-proxy approaches adapted to specific local/regional conditions. Despite recent progress there is, however, still a need for better spatial differentiation and a lack of generally accepted concepts for global and inter-hemispheric correlation of Holocene glacier chronologies. Furthermore, the "geomorphological uncertainty" inevitably connected with numerical dating of moraines in neotectonic active mountain ranges characterised by highly dynamic geomorphological process systems requires careful consideration of any subsequent palaeoclimatic interpretation. During the past few years Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) has revealed its potential to successfully challenge those specific circumstances. The Southern Alps of New Zealand have provided one of only a few suitable study sites for investigating Holocene glacier chronologies in the mid-latitudinal Southern Hemisphere. Recent years have seen a significant increase in terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND)-ages published for the Southern Alps, mainly for the last Glaciation, but also for the Holocene. The availability of a regional 10Be-production curve has improved the calibration of TCND-ages. These studies applying TCND alongside previous chronological studies using a variety of different dating techniques focus, however, primarily on a few selected glacier forelands east of the Main Divide in Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park. Bad accessibility and methodological problems account for comparatively few investigations on glacier forelands west of the Main Divide. Chronological studies applying Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) were performed on six glacier forelands in the western part of the Southern Alps

  5. The 10Be contents of SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Vajda, S.; Kruse, T.; Herzog, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    Several authors have explored the possibility that the Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) came from Mars. The spallogenic gas contents of the SNC meteorites have been used to: constrain the sizes of the SNC's during the last few million years; to establish groupings independent of the geochemical ones; and to estimate the likelihood of certain entries in the catalog of all conceivable passages from Mars to Earth. The particular shielding dependence of Be-10 makes the isotope a good probe of the irradiation conditions experienced by the SNC meteorites. The Be-10 contents of nine members of the group were measured using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. The Be-10 contents of Nakhla, Governador Valadares, Chassigny, and probably Lafayette, about 20 dpm/kg, exceed the values expected from irradiation of the surface of a large body. The Be-10 data therfore do not support scenario III of Bogard et al., one in which most of the Be-10 in the SNC meteorites would have formed on the Martian surface; they resemble rather the Be-10 contents found in many ordinary chondrites subjected to 4 Pi exposures. The uncertainties of the Be-10 contents lead to appreciable errors in the Be-10 ages, t(1) = -1/lambda ln(1 Be-10/Be-10). Nonetheless, the Be-10 ages are consistent with the Ne-21 ages calculated assuming conventional, small-body production rates and short terrestrial ages for the finds. It is believed that this concordance strengthens the case for at least 3 different irradiation ages for the SNC meteorites. Given the similar half-thicknesses of the Be-10 and Ne-21 production rates, the ratios of the Be-10 and Ne-21 contents do not appear consistent with common ages for any of the groups. In view of the general agreement between the Be-10 and Ne-21 ages it does not seem useful at this time to construct multiple-stage irradiation histories for the SNC meteorites.

  6. Absolute calibration of 10Be AMS standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Imamura, Mineo; Caffee, Marc W.; Southon, John R.; Finkel, Robert C.; McAninch, Jeffrey

    2007-05-01

    The increased detection sensitivity offered by AMS has dramatically expanded the utility of 10Be. As these applications become more sophisticated attention has focused on the accuracy of the 10Be standards used to calibrate the AMS measurements. In recent years it has become apparent that there is a discrepancy between two of the most widely used 10Be AMS standards, the ICN 10Be standard and the NIST 10Be standard. The ICN (ICN Chemical & Radioisotope Division) 10Be AMS standard was calibrated by radioactive decay counting. Dilutions, ranging from 5 × 10 -13 to 3 × 10 -1110Be/Be, have been prepared and are extensively used in many AMS laboratories. The NIST 10Be standard, prepared at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is calibrated by mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurements. To provide an independent calibration of the 10Be standards we implanted a known number of 10Be atoms in both Si detectors and Be foil targets. The 10Be concentrations in these targets were measured by AMS. The results were compared with both the ICN and NIST AMS standards. Our 10Be measurements indicate that the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratio of the ICN AMS standard, which is based on a 10Be half-life of 1.5 × 10 6 yr, is 1.106 ± 0.012 times lower than the nominal value. Since the decay rate of the ICN standard is well determined, the decrease in 10Be/ 9Be ratio requires that the 10Be half-life be reduced to (1.36 ± 0.07) × 10 6 yr. The quoted uncertainty includes a ±5% uncertainty in the activity measurement carried out by ICN. In a similar fashion, we determined that the value of the NIST 10Be standard (SRM4325) is (2.79 ± 0.03) × 10 -1110Be/ 9Be, within error of the certified value of (2.68 ± 0.14) × 10 -11. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) internal standards were also included in this study. We conclude that the 9Be(n, γ) neutron cross section is 7.8 ± 0.23 mb, without taking into account the uncertainty in the neutron irradiation.

  7. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  8. Cosmic ray exposure dating on the large landslide of Séchilienne (Western Alps): A synthesis to constrain slope evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Stéphane; Zerathe, Swann; Jongmans, Denis; Baillet, Laurent; Carcaillet, Julien; Audin, Laurence; Dumont, Thierry; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; Lebrouc, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    The 60 × 106 m3 Séchilienne landslide (Belledonne Massif, Western Alps) is located on the right bank of the East-West trending Romanche valley which is shaped by glacial and alluvial processes during the Quaternary. Its head scarp (> 35 m high) was dated by Le Roux et al. (2009) using the cosmic ray exposure (CRE) method. Even though these previous results revealed that the initiation of the instability occurred several thousand years after ice down-wastage in the valley, the internal landslide evolution is not constrained. In this paper, we provide 63 additional 10Be samples collected from the internal scarps and the main scarp, as well as on glacially polished rock surfaces. The aim is to constrain the global landslide kinematics (internal and head scarps) and its relationship with glacier retreat. Results from glacially polished surfaces point out that complex shielding processes (relict moraines, soil deposits and seasonal snow cover) might have affected rock dating. Despite scattering of the resulting ages, the dataset shows that the glacial retreat was achieved between 17.5 and 13 ka. Exposure ages obtained on gravitational scarps reveal that the landslide initiation occurred 8 to 6 ka ago. From the initiation until 2 ka the gravitational kinematics was slow ( 2 mm·year- 1) and focused around the head scarp, leading to a general slope subsidence. After 2 ka, the exposure rates increased significantly ( 8 mm·year- 1) with the development of pervasive internal deformation of the landslide mass. This new scenario for the Séchilienne slope reflects a progressive rock-slope weakening since 8 ka, associated with a continuous activity of a deep-seated surface failure.

  9. Surface exposure dating of Little Ice Age ice cap advances on Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy; Jomelli, Vincent; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Swingedouw, Didier; Favier, Vincent; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA: 1200-1920 AD) glacier advances in Greenland often form the most extensive positions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) ice cap and margins since the Early Holocene. Across Greenland these advances are commonly represented by un-vegetated moraines, usually within 1-5 km of the present ice margin. However, chronological constraints on glacier advances during this period are sparse, meaning that GrIS and ice cap behavior and advance/retreat chronology remains poorly understood during this period. At present the majority of ages are based on historical accounts, ice core data, and radiocarbon ages from proglacial threshold lakes. However, developments in the accuracy and precision of surface exposure methods allow dating of LIA moraine boulders, permitting an opportunity to better understand of ice dynamics during this period. Geomorphological mapping and surface exposure dating (36Cl) were used to interpret moraine deposits from the Lyngmarksbræen on Disko Island, West Greenland. A Positive Degree Day (PDD) model was used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and mass balance changes for two distinct paleo-glacial extents. Three moraines (M1, M2, and M3) were mapped in the field, and sampled for 36Cl surface exposure dating. The outermost moraine (M1) was of clearly different morphology to the inner moraines, and present only in small fragments. M2 and M3 were distinct arcuate termino-lateral moraines within 50 m of one another, 1.5 km from the present ice margin. The weighted average of four 36Cl ages from M1 returned an early Holocene age of 8.4 ± 0.6 ka. M2 (four samples) returned an age of 0.57 ± 0.04 ka (1441 AD) and M3 (four samples) returned an age of 0.28 ± 0.02 ka (1732 AD). These surface exposure ages represent the first robustly dated Greenlandic ice cap moraine sequence from the LIA. The two periods of ice cap advance and marginal stabilisation are similar to recorded periods of LIA GrIS advance in west Greenland, constrained

  10. Reconstruction of glacier fluctuations in the Western Alps since the LGM using OSL surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Benjamin; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Providing tight spatial/temporal constraints on late-Pleistocene glacier fluctuations remains an important challenge for understanding glacier response to climate change. In most mountainous settings, paleo-glacier reconstructions are limited because they lack precise temporal constraint, which would enable their use as a paleoclimate proxy. OSL-surface exposure dating has been recently proposed [Sohbati et al., 2011] and offers the potential to improve paleo-glacier reconstruction. Because the OSL signal is sensitive to light, OSL-signal bleaching within a rock sample depends on its exposure time and environmental conditions, and can therefore be used to date the exposure time of glacially-polished bedrock or erratic boulders. However, successful application of this technique first requires calibration and validation. Here, we focus on the Mer de Glace glacier (Mont Blanc massif, France) where the post-LGM glacier dynamics remain poorly constrained with numerous short glacier re-advances occuring during the mid-Pleistocene and Holocene [LeRoy et al., 2015]. First, the different parameters involved in OSL surface exposure dating were calibrated. Vertical transect of polished bedrock surfaces with known exposure ages (from 10 to 165 years) from the Montenvers train station (1913 m a.sl.) to the present-day position of the Mer de Glace (1600 m a.s.l.) was sampled. Secondly, we sampled the Trelaporte transect where exposed bedrock surfaces are of uniform lithology. Here, we will apply similar approach on a much longer timescale, from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~24 ka, Coutterand et al., 2006) to the present day. OSL data from rock slices show increasing exposure age with elevation which is consitent with glacier thinning since the Little Ice Age. Moreover, our results confirmed the possibility to first calibrate the model parameters on known-age surface and use it to constrain the exposure time for nearby bedrock surfaces. In summary, OSL-surface exposure dating

  11. The drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and a new Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Björck, Svante; Caffee, Marc W.; Fredin, Ola; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2015-04-01

    An important constraint on the reliability of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is the derivation of tightly controlled production rates. We present a new dataset for 10Be production rate calibration from Mount Billingen, southern Sweden, the site of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, an event dated to 11,620 ± 100 cal yr BP. Nine samples of flood-scoured bedrock surfaces and depositional boulders and cobbles unambiguously connected to the drainage event yield a reference 10Be production rate of 4.09 ± 0.22 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the CRONUS Lm scaling and 3.93 ± 0.21 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD general spallation scaling. We also recalibrate the reference 10Be production rates for four sites in Norway and combine these with the Billingen results to derive a tightly clustered Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate of 4.12 ± 0.10 (4.12 ± 0.25 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the Lm scaling scheme and 3.96 ± 0.10 (3.96 ± 0.24 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD scaling scheme.

  12. Controls on the distribution of cosmogenic 10Be across shore platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying rates of erosion on cliffed coasts across a range of timescales is vital for understanding the drivers and processes of coastal change and for assessing risks posed by future cliff retreat. Historical records cover at best the last 150 years; cosmogenic isotopes, such as 10Be could allow us to look further into the past to assess coastal change on millennial timescales. Cosmogenic isotopes accumulate in situ near the Earth surface and have been used extensively to quantify erosion rates, burial dates and surface exposure ages in terrestrial landscapes over the last 3 decades. More recently, applications in rocky coast settings have quantified the timing of mass wasting events, determined long-term averaged rates of cliff retreat and revealed the exposure history of shore platforms. In this contribution, we develop and explore a numerical model for the accumulation of 10Be on eroding shore platforms. In a series of numerical experiments, we investigated the influence of topographic and water shielding, dynamic platform erosion processes, the presence and variation in beach cover, and heterogeneous distribution of erosion on the distribution of 10Be across shore platforms. Results demonstrate that, taking into account relative sea level change and tides, the concentration of 10Be is sensitive to rates of cliff retreat. Factors such as topographic shielding and beach cover act to reduce 10Be concentrations on the platform and may result in overestimation of cliff retreat rates if not accounted for. The shape of the distribution of 10Be across a shore platform can potentially reveal whether cliff retreat rates are declining or accelerating through time. Measurement of 10Be in shore platforms has great potential to allow us to quantify long-term rates of cliff retreat and platform erosion.

  13. Verifying the new luminescence surface-exposure dating technique--rock falls in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, J. L.; Sohbati, R.; Murray, A. S.; Jain, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have helped develop the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of rock surfaces, as applied to the age of the famous Great Gallery rock art panel in Canyonlands National Park. Chapot et al. (2012) dated a key rock fall to ~900 yrs ago by applying OSL to the outer 1-mm buried surface of a sandstone talus boulder, an age confirmed by independent radiocarbon dating. Later, in a novel approach and with the use of a local known-age calibration sample, Sohbati et al. (2012) modelled the millimeter-scale OSL-depth profile to determine a pre-burial exposure duration of ~700 years for the same rock fall. This combination of rock-fall dating and exposure dating--an approach with broad potential to date Holocene mass movements--constrains the creation of the Great Gallery rock art to a time window of 900 to ~1600 years ago (Pederson et al., 2014), a result met with some controversy. Here we report on a new phase of research to verify these results and further refine OSL-profile exposure dating for mass movements. New analyses from within and near the Great Gallery alcove include: i) exposure dating of the same alcove surface upon which the rock art is painted with a predicted exposure age of ~1600 years; ii) exposure dating of the top (light-exposed) side of the same rock-fall boulder whose buried side was previously dated to test for reproduction of the known age; and iii) an improved calibration sample from a nearby trail/road-cut for verification. The residual OSL signal is measured with depth in millimeter-thick increments of all samples. We first determine the site-specific luminescence reduction rate at the rock surface by fitting the OSL surface-exposure dating model to the calibration profile from the trail/road-cut. This parameterized model then provides exposure ages for the bleaching profiles observed in the other samples. Results have implications for the application of OSL rock-surface and exposure-profile dating in other settings where

  14. Differential Gender Effects of Exposure to Rap Music on African American Adolescents' Acceptance of Teen Dating Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed the effects of exposure to nonviolent rap videos on black adolescents' perceptions of teen dating violence. Results from 60 black adolescents and teenagers indicate a significant interaction between gender and video exposure: male acceptance of the use of violence was not a function of viewing the videos, whereas video-viewing females…

  15. 26Al and 10Be Activities of Lodranites and Winona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Xue, S.; Klein, J.; Juenemann, D.; Middleton, R.

    1993-07-01

    Noble gas measurements by [1] indicate that four lodranites LEW 88280, Lodran (a fall), MAC 88177, and Yamato 791491 have the same cosmic ray exposure age of a few million years. The elevated ^22Ne/^21Ne ratios of these lodranites, from 1.22 to 1.28 [1], suggest that shielding was light and production rates appreciably lower than in average chondrites. Cosmic-ray irradiation in space for, say, 4 My would bring ^26Al and ^10Be to within 2% and 16% of their respective saturation values. Thus measurement of ^26Al may provide information about production rates and shielding and ^10Be about exposure age. We separated magnetically metal- and silicate-rich material from the four lodranites mentioned above and from Winona. The ^26Al and/or ^10Be activities (Table 1) were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry [2] with the statistical 1-sigma precision shown; the activities are thought to have an overall accuracy of 6-8%. Although the metal phases were etched with HF, they retained some silicate. To get a quantitative indication of the amounts of silicate present, the Mg concentrations in aliquots of the dissolved metal samples (Table 1) were measured by ICP/MS. The Mg, Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe contents of the silicate phases were determined by DCP emission spectrometry [3]. The measured activities in silicates from LEW 88280, Lodran, and Y 791491 resemble one another closely: The average ^26Al and ^10Be activities are 50.9 and 16.7 dpm/kg compared to estimated production rates of about 55 and 23 dpm/kg. These results lead to an exposure age of ~3.3 My, but do not indicate substantial lowering of production rates. The ^26Al and ^10Be contents of MAC 88177 are about half the values expected at saturation under normal shielding and are lower than those in the other three lodranites. These results are consistent with the very light shielding inferred from the exceptionally high ^22Ne/^21Ne ratio of 1.28, and perhaps with some lowering due to terrestrial age. Kirsten et al. [4

  16. Cosmogenic Nuclide Exposure Dating of the Tiltill Rock Avalanche, Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, K. R.; Pluhar, C. J.; Stone, J. O.; Stock, G. M.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Yosemite National Park serves as an excellent natural laboratory for studying rock falls and rock avalanches because these are the main processes modifying the nearly vertical slopes of this recently glaciated landscape. Mass wasting represents a significant hazard in the region and the database of previous rock falls and other mass wasting events in Yosemite is extensive, dating back to the mid-1800s. However, this record is too short to capture the recurrence characteristics and triggering mechanisms of the very largest events, necessitating studies of the geologic record of mass wasting. Rock falls and rock avalanches are readily dated by cosmogenic nuclide methods due to their instantaneous formation, and results can be tied to triggering events such as seismic activity (e.g. Stock et al., 2009). Here, we apply exposure dating to the Holocene Tiltill rock avalanche north of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. The deposit comprises what appear to be two separate lobes of rock and debris, yielding a total volume of ~3.1 x 106 m3. Assuming an erosion rate of 0.0006 cm/yr and neglecting snowpack shielding, preliminary data suggest a mean exposure age of 11,000 + 600 year B.P. for both deposits, indicating that they were emplaced in a single event. The age of the Tiltill 'slide' is similar to earthquakes on the Owens Valley Fault between 10,800 + 600 and 10,200 + 200 cal year B.P. (Bacon, 2007) and the White Mountain Fault, ~10,000 cal year B.P. (Reheis, 1996; DePolo, 1989). Given that movement on the Owens Valley fault in 1872 caused a number of rock falls in Yosemite and the coincidence of ages between the Tiltill 'slide' and paleoseismic events, a large earthquake in Eastern Sierra Nevada may have triggered this event. Other trigger events are also possibilities, but only through compilation of a database of large rock avalanches can statistically significant groupings of events begin to demonstrate whether seismic triggering is a dominant process.

  17. Surface exposure dates of cirque basin deglaciation along a western Ireland transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. M.; Clark, J.; Clark, P. U.; McCabe, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (20ka -11ka), variations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), accompanied by changes in North Atlantic Deep Water production, caused centennial-to-millennial abrupt climate change. Because of Ireland's proximity to North Atlantic deep-water convection sites, changes in climate associated with variations in the AMOC would be particularly pronounced there, and are recorded by fluctuations of the Irish Ice Sheet. Many of Ireland's mountains also hosted cirque glaciers during the last glaciation, which would have been particularly sensitive to abrupt climate changes of the last deglaciation. Dating of cirque glacier moraines with cosmogenic nuclides can provide a millennial-scale reconstruction of variability in these highly sensitive cirque glaciers. We report 11 new 10Be ages from two cirques basins in County Mayo, western Ireland. A moraine adjacent to Lougaharry Lough near Killary Harbour suggests deglaciation at 13.81 × 0.14 ka during the Bølling-Allerød interval. Two moraines, one inner and one outer, at Lough Accorymore on Achill Island returned ages of 17.04 × 0.31 ka and 18.43 × 0.79 ka, respectively. Both Accorymore dates are Oldest Dryas in age and suggest variability during the millennial-scale Clogher Head Stadial in Ireland. To develop a more regional reconstruction of glacier-climate variability during the last deglaciation, we have also sampled moraines from cirque basins spanning western Ireland from County Kerry in the south to County Donegal in the north. Boulders were sampled from a total of 23 moraines from seven additional cirques to provide this more expansive coverage.

  18. Cosmogenic Exposure Dating of Paleo-Rockfall Deposits, Christchurch, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, B. H.; Quigley, M.

    2013-12-01

    The 22nd February 2011 MW 6.2 Christchurch earthquake occurred on a previously unrecognized blind thrust fault and generated severe localized vertical ground accelerations (>2 g). Constraining rupture history for such faults is challenging as there is no surface evidence of faulting (e.g., scarps, fault traces) which can be studied directly. However, the earthquake generated a range of secondary effects, including extensive rockfall and cliff collapse at many locations around the Port Hills south of Christchurch, remnants of a Miocene strato-shield volcanic complex. Many of these sites also exhibit pre-historic rockfall deposits. Here we ask whether ancient rockfall deposits can serve as off-fault evidence for paleo-earthquakes, and can be used to constrain the timing of previous episodes of severe shaking? Our site at Rapaki Bay west of Lyttelton is ideally suited for analysis of paleo-rockfall events as it has a prominent 60 m high sub-vertical cliff comprised of stratified lava flows, and a 600-m-long planar fore-slope. The site experienced significant, well-documented rockfall during the 2011 event, and has large (2-10 m diameter), lichen-covered boulders scattered down slope and partially embedded in late Quaternary loess and colluvium. We employ cosmogenic exposure dating of paleo-rockfall boulders to establish the timing of boulder emplacement. The basalt rock contains abundant clinopyroxene (augite) which is able to quantitatively retain cosmogenic 3He. This approach requires constraining the inherited 3He from non-cosmogenic sources, the potential cosmogenic exposure while boulders are on the cliff, and the background erosion rate. The probability distribution of exposure ages from the surface of pre-historically emplaced boulders show significant clustering of ages in the mid Holocene, with a long tail of individual ages out to ~60 ka. Comparison with numerical modeling of a range of rockfall event scenarios reveals the measured age distribution is most

  19. Cosmic ray exposure dating with in situ produced cosmogenic He-3 - Results from young Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, Mark D.; Colodner, Debra; Trull, Thomas W.; Moore, Richard B.; O'Brien, Keran

    1990-01-01

    Cosmogenic helium contents in a suite of Hawaiian radiocarbon-dated lava flows were measured to study the use of the production rate of spallation-produced cosmogenic He-3 as a surface exposure chronometer. Basalt samples from the Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes were analyzed, showing that exposure-age dating is feasible in the 600-13000 year age range. The data suggest a present-day sea-level production rate in olivine of 125 + or - 30 atoms/g yr.

  20. Dynamics of erosion in a compressional mountain range revealed by 10Be paleoerosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, P.; Hoke, G. D.; Fosdick, J. C.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understanding the evolution of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge evolution predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based landscape evolution models predict catchment-wide erosion maxima that lag behind a rock uplift pulse. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S where extensive previous work documents deformation, climate and sediment accumulation histories. Sandstone samples spanning 8.8 to 1.8 Ma were collected from the previously dated wedge-top (Iglesia) and foredeep basins (Bermejo) for quartz purification and 10Be extraction. 10Be concentrations due to burial and exhumation were estimated and subtracted from the measured concentrations and yielded the inherited 10Be concentrations, which were then corrected for sample magnetostratigraphic age. The inherited concentrations were then used to calculate paleoerosion rates. We modeled various pre-burial and post-burial exposure scenarios in order to assess potential sources of uncertainty in the recovered paleoerosion rates. The modeling results reveal that pre-burial and post-burial exposure periods only marginally affect our results. By combining the 10Be-derived paleoerosion rates and geomorphic observations with detrital zircon provenance, we document the isolation of the wedge-top basin, which was later reconnected by an upstream migrating pulse of erosion in a process that was directly controlled by thrust activity and base level. The data further indicate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags maximum rates of deformation and subsidence over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic

  1. Cosmogenic 10Be constraints on Little Ice Age glacial advances in the eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon; Liu, Gengnian; Yi, Chaolu; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-04-01

    Presumed Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances, represented by a set of fresh, sharp-crested, boulder covered and compact moraines a few hundred meters downstream from modern glaciers, have been widely recognized in the Central Asian highlands. However, few studies have constrained the formation ages of these moraines. We report 31 10Be exposure ages from presumed LIA moraines in six glacial valleys in the Urumqi River headwater area and the Haxilegen Pass area of the eastern Tian Shan, China. Our results reveal that the maximum LIA glacial extent occurred mainly around 430 ± 100 yr, a cold and wet period as indicated by proxy data from ice cores, tree rings, and lake sediments in Central Asia. We also dated a later glacial advance to 270 ± 55 yr. However, 10Be exposure ages on several presumed LIA moraines in front of small, thin glaciers are widely scattered and much older than the globally recognized timing of the LIA. Historical topographic maps indicate that most glaciers were more extensive in the early 1960s, and two of our 10Be sample sites were located close to the ice front at that time. Boulders transported by these small and thin glaciers may be reworked from deposits originally formed prior to the LIA glacial advances, producing apparently old and widely scattered exposure ages due to varied nuclide inheritance. Other published ages indicated an earlier LIA advance around 790 ± 300 yr in the easternmost Tian Shan, but in our study area the more extensive advance around 430 ± 100 yr likely reworked or covered deposits from this earlier event.

  2. Surface exposure dating of glacial lake shorelines: implications for constraining ice margin positions and meltwater outbursts during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin; Schaefer, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) played an important role in the climate variability of the last deglaciation, notably through large discharges of meltwater to the North Atlantic that disturbed the ocean's circulation and heat transport. Deglaciation of the northeastern sector of the LIS was complex and included the development of large ice-dammed lakes that were confined within the main river valleys draining northward into Ungava Bay. The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador ice dome, but large uncertainties regarding the position and dynamic of the ice margin through time currently limit our understanding of these glacial lakes. In the Ungava lowlands, glacial lake Naskaupi invaded the George River valley, leaving a series of well-developed shorelines and deltas. These spectacular raised shorelines are 10 to 20 meters wide and can be followed for several kilometers. Our field investigations and remote sensing analysis indicate that Lake Naskaupi experienced a complex history, as shown by the succession of shorelines that likely reflect the opening of new topographic outlets during ice retreat. Constraining the timing of the different phases of the lake and its drainage has traditionally been challenging, as organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating is scarce or lacking. Recent progress in Surface Exposure Dating (SED) by cosmogenic nuclides now inspires novel approaches to glacial and deglacial geomorphology. Here we apply 10Be SED to boulders that form part of these shorelines and mark the main (high-level) stage of Lake Naskaupi. We sampled 4-6 multi-meter size boulders at 4 different sites. Preliminary results show high internal consistency and, indicate that the main lake phase developed very late in the regional deglaciation, which extends from about 8500 to 6800 cal. yr BP (Dyke and Prest, 1987). We also present SED results from boulders deposited by a substantial outburst flood presumably associated with

  3. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Marital Violence on Adolescent Gender-Role Beliefs and Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichter, Erika L.; McCloskey, Laura A.

    2004-01-01

    Children exposed to marital violence in childhood are at risk for engaging in dating violence as adolescents or young adults. Using a longitudinal prospective design, mother--child pairs from violent and nonviolent homes (N = 208) were interviewed about exposure to marital violence twice over a 7--9 year time span. Responses to questions about…

  4. Adolescent conflict as a developmental process in the prospective pathway from exposure to interparental violence to dating violence.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Angela J; Englund, Michelle M; Carlson, Elizabeth A; Egeland, Byron

    2014-02-01

    Within a developmental psychopathology framework, the current study examined adolescent conflict (age 16) with families, best friends, and dating partners as mediators in the prospective pathway from exposure to interparental violence (EIPV) in early childhood (0-64 months) to dating violence perpetration and victimization in early adulthood (age 23). Adolescent conflict was predicted to partially mediate EIPV and dating violence with significant direct paths from EIPV to dating violence, given the extant literature on the salience of early childhood EIPV for later maladjustment. Participants (N = 182; 99 males, 83 females; 67 % Caucasian, 11 % African-American, 18 % other, 4 % unreported) were drawn from a larger prospective study of high-risk mothers (aged 12-34 years) that followed their children from birth through adulthood. EIPV and adolescent conflict were rated from interviews with mothers and participants, and dating violence (physical perpetration and victimization) was assessed with the Conflict Tactics Scale. Path analyses showed that EIPV in early childhood (a) directly predicted dating violence perpetration in early adulthood and (b) predicted conflict with best friends, which in turn predicted dating violence perpetration. Although mediation of best friend conflict was not evident, indirect effects of EIPV to dating violence were found through externalizing behaviors in adolescence and life stress in early adulthood. Findings highlight that conflict with best friends is affected by EIPV and predicts dating violence, suggesting that it may be a promising target for relationship-based interventions for youth with EIPV histories. Furthermore, deleterious early experiences and contemporaneous risk factors are salient predictors of dating violence.

  5. Developmental Timing and Continuity of Exposure to Interparental Violence and Externalizing Behavior as Prospective Predictors of Dating Violence

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Angela J.; Englund, Michelle M.; Egeland, Byron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective pathways of children's exposure to interparental violence (EIPV) in early and middle childhood and externalizing behavior in middle childhood and adolescence as developmental predictors of dating violence perpetration and victimization at ages 23 and 26 years. Participants (N = 168) were drawn from a longitudinal study of low-income families. Path analyses examined whether timing or continuity of EIPV predicted dating violence and whether timing or continuity of externalizing behavior mediated these pathways. Results indicated that EIPV in early childhood directly predicted perpetration and victimization at age 23. There were significant indirect effects from EIPV to dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23. Independent of EIPV, externalizing behavior in middle childhood also predicted dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23, but this pathway stemmed from maltreatment. These results highlight that the timing of EIPV and both the timing and continuity of externalizing behavior are critical risks for the intergenerational transmission of dating violence. Findings support a developmental perspective that negative early experiences and children's externalizing behavior are powerful influences for dating violence in early adulthood. PMID:24229543

  6. Developmental timing and continuity of exposure to interparental violence and externalizing behavior as prospective predictors of dating violence.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Angela J; Englund, Michelle M; Egeland, Byron

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the prospective pathways of children's exposure to interparental violence (EIPV) in early and middle childhood and externalizing behavior in middle childhood and adolescence as developmental predictors of dating violence perpetration and victimization at ages 23 and 26 years. Participants (N = 168) were drawn from a longitudinal study of low-income families. Path analyses examined whether timing or continuity of EIPV predicted dating violence and whether timing or continuity of externalizing behavior mediated these pathways. Results indicated that EIPV in early childhood directly predicted perpetration and victimization at age 23. There were significant indirect effects from EIPV to dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23. Independent of EIPV, externalizing behavior in middle childhood also predicted dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23, but this pathway stemmed from maltreatment. These results highlight that the timing of EIPV and both the timing and the continuity of externalizing behavior are critical risks for the intergenerational transmission of dating violence. The findings support a developmental perspective that negative early experiences and children's externalizing behavior are powerful influences for dating violence in early adulthood.

  7. Association between exposure to ambient air pollution before conception date and likelihood of giving birth to girls in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hualiang; Liang, Zhijiang; Liu, Tao; Di, Qian; Qian, Zhengmin; Zeng, Weilin; Xiao, Jianpeng; Li, Xing; Guo, Lingchuan; Ma, Wenjun; Zhao, Qingguo

    2015-12-01

    A few studies have linked ambient air pollution with sex ratio at birth. Most of these studies examined the long-term effects using spatial or temporal comparison approaches. This study aimed to investigate whether parental exposure to air pollution before conception date could affect the likelihood of the offspring being male or female. We used the information collected in a major maternal hospital in Guangzhou, China. The parental exposure to air pollution was assessed using the air pollution concentration before the conception date. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between air pollution exposure and birth sex with adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as maternal age, parental education levels, long-term trend, season, and weather condition (mean temperature and relative humidity). The analysis revealed that higher air pollution was associated with higher probability of female newborns, with the effective exposure around one week prior to conception date. In the one-pollutant models, PM10, SO2 and NO2 had significant effects. For example, the excess risk was 0.61% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.36%, 0.86%) for a 10 ug/m3 increase in lag 2 day's PM10, 0.42% (95% CI: 0.21%, 0.64%) for lag 3 day's SO2 and 0.97% (95% CI: 0.44%, 1.50%) for lag 3 day's NO2; and in two-pollutant models, PM10 remained statistically significant. These results suggest that parental exposure to ambient air pollution a few days prior to conception might be a contributing factor to higher probability of giving birth to female offspring in Guangzhou.

  8. Surface-exposure Dating of Late Quaternary Glacial Advances in the Cordillera Blanca, Peruvian Andes (9°-10°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Zehner, S. P., Jr.; Bowen, D. R.; Rodbell, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    New 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on lateral moraines bordering Querococha Valley (9°44.6' S, 77°21.6' W) in the southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru, indicate that late-glacial (˜16 ka) ice extended as much as 15 km downvalley from the headwall(s). With the glacier terminus at ˜3900 masl and the headwall at ˜5200 masl, THAR reconstruction (THAR=0.45) places the late-glacial equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) at ˜4485 masl, as compared to an estimated modern ELA of ˜5100 masl. The late-glacial Querococha advance was coeval with late-glacial advances at the Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (10°00'S, 77°16'W; peaks ˜5600 masl), ˜35 km to the south, where we have dated multiple moraines. Surface-exposure ages (10Be) indicate that the largest lateral moraines from Jeullesh Valley at NJR are compound features deposited during both the local last glacial maximum (˜30 ka) and a late-glacial readvance (˜15 ka). Late-glacial moraines are the largest lateral moraines in neighboring Quenua Ragra and Tuco valleys. The timing of the late-glacial advances in the Cordillera Blanca suggests a link to increased precipitation associated with Heinrich Event I (˜17 ka). Additional new 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on a moraine crossing a side valley in the upper reaches of Jeullesh Valley are early Holocene (˜9-11 ka), suggesting retreat of 3-4 km from the late-glacial terminal position in ˜4 kyr. Using the same THAR methodology, the late-glacial ELA in Jeullesh Valley was ˜4815 masl and the early Holocene ELA was ˜4995 masl. The active, west-dipping Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault (CBNF) vertically offsets the crests of 10Be-dated moraines in six valleys where we have profiled CBNF scarps: Jeullesh, Quenua Ragra, and Tuco valleys in the NJR massif; and Llaca, Cojup, and Querococha valleys in the south-central Cordillera Blanca (9°28'-45'S, 77°28'-21'W). In Jeullesh Valley, the CBNF scarp offsets both late

  9. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the oldest glacial successions in the Himalayan orogen: Ladakh Range, northern India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Caffee, M.W.; Bovard, K.R.; Finkel, R.C.; Sharma, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and alluvial fan sediments define the timing of five glacial advances over at least the last five glacial cycles in the Ladakh Range of the Transhimalaya. The glacial stages that have been identified are: the Indus Valley glacial stage, dated at older than 430 ka; the Leh glacial stage occurring in the penultimate glacial cycle or older; the Karglacial stage, occurring during the early part of the last glacial cycle; the Bazgo glacial stage, at its maximum during the middle of the last glacial cycle; and the early Holocene Khalling glacial stage. The exposure ages of the Indus Valley moraines are the oldest observed to date throughout the Himalayan orogen. We observe a pattern of progressively more restricted glaciation during the last five glacial cycles, likely indicating a progressive reduction in the moisture supply necessary to sustain glaciation. A possible explanation is that uplift of Himalayan ranges to the south and/or of the Karakoram Mountains to the west of the region may have effectively blocked moisture supply by the south Asian summer monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies, respectively. Alternatively, this pattern of glaciation may reflect a trend of progressively less extensive glaciation in mountain regions that has been observed globally throughout the Pleistocene. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  10. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  11. In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Malespin, C; Mahaffy, P; Grotzinger, J P; Vasconcelos, P M; Milliken, R E; Malin, M; Edgett, K S; Pavlov, A A; Hurowitz, J A; Grant, J A; Miller, H B; Arvidson, R; Beegle, L; Calef, F; Conrad, P G; Dietrich, W E; Eigenbrode, J; Gellert, R; Gupta, S; Hamilton, V; Hassler, D M; Lewis, K W; McLennan, S M; Ming, D; Navarro-González, R; Schwenzer, S P; Steele, A; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Vaniman, D; Vasavada, A; Williford, K; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F

    2014-01-24

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced (3)He, (21)Ne, and (36)Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  12. 10Be chronometry of bedrock-to-soil conversion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, Marc C.; McKean, James; Dietrich, William; Klein, Jeffrey

    1992-07-01

    We report concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be ( t1/2 = 1.5 × 10 6 yrs) in soil excavated from a soil-mantled hillslope in Black Diamond Mines Regional Park, Contra Costa County, California. The most striking features of the data are: (1) the similarity in the downward decreasing trends of 10Be concentrations in two soil profiles collected 75 m apart, (2) the coincidence in each soil profile of the soil/bedrock interface (as defined by visual inspection of soil pits) and the level at which 10Be concentrations attain very low values ( ˜4 × 10 6 atoms/g), and (3) the extremely low 10Be concentrations in the underlying regolith (0.5 × 10 6 atoms/gram). The inventory of 10Be in these soils is low, equivalent to about 6000 yrs of 10Be accumulation in a soil initially containing no 10Be. On the basis of these measurements, and with the aid of simple models of soil ( 10Be) motions on the hillslope, we conclude that 10Be loss from the surface is dominated by its removal in soil by creep. We calculate local rates of bedrock-to-soil conversion of between 0.15 and 0.27 km/10 6 yrs. Comparing these with uplift rates determined for coastal regions of California indicates that soil creep alone is capable of removing soil from the local geomorphic system at a rate equivalent to the rate of uplift of much of the coast.

  13. The dating of pre-exposure times of lunar rocks and soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eugster, O.

    1986-01-01

    Xenon produced by fission of uranium, thorium and plutonium has repeatedly been observed in lunar rocks and soils. In two basaltic rocks and in two soils Xe was found originating from fission of U-235 induced by neutrons which are due to the interactions of cosmic ray particles with lunar matter. Two facts lead to this conclusion: (1) fission Xe is present in excess of that expected for the U, Th, and Pu concentrations and for the gas retention age of the samples; and (2) the Xe-134/Xe-136 ratio of excess fission Xe is close to 1.25 as expected for neutron induced fission of U-235. Information on the duration of the exposure to cosmic rays was obtained from the Kr-81-Kr systematics whereas the effective shielding conditions were derived from the depth sensitive cosmogenic ratio Xe-131/Xe-126. For the four samples the exposure to cosmic rays in the lunar regolith is described by a two stage exposure model. The history of the four samples was derived in terms of duration and shielding depth of the two stages.

  14. Do Gender and Exposure to Interparental Violence Moderate the Stability of Teen Dating Violence?: Latent Transition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Jeong; Temple, Jeff R.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the development, change, and stability of teen dating violence (TDV) victimization over time. Specifically, we identify distinct subgroups of adolescents based on past-year TDV victimization, whether adolescents change victimization statuses over time (e.g., from psychological victimization to physical victimization), and how exposure to interparental violence and gender influence the prevalence and stability of TDV statuses. Adolescents (N=1, 042) from 7 public high schools in Texas participated in this longitudinal study. The Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory (CADRI) was used to identify victimization statuses. Latent Transition Analysis (LTA) with measurement invariance was used to examine transition probability of an individual's latent status at Wave3 or Wave4 given his or her latent status at Wave2 or Wave3. Gender and exposure to interparental violence was included as moderators in the LTA. Three statuses of TDV victimization were identified: (1) non-victims; (2) emotional/verbal victims; and (3) physical/psychological victims. LTA showed that the majority of adolescents stayed in the same status over time; however, female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to move from a less to more severe status over time compared to non-exposed youth. This is among the first study to identify subgroups of TDV victimization and to examine the stability of group membership over time. Female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to remain in or move into a violent relationship compared to unexposed youth. PMID:26687203

  15. Discordant K-Ar and young exposure dates for the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, P. M.; Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P.; Ming, D.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Rice, Melissa S.

    2016-10-01

    K-Ar and noble gas surface exposure age measurements were carried out on the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley region, Gale Crater, Mars, by using the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument on the Curiosity rover. The sandstone is unusually rich in sanidine, as determined by CheMin X-ray diffraction, contributing to the high K2O concentration of 3.09 ± 0.20 wt % measured by Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer analysis. A sandstone aliquot heated to 915°C yielded a K-Ar age of 627 ± 50 Ma. Reheating this aliquot yielded no additional Ar. A second aliquot heated in the same way yielded a much higher K-Ar age of 1710 ± 110 Ma. These data suggest incomplete Ar extraction from a rock with a K-Ar age older than 1710 Ma. Incomplete extraction at 900°C is not surprising for a rock with a large fraction of K carried by Ar-retentive K-feldspar. Likely, variability in the exact temperature achieved by the sample from run to run, uncertainties in sample mass estimation, and possible mineral fractionation during transport and storage prior to analysis may contribute to these discrepant data. Cosmic ray exposure ages from 3He and 21Ne in the two aliquots are minimum values given the possibility of incomplete extraction. However, the general similarity between the 3He (57 ± 49 and 18 ± 32 Ma, mean 30 Ma) and 21Ne (2 ± 32 and 83 ± 24 Ma, mean 54 Ma) exposure ages provides no evidence for underextraction. The implied erosion rate at the Kimberley location is similar to that reported at the nearby Yellowknife Bay outcrop.

  16. Late Quaternary Glacial Chronology in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica, Investigated Using Cosmogenic Cl-36 Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Potter, R.; Horn, S.; Orvis, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The role of the tropics in past and future climate change has garnered significant attention in recent decades, but debate still exists over climate linkages between the tropics and the middle and high latitudes. Glaciers in tropical mountains are highly sensitive indicators of climate, and glacial landforms left behind by past glacier fluctuations provide key evidence of paleoclimate trends and their forcing mechanisms. We investigated late Quaternary glacial chronology from two glaciated valleys on the Chirripó massif in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. Previous studies in this highland have constrained the most recent deglaciation to 12.4-9.7 ka cal BP based on radiocarbon dates on basal sediments of glacial lakes within the cirque at the head of the Morrenas Valley. However, no studies have been conducted to constrain the ages of the moraines located down valley. We dated the formation ages of these moraines in the Morrenas and Talari valleys using cosmogenic Cl-36 surface exposure dating. Our results indicate a major glacial event ~21-18 ka, broadly synchronous with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Glaciers during this period advanced 3.2-3.4 km down valley on both sides of the Chirripó massif. Our ages also suggest periods of glacial retreat or standstills ~18-10 ka before complete deglaciation of this highland ~10 ka. These results provide insight into the timing and extent of glacial events in this tropical highland that is of critical importance for reconstructing regional and global climate patterns.

  17. Deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica from glacial geomorphology and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. J.; Hein, A. S.; Sugden, D. E.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Shanks, R.; Xu, S.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.

    2017-02-01

    The retreat history of the Antarctic Ice Sheet is important for understanding rapid deglaciation, as well as to constrain numerical ice sheet models and ice loading models required for glacial isostatic adjustment modelling. There is particular debate about the extent of grounded ice in the Weddell Sea embayment at the Last Glacial Maximum, and its subsequent deglacial history. Here we provide a new dataset of geomorphological observations and cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages of erratic samples that constrain the deglacial history of the Pensacola Mountains, adjacent to the present day Foundation Ice Stream and Academy Glacier in the southern Weddell Sea embayment. We show there is evidence of at least two glaciations, the first of which was relatively old and warm-based, and a more recent cold-based glaciation. During the most recent glaciation ice thickened by at least 450 m in the Williams Hills and at least 380 m on Mt Bragg. Progressive thinning from these sites was well underway by 10 ka BP and ice reached present levels by 2.5 ka BP, and is broadly similar to the relatively modest thinning histories in the southern Ellsworth Mountains. The thinning history is consistent with, but does not mandate, a Late Holocene retreat of the grounding line to a smaller-than-present configuration, as has been recently hypothesized based on ice sheet and glacial isostatic modelling. The data also show that clasts with complex exposure histories are pervasive and that clast recycling is highly site-dependent. These new data provide constraints on a reconstruction of the retreat history of the formerly-expanded Foundation Ice Stream, derived using a numerical flowband model.

  18. Importance of Gender and Attitudes about Violence in the Relationship between Exposure to Interparental Violence and the Perpetration of Teen Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Jeff R.; Shorey, Ryan C.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Wolfe, David A.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mounting evidence has demonstrated a link between exposure to family of origin violence and the perpetration of teen dating violence (TDV). However, only recently have mechanisms underlying this relationship been investigated and very few studies have differentiated between exposure to father-to-mother and mother-to-father violence.…

  19. Cosmic ray exposure dating with in situ produced cosmogenic 3He: results from young Hawaiian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurz, M.D.; Colodner, D.; Trull, T.W.; Moore, R.B.; O'Brien, K.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to determine the in situ production rate of spallation-produced cosmogenic 3He, and evaluate its use as a surface exposure chronometer, we have measured cosmogenic helium contents in a suite of Hawaiian radiocarbon-dated lava flows. The lava flows, ranging in age from 600 to 13,000 years, were collected from Hualalai and Mauna Loa volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Because cosmic ray surface-exposure dating requires the complete absence of erosion or soil cover, these lava flows were selected specifically for this purpose. The 3He production rate, measured within olivine phenocrysts, was found to vary significantly, ranging from 47 to 150 atoms g-1 yr-1 (normalized to sea level). Although there is considerable scatter in the data, the samples younger than 10,000 years are well-preserved and exposed, and the production rate variations are therefore not related to erosion or soil cover. Data averaged over the past 2000 years indicate a sea-level 3He production rate of 125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1, which agrees well with previous estimates. The longer record suggests a minimum in sea level normalized 3He production rate between 2000 and 7000 years (55 ?? 15 atoms g-1 yr-1), as compared to samples younger than 2000 years (125 ?? 30 atoms g-1 yr-1), and those between 7000 and 10,000 years (127 ?? 19 atoms g-1 yr-1). The minimum in production rate is similar in age to that which would be produced by variations in geomagnetic field strength, as indicated by archeomagnetic data. However, the production rate variations (a factor of 2.3 ?? 0.8) are poorly determined due to the large uncertainties in the youngest samples and questions of surface preservation for the older samples. Calculations using the atmospheric production model of O'Brien (1979) [35], and the method of Lal and Peters (1967) [11], predict smaller production rate variations for similar variation in dipole moment (a factor of 1.15-1.65). Because the production rate variations, archeomagnetic data

  20. Do Fungi Transport 10Be During Wood Degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conyers, G.; Granger, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Meteoric cosmogenic 10Be is increasingly used to determine erosion and soil transport rates. To calculate these rates, it is assumed that 10Be is a conservative passive tracer of soil particles. However, there is experimental evidence that beryllium is mobilized in natural soils complexed with organic acids. For example, up to 50% of beryllium can be mobilized by humic acids in soils at pH 7 (Takahashi et al., 1999). Beryllium is also known to be taken up in plants such as tobacco and vegetables (World Health Organization, 1990) at ppm levels, primarily as organic acid chelates. It is not known to what extent biological beryllium transport in the environment affects the cosmogenic 10Be budget, or how it influences beryllium mobility. In this study, we address a problem recognized early in the development of meteoric 10Be methods. It has been observed that decayed organic matter in soils and sediments contains very high concentrations of 10Be of up to 109-1010 atoms/g (Lundberg, et al., 1983). On the other hand, living trees contain much lower concentrations of 106 atoms/g (Klein et al., 1982). The driving question for this study is how 10Be becomes bound to decayed organic matter. Direct fallout seems unlikely as the residence time of organic matter in soil is too short. One possibility is that 10Be is transported by fungi. Wood-degrading fungi are known to transport and bioaccumulate metals from large areas, facilitated by acids such as oxalic acid in the fungal hyphae. To test the hypothesis that fungi transport 10Be, we analyzed both intact and fungally degraded wood of oak, hickory, and hemlock. From these data, we reached two conclusions (observations?): 1) Oak has a 10Be concentration of about 2x106 at/g, similar to that observed by Klein et al. (1982). Hickory has a significantly higher concentration of about 3x107 atoms/g, confirming observations that hickory bioaccumulates beryllium. Using these data, the inventory of 10Be in a temperate forest is expected

  1. An inter-comparison of 10Be and 26Al AMS reference standards and the 10Be half-life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Smith, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We have completed a survey and inter-comparison of several 10Be and 26Al standard reference materials (SRMs) that are in routine use at various AMS laboratories to assess their relative values and the accuracy of their quoted nominal ratios. The accelerator measurement cycle, analysis procedure and setup used at the ANTARES AMS facility for this survey are described. We focused on a new set of 10Be and 26Al serial dilutions of standard reference materials (SRMs) prepared by Kuni Nishiizumii at the University of California, Berkeley, and found excellent systematic reproducibility and internal consistency. For other standard materials, minor deviations are evident even when the results have been recalibrated to a common half-life. In particular, we confirm that the NIST 10Be SRM-4325 has a 14% greater 10Be/Be ratio than that certified by NIST when it is calibrated against other SRMs whose ratios have been normalized to a common 1.5 Ma 10Be half-life. In order to investigate this apparent discrepancy, we report on the results of an absolute, normalization independent, measure of the NIST-4325 10Be/Be ratio. Within the constraints of this type of measurement and its systematic errors, we determine an absolute value for the 10Be/Be SRM-4325 ratio in the range 26,050 to 24,800 × 10-15 in support of the certified value of 26,800 × 10-15 given by NIST. We hesitate to directly infer as a consequence that the 10Be half-life is 1.34 Ma because such an inference is contingent on a direct and accurate specific activity in the parent solution, which at present is not available.

  2. Do Gender and Exposure to Interparental Violence Moderate the Stability of Teen Dating Violence?: Latent Transition Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Jeong; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the development, change, and stability of teen dating violence (TDV) victimization over time. Specifically, we identify distinct subgroups of adolescents based on past-year TDV victimization, whether adolescents change victimization statuses over time (e.g., from psychological victimization to physical victimization), and how exposure to interparental violence and gender influence the prevalence and stability of TDV statuses. Adolescents (N=1,042) from 7 public high schools in Texas participated in this longitudinal study. The Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory (CADRI) (Wolfe et al., Psychological Assessment, 13(2), 277-293, 2001) was used to identify victimization statuses. Latent Transition Analysis (LTA) with measurement invariance was used to examine transition probability of an individual's latent status at Wave3 or Wave4 given his or her latent status at Wave2 or Wave3. Gender and exposure to interparental violence was included as moderators in the LTA. Three statuses of TDV victimization were identified: (1) non-victims; (2) emotional/verbal victims; and (3) physical/psychological victims. LTA showed that the majority of adolescents stayed in the same status over time; however, female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to move from a less to more severe status over time compared to non-exposed youth. This is among the first study to identify subgroups of TDV victimization and to examine the stability of group membership over time. Female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to remain in or move into a violent relationship compared to unexposed youth.

  3. /sup 10/Be profiles in lunar surface rock 68815

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiizumi, K.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C.P.; Nagai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yamashita, H.; Reedy, R.C.; Honda, M.; Arnold, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Cosmic ray produced /sup 10/Be (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ years) activities have been measured in fourteen carefully ground samples of lunar surface rock 68815. The /sup 10/Be profiles from 0 to 4 mm are nearly flat for all three surface angles measured and show a very slight increase with depth from the surface to a depth of 1.5 cm. These depth profiles are in contrast to the SCR (solar cosmic ray) produced /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn profiles measured from these same samples. There is no sign of SCR produced /sup 10/Be in this rock. The discrepancy between the data and the Reedy-Arnold theoretical calculation (about 2 dpm /sup 10/Be/kg at the surface) can be explained in two ways: (1) the low energy proton induced cross sections for /sup 10/Be production from oxygen are really lower than those used in the calculations or, (2) compared to the reported fits for /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn, the solar proton spectral shape is actually softer (exponential rigidity parameter Ro less than 100 MV), the omnidirectional flux above 10 MeV is higher (more than 70 protons/cm/sup 2/ s), and the erosion rate is higher (greater than 1.3 mm/My). /sup 10/Be, as a high energy product, is a very useful nuclide for helping to obtain the SCR spectral shape in the past. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Evidence from cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating for the existence of a pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassas, C. D.; Bourlès, D. L.; Braucher, R.; Druitt, T. H.; Nomikou, P.; Léanni, L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating was performed on the caldera cliffs of Santorini with the aim of detecting cliff segments predating the Minoan eruption (17th century BCE). The methodology involved the determination of in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl concentration in basaltic-to-rhyodacitic whole rocks cropping out in the cliffs. After the samples were processed following the chemical protocol of 36Cl preparation for silicate rocks, 36Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Important challenges during the implementation procedure were related to large amounts of radiogenic 36Cl, complex modeling of inherited 36Cl, and dominance of the thermal and epithermal (low-energy) neutron capture production pathway. Nevertheless, quantitative assessments on the basis of the contribution of the low-energy neutron capture pathway percent to the total production rate validated the calculated CRE dates. Current CRE ages demonstrate that an ancient caldera existed on pre-Minoan Santorini, occupying at least the northern half of the modern-day caldera.

  5. Microscopic three-cluster model of 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashko, Yu. A.; Filippov, G. F.; Vasilevsky, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and scattering of alpha-particles on 6He. For this aim we make use of a three-cluster microscopic model. This model incorporates Gaussian and oscillator basis functions and reduces three-cluster Schrödinger equation to a two-body like many-channel problem with the two-cluster subsystem being in a bound or a pseudo-bound state. Much attention is given to the effects of cluster polarization on spectrum of bound and resonance states in 10Be, and on elastic and inelastic 6He + α scattering.

  6. Cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production ratio in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Caffee, Marc W.; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    The assumed value for the cosmogenic 26Al/10Be surface production rate ratio in quartz is an important parameter for studies investigating the burial or subaerial erosion of long-lived surfaces and sediments. Recent models and data suggest that the production ratio is spatially variable and may be greater than originally thought. Here we present measured 26Al/10Be ratios for 24 continuously exposed bedrock and boulder surfaces spanning 61-77°N in Greenland. Empirical measurements, such as ours, include nuclides produced predominately by neutron-induced spallation with percent-level contributions by muon interactions. The slope of a York regression line fit to our data is 7.3 ± 0.3 (1σ), suggesting that the 26Al/10Be surface production ratio exceeds the commonly used value of 6.75, at least in the Arctic. A higher 26Al/10Be production ratio has implications for multinuclide cosmogenic isotope studies because it results in greater modeled burial durations and erosion rates.

  7. Evidence from cosmic-ray exposure dating based on 36Cl for the pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassas, Constantin; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Regis; Druitt, Tim; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Léanni, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Santorini prior to the Minoan (Late Bronze Age) eruption (17th century BCE) is of great archaeological interest, given the importance of Santorini as a commercial centre and port in the Minoan empire. However, the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera has been a point of controversy: Heiken and McCoy (1984) advocated the existence, in the southern part of the present-day caldera, of a pre-existing caldera formed during the 172 ka Lower Pumice eruption, whereas Druitt and Francaviglia (1992), based on the presence of in situ plinian pumice from the Minoan eruption adhering to the modern cliff, conceived the pre-Minoan (22 ka) caldera as having occupied much of the northern basin of the present-day caldera. With the goal of settling the debate we performed cosmic ray exposure dating employing in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl to date different generations of caldera cliffs at Santorini, and hence to identify those cliffs predating the Minoan eruption. Our methodology involved the determination of the in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl in basaltic and andesitic rocks cropping out in the cliffs. The samples returned 36Cl CRE ages consistent with previously published field mapping of cliff populations based on geomorphological and stratigraphic arguments (Druitt and Francaviglia 1992), suggesting that much of the present cliff line of northern Santorini predated the Minoan eruption, or was superficially modified by landslips and rockfalls during that eruption. The 36Cl CRE ages enable us to better define the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera. References [1] Druitt, T. H. and Francaviglia, V.1992. Caldera formation on Santorini and the physiography of the islands in the Late Bronze Age. Bulletin of Volcanology 54, 484-493. [2] Heiken G and McCoy F (1984) Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece. Journal of Geophysical Research: 89 (B10), 8841-8862.

  8. The rock avalanche of the Mt. Peron (Eastern Alps, Italy): new insights from 36Cl exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Silvana; Ivy-ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasili; Vockenhuber, %Christof; Surian, Nicola; Campedel, Paolo; Rigo, Manuel; Viganò, Alfio; De Zorzi, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    In the Late Pleistocene, in the southern side of the Eastern Alps (Veneto region, Italy), when the glacier tongues retreated from the end moraine system areas towards the Dolomitic region, large rock avalanches took place. In the Belluno Valley, occupied by the Piave river, the left side is represented by the Belluno Prealps range, corresponding to the northern flank of a km-scale WSW-ENE oriented alpine syncline formed by rocks from Late Triassic to Late Tertiary in age. The Mt. Peron, belonging to this mountain range, shows its southern lower slope covered by debris cones with scattered boulders and its higher slope, corresponding to the scarp, made of vertical rock strata. At the foot of Mt. Peron, at a distance varying from 500 to 4500 m, there is a 4.5 km2 fan like area delimited by a perimeter of about 15 km. This is a hilly area of poortly sorted, chaotic deposits composed of heterogeneous debris, sandy and silty gravels, angular blocks and very large boulders of carbonatic rocks up to 20 m in diameter. The average thickness of the deposit was estimated to be 80 m, with maximum of 120 m. According to previous works, the main event occurred during the first phases of deglaciation, between 17,000 and 15,000 years BP. Popular stories narrate about two legendary villages destroyed by a mass of stones rolling down in the valley. This is confirmed by archeological findings in the Piave valley which indicate the presence of almost one pre-historic settlement dating 40000-20000 years a B.P., (i.e. before the Last Glacial Maximum).. Recent 36Cl exposure dating have yielded historical ages for both the boulders at the foot of the Mt Peron and those located a few km far from the main scarp. According to these exposure ages we can not exclude the hypothesis that earthquakes related to the Venetian faults could have played a key role for triggering of the rock avalanche and that the main gravitational event took place in historical times rather than during the

  9. A preliminary study on the use of (10)Be in forensic radioecology of nuclear explosion sites.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, N E; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Takatsuji, T; Hoshi, M; Fukutani, S; Ditchburn, R G; Zondervan, A

    2008-02-01

    Cosmogenic (10)Be, known for use in dating studies, unexpectedly is also produced in nuclear explosions with an atom yield almost comparable to (e.g.) (137)Cs. There are major production routes via (13)C(n, alpha)(10)Be, from carbon dioxide in the air and the organic explosives, possibly from other bomb components and to a minor extent from the direct fission reaction. Although the detailed bomb components are speculative, carbon was certainly present in the explosives and an order of magnitude calculation is possible. The (n, alpha) cross-section was determined by irradiating graphite in a nuclear reactor, and the resulting (10)Be estimated by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) giving a cross-section of 34.5+/-0.7mb (6-9.3MeV), within error of previous work. (10)Be should have applications in forensic radioecology. Historical environmental samples from Hiroshima, and Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) showed two to threefold (10)Be excesses compared with the background cosmogenic levels. A sample from Lake Chagan (a Soviet nuclear cratering experiment) contained more (10)Be than previously reported soils. (10)Be may be useful for measuring the fast neutron dose near the Hiroshima bomb hypocenter at neutron energies double those previously available.

  10. Atmospheric deposition of sup 7 Be and sup 10 Be

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L. ); Stensland, G.J. ); Klein, J.; Middleton, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of {sup 10}Be in precipitation taken in Hawaii, Illinois and New Jersey over a period of five years are reported. The problem of contamination by the isotope being resuspended on wind blown soil that is also collected is addressed. Rain collected at Mauna Loa, Hawaii has such low values of dust contamination that it has been taken as clean, and the data from Illinois and New Jersey are evaluated on that assumption. The conclusion is that the deposition in a given amount of rain for the non-resuspended component is the same for all three stations, and the authors propose that the annual rate for mid-latitude locations have moderate rainfall is proportional to the local rainfall. {sup 7}Be, which is probably negligibly contributed to the measurements by soil contamination was measured for individual rains in Illinois and found to have a deposition of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}. The authors have found that concentration variations between precipitation events greater than a factor of 20 exist for both isotopes and that relatively rare, high concentration events dominate deposition, thereby requiring long periods of observation to avoid significant error. Based on their own and other data they conclude that the best value for {sup 10}Be deposition is 1.5 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}, uncertain by 20%, and for {sup 7}Be is 1.2 {times} 10{sup 4} atom/cm{sup 3}, uncertain by 25%. A global average deposition rate cannot be inferred directly for either isotope from these kinds of data; however, the theoretical global deposition rate for {sup 10}Be is shown to be consistent with the deposition reported here, if the concentration in equatorial rain is about 3300 atom/g.

  11. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  12. Meteoric 10Be in Lake Cores as a Measure of Climatic and Erosional Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, R. E.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Utilization of meteoric 10Be as a paleoenvironmental proxy has the potential to offer new insights into paleoprecipitation records and paleoclimate models, as well as to long-term variations in erosion with climate. The delivery of meteoric 10Be to the surface varies with precipitation and its strong adsorption to sediment has already proven useful in studies of erosion. Thus, it is likely meteoric 10Be concentrations in lake sediments vary under both changing climate and changing sediment influx. Assessment of the relative importance of these changes requires the comparison of 10Be concentrations in well-dated lake cores with independent paleoenvironmental proxies, including oxygen isotope, pollen, and charcoal records, as well as variation in geochemical composition of the sediments. Blacktail Pond details 15,000 years of climatic change in the Yellowstone region. We develop a new model framework for predicting meteoric 10Be concentrations with depth in the core, based on sedimentation rates of both lake-derived and terrigenous sediments and changes in the flux of meteoric 10Be with precipitation. Titanium concentrations and previously determined 10Be concentrations in wind-derived loess provide proxies for changing delivery of 10Be to the lake by terrigenous sources. We use existing paleoenvironmental data obtained from this core and the surrounding region to develop models for changing rainfall across the region and predict meteoric 10Be delivery to the lake by precipitation. Based on a suite of ~10 models, sedimentation rate is the primary control of meteoric 10Be in the Blacktail Pond core unless terrestrial input is very high, as it was post-glacial in the early Holocene when the lake experienced a high influx of loess and terrigenous sediments. We used these models to inform sample selection for 10Be analysis along the Blacktail pond core. Core sediments are processed for meteoric 10Be analysis using sequential digestions and standard extraction procedures

  13. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Kodar Mountains, south-central Siberia, constrained by Be-10 exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David

    2014-05-01

    The glacial history of the mountainous Transbaikalia region NE of Lake Baikal, Siberia, has so far received little attention. The Kodar Mountains exceed 3000 m in elevation and small cirque glaciers currently occur in the central parts of the range. Yet, greatly expanded glaciation in the past is evidenced by massive moraine complexes at the mouth of glacial valleys in the Chara Depression (part of the Baikal rift system), and along the Vitim River valley to the NW. The moraines document the existence of large valley glaciers that reached to over 120 kilometres in length. We applied Be-10 exposure dating to determine the timing of glacier advances that formed the major moraines: 19 samples from boulders on 8 moraine ridges in 5 moraine complexes. Our results indicate extensive glaciation in the Kodar Mountains at the time of the Last Glacial Maximum, with our ages spanning from about 20 ka to the Late Glacial. We attribute the age spread on some of the moraines to boulder exhumation linked to permafrost dynamics.

  14. Helium breakup states in 10Be and 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, M.; Angélique, J. C.; Axelsson, L.; Benoit, B.; Bergmann, U.; Catford, W. N.; Chappell, S. P.; Clarke, N. M.; Curtis, N.; D'arrigo, A.; de Góes Brennard, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Fulton, B. R.; Giardina, G.; Gregori, C.; Grévy, S.; Hanappe, F.; Kelly, G.; Labiche, M.; Le Brun, C.; Leenhardt, S.; Lewitowicz, M.; Markenroth, K.; Marqués, F. M.; Murgatroyd, J. T.; Nilsson, T.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N. A.; Piqueras, I.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Singer, S. M.; Sorlin, O.; Stuttgé, L.; Watson, D. L.

    2001-03-01

    The breakup of 10,12Be into He clusters has been studied using the p,12C(12Be,6He,6He) and 12C(12Be,4He,6He) inelastic scattering and two neutron transfer reactions with a 378 MeV 12Be beam incident on 12C and (CH2)n targets. Evidence has been found for three new states in 10Be at excitation energies of 13.2, 14.8, and 16.1 MeV, which may be associated with a 4He+6He cluster structure. The evidence for He cluster states in 12Be in the excitation energy range 12 to 25 MeV is also discussed.

  15. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  16. Exposure to family violence and attachment styles as predictors of dating violence perpetration among men and women: a mediational model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mary; Reese-Weber, Marla; Kahn, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a multiple mediator model explaining how sibling perpetration and one's attachment style mediate the relation between parent-to-child victimization and dating violence perpetration. A sample of undergraduate students (n = 392 women, n = 89 men) completed measures of the aforementioned variables on an Internet survey. For men, path analyses found no mediation; parent-to-child victimization had a direct association with dating violence perpetration, no association was found between sibling perpetration and dating violence perpetration, and attachment anxiety, but not attachment avoidance, was positively associated with dating violence perpetration for men. For women, the hypothesized mediation model was supported; parent-to-child victimization had a direct association with dating violence perpetration, and sibling perpetration and attachment anxiety served as mediating variables. Attachment avoidance was not associated with dating violence perpetration for women. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  17. Exploring ice core drilling chips from a cold Alpine glacier for cosmogenic radionuclide (10Be) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Lars; Merchel, Silke; Bohleber, Pascal; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas

    Ice cores offer unique multi-proxy paleoclimate records, but provide only very limited sample material, which has to be carefully distributed for various proxy analyses. Beryllium-10, for example, is analysed in polar ice cores to investigate past changes of the geomagnetic field, solar activity, and the aerosol cycle, as well as to more accurately date the material. This paper explores the suitability of a drilling by-product, the so-called drilling chips, for 10Be-analysis. An ice core recently drilled at a cold Alpine glacier is used to directly compare 10Be-data from ice core samples with corresponding drilling chips. Both sample types have been spiked with 9Be-carrier and identically treated to chemically isolate beryllium. The resulting BeO has been investigated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 10Be/9Be-ratios to calculate 10Be-concentrations in the ice. As a promising first result, four out of five sample-combinations (ice core and drilling chips) agree within 2-sigma uncertainty range. However, further studies are needed in order to fully demonstrate the potential of drilling chips for 10Be-analysis in alpine and shallow polar ice cores.

  18. Calibration of cosmogenic 3He and 10Be production rates in the High Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Martin, Léo; Lavé, Jérôme; Charreau, Julien; Condom, Thomas; Lupker, Maarten; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier

    2014-05-01

    It is critical to refine both the accuracy and the precision of the in situ cosmogenic dating tool, especially for establishing reliable glacial chronologies that can be compared to other paleoclimatic records. Recent cross-calibrations of cosmogenic 3He in pyroxene and 10Be in quartz [1, 2] showed that, both at low (1300 m) and high elevation (4850 m), the 3He/10Be production ratio was probably ~40% higher than the value of ~23 initially defined in the 90's. This recent update is consistent with the last independent determinations of the sea level high latitude production rates of 10Be and 3He, that are about 4 and 125 at.g-1.yr-1, respectively [e.g. 3, 4]. However, major questions remain about these production rates at high elevation, notably because existing calibration sites for both 3He and 10Be are scarce above 2000 m. It is thus crucial to produce new high precision calibration data at high elevation. Here we report cosmogenic 10Be data from boulders sampled on a glacial fan located at 3800 m in the Central Altiplano (Bolivia), whose age is independently constrained by stratigraphic correlations and radiocarbon dating at ca. 16 ka. These data can be used to calibrate the production rate of 10Be at high elevation, in the Tropics. After scaling to sea level and high latitude, these data yield a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.8 to 4.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the used scaling scheme. These new calibration data are in good agreement with recent absolute and cross-calibration of 3He in pyroxenes and 10Be in quartz, from dacitic moraines located at 4850 m in the Southern Altiplano (22° S, Tropical Andes) [2,5]. The so-obtained 3He/10Be production ratio of 33.3±0.9 (1σ) combined with an absolute 3He production rate locally calibrated in the Central Altiplano, at 3800 m, indeed yielded a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.7±0.2 to 4.1±0.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the scaling scheme [2,5]. These values are also consistent with the 10Be

  19. Constraints on the sedimentation history of San Francisco Bay from 14C and 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanGeen, A.; Valette-Silver, N. J.; Luoma, S.N.; Fuller, C.C.; Baskaran, M.; Tera, F.; Klein, J.

    1999-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization around San Francisco Bay as well as mining and agriculture in the watersheds of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers have profoundly modified sedimentation patterns throughout the estuary. We provide some constraints on the onset of these erosional disturbances with 10Be data for three sediment cores: two from Richardson Bay, a small embayment near the mouth of San Francisco Bay, and one from San Pablo Bay, mid-way between the river delta and the mouth. Comparison of pre-disturbance sediment accumulation determined from three 14C-dated mollusk shells in one Richardson Bay core with more recent conditions determined from the distribution of 210Pb and 234Th [Fuller, C.C., van Geen, A., Baskaran, M, Anima, R.J., 1999. Sediment chronology in San Francisco Bay, California, defined by 210Pb, 234Th, 239,240Pu.] shows that the accumulation rate increased by an order of magnitude at this particular site. All three cores from San Francisco Bay show subsurface maxima in 10Be concentrations ranging in magnitude from 170 to 520 x 106 atoms/g. The transient nature of the increased 10Be input suggests that deforestation and agricultural develop- ment caused basin-wide erosion of surface soils enriched in 10Be. probably before the turn of the century.

  20. Exposure to Spousal Violence in the Family, Attitudes and Dating Violence Perpetration Among High School Students in Port-au-Prince.

    PubMed

    Gage, Anastasia J

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the associations of exposure to spousal violence in the family and personal and peer attitudes with dating violence (DV) perpetration among high school students in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Participants were 342 high school students in Grades 10 to 12 who stated that they had ever been on a date. Multiple linear regression methods were used to examine correlates of the scale of DV perpetration. Findings showed that personal acceptance of DV mediated the association between exposure to wife-perpetrated and husband-perpetrated spousal violence in the family and DV perpetration for girls. Boys who were exposed to husband-perpetrated spousal violence in the family had significantly higher levels of psychological DV perpetration than those who were not. Contrary to expectations, exposure to wife-perpetrated spousal violence in the family was negatively associated with psychological and physical/sexual DV perpetration by boys, after controlling for other factors. Overall, perceived peer tolerance of DV was more strongly associated with DV perpetration than personal tolerance of DV, and was the only significant correlate of psychological DV perpetration for girls. Perceived peer attitudes also moderated the association between boys' exposure to spousal violence in the family and DV perpetration. Implications for future research and policy are discussed.

  1. Low 10Be concentrations in geomorphic studies: Problems, strategies, and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savi, Sara; Tofelde, Stefanie; Wittmann, Hella; Binnie, Steven; Heinze, Stefan; Schildgen, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, the use of in situ cosmogenic nuclides for the quantification of exogenic processes and the determination of exposure ages of landforms has seen a fast and broad expansion. Among the group of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides that can be used to study geomorphic processes (e.g. 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 3He, 21Ne and 22Ne), in situ-produced 10Be is the most widely used, especially for the quantification of denudation rates. However, there are a number of problematic issues related to the use of cosmogenic nuclide techniques in rapidly evolving landscapes because of the typically low 10Be abundancies. The difficulties encountered in these settings are mainly related to (1) the mass of clean quartz that can be obtained and thus the total amount of 10Be available, and (2) the backgrounds of the sample preparation and measurement processes. In order to improve measurements in these circumstances, a series of steps can be taken into consideration during field work and sample preparation to help improve the final results. We discuss the quality of the blanks, blank corrections, and the limits of detection of the technique in the specific case of low concentration samples. Based on a number of different synthetic scenarios, we demonstrate the importance of blank corrections and utility of determination limits, and we highlight how these parameters may affect the reliability and meaningfulness of the results. This information in turn helps to illustrate how low-concentration data should be interpreted and reported.

  2. 68 FR 4132 - Effective Dates of Benefits for Disability or Death Caused by Herbicide Exposure; Disposition of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-01-28

    ... establishing presumptions of service connection for four additional diseases (Hodgkin's disease, February 3... pursuant to liberalizing regulations concerning diseases presumptively associated with herbicide exposure... the notes to that section). That Act established presumptions for chloracne, non-Hodgkins...

  3. 10Be ages of glacial and meltwater features northwest of Lake Superior: a chronology of Laurentide Ice sheet deglaciation and eastward flooding from Glacial Lake Agassiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Fisher, T. G.; Lowell, T.; Barnett, P.; Schaefer, J. M.; Schwartz, R.

    2009-12-01

    Significant controversy exists as to the role of Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater in causing the Younger Dryas cold event. Recently, Lowell et al. (2009) presented a radiocarbon chronology of Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation along a north-south transect located northwest of Lake Superior. These authors concluded that the presence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet precluded an eastward drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz until mid-Younger Dryas time. Here, we use 10Be surface exposure dating to examine the timing of the eastward drainage of Lake Agassiz. We present 10Be ages of moraines and erratic boulders in meltwater pathways along the same transect as Lowell et al. (2009), northwest of Lake Superior. In general, 10Be ages of glacial features are similar to, or slightly older than, basal radiocarbon ages of nearby lakes. Based on the 10Be chronology, deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in this region occurred between ~13,000 and 10,000 yr BP. We also present the first direct ages of flood deposits in bedrock channels presumably associated with the eastern drainage of Lake Agassiz. Evidence for flooding includes extensive channels incised into bedrock and enormous bedforms located north of Lake Superior. 10Be ages of two flood deposits near the Roaring River and Mundell Lake yield mean 10Be ages of ~11,700 and 11,000 yr BP, respectively. These ages indicate that occupation of the channels postdates initiation of the Younger Dryas by more than 1,000 years and are in general agreement with a basal radiocarbon age from nearby Lower Vail Lake (Teller et al., 2005). Preliminary paleohydrological estimates based on bedform clast sizes and channel geometries are velocities and discharges of 2.8-19.8 ms-1 and 4,200-30,000 m3s-1 at the Roaring River location and 2.5-17.5 ms-1 and 49,000-349,000 m3s-1 at the Mundell Lake location.

  4. New Insights into West Antarctic Ice Sheet History Based on Ground Penetrating Radar Linking Stratigraphy With Surface-Exposure Dated Geomorphology in Lower Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, M. L.; Arcone, S.; Ackert, R.

    2002-05-01

    A most extensive record of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) during the last glacial cycle is found in lower Taylor Valley. We gained new insights into the drift stratigraphy using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and surface-exposure dating in selected locations there. Evidence for the following two hypotheses will be presented. The WAIS achieved Last Glacial Maximum size between the LGM and the penultimate glaciation based on the exposure ages of boulders mantling moraines that GPR indicates are stratigraphically older than late Wisconsin drift. The drift record is on Hjorth Hill. Exposure ages range between 29 and 85 kya. The Taylor lobe of the WAIS dammed a valley-wide glacial lake, Glacial Lake Washburn between 21,200 and 8,340 14C yr BP. How and when the Taylor Lobe disintegrated are debated. We collected GPR profiles at both 100 and 400 MHz on transverse ridges that could date the recession of the Taylor Lobe. We calibrated GPR to sediment stratigraphy, primarily using 10 drill holes in eastern Taylor Valley. Ridge GPR consistently shows multiple superposed sediment packets each with internal sub-parallel reflections that resemble the stratification of migrating current ripples. We interpret the reflectors as foreset (megaripple) bedding. We think that the scalloped-shaped surfaces represent erosion indicative of a shift in current regime. Cross profiles show the festoon-shaped packets of cross-bedded units that characterize undulatory to lunate ripples. We interpret the ridges as form-discordant composite mega- and giant-current ripples. The boulders on the ripples are glacial erratics and attest to the close presence of glacial ice. The environment of deposition, ice-contact supraglacial, was characterized by high meltwater outflow from streams running off the glacier. Therefore, ridge chronology directly dates recession of the Taylor Valley lobe to about 17,000 - 13,000 14C yrs BP. Climate warming was involved in ice disintegration.

  5. A varved lake sediment record of the 10Be solar activity proxy for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czymzik, Markus; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Mekhaldi, Florian; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Brauer, Achim

    2016-12-01

    Solar modulated variations in cosmogenic radionuclide production provide both information on past changes in the activity of the Sun and a global synchronization tool. However, to date the use of cosmogenic radionuclides for these applications is almost exclusively based on 10Be records from ice cores and 14C time-series from tree rings, all including archive-specific limitations. We present the first 10Be record from annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for the Lateglacial-Holocene transition from Meerfelder Maar. We quantify environmental influences on the catchment and, consequently, 10Be deposition using a new approach based on regression analyses between our 10Be record and environmental proxy time-series from the same archive. Our analyses suggest that environmental influences contribute to up to 37% of the variability in our 10Be record, but cannot be the main explanation for major 10Be excursions. Corrected for these environmental influences, our 10Be record is interpreted to dominantly reflect changes in solar modulated cosmogenic radionuclide production. The preservation of a solar production signal in 10Be from varved lake sediments highlights the largely unexplored potential of these archives for solar activity reconstruction, as global synchronization tool and, thus, for more robust paleoclimate studies.

  6. Reconstruction of the Earthquake History of Limestone Fault Scarps in Knidos Fault Zone Using in-situ Chlorine-36 Exposure Dating and "R" Programming Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Sefa; Yildirim, Cengiz; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic surface exposure dating is based on the production of rare nuclides in exposed rocks, which interact with cosmic rays. Through modelling of measured 36Cl concentrations, we might obtain information of the history of the earthquake activity. Yet, there are several factors which may impact production of rare nuclides such as geometry of the fault, topography, geographic location of the study area, temporal variations of the Earth's magnetic field, self-cover and denudation rate on the scarp. Recently developed models provides a method to infer timing of earthquakes and slip rates on limited scales by taking into account these parameters. Our study area, the Knidos Fault Zone, is located on the Datça Peninsula in Southwestern Anatolia and contains several normal fault scarps formed within the limestone, which are appropriate to generate cosmogenic chlorine-36 (36Cl) dating models. Since it has a well-preserved scarp, we have focused on the Mezarlık Segment of the fault zone, which has an average length of 300 m and height 12-15 m. 128 continuous samples from top to bottom of the fault scarp were collected to carry out analysis of cosmic 36Cl isotopes concentrations. The main purpose of this study is to analyze factors affecting the production rates and amount of cosmogenic 36Cl nuclides concentration. Concentration of Cl36 isotopes are measured by AMS laboratories. Through the local production rates and concentration of the cosmic isotopes, we can calculate exposure ages of the samples. Recent research elucidated each step of the application of this method by the Matlab programming language (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al., 2010). It is vitally helpful to generate models of Quaternary activity of the normal faults. We, however, wanted to build a user-friendly program through an open source programing language "R" (GNU Project) that might be able to help those without knowledge of complex math programming, making calculations as easy and understandable as

  7. Erratic boulder trains and cosmogenic exposure dating of former glacial limits: A case-study from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher; Stokes, Chris; Bentley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Erratic Boulder Trains (EBTs) are a spectacular yet poorly-understood glacial geomorphological feature. These linear clusters of glacial erratic boulders help to illustrate the flow-lines of former glaciers by pin-pointing the parent rock from which they have originated and are often used as targets for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Consequently, there is a need to understand their geomorphological significance to improve ice-sheet reconstructions and provide important contextual information for dating studies. The EBTs in Tierra del Fuego are some of the finest examples of this feature in the world, and this paper presents the first comprehensive mapping and physical assessment of four boulder trains. Unlike most other examples, they were deposited laterally rather than medially and are tightly clustered, presenting linear features only a few kilometres long that contain hundreds to thousands of huge boulders (often >8 m in diameter). The size and angularity of the boulders strongly supports the hypothesis that they were deposited as a supraglacial rock avalanche. The boulders have been the subject of previous cosmogenic dating, which have yielded anomalously young ages from deposits thought to be hundreds of thousands of years old. Analysis of weathering proxies shows little difference between boulder trains thought to be of radically different ages, with important implications for the timing of glaciations and potentially contradicting previous age constraints on glacial limits in the region.

  8. Cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements. Implications for landscape evolution in deserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Poths, J.; Olinger, C.T.

    1995-07-01

    The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor mantling landforms in arid regions of the world, has been previously attributed to erosion by wind and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated at the land surface in a time-transgressive manner. A newly proposed model for pavement evolution differs from these models in that pavement clasts are continuously maintained at the land surface in response to deposition and pedogenic modification of windblown dust. In-situ cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure ages on volcanic and alluvial landforms in the Mojave Desert of California are used to understand pavement evolution over geologic time scales and to test this new model. These exposure ages are stratigraphically consistent, show internal consistency at each site, and, for stone pavements adjacent to pristine, continuously exposed volcanic bedrock, are indistinguishable at the 1{sigma} level. We conclude that stone pavements are born at the surface and that pavements may provide one of the longest-term records of geologic, hydrologic, and climatic processes operating on desert surfaces. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Early to Late Pleistocene history of debris-flow fan evolution in western Death Valley (California) using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dühnforth, Miriam; Densmore, Alexander L.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Allen, Philip; Kubik, Peter W.

    2017-03-01

    Debris-flow fans with depositional records over several 105 years may be useful archives for the understanding of fan construction by debris flows and post-depositional surface modification over long timescales. Reading these archives, however, requires that we establish the temporal and spatial pattern of debris-flow activity over time. We used a combination of geomorphic mapping of fan surface characteristics, digital topographic analysis, and cosmogenic radionuclide dating using 10Be and 26Al to study the evolution of the Warm Springs fan on the west side of southern Death Valley, California. The 10Be concentrations yield dates that vary from 989 ± 43 to 595 ± 17 ka on the proximal fan and between 369 ± 13 and 125 ± 5 ka on distal fan surfaces. The interpretation of these results as true depositional ages though is complicated by high inheritance with a minimum of 65 ka measured at the catchment outlet and of at least 125 ka at the distal fan. Results from the 26Al measurements suggest that most sample locations on the fan surfaces underwent simple exposure and were not affected by complex histories of burial and re-exposure. This implies that Warm Springs fan is a relatively stable landform that underwent several 105 years of fan aggradation before fan head incision caused abandonment of the proximal and central fan surfaces and deposition continued on a younger unit at the distal fan. We show that the primary depositional debris-flow morphology is eliminated over a time scale of less than 105 years, which prevents the delineation of individual debris flows as well as the precise reconstruction of lateral shifts in deposition as we find it on younger debris-flow fans. Secondary post-depositional processes control subsequent evolution of surface morphology with the dissection of planar surfaces while smoothing of convex-up interfluves between incised channels continues through time.

  10. Cosmogenic 10Be Chronologies of Moraines and Glacially Scoured Bedrock in the Teton Range, with Implications for Paleoclimatic Events and Tectonic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Pierce, K. L.; Thackray, G. D.; Finkel, R. C.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.

    2015-12-01

    At its Pleistocene maximum, the greater Yellowstone glacial system consisted of an ice cap on the Yellowstone Plateau joined by glaciers from adjacent high mountains, including the Teton Range. In prior research, we obtained 112 exposure ages from moraines and bedrock in this region. These chronologies identified asynchronous outlet glacier culminations around the periphery of the Yellowstone glacier complex, supporting a model of spatial and temporal progressions in buildup and decay of the various ice source regions. Here we build on this previous work and present >30 recently developed 10Be exposure ages on glacial features in the Teton Range. Although the Tetons harbored a relatively small portion of the greater Yellowstone ice complex, glaciers in this range left behind some of the region's best-preserved moraine sequences and scoured bedrock. Ongoing investigations are focused on developing moraine chronologies in several drainages on the eastern and western Teton Range fronts, and obtaining exposure ages along scoured bedrock transects in glacial troughs upvalley from the dated moraines to define rates of ice recession. Notably, our dating campaign includes lateral moraines that are offset by the Teton fault, providing a rare opportunity to establish direct constraints on integrated long-term slip rates. All new and previously obtained 10Be ages are calculated using recently published calibrations and scaling of 10Be production rates. Initial results show that massive lateral moraines in selected drainages are several thousands of years older than adjacent distal end moraines, implying that the laterals were constructed during an earlier phase of the last glaciation and then acted to topographically confine subsequent ice advances. Mean ages of ca. 17-16 ka from terminal moraine loops along with limiting ages from scoured bedrock upvalley of the moraines indicate glacier culminations followed by the onset of rapid ice retreat long after the end of the global

  11. Beryllium geochemistry in soils: Evaluation of 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals as a basis for age models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barg, E.; Lal, D.; Pavich, M.J.; Caffee, M.W.; Southon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Soils contain a diverse and complex set of chemicals and minerals. Being an 'open system', both in the chemical and nuclear sense, soils have defied quantitative nuclear dating. However, based on the published studies of the cosmogenic atmospheric 10Be in soils, its relatively long half-life (1.5 Ma), and the fact that 10Be gets quickly incorporated in most soil minerals, this radionuclide appears to be potentially the most useful for soil dating. We therefore studied the natural variations in the specific activities of 10Be with respect to the isotope 9Be in mineral phases in eight profiles of diverse soils from temperate to tropical climatic regimes and evaluated the implications of the data for determining the time of formation of soil minerals, following an earlier suggestion [Lal et al., 1991. Development of cosmogenic nuclear methods for the study of soil erosion and formation rates. Current Sci. 61, 636-639.]. We find that the 10Be/9Be ratios in both bulk soils and in the authigenic mineral phases are confined within a narrower range than in 10Be concentrations. Also, the highest 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals are observed at the soil-rock interface as predicted by the model. We present model 10Be/9Be ages of the B-horizon and the corresponding soil formation rates for several soil profiles. The present study demonstrates that the 10Be/9Be ratios in the authigenic phases, e.g. clay and Fe-hydroxides, can indeed be used for obtaining useful model ages for soils younger than 10-15 Ma. However, the present work has to be pushed considerably further, to take into account more realistic age models in which, for instance, downward transport of 10Be and clays, and in-situ dissolution of clay minerals at depths, altering the 10Be/9Be ratios of the acidic solutions, are included. We show that in the case of younger soils (< 1 Ma) studied here, their 10Be inventories and 10Be/9Be ratios have been significantly disturbed possibly by mixing with transported

  12. Amplitude and timing of the Laschamp geomagnetic dipole low from the global atmospheric 10Be overproduction: Contribution of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios in west equatorial Pacific sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MéNabréAz, L.; BourlèS, D. L.; Thouveny, N.

    2012-11-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios were measured along a sediment core collected in the west equatorial Pacific in order to reconstruct cosmogenic 10Be production variations near the equator, where the geomagnetic modulation is maximum. From 60 to 20 ka, the single significant 10Be production impulse recorded at 41 ka results from the geomagnetic dipole low that triggered the Laschamp excursion. No significant 10Be overproduction signature is recorded at the age of the Mono Lake excursion (˜34 ka). A compilation of authigenic 10Be/9Be records obtained from sediments was averaged over a 1 kyr window and compared with the 1 kyr averaged 10Be flux record of Greenland ice cores. Their remarkable similarity demonstrates that 10Be production is globally modulated by geomagnetic dipole variations and redistributed by atmosphere dynamics. After calibration using absolute values of the virtual dipole moment drawn from paleomagnetic database, the authigenic 10Be/9Be stack allows reconstructing the geomagnetic dipole moment variations over the 20-50 ka time interval. Between 48 and 41 ka, the dipole moment collapsed at a rate of -1.5 × 1022 A m2 kyr-1, which will be an interesting criterion for the assessment of the loss rate of the historical field and the comparison of dipole moment loss prior to excursions and reversals. After a 2 kyr duration of the minimum dipole moment (˜1 × 1022 A m2), a slow increase started at 39 ka, progressively reaching 5 × 1022 A m2 at 20 ka. The absence of a significant dipole moment drop at 34 ka, the age of the Mono lake excursion, suggests that the duration and amplitude of the dipole weakening cannot be compared with that of the Laschamp. This study provides a reliable basis to model the production of radiocarbon and in situ cosmogenic nuclides and to improve the calibration of these dating methods.

  13. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of

  14. In situ produced 10Be depth profiles and luminescence data tracing climatic and tectonic control on terrace formation, Danube River, Central Europe, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Braucher, Régis; Novothny, Ágnes; Csillag, Gábor; Fodor, László; Molnár, Gábor; Madarász, Balázs; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    The terrace sequence of the Hungarian part of the Danube valley preserves a record of varying tectonic uplift rates along the river course and throughout several climate stages. To establish the chronology of formation of these terraces, two different dating methods on alluvial terraces were used: 1) in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be, which yield the time of abandonment of the terrace and 2) luminescence dating, which provides burial ages of the sediment. In situ produced cosmogenic 10Be samples originated from vertical depth profiles to enable the determination of both the exposure time and the denudation rate at each locality. We used Monte Carlo approach to model the denudation rate-corrected exposure ages. Post-IR IRSL measurements were carried out on K-feldspar samples to obtain the ages of sedimentation. The highest and oldest terrace remnants (tIV-VI) yield a minimum 10Be exposure age of 800 ka close to MIS 22, the onset of major continental glaciations of Quaternary age, suggesting climatic signal of the abandonment of the uppermost terrace levels. For the lower terraces it was possible to reveal close correlation with MIS stages using IRSL ages. The new chronology enables the distinction of tIIb (60-110 ka; MIS 4-5d) and tIIIa (130-190 ka; MIS 6) in the study area. Surface denudation rates were well constrained by the cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles between 5.9 m/Ma and 10.0 m/Ma for all terraces. Maximum incision rates of the Danube were calculated for middle and late Pleistocene times. These rates were increasing from west to east, toward the more elevated Transdanubian Range from 0.05 mm/a to 0.12 mm/a. Incision rates derived from the age of the low terraces (0.13 mm/a) may suggest a slight acceleration of uplift towards present. Our research was supported by the OTKA PD83610, PD100315, NK60455, K062478, K83150 and F042799, the French-Hungarian Balaton-Tét Project (FR-32/2007; TÉT_11-2-2012-0005), the Bolyai János Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy

  15. Rapid thinning of the Welsh Ice Cap at 20-19 ka based on 10Be ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Philip D.; Glasser, Neil F.; Fink, David

    2016-01-01

    New 10Be ages from the summits of three mountain areas of North Wales reveal a very similar exposure timing as the Welsh Ice Cap thinned after the global Last Glacial Maximum. Eight bedrock and one boulder sample gave a combined arithmetic mean exposure age of 19.08 ± 0.80 ka (4.2%, 1σ). Similar exposure ages over a 320 m vertical range (824 to 581 m altitude) show that ice cap thinning was very rapid and spatially uniform. Using the same production rate and scaling scheme, we recalculated six published 10Be exposure ages from the nearby Arans, which also covered a similar elevation range from 608 to 901 m and obtained an arithmetic mean of 19.41 ± 1.45 ka (7.5%, 1σ). The average exposure age of all 15 accepted deglaciation ages is 19.21 ± 1.07 (5.6%, 1σ). The complete dataset from North Wales provides very strong evidence indicating that these summits became exposed as nunataks at 20-19 ka. This result provides important insight to the magnitude of ice surface lowering and behavior of the Welsh Ice Cap during the last deglaciation that can be compared to other ice masses that made up the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  16. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  17. Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) of Lateglacial rock glacier systems near the eastern margin of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rock glaciers are widespread permafrost landforms in Austria. Various rock glacier inventories list more than 4500 rock glaciers in the country; some 30-40% of them are intact. Relict (permafrost free) and pseudo-relict rock glaciers (sporadic and isolated permafrost particularly near the root zone) prevail in number. Rock glaciers are commonly formed over a period of several ka. Dating such landforms helps to understand palaeoclimatic conditions. In this study three rock glaciers consisting of gneiss were dated applying the Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) method. The rock glaciers are located at three neighbouring cirques in the Seckauer Tauern Range named Reichart Rock Glacier (RRG, area 1.26 km², length 1800 m, elevation range 1520-1940 m a.s.l.), Schöneben Rock Glacier (SRG, 0.11 km², 750 m, 1715-1905 m a.s.l.), and Dürrtal Rock Glacier (DRG, 0.08 km², 850 m, 1750-1980 m a.s.l.). RRG is one of the largest rock glaciers in Austria. All three landforms are influenced by lenses of permafrost at present (as indicated by ERT). During the LGM the Seckauer Tauern were covered by valley glaciers and deglaciation occurred presumably already early in the Alpine Lateglacial period. An analogue N-type Schmidt-hammer (proceq) was used for measuring the surface strength of stable blocks at the rock glacier surface by recording a rebound value (R-value) of a spring-loaded bolt. The R-value gives a relative measure of the surface hardness and hence time since exposure to weathering. Eight (RRG) or six (SRG, DRG) Schmidt-hammer measurement sites (with 50-100 individual readings) aligned along longitudinal transects (=former central flow line) between a talus slope (with relatively fresh boulders) in the root zone and the frontal ridge were measured. Mean R-value differences of 30.5 at RRG, 25.1 at SRG, and 20.7 at DRG were revealed along the three transects. The differences between the lowest and the highest R-value at the rock glaciers itself were 19.0 at RRG, 15

  18. 10Be in late deglacial climate simulated by ECHAM5-HAM - Part 2: Isolating the solar signal from 10Be deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, U.; Shi, X.; Phipps, S. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of deglacial climate on the deposition of the solar proxy 10Be globally, and at two specific locations, the GRIP site at Summit, Central Greenland, and the Law Dome site in coastal Antarctica. The deglacial climate is represented by three 30 year time slice simulations of 10 000 BP (years before present = 1950 CE), 11 000 and 12 000 BP, compared with a preindustrial control simulation. The model used is the ECHAM5-HAM atmospheric aerosol-climate model, driven with sea-surface temperatures and sea ice cover simulated using the CSIRO Mk3L coupled climate system model. The focus is on isolating the 10Be production signal, driven by solar variability, from the weather- or climate-driven noise in the 10Be deposition flux during different stages of climate. The production signal varies at lower frequencies, dominated by the 11 year solar cycle within the 30 year timescale of these experiments. The climatic noise is of higher frequencies than 11 years during the 30 year period studied. We first apply empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to global 10Be deposition on the annual scale and find that the first principal component, consisting of the spatial pattern of mean 10Be deposition and the temporally varying solar signal, explains 64% of the variability. The following principal components are closely related to those of precipitation. Then, we apply ensemble empirical decomposition (EEMD) analysis to the time series of 10Be deposition at GRIP and at Law Dome, which is an effective method for adaptively decomposing the time series into different frequency components. The low-frequency components and the long-term trend represent production and have reduced noise compared to the entire frequency spectrum of the deposition. The high-frequency components represent climate-driven noise related to the seasonal cycle of e.g. precipitation and are closely connected to high frequencies of precipitation. These results firstly show that

  19. 10Be in late deglacial climate simulated by ECHAM5-HAM - Part 2: Isolating the solar signal from 10Be deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, U.; Shi, X.; Phipps, S. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of deglacial climate on the deposition of the solar proxy 10Be globally, and at two specific locations, the GRIP site at Summit, Central Greenland, and the Law Dome site in coastal Antarctica. The deglacial climate is represented by three 30 yr time slice simulations of 10 000 BP (years before present = 1950 CE), 11 000 BP and 12 000 BP, compared with a preindustrial control simulation. The model used is the ECHAM5-HAM atmospheric aerosol-climate model, driven with sea surface temperatures and sea ice cover simulated using the CSIRO Mk3L coupled climate system model. The focus is on isolating the 10Be production signal, driven by solar variability, from the weather or climate driven noise in the 10Be deposition flux during different stages of climate. The production signal varies on lower frequencies, dominated by the 11yr solar cycle within the 30 yr time scale of these experiments. The climatic noise is of higher frequencies. We first apply empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis to global 10Be deposition on the annual scale and find that the first principal component, consisting of the spatial pattern of mean 10Be deposition and the temporally varying solar signal, explains 64% of the variability. The following principal components are closely related to those of precipitation. Then, we apply ensemble empirical decomposition (EEMD) analysis on the time series of 10Be deposition at GRIP and at Law Dome, which is an effective method for adaptively decomposing the time series into different frequency components. The low frequency components and the long term trend represent production and have reduced noise compared to the entire frequency spectrum of the deposition. The high frequency components represent climate driven noise related to the seasonal cycle of e.g. precipitation and are closely connected to high frequencies of precipitation. These results firstly show that the 10Be atmospheric production signal is preserved

  20. Toward a Master Chronology for Western Greenland's Fjord Stade Moraines: New 10Be Ages from the Søndre Isortoq Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnek, A.; Briner, J. P.; Schweinsberg, A.; Lifton, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) margin fluctuations during the Holocene place empirical constraints on the extent of the GrIS that can be used as benchmark data for ice-sheet climate models. Here, we reconstruct the early Holocene ice margin history of the Søndre Isortoq region of western Greenland to evaluate the response of the GrIS to Holocene climate change. The moraines in this region are part of an extensive moraine system known as the Fjord Stade moraines, which have been nearly continuously traced throughout western Greenland. These moraines have been directly dated to 9.2 and 8.2 ka in the Disko Bugt region, suggesting that they represent a readvance or stillstand of the GrIS in response to the 9.3 and 8.2 ka abrupt cooling events, respectively. However, because the Fjord Stade moraines have not been directly and precisely dated elsewhere, it is unclear whether the entire western GrIS margin responded to these events or not. To address this issue, we selected boulders from two sites in the Søndre Isortoq region for cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating. In Nunatarssuaq, we sampled eight erratic boulders perched on bedrock beyond and inside of the Fjord Stade moraines. Samples from Qátqatsiaq include nine Fjord Stade moraine boulders and seven erratic boulders that bracket the moraines. We found that the Fjord Stade moraines in the Søndre Isortoq region were abandoned at ~9 ka and that they may be correlated with the outer Fjord Stade moraines in Disko Bugt. If the western GrIS margin did respond to the 9.3 ka cooling event, the later age of ~9 ka at Søndre Isortoq could suggest that land-terminating sectors of the GrIS are less sensitive to centennial-scale climate change than their marine-terminating counterparts. In addition, exposure ages for moraine boulders and boulders inside the moraines are indistinguishable within dating uncertainties, indicating that once initiated, retreat from the Fjord Stade moraines occurred rapidly.

  1. Potential improvement of Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) of moraines in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, by application of the new electronic Schmidt-hammer (SilverSchmidt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan; Corbett, David

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Alps of New Zealand are among the few key study sites for investigating Holocene glacier chronologies in the mid-latitudinal Southern Hemisphere. Their characteristic highly dynamic geomorphological process systems prove, however, to be a considerable challenge for all attempts to date and palaeoclimatologically interpret the existing Holocene moraines record. As a multi-proxy approach combining 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) with Schmidt-hammer testing, the recently developed Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) has already shown its potential in this study area (cf. Winkler 2005, 2009, 2013). An electronic Schmidt-hammer (named SilverSchmidt) was introduced by the manufacturer of the original mechanical Schmidt-hammer (Proceq SA) a few years ago. It offers, in particular, facilities for much easier data processing and constitutes a major improvement and potential replacement for the mechanical Schmidt-hammer. However, its different approach to the measurement of surface hardness - based on Q-(velocity) values instead of R-(rebound) values - is a potential drawback. This difference effectively means that measurements from the two instruments are not easily interconvertible and, hence, that the instruments cannot be used interchangeably without previous comparative tests of both instruments under field conditions. Both instruments used in this comparative study were N-type models with identical impact energy of 2.207 Nm for the plunger. To compare both instruments and explore interconvertibility, parallel measurements were performed on a selected number of boulders (10 boulders per site with 5 impacts each, at least 2 sites per moraine) on moraines of homogeneous lithology but different established ages covering the entire Holocene and the Late Glacial. All moraines are located east of the Main Divide of the Southern Alps at Mueller Glacier, Tasman Glacier, and in the outer Tasman River Valley. All paired samples (n = 50) were

  2. Chronology of glaciations in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Iberia) during the Last Glacial Cycle based on in situ-produced 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Bourlès, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula preserve a valuable record of past glaciations that may help reconstruct past atmospheric circulation patterns in response to cooling events in the North Atlantic Ocean. Available chronologies for the glacial record of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are mainly based on radiocarbon and luminescence dating of glacial-related sediments, suggest that glaciers recorded their Glacial Maximum (GM) during MIS 3 and experienced a later Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) advance. This LGM extent is not established yet, preventing a fair correlation with available Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) based chronologies for the glacial record of the Pyrenees and the Sistema Central. We present a glacial reconstruction and a 10Be CRE chronology for the Porma valley, in the southern slope of the central Cantabrian Mountains. Glacial evidence at the lowest altitudes correspond to erratic boulders and composite moraines whose minimum 10Be CRE age of 113.9 ± 7.1 ka suggests that glaciers were at their maximum extent during MIS 5d, most likely in response to the minima in summertime insolation of the Last Glacial Cycle. Recessional moraines preserved within the glacial maximum limits allow the assessment of subsequent glacier advances or stagnations. The most remarkable advance took place prior to 55.7 ± 4.0 ka (probably at the end of MIS 4), consistently with minimum radiocarbon ages previously reported for lacustrine glacial-related deposits in the Cantabrian Mountains. A limited number of 10Be CRE ages from a composite moraine suggest a possible advance of the Porma glacier coeval with the global LGM; the glacier front attributed to the LGM would be placed within the margins of the previous GM like in the western Pyrenees. Erratic boulders perched on an ice-moulded bedrock surface provided a mean 10Be CRE age of 17.7 ± 1.0 ka, suggesting that part of the recessional moraine sequence corresponds to minor advances or stagnations of the glacier fronts

  3. Magmatic He-3 in Ferrar Dolerite: Implications for Cosmogenic He-3 Surface Exposure Dating in the Dry Valleys of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Landis, G. P.; Marchant, D. R.; Lewis, A. R.; Mills-Herring, L. M.; Margerison, H. R.

    2001-12-01

    Sills of Jurassic Ferrar Dolerite are common in the Transantarctic Mountains. Cosmogenic He-3 surface exposure dating of glacial deposits using Ferrar clinopyroxene has become an important tool in Antarctic paleoclimatology. Here we report preliminary evidence for magmatic helium in Ferrar clinopyroxene from the Mullins Valley rock glacier, Quartermain Mountains, East Antarctica (S. 77.88\\deg, E. 160.58\\deg). Magmatic helium has not previously been recognized in Ferrar clinopyroxene, and all He-3 released by sample fusion has been ascribed to cosmogenic production. However, our evidence indicates that a correction for non-cosmogenic He-3 is needed for at least some samples. The Mullins Valley rock glacier is fed by a small, cold-based alpine glacier. Rockfall onto the alpine glacier becomes concentrated by sublimation, creating a dolerite-rich debris cap. Glacial ice, which may contain ancient atmospheric records, is preserved beneath the debris. We sampled 13 surface dolerite boulders from the head to the terminus of the rock glacier. Magmatic helium was identified by crushing clinopyroxene grains under vacuum 3 samples, yielding gas from broken inclusions with He-3/He-4 ratios of 0.11 to 0.45 R/Ra. Fusion ratios for these samples are 0.24 to 1.77 R/Ra. The magmatic component was also quantified by replicate fusion analyses of aliquots from the same mineral separates. These yielded He-3 and He-4 concentrations that plot along linear mixing lines. Since cosmogenic He-3 is the same in these replicates, this behavior must be due to trapped contributions. Thus, He-3 concentrations seem controlled by both cosmogenic production and irregularly distributed gas-rich inclusions. Radiogenic He-4 is also present. Magmatic and radiogenic He creates large He-3 exposure age errors in some samples. For example, two samples near the head of the glacier had apparent ages of 280 ka and 400 ka. After correction, these exposure ages were reduced to about 9 ka and 20 ka. Corrected

  4. Exposure dating and glacial reconstruction at Mt. Field, Tasmania, Australia, identifies MIS 3 and MIS 2 glacial advances and climatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, A. N.; Barrows, T. T.; Colhoun, E. A.; Fifield, L. K.

    2006-05-01

    Tasmania is important for understanding Quaternary climatic change because it is one of only three areas that experienced extensive mid-latitude Southern Hemisphere glaciation and it lies in a dominantly oceanic environment at a great distance from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet feedbacks. We applied exposure dating using 36Cl to an extensive sequence of moraines from the last glacial at Mt. Field, Tasmania. Glaciers advanced at 41-44 ka during Marine oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 and at 18 ka during MIS 2. Both advances occurred in response to an ELA lowering greater than 1100 m below the present-day mean summer freezing level, and a possible temperature reduction of 7-8°C. Deglaciation was rapid and complete by ca. 16 ka. The overall story emerging from studies of former Tasmanian glaciers is that the MIS 2 glaciation was of limited extent and that some glaciers were more extensive during earlier parts of the last glacial cycle. Copyright

  5. Age assessment and implications of late Quaternary periglacial and paraglacial landforms on Muckish Mountain, northwest Ireland, based on Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Peter; Matthews, John A.

    2016-10-01

    Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) was applied to a variety of late Quaternary periglacial and paraglacial landforms composed of coarse rock debris on Muckish Mountain, northwest Ireland. Landform ages were determined using a linear high-precision age-calibration curve, derived from young and old control surfaces of known age on the same rock type. The SHD ages represent maximum estimates of the time elapsed since the boulders stabilised and the landforms became inactive. Most ages are also minimum estimates for the start of landform development because older boulders are buried beneath the sampled surface boulders. Ages and 95% confidence intervals obtained for blockfield, boulder lobes and talus indicate these features were likely active during several of the early Holocene cold events evidenced in Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic sediment records. Activity ceased at different times ~ 9-7 ka BP. These landforms are the first indication of a geomorphological response to early Holocene cooling in the oceanic mountains of Ireland. Late Holocene ages, obtained for rock-slope failure run-out debris and debris cone boulders, overlap with shifts to cooler and/or wetter conditions, including the Little Ice Age. Geomorphological impacts associated with these changes in climate have not previously been recorded in the Irish uplands. The SHD results indicate that previously implied timings for the stabilisation of some accumulations of coarse rock debris on mountain slopes are in need of revision.

  6. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR {sup 10}Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W. E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed

    2010-12-10

    We propose a model for the incorporation of {sup 10}Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, {sup 10}Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This {sup 10}Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting {sup 10}Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of {sup 10}Be at the surface of the Sun is {approx}0.1 {sup 10}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Scaling up the contemporary {sup 10}Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10{sup 5} would increase the production rate to 10{sup 410}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model {sup 10}Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted {sup 10}Be would have been of the order of 10{sup 1210}Be g{sup -1} in CAIs, consistent with initial{sup 10}Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  7. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signature of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary in the Montalbano Jonico marine succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Bourlès, Didier L.; Bassinot, Franck; Nomade, Sébastien; Marino, Maria; Ciaranfi, Neri; Girone, Angela; Maiorano, Patrizia; Thouveny, Nicolas; Choy, Sandrine; Dewilde, Fabien; Scao, Vincent; Isguder, Gulay; Blamart, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) lows associated with polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions induce significant modulation of the cosmogenic nuclide Beryllium-10 (10Be) production. Hence, the reconstruction of atmospheric 10Be production rates from natural archives such as marine sedimentary sequences or ice cores constitutes a complementary approach, independent from paleomagnetic measurements, to decipher past GDM fluctuations. This is particularly important in the Montalbano Jonico succession (South Italy) since it is candidate to host the Global Stratotype Section and Point of the Middle Pleistocene Stage but where the magnetostratigraphic positioning of the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary (MBB) has not been available up to now. This study presents (1) original authigenic 10Be cosmogenic nuclide and 9Be stable isotope results, and (2) new high-resolution benthic oxygen isotope record covering termination IX and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 19. A robust chronological framework is established on the basis of (i) our oxygen isotope stratigraphy, using the strong analogies between MIS 1 and MIS 19c in terms of orbital forcing and CO2 level, and (ii) one precise 40Ar/39Ar date obtained in the tephra layer V4. The authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio record marks the atmospheric 10Be overproduction linked to the dipole low accompanying the MBB transition, with a characteristic twofold increase of the 10Be production at the end of MIS 19c and early MIS 19b. This signature is similar to those described in both marine and ice core records. The detailed chronostratigraphy constrained by a radiometrically-dated tephra layer (773.9 ± 1.3 ka) within the MBB interval, makes it possible to discuss the structure and to assess the timing of the 10Be-production changes, and thus the MBB geomagnetic variations, with an unprecedented accuracy for a marine archive (sedimentation rates ∼80 cm/ka). These new cosmogenic nuclide production signatures provide the only missing constraint required

  8. Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  9. Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  10. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  11. AMS measurement of 10Be concentrations in marine sediments from Chile Trench at the TANDAR laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Arazi, A.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Martí, G. V.; Negri, A. E.; Abriola, D.; Capurro, O. A.; Cardona, M. A.; de Barbará, E.; Gollan, F.; Hojman, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Samsolo, N.; Togneri, M.; Villanueva, D.

    2017-03-01

    The 10Be/9Be ratios in marine sediments samples from the Southern Chile Trench have been measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The samples were measured at the TANDAR accelerator, where the discrimination of the 10Be radionuclides was achieved by means of a passive absorber in front of an ionization chamber. This setup along with the high voltage available, provided a complete suppression of the 10B isobar interference. The obtained values for the 10Be concentrations, of the order of 109 atoms/g, are the first 10Be measurements from the Southern Chile Trench and offer an excellent tracer to quantitatively study the recycling of sediments in Andean magmas.

  12. Deriving earthquake history of the Knidos Fault Zone, SW Turkey, using cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of the fault scarp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Cengiz; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa; Sahin, Sefa; Benedetti, Lucilla; Tesson, Jim; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    Formation of bedrock fault scarps in extensional provinces is a result of large and successive earthquakes that ruptured the surface several times. Extraction of seismic history of such faults is critical to understand the recurrence intervals and the magnitude of paleo-earthquakes and to better constrain the regional seismic hazard. Knidos on the Datca Peninsula (SW Turkey) is one of the largest cities of the antique times and sits on a terraced hill slope formed by en-echelon W-SW oriented normal faults. The Datça Peninsula constitutes the southern boundary of the Gulf of Gökova, one of the largest grabens developed on the southernmost part of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province. Our investigation relies on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of limestone faults scarps. This method is a powerful tool to reconstruct the seismic history of normal faults (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al 2010, Benedetti et al. 2013). We focus on one of the most prominent fault scarp (hereinafter Mezarlık Fault) of the Knidos fault zone cutting through the antique Knidos city. We collected 128 pieces of tablet size (10x20cm) 3-cm thick samples along the fault dip and opened 4 conventional paleoseismic trenches at the base of the fault scarp. Our 36Cl concentration profile indicates that 3 to 4 seismic events ruptured the Mezarlık Fault since Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results from the paleoseismic trenching are also compatible with 36Cl results, indicating 3 or 4 seismic events that disturbed the colluvium deposited at the base of the scarp. Here we will present implications for the seismic history and the derived slip-rate of the Mezarlık Fault based on those results. This project is supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Grant number: 113Y436) and it was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No. 2013/5387 on the date 30.09.2013 and was done with the permission of Knidos Presidency of excavation in

  13. Large Earthquake Repeat on Normal Faults: Insights from dense in-situ 36Cl Exposure Dating of Limestone Fault Scarps, Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagenhauf, A.; Benedetti, L.; Manighetti, I.

    2007-12-01

    The only chance to learn how major earthquakes have repeated in the past on major active faults is to analyze their surface geological record, if any. We analyze such a record on 11 active normal faults to seek identifying, dating and measuring the large earthquake ruptures that have broken these faults in the last 10-20 kyrs, and determine how these major ruptures have followed in space and time on each fault and from one fault to another. As large earthquakes repeat on a normal fault, the fault plane is progressively exhumed and exposed at the free air, forming an escarpment at the surface. Provided that this escarpment is preserved from erosion, its surface holds the complete record of the successive ruptures (and possible aseismic slip) as they have broken the ground surface. We have started to analyze such a record on 11 neighboring, likely interacting active faults in the Fucino area, Central Italy, where seismic activity can be devastating (1915, M7 Avezzano earthquake, 30 000 casualties). Faults offset limestone rocks and form several hundred meters high cumulative escarpments, whose youngest parts (10-20 kyrs) are well preserved in the form of 10-20 m high, steep scarps running along the fault lengths (10-20 km). The Holocene seismic slip history of the faults can be recovered from base-to-top continuous in-situ 36Cl exposure dating of the limestone scarps (Benedetti et al. 2002, 2003; Palumbo et al. 2004). To reach that objective, we have sampled the faults in two different ways: two faults (Magnola and Roccapreturo) were sampled at several, regularly spaced sites along their length, so that to recover the earthquake slip variability in both space and time. Nine other faults (Fiamigniano, Campo-Felice, Velino, Tre- Monti, Trasacco, Parasano, San Sebastiano, Castel di Ieri, Roccacasale) were sampled at one single spot along their length, so that to examine the possible earthquake interactions within the entire fault system. Doing so, we have collected one

  14. A new 10Be record recovered from an Antarctic ice core: validity and limitations to record the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Mélanie; Bard, Edouard; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides provide the only possibility to document solar activity over millennia. Carbon-14 (14C) and beryllium-10 (10Be) records are retrieved from tree rings and ice cores, respectively. Recently, 14C records have also proven to be reliable to detect two large Solar Proton Events (SPE) (Miyake et al., Nature, 2012, Miyake et al., Nat. Commun., 2013) that occurred in 774-775 A.D. and in 993-994 A.D.. The origin of these events is still under debate but it opens new perspectives for the interpretation of 10Be ice core records. We present a new 10Be record from an ice core from Dome C (Antarctica) covering the last millennium. The chronology of this new ice core has been established by matching volcanic events on the WAIS Divide ice core (WDC06A) that is the best dated record in Antarctica over the Holocene (Sigl et al., JGR, 2013, Sigl et al., Nat. Clim. Change, 2014). The five minima of solar activity (Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton) are detected and characterized by a 10Be concentration increase of ca. 20% above average in agreement with previous studies of ice cores drilled at South Pole and Dome Fuji in Antarctica (Bard et al., EPSL, 1997; Horiuchi et al., Quat. Geochrono., 2008) and at NGRIP and Dye3 in Greenland (Berggren et al., GRL, 2009). The high resolution, on the order of a year, allows the detection of the 11-year solar cycle. Sulfate concentration, a proxy for volcanic eruptions, has also been measured in the very same samples, allowing a precise comparison of both 10Be and sulfate profiles. We confirm the systematic relationship between stratospheric eruptions and 10Be concentration increases, first evidenced by observations of the stratospheric volcanic eruptions of Agung in 1963 and Pinatubo in 1991 (Baroni et al., GCA, 2011). This relationship is due to an increase in 10Be deposition linked to the role played by the sedimentation of volcanic aerosols. In the light of these new elements, we will discuss the limitations and

  15. 10Be application to soil development on Marion Island, southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussmann, N.; Aldahan, A.; Boelhouwers, J.; Possnert, G.

    2010-04-01

    Marion Island, located in the southern Indian Ocean, constitutes the summit of an active shield volcano. It is a small terrestrial environment where glacially abraded bedrock became exposed c × 10 kyr ago. These conditions provide an interesting possibility for the assessment of 10Be accumulation rates and their application to soil erosion studies on the island. 10Be concentrations were measured in precipitation, soil profiles and an Azorella selago cushion plant. The data reveal a 10Be precipitation flux several times higher than model prediction. Estimation of the 10Be accumulation based on the soil inventory suggests a span between 2000 and 7000 yr. This time span is not in accordance with the accepted notion that the island was covered with ice about 10,000 yr ago and suggests either removal of 10Be from the soil profile, an overestimated Holocene 10Be-flux or a delayed soil development history. Our results provide new data on 10Be concentrations from the sub-Antarctic islands and contribute towards enlarging the southern-hemisphere 10Be database.

  16. A model-based evaluation of sedimentary reconstructions of 10Be production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Lewis; Plancherel, Yves; Khatiwala, Samar; Henderson, Gideon

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric production of 10Be is small when solar activity and, therefore, solar magnetic field and total solar irradiance are strong. Variations in solar activity affect climate and the production of other climate-relevant isotopes, such as 14C. Solar activity is thus an important variable to constrain. Since 10Be production is clearly related to solar activity and the cycle of beryllium is simpler than that of carbon, 10Be records in ice cores have been used to reconstruct total solar irradiance variability. Unfortunately, 10Be records in ice cores are not only affected by variations in atmospheric production, but are also modulated by changes in wind patterns since spatiotemporal atmospheric 10Be gradients are quite large. In that context, sedimentary 10Be records from the abyssal ocean could be of great interest: since the residence time of 10Be in the ocean is thought to be comparable to the overturning time-scale of the ocean, spatial 10Be gradients may be relatively weaker than those in the atmosphere. Under these conditions, regional oceanic variability should only weakly affect the distribution of 10Be in the ocean and local sedimentary 10Be records are expected to represent the global average 10Be production better than 10Be measured in ice cores. We here show results from a global ocean model of 10Be that we use to investigate the spatial variability of simulated sedimentary 10Be records and test the sensitivity of the 10Be sedimentary flux to uncertainties in the circulation field and in the particle chemistry of beryllium. Our ocean model is based on the Transport Matrix method. The surface 10Be input fluxes are taken from atmospheric model simulations. Our model experiments, constrained by available dissolved 10Be data, show that there exist regions in the ocean where the sedimentary 10Be flux is relatively insensitive to changes in input patterns and magnitudes, assumed particle chemistry and flux patterns, and ocean circulation. We submit that

  17. Aluminum 26, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl depth profiles in the Canyon Diablo iron meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Michlovich, E.S.; Elmore, D.; Vogt, S.; Lipschutz, M.E.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-11-25

    The authors have measured activities of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl in 12 fragments of the iron meteorite Canyon Diablo and have constructed production rate-versus-depth profiles of those radionuclides. Profiles determined using differential particle fluxes calculated with the LAHET code system are in good agreement with {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl experimental data, but the agreement for {sup 36}Cl was obtained only after neutron-induced cross sections were modified. Profiles calculated with lunar particle fluxes are much lower than experimental Canyon Diablo profiles. The cosmic ray exposure ages of most samples are near 540 m.y. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Simulating ice core 10Be on the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, C.; Wagenbach, D.; Levin, I.; Stanzick, A.; Christl, M.; Wallner, A.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Seierstad, I. K.; Wershofen, H.; Dibb, J.

    2014-02-01

    10Be ice core measurements are an important tool for paleoclimate research, e.g. allowing for the reconstruction of past solar activity or variation in the natural 14C production rate. However, especially on multi-millennial timescales, the share of production and climate induced variations of respective 10Be ice core records is still up to debate. Here we present the first quantitative climatological model of the 10Be ice concentration up to the glacial-interglacial timescale. The model approach is composed of (i) a coarse resolution global atmospheric transport model and (ii) a local 10Be air-firn-transfer model. Extensive global-scale observational data of short-lived radionuclides as well as new polar 10Be snow pit measurements are used for model calibration and validation. Being specifically configured for polar 10Be, this tool thus allows for a straight-forward investigation of production and non-production related modulation of this nuclide. We find that the polar 10Be ice concentration does not record a globally mixed cosmogenic production signal. In fact, the geomagnetic modulation of Greenland 10Be is up to 50% lower than in case of the global atmospheric 10Be inventory. Using geomagnetic modulation and revised Greenland snow accumulation rate changes as model input we simulate the observed Greenland Summit (GRIP and GISP2) 10Be ice core records over the last 75 kyr (on the GICC05modelext timescale). We show that our basic model is capable to reproduce the largest portion of the observed 10Be changes. However, model-measurements differences exhibit multi-millennial oscillations with amplitudes up to 87% of the mean observed Holocene 10Be concentration. Focusing on the (12-37) kyr b2k (before the year 2000 AD) period, mean model-measurements differences of 30% cannot be imputed to production changes. However, unconsidered climate-induced changes could likely explain the model shortcomings. In fact, the 10Be ice concentration is very sensitive to snow

  19. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  20. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed.

  1. 10Be analysis of a Quaternary weathering profile in the Virginia Piedmont.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavich, M.J.; Brown, Louis; Valette-Silver, J. Nathalie; Klein, Jeffrey; Middleton, Roy

    1985-01-01

    Samples from a residual weathering profile in the Virginia Piedmont have been analyzed for cosmogenic 10Be. Concentrations are highest in clay-rich soil and decrease exponentially to a depth of about 15 m. Despite uncertainties about the processes by which 10Be may be intercepted before entering the solum and eroded after incorporation, a minimum age may be calculated for the regolith. This calculation is based on the delivery rate of 10Be and its decay rate and suggests that this residual profile developed during a period no shorter than 8 × 105 yr. The calculated minimum age may be within a factor of 2 of maximum-age estimates based on surface lowering by erosion and on the rate of rock weathering to saprolite. The vertical distribution of 10Be in the profile could result from a steady-state balance of deposition, weathering, radioactive decay, and erosion.

  2. Inter-comparison in 10Be analysis starting from pre-purified quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, C.; Reinhardt, L.; Barrows, T. T.; Bishop, P.; Davidson, A.; Fifield, L. K.; Freeman, S.; Kim, J. Y.; Maden, C.; Xu, S.

    2007-06-01

    The results of the first international inter-comparison of 10Be analysis from quartz are presented. This inter-comparison includes the sample preparation starting from pre-purified quartz and AMS measurements at SUERC and ANU. Measured 10Be concentrations agree within their uncertainties for six out of seven samples with 10Be concentrations greater than 1 × 104 at/g quartz. This agreement and also the agreement of 10Be concentrations analysed from two aliquots of the same sample at SUERC indicate that addition of 9Be carrier before (used at ANU) or after quartz dissolution (used at SUERC apart from one aliquot of one sample) should not result in substantially different results.

  3. Correlated 50V and 10Be Excesses of Irradiation Origin in Refractory Inclusions from Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, P. A.; Moynier, F.; Chaussidon, M.; Gounelle, M.; Villeneuve, J.; Kato, C.

    2016-08-01

    The discovery in 7 CAIs of strong 50V excesses correlated with the presence of high 10Be/9Be ratios demonstrates that irradiation processes took place early in the accretion disk and allows to constrain the conditions of irradiation.

  4. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Majer, M.; Milin, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Acosta, L.

    2009-08-26

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  5. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  6. Preparation of ASTER in-house 10Be/9Be standard solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braucher, R.; Guillou, V.; Bourlès, D. L.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Keddadouche, K.; Nottoli, E.

    2015-10-01

    Since its commissioning in 2006, the commercially available certificated National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material NIST SRM 4325 is used at the French national facility ASTER (CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence) to normalize 10Be measurements. This standard solution being no longer disposable, we thus decided to produce in-house standards. As a first attempt, a STD-12 standard (10Be/9Be = (4.939 ± 0.053) × 10-12) has been prepared from 2.5 kg of marine sediments with an adapted chemical protocol. Then, a 10Be enriched solution of known concentration being available, a STD-11 standard (10Be/9Be = (1.191 ± 0.013) × 10-11) that will be used at ASTER in the near future to calibrate 10Be measurements and its dilution to the 10-14 level (STD-14 (10Be/9Be = (5.468 ± 0.064) × 10-14)) have been prepared from it.

  7. Simulating ice core 10Be on the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, C.; Wagenbach, D.; Levin, I.; Stanzick, A.; Christl, M.; Wallner, A.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Seierstad, I. K.; Wershofen, H.; Dibb, J.

    2015-02-01

    10Be ice core measurements are an important tool for paleoclimate research, e.g., allowing for the reconstruction of past solar activity or changes in the geomagnetic dipole field. However, especially on multi-millennial timescales, the share of production and climate-induced variations of respective 10Be ice core records is still up for debate. Here we present the first quantitative climatological model of the 10Be ice concentration up to the glacial-interglacial timescale. The model approach is composed of (i) a coarse resolution global atmospheric transport model and (ii) a local 10Be air-firn transfer model. Extensive global-scale observational data of short-lived radionuclides as well as new polar 10Be snow-pit measurements are used for model calibration and validation. Being specifically configured for 10Be in polar ice, this tool thus allows for a straightforward investigation of production- and non-production-related modulation of this nuclide. We find that the polar 10Be ice concentration does not immediately record the globally mixed cosmogenic production signal. Using geomagnetic modulation and revised Greenland snow accumulation rate changes as model input, we simulate the observed Greenland Summit (GRIP and GISP2) 10Be ice core records over the last 75 kyr (on the GICC05modelext timescale). We show that our basic model is capable of reproducing the largest portion of the observed 10Be changes. However, model-measurement differences exhibit multi-millennial trends (differences up to 87% in case of normalized to the Holocene records) which call for closer investigation. Focusing on the (12-37) b2k (before the year AD 2000) period, mean model-measurement differences of 30% cannot be attributed to production changes. However, unconsidered climate-induced changes could likely explain the model-measurement mismatch. In fact, the 10Be ice concentration is very sensitive to snow accumulation changes. Here the reconstructed Greenland Summit (GRIP) snow

  8. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  9. Cosmogenic 10Be ages from the Meirs and Garwood Valleys, Denton Hills, West Antarctica, suggest an absence in LGM Ice Sheet expansion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Joy, Kurt; Storey, Bryan

    2014-05-01

    It has been hypothesised that during interglacials, thinning of the Ross Ice Shelf allowed a more open water environment with increased local precipitation. This resulted in outlet glaciers, which drain the Transantarctic Mountains and fed by the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, advancing during moist warmer periods, apparently out of phase with colder arid dry periods. Significantly the ice core record during these warm periods also shows increased accumulation continent wide The geomorphology of the Denton Hills in the Royal Society Range, West Antarctica, is a result of Miocene fluvial incision reworked by subsequent glacial advances throughout the Quaternary. The Garwood and Miers glacial valleys drain ice across the Denton Hills into the Shelf, and should thus show maximum extent during interstadials. To understand the chronology of late Quaternary glaciations, 15 granitic boulders from terminal moraines were sampled for 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic dating. Obtaining reliable exposure ages of erratics within moraines that represent timing of deposition (i.e. glacial advances) is problematic in polar regions, where glacial activity is principally controlled by ice sheet dynamics. Recycling of previously exposed debris, uncertainty in provenance of glacially transported boulders and a lack of a post-depositional hydrologic process to remove previously exposed material from a valley system, leads to ambiguities in multiple exposure ages from a single coeval glacial landform. More importantly, cold-based ice advance can leave a landform unmodified resulting in young erratics deposited on bedrock that shows weathering and/or inconsistent age-altitude relationships. Primarily, inheritance becomes a difficulty in qualifying exposure ages from polar regions. Preliminary results from the Garwood and Miers Valleys indicate that glaciers in the Denton Hills had begun to retreat from their last maximum positions no later than 23-37 ka, and thus the local last glacial maximum

  10. Reactive and dissolved meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Hella; Dannhaus, Nadine; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Suessenberger, Annette; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Maurice, Laurence; Filizola, Naziano; Gaillardet, Jerome; Christl, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be has been established as a weathering and erosion proxy where meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in reactive phases of secondary weathering products leached from detrital Amazonian river sediment were measured[1]. For this dataset, we derived a new 10Be-based mass balance, which compares the fluxes exported during erosion and weathering, Fout, calculated by the sum of [10Be]reac multiplied by gauging-derived sediment discharge and [10Be]dissmultiplied by water discharge, to the meteoric depositional flux Fin. This assessment allows evaluating the weathering state of the Amazon basin. Further, in order to assess equilibration of reactive phases in the water column, we measured (10Be/9Be)reac ratios leached from suspended sediments for two depth profiles of the Amazon (55m depth) and Madeira (12m depth) Rivers, their corresponding surface dissolved 10Be/9Be ratios, as well as dissolved ratios of smaller Amazon tributaries (Beni, Madre de Dios) to compare with published reactive ratios[1]. In these rivers, modest pH and salinity fluctuations help to constrain a 'simple' system that might however still be affected by seasonally changing isotopic compositions between water and suspended sediment[2] and seasonal fluctuations of TSS and TDS[3]. The 10Be-based mass balance shows that in Andean source areas Fout/Fin ≡1, indicating a balance between ingoing and exported flux, whereas in the Shield headwaters, Fout/Fin=0.3, indicating a combination of decay of 10Be during storage and little export of 10Be associated with particulate and dissolved loads. In central Amazonia, the export of 10Be decreases slightly relative to its atmospheric flux as evidenced by Fout/Fin=0.8 for the Amazon and Madeira Rivers. This value is interpreted as being close to steady state, but its modification could be due to additions of Shield-derived sediment to sediment carried in the main river[4]. Regarding the depth profiles, our

  11. Study of 10 Be and 16 C cluster structure by means of breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of cluster structures in nuclei far from stability represents a valid tool to explore the nuclear force in few-body systems. In this paper we discuss a new experimental investigation of the structure of 10Be and 16C nuclei by means of projectile sequential break-up reactions induced on CH2 target at intermediate-energies. Their spectroscopy is obtained via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments with the CHIMERA multi-detector. From 4He+6He correlations we suggest the presence of a new state at about 13.5MeV in 10Be. The inspection of 6He+10Be break-up channel reveals the existence of a possible high-lying excited state at 20.6MeV in 16C. Finally, new perspectives concerning the improvement of the present results are discussed.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE SOURCES OF {sup 10}Be IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wielandt, Daniel; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R.; Ivanova, Marina A.

    2012-04-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t{sub 1/2} = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of {sup 10}Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We report Li-Be-B isotope measurements of CAIs from CV chondrites, including CAIs that formed with the canonical {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratio of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} (canonical CAIs) and CAIs with Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects (FUN-CAIs) characterized by {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratios much lower than the canonical value. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of four distinct fossil {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isochrons, lower in the FUN-CAIs than in the canonical CAIs, and variable within these classes. Given that FUN-CAI precursors escaped evaporation-recondensation prior to evaporative melting, we suggest that the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio recorded by FUN-CAIs represents a baseline level present in presolar material inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud, generated via enhanced trapping of galactic cosmic rays. The higher and possibly variable apparent {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios of canonical CAIs reflect additional spallogenesis, either in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of {sup 10}Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for {sup 10}Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide with periods of intense particle irradiation occurring on timescales significantly shorter than the formation interval of canonical CAIs.

  13. Long-term erosion rates of Panamanian drainage basins determined using in situ 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Veronica Sosa; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-12-01

    Erosion rates of tropical landscapes are poorly known. Using measurements of in situ-produced 10Be in quartz extracted from river and landslide sediment samples, we calculate long-term erosion rates for many physiographic regions of Panama. We collected river sediment samples from a wide variety of watersheds (n = 35), and then quantified 24 landscape-scale variables (physiographic, climatic, seismic, geologic, and land-use proxies) for each watershed before determining the relationship between these variables and long-term erosion rates using linear regression, multiple regression, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). We also used grain-size-specific 10Be analysis to infer the effect of landslides on the concentration of 10Be in fluvial sediment and thus on erosion rates. Cosmogenic 10Be-inferred, background erosion rates in Panama range from 26 to 595 m My- 1, with an arithmetic average of 201 m My- 1, and an area-weighted average of 144 m My- 1. The strongest and most significant relationship in the dataset was between erosion rate and silicate weathering rate, the mass of material leaving the basin in solution. None of the topographic variables showed a significant relationship with erosion rate at the 95% significance level; we observed weak but significant correlation between erosion rates and several climatic variables related to precipitation and temperature. On average, erosion rates in Panama are higher than other cosmogenically-derived erosion rates in tropical climates including those from Puerto Rico, Madagascar, Australia and Sri Lanka, likely the result of Panama's active tectonic setting and thus high rates of seismicity and uplift. Contemporary sediment yield and cosmogenically-derived erosion rates for three of the rivers we studied are similar, suggesting that human activities are not increasing sediment yield above long-term erosion rate averages in Panama. 10Be concentration is inversely proportional to grain size in landslide and fluvial samples

  14. Comparison of gestational dating methods and implications for exposure-outcome associations: an example with PM2.5 and preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVES: Estimating gestational age is usually based on date of last menstrual period (LMP) or clinical estimation (CE); both approaches introduce potential bias. Differences in methods of estimation may lead to misclassificat ion and inconsistencies in risk estimates, particu...

  15. The study of the geomagnetic excursions and the relative intensities from Chinese loess 10Be over the past 130 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Xian, F.; Beck, J.; An, Z.; Wu, Z.; Liu, M.; Chen, M.; Priller, A.; Kutschera, W.; Jull, A. T.; Yu, H.; Song, S.; Cheng, P.; Kong, X.

    2009-12-01

    Chinese loess is well-known archive for the paleogeomagnetic and paleoclimatic studies [Zhou et al., 1990; An et al., 1990; Zhu et al., 2007]. However, earlier efforts to extract weak geomagnetic excursion signals from Chinese loess 10Be were always unsuccessful due to the complexities of loess 10Be, which results in the fact that loess 10Be was only used as a climatic proxy [Shen et al., 1992; Beer et al.,1993; Gu et al.,1996]. Meanwhile, knowledge on the precise stratigraphic horizons of geomagnetic excursions with a reliable dating [Channell, 2006], on whether the short-lived excursions such as Blake can not be recorded in paleosol unit are still controversial. Here, we present the reconstructed past 130ka geomagnetic excursions and relative paleointensities for the first time from 10Be records in two Chinese loess sections. Results are comparative with those of independent geomagnetic research on Atlantic and Pacific sediments. The derived Laschamp and Blake events lie in the loess-paleosol (L1SS1 and S1SS3) corresponding to mid MIS 3 and 5e respectively. Our studies prove the potential application of the complex loess 10Be for long-term geomagnetic tracing and provide new evidence to answer the long-existing debates on the precise stratigraphic horizon of geomagnetic excursions. Our study suggests the potential application of loess-paleosol 10Be for reconstructing geomagnetic intensity variations spanning the whole Quaternary. References 1. Zhou, L. P., F. Oldfield, A. G. Wintle, S. G. Robinson, and J. T. Wang (1990), Partly pedogenic origin of magnetic variations in Chinese loess, Nature, 346, 737-739. 2. An, Z. S., T. S. Liu, Y. C. Lu, S. C. Porter, G. Kukla, X. H. Wu, and Y. M. Hua (1990), The long-term paleomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-paleosol sequence in Central China, Quat. Int., 7-8, 91-95. 3. Zhu, R. X., R. Zhang, C. L. Deng, Y. X. Pan, Q. S. Liu, and Y. B. Sun (2007), Are Chinese loess deposits essentially continuous?, Geophys. Res. Lett

  16. Specific Caleosin/Peroxygenase and Lipoxygenase Activities Are Tissue-Differentially Expressed in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Seedlings and Are Further Induced Following Exposure to the Toxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Rahman, Farzana; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J

    2016-01-01

    Two caleosin/peroxygenase isoforms from date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L., PdCLO2 and PdCLO4, were characterized with respect to their tissue expression, subcellular localization, and oxylipin pathway substrate specificities in developing seedlings. Both PdCLO2 and PdCLO4 had peroxygenase activities that peaked at the mid-stage (radicle length of 2.5 cm) of seedling growth and were associated with the lipid droplet (LD) and microsomal fractions. Recombinant PdCLO2 and PdCLO4 proteins heterologously expressed in yeast cells were localized in both LD and microsomal fractions. Each of the purified recombinant proteins exhibited peroxygenase activity but they were catalytically distinct with respect to their specificity and product formation from fatty acid epoxide and hydroxide substrates. We recently showed that date palm CLO genes were upregulated following exposure to the potent toxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Hanano et al., 2016), and we show here that transcripts of 9- and 13-lipoxygenase (LOX) genes were also induced by TCDD exposure. At the enzyme level, 9-LOX and 13-LOX activities were present in a range of seedling tissues and responded differently to TCDD exposure, as did the 9- and 13-fatty acid hydroperoxide reductase activities. This demonstrates that at least two branches of the oxylipin pathway are involved in responses to the environmental organic toxin, TCDD in date palm.

  17. Specific Caleosin/Peroxygenase and Lipoxygenase Activities Are Tissue-Differentially Expressed in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Seedlings and Are Further Induced Following Exposure to the Toxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Rahman, Farzana; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J.

    2017-01-01

    Two caleosin/peroxygenase isoforms from date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L., PdCLO2 and PdCLO4, were characterized with respect to their tissue expression, subcellular localization, and oxylipin pathway substrate specificities in developing seedlings. Both PdCLO2 and PdCLO4 had peroxygenase activities that peaked at the mid-stage (radicle length of 2.5 cm) of seedling growth and were associated with the lipid droplet (LD) and microsomal fractions. Recombinant PdCLO2 and PdCLO4 proteins heterologously expressed in yeast cells were localized in both LD and microsomal fractions. Each of the purified recombinant proteins exhibited peroxygenase activity but they were catalytically distinct with respect to their specificity and product formation from fatty acid epoxide and hydroxide substrates. We recently showed that date palm CLO genes were upregulated following exposure to the potent toxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Hanano et al., 2016), and we show here that transcripts of 9- and 13-lipoxygenase (LOX) genes were also induced by TCDD exposure. At the enzyme level, 9-LOX and 13-LOX activities were present in a range of seedling tissues and responded differently to TCDD exposure, as did the 9- and 13-fatty acid hydroperoxide reductase activities. This demonstrates that at least two branches of the oxylipin pathway are involved in responses to the environmental organic toxin, TCDD in date palm. PMID:28111588

  18. Quantifying Sub-Glacial Abrasion at Jakobshavn Isbræ: A Novel Approach Using In Situ 10Be Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, N. E.; Briner, J. P.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Warm-based ice sheets and glaciers incontrovertibly erode and modify the terrain that they mantle; yet precise estimates of the rate and magnitude of sub-glacial erosion are rare. Estimates of sub-glacial erosion occurring beneath ice sheets, such as the Greenland Ice Sheet, are particularly important because they can provide key insights into sediment availability at ice-sheet margins that influences ice-sheet stability. Furthermore, estimates of sub-glacial erosion can help inform predictive geophysical ice-sheet models that incorporate a basal sliding parameter. Here, we take advantage of a detailed ice-margin history at Jakobshavn Isbræ over the last ~7,500 years, combined with in situ 10Be measurements from strategic bedrock locations, to quantify the rate of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-based margins. Our bedrock samples are from 1) locations that deglaciated ~7,500 years ago and have remained ice-free through present day, and 2) locations that also deglaciated ~7,500 years ago, but were re-occupied by the ice-margin during the last few hundred years. After accounting for the slightly different exposure histories between bedrock locations, and despite the short duration in ice-cover, initial 10Be measurements reveal a detectable difference in 10Be concentrations between the two bedrock surfaces. We hypothesize that the offset in 10Be concentrations reveals the magnitude of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-terminating margins.

  19. 7Be and 10Be concentrations in recent firn and ice at Law Dome, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Fink, D.; Child, D.; Levchenko, V. A.; Morgan, V. I.; Curran, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Elliott, G.

    2000-10-01

    Over the past three years, the Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES) AMS facility at ANSTO has been expanding its sample preparation and measurement capability, particularly for 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. During this time, ANSTO has continued its collaboration with the AAD and CSIRO Atmospheric Research on the measurement of cosmogenic isotopes from Law Dome, Antarctica. This research program has been supported by the construction of a dedicated geochemistry laboratory for the processing of ice and rock samples for the preparation of AMS targets. Here we present our first results for 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores from three sites at Law Dome and describe the sample processing protocol and aspects of the AMS measurement procedure. These sites are characterised by an eightfold difference in accumulation rate with a common precipitation source. In combination with an established ice chronology, this has enabled some preliminary findings concerning the relationship between the snow accumulation rate and the measured 10Be concentration for Law Dome during recent times. Additionally, we present 7Be and 10Be/ 7Be measurements made for a few surface snow samples from Law Dome and Australia.

  20. Dilute Nuclear States: {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.

    2008-11-11

    The experimental evidence for dilute {alpha}-particle states in {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C is discussed. The question of the location of the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV {sup 12}C state remains unresolved, as does the existence of possible analogue states in {sup 14}C.

  1. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M.; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45°N, 51.06°W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic 10Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average 10Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65–90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on 10Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26–115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high 10Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP. PMID:25266953

  2. NQRS Data for C10H10Be (Subst. No. 1228)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C10H10Be (Subst. No. 1228)

  3. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M.; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-09-01

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45°N, 51.06°W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic 10Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average 10Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65-90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on 10Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26-115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high 10Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP.

  4. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland.

    PubMed

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-09-30

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45 °N, 51.06 °W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic (10)Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average (10)Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65-90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on (10)Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26-115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high (10)Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP.

  5. 10Be history of cliff retreat: theory and example from the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regard, Vincent; Dewez, Thomas; Bourlès, Didier; Duperret, Anne; Costa, Stéphane; Leanni, Laetitia; Lasseur, Eric; Pedoja, Kevin; Maillet, Grégoire

    2010-05-01

    What if coastal cliffs recession rates could be measured 60 times further in time than with classical methods? Coastal cliff evolution prediction for the next century would then not be so much of a stretch. In this work, we present a new method based on measurements and modelling of 10Be concentration transect across present-day shore platforms to establish the recession rate of coastal cliff for the last ca. 6000 years. The numerical model predicts the shape of 10Be concentration transects to be expected as a function of a given cliff recession rate, vertical coastal platform down-wearing rate and assumed time of sea level reestablishment to present-day level since deglaciation. Two independent transect features serve to fit long-term recession rate model to field observations: a major 10Be concentration drop is predicted where the cliff was abandoned for ca. 100k years, during the glacial period, and a characteristic dome shape directly related to the recession rate of the cliff. A retreating cliff site from the English Channel coast of France at Mesnil Val serves as a demonstrator of this method. Retreat rates were too fast to pinpoint the predicted glacial cliff position but 10Be concentrations sampled across the shore platform nevertheless indicate that the cliff retreat rate since the mid-late Holocene is comprised between 10-30 cm/yr, with a preferred value at 25 ± 5 cm, which turns out to be fully coherent with a 30-years-long assessment.

  6. Headwall erosion rates from cosmogenic (10) Be in supraglacial debris, Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Dirk; Egholm, David

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are widespread within the Himalaya and other steep mountain ranges. They testify to active erosion of ice-free bedrock hillslopes that tower above valley glaciers, sometimes more than 1 km high. It is long known that debris cover significantly reduces surface ablation rates and thereby influences glacial mass balances; but its dynamic evolution along with climatic and topographic changes is poorly studied. Better understanding the coupling of ice-free bedrock hillslopes and glaciers in steep mountains requires means to assess headwall erosion rates. Here, we present headwall erosion rates derived from 10Be concentrations in the ablation-dominated medial moraine of the Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya. We combine our empirical, field-based approach with a numerical model of headwall erosion and glacial debris transport to assess permissible patterns of headwall erosion on the ice-free bedrock hillslopes surrounding the Chhota Shigri Glacier. Our five samples, each separated by approximately 500 m along the glacier, consist of an amalgamation of >1000 surface clasts with grain sizes between ˜1 and ˜30 mm that were taken from the medial moraine. Our results show that 10Be concentrations increase downglacier from ˜3×104 to ˜6×104 atoms g-1, yielding headwall erosion rates of ˜1.3-0.6 mm yr-1. The accumulation of 10Be during debris residence on the ice surface can only account for a small fraction (<20%) of the downglacier increase. Other potential explanations include (1) heterogeneous source areas with differences average productions rates, and (2) homogeneous source areas but temporally variable headwall erosion rates. We use the 10Be-derived headwall erosion rates to define debris supply rates from ice-free bedrock hillslopes in the numerical ice model iSOSIA. Headwall debris that is deposited in the ablation zone of the ice surface becomes englacial, is passively advected with the ice and emerges in the ablation zone where it

  7. Particle trajectories on hillslopes: Implications for particle age and 10Be structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-09-01

    Many geomorphic systems act as conveyor belts onto which material is loaded at a particular rate and is transported in one direction toward another system that serves as a sink. As the material travels, it ages, it changes in grain size, it accumulates cosmogenic radionuclides, it adsorbs or releases nutrients, and it weathers. Here I address the hillslope conveyor. As many geochemical processes are depth-dependent, the depth history of a particle becomes important to know. I calculate soil particle trajectories in the horizontal-depth plane and address three cases, one in which horizontal speeds decline exponentially with depth, a second in which they are uniform with depth, and a third in which horizontal speeds are also uniform but all profile values are vertically well-mixed. Vertical speeds are governed by continuity in an incompressible medium and by the boundary condition of zero vertical particle speed at the soil surface. Particle trajectories must therefore become surface parallel at the surface. Knowledge of soil particle trajectories allows calculation of residence times and concentration profiles of 10Be in the soil. The results inform strategies for interpretation of nuclide concentrations in soils and stream sediments and for inference of transport rate profiles. In all steady cases, the particle age and 10Be structure are uniform with distance from the divide. When significant vertical gradients in horizontal speed occur, the patterns of particle age and of 10Be concentration are dominated by the depth scale of the transport process. In unmixed cases, the particle age and 10Be concentration in near-surface samples can greatly exceed the vertically averaged values, reflecting the fact that the vertical speeds of particles slow dramatically as they near the surface. In cases in which horizontal speed varies significantly with depth, the vertically averaged concentration of 10Be within the soil can significantly underpredict the mean 10Be concentration

  8. 10Be Content in Suevite Breccia from the Bosumtwi Impact Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: According to the current understanding of meteorite impact processes, surface target material is transported from a crater in the form of ejecta or is vaporized/melted (e.g., [1]). The formation model of tektites from the surface of the target rocks has been established using the 10Be content of tektites (e.g., [2]), and chemical comparison with the possible target surface material (e.g., [3]); it was also reproduced by computer modeling (e.g., [4]). On the other hand, some observations ([5, 6]) suggest that part of the surface material may be incorporated into the crater-fill. The aim of this study is to check if surface-derived material is present in suevitic breccias to better understand formation mechanisms of fallback breccias. Also, 10Be can be used to trace contamination of rocks in the top layer of the suevitic layer by meteoric (lake) water. This abstract is an update (based on more data now available) of the previous report presented during the Metsoc75 conference. Samples: The Bosumtwi crater was chosen as study site because of its relatively large size (10.5 km in diameter), young age of 1.07 Ma [7], good state of preservation, and availability of core samples. Clasts from suevitic breccia selected for this study come from the LB-07A and LB-08A cores that are located within the crater and represent fallback breccia (e.g., [7]). Of 41 analyzed samples (22 single clasts and 21 matrix samples - 11 of those being monomictic breccia), 36 came from core LB-07A (in the zone outside the central uplift) and represent depths of 333.7 - 407.9 m and 5 are from core LB-08A (on the flank of the central uplift) from depths 239.5 - 264.9 m. Methods: For each sample, 0.8 g of finely grounded material from clasts containing in situ produced and meteoric 10Be was dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 by microwave digestion. A 9Be carrier (1 mg or 0.6 mg, 10Be/9Be ratio: 2.82±0.31*10-15 [2? uncertainty]) was added to the sample, and then Be was chemically

  9. Development of the NBS /sup 10/Be//sup 9/Be isotopic standard reference material

    SciTech Connect

    Inn, K.G.W.; Raman, S.; Coursey, B.M.; Fassett, J.D.; Walker, R.L.

    1987-04-01

    The National Bureau of Standards (NBS), in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) community, is in the process of developing a /sup 10/Be//sup 9/Be isotopic solution Standard Reference Material (SRM). The starting /sup 10/Be//sup 9/Be solution was provided by the ORNL after Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometric characterization for isotopic concentration. The radioactivity purity of the ORNL Master solution was confirmed by gamma-ray spectrometry, then diluted at NBS with solutions made from zone-refined single-crystal beryllium metal and sub-boiling double-distilled hydrochloric acid. Four serial dilutions were necessary to achieve a final /sup 10/Be//sup 9/Be isotopic composition of approximately 3 x 10/sup -11/ (g/g). The accuracy of the dilutions was confirmed by liquid scintillation and AMS measurements. The isotopic composition of the ORNL Master solution was also confirmed at NBS by Resonant Ionization Mass Spectrometry. The isotopic composition of the final solution is being affirmed at the present time through international laboratory AMS measurements.

  10. Study of bound states in 10Be by one neutron removal reactions of 11Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Jacob G.; Bildstein, V.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cubero, M.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Jonson, B.; Koldste, G. T.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Mücher, D.; Nilsson, T.; Nowak, K.; Pakarinen, J.; Pesudo, V.; Raabe, R.; Riisager, K.; Seidlitz, M.; Tengblad, O.; Törnqvist, H.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wimmer, K.; De Witte, H.

    2017-04-01

    The bound states of 10Be have been studied by removing single neutrons from 11Be nuclei. A 2.8 MeV u–1 beam of 11Be was produced at ISOLDE, CERN and directed on to both proton and deuteron targets inducing one-neutron removal reactions. Charged particles were detected to identify the two reaction channels (d, t) and (p, d), and the individual states in 10Be were identified by gamma detection. All bound states but one were populated and identified in the (d, t) reaction. The combination of REX-ISOLDE and MINIBALL allowed for a clean separation of the high-lying states in 10Be. This is the first time these states have been separated in a reaction experiment. Differential cross sections have been calculated for all the reaction channels and compared to DWBA calculations. Spectroscopic factors are derived and compared to values from the litterature. While the overall agreement between the spectrocopic factors is poor, the ratio between the ground state and the first excited state is in agreement with the previous measured ones. Furthermore, a significant population of the {2}2+ state is observed, which which may indicate the presence of multi-step processes at our beam energy.

  11. Detrital 10Be Response to the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake and Quantifying Evacuation of Coseismic Landslide Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Godard, V.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Scherler, D.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xie, K.; Bellier, O.; Bourles, D. L.; Ansberque, C.

    2014-12-01

    In reverse fault-bounded high relief mountain ranges, large-magnitude earthquakes contribute to the topographic growth by co- and inter-seismic surface uplift on the hanging wall. Meanwhile, they also trigger widespread landslides along ridge lines or hillslopes. Coseismic landsliding lowers relief and causes a phase of high erosion in the period following the quake. The net effect of large-magnitude earthquakes in topographic evolution of active orogens partially depends on how fast the landslide debris are being evacuated out of the mountain range. The 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, China activated the Longmen Shan reverse fault system in eastern Tibetan plateau, also induced enormous amount of landslides, volume comparable to the coseismic uplift, providing an excellent opportunity to address the question. We use cosmogenic 10Be concentration in river sand as a tracer to study the sediment routing process of coseismic landslide debris, because landslide debris contains low 10Be concentration. We sampling annually during 2008-2013, at 19 locations along the rivers that traverse the fault ruptures, with upstream catchment area varying between 4.4 km2 and 21775 km2, including 10 catchments sampled before Wenchuan earthquake in 2004 and 2005. A comparison with pre-earthquake measurements show reduced 10Be concentration at all sites. This dilution is more significant for small catchments on short range-front rivers: mostly half to one-fourth, and down to one-fifth in some cases. Multi-year time series of 10Be concentration at single sites show roughly constant level of dilution six years after the quake, with moderate temporal fluctuations, which may be related to the variation in precipitation and storm intensity. Under the assumption of constant dilution rate and a depth-mixing of 10Be concentration for landslide input, a simple calculation indicates it would take ~ 200 to 3000 years to completely evacuate the landslides debris within range-front transverse rivers

  12. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  13. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  14. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  15. Reconciling tectonic shortening, sedimentation and spatial patterns of erosion from 10Be paleo-erosion rates in the Argentine Precordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, Pedro; Hoke, Gregory D.; Fosdick, Julie C.; Wittmann, Hella

    2016-09-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understand the development of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge dynamics predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based models predict that catchment-wide erosion maxima significantly lag behind a pulse of rock uplift. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S. Using a combination of 10Be-derived paleo-erosion rates, constraints on re-exposure using 26Al/10Be ratios, geomorphic observations and detrital zircon provenance, we demonstrate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags the maximum rate of deformation over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic wedges.

  16. Millennial Rates of Sea Cliff Retreat Derived From Cosmogenic 10Be and Coastal Platform Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, M. D.; Ellis, M. A.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observation of cliff erosion are often limited to relatively short timescales (a few decades), which are within the timeframe of anthropogenic modification of the coast and may be shorter than the recurrence interval for erosion events. Here we present long-term (centennial-millennial) averaged rates of sea cliff retreat for chalk cliffs in SE England derived from cosmogenic isotopes and coastal morphology. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in situ flint samples collected from three transects across the coastal platform in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate averaged over several hundred years. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. Additionally, we use high-resolution (1m) multibeam bathymetry to map the extent of the coastal platform based on the surface texture in order to infer the position of the coast at ~8 ka. The difference in position to the current coastline provides estimates of Holocene-averaged rates of cliff erosion for all chalk cliffed coastline in the region. Comparison to historic records of cliff retreat reveals key similarities and differences between long and short-term signals. In certain locations, there are significant discrepancies (either faster or slower) between historic records and long-term rates of retreat. Each type of discrepancy may be the result of human interaction with the coastal environment, whether that interaction is local or non-local, and it is worthwhile noting that sites of relatively low historic rates of erosion are likely subject to high-magnitude, low-frequency failure events that could have devastating effects on human lives and infrastructure in areas that are considered to be low risk.

  17. 10Be measurements in bedrock constrain erosion beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Nicolás. E.; Briner, Jason P.; Maurer, Josh; Schaefer, Joerg M.

    2016-11-01

    Glacial erosion is a key process driving landscape evolution, but it remains unclear what factors dictate the rate at which subglacial erosion occurs. Moreover, estimates of subglacial erosion that do not rely on sediment flux techniques are rare. Here, we present in situ 10Be measurements from bedrock surfaces in western Greenland with well-constrained ice-cover histories to quantify the erosion rate beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet margin during historical times. We calculate an abrasion rate of 0.72 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 and a likely total basin-wide erosion rate (abrasion + quarrying) of 1-1.8 mm yr-1, which are at least 1 order of magnitude higher than typical subglacial erosion rates in other polar landscapes. A compilation of published 10Be data suggests that the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet acts as a particularly effective erosional agent within the broader Baffin Bay-Greenland region over millennial to glacial-interglacial timescales, suggestive of a basal ice sheet thermal regime controlled by regional climate.

  18. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with 10Be marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Zhou, Y.; Heinola, K.; Pettersson, J.; Conroy, S.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Widdowson, A.

    2016-03-01

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a 10Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011-2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm2 sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The 10Be/9Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the 10B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4-1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  19. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Beck, J. Warren; Kong, Xianghui; An, Zhisheng; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Zhenkun; Xian, Feng; Ao, Hong

    2015-04-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19 (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996). These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess

  20. Reconstruction of Subdecadal Changes in Sunspot Numbers Based on the NGRIP 10Be Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.

    2014-11-01

    Sunspot observations since 1610 A.D. show that the solar magnetic activity displays long-term changes, from Maunder Minimum-like low-activity states to Modern Maximum-like high-activity episodes, as well as short-term variations, such as the pronounced 11-year periodicity. Information on changes in solar activity levels before 1610 relies on proxy records of solar activity stored in natural archives, such as 10Be in ice cores and 14C in tree rings. These cosmogenic radionuclides are produced by the interaction between Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and atoms in the Earth's atmosphere; their production rates are anti-correlated with the solar magnetic activity. The GCR intensity displays a distinct 11-year periodicity due to solar modulation of the GCRs in the heliosphere, which is inversely proportional to, but out of phase with, the 11-year solar cycle. This implies a time lag between the actual solar cycles and the GCR intensity, which is known as the hysteresis effect. In this study, we use the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) records of the 10Be flux to reconstruct the solar modulation strength (Φ), which describes the modulation of GCRs throughout the heliosphere, to reconstruct both long-term and subdecadal changes in sunspot numbers (SSNs). We compare three different approaches for reconstructing subdecadal-scale changes in SSNs, including a linear approach and two approaches based on the hysteresis effect, i.e. models with ellipse-linear and ellipse relationships between Φ and SSNs. We find that the ellipse approach provides an amplitude-sensitive reconstruction and the highest cross-correlation coefficients in comparison with the ellipse-linear and linear approaches. The long-term trend in the reconstructed SSNs is computed using a physics-based model and agrees well with the other group SSN reconstructions. The new empirical approach, combining a physics-based model with ellipse-modeling of the 11-year cycle, therefore provides a method for

  1. Tectonic control on 10Be-derived erosion rates in the Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Dirk; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2014-02-01

    Erosion in the Himalaya is responsible for one of the greatest mass redistributions on Earth and has fueled models of feedback loops between climate and tectonics. Although the general trends of erosion across the Himalaya are reasonably well known, the relative importance of factors controlling erosion is less well constrained. Here we present 25 10Be-derived catchment-averaged erosion rates from the Yamuna catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India. Tributary erosion rates range between ~0.1 and 0.5 mm yr-1 in the Lesser Himalaya and ~1 and 2 mm yr-1 in the High Himalaya, despite uniform hillslope angles. The erosion-rate data correlate with catchment-averaged values of 5 km radius relief, channel steepness indices, and specific stream power but to varying degrees of nonlinearity. Similar nonlinear relationships and coefficients of determination suggest that topographic steepness is the major control on the spatial variability of erosion and that twofold to threefold differences in annual runoff are of minor importance in this area. Instead, the spatial distribution of erosion in the study area is consistent with a tectonic model in which the rock uplift pattern is largely controlled by the shortening rate and the geometry of the Main Himalayan Thrust fault (MHT). Our data support a shallow dip of the MHT underneath the Lesser Himalaya, followed by a midcrustal ramp underneath the High Himalaya, as indicated by geophysical data. Finally, analysis of sample results from larger main stem rivers indicates significant variability of 10Be-derived erosion rates, possibly related to nonproportional sediment supply from different tributaries and incomplete mixing in main stem channels.

  2. Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-02-01

    Isovector and isoscalar dipole excitations in 9Be and 10Be are investigated in the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics, in which angular-momentum and parity projections are performed. In the present method, 1p-1h excitation modes built on the ground state and a large amplitude α -cluster mode are taken into account. The isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR) in E >20 MeV shows the two-peak structure, which is understood from the dipole excitation in the 2 α core part with the prolate deformation. Because of valence neutron modes against the 2 α core, low-energy E 1 resonances appear in E <20 MeV, exhausting about 20 % of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule and 10 % of the calculated energy-weighted sum. The dipole resonance at E ˜15 MeV in 10Be can be interpreted as the parity partner of the ground state having a 6He+α structure and has remarkable E 1 strength because of the coherent contribution of two valence neutrons. The isoscalar dipole strength for some low-energy resonances is significantly enhanced by the coupling with the α -cluster mode. For the E 1 strength of 9Be, the calculation overestimates the energy-weighted sum (EWS) in the low-energy (E <20 MeV) and GDR (20

  3. Cosmogenic nuclide dating of glaciofluvial deposits: insights from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasily; Claude, Anne; Reber, Regina; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Schlunegger, Fritz; Rahn, Meinert; Dehnert, Andreas; Schlüchter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al can be employed to reconstruct the chronology of sediment layers. Accumulation of these can be used to exposure date the sediment layer as the variation of cosmogenic nuclide concentration with depth can be modeled. Decay of 10Be and 26Al in the samples from a well-defined single bed in a deposit enables the modeling of the post-burial component and the determination of the 26Al/10Be at the time of burial. The isochron-burial age can then be calculated from the initial and the measured ratios. In this study, we focus on the depth-profile and isochron-burial dating of the oldest Quaternary deposits of the Alpine Foreland. These are called Swiss Deckenschotter (cover gravels) as they build mesa-type hill tops on the Mesozoic or Cenozoic bedrock of the Swiss Alpine forelands. Deckenschotter consists of glaciofluvial gravel layers intercalated with glacial and/or overbank deposits. Although previously morphostratigraphically correlated with Günz and Mindel glaciations of Penck and Brückner, the Swiss Deckenschotter is likely much older, and their chronostratigraphy is not well constrained. In order to reconstruct the chronology of these deposits, we studied two Deckenschotter outcrops in abandoned gravel pits in Mandach (507 m a.s.l.) and Siglistorf (530 m a.s.l.) in canton Zurich. We collected four samples from Mandach for 10Be analysis and more than 30 clasts of different lithology, shape and size from a single stratigraphic horizon in Siglistorf among which we processed 19 clasts for 10Be and 26Al analysis. 10Be concentrations of the Mandach samples vary between 10000 and 30000 at/g. Based on these, we calculated a modal depth-profile age of around 1.0 Ma. Among Siglistorf samples, four did not yield successful 26Al measurements and two were unsuccessful for 10Be. Most of the samples have low nuclide concentrations, i.e. <20000 10Be at/g and <150000 26Al at/g. The 26Al/10Be ratio of eight samples was above the surface ratio of 6

  4. Long-term background denudation rates of southern and southeastern Brazilian watersheds estimated with cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica; Bierman, Paul R.; Fernandes, Nelson F.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-09-01

    In comparison to humid temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, less is known about the long-term (millennial scale) background rates of erosion in Southern Hemisphere tropical watersheds. In order to better understand the rate at which watersheds in southern and southeastern Brazil erode, and the relationship of that erosion to climate and landscape characteristics, we made new measurements of in situ produced 10Be in river sediments and we compiled all extant measurements from this part of the country. New data from 14 watersheds in the states of Santa Catarina (n = 7) and Rio de Janeiro (n = 7) show that erosion rates vary there from 13 to 90 m/My (mean = 32 m/My; median = 23 m/My) and that the difference between erosion rates of basins we sampled in the two states is not significant. Sampled basin area ranges between 3 and 14,987 km2, mean basin elevation between 235 and 1606 m, and mean basin slope between 11 and 29°. Basins sampled in Rio de Janeiro, including three that drain the Serra do Mar escarpment, have an average basin slope of 19°, whereas the average slope for the Santa Catarina basins is 14°. Mean basin slope (R2 = 0.73) and annual precipitation (R2 = 0.57) are most strongly correlated with erosion in the basins we studied. At three sites where we sampled river sand and cobbles, the 10Be concentration in river sand was greater than in the cobbles, suggesting that these grain sizes are sourced from different parts of the landscape. Compiling all cosmogenic 10Be-derived erosion rates previously published for southern and southeastern Brazil watersheds to date (n = 76) with our 14 sampled basins, we find that regional erosion rates (though low) are higher than those of watersheds also located on other passive margins including Namibia and the southeastern North America. Brazilian basins erode at a pace similar to escarpments in southeastern North America. Erosion rates in southern and southeastern Brazil are directly and positively related to

  5. Detection of erosion events using 10Be profiles: example of the impact of agriculture on soil erosion in the Chesapeake Bay area (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valette-Silver, J. N.; Brown, L.; Pavich, M.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1986-01-01

    10Be concentration, total carbon and grain-size were measured in cores collected in undisturbed estuarine sediments of three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. These cores were previously studied by Davis [1] and Brush [2,3] for pollen content, age and sedimentation rate. In this work, we compare the results obtained for these various analyses. In the cores, we observed two increases in 10Be concentration concomitant with two major changes in the pollen composition of the sediments. These two pollen changes each correspond to well-dated agricultural horizons reflecting different stages in the introduction of European farming techniques [2]. In the Chesapeake Bay area, the agricultural development, associated with forest clearing, appears to have triggered the erosion, transport, and sedimentation into the river mouths of large quantities of 10Be-rich soils. This phenomenon explains the observed rise in the sedimentation rate associated with increases in agricultural land-use. ?? 1986.

  6. Paleodischarge of the Mojave River, southwestern U.S.A, investigated with single-pebble measurements of 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyr, Andrew J.; Miller, David; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The paleohydrology of ephemeral stream systems is an important constraint on paleoclimatic conditions in arid environments, but remains difficult to constrain quantitatively. For example, sedimentary records of the size and extent of pluvial lakes in the Mojave Desert have been used as a proxy for Quaternary climate variability. Although the delivery mechanisms of this additional water are still being debated, it is generally agreed that the discharge of the Mojave River, which supplied water for several Pleistocene pluvial lakes along its course, must have been significantly greater during lake high stands. We used the 10Be concentrations of 10 individual quartzite pebbles sourced from the San Bernardino Mountains and collected from a ~25 ka strath terrace of the Mojave River near Barstow, Calif., to test whether pebble ages record the timing of large paleodischarge of the Mojave River. Our exposure ages indicate that periods of discharge large enough to transport pebble-sized sediment occurred at least four times over the past ~240 ky; individual pebble ages cluster into four groups with exposure ages of 24.82 ± 2.52 ka (n=3), 55.79 ± 2.59 ka (n=2), 99.14 ± 6.04 ka (n=4) and 239.9 ± 52.16 ka (n=1). These inferred large discharge events occurred during both glacial and interglacial conditions. We demonstrate that bedload materials provide information about the frequency and duration of transport events in river systems. This approach could be further improved with the addition of additional measurements of one or more cosmogenic nuclides coupled with models of river discharge and pebble transport.

  7. Landscape development in Southern Peninsular India from 10Be denudation rates in river sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sanjay; Lupker, Maarten; Haghipour, Negar; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Christl, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    The persistence of high elevation and topography observed along many passive margins remains one of the outstanding problems in landscape evolution. In Southern Peninsular India, this question revolves around the understanding of whether the observed high relief and pronounced topography results from equilibrium with contemporaneous external forcing or whether the relief was acquired during the late Cenozoic and conserved over several tens of millions years. Modern denudation rates dictating the current landscape evolution are ruled by the interactions between climate, tectonics and rock strength. We used detrital cosmogenic 10Be from 43 drainage basins ranging in size from 4 to 68768 km2, to infer millennial averaged denudation rates along and across the Western Ghat Mountains in Southern India and to understand if the present landscape is still actively evolving or not. The Western Ghat is characterized by a W-E gradient in relief and rainfall with only minor variations in lithology allowing to isolate the relationship between erosion rates and topographic indices. Cosmogenic-derived erosion rates are spatially variable, ranging from ~8 to 77 mm/ka on the western side and 8 to 51 mm/ka on the eastern side. The rugged topography of Western Ghats and Nilgiri Mountains exhibit pronounced topography in conjunction with low denudation rates. This represents an exception to the often-cited general coupling of topography and denudation rates and suggests that steep slopes and high relief in passive margin settings are not associated to high denudation. Nevertheless, locally the differences in denudation rates along and across the Western Ghats are well correlated with local relief, which suggests that the inherited topography still controls current denudation rates. Even though the catchments in Western Ghats receive a mean annual precipitation ~ 5 m, due to the SW Indian monsoon, precipitation shows only a minor control on denudation rates. This suggests that in the

  8. Global analysis of the stream power law parameters based on worldwide 10Be denudation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, M.-A.; Mudd, S. M.; Attal, M.

    2016-09-01

    The stream power law, expressed as E = KAmSn - where E is erosion rate [LT - 1], K is an erodibility coefficient [T - 1L (1 - 2m)], A is drainage area [L 2], S is channel gradient [L/L], and m and n are constants - is the most widely used model for bedrock channel incision. Despite its simplicity and limitations, the model has proved useful for topographic evolution, knickpoint migration, palaeotopography reconstruction, and the determination of rock uplift patterns and rates. However, the unknown parameters K, m, and n are often fixed arbitrarily or are based on assumptions about the physics of the erosion processes that are not always valid, which considerably limits the use and interpretation of the model. In this study, we compile a unique global data set of published basin-averaged erosion rates that use detrital cosmogenic 10Be. These data (N = 1457) enable values for fundamental river properties to be empirically constrained, often for the first time, such as the concavity of the river profile (m/n ratio or concavity index), the link between channel slope and erosion rate (slope exponent n), and substrate erodibility (K). These three parameters are calculated for 59 geographic areas using the integral method of channel profile analysis and allow for a global scale analysis in terms of climatic, tectonic, and environmental settings. In order to compare multiple sites, we also normalize n and K using a reference concavity index m/n = 0.5. A multiple regression analysis demonstrates that intuitive or previously demonstrated local-scale trends, such as the correlation between K and precipitation rates, do not appear at a global scale. Our results suggest that the slope exponent is generally > 1, meaning that the relationship between erosion rate and the channel gradient is nonlinear and thus support the hypothesis that incision is a threshold controlled process. This result questions the validity of many regional interpretations of climate and/or tectonics where

  9. U-Th and 10Be constraints on sediment recycling in proglacial settings, Lago Buenos Aires, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogez, Antoine; Herman, Frédéric; Pelt, Eric; Norton, Kevin; Darvill, Christopher; Christl, Marcus; Morvan, Gilles; Reuschlé, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    The sedimentary cycle includes the formation by erosion of rocks, transport and deposition. While erosion and deposition can be documented, the history of sediments between the time it is extracted from the rocks and ultimately deposited into basins remains a major challenge. However, the mechanism of transfer and alteration of the sediments during transport plays a key role in the evolution of basins, feedbacks between erosion and climate, and glacial-interglacial variability of sediment transport and weathering. This is particularly true in proglacial settings because large overdeepenings, in particular, are potential sediment traps for which the efficiency at evacuating those sediments is largely unknown. The Lago Buenos Aires moraines in Patagonia are particularly interesting because they are imbricated from the older in the outer part to the younger in the inner part of the system. We sampled fine grained sediments from these moraines and measured U-Th isotopes in the 4-50 μm silicate fraction. Deposition ages were refined using 10Be exposure ages. We show first that the comminution ages model can be improved by measuring also Th isotopes, from which weathering rates can be deduced. Moreover we show from our data that there is a time lag of 300 kyr on average between erosion and deposition in the moraine. This could be attributed to the long residence time of sediments in the lake overdeepening. This conclusion raises perspectives about the transport times and dynamic of the sediments during a whole sedimentary cycle, and the subsequent effect on weathering. This conclusion could also contradict some assumptions commonly made for our erosion rates/sediment fluxes reconstructions based on river sediments analysis, in recently deglaciated catchments.

  10. Study of cluster structures in 10Be and 16C neutron-rich nuclei via break-up reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    Projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH2) target are used in order to study the spectroscopy of 10Be and 16C nuclei. For the present experiment we used 10Be and 16C beams delivered by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS, and the CHIMERA 4π multi-detector. 10Be and 16C structures are studied via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments. The 4He+6He break-up channel allowed us to study the spectroscopy of 10Be; in particular we find evidence of a new state in 10Be at 13.5 MeV excitation energy. The 16C nucleus is studied via 6He-10Be correlation; we find the fingerprint of a possible state at about 20.6 MeV

  11. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  12. Beryllium-Boron Systematics of Refractory Inclusions in CR2 and CV3 Chondrites: Evidence for 10Be Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, E.; Wadhwa, M.; Simon, S.; Grossman, L.

    2016-08-01

    Be-B systematics of Allende (CV3), Axtell (CV3), and NWA 5028 (CR2) CAIs suggests that 10Be was distributed heterogeneously in the early solar system which implies that 10Be was produced in the solar nebula by irradiation of nebular gas or dust.

  13. Erosion rates and landscape evolution of the lowlands of the Upper Paraguay river basin (Brazil) from cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupim, Fabiano do Nascimento; Bierman, Paul R.; Assine, Mario Luis; Rood, Dylan H.; Silva, Aguinaldo; Merino, Eder Renato

    2015-04-01

    The importance of Earth's low sloping areas in regard to global erosion and sediment fluxes has been widely and vigorously debated. It is a crucial area of research to elucidate geologically meaningful rates of land-surface change and thus the speed of element cycling on Earth. However, there are large portions of Earth where erosion rates have not been well or extensively measured, for example, the tropical lowlands. The Cuiabana lowlands are an extensive low-altitude and low-relief dissected metamorphic terrain situated in the Upper Paraguay river basin, central-west Brazil. Besides exposures of highly variable dissected metamorphic rocks, flat residual lateritic caps related to a Late Cenozoic planation surface dominate interfluves of the Cuiabana lowlands. The timescale over which the lowlands evolved and the planation surface developed, and the rate at which they have been modified by erosion, are poorly known. Here, we present measurements of in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be in outcropping metamorphic bedrock and clastic-lateritic caps to quantify rates of erosion of the surface and associated landforms in order to better understand the Quaternary landscape evolution of these lowlands. Overall, slow erosion rates (mean 10 m/Ma) suggest a stable tectonic environment in these lowlands. Erosion rates vary widely between different lithologies (range 0.57 to 28.3 m/Ma) consistent with differential erosion driving regional landform evolution. The lowest erosion rates are associated with the low-relief area (irregular plains), where clastic-laterite (mean 0.67 m/Ma) and quartzite (mean 2.6 m/Ma) crop out, whereas the highest erosion rates are associated with dissection of residual hills, dominated by metasandstone (mean 11.6 m/Ma) and phyllite (mean 27.6 m/Ma). These data imply that the Cuiabana lowland is comprised of two dominant landform sets with distinct and different dynamics. Because the planation surface (mostly lowlands) is lowering and losing mass more

  14. A Model for Interpreting 10Be Basin-Wide Erosion Rates in Post-Glacial Environments, Northwest Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fame, M. L.; Owen, L. A.; Balco, G.; Spotila, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful interpretation of in-situ cosmogenic 10Be basin-wide erosion rates in slowly eroding postglacial catchments is complicated because 10Be is inherited through shifts between glacial and fluvial regimes and ice shielding prevents 10Be production. Such environments do not attain isotopic and landscape steady state, conditions necessary for the current method of calculating basin-wide erosion rates. We propose an alternate set of assumptions, specific to postglacial regions, which make it possible to calculate basin-wide erosion rates in the post-glacial Highlands of NW Scotland. From 20 Scottish basins basin-wide 10Be concentrations range from 2.129 x 104 to 4.870 x 104 atoms/g qtz. Average 10Be concentrations from shallow till and bank deposits within the basins are 2.856 x 104 atoms/g qtz, similar to the basin-wide concentrations, whereas average bedrock concentrations in the basins are 1.747 x 105 atoms/g qtz. This suggests that during the postglacial time most active sediment is derived from reworked deposits rather then sub-aerially eroded bedrock. Therefore, we make the simplifying assumption that most bedrock erosion occurs during glaciation. A deeply buried till that has experienced no nuclide production since deglaciation has a 10Be concentration of 6.810 x 103 atoms/g qtz and allows us to estimate how much of the 10Be in basin-wide samples was produced since deglaciation. A glacial ice thickness of only 2 m would shield all 10Be production; therefore we assume that no 10Be production occurred during glacial periods and that all production occurs during interglacial periods. Using 100 ka as the approximate duration of a Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycle, comprised of a 15 ka interglacial period and an 85 ka glacial period, and the aforementioned assumptions we have derived a numerical model to calculate basin-wide glacial erosion rates in NW Scotland.

  15. Atmospheric production signal in 10Be from varved sediments of Lake Meerfelder Maar during the late glacial-early Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czymzik, Markus; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Mekhaldi, Florian; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Tjallingii, Rik; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2016-04-01

    Beryllium 10 concentrations (10Becon) were measured at 20-year resolution in annually laminated (varved) sediments of Lake Meerfelder Maar (western Germany) covering the late glacial-early Holocene transition 11310-13130 varve years before present. Comparing the 10Becon record to environmental proxy records from the same archive indicates that varying sediment accumulation and composition only slightly modify trends, but do not substantially influence multi-decadal to centennial 10Becon excursions. Corrected for potential environmental biases using multiple-regression analysis, the resulting 10Beatmosphere time-series likely represents an alternative mid-latitude 10Be production record, exhibiting broad similarities but also some differences to radionuclide records as 14C in tree rings and 10Be in polar ice cores. The preservation of the globally common atmospheric production signal in 10Be from varved lake sediments indicates the, to date, largely unexplored potential of these archives for the synchronization to other radionuclide records around the globe, complementing existing solar activity reconstructions and Sun-climate studies.

  16. The influence of sediment supply on arroyo cut-fill dynamics: a preliminary dataset of catchment averaged erosion rates calculated from in-situ 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, K. E.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread and near-synchronous post-settlement stream entrenchment (arroyo cutting) in the southwest US stimulated research addressing forcing mechanisms and necessary geomorphic and climate conditions leading to episodic evacuations of valley-fill alluvium. Arroyos are an end-member channel form associated with ephemeral streams entrenched into cohesive, fine-grained, valley-fill. Historic arroyo entrenchment exposed 5-30 m of unconformity-bound packages of different aged Holocene alluvium. Chronostratigraphic reconstructions indicate that during the mid-late Holocene these systems underwent multiple periods of rapid episodic entrenchment followed by slow re-aggradation. Previous and ongoing work has developed alluvial chronostratigraphies of Kanab Creek, Johnson Wash, and surrounding streams in southern UT using a combination of stratigraphic relationships, radiocarbon, and single-grain OSL dating. This research investigates the role of allogenic forcing (climate change) and autogenic processes on cut-fill dynamics. This study tests if temporal or spatial variations in sediment supply have influenced the timing and location of arroyo aggradation and entrenchment. We measured in-situ 10-Be in quartz from alluvial and colluvial sediment in Kanab Creek and Johnson Wash to quantify catchment-average erosion rates. Samples were collected from modern channels throughout the watershed and from dated alluvial packages preserved in arroyo walls. Results quantify spatial and temporal variability in sediment supply throughout the two watersheds as a function of lithology, slope, elevation, contribution of sediment stored in valley-fill, and time. Moreover, 10-Be results from dated Holocene alluvium will be used to evaluate if climate change has influenced sediment supply and arroyo cut-fill dynamics.

  17. Preliminary study of 10Be/7Be in rainwater from Xi’an by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Fu, Yun-Chong

    2017-01-01

    The 10Be/7Be ratio is a sensitive tracer for the study of atmospheric transport, particularly with regard to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Measurements with high accuracy and efficiency are crucial to 7Be and 10Be tracer studies. This article describes sample preparation procedures and analytical benchmarks for 7Be and 10Be measurements at the Xi’an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (Xi’an-AMS) laboratory for the study of rainwater samples. We describe a sample preparation procedure to fabricate beryllium oxide (BeO) AMS targets that includes co-precipitation, anion exchange column separation and purification. We then provide details for the AMS measurement of 7Be and 10Be following the sequence BeO-→Be2+→Be4+ in the Xi’an- AMS. The 10Be/7Be ratio of rainwater collected in Xi’an is shown to be about 1.3 at the time of rainfall. The virtue of the method described here is that both 7Be and 10Be are measured in the same sample, and it is suitable for routine analysis of large numbers of rainwater samples by AMS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205161) and CAS Key Technology Talent Program

  18. New developments with Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD): Comparison of mechanical and electronic Schmidt-hammers - towards a conversion factor for Q- and R-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan; Matthews, John; Corbett, David

    2014-05-01

    Developed as an instrument for in situ destruction-free testing of concrete hardness in construction works, the Schmidt-hammer has subsequently been introduced and applied in various fields of geomorphology and geology. In the context of investigating Late Glacial and Holocene glacier chronologies, the Schmidt-hammer has been widely used as a relative-age dating technique. Such applications have for example successfully separated moraines formed during different glacier advance periods ('Little Ice Age'-type events). Pilot studies combined Schmidt-hammer measurements with available radiocarbon ages in order to achieve age constraints. Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) combining Schmidt-hammer and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) has recently been successfully applied in Norway and New Zealand. Schmidt-hammer tests have also been used to ensure the representativeness of boulders selected for TCND sampling. Especially in mountain regions with a high "geomorphological uncertainty" with the dating of Holocene moraines the inherited multi-proxy approach of SHD owns a considerable potential for reliable investigations of Late Glacial/Holocene glacier chronologies and their palaeoclimatic interpretation. An electronic Schmidt-hammer (named SilverSchmidt) was introduced by the manufacturer of the original mechanical Schmidt-hammer (Proceq SA) a few years ago. It offers especially facilities for much easier data processing and constitutes, therefore, a major improvement and potential replacement for the mechanical Schmidt-hammer. However, its different approach to the measurement of surface hardness - based on Q-(velocity) values instead of R-(rebound) values - means that measurements from the two instruments are not easily interconvertible. Prior to any considerations of using the instruments interchangeably or replacing the mechanical Schmidt-hammer in future studies with the SilverSchmidt, comparative tests under field conditions need to be undertaken

  19. Studying 10BE and 11BE Halo States Through The (P,D) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; Tigress Collaboration; (Pcb)2 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03- 93ER40789.

  20. Studying 10Be and 11Be Halo States through the (p,d) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; (Pcb)2 Collaboration; Tigress Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03-93ER40789 (Colorado School of Mines).

  1. New experimental investigation of the structure of 10Be and 16C by means of intermediate-energy sequential breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.; Acosta, L.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-02-01

    10Be and 16C spectroscopy has been investigated by analyzing their breakup events on CH2 and CD2 targets. Breakup fragments have been detected by means of the CHIMERA detector. In particular, we investigated cluster decays of 10Be in 4He+6He and of 16C in 6He+10Be and 4He+6He+6He . From the relative energy analysis of breakup fragments, we investigate the spectroscopy of excited states of projectile nuclei. In the 10Be case we observe known states at 9.51, 10.16, 10.6, and 11.8 MeV. Further, we suggest the existence of a new state at 13.5 MeV, possibly 6+ as indicated from angular correlation analysis. The relative energy (Erel+Eth) spectrum of 16C, reconstructed starting from 6He+10Be correlations, shows a peak at about 20.6 MeV, probably related to the existence of an high-lying excited state. Non-vanishing yields are also seen in the triple coincidences 4He+6He+6He .

  2. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  3. Cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl geochronology of offset alluvial fans along the northern Death Valley fault zone: Implications for transient strain in the eastern California shear zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, K.L.; Brantley, K.S.; Dolan, J.F.; Finkel, R.C.; Klinger, R.E.; Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Owen, L.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Slate, J.L.; Wernicke, B.P.

    2007-01-01

    The northern Death Valley fault zone (NDVFZ) has long been recognized as a major right-lateral strike-slip fault in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). However, its geologic slip rate has been difficult to determine. Using high-resolution digital topographic imagery and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating, we present the first geochronologically determined slip rate for the NDVFZ. Our study focuses on the Red Wall Canyon alluvial fan, which exposes clean dextral offsets of seven channels. Analysis of airborne laser swath mapping data indicates ???297 ?? 9 m of right-lateral displacement on the fault system since the late Pleistocene. In situ terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be and 36C1 geochronology was used to date the Red Wall Canyon fan and a second, correlative fan also cut by the fault. Beryllium 10 dates from large cobbles and boulders provide a maximum age of 70 +22/-20 ka for the offset landforms. The minimum age of the alluvial fan deposits based on 36Cl depth profiles is 63 ?? 8 ka. Combining the offset measurement with the cosmogenic 10Be date yields a geologic fault slip rate of 4.2 +1.9/-1.1 mm yr-1, whereas the 36Cl data indicate 4.7 +0.9/-0.6 mm yr-1 of slip. Summing these slip rates with known rates on the Owens Valley, Hunter Mountain, and Stateline faults at similar latitudes suggests a total geologic slip rate across the northern ECSZ of ???8.5 to 10 mm yr-1. This rate is commensurate with the overall geodetic rate and implies that the apparent discrepancy between geologic and geodetic data observed in the Mojave section of the ECSZ does not extend north of the Garlock fault. Although the overall geodetic rates are similar, the best estimates based on geology predict higher strain rates in the eastern part of the ECSZ than to the west, whereas the observed geodetic strain is relatively constant. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Influence of topography and human activity on apparent in situ 10Be-derived erosion rates in Yunnan, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Amanda H.; Neilson, Thomas B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ouimet, William B.; Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica

    2016-11-01

    In order to understand better if and where erosion rates calculated using in situ 10Be are affected by contemporary changes in land use and attendant deep regolith erosion, we calculated erosion rates using measurements of in situ 10Be in quartz from 52 samples of river sediment collected from three tributaries of the Mekong River (median basin area = 46.5 km2). Erosion rates range from 12 to 209 mm kyr-1 with an area-weighted mean of 117 ± 49 mm kyr-1 (1 standard deviation) and median of 74 mm kyr-1. We observed a decrease in the relative influence of human activity from our steepest and least altered watershed in the north to the most heavily altered landscapes in the south. In the areas of the landscape least disturbed by humans, erosion rates correlate best with measures of topographic steepness. In the most heavily altered landscapes, measures of modern land use correlate with 10Be-estimated erosion rates but topographic steepness parameters cease to correlate with erosion rates. We conclude that, in some small watersheds with high rates and intensity of agricultural land use that we sampled, tillage and resultant erosion has excavated deeply enough into the regolith to deliver subsurface sediment to streams and thus raise apparent in situ 10Be-derived erosion rates by as much as 2.5 times over background rates had the watersheds not been disturbed.

  5. The Antarctica component of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5a) based on GPS positioning, exposure age dating of ice thicknesses, and relative sea level histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Moore, Angelyn W.

    2014-07-01

    A new model of the deglaciation history of Antarctica over the past 25 kyr has been developed, which we refer to herein as ICE-6G_C (VM5a). This revision of its predecessor ICE-5G (VM2) has been constrained to fit all available geological and geodetic observations, consisting of: (1) the present day uplift rates at 42 sites estimated from GPS measurements, (2) ice thickness change at 62 locations estimated from exposure-age dating, (3) Holocene relative sea level histories from 12 locations estimated on the basis of radiocarbon dating and (4) age of the onset of marine sedimentation at nine locations along the Antarctic shelf also estimated on the basis of 14C dating. Our new model fits the totality of these data well. An additional nine GPS-determined site velocities are also estimated for locations known to be influenced by modern ice loss from the Pine Island Bay and Northern Antarctic Peninsula regions. At the 42 locations not influenced by modern ice loss, the quality of the fit of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5A) is characterized by a weighted root mean square residual of 0.9 mm yr-1. The Southern Antarctic Peninsula is inferred to be rising at 2 mm yr-1, requiring there to be less Holocene ice loss there than in the prior model ICE-5G (VM2). The East Antarctica coast is rising at approximately 1 mm yr-1, requiring ice loss from this region to have been small since Last Glacial Maximum. The Ellsworth Mountains, at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula, are inferred to be rising at 5-8 mm yr-1, indicating large ice loss from this area during deglaciation that is poorly sampled by geological data. Horizontal deformation of the Antarctic Plate is minor with two exceptions. First, O'Higgins, at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is moving southeast at a significant 2 mm yr-1 relative to the Antarctic Plate. Secondly, the margins of the Ronne and Ross Ice Shelves are moving horizontally away from the shelf centres at an approximate rate of 0.8 mm yr-1, in

  6. Eight Million Years of Land-Based Antarctic Ice Sheet Stability Recorded By In Situ 10Be from the ANDRILL-1B Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, J. D.; Corbett, L. B.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) to Pliocene warmth provides a critical way to gauge its sensitivity to climate change. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the Pliocene behavior of the EAIS, however. For instance, global sea level estimates for the mid-Pliocene warm period range from <10 m to >30 m, and numerous cosmogenic nuclide and sedimentological studies from the Transantarctic Mountains imply extreme landscape stability over the last several Myr whereas ocean records suggest orbital-scale instability of at least marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. These stabilist versus dynamicist views are difficult to resolve because onshore records are generally biased toward intervals of expanded ice cover and limited to areas with exposed land, while marine sediments typically provide indirect evidence for conditions on land and cannot distinguish between marine versus land-based ice sheet collapse. The AND-1B marine sediment core drilled beneath the Ross Ice Shelf contains a remarkably complete late Cenozoic sequence of glacial diamictons sourced from the adjacent EAIS, intercalated with open-water sediments likely associated with West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse. We measured concentrations of in situ 10Be - produced only when ice cover is reduced and the landscape is exposed - in eight samples of glacially-derived quartz sand from AND-1B spanning parts of the last 8 Myr. Decay-corrected concentrations are low and show a long-term decline from 13,000 atoms/g to 1000 atoms/g over the record. These low values and the monotonic trend suggest that land-based ice sheet sectors have experienced little, if any, exposure during the past 8 Myr; the 10Be concentrations we measured are equivalent to only centuries or a few kyr of surface exposure. Perhaps more likely, the small quantities of 10Be were produced prior to the establishment of a full EAIS in the mid-Miocene, and reflect deeply-exhumed and thus 10Be-poor material that has been radioactively

  7. {sup 7,9,10}Be elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections on a {sup 12}C target

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, J. C.; Guimaraes, V.; Barioni, A.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Gasques, L. R.; Scarduelli, V.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Leistenschneider, E.; Condori, R. P.; Zagatto, V. A.; Morais, M. C.; Crema, E.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2011-09-15

    Elastic scattering angular distributions for {sup 7}Be, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 10}Be isotopes on {sup 12}C target were measured at laboratory energies of 18.8, 26.0, and 23.2 MeV, respectively. The analysis was performed in terms of optical model potentials using Woods-Saxon and double-folding form factors. Also, continuum discretized coupled-channels calculations were performed for {sup 7}Be and {sup 9}Be + {sup 12}C systems to infer the role of breakup in the elastic scattering. For the {sup 10}Be + {sup 12}C system, bound states coupled-channels calculations were considered. Moreover, total reaction cross sections were deduced from the elastic scattering analysis and compared with published data on other weakly and tightly bound projectiles elastically scattered on the {sup 12}C target, as a function of energy.

  8. An improved north-south synchronization of ice core records around the 41 kyr 10Be peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raisbeck, Grant M.; Cauquoin, Alexandre; Jouzel, Jean; Landais, Amaelle; Petit, Jean-Robert; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y.; Beer, Juerg; Synal, Hans-Arno; Oerter, Hans; Johnsen, Sigfus J.; Steffensen, Jorgen P.; Svensson, Anders; Yiou, Françoise

    2017-03-01

    Using new high-resolution 10Be measurements in the NGRIP, EDML and Vostok ice cores, together with previously published data from EDC, we present an improved synchronization between Greenland and Antarctic ice cores during the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion ˜ 41 kyr ago. We estimate the precision of this synchronization to be ±20 years, an order of magnitude better than previous work. We discuss the implications of this new synchronization for making improved estimates of the depth difference between ice and enclosed gas of the same age (Δdepth), difference between age of ice and enclosed gas at the same depth (Δage) in the EDC and EDML ice cores, spectral properties of the 10Be profiles and phasing between Dansgaard-Oeschger-10 (in NGRIP) and AIM-10 (in EDML and EDC).

  9. Observations of historical sea cliff retreat rates exceed long-term estimates derived from cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Historical observation of coastal retreat are limited to relatively short timescales (< 150 years), during which time humans may have modified the coastal environment. There is growing concern that rates of coastal change may be accelerated in the face of anticipated stormier climates and rising sea level, yet there is little knowledge of rates of coastal change prior to the relatively brief historical records. In order to make predictions about potential future coastal change it is important to establish baseline conditions averaged over longer time periods. Here we present analysis of sea cliff retreat throughout the Holocene averaged for chalk cliffs in south-east England using cosmogenic isotopes. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in-situ flint samples collected from three transects across coastal platforms in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate during the Holocene. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. We find that cliff retreat rates during the Holocene were significantly slower (2-6 cm yr-1) than those derived from recent historical observations (15-25 cm yr-1). Modelled accumulation of 10Be requires retreat rates that increase rapidly in recent times, potentially reflecting human modification of the coastal sediment budget through construction of sea defences, flood defenses and aggregate extraction. Therefore knowledge of past human activity at the coastline may be important in anticipating future rates of coastal retreat.

  10. 10Be-derived denudation rates from the Burdekin catchment: The largest contributor of sediment to the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Jacky; Bartley, Rebecca; Chappell, John; Austin, Jenet M.; Fifield, Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Thompson, Chris J.; Furuichi, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs) such as Beryllium-10 (10Be) are now routinely used to reconstruct erosional rates over tens of thousands of years at increasingly large basin scales (> 100,000 km2). In Australia, however, the approach and its assumptions have not been systematically tested within a single, large drainage basin. This study measures 10Be concentrations in river sediments from the Burdekin catchment, one of Australia's largest coastal catchments, to determine long-term (> 10,000 years), time-integrated rates of sediment generation and denudation. A nested-sampling design was used to test for effects of increasing catchment scale on nuclide concentrations with upstream catchment areas ranging from 4 to 130,000 km2. Beryllium-10 concentrations in sediment samples collected from the upstream headwater tributaries and mid-stream locations range from 1.8 to 2.89 × 105 atoms g- 1 and data confirm that nuclide concentrations are well and rapidly mixed downstream. Sediment from the same tributaries consistently yielded 10Be concentrations in the range of their upstream samples. Overall, no decrease in 10Be concentrations can be observed at the range of catchment scales measured here. The mean denudation rate for all river sediment samples throughout the Fanning subcatchment (1100 km2) is 18.47 m Ma- 1, which compares with the estimate at the end of the Burdekin catchment (130,000 km2) of 16.22 m Ma- 1. Nuclide concentrations in the lower gradient western and southern catchments show a higher degree of variability, and several complications emerged as a result of the contrasting geomorphic processes and settings. This study confirms the ability of TCNs to determine long-term denudation rates in Australia and highlights some important considerations in the model assumptions that may affect the accuracy of limited sampling in large, low-gradient catchments with long storage times.

  11. [sup 14]C and [sup 10]Be evidence for no incursion of the Lake Michigan lobe in northern Illinois from ca. 170 to 25 ka

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, B.B. ); Pavich, M.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Uncorrected [sup 10]Be inventories of a 2.7 m-long section of core indicate surface exposure lasting 115 ka during development of the Sangamon Geosol and 30 ka for a soil complex developed in overlying loessial sediment (Robein Silt). The latter estimate is in agreement with [sup 14]C assays in the region. Taking into account the age of overlying late Wisconsin drift, the new data indicate an age of about 170 ka for the onset of Sangamon pedogenesis in northern Illinois. Previous to this study, there have been no numerical-age determinations for the start of the last interglacial in northern IL. The data confirm a previous hypothesis that the Lake Michigan Lobe did not invade IL contemporaneous with deposition of Roxana Silt, or during the other period of midcontinental loess deposition suggest by TL ages of ca. 70 to 85 ka. The core was collected immediately south of the IL-WI border (42[degree] 30 minutes N, 88[degree] 30 minutes W) near Hebron, IL. Buried by 14 m of late Wisconsin drift, and the interval assayed for [sup 10]Be included 2.0 m of pedogenically-altered Illinoian sand and gravel, and 0.7 m of Wisconsin silt. One AMS [sup 14]C assay of carbonized fragments from the A-horizon of the Sangamon Geosol yielded an age of 38,500 [+-] 5,000 yr B.P.; conventional [sup 14]C ages for the overlying silt are from wood fragments (24,780 [times] 360 yr B.P.) and a bulk soil sample (26,030 [+-] 450 yr B.P.). The range of ages is typical for this stratigraphic sequence in IL. The [sup 10]Be concentration in the lowest part of the silt is 600 atoms/gm. This value is three times greater than the concentration typical of calcareous Mississippi River valley loess and of the C-horizon of the Sangamon Geosol in the core. High concentration of [sup 10]Be in the Robein Silt likely was caused by redeposition of [sup 10]Be-rich B-horizon material eroded from soil profiles elsewhere in the paleobasin.

  12. Coexistence of {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, N.; Ito, M.; Milin, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.

    2008-06-15

    The coexistence of the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in the excited states of {sup 10}Be has been discussed. In the previous analysis, all the low-lying states of {sup 10}Be were found to be well described by the motion of the two valence neutrons around two {alpha} clusters. However, the {alpha}+t+t cluster structure was found to coexist with the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n structure around E{sub x}=15 MeV, close to the corresponding threshold. We have introduced a microscopic model to solve the coupling effect between these two configurations. The K=0 and K=1 states are generated from the {alpha}+t+t configurations due to the spin coupling of two triton clusters. The present case of {sup 10}Be is one of the few examples in which completely different configurations of triton-type ({alpha}+t+t three-center) and {alpha}-type ({alpha}+{alpha}+n+n two-center) clusters coexist in a single nucleus in the same energy region.

  13. CRE dating on the scarps of large landslides affecting the Belledonne massif ( French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrouc, V.; Baillet, L.; Schwartz, S.; Jongmans, D.; Gamond, J. F.; Bourles, D.; Le Roux, O.; Carcaillet, J.; Braucher, R.

    2012-04-01

    The southwestern edge of the Belledonne Massif (French Alps) consists of micaschists unconformably covered with Mesozoic sediments and Quaternary deposits. The morphology corresponds to a glacial plateau (Mont Sec plateau) bordered by steep slopes (around 40°), where moraines and peat bog subsist. The massif is incised by the East-West trending Romanche valley that was shaped by several cycles of quaternary glaciations and deglaciations. Slopes are affected by several active or past large scale rock mass instabilities. Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating was applied on the head scarps of three large landslides, one of which being the active Séchilienne landslide whose headscarp was already dated by Leroux et al. [2009]. Dating results suggest a concomitant initiation of these instabilities at about 7 ± 2 10Be ka, thousands years after the total downwastage of the valley. A different kinematic behaviour was however observed on two contiguous landslides for which continuous exposure profiles were obtained. On the Séchilienne landslide, 23 samples were collected from internal and lateral scarps, as well as on polished bedrock surfaces, with the aim of dating the internal kinematics of the landslide. Preliminary dating results obtained on polished surfaces and near the top of the scarps show unexpected low 10Be concentrations, suggesting the existence of thin moraine or peat bog deposits masking the bedrock, which have been subsequently eroded. The minimum thickness of these deposits was estimated assuming a constant denudation rate over time. Exposure date profiles show that the studied lateral and internal scarps were initiated at the same period as the Sechilienne headscarp. An increase in the exposure rate was also observed between 2 and 1 ka, in agreement with that evidenced along the headscarp. Forty other samples have been collected in the landslide to corroborate these results. Reference Le Roux, O., S. Schwartz , J.-F. Gamond, D. Jongmans, D. Bourles, R

  14. Search for the isovector monopole resonance via the 28Si(10Be,10B+ γ)28Al reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Michael; e11021 Collaboration Team

    2013-10-01

    The isovector giant monopole resonance (IVGMR) is a fundamental mode of collective oscillation in which the neutron and proton fluids in a nucleus radially expand and contract in an out-of-phase manner. Observation of the IVGMR has been difficult due to the lack of a probe that will excite only its non-spin-flip (ΔS = 0) transitions. The IVGMR's spin-transfer (ΔS = 1) counterpart, the isovector spin giant monopole resonance, is much more strongly excited at bombarding energies higher than 60 MeV/ u. By way of the (10Be,10B+ γ) charge-exchange reaction, the selectivity for the excitation of the IVGMR can be gained. In this probe, the superallowed Fermi transition 10Be(0+,g.s.) -->10B(01+,1.74 MeV, T = 1) allows a nearly pure isolation of the ΔS = 0 component by detecting the 1022 keV gamma rays from the deexcitation of the 10B. We measured the double differential cross sections for the 28Si(10Be,10B+ γ) reaction at 100 MeV/ u using the large acceptance S800 Spectrometer at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the GRETINA array detecting the gamma rays emitted from the 10B ejectile. In this presentation, we will report preliminary reults of the IVGMR in 28Al. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  15. Food Product Dating

    MedlinePlus

    ... of date you might find on a meat, poultry, or egg product label. Are dates required on ... is not required by Federal regulations. For meat, poultry, and egg products under the jurisdiction of the ...

  16. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  17. Regolith evolution on the millennial timescale from combined U-Th-Ra isotopes and in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis in a weathering profile (Strengbach catchment, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Van der Woerd, J.; Viville, D.; Pelt, E.; Kali, E.; Lerouge, C.; Ackerer, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Négrel, P.

    2016-11-01

    U-Th-Ra disequilibria, cosmogenic in situ 10Be concentrations and major and trace element concentrations have been analyzed in a 2 m-deep weathering profile sampled at the summit of the granitic Strengbach catchment (France). The data have been used to independently estimate both the long-term regolith production and denudation rates and the weathering and erosion rates. Modeling of the 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium variations in the lower part of the profile yields a regolith production rate of 12 ± 4 mm/kyr (30 ± 10 T/km2/yr), while modeling of the high-resolution 10Be concentration profile leads to an exposure age of 19.7 ± 2.2 kyr, an inherited concentration of 15,000 ± 1,000 at/g in quartz and a mean denudation rate of 22 ± 10 mm/kyr (37 ± 15 T/km2/yr). The consistency between production and denudation rates suggests that, on a millennial timescale, the regolith mass balance at the summit of the catchment is close to a steady state, even if the watershed may have been impacted by Quaternary climatic changes and by recent anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., 20th century acid rain and recent afforestation efforts). The results also indicate that physical erosion is likely the dominant long-term process of regolith denudation in the catchment. Furthermore, the comparison of the long-term production and denudation rates and of weathering and erosion rates determined from the depth profile analyses with the current weathering and erosion rates estimated at the outlet of the watershed based on monitoring of the water chemistry and sediment fluxes suggests that physical erosion may have varied more than the chemical weathering flux during the last 150 kyr. Although very few other sites with U-series, in situ 10Be and stream monitoring data are available for comparison, the current data suggest that (1) the mass balance steady state of regolith might be commonly achieved in soil mantled landscapes, and (2) physical erosion has varied much more than

  18. Application of in situ-produced 10Be to the study of Australian stone line induced by termite activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Gurarie, E.; Bourles, D.; Braucher, R.; Brown, E.; Anan, R.; Gilkes, R.; Meunier, J. D.; Varajao, C.

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the genesis of a stoneline sequence located at the border of the Yilgarn Craton in southwest Austrtalia. The sequence was selected because a well-defined line of siliceous pebbles traces the limit between a typical tropical saprolite and a soil almost entirely composed of termite nests, providing an opportunity to study the role of biological processes in stoneline genesis. A roadcut along the Boyup Brook Road provided the opportunity to examine and sample a 100 m wide section of weathering mantle developed on a gently sloping hill. The sequence consists, from base to top, of three main weathering layers: a gneiss- and schist-inherited yellow saprolite that includes subvertical quartz veins ; a 10 to 20 cm thick stone line composed primarily of angular quartz pebble; and a 40 to 50 cm thick dark brown surficial soil rich in both active and dormant termite nests. The distribution of these layers does not vary significantly across the hill, but quartz rich veins are most abundant in the central part of the hill. Kaolinite and quartz are the major mineralogical components throughout the sequence. There is little variation in grain size distributions, other than a modest increase in the >63 micron fractions of surface samples due to termite activity (mixing of minerals with woody and grassy debris). Chemical and mineralogical analyses were used to characterise the weathering layers and to investigate the role of termite colonies. We determined the in situ produced 10Be contents of samples collected from a depth profile through the quartz-rich schist and of pebbles from the stoneline at distances up to 40 m from central quartz veins. The 10Be depth profile shows a simple exponential decrease with depth, consistent with attenuation of cosmic ray neutrons and erosion at a rate of 20 mMyr, consistent with rates of excavation by termites. The pebbles from the stoneline have nearly constant 10Be concentrations that are approximately

  19. Tectonics, climate and mountain building in the forearc of southern Peru recorded in the 10Be chronology of low-relief surface abandonment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. R.; Farber, D.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Regional low-relief surfaces have long been recognized as key features to understanding the response of landscapes to surface uplift. The canonical models of low-relief surface formation involve an extended period of tectonic quiescence during which, the fluvial systems bevel the landscape to a uniform elevation. This quiescent period is punctuated by a period(s) of surface uplift, which causes fluvial incision thereby abandoning the low-relief landscape. Over time, as rivers continue to incise in response to changes in sediment supply, river discharge, and base level fall, pieces of the relict low-relief landscape are left as abandoned remnants stranded above active channels. By determining the age of abandoned surfaces, previous workers have identified the onset of a change in the tectonic or climatic setting. One key assumption of this model is that the low-relief surfaces are truly abandoned with no current processes further acting on the surface. To improve our understanding of the underlying assumptions and problems of low-relief surface formation, we have used detailed mapping and absolute dating with cosmogenic 10Be to investigate surfaces in the hyperarid forearc region of southern Peru between ~14° and 18°S. Within this region, marine terraces and strath terraces reflect Plio-Pleistocene surface uplift, and together with the hyperarid climate, ongoing surface uplift provides a perfect natural laboratory to examine the processes affecting low-relief surface abandonment and preservation. With our new chronology we address: 1) the space and time correlations of surfaces, 2) incision rates of streams in response to base-level fall, and 3) surface erosion rates. Multiple surfaces have yielded 10Be surface abandonment ages that span >2 Ma - ~35 ka. While most of the surfaces we have dated are considerably less than 1 Ma, we have located two surfaces which are likely older than 2 Ma and constrain regional erosion rates to be <0.5mm/yr. Where the surface age

  20. Constraining multi-stage exposure-burial scenarios for boulders preserved beneath cold-based glacial ice in Thule, northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-04-01

    Boulders and landscapes preserved beneath cold-based, non-erosive glacial ice violate assumptions associated with simple cosmogenic exposure dating. In such a setting, simple single isotope exposure ages over-estimate the latest period of surface exposure; hence, alternate approaches are required to constrain the multi-stage exposure/burial histories of such samples. Here, we report 28 paired analyses of 10Be and 26Al in boulder samples from Thule, northwest Greenland. We use numerical models of exposure and burial as well as Monte Carlo simulations to constrain glacial chronology and infer process in this Arctic region dominated by cold-based ice. We investigate three specific cases that can arise with paired nuclide data: (1) exposure ages that are coeval with deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure; (2) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with burial following initial exposure; and (3) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure. Most glacially-transported boulders in Thule have complex histories; some were exposed for tens of thousands of years and buried for at least hundreds of thousands of years, while others underwent only limited burial. These boulders were probably recycled through different generations of till over multiple glacial/interglacial cycles, likely experiencing partial or complete shielding during interglacial periods due to rotation or shallow burial by sediments. Our work demonstrates that the landscape in Thule, like many high-latitude landscapes, was shaped over long time durations and multiple glacial and interglacial periods throughout the Quaternary.

  1. Evidence from stable isotopes and (10)Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-11-22

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived (10)Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  2. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-01-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed. PMID:27873999

  3. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Collective modes of tri-nuclear molecules of the type 96Sr+ 10Be+ 146Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, P. O.; Scheid, W.; Greiner, W.; Hamilton, J. H.

    1999-12-01

    The collective modes of the tri-nuclear molecule 96Sr+ 10Be+ 146Ba, observed in recent cold fission decay of 252Cf into three clusters, are theoretically investigated. The main excitations are rotations, the butterfly and belly-dancer modes and icons/Journals/Common/beta" ALT="beta" ALIGN="TOP"/>- and icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/>-vibrations. Due to the presence of the Be nucleus, butterfly excitation energies are shifted up to 2 MeV. There are only a few collective states below 1 MeV which are not rotational. The first rotational level of spin 2+ lies at an energy of about 6 keV. Proposals of how these collective modes may be measured are suggested.

  5. Measurement of proton production cross sections of {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al from elements found in lunar rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, J.M.; Kim, K.; Englert, P.A.J.

    1996-07-01

    Cosmic rays penetrate the lunar surface and interact with the lunar rocks to produce both radionuclides and stable nuclides. Production depth profiles for long-lived radionuclides produce in lunar rocks are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). For a particular radionuclide these production depth profiles can be interpreted to give an estimate for the solar proton flux over a time period characterized by the half life of the radionuclide under study. This analysis is possible if and only if all the cross sections for the interactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are well known. In practice, the most important cross sections needed are the proton production cross sections, because 98% of solar cosmic rays and {similar_to}87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons. The cross sections for the production of long-lived radionuclides were very difficult to measure before the development of AMS and only in recent years has significant progress been made in determining these essential cross sections. Oxygen and silicon are major constituents of lunar rocks. We have reported already {sup 14}C production cross sections from O and Si for proton energies 25-500 MeV, and O(p,x){sup 10}Be from 58 160 MeV[6]. Here we present new measurements for the cross sections O(p,x){sup 10}Be,O(p,x){sup 7}Be, Si(p,x){sup 7}Be,Si(p,x){sup 26}Al, and Si(p,x){sup 22}Na from {approximately}30 - 500 MeV.

  6. Late glacial 10Be ages for glacial landforms in the upper region of the Taibai glaciation in the Qinling Mountain range, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yixin; Liu, Beibei; Harbor, Jonathan M.; Cui, Zhijiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiao; Zhao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Glacial landforms are well preserved on Taibai Mountain (3767 m), the main peak of the Qinling mountain range located south of the Loess Plateau and east of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The timing and extent of Quaternary glaciation in the study area is important for reconstructing Quaternary environmental change however numerical ages for glaciation in this study area have not previously been well resolved. Using terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides we dated four samples collected from two glacially eroded rock steps in the upper part of a valley near the main peak, in an area previously identified as having been occupied by ice during the Taibai glaciation. The 10Be results are all late glacial in age: 18.6 ± 1.1 ka, 16.9 ± 1.0 ka, 16.9 ± 1.1 ka and 15.1 ± 1.0 ka. The spatial pattern of ages in the valley suggests fast retreat, with horizontal and vertical retreat rates estimated to be on the order of 0.4 and 0.09 m a-1, respectively. A simple extrapolation of these retreat rates from the ages at the two sample sites suggests that the glacier retreat began during Last Glacial Maximum and that glaciers disappeared from the main peak by about 15 ka.

  7. Dating the Crucifixion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Colin J.; Waddington, W. G.

    1983-12-01

    The date of the Crucifixion has been debated for many years, but there has been no agreement on the year nor the day. Astronomical calculations have now been used to reconstruct the Jewish calendar in the first century AD and to date a lunar eclipse that biblical and other references suggest followed the Crucifixion. The evidence points to Friday 3 April AD 33 as the date when Jesus Christ died.

  8. Active basement uplift of Sierra Pie de Palo (Northwestern Argentina): Rates and inception from10Be cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siame, Lionel L.; Sébrier, Michel; Bellier, Olivier; Bourlès, Didier; Costa, Carlos; Ahumada, Emilio A.; Gardini, Carlos E.; Cisneros, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Quaternary tectonic and denudation rates are investigated for an actively growing basement anticline: the Sierra Pie de Palo range, which belongs to the Andean foreland of Northwestern Argentina (28°S-33°S). In this study, a detailed morphometric analysis of the topography is combined with in situ-produced cosmogenic10Be concentrations measured in (1) surface boulders abandoned on alluvial terraces affected by fault activity (along the north bounding fault) and growth of the basement fold (along the southeastern border), (2) bedrock outcrops corresponding to an exhumed and folded, regional erosion surface, and (3) fluvial sediments sampled at the outlets of several watersheds. Along the eastern and northern borders of the range, incision and uplift rates have been estimated at approximately 0.5 and 1 mm/yr when integrated on Holocene and Pleistocene time scales, in close agreement with both long-term (structural and basin evolution data) and short-term (GPS-derived velocity field) analyses. Cosmogenic-derived denudation and uplift rates combined with geomorphic characteristics of watersheds and river channels allows estimating the onset of the uplift at 4-6 Ma, followed by a more recent period of topographic rejuvenation at roughly 1-2 Ma, probably synchronous with steepening of the eastern and northern flanks of the anticline.

  9. Rates of sediment supply to arroyos from upland erosion determined using in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clapp, Erik M.; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Pavich, Milan; Caffee, Marc A.

    2001-01-01

    Using 10Be and 26Al measured in sediment and bedrock, we quantify rates of upland erosion and sediment supply to a small basin in northwestern New Mexico. This and many other similar basins in the southwestern United States have been affected by cycles of arroyo incision and backfilling several times in the past few millennia. The sediment generation (275 ± 65 g m−2 yr−1) and bedrock equivalent lowering rates (102 ± 24 m myr−1) we determine are sufficient to support at least three arroyo cycles in the past 3,000 years, consistent with rates calculated from a physical sediment budget within the basin and regional rates determined using other techniques. Nuclide concentrations measured in different sediment sources and reservoirs suggest that the arroyo is a good spatial and temporal integrator of sediment and associated nuclide concentrations from throughout the basin, that the basin is in steady-state, and that nuclide concentration is independent of sediment grain size. Differences between nuclide concentrations measured in sediment sources and reservoirs reflect sediment residence times and indicate that subcolluvial bedrock weathering on hillslopes supplies more sediment to the basin than erosion of exposed bedrock.

  10. Rates of Sediment Supply to Arroyos from Upland Erosion Determined Using in Situ Produced Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Erik M.; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Pavich, Milan; Caffee, Marc

    2001-03-01

    Using 10Be and 26Al measured in sediment and bedrock, we quantify rates of upland erosion and sediment supply to a small basin in northwestern New Mexico. This and many other similar basins in the southwestern United States have been affected by cycles of arroyo incision and backfilling several times in the past few millennia. The sediment generation (275 ± 65 g m-2 yr-1) and bedrock equivalent lowering rates (102 ± 24 m myr-1) we determine are sufficient to support at least three arroyo cycles in the past 3,000 years, consistent with rates calculated from a physical sediment budget within the basin and regional rates determined using other techniques. Nuclide concentrations measured in different sediment sources and reservoirs suggest that the arroyo is a good spatial and temporal integrator of sediment and associated nuclide concentrations from throughout the basin, that the basin is in steady-state, and that nuclide concentration is independent of sediment grain size. Differences between nuclide concentrations measured in sediment sources and reservoirs reflect sediment residence times and indicate that subcolluvial bedrock weathering on hillslopes supplies more sediment to the basin than erosion of exposed bedrock.

  11. Weathering histories of Chinese loess deposits based on uranium and thorium series nuclides and cosmogenic {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z.Y. |; Lal, D.; Liu, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The long, continuous deposition of dust in the Chinese loess plateau offers an unique opportunity to study the nature of soil weathering in a wide range of climatic conditions. In this paper we report on measurements of concentrations of U- and Th-series nuclides and of major cations in 150 loess and paleosol samples from five sites, going back 2.5 Ma. Using the results for {sup 10}Be concentrations in these soils, we determined the absolute amounts of water added to several soil units and obtained: (1) first-order leaching constants for U and several cations and (2) the compositions of the soils contributing to the dust-source regions and of the dust at deposition. Further, based on analyses of {sup 230}Th in soils deposited in the past ca. 140 ka, we determined when the soils weathered in the source regions. We conclude that most of the weathering in the dust-source regions may have occurred during the interglacials. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Combining bulk sediment OSL and meteoric 10Be fingerprinting techniques to identify gully initiation sites and erosion depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portenga, E. W.; Bishop, P.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2017-02-01

    Deep erosional gullies dissect landscapes around the world. Existing erosion models focus on predicting where gullies might begin to erode, but identifying where existing gullies were initiated and under what conditions is difficult, especially when historical records are unavailable. Here we outline a new approach for fingerprinting alluvium and tracing it back to its source by combining bulk sediment optically stimulated luminescence (bulk OSL) and meteoric 10Be (10Bem) measurements made on gully-derived alluvium samples. In doing so, we identify where gully erosion was initiated and infer the conditions under which such erosion occurred. As both 10Bem and bulk OSL data have distinctive depth profiles in different uneroded and depositional settings, we are able to identify the likely incision depths in potential alluvium source areas. We demonstrate our technique at Birchams Creek in the southeastern Australian Tablelands—a well-studied and recent example of gully incision that exemplifies a regional landscape transition from unchanneled swampy meadow wetlands to gully incision and subsequent wetland burial by post-European settlement alluvium. We find that such historic alluvium was derived from a shallow erosion of valley fill upstream of former swampy meadows and was deposited down the center of the valley. Incision likely followed catchment deforestation and the introduction of livestock, which overgrazed and congregated in valley bottoms in the early 20th century during a period of drought. As a result, severe gully erosion was likely initiated in localized, compacted, and oversteepened reaches of the valley bottom.

  13. Live 129I-129Xe dating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.

    1986-01-01

    A technique of cosmic ray exposure age dating using cosmic ray produced I-129 and Xe-129 components is discussed. The live I-129 - Xe-129 method provides an ideal monitor for cosmic ray flux variations on the 10(7)y - 10(8)y time-scale. It is based on low-energy neutron reactions on Te, and these data, when coupled to those from other methods, may facilitate the detection of complex exposure histories.

  14. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Barham, Lawrence; Phillips, William M; Maher, Barbara A; Karloukovski, Vassil; Duller, Geoff A T; Jain, Mayank; Wintle, Ann G

    2011-05-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ~2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating ((10)Be/(26)Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (~78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  15. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barham, L.; Phillips, W.M.; Maher, B.A.; Karloukovski, V.; Duller, G.A.T.; Jain, M.; Wintle, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ??? 2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating (10Be/26Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (???78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited: Archaeological Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses methods used to date archaeological artifacts and other remains. They include: (1) nuclear dating techniques (radiocarbon dating, accelerator radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence, and others); (2) chemical dating techniques (amino acid racemization, obsidian hydration dating, elemental content changes, and thermal analysis dating); and…

  17. Measurement of proton production cross sections of (sup 10)Be and (sup 26)Al from elements found in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; McHargue, L.; Castaneda, C.; Vincent, J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    Cosmic rays penetrate the lunar surface and interact with the lunar rocks to produce both radionuclides and stable nuclides. Production depth profiles for long-lived radionuclides produce in lunar rocks are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). For a particular radionuclide these production depth profiles can be interpreted to give an estimate for the solar proton flux over a time period characterized by the half life of the radionuclide under study. This analysis is possible if and only if all the cross sections for the interactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are well known. In practice, the most important cross sections needed are the proton production cross sections, because 98% of solar cosmic rays and (similar to)87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons. The cross sections for the production of long-lived radionuclides were very difficult to measure before the development of AMS and only in recent years has significant progress been made in determining these essential cross sections. Oxygen and silicon are major constituents of lunar rocks. We have reported already C-14 production cross sections from O and Si for proton energies 25-500 MeV, and O(p,x)(sup 10)Be from 58 160 MeV[6]. Here we present new measurements for the cross sections O(p,x)Be-10,O(p,x)Be-7, Si(p,x)Be-7,Si(p,x)Al-26, and Si(p,x)Na-22 from approximately 30 - 500 MeV.

  18. Rate of fluvial incision in the Central Alps constrained through joint inversion of detrital 10Be and thermochronometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M.; Leith, K.; Bodin, T.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Catchment-wide cosmogenic nuclide concentration (CNCs) measurements of erosion rates have revolutionized the interpretation of processes responsible for generating mountainous landscapes. However, surface processes can vary within a single catchment, leading to spatial and temporal variations in erosion rates. This is particularly apparent for landscapes that have transient topographic features due to changes in tectonics or inherited glacial topography. Detrital thermochronometry provides a means to assess where modern sediment is derived as a function of elevation, and constrains the relative erosion rates across a catchment. To solve the corresponding inverse problem, we build on the Bayesian interpretation of probability of observing a detrital age (Avdeev et al., 2011) and use a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample both the parameter space and also the model complexity. Rivers within the Codera watershed of the Bergell Intrusion (Central European Alps) have incised into a glacial valley. We integrate constraints from detrital apatite fission track ages and detrital 10Be concentrations to interrogate the primary erosion processes shaping this Alpine landscape and constrain rates of erosion across the catchment. We find that modern erosion rates within most downstream portions of the landscape are too low to permit the inferred ˜500 m of incision during the most recent interglacial. Based on the spatial pattern of modern erosion rates, we predict that if the incised fluvial valley was formed solely during interglacial periods, incision is likely to have initiated almost 400,000 years BP. We explore the potential for this type of analysis to study inaccessible landscapes currently covered by ice. Avdeev, B., Niemi, N.A., Clark, M.K., 2011. Doing more with less: Bayesian estimation of erosion models with detrital thermochronometric data. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 305 (3), 385-395.

  19. Choosing a calving date

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calving date affects cost and timing of production events. Due to the polyestrous nature of beef females, producers can choose a calving date that fits their production system and geographic region. Any time an entire production system is considered, decision making becomes complex. Any calving syst...

  20. Pests of stored dates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dates are a major food crop across a large band of Africa and Eurasia, and to a lesser extent elsewhere. In most of its growing range, dates are threatened with infestation in the field by a complex of pests including nitidulid beetles and pyralid moths of the Subfamily Phycitinae. They are further ...

  1. Date Palm Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews date palm genetic resources and their conservation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is an important food crop in the Middle East and North Africa. Its center of origin and diversity most probably is the area near Iraq/Iran. From there, it spread throughout its present range...

  2. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  3. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  4. Radiocarbon dating accuracy improved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists have extended the accuracy of carbon-14 (14C) dating by correlating dates older than 8,000 years with uranium-thorium dates that span from 8,000 to 30,000 years before present (ybp, present = 1950). Edouard Bard, Bruno Hamelin, Richard Fairbanks and Alan Zindler, working at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, dated corals from reefs off Barbados using both 14C and uranium-234/thorium-230 by thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques. They found that the two age data sets deviated in a regular way, allowing the scientists to correlate the two sets of ages. The 14C dates were consistently younger than those determined by uranium-thorium, and the discrepancy increased to about 3,500 years at 20,000 ybp.

  5. Denudation rates across the Pamir based on 10Be concentrations in fluvial sediments: dominance of topographic over climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M. C.; Gloaguen, R.; Merchel, S.; Pohl, E.; Sulaymonova, V. A.; Andermann, C.; Rugel, G.

    2015-08-01

    A clear understanding of erosion processes is fundamental in order to comprehend the evolution of actively deforming mountain ranges. However, the relative contributions of tectonic and climatic factors and their feedbacks remain highly debated. In order to contribute to the debate, we quantify basin-wide denudation rates from cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in modern river sediments in the Pamir. This mountain range is a unique natural laboratory because the ongoing India-Eurasia collision sustains high deformation rates and, on account of its position at the transition between Westerlies and monsoon, a strong regional climatic variability arises. Sample acquisition and preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry measurements were challenging due to difficult field accessibility, low quartz and high feldspar concentrations and crystal coating. Six samples along the main draining river, the Panj, and five samples within the major, east-west elongated tributary basins allow us to quantify basin-wide denudation rates for the first time in this orogen. An average denudation rate of ~ 0.64 mm yr-1 reveals a rapid evolution of the entire Pamir. Denudation rates of tributary sub-basins highlight the strong contrast between the Pamir Plateau (0.05 to 0.16 mm yr-1) and its margins (0.54 to 1.45 mm yr-1). The intensity of denudation is primarily correlated with geometric properties of the surface, such as slope steepness (0.75 quartiles; R2 of 0.81), and to a lesser extent to climatic factors such as precipitation. We thus argue that either tectonic uplift or base-level lowering are the main contributors to denudation processes. Multiple linear regression analysis (best R2 of 0.93) suggests that precipitation may act as a limiting factor to denudation. The highest denudation rates coincide with areas of the northwestern Pamir margin that receive precipitation predominantly from the Westerlies during winter. There, the concentrated discharge during spring and early summer

  6. Uplift and denudation rates of an actively growing mountain range inferred from in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be: the Yumu Shan (NE Tibetan Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, L.; Hetzel, R.; Minxing, T.; Li, X.; Guo, J.

    2009-04-01

    Located in the foreland of the Quilian Shan (NE Tibet), the Yumu Shan is an isolated mountain range bounded by an active NW-SE striking thrust fault. Geomorphic and structural features such as fault scarps and wind gaps suggest that the ~70 km long range is actively growing (Hetzel et al., 2004; Tapponnier et al., 1990), hence the tectonic uplift should exceed the rate of denudation. Here we quantify the rate of these two competing processes using in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be. Catchment-wide denudation rates are derived from 10Be concentrations in stream sediments, whereas rock uplift rates are obtained by combining scarp topographic profiles with dating of geomorphic surfaces deformed by active thrust faults at the Yumu Shan mountain front. Both denudation and rock uplift rates integrate over a similar temporal scale (~10-100 ka) and thus over many earthquake cycles. Our data document that catchment wide-denudation rates vary from ~100 to ~400 mm ka-1 as a function of morphology and lithology, while rock uplift takes place at the rate of ~0.7 mm ka-1. The difference between these values confirms that the Yumu Shan is in a topographic pre-steady state and in accordance with geomorphic and structural features. Tectonic features indicate that over few millions of years the Yumu Shan may rise to a similar height as the main ranges of the Qilian Shan farther south, which have peaks with elevations between ~5 and ~5.5 km. References: Hetzel R., Tao M., Niedermann S., Strecker M.R., Ivy-Ochs S., Kubik P.W., Gao B. (2004). Implications of the fault scaling law for the growth of topography: Mountain ranges in the broken foreland of NE Tibet, Terra Nova, 16, 157-162. Tapponnier P., Meyer B., Avouac J.P., Peltzer G., Gaudemer Y., Guo S., Xiang H., Yin K., Chen Z., Cai S., Dai H. (1990). Active thrusting and folding in the Quilian Shan, and decoupling between upper crust and mantle in northeastern Tibet, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 97, 382-403.

  7. Date Rape Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also are used to help people commit other crimes, like robbery and physical assault. They are used ... be misleading because the person who commits the crime might not be dating the victim. Rather, it ...

  8. Date Rape (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve been drinking. continue Protect Yourself The best defense against date rape is to try to prevent ... for help if you feel threatened. Take self-defense courses. These can build confidence and teach valuable ...

  9. Dating the Vinland Map

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  10. Dating the Vinland Map

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-04

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  11. Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Violence Featured Topic: Opportunities for Action Featured Topic: Bullying Research Featured Topic: Prevent Gang Membership Featured Topic: ... and alcohol Involvement in antisocial behaviors Thoughts about suicide Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence ...

  12. Cirques have growth spurts during deglacial and interglacial periods: Evidence from 10Be and 26Al nuclide inventories in the central and eastern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crest, Y.; Delmas, M.; Braucher, R.; Gunnell, Y.; Calvet, M.

    2017-02-01

    Cirques are emblematic landforms of alpine landscapes. The statistical distribution of cirque-floor elevations is used to infer glacial equilibrium-line altitude, and the age of their frontal moraines for reconstructing glacial chronologies. Very few studies, however, have sought to measure cirque-floor and supraglacial ridgetop bedrock downwearing rates in order to confront these denudation estimates with theoretical models of Quaternary mountain landscape evolution. Here we use 10Be nuclide samples (n = 36) from moraines, bedrock steps, and supraglacial ridgetops among a population of cirques in the east-central Pyrenees in order to quantify denudation in the landscape and detect whether the mountain topography bears any relevance to the glacial buzzsaw hypothesis. Minimum exposure ages (MEAs) obtained for a succession of moraines spanning the Oldest Dryas to the Holocene produced a deglaciation chronology for three different Pyrenean ranges: Maladeta, Bassiès, and Carlit. Based on a series of corrections, calibrations, and chronostratigraphic tuning procedures, MEAs on ice-polished bedrock exposures were further used to model denudation depths at nested timescales during the Würm, the Younger Dryas, and the Holocene. Results show that subglacial cirque-floor denudation was lower during glacial periods (Würm: 10 mm/ka) than during deglacial and interglacial periods (tens to hundreds of mm/ka). The relative inefficiency of glacial denudation in the cirque zone during the Würm would have resulted from (i) cold-based and/or (ii) low-gradient glaciers situated in the upper reaches of the icefield; and/or from (iii) glacier-load starvation because of arrested clast supply from supraglacial rockslopes situated in the permafrost zone. Denudation peaked during the Younger Dryas and Holocene glacial advances, a time when cirque glaciers became steeper, warmer-based, and when frost cracking weakened supraglacial ridgetops, thus enhancing subglacial erosion by providing

  13. 230Th/U dating of a late pleistocene alluvial fan along the southern san andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, K.E.K.; Sharp, W.D.; Kendrick, K.J.; Behr, W.M.; Hudnut, K.W.; Hanks, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate-clast coatings provides a reliable, precise minimum age of 45.1 ?? 0.6 ka (2??) for the T2 geomorphic surface of the Biskra Palms alluvial fan, Coachella Valley, California. Concordant ages for multiple subsamples from individual carbonate coatings provide evidence that the 238U-234U-230Th system has remained closed since carbonate formation. The U-series minimum age is used to assess previously published 10Be exposure ages of cobbles and boulders. All but one cobble age and some boulder 10Be ages are younger than the U-series minimum age, indicating that surface cobbles and some boulders were partially shielded after deposition of the fan and have been subsequently exhumed by erosion of fine-grained matrix to expose them on the present fan surface. A comparison of U-series and 10Be ages indicates that the interval between final alluvial deposition on the T2 fan surface and accumulation of dateable carbonate is not well resolved at Biskra Palms; however, the "time lag" inherent to dating via U-series on pedogenic carbonate can be no larger than ~10 k.y., the uncertainty of the 10Be-derived age of the T2 fan surface. Dating of the T2 fan surface via U-series on pedogenic carbonate (minimum age, 45.1 ?? 0.6 ka) and 10Be on boulder-top samples using forward modeling (preferred age, 50 ?? 5 ka) provides broadly consistent constraints on the age of the fan surface and helps to elucidate its postdepositional development. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  14. 230Th/U dating of a late Pleistocene alluvial fan along the southern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Kathryn E.K.; Sharp, Warren D.; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Behr, Whitney M.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hanks, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate-clast coatings provides a reliable, precise minimum age of 45.1 ± 0.6 ka (2σ) for the T2 geomorphic surface of the Biskra Palms alluvial fan, Coachella Valley, California. Concordant ages for multiple subsamples from individual carbonate coatings provide evidence that the 238U-234U-230Th system has remained closed since carbonate formation. The U-series minimum age is used to assess previously published 10Be exposure ages of cobbles and boulders. All but one cobble age and some boulder 10Be ages are younger than the U-series minimum age, indicating that surface cobbles and some boulders were partially shielded after deposition of the fan and have been subsequently exhumed by erosion of fine-grained matrix to expose them on the present fan surface. A comparison of U-series and 10Be ages indicates that the interval between final alluvial deposition on the T2 fan surface and accumulation of dateable carbonate is not well resolved at Biskra Palms; however, the “time lag” inherent to dating via U-series on pedogenic carbonate can be no larger than ∼10 k.y., the uncertainty of the 10Be-derived age of the T2 fan surface. Dating of the T2 fan surface via U-series on pedogenic carbonate (minimum age, 45.1 ± 0.6 ka) and 10Be on boulder-top samples using forward modeling (preferred age, 50 ± 5 ka) provides broadly consistent constraints on the age of the fan surface and helps to elucidate its postdepositional development.

  15. Radiocarbon Dating the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, M. A.; Gajewski, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Anthropocene has no agreed start date since current suggestions for its beginning range from Pre-Industrial times to the Industrial Revolution, and from the mid-twentieth century to the future. To set the boundary of the Anthropocene in geological time, we must first understand when, how and to what extent humans began altering the Earth system. One aspect of this involves reconstructing the effects of prehistoric human activity on the physical landscape. However, for global reconstructions of land use and land cover change to be more accurately interpreted in the context of human interaction with the landscape, large-scale spatio-temporal demographic changes in prehistoric populations must be known. Estimates of the relative number of prehistoric humans in different regions of the world and at different moments in time are needed. To this end, we analyze a dataset of radiocarbon dates from the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), the Palaeolithic Database of Europe and the AustArch Database of Australia, as well as published dates from South America. This is the first time such a large quantity of dates (approximately 60,000) has been mapped and studied at a global scale. Initial results from the analysis of temporal frequency distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates, assumed to be proportional to population density, will be discussed. The utility of radiocarbon dates in studies of the Anthropocene will be evaluated and potential links between population density and changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, climate, migration patterning and fire frequency coincidence will be considered.

  16. Plutonium age dating reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Monika; Richter, Stephan; Aregbe, Yetunde; Wellum, Roger; Mayer, Klaus; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Although the age determination of plutonium is and has been a pillar of nuclear forensic investigations for many years, additional research in the field of plutonium age dating is still needed and leads to new insights as the present work shows: Plutonium is commonly dated with the help of the 241Pu/241Am chronometer using gamma spectrometry; in fewer cases the 240Pu/236U chronometer has been used. The age dating results of the 239Pu/235U chronometer and the 238Pu/234U chronometer are scarcely applied in addition to the 240Pu/236U chronometer, although their results can be obtained simultaneously from the same mass spectrometric experiments as the age dating result of latter. The reliability of the result can be tested when the results of different chronometers are compared. The 242Pu/238U chronometer is normally not evaluated at all due to its sensitivity to contamination with natural uranium. This apparent 'weakness' that renders the age dating results of the 242Pu/238U chronometer almost useless for nuclear forensic investigations, however turns out to be an advantage looked at from another perspective: the 242Pu/238U chronometer can be utilized as an indicator for uranium contamination of plutonium samples and even help to identify the nature of this contamination. To illustrate this the age dating results of all four Pu/U clocks mentioned above are discussed for one plutonium sample (NBS 946) that shows no signs of uranium contamination and for three additional plutonium samples. In case the 242Pu/238U chronometer results in an older 'age' than the other Pu/U chronometers, contamination with either a small amount of enriched or with natural or depleted uranium is for example possible. If the age dating result of the 239Pu/235U chronometer is also influenced the nature of the contamination can be identified; enriched uranium is in this latter case a likely cause for the missmatch of the age dating results of the Pu/U chronometers.

  17. The Realities of Date Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Cara; Watson, Jennifer; Williams, Audrey R.

    This poster presentation addresses the issue of date rape, specifically in the college environment. Highlighted are date rape statistics, demographics, and date rape drugs. Also discussed are date rape warnings and prevention strategies. It is concluded that college and university administrators must place the issue of date rape and acquaintance…

  18. A new value for the half-life of 10Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korschinek, G.; Bergmaier, A.; Faestermann, T.; Gerstmann, U. C.; Knie, K.; Rugel, G.; Wallner, A.; Dillmann, I.; Dollinger, G.; von Gostomski, Ch. Lierse; Kossert, K.; Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M.; Remmert, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 10Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of 10Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of 10Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the 10Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched 10Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of 9Be. We then determined the initial 10Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant 10Be/ 9Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the 10Be concentration and activity yields a 10Be half-life of T1/2 = 1.388 ± 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. [11]), found a value of 1.386 ± 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for 10Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 ± 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  19. A New Approach for Estimating Background Rates of Erosion Using Concentration of Meteoric 10-Be Adhered to River Sediment: Application to the Rapidly Eroding Waipaoa Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, L. J.; Bierman, P. R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R.

    2007-12-01

    New and existing data suggest that the concentration of atmospherically- produced, meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment provides a proxy for basin-scale erosion rates. Although the widely applied method of analyzing in situ produced 10-Be in river sediments has proven useful for estimating pre-anthropogenic rates of erosion in a variety of environments, there are lithologic limitation. In contrast, measuring the concentration of meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment allows erosion rate analysis in landscapes underlain by quartz-deficient or fine-grained lithologies, as well as in basins where the concentration of quartz varies spatially. By assuming that basins are in an overall isotopic steady-state, that erosion is rapid enough that decay is negligible, and that the integrated delivery rate of 10-Be from the atmosphere (D10-Be) can be estimated, basin-scale mass loss rates (Ms) can be solved by equating the 10-Be flux in from the atmosphere with the flux of 10-Be out of the basin on sediment (C10-Be) and expressed as sediment yield per unit area (Ys). Fin = Fout D10-Be * A = Ms * C10-Be Ms = (D10-Be * A)/ C10-Be Ys = D10-Be / C10-Be To validate this new approach, we examined the limited data that do exist and found reasonable correspondence between erosion rates estimated from meteoric 10-Be concentrations and estimated by other means. As a first application, we use meteoric 10-Be in river sediment to estimate basin-scale erosion rates from catchments within and near the mud-stone dominated Waipaoa River Basin draining the tectonically active east coast of New Zealand's North Island. Near total conversion of indigenous forest to pasture over the past century in the Waipaoa Basin has resulted in some of the most dramatic and widespread erosional features on the planet, and contemporary sediment yields that rank among the highest in the world (~7 million kg/(km2 * yr)). The amount of meteoric 10-Be adhered to eight river sediment samples suggests that modern

  20. Biodiversity of date palm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is the dominant component upon which the sustainable biophysical and socio-economic structures of the oasis ecosystem are based; a fruit tree with unique nutritional, biochemical and biophysical characteristics, a rich source of aesthetic and cultural values, and ...

  1. The Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerger, Monte J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities to cultivate the tendency to see special qualities in numbers that can be played on certain calendar days. Includes games on the constant of the day, Fibonacci and golden ratio dates, primes, powers, December 25, and the day of the year. (ASK)

  2. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 (10Be) production rates. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 1022 Am2) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  3. Long-term variations in the flux of cosmogenic isotope 10Be over the last 10000 years: Variations in the geomagnetic field and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, S. S.; Dergachev, V. A.; Raspopov, O. M.; Jungner, H.

    2012-02-01

    A spectral analysis of data on the flux of cosmogenic 10Be in ice core samples from the Central Greenland (project GRIP) over the last 10 thousand years have been carried out. It has been shown that the 10Be flux varies cyclically; the most significant cycle is of about 2300 years. Variations in the position of the virtual geomagnetic pole over 8000 years have been analyzed. Significant components, pointing to the cyclic variation in the position of the geomagnetic pole with a period of about 2300 years, have been revealed in a periodogram of the virtual geomagnetic pole longitude. In addition to the nearly 2300-year-long cycle, some lines are observable in the 10Be flux periodogram, which can be considered as a manifestation of the 1000-year-long cycle of the 10Be deposition rate on the ice surface. The relationship between the cyclicity of the geomagnetic pole position and the 10Be flux is discussed.

  4. Comparison of gestational dating methods and implications ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    OBJECTIVES: Estimating gestational age is usually based on date of last menstrual period (LMP) or clinical estimation (CE); both approaches introduce potential bias. Differences in methods of estimation may lead to misclassificat ion and inconsistencies in risk estimates, particularly if exposure assignment is also gestation-dependent. This paper examines a'what-if' scenario in which alternative methods are used and attempts to elucidate how method choice affects observed results.METHODS: We constructed two 20-week gestational age cohorts of pregnancies between 2000 and 2005 (New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, USA) using live birth certificates : one defined preterm birth (PTB) status using CE and one using LMP. Within these, we estimated risk for 4 categories of preterm birth (PTBs per 106 pregnancies) and risk differences (RD (95% Cl s)) associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM2. 5).RESULTS: More births were classified preterm using LMP (16%) compared with CE (8%). RD divergences increased between cohorts as exposure period approached delivery. Among births between 28 and 31 weeks, week 7 PM2.5 exposure conveyed RDs of 44 (21 to 67) for CE and 50 (18 to 82) for LMP populations, while week 24 exposure conveyed RDs of 33 (11 to 56) and -20 (-50 to 10), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Different results from analyses restricted to births with both CE and LMP are most likely due to differences in dating methods rather than selection issues. Results are sensitive t

  5. Late Holocene denudation rates and sediment fluxes in the Po basin from source to sink based on in situ cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Hella; Malusà, Marco; Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    We constrain the long-term sediment delivery within the Po basin from source to lowland sink using sediment fluxes from in situ 10Be-derived denudation rates and compare these to published short-term estimates from gauging. We measured in situ 10Be concentrations in nearly all Alpine and Apennine upstream catchments draining to the Po River and in the Po lowlands down to the Po delta, respectively. In the upstream reaches of the Po basin, short-term sediment interception in dams and reservoirs and long-term sediment trapping in periglacial lakes may modify 10Be concentrations, whereas in lowland reaches, sediment burial and storage may affect nuclide concentrations. From the comparison of 10Be nuclide data measured upstream of dam influence to those measured downstream of major dams, we find that the average 10Be signal is not significantly modified. In the lowland reaches, we find that the average 10Be concentration is only marginally modified by floodplain processes, as 26Al/10Be ratios do not show differential decay due to burial and 21Ne concentrations change only slightly along the floodplain reach. Thus we interpret the average 10Be concentration of lowland samples to reflect the average 10Be concentration of all upstream catchments in terms of a preservation of the source area erosion signal. The close similarity in 10Be concentrations from the sources to the Po lowland sink suggests that LGM denudation rates prior to sediment trapping in periglacial lakes were similar to today's, as the sediment now contained in the Po lowlands must have been eroded from the orogen and deposited in the lowlands prior to lake formation. This source-sink assessment shows the robustness of cosmogenic 10Be as erosion rate tracer. From these in situ 10Be-derived denudation rates integrating over the last few thousand years, we constrain the sediment contributions of the Alpine and Apennine source areas arriving at the Po delta. In total, ca. 60 Mt/yr of sediment are exported to

  6. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Submit Statements of Net Outstanding Campaign Obligations AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of matching fund submission dates and submission dates for statements of net outstanding campaign... statements of net outstanding campaign obligations (``NOCO statement'') after their dates of...

  7. Dual 10Be isotope systems constrain the source of sediment and rate of erosion for the tropical Barron River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Reusser, L. J.; Portenga, E.; Matmon, A.; Rood, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand source of sediment and rate of erosion for Barron River catchment, which heads on the Atherton Tablelands of northeast Australia, crosses the northern Queensland escarpment and drains into the Coral Sea, we collected fluvial sediment and measured both in situ and meteoric 10Be contents on the medium sand fraction. We collected fourteen samples from rivers and streams including large regional drainages and small tributaries. The upland basins are characterized by lower relief and less precipitation than the steeper and wetter escarpment basins. One sample is quartz sand from the Coral Sea beach at Yorkey's Knob, below the escarpment. Sand from the Barron River upstream of the escarpment integrates the upland basins and has an in situ 10Be concentration of 2.31±0.84 x105atoms/g and an erosion rate of 17.2 m/My (calculated using the CRONOS on-line calculator). This is similar to a major upland tributary (2.51±0.40 x105 atoms/g; 15.2 m/My) and two smaller upstream tributaries (20.5 m/My and 21.4 m/My). Escarpment streams have less in situ 10Be in their sediment (mean = 1.64±0.55 x 105 atoms/g, n=8) and higher basin area-weighted erosion rates (37.2 m/My). Based on the in situ measurements, the uplands are eroding at approximately half the rate of the escarpment basins. The beach sand has an in situ 10Be concentration (2.75±0.19 x 105 atoms/g) similar to the upland sediment suggesting that the source of beach sand is the larger but more slowly eroding Tablelands. In contrast, the meteoric 10Be concentrations of Barron River sand-sized sediment collected above the escarpment is ~4 fold lower (2.55x107 atoms/g) than the average meteoric 10Be concentration of the 8 escarpment samples (9.94±4.49 x107 atoms/g). This discrepancy cannot be explained by differences in annual average precipitation which ranges only from 1.9 to 2.3 m/yr but likely results from the deep mobility of meteoric 10Be in oxic Tableland soils. Considering meteoric 10Be as a

  8. Dating Violence among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  9. First application of the n - 9Be optical potential to the study of the 10Be continuum via the (18O,17O ) neutron-transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, D.; Bondı, M.; Bonaccorso, A.; Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Charity, R. J.; Cunsolo, A.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.

    2014-12-01

    The 9Be(18O,17O ) 10Be reaction has been studied at an incident energy of 84 MeV, and the ejectiles have been detected at forward angles. The 10Be excitation energy spectrum has been obtained up to about 18 MeV, and several known bound and resonant states of 10Be have been identified. Calculations that describe the interaction of the neutron removed from the 18O projectile with the 9Be target by means of an optical potential with a semiclassical approximation for the relative motion account for a significant part of the 10Be continuum. Two parametrizations of the optical-model potential for the system n - 9Be have been used and compared.

  10. Terrestrial cosmogenic surface exposure dating of glacial and associated landforms in the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range of central Nevada and along the northeastern flank of the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.; Briggs, Richard W.; Caffee, Marc W.; Ryerson, F. J.; Finkel, Robert C.; Owen, Lewis A.

    2016-09-01

    Deposits near Lamoille in the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range of central Nevada and at Woodfords on the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada each record two distinct glacial advances. We compare independent assessments of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure ages for glacial deposits that we have determined to those obtained by others at the two sites. At each site, TCN ages of boulders on moraines of the younger advance are between 15 and 30 ka and may be associated with marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 2. At Woodfords, TCN ages of boulders on the moraine of the older advance are younger than ~ 60 ka and possibly formed during MIS 4, whereas boulders on the correlative outwash surface show ages approaching 140 ka (~ MIS 6). The TCN ages of boulders on older glacial moraine at Woodfords thus appear to severely underestimate the true age of the glacial advance responsible for the deposit. The same is possibly true at Lamoille where clasts sampled from the moraine of the oldest advance have ages ranging between 20 and 40 ka with a single outlier age of ~ 80 ka. The underestimations are attributed to the degradation and denudation of older moraine crests. Noting that boulder ages on the older advances at each site overlap significantly with MIS 2. We speculate that erosion of the older moraines has been episodic, with a pulse of denudation accompanying the inception of MIS 2 glaciation.

  11. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 ((10)Be) production rates. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric (10)Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest (10)Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 10(22) Am(2)) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant (10)Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The (10)Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  12. Strong pickup-coupling effect on p+{sup 10}Be and {sup 11}Be elastic scattering around 40A MeV incident energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, N.; Lapoux, V.

    2008-01-15

    To explore the nature of the coupling effects on p+{sup 10}Be and p+{sup 11}Be elastic scattering at incident energies of 39.1A and at 38.4A MeV, respectively, coupled reaction channels (CRC) calculations were performed for the {sup 10}Be(p,d){sup 9}Be and {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be* pickup to the ground state of {sup 9}Be and the 5.960 MeV 1{sup -} and 6.263 MeV 2{sup -} doublet of excited states in {sup 10}Be at the corresponding incident energies. We show that within the CRC framework, the coupling effect on the elastic scattering is significant in both cases and produces effective absorption in the entrance channel. This suggests that the use of a fitted p+{sup 10}Be optical model potential may lead to too much absorption in the core plus proton interaction in extended coupled discretized continuum channels type of calculations for the p+{sup 11}Be system and that coupling to the {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be* pickup should be explicitly included in such studies.

  13. Linking the10Be continental record of Lake Baikal to marine and ice archives of the last 50 ka: Implication for the global dust-aerosol input

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Peck, J.; King, J.; Colman, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present here a 10Be profile from the continental sediments of Lake Baikal (the world's largest fresh water lake), which, for the first time, shows the ??? 40 ka 10Be enhancement and a pattern that strongly matches those from the marine and ice records for the last 50 ka. This finding provides a new horizon for global and regional correlation of continental archives. Additionally, our VADM-predicted 10Be production confirms and further strengthens a common global cause (geomagnetic field intensity) for the change in atmospheric 10Be over the last 50 ka. We also show that most of the 10Be inventory to the lake has been provided by riverine input, but with a significant addition from direct precipitation and dust-aerosol fallout. We estimate a higher dust-aerosol contribution of 10Be during the Holocene and interstadial stage 3 (22-50 ka) as compared with the glacial period (12-22 ka). Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. 64 FR 34625 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-28

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice..., 1997, OSHA published its proposed standard to regulate occupational exposure to tuberculosis (TB) (62... preliminary risk assessment for occupational exposure to tuberculosis. DATES: Comments and data...

  15. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, J. C.; Jiang, W.; Bailey, K. G.; Lu, Z. T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport in the terrestrial environment, 81Kr (half-life = 230,000 yr) is the ideal tracer for old water and ice with mean residence times in the range of 105-106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating is now available to the earth science community at large thanks to the development of an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method where individual neutral atoms of the desired isotope are selectively captured by laser beams, and their fluorescence detected via a CCD camera. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. The ATTA instrument at Argonne's Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10-14-10-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 kyr - 1500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 kg of water or 40 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the sample size can be smaller by an order of magnitude. We are continually developing the method towards higher counting efficiency, smaller sample sizes requirements, and higher sample throughput rates. In the past four years, we have performed radiokrypton analysis of over 150 groundwater and ice samples extracted by collaborators from all seven continents. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Bern, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. 210Pb dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Roughly fifty years ago, a small group of scientists from Belgium and the United States, trying to better constrain ice sheet accumulation rates, attempted to apply what was then know about environmental lead as a potential geochronometer. Thus Goldberg (1963) developed the first principles of the 210Pb dating method, which was soon followed by a paper by Crozaz et al. (1964), who examined accumulation history of Antarctic snow using 210Pb. Shortly thereafter, Koide et al. (1972, 1973) adapted this technique to unravel sediment deposition and accumulation records in deep-sea environments. Serendipitously, they chose to work in a deep basin off California, where an independent and robust age model had already been developed. Krishanswami et al. (1971) extended the use of this technique to lacustrine deposits to reconstruct depositional histories of lake sediment, and maybe more importantly, contaminant inputs and burial. Thus, the powerful tool for dating recent (up to about one century old) sediment deposits was established and soon widely adopted. Today almost all oceanographic or limnologic studies that address recent depositional reconstructions employ 210Pb as one of several possible geochronometers (Andrews et al., 2009; Gale, 2009; Baskaran, 2011; Persson and Helms, 2011). This paper presents a short overview of the principles of 210Pb dating and provides a few examples that illustrate the utility of this tracer in contrasting depositional systems. Potential caveats and uncertainties (Appleby et al., 1986; Binford, 1990; Binford et al., 1993; Smith, 2001; Hancock et al., 2002) inherent to the use and interpretation of 210Pb-derived age-models are also introduced. Recommendations as to best practices for most reliable uses and reporting are presented in the summary.

  17. Vulcanism and Radiocarbon Dates

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, L. M.; Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    We consider whether the long term perturbation of radiocarbon dates, which is known to be approximately a sin function of period about 8000 years and amplitude of about 8% peak-to-peak, could have been caused in any major part by vulcanism. We conclude that this is not the case. On the contrary, present day volcanoes are a far less important source of inert CO{sub 2} (about 100 fold less) than is man's burning of fossil fuels which has caused the Suess dilution of about 2%. (auth)

  18. Authigenic 10Be/9Be Ratio Signatures of the Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Linked to Geomagnetic Dipole Moment Variation During and Since the Brunhes/Matuyama Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Ménabréaz, L.; Valet, J. P.; Valery, G.; Choy, S.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rate of cosmogenic nuclides is linked to the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) by a non-linear inverse relationship. Large amplitude GDM variations associated with reversals and excursions can potentially be reconstructed using time variation of the cosmogenic beryllium-10 (10Be) production recorded in ocean sediments. Downcore profiles of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) in oceanic cores provide independent and additional records of the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity and complete previous information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI). Here are presented new authigenic 10Be/9Be results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and from the top of core MD05-2930 collected in the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Completing data of Ménabréaz et al. (2012, 2014), these results provide the first continuous 10Be production rate sedimentary record covering the last 800 ka. Along these cores, authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio peaks are recorded - within methodological errors - at the stratigraphic level of RPI lows. High-resolution chronologies (δ18O-derived) lead to interpret these peaks as successive global 10Be overproduction events triggered by geomagnetic dipole lows present in the PISO-1500 and Sint-2000 stacks. The largest amplitude 10Be production enhancement is synchronous to the very large decrease of the dipole field associated with the last polarity reversal (772 ka). It is consistent in shape and duration with the peak recorded in core MD90-0961 from the Maldive area (Indian Ocean) (Valet et al. 2014). Two significant 10Be production enhancements are coeval with the Laschamp (41 ka) and Icelandic basin (190 ka) excursions, while 10Be production peaks of lower amplitude correlate to other recognized excursions such as the Blake (120 ka), Pringle-Falls (215 ka), Portuguese Margin (290 ka), Big Lost (540 ka) among others. This study provides new data on the amplitude and timing of dipole field variations

  19. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary

    PubMed Central

    Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Valet, Jean‐Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium‐10 (10Be) production rates. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05‐2920 and MD05‐2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05‐2920, MD05‐2930 and MD90‐0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 1022 Am2) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10Be‐derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes‐Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial‐scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities. PMID:28163989

  20. Spatiotemporal characteristics of erosion processes along a steep climatic gradient in the NW Himalaya: Insights from satellite-rainfall data, mass-transport measurements, and surface-exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.; Niedermann, S.; Scherler, D.

    2011-12-01

    The intensity of the Indian summer-monsoon circulation varies at decadal to millennial time scales and affects the terrestrial and marine sediment records. The impact of climatic forcing on erosional and sedimentary processes and their manifestation in the landscape varies, depending on magnitude and size of the climatic events, as well as on the tectonic and geomorphic preconditioning of the landscape. Significant mass-transport processes during the large Pakistan flood 2010 and previous abnormal years have emphasized the importance of extreme events on shaping landscapes. Here, we analyze gauge and satellite-derived rainfall data combined with new cosmogenic nuclide surface-exposure ages and basin-wide erosion rates to elucidate the impact of climatic forcing on Earth-surface processes at different time scales. The NW Himalaya is located at the western end of the monsoonal conveyer belt that transports moisture from the Bay of Bengal to the Sutlej Valley and farther west. Orographic rainfall processes at the southern Himalayan mountain front create a steep south-to-north rainfall gradient. The tail and northward end of the rainfall distribution decays rapidly with only little or no moisture reaching the southern Tibetan Plateau. However, during recent, abnormally strong monsoon years rainfall did reach the presently arid to semi-arid regions of the northern Himalaya and southern Tibetan Plateau. Gauge and satellite-derived rainfall data show that erosion in these environments does not follow the mean annual rainfall distribution. Instead, we document the northward penetration of rainfall into the orogen and highlight the importance of extreme-event rainfall (>90th percentile) on sediment-transport processes by analyzing basin-wide erosion rates tied into a specific stream-power model. Similarly, but on longer time scales (> 100 yr), rainfall propagated farther into the orogen during a generally stronger monsoon circulation in the early Holocene. During these

  1. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University

  2. A Protection Motivation Theory application to date rape education.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Orwat, John; Grossman, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Date rape risk communication is a key component of education-based Date Rape Prevention Programs, common across colleges. In such programs, risk assessment in date rape is approached cautiously in order to avoid a tone of "victim blaming." Since it is important in the assessment of any risk to understand the surrounding social context of the risky situation and the individual's unique relationship with that social context, this study examines Protection Motivation Theory as it applies to handling the risk of date rape without victim blaming. The paper links individual personality and social contexts with risk communication. The study sample comprised 367 undergraduate women enrolled in a large Southern Public University. The study examines the relationships between dating activity, social competency, and type of information provided with the dependents variables of date rape related protection behavior (intent), belief, and knowledge. A factorial multiple analysis of covariance analysis found that the dependent variables had a significant relationship with aspects of social competency and dating activity. The exposure to varying information about date rape was not significantly related to the dependent variables of date rape-related protection behavior (intent), belief, and knowledge. The identification of social competency and dating activity status as protective factors in this study makes a significant contribution to the practice and research efforts in date rape education.

  3. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  4. Violence in Adolescent Dating Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; Platt, Cora; McDonald, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with a definition of dating and dating violence among adolescents, this article explores the factors which impact such violence. It concludes with a review of two school-based prevention/intervention programs (Safe Dates and The Youth Relationships Project). (Contains 1 table.)

  5. Sex Role and Dating Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, M. P.; Collins, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Male and female subjects from three age groups completed questionnaires on sex roles and dating orientations. Males approached dating from both a psychoaffectional and psychobiological orientation, while females approached it from a psychoaffectional orientation. Significant differences were found in dating attitudes between male and female…

  6. Radiation in archaeometry: archaeological dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Marco; Sibilia, Emanuela

    2001-06-01

    Crystalline inclusions contained in ceramics act as thermoluminescent dosimeters, the irradiation source being the natural radiation environment. Because of this, various ceramic materials (pottery, bricks, cooked clays, bronze clay-cores) have been dated by thermoluminescence (TL). A short review of the main possibilities of TL dating is given, with some examples that enlighten the advantages and limits of this method in the field of archaeological dating, compared to TL dating of buildings. The assessment of the chronology of Valdivia culture (Ecuador), based on a three-year project of TL dating, is presented and discussed. The overall uncertainty at around 4-5% can be considered the best limit presently available. The uncertainty distribution found among 700 archaeological TL datings and for about 500 building TL datings is also presented.

  7. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    basalts is labradorite. The natural radiogenic dose rates for the alkalic basalts calculated on the basis of assumed secular equilibrium range from 0.228 to 0.462 rad per year and average 0.335 rad per year exclusive of the cosmic-ray energy dose and with the alpha-particle component equal to one-tenth of the total alpha decay energy. The TL measurements were made using material of a 37 to 44-micrometer size range; the crushing required during sample preparation was found to have a negligible effect on natural TL. Both natural and artificial TL were filtered to the bandwidth 3,500 A to 5,000 A to restrict the light detected to that from the plagioclase emission peak centered at about 4,500 A and associated with structural defects. Within this bandwidth, the natural TL from both the alkalic and tholeiitic basalt plagioclase consists of a single peak with a maximum amplitude at about 350?C; the artificial TL glow curves produced by an exposure of the drained samples to a standard dose of X-radiation consist of four broad, variably overlapping peaks with maxima at about 110?C, 150?C, 225?C, and 300?C. The maximum amplitude of the 350?C natural and 300?C artificial TL peaks, both produced by the same general activation energy distribution of trapping centers, were used for TL dating. The high-temperature artificial TL peak occurs at a lower temperature than the corresponding natural TL peak owing to the presence of a large number of electrons retained in traps near the lower end of the trap-depth energy range in samples whose TL is measured a short time after intense artificial irradiation. These traps remain essentially empty in the natural environment owing to spontaneous decay and do not produce measurable low-temperature natural TL peaks. With prolonged storage after irradiation, the 300?C artificial TL peak migrates to higher temperatures and decreases in amplitude.

  8. Relative Dating Via Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image of the eastern part of the Tharsis region illustrates how fractures can be used in relative dating of a surface. The fractured materials on the right side of the image are embayed by younger volcanic flows originating to the west of the image. Note how the younger flows cover the ends of the fractures, and are not at all fractured themselves.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.2, Longitude 269.4 East (90.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Age-dating of rockslides: Methods and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, M.; Sanders, D.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    Age-dating of deposits of catastrophic rockslides is prerequisite to unravel the potential relation between the frequency of mass-wasting events with climatic change or earthquakes. In the Alps, about 250 rockslides exceeding 106 m3 in volume are known, but the age as yet is determined only for a comparatively small number of events. For age determination of rockslide events, different methods are available (e. g. Lang et al., 1999). Radiocarbon Dating In the past few decades, rockslide deposits commonly were proxy-dated by 14C age determination of organic remnants preserved (a) in glacial, fluvio-glacial sediments overridden by the rockslide, (b) within the rockslide mass, or (c) in rockslide-dammed backwater deposits or lakes situated atop the rockslide mass. In each case, the 14C age provides a different constraint on the age of the rockslide event: in case (a), the 14C age represents a maximum age of the event; in case (b), which is quite rare, the 14C age is generally considered as a good proxy of the event age; in case (c) the 14C age represents a minimum age for the rockslide event. Unfortunately, radiocarbon dating often cannot be applied because of absence of suited deposits or exposures thereof, lack of organic remnants or of remnants suited for age-dating, and/or because determined 14C ages are substantially biased. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Proxy-dating of rockslide events by OSL can be applied to silt- to sand-sized quartzose sediments present (a) directly below, (b) within, or (c) above/laterally aside a rockslide mass. For each case (a) to (c), the determined ages are subject to the same constraints as outlined for radiocarbon dating. Unfortunately, situations allowing for application of OSL to rockslide event dating are comparatively rare, and the resulting ages tend to have a wide error range. Surface Exposure Dating with cosmogenic radionuclides Surface exposure ages can be determined for rock samples taken from the sliding planes at

  10. 10Be constrains the sediment sources and sediment yields to the Great Barrier Reef from the tropical Barron River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Kyle K.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2014-11-01

    Estimates of long-term, background sediment generation rates place current and future sediment fluxes to the Great Barrier Reef in context. Without reliable estimates of sediment generation rates and without identification of the sources of sediment delivered to the reef prior to European settlement (c. 1850), determining the necessity and effectiveness of contemporary landscape management efforts is difficult. Here, using the ~ 2100-km2 Barron River catchment in Queensland, Australia, as a test case, we use in situ-produced 10Be to derive sediment generation rate estimates and use in situ and meteoric 10Be to identify the source of that sediment, which enters the Coral Sea near Cairns. Previous model-based calculations suggested that background sediment yields were up to an order of magnitude lower than contemporary sediment yields. In contrast, in situ 10Be data indicate that background (43 t km- 2 y- 1) and contemporary sediment yields (~ 45 t km- 2 y- 1) for the Barron River are similar. These data suggest that the reef became established in a sediment flux similar to what it receives today. Since western agricultural practices increased erosion rates, large amounts of sediment mobilized from hillslopes during the last century are probably stored in Queensland catchments and will eventually be transported to the coast, most likely in flows triggered by rare but powerful tropical cyclones that were more common before European settlement and may increase in strength as climate change warms the south Pacific Ocean. In situ and meteoric 10Be concentrations of Coral Sea beach sand near Cairns are similar to those in rivers on the Atherton Tablelands, suggesting that most sediment is derived from the extensive, low-gradient uplands rather than the steep, more rapidly eroding but beach proximal escarpment.

  11. Production of the cosmogenic isotopes 3H, 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl in the Earth's atmosphere by solar and galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, W. R.; Higbie, P. R.; McCracken, K. G.

    2007-10-01

    In a follow-up study to the earlier work of Webber and Higbie (2003) on 10Be production in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays, we have calculated the atmospheric production of the cosmogenic isotopes 3H, 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This new calculation of atmospheric yields of these isotopes is based on 107 vertically incident protons at each of 24 logarithmically spaced energies from 10 MeV to 10 GeV, 102 times the number used in the earlier calculation, along with the latest cross sections. This permits a study of the production due to solar cosmic rays as well as galactic cosmic rays at lower energies where isotope production is a very sensitive function of energy. Solar cosmic ray spectra are reevaluated for all of the major events occurring since 1956. In terms of yearly production of 10Be, only the February 1956 solar event makes a major contribution. For 36Cl these yearly SCR production contributions are 2-5 times larger depending on the solar cosmic ray energy spectra. We have determined the yearly production of 10Be, 36Cl, and other cosmogenic isotopes above 65° geomagnetic latitude for the time period 1940-2006 covering six solar 11-year (a) cycles. The average peak-to-peak 11-a amplitude of this yearly production is 1.77. The effects of latitudinal mixing alter these direct polar production values considerably, giving an average peak-to-peak 11-a amplitude of 1.48 for the global average production.

  12. LITHIUM-BERYLLIUM-BORON ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN METEORITIC HIBONITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ORIGIN OF {sup 10}Be AND EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming-Chang; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Lee, Typhoon

    2010-08-10

    NanoSIMS isotopic measurements of Li, Be, and B in individual hibonite grains extracted from the Murchison meteorite revealed that {sup 10}B excesses correlate with the {sup 9}Be/{sup 11}B ratios in {sup 26}Al-free PLAty hibonite Crystals. From these data, an initial {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (5.5 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -4} (2{sigma}) and {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B = 0.2508 {+-} 0.0015 can be inferred. On the other hand, chondritic boron isotopic compositions were found in {sup 26}Al-bearing Spinel-HIBonite spherules, most likely due to contamination with normal boron. No {sup 7}Li excesses due to {sup 7}Be decay were observed. When combined with previously reported data, the new data yield the best defined {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (5.3 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -4} (2{sigma}) and {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B = 0.2513 {+-} 0.0012 for PLACs. A comparison of this value and the best constrained {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be = (8.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4} in CV Ca-Al-rich inclusions supports a heterogeneous distribution of {sup 10}Be and its protosolar irradiation origin. We consider two possible irradiation scenarios that could potentially lead to the observed Li-Be-B isotopic compositions in PLACs. Although in situ irradiation of solids with hibonite chemistry seems to provide the simplest explanation, more high quality data will be needed for quantitatively constraining the irradiation history.

  13. VARIABLE AND EXTREME IRRADIATION CONDITIONS IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM INFERRED FROM THE INITIAL ABUNDANCE OF {sup 10}Be IN ISHEYEVO CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Rollion-Bard, Claire

    2013-02-01

    A search for short-lived {sup 10}Be in 21 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from Isheyevo, a rare CB/CH chondrite, showed that only 5 CAIs had {sup 10}B/{sup 11}B ratios higher than chondritic correlating with the elemental ratio {sup 9}Be/{sup 11}B, suggestive of in situ decay of this key short-lived radionuclide. The initial ({sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be){sub 0} ratios vary between {approx}10{sup -3} and {approx}10{sup -2} for CAI 411. The initial ratio of CAI 411 is one order of magnitude higher than the highest ratio found in CV3 CAIs, suggesting that the more likely origin of CAI 411 {sup 10}Be is early solar system irradiation. The low ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al){sub 0} [{<=} 8.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}] with which CAI 411 formed indicates that it was exposed to gradual flares with a proton fluence of a few 10{sup 19} protons cm{sup -2}, during the earliest phases of the solar system, possibly the infrared class 0. The irradiation conditions for other CAIs are less well constrained, with calculated fluences ranging between a few 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 20} protons cm{sup -2}. The variable and extreme value of the initial {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios in carbonaceous chondrite CAIs is the reflection of the variable and extreme magnetic activity in young stars observed in the X-ray domain.

  14. 10Be constrains the sediment sources and sediment yields to the Great Barrier Reef from the tropical Barron River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of long-term, background sediment generation rates place current and future sediment fluxes to the Great Barrier Reef in context. Without reliable estimates of sediment generation rates and without identification of the sources of sediment delivered to the reef prior to European settlement (c. 1850), determining the necessity and effectiveness of contemporary landscape management efforts is difficult. Using the ~2100-km2 Barron River catchment in Queensland, Australia, as a test case, we use in situ-produced 10Be to derive sediment generation rate estimates and use in situ and meteoric 10Be to identify the source of that sediment, which enters the Coral Sea near Cairns. Previous model-based calculations suggested that background sediment yields were up to an order of magnitude lower than contemporary sediment yields. In contrast, in situ 10Be data indicate that background (43 t km-2 y-1) and contemporary sediment yields (~45 t km-2 y-1) for the Barron River are similar. These data suggest that the reef became established in a sediment flux similar to what it receives today. Since western agricultural practices increased erosion rates, large amounts of sediment mobilized from hillslopes during the last century are probably stored in Queensland catchments and will eventually be transported to the coast, most likely in flows triggered by rare but powerful tropical cyclones that were more common before European settlement and may increase in strength as climate change warms the south Pacific Ocean. In situ and meteoric 10Be concentrations of Coral Sea beach sand near Cairns are similar to those in rivers on the Atherton Tablelands, suggesting that most sediment is derived from the extensive, low-gradient uplands rather than the steep, more rapidly eroding but beach proximal escarpment.

  15. Extensive MIS 3 glaciation in southernmost Patagonia revealed by cosmogenic nuclide dating of outwash sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Hein, Andrew S.; Rodés, Ángel

    2015-11-01

    The timing and extent of former glacial advances can demonstrate leads and lags during periods of climatic change and their forcing, but this requires robust glacial chronologies. In parts of southernmost Patagonia, dating pre-global Last Glacial Maximum (gLGM) ice limits has proven difficult due to post-deposition processes affecting the build-up of cosmogenic nuclides in moraine boulders. Here we provide ages for the Río Cullen and San Sebastián glacial limits of the former Bahía Inútil-San Sebastián (BI-SSb) ice lobe on Tierra del Fuego (53-54°S), previously hypothesised to represent advances during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 12 and 10, respectively. Our approach uses cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure dating, but targets glacial outwash associated with these limits and uses depth-profiles and surface cobble samples, thereby accounting for surface deflation and inheritance. The data reveal that the limits formed more recently than previously thought, giving ages of 45.6 ka (+139.9/-14.3) for the Río Cullen, and 30.1 ka (+45.6/-23.1) for the San Sebastián limits. These dates indicate extensive glaciation in southern Patagonia during MIS 3, prior to the well-constrained, but much less extensive MIS 2 (gLGM) limit. This suggests the pattern of ice advances in the region was different to northern Patagonia, with the terrestrial limits relating to the last glacial cycle, rather than progressively less extensive glaciations over hundreds of thousands of years. However, the dates are consistent with MIS 3 glaciation elsewhere in the southern mid-latitudes, and the combination of cooler summers and warmer winters with increased precipitation, may have caused extensive glaciation prior to the gLGM.

  16. Surface dating of dynamic landforms: young boulders on aging moraines.

    PubMed

    Hallet, B; Putkonen, J

    1994-08-12

    The dating of landforms is crucial to understanding the evolution, history, and stability of landscapes. Cosmogenic isotope analysis has recently been used to determine quantitative exposure ages for previously undatable landform surfaces. A pioneering application of this technique to date moraines illustrated its considerable potential but suggested a chronology partially inconsistent with existing geological data. Consideration of the dynamic nature of landforms and of the ever-present processes of erosion, deposition, and weathering leads to a resolution of this inconsistency and, more generally, offers guidance for realistic interpretation of exposure ages.

  17. Radiocarbon Dating, Memories, and Hopes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    The history of radiocarbon dating from 1939 to the present is reviewed. The basic principles of radiocarbon dating are that cosmic rays make living things radioactive with {sup 14}C to a certain level fixed by the environment and that at death the intake of food stops so no replenishment of the {sup 14}C steadily lost by the immutable decay occurs. Therefore measurement of the degree of decay gives the time lapse since death, i.e., the radiocarbon age. The equipment developed and experiments performed to measure the specific activity of specimens to be dated are described. The results obtained by world-wide experimenters are discussed. These showed that on simultaneity radiocarbon dating is apparently reliable but that absolute dates may be incorrect by as much as 600 to 700 y. The value of radiocarbon dating to archaeologists, geologists, climatologists, and historians is stressed. (LCL)

  18. VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING DATE PALMS. NOTE TRELLIS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, SHOWING DATE PALMS. NOTE TRELLIS ON TYPE 11 FACILITY, FACILITY 808. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  20. Combining FastScape χ Values and 10Be Erosion Rates to Evaluate Topographic Equilibrium in Evolving Landscapes: Examples from Namibia and the Central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, C.; Codilean, A.; Braun, J.; Merrall, S.

    2015-12-01

    The FastScape landscape evolution model is a powerful and user-friendly tool that can be used in concert with catchment-wide cosmogenic 10Be erosion rates to assess states of dynamic equilibrium in landscapes with respect to their tectonic and climatic settings. FastScape was used to compute chi (χ), a proxy for steady-state river channel elevation (Willet et al., 2014), for model domains in Namibia (e.g., desert climate and passive continental margin) and the central Himalaya (e.g., active mountain building and a wet, monsoonal climate). Namibian and central Himalayan landscapes are eroding at widely different rates (e.g., 101 mm/ka and 103 mm/ka, respectively). Chi values are sensitive to both DEM domain size and base level, cell resolution, and time, thus, chi values can only be evaluated and directly compared within a given domain. Chi values indicate areas or regions of equilibrium or disequilibrium within a given model domain, and not between domains in different geographic study areas. Chi can be used to ascertain if anomalously high 10Be erosion rates are affected by the addition of youthful sediment from landslides, debris flows, or glaciation of river catchments or tributary basins. In this study, glacial settings with high erosion rates show no relationship to chi values. For unglaciated tributary basins in a given catchment, chi values are related to cosmogenic 10Be erosion rates in the following ways: (1) basins in equilibrium have chi values that remain constant with increasing cosmogenic erosion rates; (2) basins in disequilibrium have an inverse relationship between chi values and erosion rates in a setting where erosion is driven predominantly by precipitation; and (3) basins in disequilibrium have a positive correlation between chi values and erosion rates in a setting where tectonic uplift is the dominant force driving erosion.

  1. Dating human bone: is racemization dating species-specific?

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M; France, Christine A M

    2013-12-03

    Our recently developed dating technique based on the racemization rate of aspartic acid was applied to dating human bone, as well as that of other mammals, utilizing capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry. First, several well-dated (mostly (14)C-dated and with strong archeological evidence) human bones ranging in age from 150 to ~10,000 years were used to develop a calibration curve for human bone. The D/L ratio of aspartic acid for these specimens ranged from 2.4% to ~10%, with a correlation coefficient of better than 0.99, indicating a strong linear relationship between the d/l ratio of aspartic acid and the age of the specimens. This calibration curve can now be used to date human archeological specimens of unknown age, up to ~10,000 years. However, when the technique was applied to well-dated mixed species of larger mammal bones such as bison, whale, llama, etc., the calibration curve showed a slower rate of racemization with a lower correlation (0.88). As additional large mammal bones with less certain age (i.e., using archeological evidence alone with no (14)C-dating) were dated the correlation coefficient decreased to 0.70. The correlation coefficient decreased further to 0.58 when the racemization data from all mammals (including human) were added to the calibration curve, indicating the importance of using well-dated, species-specific specimens for forming a calibration curve. This conclusion is consistent with our previously published calibration curve for a single species of silk (Bombyx mori), which followed the expected reversible first-order kinetics. These results support species specificity of amino acid racemization dating.

  2. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluianov, S. V.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radioisotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air mass dynamics using cosmogenic radioisotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the 10Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 A.D. and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores.

  3. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  4. Ionium dating of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Kigoshi, K

    1967-05-19

    Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals within a sample of igneous rock at the time of crystallization, makes it possible to date its solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite, pumice, and lava suggest that this method of dating is reliable.

  5. Radiocarbon Dating: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortine, Suellen

    This selective annotated bibliography covers various sources of information on the radiocarbon dating method, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, reflecting the most important and useful sources of the last 25 years. The bibliography is divided into five parts--general background on radiocarbon, radiocarbon dating,…

  6. National Date Palm Germplasm Repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus & Dates (NCGRCD), located in Riverside, California USA, is a project of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The NCGRCD maintains a collection of germplasm of date palm (Phoneix dactylifera ...

  7. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  8. Exposure Factors Handbook 2011 Edition (Final Report) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition (EPA/600/R-09/052F), prepared by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments (NCEA). This updated edition of the handbook provides the most up-to-date data on the various human factors used in assessing exposure. The Exposure Factors Handbook (EFH or

  9. Determining the growth rate of topographic relief using in situ-produced 10Be: A case study in the Black Forest, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Hetzel, R.; Fügenschuh, B.; Strauss, H.

    2010-02-01

    To determine how topographic relief in mountainous regions evolves through time we present a new approach that uses in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be to quantify (1) spatially averaged denudation rates of small watersheds and (2) local denudation rates of the ridge crests bounding these basins. The technique is applied to two catchments in the Black Forest, a forested mountain range with a local relief of a few hundred meters, which is typical for ranges in central Europe. Both the Acher and the Gutach catchments expose predominantly Carboniferous granite, and only minor amounts of high-grade gneiss and Triassic sandstone. The latter occurs on ridges defining the eastern boundaries of the catchments, above a regional unconformity. In the Acher and northern Gutach watersheds denudation rates of subcatchments derived from 10Be concentrations in stream sediment range from 52 to 87 mm/ka and 59 to 91 mm/ka, respectively. In contrast, grus samples from the ridge crests bounding both watersheds yield lower denudation rates of 34 to 59 mm/ka. The differences in denudation rates for sample pairs from individual subcatchments and adjacent ridge crests reveals that topographic relief is growing at a mean rate of 24 ± 12 mm/ka (with the exception of the flat southwestern part of the Gutach catchment, where catchment-wide denudation rates are similar to the rate of ridge crest lowering). The inferred rates of denudation and relief growth are consistent with erosion rates calculated from the known thickness of Triassic to Lower Jurassic sediments, which were once present above the regional unconformity but have been largely eroded during the exhumation of the Black Forest. The onset of exhumation ˜ 19 Ma ago is constrained by thermal modelling of apatite fission track data, which suggest a cooling rate of ˜ 3 °C/Ma. Combined with a geothermal gradient of 30 to 40 °C/km this cooling rate yields an average exhumation rate of 75-100 mm/ka for the modelled apatite fission track

  10. Epidemiology of accidental radiation exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, E

    1996-01-01

    Much of the information on the health effects of radiation exposure available to date comes from long-term studies of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Accidental exposures, such as those resulting from the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, have as yet provided little information concerning health effects of ionizing radiation. This paper will present the current state of our knowledge concerning radiation effects, review major large-scale accidental radiation exposures, and discuss information that could be obtained from studies of accidental exposures and the types of studies that are needed. PMID:8781398

  11. Epidemiology of accidental radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Cardis, E

    1996-05-01

    Much of the information on the health effects of radiation exposure available to date comes from long-term studies of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Accidental exposures, such as those resulting from the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, have as yet provided little information concerning health effects of ionizing radiation. This paper will present the current state of our knowledge concerning radiation effects, review major large-scale accidental radiation exposures, and discuss information that could be obtained from studies of accidental exposures and the types of studies that are needed.

  12. 31 CFR 595.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 595.302 Section 595... § 595.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable... of specially designated terrorists designated after that date, the earlier of the date on which...

  13. Electron spin resonance dating of human bones from Brazilian shell-mounds (Sambaquís).

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, S; Baffa Filho, O; Ikeya, M

    1982-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) signals from bone increase with exposure to radiation. This permits the dating of ancient bone from its exposure to natural radiation over the centuries. The ESR technique was used for dating human bones from Brazilian shell mounds. The results were compared with 14C dates on charcoal found near the bone. The natural radiation dose rate of the bones was about 0.01 Gy/year (1 rad/year), similar to that found in Japanese shell-mounds. Ages of the bone samples dated ranged from 2000-5000 years BP.

  14. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  15. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Sediment production and transport from in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be and river loads in the Napo River basin, an upper Amazon tributary of Ecuador and Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Guyot, J. L.; Laraque, A.; Bernal, C.; Kubik, P. W.

    2011-02-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide-based denudation rates and published erosion rates from recent river gauging in the Napo River basin (Peruvian Amazonia) are used to decipher erosion and sedimentation processes along a 600 km long transect from the headwaters to the lowlands. The sediment-producing headwaters to the Napo floodplain are the volcanically active Ecuadorian Andes, which discharge sediment at a cosmogenic nuclide-based denudation rate of 0.49 ± 0.12 mm/yr. This denudation rate was calculated from an average 10Be nuclide concentration of 2.2 ± 0.5 × 104 at/g(Qz) that was measured in bedload-derived quartz. Within the Napo lowlands, a significant drop in trunk stream 10Be nuclide concentrations relative to the Andean hinterland is recorded, with an average concentration of 1.2 ± 0.5 × 104 at/g(Qz). This nuclide concentration represents a mixture between the 10Be nuclide concentration of eroded floodplain deposits, and that of sediment eroded from the Andean hinterland that is now carried in the trunk stream. Evidence for addition of sediment from the floodplain to the trunk stream is provided by published decadal-scale sediment flux measurements from gauging stations operated in the Napo basin, from which an increase from 12 × 106 t/yr at the outflow of the Andes to ˜47 × 106 t/yr at the confluence with the Solimões (upper Amazon River) is recorded. Therefore, approximately 35 × 106 t of floodplain sediment are added annually to the active Napo trunk stream. Combined with our nuclide concentration measurements, we can estimate that the eroded floodplain deposits yield a nuclide concentration of ˜0.9 × 104 at/g(Qz) only. Under steady state surface erosion conditions, this nuclide concentration would translate to a denudation rate of the floodplain of ˜0.47 mm/yr. However, we have no geomorphologic explanation for this high denudation rate within the low relief floodplain and thus suggest that this low-nuclide concentrated sediment is Andean-derived and

  17. Differential erosion by different-sized glaciers as reflected in 10Be-derived erosion rates of glacier valley walls, Kichatna Mts., Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Anderson, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Kichatna Mountains, Alaska Range, Alaska comprise a dramatic landscape carved into a small ~65 Ma granitic pluton about 100 km west of Denali, in which kilometer-tall rock walls and “cathedral” spires tower over a radial array of over a dozen individual valley glaciers. The sheer scale of the relief speaks to the relative rates of valley incision by glaciers and rockwall retreat, but absolute rates are difficult to determine. We use cosmogenic 10Be to measure rockwall backwearing rates (and discuss several very important caveats to this use) on timescales of 103-104 yr, with a straightforward sampling strategy that exploits ablation-dominated medial moraines. In simple cases, a medial moraine and its associated englacial debris serve as a conveyor belt that brings supraglacial rockfall debris from the accumulation zone valley wall to a moraine crest in the ablation zone. Our samples come from the largest medial moraine on each of three glaciers. The northeast-flowing Trident glacier is the largest (15 km long, 1.4 km wide) and most deeply incised, and it has the lowest modern snowline in the range (~1200 m). Its primary medial moraine is sourced from west-facing sidewalls. The north-flowing Shadows glacier is slightly smaller (13 km long, 0.8 km wide) and has a large moraine sourced in dominantly east-facing sidewalls. The south-flowing Caldwell glacier is the smallest of the three (7 km long, 0.7 km wide), has a high modern snowline (~1500 m), and is nearly completely covered in debris. Its primary moraine is sourced from all south-facing aspects. These three glaciers share divides in their headwaters, and so are sourced in identical rock. Sidewall relief is similar (~1 km) in all three catchments. Each sample was amalgamated from 25-35 clasts collected over a 1 km longitudinal transect of each moraine. Replicate samples are internally consistent. The lowest 10Be concentrations (8000 at/g), and thus the highest inferred sidewall erosion rates (1.4 mm

  18. Spatial variability of 10Be-derived erosion rates across the southern Peninsular Indian escarpment: A key to landscape evolution across passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Lupker, Maarten; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Valla, Pierre G.; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    The persistence of significant topography in ancient, tectonically inactive orogenic belts remains one of the outstanding questions in geomorphology. In southern Peninsular India, the impressive topographic relief of the Western Ghat Mountains in tectonic quiescence since at least ca. 65 Ma has raised important questions concerning the long-term mechanism of topographic evolution. Quantifying the distribution of erosion in space and time is critical to understanding landscape evolution. Although the long-term erosion rates are reasonably well known, the short-term erosion rates and the relative importance of factors controlling erosion in southern Peninsular India are less well constrained. We present a new suite of catchment-averaged and local erosion rates using in situ produced 10Be concentrations in river sediments and exposed bedrock samples in southern Peninsular India. Catchment-averaged erosion rates vary from 9.6 ± 0.8 mMa-1 in the highlands to 114.3 ± 13.8 mMa-1 on the escarpment side. Bedrock erosion rates range from 2.4 ± 0.2 mMa-1 in the ridge-top to 143.4 ± 25.4 mMa-1 in active channel beds of the highlands. Catchment-averaged erosion rates derived from the across-escarpment, westward-draining catchments are significantly higher than those derived from the eastward-draining, over highland catchments. The difference indicates that long-term down-wearing of the highland proceeds at lower rates than in the escarpment zones. Catchment-averaged erosion rates are moderately correlated with mean hillslope angles and local relief whereas they are strongly correlated with catchment-averaged channel steepness index. This suggests that topographic steepness is the major control on the spatial variability of erosion while strong rainfall gradient is of minor importance in this area. 10Be-derived average erosion rates in highlands are consistent with previous long-term erosion rate estimated from thermochronometry. These results collectively point to large

  19. Catchment-scale denudation and chemical erosion rates determined from 10Be and mass balance geochemistry (Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestland, Erick A.; Liccioli, Caterina; Soloninka, Lesja; Chittleborough, David J.; Fink, David

    2016-10-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles have, as a central component, estimates of physical and chemical erosion rates. These erosion rates are becoming better quantified by the development of a global database of cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be (CRN) analyses of soil, sediment, and outcrops. Here we report the denudation rates for two small catchments (~ 0.9 km2) in the Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia as determined from 10Be concentrations from quartz sand from the following landscape elements: 1) dissected plateaux, or summit surfaces (14.10 ± 1.61 t km- 2 y- 1), 2) sandstone outcrops (15.37 ± 1.32 t km- 2 y- 1), 3) zero-order drainages (27.70 ± 1.42 t km- 2 y- 1), and 4) stream sediment which reflect a mix of landscape elements (19.80 ± 1.01 t km- 2 y- 1). Thus, the more slowly eroding plateaux and ridges, when juxtaposed with the more rapidly eroding side-slopes, are leading to increased relief in this landscape. Chemical erosion rates for this landscape are determined by combining cosmogenic denudation rates with the geochemical mass balance of parent rock, soil and saprolite utilizing zirconium immobility and existing mass balance methods. Two different methods were used to correct for chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite zone that is shielded at depth from CRN production. The corrected values are higher than uncorrected values: total denudation of 33.24 or 29.11 t km- 2 y- 1, and total chemical erosion of 15.64 or 13.68 t km- 2 y- 1. Thus, according to these methods, 32-40% of the denudation is taking place by chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite below CRN production depth. Compared with other similar areas, the overall denudation and chemical erosion rates are low. In most areas with sub-humid climates and tectonic uplift, physical erosion is much greater than chemical erosion. The low physical erosion rates in these Mt. Lofty Range catchments, in what is a relatively active tectonic setting, are thought to be due to low rainfall intensity

  20. Using 10Be erosion rates and fluvial channel morphology to constrain fault throw rates in the southwestern Sacramento River Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, is a critical region for California water resources, agriculture, and threatened or endangered species. This landscape is affected by an extensive set of levees that enclose artificial islands created for agricultural use. In addition to their importance for sustaining agriculture, this levee system also supports extensive transport and power transmission infrastructure and urban/suburban development. These levees are susceptible to damage from even moderate ground shaking by either a large earthquake on one of the high-activity faults in the nearby San Francisco Bay region, or even a moderate earthquake on one of the low-activity faults in the Delta region itself. However, despite this danger the earthquake hazards in this region are poorly constrained due to our lack of understanding of faults in and near the Delta region. As part of an effort to better constrain the seismic hazard associated with known, but poorly constrained, faults in the region, a geomorphic analysis of the Dunnigan Hills, northwest of Woodland, CA, is being combined with cosmogenic 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates. The Dunnigan Hills are a low-relief (maximum elevation 87 m) landscape generated by fault-bend folding above the west-vergent Sweitzer reverse fault that soles into a blind east-vergent reverse fault. These faults have been imaged by seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity indicates that this system is actively propagating to the east. However, the throw rates on the faults in this system remain unconstrained, despite the potential for significant shaking such as that experienced in the nearby April, 1892 earthquake sequence between Winters and Vacaville, Ca, ~25 km to the south, which has been estimated at magnitude 6.0 or greater. Geomorphic and cosmogenic 10Be analyses from 12 catchments draining the eastern flank of the Dunnigan Hills will be used to infer vertical rock uplift rates to better constrain

  1. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Küffner, Markus; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Ferreira, Ester S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated.

  2. Direct dating of human fossils.

    PubMed

    Grün, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The methods that can be used for the direct dating of human remains comprise of radiocarbon, U-series, electron spin resonance (ESR), and amino acid racemization (AAR). This review gives an introduction to these methods in the context of dating human bones and teeth. Recent advances in ultrafiltration techniques have expanded the dating range of radiocarbon. It now seems feasible to reliably date bones up to 55,000 years. New developments in laser ablation mass spectrometry permit the in situ analysis of U-series isotopes, thus providing a rapid and virtually non-destructive dating method back to about 300,000 years. This is of particular importance when used in conjunction with non-destructive ESR analysis. New approaches in AAR analysis may lead to a renaissance of this method. The potential and present limitations of these direct dating techniques are discussed for sites relevant to the reconstruction of modern human evolution, including Florisbad, Border Cave, Tabun, Skhul, Qafzeh, Vindija, Banyoles, and Lake Mungo.

  3. The new local interstellar spectra and their influence on the production rates of the cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be and 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, K.; Muscheler, R.; Heber, B.

    2017-01-01

    With Voyager1 crossing the outer boundary of our solar system at the end of 2012, for the first time in the instrumental era an unmodulated local interstellar spectrum (LIS) at galactic particle energies below 500 MeV has been measured. On the basis of these as well as Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) and Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS02) measurements, most recently, three new LIS models have been proposed in the literature. In this study we compare the newest LIS models to previously most often used ones. Thereby, we investigate and discuss the influence of these LIS models on the terrestrial production rates of the cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be and 14C, which are produced due to the interaction of galactic and solar cosmic rays with atmospheric constituents. After being transported within the atmosphere they are preserved in natural archives such as, e.g., ice sheets or tree rings, forming a unique tool to study the solar modulation of thousands of years back in time. To parameterize the heliospheric modulation we apply the force-field approximation for the individual LIS models from which LIS-dependent solar modulation parameter (ϕ) values are derived. Furthermore, we present updated sets of linear regression functions containing the opportunity to convert the LIS-dependent ϕ values between the investigated LIS models. The results are then applied to a long-term reconstruction of the solar modulation parameter.

  4. Characterization and (10)Be content of iron carbonate concretions for genetic aspects - Weathering, desert varnish or burning: Rim effects in iron carbonate concretions.

    PubMed

    Polgári, Márta; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Horiuchi, Kazuho; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kovács, Tibor; Józsa, Sándor; Bendő, Zsolt; Fintor, Krisztián; Fekete, József; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Gucsik, Arnold; Gyollai, Ildikó; Kovács, János; Dódony, István

    2016-12-20

    The research investigated three iron carbonate (siderite) sedimentary concretions from Nagykovácsi, Úri and Délegyháza, Hungary. To identify possible source rocks and effects of the glaze-like exposed surface of the concretions, we carried on comparative petrological, mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic studies. The samples were microbially mediated siderite concretions with embedded metamorphous and igneous mineral clasts, and had specific rim belts characterized by semi-concentric outer Fe-oxide layers, fluffy pyrite-rich outer belts and siderite inner parts. We investigated the cross section of the Fe-carbonate concretions by independent methodologies in order to identify their rim effects. Their surficial oxide layers showed evidence of degassing of the exposed surface caused most probably by elevated temperatures. The inner rim pyrite belt in the concretions excluded the possibility of a prolonged wet surface environment. Microtextural and mineralogical features did not support desert varnish formation. (10)Be nuclide values of the Nagykovácsi and Uri concretions were far above the level of terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides, but they were consistent with the lowest levels for meteorites. Though the data were not conclusive to confirm any kind of known origin, they are contradictary, and open possibilities for a scenario of terrestrial meteorite origin.

  5. Microscopic analysis of 10,11Be elastic scattering on protons and 12C and breakup processes of 11Be within the 10Be+n cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    The elastic scattering cross-sections of 10,11Be on protons and 12C at energy E < 100 MeV/nucleon using microscopically calculated optical potentials (OP) are presented. The real OP is obtained by a folding procedure with effective NN interactions, while the imaginary OP is estimated within the high energy approximation (HEA). The spin-orbit part of the OP is also included. The characteristics of the breakup processes of 11Be on different nuclear targets are also considered. The cross-sections of diffractive breakup and stripping reactions of 11Be on 9Be, 93Nb, 181Ta and 238U at energy E = 63 MeV/nucleon and the longitudinal momentum distributions of 10Be fragments produced in the breakup of 11Be on these nuclei are presented. The results are in a good agreement with the available experimental data, in particular the obtained widths of about 50 MeV/c are closed to the empirical ones.

  6. Uplift rates of the marine terraces in the south coast of Japan deduced from in situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Nagano, G.; Nakamura, A.; Maemoku, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine terraces are low-relief platforms located along coastal areas. They are formed by waves action with the changes in the relative sea level (RSL) that is affected by combined effects of the eustatic sea level (ESL) and the tectonic movements (e.g. uplift, subsidence and isostatic effect). Therefore, determining the ages and the elevations of the marine terraces allows us to reconstruct the ESL and/or the tectonic history of the study area. The Kii Peninsula and the southern coast of the Shikoku Island are located along the Nankai Trough where the Philippine Sea Plate is subducting under the Eurasian plate. There exist relatively well-preserved marine terraces along the coastal line with the elevation of ca. 50 -100 m. Because of this unique tectonic setting, the terraces are regarded as the suitable counterparts to reconstruct uplift history of the south coast of Japan. However, the ages of these terraces are poorly understood due to the lack of the ash layers that is suitable for the tephrochronology. In this study, we determine the age of the marine terraces using terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic radionuclides (TCN), 10Be and 26Al. This is the first age estimation of the marine terraces in Japan using TCN, allowing us to determine the uplift rates and the seismic history of the region.

  7. Dating of Modern Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, R.

    Dating studies on palaoeanthropological sites is usually carried out on material associ- ated with the human remains, such as the sediment, charcoal or other fauna rather than the human specimen itself. The reason lies in the fact that most dating techniques are destructive and because the hominid remains are too rare to be sacrificed for dating. This indirect dating approach is in many cases not satisfactory, because: (i) the human remains are often buried into the sediments and the association with other materials is uncertain (e.g. Skhul, Qafzeh, etc.); (ii) faunal remains or minerals from the sediment are re-worked from older deposits (see e.g. present discussion of the age of the Homo erectus remains in Indonesia; (iii) the hominid fossils were discovered at a time when no careful excavations were carried out and it is impossible to correlate the specimen with other datable material (which applies tonearly 90% of all palaeoanthropological specimens). For example, the hominid burial site of Qafzeh in Israel has been dated by several independent dating laboratories with a multitude of methods. However, the data are still not accepted by some because the dating has not been carried out on the hominid specimen. Until recently, hominid fossils could only be dated by radiocarbon. This method reaches back to about 40,000 years. As a consequence, all the older fossils could not be analysed and many important questions in our understanding of human evolution could not be addressed. Human remains are scarce and extremely valuable, therefore any sort of destruction has to be kept to an absolute minimum. This is of particular importance in Australia where any human fossils are sacred. Thus, for the analysis of hominid material it was necessary to develop a more or less non-destructive techniques. This has been ac- complished in recent years by the application of ESR dating of tooth enamel and a combination of gamma spectrometric and TIMS U-series dating of bones. The exam

  8. Landscape development in an hyperarid sandstone environment along the margins of the Dead Sea fault: Implications from dated rock falls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, A.; Shaked, Y.; Porat, N.; Enzel, Y.; Finkel, R.; Lifton, N.; Boaretto, E.; Agnon, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we explored the spatial and temporal relations between boulders and their original in-situ locations on sandstone bedrock cliffs. This was accomplished by combining field observations with dating methods using cosmogenic isotopes (10Be and 14C) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Our conclusions bear both on the landscape evolution and cliff retreat process in the hyperarid region of Timna and on the methodology of estimating exposure ages using cosmogenic isotopes. We recognize three discrete rock fall events, at 31 ka, 15 ka, and 4 ka. In this hyperarid region, the most plausible triggering mechanism for rock fall events is strong ground acceleration caused by earthquakes generated by the nearby Dead Sea fault (DSF). Our record, however, under represents the regional earthquake record implying that ongoing development of detachment cracks prior to the triggering event might be slower than the earthquake cycle. Cliff retreat rates calculated using the timing of rock fall events and estimated thickness of rock removed in each event range between 0.14 m ky-1 and 2 m ky-1. When only full cycles are considered, we derive a more realistic range of 0.4 m ky-1 to 0.7 m ky-1. These rates are an order of magnitude faster than the calculated rate of surface lowering in the area. We conclude that sandstone cliffs at Timna retreat through episodic rock fall events that preserve the sharp, imposing, landscape characteristic to this region and that ongoing weathering of the cliff faces is minor. A 10%-20% difference in the 10Be concentrations in samples from matching boulder and cliff faces that have identical exposure histories and are located only a few meters apart indicates that cosmogenic nuclide production rates are sensitive to shielding and vary spatially over short distances. However, uncertainties associated with age calculations yielded boulder and matching cliff face ages that are similar within 1 ??. The use of external constraints in the

  9. Tectonics and Unroofing of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California, from Low-Temperature Thermochronology and Catchment-Averaged 10Be-Derived Denudation Rates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, G. E.; Burgmann, R.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ebert, Y.; Fosdick, J. C.; Le, K.; Levine, N. M.; Wilson, A.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present eleven Apatite Fission Track (AFT) and Apatite (U-Th)/He (A-He) analyses and eighteen catchment-averaged cosmogenic 10Be denudation rates from the Santa Cruz Mountains (SCM) that resolve the unroofing history of this range over the past several Myr. This range lies within a restraining bend in the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which appears to be fixed to the crust on the northeast side of the fault based on previous work. In this view, the topographic asymmetry of the SCM reflects the advection of material southwest of the right-lateral SAF through a zone of uplift centered on the restraining bend, while material northwest of the fault remains trapped this zone. Northeast of the fault bend in the Sierra Azul block of the SCM, AFT ages adjacent to the SAF appear completely reset during the Pliocene, and show partial resetting at the periphery of the block. This suggests that total exhumation exceeded 3-4 km within the heart of the block and was < 4 km at its margins. However, A-He ages, which record a shallower exhumation history than the AFT system, show limited spatial variation in the timing of exhumation across the range. Additionally, some samples showed that rocks cooled through both the A-He and AFT systems at similar times. These samples were located in the core of the range, suggesting that this area underwent rapid exhumation at 5-7 Ma, after which time exhumation slowed as deformation apparently stepped to the periphery of the range. In contrast, AFT ages from samples southwest of the SAF indicate that recent burial and unroofing has been limited. These long-timescale observations are broadly consistent with a model in which crust within the Sierra Azul has experienced more total unroofing within the restraining bend, while crust southwest of the SAF has experienced far less as it is uplifted and advected laterally through the restraining bend. 10Be-derived denudation rates from basins southwest of the fault decrease systematically from 0.60 to 0

  10. How does a single precipitation event erode a landscape? Clues from meteoric 7Be and 10Be analysis of suspended sediments and soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhi, M.; Willenbring, J. K.; Kaste, J. M.; Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Stream sediment contains a history recorded in isotopes that cling to suspended particles. In this study we exploit this recorded history in order to understand how a single precipitation event erodes the landscape at two watershed sites (Bisley I and Mameyes) within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. We use fallout cosmogenic radionuclides Beryllium-7 (7Be) and Beryllium-10 (10Be) to determine the provenance of suspended sediment at various stages of a hydrograph. Sediments from source areas within the watersheds, such as stable ridge crests and active landslide scars, were also sampled and analyzed. Exploiting the large difference in half-life, the 10Be/7Be ratio of suspended sediments coupled with the concentration and nature of organic material present show original depth of mobilized stream sediment in the hillslope. The storm hydrographs of a one-month recurrence interval storm on June 7th, 2011 were sampled at both watersheds. In the small watershed (0.067 km2), storm discharge and total suspended solids (TSS) show short lag times between the initiation of precipitation and the initial rise of the hydrograph and no lag time between peak discharge and peak TSS. The larger site (17.8 km2) had a lag time of approximately 30 minutes between the initiation of precipitation and a rise in discharge and had a 15-minute lag between peak stage (which occurred first) and peak TSS, highlighting the longer travel distances that particles must take to reach the stream sampling point in the larger basin. We compare fallout 7Be nuclide concentration in source sediments and assume a simple, two end-member model to mix these sources in the stream. Soil sediments collected from stable ridge crests ('old') have relatively high average 7Be concentrations of 2.7x106 atoms/g±10% and sediments collected from active landslide scars ('new') have relatively low 7Be concentrations of 4.0x104 atoms/g±15%. Suspended sediments had an average 7Be concentration of 7.2x

  11. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  12. Dating of ballpoint pen ink.

    PubMed

    Hofer, R

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we describe a case in which a cash book, dated of the year 2000, was sent to the Forensic Science Division, Document Laboratory, Zurich Canton Police in March 2003. The questioned document was a list of 29 pages containing a consecutive handwritten numbering and dated entries (payments) made of blue ballpoint pen ink. By definition, a cash book has to be written by hand and the entries have to be made daily. The questioned document was suspected to have been written within a short period (e.g., a few hours) and backdated. The document lab was asked to determine the date of the entries of the questioned list. On one hand, we were asked, if the cash book had been kept on account consecutively during the period of one year, and on the other hand, the judges were interested in knowing, if the document could have been written in 2003 and back dated to 2000. To answer these questions, the document was examined for latent elements by electrostatic detection device (ESDA). The relative dating of the entries was performed by the quantification of the ballpoint pen ink dyes and their degradation products using HPLC. Results show that it is possible to determine the relative age of entries written by ballpoint pen within a relatively short time scale, if storage and supporting material of the different samples are the same or at least similar.

  13. Exposure Nomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissell, Ronald E.

    Correct exposure times may be determined from nomographs relating signal-to-noise ratio, exposure time, color, seeing, and magnitude. The equations needed to construct the nomographs are developed. Calibration techniques are discussed.

  14. The relationship between violence in the family of origin and dating violence among college students.

    PubMed

    Gover, Angela R; Kaukinen, Catherine; Fox, Kathleen A

    2008-12-01

    Prior research has established that violence in dating relationships is a serious social problem among adolescents and young adults. Exposure to violence during childhood has been linked to dating violence victimization and perpetration. Also known as the intergenerational transmission of violence, the link between violence during childhood and dating violence has traditionally focused on physical violence. This research examines the relationship between experiencing and perpetrating dating violence and exposure to violence in the family of origin. Specifically, the current research examines gender differences in the relationship between exposure to violence during childhood and physical and psychological abuse perpetration and victimization. Data were collected from a sample of approximately 2,500 college students at two southeastern universities. Findings indicate that childhood exposure to violence is a consistent predictor of involvement in relationships characterized by violence for males and females. The implications of the current research on policy are discussed.

  15. Climatic controls on steady state erosion using the relationship between channel steepness and cosmogenic 10Be-derived catchment averaged erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. W.; Whipple, K. X.; DiBiase, R. A.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    To understand landscape response to climate change, baseline controls on erosion rates must be established for given climate conditions. Theory suggests a number of climate metrics should be important to erosion (i.e. precipitation, temperature, storminess, seasonality, snow fraction). Nevertheless, definitive field evidence quantifying how climate affects erosion rate has proven difficult to obtain. This is at least partly due to the difficulty of isolating climatic influences on erosion rates from topographic and rock strength influences. We circumvent this problem by evaluating how climate influences the relationship between erosion rate and topography in settings with similar rock types. At steady state, tectonic uplift dictates erosion rate, and climate and rock strength are manifest as changes in erosional efficiency - the topographic relief necessary to maintain the tectonically imposed erosion rate. In fluvial landscapes, bedrock rivers set the relevant scale of topographic relief, which can be described by the channel steepness index. A number of recent studies have shown that the relationship between channel steepness and millennial scale erosion rates is non-linear, implying that erosional efficiency increases with relief. Work in the San Gabriel Mountains suggests this relationship is due to erosion thresholds that limit incision of channels in low relief landscapes. By using a fluvial incision model that incorporates a range of daily discharge events coupled with an erosion threshold (Lague et al., 2005), the influence of flood frequency on the relationship between channel steepness and erosion rate can be explored. We apply this same modeling approach to five other landscapes that exhibit a range of channel steepness, have similar rock types (granitoids), but that are in dramatically different climate regimes ranging from desert to rainforest (annual rainfall, P, from 0.25 to 3 m/yr). Specifically, we present new cosmogenic 10Be erosion rate data from

  16. 63 FR 5905 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-02-05

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Proposed rule... to tuberculosis and is announcing the dates and locations of the informal public hearings to be held...-5986. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OSHA's proposed standard on Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis...

  17. 7 CFR 987.12 - Marketable dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pursuant to § 987.40. Marketable dates shall include but not be limited to the following: (a) DAC dates. DAC dates are marketable whole or pitted dates that are inspected and certified as meeting the grade... handler that are certified as meeting the same grade and size requirements for DAC dates, with...

  18. 31 CFR 588.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 588.302 Section 588... Definitions § 588.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable... § 588.201(a)(2), the earlier of the date on which is received actual or constructive notice of...

  19. 31 CFR 544.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 544.302 Section 544... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 544.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date... property are blocked pursuant to § 544.201(a)(2), (a)(3), or (a)(4), the earlier of the date of actual...

  20. 31 CFR 546.303 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 546.303 Section 546....303 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable... § 546.201(a)(2), the earlier of the date of actual or constructive notice of such person's designation....

  1. 21 CFR 1312.25 - Expiration date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expiration date. 1312.25 Section 1312.25 Food and... SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.25 Expiration date. An export permit shall not be valid after the date specified therein, which date shall conform to the expiration date specified in...

  2. 31 CFR 537.303 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 537.303 Section 537....303 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable... property of persons designated pursuant to § 537.201(a)(2), the earlier of the date on which either...

  3. 31 CFR 541.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 541.302 Section 541... § 541.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable....201(a)(2), the earlier of the date on which either actual notice or constructive notice is received...

  4. 31 CFR 547.303 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 547.303 Section 547... General Definitions § 547.303 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the... blocked pursuant to § 547.201(a)(2), the earlier of the date of actual or constructive notice of...

  5. 31 CFR 594.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 594.302 Section 594... Definitions § 594.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable... to § 594.201(a)(2), (a)(3), or (a)(4), the earlier of the date on which is received actual...

  6. 21 CFR 1312.25 - Expiration date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expiration date. 1312.25 Section 1312.25 Food and... SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.25 Expiration date. An export permit shall not be valid after the date specified therein, which date shall conform to the expiration date specified in...

  7. The effects of moms and teens for safe dates: a dating abuse prevention program for adolescents exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Benefield, Thad; Dixon, Kimberly S; Chang, Ling-Yin; Senkomago, Virginia; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Michael Bowling, J

    2015-05-01

    Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at high risk for dating abuse. This randomized controlled trial evaluated a dating abuse prevention program designed specifically for this risk group. Moms and Teens for Safe Dates consisted of six mailed booklets of dating abuse prevention information and interactive activities. Mothers who had been victims of domestic violence but no longer lived with the abuser delivered the program to their adolescents who had been exposed to the abuse. Mother and adolescent pairs (N = 409) were recruited through community advertising; the adolescents ranged from 12 to 16 years old and 64 % were female. Mothers and adolescents completed baseline and 6-month follow-up telephone interviews. Booklet completion in the treatment group ranged from 80 % for the first to 62 % for the last booklet. The analyses first tested whether program effects on dating abuse varied by four a priori identified moderators (mother's psychological health, the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence, and adolescent sex and race/ethnicity). Main effects of the program were examined when there were no differential program effects. Program effects on psychological and physical victimization and psychological and cyber perpetration were moderated by the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence; there were significant favorable program effects for adolescents with higher, but not lower levels of exposure to domestic violence. There were no moderated or main effects on sexual violence victimization and perpetration or cyber victimization. The findings suggest that a dating abuse prevention program designed for adolescents exposed to domestic violence can have important positive effects.

  8. Using (1)(0)Be cosmogenic isotopes to estimate erosion rates and landscape changes during the Plio-Pleistocene in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Paul H G M; Placzek, Christa J; Fink, David; Dosseto, Anthony; Roberts, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic (10)Be, measured in quartz from chert and river sediment around the Cradle of Humankind (CoH), are used to determine basin-averaged erosion rates and estimate incision rates for local river valleys. This study focusses on the catchment area that hosts Malapa cave with Australopithecus sediba, in order to compare regional versus localized erosion rates, and better constrain the timing of cave formation and fossil entrapment. Basin-averaged erosion rates for six sub-catchments draining the CoH show a narrow range (3.00 ± 0.28 to 4.15 ± 0.37 m/Mega-annum [Ma]; ±1σ) regardless of catchment size or underlying geology; e.g. the sub-catchment with Malapa Cave (3 km(2)) underlain by dolomite erodes at the same rate (3.30 ± 0.30 m/Ma) as the upper Skeerpoort River catchment (87 km(2)) underlain by shale, chert and conglomerate (3.23 ± 0.30 m/Ma). Likewise, the Skeerpoort River catchment (147 km(2)) draining the northern CoH erodes at a rate (3.00 ± 0.28 m/Ma) similar to the Bloubank-Crocodile River catchment (627 km(2)) that drains the southern CoH (at 3.62 ± 0.33 to 4.15 ± 0.37 m/Ma). Dolomite- and siliciclastic-dominated catchments erode at similar rates, consistent with physical weathering as the rate controlling process, and a relatively dry climate in more recent times. Erosion resistant chert dykes along the Grootvleispruit River below Malapa yield an incision rate of ∼8 m/Ma at steady-state erosion rates for chert of 0.86 ± 0.54 m/Ma. Results provide better palaeo-depth estimates for Malapa Cave of 7-16 m at the time of deposition of A. sediba. Low basin-averaged erosion rates and concave river profiles indicate that the landscape across the CoH is old, and eroding slowly; i.e. the physical character of the landscape changed little in the last 3-4 Ma, and dolomite was exposed on surface probably well into the Miocene. The apparent absence of early Pliocene- or Miocene-aged cave deposits and

  9. 75 FR 16516 - Dates Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Office of the Federal Register Dates Correction Correction In the Notices section beginning on page 15401 in the issue of March 29th, 2010, make the following correction: On pages...

  10. Sexual Intimacy in Dating Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peplau, Letitia Anne; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The patterning of sexual interaction in male-female dyads and the links between sexual behavior and emotional intimacy were investigated as part of a two-year study of college dating couples. Traditional sexual role playing was found to be common. (Author/AM)

  11. Online Dating and Conjugal Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dannagal Goldthwaite; Caplan, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-presentation in the online dating profiles of 241 widowed and 280 divorced individuals between 18 and 40 years old. A content analysis of open-ended user-generated profiles assessed the presence or absence of various themes, including the user's marital status, the backstory of their lost relationship, and whether they…

  12. Past Victimizations and Dating Violence Perpetration in Adolescence: The Mediating Role of Emotional Distress and Hostility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boivin, Sophie; Lavoie, Francine; Hebert, Martine; Gagne, Marie-Helene

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the nature of the relationships between three forms of past victimizations (exposure to interparental violence in childhood, sexual harassment by peers since beginning high school, prior experience of dating violence), physical dating violence perpetration by adolescents, and anger-hostility and emotional distress.…

  13. The Relationship between Violence in the Family of Origin and Dating Violence among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gover, Angela R.; Kaukinen, Catherine; Fox, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has established that violence in dating relationships is a serious social problem among adolescents and young adults. Exposure to violence during childhood has been linked to dating violence victimization and perpetration. Also known as the intergenerational transmission of violence, the link between violence during childhood and…

  14. Socialization in the Family of Origin and Male Dating Violence: A Prospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Ronald L.; Lin, Kuei-Hsiu; Gordon, Leslie C.

    1998-01-01

    Several theoretical perspectives regarding the manner in which parental behavior might increase the probability that an adolescent will engage in dating violence were tested using 113 adolescent males. Frequent exposure to corporal punishment increased the risk of dating violence; interparental aggression did not. Low support and involvement by…

  15. Dating Techniques in Archaeology and Paleoanthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the new physical dating methods being used by archaeologists and paleoanthropologists to study the material remains of ancient primates. Describes the quaternary physical dating techniques, advances in radiocarbon dating, and the radiocalcium data method. (TW)

  16. Dating techniques in archaeology and paleoanthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1987-02-15

    Archaeologists have an increasing array of physical dating methods at their disposal. R.E. Taylor of the University of California discusses available techniques, recent advances in radiocarbon dating, and current developments in radiocalcium dating.

  17. 40 CFR 63.403 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance date shall be 18 months after September 8, 1994. (b) For new IPCT's that have an initial startup... initial startup on or after September 8, 1994, the compliance date shall be the date of the initial startup....

  18. 40 CFR 63.403 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance date shall be 18 months after September 8, 1994. (b) For new IPCT's that have an initial startup... initial startup on or after September 8, 1994, the compliance date shall be the date of the initial startup....

  19. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  20. 31 CFR 536.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General... of specially designated narcotics traffickers designated after that date, the earlier of the date...

  1. 31 CFR 536.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General... of specially designated narcotics traffickers designated after that date, the earlier of the date...

  2. 31 CFR 536.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General... of specially designated narcotics traffickers designated after that date, the earlier of the date...

  3. 31 CFR 536.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General... of specially designated narcotics traffickers designated after that date, the earlier of the date...

  4. 31 CFR 536.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General... of specially designated narcotics traffickers designated after that date, the earlier of the date...

  5. Epidemiology of accidental radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Cardis, E.

    1996-05-01

    Much of the information on the health effects of radiation exposure available to date comes from long-term studies of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Accidental exposures, such as those resulting from the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, have as yet provided little information concerning health effects of ionizing radiation. This paper will present the current state of our knowledge concerning radiation effects, review major large-scale accidental exposures and the types of studies that are needed. 64 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Incision of the Yangtze River at the First Bend Determined by Three-Nuclide Burial Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, D. F.; Hoke, G. D.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau, the evolution of the Yangtze River and its major tributaries has become an important source of data for investigating geodynamics. In particular, the timing of river incision is frequently interpreted as a proxy for the timing of surface uplift in the absence of structural evidence. We investigate the timing of the incision of the gorge at the First Bend using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of coarse, quartz sediments from caves. Sediments were deposited when the caves were near river level and subsequently abandoned as the river incised. To resolve burial ages >5 Ma, we measured the radionuclides 10Be and 26Al, and the stable nuclide 21Ne. Results from 4 caves show that 26Al and 10Be concentrations are an order of magnitude lower in abandoned cave samples than in a river-level cave sample where deposition is active (10Be: 1.3x104 and 3.4x105 at/g). In contrast, 26Al/10Be ratios in all caves are ≥6.2 and indistinguishable within error. 21Ne concentrations range from 2.1x106 to 7.8x106 at/g. The results are consistent with an old age for the abandoned cave deposits, such that most of the radionuclides initially present have decayed and the concentrations that we measure today are the result of millions of years of exposure to muons. We solve for burial ages, taking into account in situ muogenic production, and find that the majority of the gorge (1 km) was likely incised between ~12 and 9 Ma. The results also require that the rate of river incision declined after the gorge was cut below the lowest elevation cave at 9 Ma. Inverse modeling of published low-temperature thermochronology (Ouimet et al., 2010) supports our burial age results. River capture near the First Bend, which likely integrated the modern Yangtze, likely occurred prior to the mid-Miocene incision of the gorge. In view of the geographic position of the First Bend—just downslope from the southeast margin of the Plateau—it is difficult to explain

  7. The Effects of the Moms and Teens for Safe Dates Program on Dating Abuse: a Conditional Process Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Benefield, Thad; Chen, May S; Reyes, Luz McNaughton; Dixon, Kimberly S; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Bowling, J Michael

    2016-04-01

    Moms and Teens for Safe Dates (MTSD) is a dating abuse (DA) prevention program for teens exposed to domestic violence. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), MTSD prevented certain types of DA victimization (psychological and physical) and perpetration (psychological and cyber) among teens with higher, but not lower, exposure to domestic violence. We built on these findings by using moderated mediation analysis to examine whether level of teen exposure to domestic violence conditioned the indirect effects of MTSD on these types of DA through targeted mediators. MTSD consisted of six mailed activity booklets. Mothers who had been former victims of domestic violence delivered the program to their teens. Mother and teen pairs were recruited into the RCT through community advertising and completed baseline and 6-month follow-up interviews (N = 277 pairs). As expected, MTSD had significant favorable effects for teens with higher but not lower exposure to domestic violence on several mediators that guided program content, including teen conflict management skills and mother-perceived severity of DA, self-efficacy for enacting DA prevention efforts, and comfort in communicating with her teen. MTSD had significant main effects on other mediators including teen feeling of family closeness and cohesion and mother-perceived susceptibility of her teen to DA. As expected, all significant indirect effects of MTSD on DA outcomes through mediators were for teens with higher exposure to domestic violence. Findings have implications for developing DA victimization and perpetration prevention programs for teens with high exposure to domestic violence.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of biogenetic opal.

    PubMed

    Wilding, L P

    1967-04-07

    Approximately 75 grams of biogenetic opal were isolated from 45 kilograms of soil by employing gross particle-size and sink-float specific gravity fractionation procedures. After pretreatment of the sample to remove extraneous organic and inorganic carbon contaminants, the carbon occluded within opal phytoliths was dated at 13,300 +/- 450 years before the present. Therefore, biogenetic opal is stable for relatively long periods.

  9. Military Exposures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (Agent Orange, contaminated water…) Radiation (nuclear weapons, X-rays…) Air Pollutants (burn pit smoke, dust…) Occupational Hazards (asbestos, lead…) Warfare Agents (chemical and biological weapons) Exposure ...

  10. School Counselors' Role in Dating Violence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craigen, Laurie M.; Sikes, April; Healey, Amanda; Hays, Danica

    2009-01-01

    Dating violence among adolescents is a major public health concern. The purpose of this paper is to examine five factors of which school counselors must be aware in order to recognize, intervene, and report incidence of dating violence. These factors are (a) understanding the diverse definitions of dating violence, (b) recognizing dating violence…

  11. 24 CFR 1710.21 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... developer in writing prior to such 30th day that: (1) The effective date has been suspended in accordance... date by developer. (1) A developer, or owner, may request that the effective date of its Statement of... shall be suspended as of the date the request was executed by the developer or owner. (3) The...

  12. 31 CFR 575.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 575.302 Section 575.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF....302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable...

  13. 31 CFR 539.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 539.302 Section 539... General Definitions § 539.302 Effective date. The term effective date means the “effective date” specified... foreign person. This date is listed after the name of each designated foreign person in appendix I to...

  14. 19 CFR 351.701 - Applicability dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability dates. 351.701 Section 351.701... DUTIES Applicability Dates § 351.701 Applicability dates. The regulations contained in this part 351... governed by the regulations in effect on the date the petitions were filed or requests were made for...

  15. 31 CFR 538.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 538.302 Section 538.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... § 538.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of the...

  16. 10 CFR 2.807 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effective date. 2.807 Section 2.807 Energy NUCLEAR... § 2.807 Effective date. The notice of adoption of a regulation will specify the effective date... relieving from restrictions, will be made not less than thirty (30) days prior to the effective date...

  17. 31 CFR 597.305 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 597.305 Section 597... General Definitions § 597.305 Effective date. Except as that term is used in § 597.201(d), the term effective date refers to the effective date of the applicable prohibitions and directives contained in...

  18. 11 CFR 7.28 - Hearing date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearing date. 7.28 Section 7.28 Federal... for Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 7.28 Hearing date. (a) Setting of date by examiner. The examiner shall set the hearing at a reasonable time, date, and place. (b) Considerations....

  19. 18 CFR 11.7 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective date. 11.7... Dams § 11.7 Effective date. All annual charges imposed under this subpart will be computed beginning on the effective date of the license unless some other date is fixed in the license....

  20. 31 CFR 585.301 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 585.301 Section 585.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... General Definitions § 585.301 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective date of...

  1. 31 CFR 560.301 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 560.301 Section 560... § 560.301 Effective date. The effective date of the prohibitions and directives contained in subpart B of this part is 12:01 a.m., Eastern Daylight Time, August 20, 1997. For the effective date of...

  2. 7 CFR 987.5 - Dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dates. 987.5 Section 987.5 Agriculture Regulations of... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC DATES PRODUCED OR PACKED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.5 Dates. Dates means the...

  3. 10 CFR 784.13 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... effective date of the contract, on the effective date of the contract, even though the advance waiver may...., inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice after the effective date of the contract, on the... OF ENERGY PATENT WAIVER REGULATION § 784.13 Effective dates. Waivers shall be effective on...

  4. 10 CFR 784.13 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... effective date of the contract, on the effective date of the contract, even though the advance waiver may...., inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice after the effective date of the contract, on the... OF ENERGY PATENT WAIVER REGULATION § 784.13 Effective dates. Waivers shall be effective on...

  5. 10 CFR 784.13 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... effective date of the contract, on the effective date of the contract, even though the advance waiver may...., inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice after the effective date of the contract, on the... OF ENERGY PATENT WAIVER REGULATION § 784.13 Effective dates. Waivers shall be effective on...

  6. 10 CFR 784.13 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... effective date of the contract, on the effective date of the contract, even though the advance waiver may...., inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice after the effective date of the contract, on the... OF ENERGY PATENT WAIVER REGULATION § 784.13 Effective dates. Waivers shall be effective on...

  7. 10 CFR 784.13 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... effective date of the contract, on the effective date of the contract, even though the advance waiver may...., inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice after the effective date of the contract, on the... OF ENERGY PATENT WAIVER REGULATION § 784.13 Effective dates. Waivers shall be effective on...

  8. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings chapter presents the state of the science regarding the evaluation of exposure as it relates to WQC, SQGs, and wildlife criteria (WC). . . . In summary, the exposure workgroup concluded the following: There should be greater use of mechanistic models to predict b...

  9. Radioactive dating of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  10. Birthday and date of death.

    PubMed Central

    Angermeyer, M C; Kühn, L; Osterwald, P

    1987-01-01

    The relation between birthday and date of death has so far been studied from two different perspectives: birthdays were either conceived of as emotionally invested deadlines motivating people to ward off their death which causes a 'dip' in death rates before their birthday, or they were considered as stressful events leading to an increase of mortality on or after their birthday. Using a collection of biographies of famous people from the whole world and another of well-known Swiss citizens we tested hypotheses derived from these assumptions. Neither the 'death-dip' hypotheses nor the 'birthday stress' hypothesis was supported by our results. PMID:3655631

  11. Using 10Be to quantify rates of landscape change in 'dead' orogens - millennial scale rates of bedrock and basin-scale erosion in the southern and central Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, P. R.; Reusser, L.; Portenga, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Appalachian Mountain chain stretches north-south along the eastern margin of North America, in places rising a thousand meters and more above the adjacent piedmont. Here, Davis built his paradigm of landscape evolution, seeing landscape rejuvenation and dissected peneplains, a transient landscape. Hack saw the Appalachians as a dynamic system where topography was adjusted to rock strength, a steady-state landscape. Neither had quantitative data by which to test their theories. Today, we approach landscapes of the Appalachian Mountains quite differently. Over the past decade, we and others have measured in situ-produced 10Be in more than 300 samples of quartz isolated from Appalachian drainage basin sediments and in more than 100 samples from exposed Appalachian bedrock outcrops, most of which are on ridgelines. Samples have been collected from the Susquehanna, Potomac, and Shenandoah drainage basins as well as from the area around the Great Smoky Mountain National Park and the Blue Ridge escarpment, and from rivers draining from the Appalachians across the southeastern United States Piedmont. Most areas of the Appalachian Mountains are eroding only slowly; the average for all drainage basin samples analyzed to date is ~18 m/My (n=328). The highest basin-scale erosion rates, 25-70 m/My are found in the Appalachian Plateau and in the Great Smoky Mountains. Lower rates, on the order on 10-20 m/My, characterize the Shenandoah, Potomac, and Blue Ridge escarpment areas. There is a significant, positive relationship between basin-scale erosion rates and average basin slope. Steeper basins are in general eroding more rapidly than less steep basins. On the whole, the erosion rates of bedrock outcrops are either lower than or similar to those measured at a basin scale. The average erosion rate for samples of outcropping bedrock collected from the Appalachians is ~15 m/My (n=101). In the Potomac River Basin and the Great Smoky Mountains, bedrock and basin-scale erosion

  12. Surface-exposure ages of Front Range moraines that may have formed during the Younger Dryas, 8.2 cal ka, and Little Ice Age events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Madole, R.; Kubik, P.; McDonald, R.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-exposure (10Be) ages have been obtained on boulders from three post-Pinedale end-moraine complexes in the Front Range, Colorado. Boulder rounding appears related to the cirque-to-moraine transport distance at each site with subrounded boulders being typical of the 2-km-long Chicago Lakes Glacier, subangular boulders being typical of the 1-km-long Butler Gulch Glacier, and angular boulders being typical of the few-hundred-m-long Isabelle Glacier. Surface-exposure ages of angular boulders from the Isabelle Glacier moraine, which formed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) according to previous lichenometric dating, indicate cosmogenic inheritance values ranging from 0 to ???3.0 10Be ka.11Surface-exposure ages in this paper are labeled 10Be; radiocarbon ages are labeled 14C ka, calendar and calibrated radiocarbon ages are labeled cal ka, and layer-based ice-core ages are labeled ka. 14C ages, calibrated 14C ages, and ice core ages are given relative to AD 1950, whereas 10Be ages are given relative to the sampling date. Radiocarbon ages were calibrated using CALIB 5.01 and the INTCAL04 data base Stuiver et al. (2005). Ages estimated using CALIB 5.01 are shown in terms of their 1-sigma range. Subangular boulders from the Butler Gulch end moraine yielded surface-exposure ages ranging from 5 to 10.2 10Be ka. We suggest that this moraine was deposited during the 8.2 cal ka event, which has been associated with outburst floods from Lake Agassiz and Lake Ojibway, and that the large age range associated with the Butler Gulch end moraine is caused by cosmogenic shielding of and(or) spalling from boulders that have ages in the younger part of the range and by cosmogenic inheritance in boulders that have ages in the older part of the range. The surface-exposure ages of eight of nine subrounded boulders from the Chicago Lakes area fall within the 13.0-11.7 10Be ka age range, and appear to have been deposited during the Younger Dryas interval. The general lack of inheritance in

  13. Application of a combination of dating techniques to reconstruct the Lateglacial and early Holocene landscape history of the Albula region (eastern Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhlert, Ralph; Egli, Markus; Maisch, Max; Brandová, Dagmar; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W.; Haeberli, Wilfried

    2011-04-01

    Landforms in Val Mulix and the Albula region in eastern Switzerland offer a detailed insight into the period between the Oldest Dryas until the early Holocene. To better understand Lateglacial and Holocene climate change in the central Alps, glacial (moraines, polished bedrock) and periglacial (rock glacier) landforms were dated using a combined approach of numerical (cosmogenic 10Be) and relative (Schmidt-hammer, weathering rind thickness) dating techniques. At high-elevation sites near the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) trimline, 10Be exposure ages of glacially modified bedrock are between 11.2 ka and 13.5 ka. This suggests the persistence of long-lasting small local ice caps after the breakdown of the LGM ice domes or, alternatively, a reformation of ice perhaps during the Younger Dryas. In Val Mulix we obtained one of the first ages for the Daun-stadial (> 14.7 ka) moraines (14.9 ± 1.8 ka), supporting a pre-Bølling chronological position. The age is in excellent agreement with the age of a boulder from an Egesen I moraine located up-valley which we postulate may be a Daun moraine that was re-occupied during the Egesen stadial. A boulder from an Egesen II moraine gave an age of 10.7 ka, which is similar to ages of Egesen II moraines at other sites in the Alps. 10Be ages from boulders found on a relict rock glacier in Val Mulix indicate that the main active phase lasted from the Lateglacial until the early Holocene. The derived mean annual flow rate is of the order of decimetres, which is in accordance with values stated in the literature based on measuring active rock glaciers in the Alps. Exposure ages from a glacially polished rock barrier showed that this area was ice-free at the end of the Younger Dryas (9.0 ± 0.7 ka and 11.9 ± 0.9 ka). The polished bedrocks are located a few hundred meters down-valley from the Little Ice Age (LIA) moraines. This gives direct evidence of a fast ice retreat towards the end of the Younger Dryas, with glacier length variations

  14. Online dating and conjugal bereavement.

    PubMed

    Young, Goldthwaite Dannagal; Caplan, Scott E

    2010-08-01

    This study examined self-presentation in the online dating profiles of 241 widowed and 280 divorced individuals between 18 and 40 years old. A content analysis of open-ended user-generated profiles assessed the presence or absence of various themes, including the user's marital status, the backstory of their lost relationship, and whether they engaged in sense-making regarding that lost relationship. Results indicated that about one-third of widowed individuals discussed their loss in their profiles. In addition, about one-third of the widowed profiles included explicit reference to a philosophy of life, and about 16% mentioned sense-making or cognitive reappraisals of their bereavement. Many profiles included some articulation of a vision of a future partnership. Results also revealed a significant correlation between widowed individuals including a backstory and their likelihood of exhibiting sense-making in their profiles. Finally, unlike the widowed users, divorcees provided much briefer mentions of their lost relationships, used less sense-making language, and were less likely to articulate an explicit vision of future partnerships. Overall, the results suggest that for widowed individuals, online dating sites may function as venues to explore their past experiences and engage in the construction of a post-loss identity or a post-loss "ideal self".

  15. Retrospective Birth Dating of Cells

    SciTech Connect

    L.Spalding, K; Bhardwaj, R D; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Frisen, J

    2005-04-19

    The generation of cells in the human body has been difficult to study and our understanding of cell turnover is limited. Extensive testing of nuclear weapons resulted in a dramatic global increase in the levels of the isotope {sup 14}C in the atmosphere, followed by an exponential decrease after the test ban treaty in 1963. We show that the level of {sup 14}C in genomic DNA closely parallels atmospheric levels, and can be used to establish the time point when the DNA was synthesized and cells were born. We use this strategy to determine the age of cells in the cortex of the adult human brain, and show that whereas non-neuronal cells are exchanged, occipital neurons are as old as the individual, supporting the view that postnatal neurogenesis does not take place in this region. Retrospective birth dating is a generally applicable strategy that can be used to measure cell turnover in man under physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Sexual assault in dating relationships.

    PubMed

    Rhynard, J; Krebs, M; Glover, J

    1997-03-01

    This article focuses on acquaintance rape, which under Canadian law constitutes a form of sexual assault. Frequency of acquaintance rape often is underestimated due to under-reporting, resulting in a local perception that acquaintance rape rarely occurs in a small Canadian community. A survey was conducted to determine whether acquaintance rape does occur in this community. One hundred sixty-four male and female students from grades 8-12 completed a questionnaire. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported being forced into some type of sexual activity. Based on the survey, this article explores the type of force used, the relationship between acquaintance rape and use of alcohol and drugs, and the relationship between acquaintance rape and the ability to indicate to a partner to stop a behavior. Results confirmed a need to develop programs to prevent rather than merely respond to issues of sexual assault on a date.

  17. Combined use of relative and absolute dating techniques for detecting signals of Alpine landscape evolution during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favilli, Filippo; Egli, Markus; Brandova, Dagmar; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter; Cherubini, Paolo; Mirabella, Aldo; Sartori, Giacomo; Giaccai, Daniele; Haeberli, Wilfried

    2009-11-01

    A combination of three relative and two absolute (numerical) dating techniques, applied on nine soil profiles in an Alpine environment located in Val di Rabbi (Trentino, Northern Italy), was used to improve the investigation methodology of Alpine sites in response to climate change and to reconstruct the chronology of late Pleistocene and early Holocene landscape evolution. The degree of podzolisation, clay mineral evolution and the element mass balances of each site were investigated. Furthermore, the stable fraction of the soil organic matter (SOM) was extracted with 10% H 2O 2 and 14C-dated. The age of the organic residues was compared with the age of charcoal fragments found in one of the studied soils and with the age of rock boulders obtained by surface exposure dating (SED) with cosmogenic 10Be. Numerical dating and weathering characteristics of the soils showed a fairly good agreement and enabled a relative and absolute differentiation of landscape elements. The combination of 14C-dating of SOM and SED indicated that deglaciation processes in Val di Rabbi were already far advanced by around 14 000 cal BP and that glacier oscillations affected the highest part of the region until about 9000 cal BP. The development of clay minerals is time-dependent and reflects weathering intensity. We found a close link between secondary clay minerals like smectite or vermiculite and soil age as obtained by the dating of the organic residues after the H 2O 2 treatment. Calculated element mass balances strongly correlated with the ages derived from 14C measurements. Old soils have lost a major part of base cations (up to 75% compared to the parent material), Fe and Al, which indicates a continuous high weathering intensity. Results of the chemical and mineralogical analyses were in good agreement with numerical dating techniques, showing the dynamics of an Alpine landscape within a relatively small area. The combination of relative and absolute dating techniques is a

  18. 40 CFR 62.4671 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units § 62.4671 Effective date. The effective date of this portion of the State's plan applicable to existing commercial and industrial solid waste incineration units is May...

  19. 40 CFR 62.4671 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units § 62.4671 Effective date. The effective date of this portion of the State's plan applicable to existing commercial and industrial solid waste incineration units is May...

  20. 40 CFR 62.9191 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units § 62.9191 Effective date. The effective date of this portion of the State's plan applicable to existing commercial and industrial solid waste incineration units is...

  1. 40 CFR 62.9191 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units § 62.9191 Effective date. The effective date of this portion of the State's plan applicable to existing commercial and industrial solid waste incineration units is...

  2. Peer involvement in adolescent dating violence.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Pam S; Martsolf, Donna; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the ways in which peers are involved in adolescent dating violence. Eighty-eight young adults aged 18-21 were interviewed and asked to reflect on aggressive dating relationships they experienced as teens. The researchers used grounded theory to analyze the data. Findings showed that male and female peers were involved in adolescent dating violence in unique ways. Male peers were involved in dating violence by participating in the aggression, agitating the aggression, being the competition, trivializing the aggression, and keeping tabs on the recipient. Female peers were involved in dating violence by deserting the recipient, cheating with the boyfriend, being the audience, needling the male dating partner, and helping the recipient. Male and female peers were involved similarly in adolescent dating violence by confronting the partner. School nurses working with adolescents are uniquely positioned to approach adolescents about dating violence. Interventions aimed at promoting discussions with adolescents are discussed.

  3. 7 CFR 987.13 - Free dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.13 Free dates. Free dates means... to acquire them at prices reasonably comparable with prices received domestically) and which are...

  4. When you pass your due date

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000515.htm When you pass your due date To use the sharing features ... link between you and your baby. As you pass your due date, the placenta may not work ...

  5. 16 CFR 1207.2 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR SWIMMING POOL SLIDES § 1207.2 Effective date. This part 1207 shall become effective July 17, 1976. All swimming pool slides manufactured after that date must meet the requirements of this...

  6. 16 CFR 1207.2 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR SWIMMING POOL SLIDES § 1207.2 Effective date. This part 1207 shall become effective July 17, 1976. All swimming pool slides manufactured after that date must meet the requirements of this...

  7. 16 CFR 1207.2 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR SWIMMING POOL SLIDES § 1207.2 Effective date. This part 1207 shall become effective July 17, 1976. All swimming pool slides manufactured after that date must meet the requirements of this...

  8. 16 CFR 1207.2 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR SWIMMING POOL SLIDES § 1207.2 Effective date. This part 1207 shall become effective July 17, 1976. All swimming pool slides manufactured after that date must meet the requirements of this...

  9. 16 CFR 1207.2 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR SWIMMING POOL SLIDES § 1207.2 Effective date. This part 1207 shall become effective July 17, 1976. All swimming pool slides manufactured after that date must meet the requirements of this...

  10. Teaching the Mathematics of Radioactive Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a method used to teach the concept of radiometric dating using mathematical equations. Explores the lack of information in textbooks on how to solve radiometric dating problems using mathematical concepts. (SAH)

  11. 40 CFR 62.4626 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Phosphate Fertilizer Plants § 62.4626 Effective date. (a) The effective date of the portion of the plan applicable to phosphate fertilizer plants is July 12, 1982. Fluoride Emissions From Existing Primary...

  12. 40 CFR 62.4626 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Phosphate Fertilizer Plants § 62.4626 Effective date. (a) The effective date of the portion of the plan applicable to phosphate fertilizer plants is July 12, 1982. Fluoride Emissions From Existing Primary...

  13. 40 CFR 62.7102 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Nevada Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7102 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval...

  14. 40 CFR 62.7102 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Nevada Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7102 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval...

  15. 40 CFR 62.602 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Arizona Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.602 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of...

  16. 40 CFR 62.602 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Arizona Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.602 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of...

  17. 40 CFR 62.7102 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Nevada Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7102 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval...

  18. 40 CFR 62.602 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Arizona Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.602 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of...

  19. 40 CFR 62.602 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Arizona Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.602 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of...

  20. 40 CFR 62.7102 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Nevada Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7102 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval...

  1. 40 CFR 62.602 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Arizona Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.602 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of...

  2. 40 CFR 62.7102 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Nevada Landfill Gas Emissions from Existing Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 62.7102 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval...

  3. 40 CFR 62.632 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.632 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is August 21, 2000. Emissions From Small Existing Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  4. 40 CFR 62.6612 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6612 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is August 21, 2000....

  5. 40 CFR 62.10911 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hospital/medical/infectious Wastes Incinerators § 62.10911 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is November...

  6. 40 CFR 62.632 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.632 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is August 21, 2000. Emissions From Small Existing Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  7. 40 CFR 62.632 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.632 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is August 21, 2000. Emissions From Small Existing Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  8. 40 CFR 62.6612 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6612 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is August 21, 2000....

  9. 40 CFR 62.632 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.632 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is August 21, 2000. Emissions From Small Existing Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  10. 40 CFR 62.10911 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hospital/medical/infectious Wastes Incinerators § 62.10911 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is November...

  11. 40 CFR 62.6612 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6612 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is August 21, 2000....

  12. 40 CFR 62.632 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.632 Effective date. The effective date of EPA approval of the plan is August 21, 2000. Emissions From Small Existing Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  13. 40 CFR 62.6612 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6612 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is August 21, 2000....

  14. 40 CFR 62.6612 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .../medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6612 Effective date. The effective date for the portion of the plan applicable to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators is August 21, 2000....

  15. 40 CFR 1506.12 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 1506.12 Section 1506... Effective date. The effective date of these regulations is July 30, 1979, except that for agencies that... extent practicable to ongoing activities and environmental documents begun before the effective...

  16. 18 CFR 1308.7 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective date. 1308.7... General Matters § 1308.7 Effective date. Subject to § 1308.3(a), this part applies to any TVA contract having an effective date on or after March 1, 1979....

  17. 34 CFR 105.42 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 105.42 Section 105.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION § 105.42 Effective date. The effective date of this part is October 9, 1990....

  18. 33 CFR 106.110 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 106.110 Section... MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES General § 106.110 Compliance dates. (a) On or... TWIC under this part may enroll beginning after the date set by the Coast Guard in a Notice to...

  19. 49 CFR 214.305 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance dates. 214.305 Section 214.305..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.305 Compliance dates. Each program adopted by a railroad shall comply not later than the date specified in the...

  20. 40 CFR 57.106 - Expiration date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expiration date. 57.106 Section 57.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PRIMARY NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS General § 57.106 Expiration date. Each NSO shall state its expiration date. No...

  1. 38 CFR 8a.3 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 8a.3... INSURANCE § 8a.3 Effective date. (a) Where the grant was approved prior to August 11, 1971, VMLI shall be effective August 11, 1971, if on that date, the eligible veteran was obligated under a mortgage loan,...

  2. 31 CFR 575.212 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective dates. 575.212 Section 575.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... Effective dates. The effective dates of the prohibitions and directives contained in this subpart B are...

  3. 49 CFR 1150.13 - Relevant dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relevant dates. 1150.13 Section 1150.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... Designated Operators § 1150.13 Relevant dates. The exact dates of the period of operation which have...

  4. 33 CFR 105.115 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 105.115 Section... MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES General § 105.115 Compliance dates. (a) On or before December 31, 2003... required to obtain a TWIC under this part may enroll beginning after the date set by the Coast Guard in...

  5. 36 CFR 1258.16 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 1258.16... AVAILABILITY AND USE FEES § 1258.16 Effective date. The fees in this part are effective on October 1, 2007. If your order was received by NARA before this effective date, we will charge the fees in effect at...

  6. 7 CFR 1000.90 - Dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Dates. 1000.90 Section 1000.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Miscellaneous Provisions § 1000.90 Dates. If a date required for a payment contained in a Federal milk...

  7. 29 CFR 452.137 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective dates. 452.137 Section 452.137 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS... OF 1959 Dates and Scope of Application § 452.137 Effective dates. (a) Section 404 states when...

  8. 31 CFR 540.302 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effective date. 540.302 Section 540.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.302 Effective date. The term effective date refers to the effective...

  9. 46 CFR 272.44 - Dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dates. 272.44 Section 272.44 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS... Examination, Audit, Review and Appeal Procedures § 272.44 Dates. The dates noted on the letters...

  10. 42 CFR 423.40 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective dates. 423.40 Section 423.40 Public... Effective dates. (a) Initial enrollment period. (1) An enrollment made prior to the month of entitlement to... period specified in § 423.38(c), the effective date is determined by CMS, which, to the...

  11. 40 CFR 75.4 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designated under the Acid Rain permit which governs that unit and contains the approved substitution or... become applicable upon the issuance date of the Acid Rain permit. For combustion sources seeking to enter... following dates: (i) January 1, 1995; or (ii) 90 days after the issuance date of the Acid Rain permit...

  12. 49 CFR 571.8 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective date. 571.8 Section 571.8 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 571.8 Effective date. (a) Firefighting vehicles. Notwithstanding the effective date provisions of the motor vehicle safety standards...

  13. 40 CFR 51.1004 - Attainment dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Attainment dates. 51.1004 Section 51....5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards § 51.1004 Attainment dates. (a) Consistent with section 172(a)(2)(A) of the Act, the attainment date for an area designated nonattainment for the PM2.5...

  14. 7 CFR 987.13 - Free dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Free dates. 987.13 Section 987.13 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.13 Free dates. Free dates means... to acquire them at prices reasonably comparable with prices received domestically) and which are...

  15. 7 CFR 987.13 - Free dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Free dates. 987.13 Section 987.13 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.13 Free dates. Free dates means... to acquire them at prices reasonably comparable with prices received domestically) and which are...

  16. 7 CFR 987.13 - Free dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Free dates. 987.13 Section 987.13 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.13 Free dates. Free dates means... to acquire them at prices reasonably comparable with prices received domestically) and which are...

  17. 7 CFR 987.13 - Free dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Free dates. 987.13 Section 987.13 Agriculture... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.13 Free dates. Free dates means... to acquire them at prices reasonably comparable with prices received domestically) and which are...

  18. 40 CFR 63.863 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 63.863 Section 63..., Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills § 63.863 Compliance dates. (a) The owner or operator of... startup date after March 13, 2001 must comply with the requirements in this subpart immediately...

  19. 40 CFR 63.826 - Compliance dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance dates. 63.826 Section 63... Emission Standards for the Printing and Publishing Industry § 63.826 Compliance dates. (a) The compliance date for an owner or operator of an existing affected source subject to the provisions of this...

  20. 29 CFR 4007.11 - Due dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Due dates. (a) In general. For flat-rate and variable-rate premiums, the premium filing due date for... variable-rate premium payment must be made by the last day of the sixteenth full calendar month following... payment year. (ii) The due date for the variable-rate premium required by § 4006.3(b) of this chapter...

  1. Geophysical Insights from Archaeomagnetic Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, R.; Lodge, A.; Suttie, N.; Shaw, J.; Hill, M. J.; Linford, P.

    2009-12-01

    We report on work which has been undertaken towards developing an improved methodology for archaeomagnetic dating of archaeological samples through the use of a dedicated field model. In this talk, we focus on the more general (non-archaeological) implications of our results. Our work has focused on Europe, taking advantage of the better spatial and temporal coverage of available samples. Nevertheless, we model the field globally, using an a priori model (such as, for example, CALS7K) to constrain the field away from the regions of available data. This is advantageous over the use of a local field modelling methodology, as it allows us to examine the physical consequences of structure in our model (for example, in terms of the spectra of the field and secular variation at the core-mantle boundary), and to control possible edge effects in the model, which in a local model might produce an unphysical solution. By focusing on one particular region, we produce models that may not be optimal in terms of global structure, but allow us to investigate the data content in the region where it may provide the most information on core-field evolution. In parallel, we have been expanding the archaeointensity record for Great Britain, towards producing an archaeointensity curve for the UK which could ultimately be used for dating of unoriented samples (such as pot sherds). This new record, combined with other recently acquired high-quality intensity data, allows us to consider the evolution of global geomagnetic field strength in parallel with a good model of directional measurements; from 1590, the GUFM model is appropriate. Recent attempts to determine global intensity variation have used all available data (some of uncertain quality) to quantify variations in field strength. By instead focusing on a more limited dataset of known quality, we are able to examine intensity trends in greater detail. We present evidence that the intensity of the field was higher prior to 1840 than

  2. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.; Howard, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma. Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the inclusion

  3. Substance use as a longitudinal predictor of the perpetration of teen dating violence.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jeff R; Shorey, Ryan C; Fite, Paula; Stuart, Gregory L; Le, Vi Donna

    2013-04-01

    The prevention of teen dating violence is a major public health priority. However, the dearth of longitudinal studies makes it difficult to develop programs that effectively target salient risk factors. Using a school-based sample of ethnically diverse adolescents, this longitudinal study examined whether substance use (alcohol, marijuana, and hard drugs) and exposure to parental violence predicted the perpetration of physical dating violence over time. 1,042 9th and 10th grade high schools students were recruited and assessed in the spring of 2010, and 93 % of the original sample completed the 1-year follow-up in the spring of 2011. Participants who had begun dating at the initial assessment and who self-identified as African American (n = 263; 32 %), Caucasian (n = 272; 33 %), or Hispanic (n = 293; 35 %) were included in the current analyses (n = 828; 55 % female). Slightly more than half of the adolescents who perpetrated dating violence at baseline reported past year dating violence at follow-up, relative to only 11 % of adolescents who did not report perpetrating dating violence at baseline. Structural equation modeling revealed that the use of alcohol and hard drugs at baseline predicted the future perpetration of physical dating violence, even after accounting for the effects of baseline dating violence and exposure to interparental violence. Despite differences in the prevalence of key variables between males and females, the longitudinal associations did not vary by gender. With respect to race, exposure to mother-to-father violence predicted the perpetration of dating violence among Caucasian adolescents. Findings from the current study indicate that targeting substance use, and potentially youth from violent households, may be viable approaches to preventing the perpetration of teen dating violence.

  4. Two 1999 Dates Worth Noting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Two dates in 1999 can serve as pivots for space-related educational outreach. On August 11 a total solar eclipse will sweep across Europe and also across the Near East, where it will come remarkably close to matching the ancient eclipse (probably in 129 BC) used by Hipparchus to estimate the distance of the Moon. Using published eclipse data, students may conduct a similar calculation for 1999 and in the process obtain insights about astronomy, history and the way scientists work. October 19, 1999 will be the 100th anniversary of the day when a teen-age Robert Goddard climbed a cherry tree near the Worcester home where his family was staying, intending to prune it. Sitting in that tree, Goddard began daydreaming about space flight, and by the time he came down he had resolved to dedicate his life to implementing that dream. He later marked that day as "Anniversary day," a personal holiday. Material on both subjects can be reached from http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Sintro.htm, sections 8a and 26. The section on Goddard includes his experiments with a ballistic pendulum and the DeLaval nozzle, which laid the essential scientific foundation of spaceflight and which is also suitable for classroom presentation.

  5. Exposure Standard for Fog Oil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-15

    28 DISTRIBUTION LIST ...................................................... 37 LIST OF TABLES 1. Exposure to oil mist in...Because contract numbers and order dates are not generally included in inventory lists , and the material in war reserves is classified, the quantities of...petroleum Industry indicat 2that while larger producers may use,.ests such as the modif-ed Ames assay or the FDA test for white oil purity,"m any

  6. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings chapter will discuss the state-of-the-science regarding the evaluation of exposure as it relates to water quality criteria (WQC), sediment quality guidelines (SQG), and wildlife criteria (WC). Throughout this discussion, attempts are made to identify the methods ...

  7. Correlates of cyber dating abuse among teens.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Janine M; Lachman, Pamela; Yahner, Jennifer; Dank, Meredith

    2014-08-01

    Recent advancements in technology (e.g., social networking, texting) have created new ways for dating youth to relate to one another, including in abusive ways via "cyber dating abuse." Cyber dating abuse is a form of teen dating violence that overlaps with other types of abuse (e.g., psychological) but also has several unique characteristics. Given the phenomenon's limited presence in dating violence literature, we focus on identifying how experiencing cyber dating abuse relates to youths' individual behaviors and experiences (e.g., substance use, sexual activity), psychosocial adjustment, school connection, family relationships, and partner relationships. A total of 3,745 youth (52% female, 74% White) in three northeastern states participated in the survey and reported currently being in a dating relationship or having been in one during the prior year. We found that experiences of cyber dating abuse were most significantly correlated with being female, committing a greater variety of delinquent behaviors, having had sexual activity in one's lifetime, having higher levels of depressive symptoms, and having higher levels of anger/hostility. Further, cyber dating abuse appeared somewhat more strongly related to depressive symptoms and delinquency than did other forms of teen dating violence and abuse.