Science.gov

Sample records for 10be surface exposure

  1. 10Be surface exposure dating of rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Tyrol, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kerschner, H.; Maisch, M.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Schluchter, C.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of Lateglacial and Holocene climate change research, rock glaciers (creeping mountain permafrost) also play an important role. They are phenomena of discontinuous alpine permafrost and as such good indicators for the mean annual air temperature for the period they are active. We have 10Be surface exposure dated boulders from two relict rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Austria. This is the type area for a postulated mid-Holocene cold period called the Larstig oscillation. The period of activity was suggested to be of similar age as the mid-Holocene Frosnitz advance of glaciers in the Venediger Mountains farther to the east (Patzelt and Bortenschlager, 1973). For rock glaciers of this size to be active at 2200 m a.s.l. in Larstig valley would have required a significant drop in temperatures, thus a marked mid-Holocene cold pulse, for at least several centuries at around 7.0 ka. In contrast, our exposure dates show that the rock glaciers stabilized during the early Preboreal (Ivy-Ochs et al., submitted). We see no distinct pattern with respect to exposure age and boulder location on the rock glaciers. This implies that for our site the blocks did not acquire inherited 10Be during exposure in the free rock face, in the talus at the base of the slope, or during transport on the rock glaciers. Our data point to final stabilization of the Larstigtal rock glaciers in the earliest Holocene and not in the middle Holocene. Combined with data from other archives (Nicolussi et al., 2005), there appears to have been no time window in the middle Holocene long enough for rock glaciers of the size and at the elevation of the Larstig site to have formed. Ivy-Ochs, S., Kerschner, H., Maisch, M., Christl, M., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier variations in the European Alps. Quaternary Science Reviews (submitted). Nicolussi, K., Kaufmann, M., Patzelt, G., van der Plicht, J., Thurner, A., 2005. Holocene tree-line variability in the Kauner

  2. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  3. Surface exposure dating of the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine system, western Swiss Alps, using the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Meredith A.; Kubik, Peter W.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Schlüchter, Christian

    2004-07-01

    Egesen moraines throughout the Alps mark a glacial advance that has been correlated with the Younger Dryas cold period. Using the surface exposure dating method, in particular the measurement of the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be in rock surfaces, we attained four ages for boulders on a prominent Egesen moraine of Great Aletsch Glacier, in the western Swiss Alps. The 10Be dates range from 10 460+/-1100 to 9040+/-1020 yr ago. Three 10Be dates between 9630+/-810 and 9040+/-1020 yr ago are based upon samples from the surfaces of granite boulders. Two 10Be dates, 10 460+/-1100 and 9910+/-970 yr ago, are based upon a sample from a quartz vein at the surface of a schist boulder. In consideration of the numerous factors that can influence apparently young 10Be dates and the scatter within the data, we interpret the weighted mean of four boulder ages, 9640+/-430 yr (including the weighted mean of two 10Be dates of the quartz vein), as a minimum age of deposition of the moraine.All 10Be dates from the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine are consistent with radiocarbon dates of nearby bog-bottom organic sediments, which provide minimum ages of deglaciation from the moraine. The 10Be dates from boulders on the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine also are similar to 10Be dates from Egesen moraines of Vadret Lagrev Glacier on Julier Pass, in the eastern Swiss Alps. Both the morphology of the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine and the comparison with 10Be dates from the inner Vadret Lagrev Egesen moraine support the hypothesis that the climatic cooling that occurred during the Younger Dryas cold episode influenced the glacial advance that deposited the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine. Because of the large size and slow response time of Great Aletsch Glacier, we suggest that the Great Aletsch Glacier Egesen moraine was formed during the last glacial advance of the multiphased Egesen cold period, the Kromer stage, during the Preboreal chron. Copyright

  4. Examination of surface exposure age of Antarctic moraines using in situ produced [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.T.; Edmond, J.M. ); Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F. ); Kurz, M.D.; Brook, E.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Concentrations of [sup 10]Be (t[sub 1/2] = 1.5 [times] 10[sup 6]y) and [sup 26]Al (t[sub 1/2] = 0.72 [times] 10[sup 6]y) have been determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in a suite of quartz samples taken from sandstone boulders in several moraines in Arena Valley, a dry valley adjacent to the Taylor Glacier in the Quatermain Mountains, Southern Victoria Land, East Antarctica. These isotopes are produced in surficial quartz by cosmic ray spallation of O and Si. The concentrations in these samples ranged from 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5] to 3.0 [times] 10[sup 7] at g[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and from 9.4 [times] 10[sup 6] to 1.2 [times] 10[sup 8] at g[sup [minus]1] for [sup 26]Al, depending upon the extent of exposure at the surface. Production rates of 17[sub [minus]4][sup +16] at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and 113[sub [minus]16][sup +54] at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 26]Al at 1300 m and 87[degree]S and a [sup 26]Al:[sup 10]Be production ratio of 6.5[sub [minus]1.3][sup +1.3] were calculated from the data. These values correspond to sea-level production rates at high geomagnetic latitude of 6.4 at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] and 41.7 at g[sup [minus]1]y[sup [minus]1] for [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al, respectively, consistent with determinations based on [approximately]11 Ky glacially polished surfaces in the Sierra Nevada in California. These production rates imply exposure ages for the various moraines ranging from 50 Ky to 2.5 My, in accordance with other geological evidence. The [sup 10]Be and [sup 26]Al ages of these rocks compare favorably with those found using a similar dating method based on in situ production of [sup 3]He.

  5. Mid-late Pleistocene glacial evolution in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica, constraints from cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of glacial erratic cobbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guocheng; Huang, Feixin; Yi, Chaolu; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhou, Weijian; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-08-01

    Glacial histories from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) provide keys to understanding correlations between the EAIS and global climate. They are especially helpful in the assessment of global sea level change, and as a means of quantifying the magnitude of past glacial activity and the rate at which ice responded to climate change. Given the significance of EAIS glacial histories, it is imperative that more glacial chronologic data for this region be obtained, especially for the mid-to-late Pleistocene. We report cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating results from glacially transported cobbles embedded in blue-ice moraine material at Mount Harding, the Grove Mountains, EAIS. Forty exotic cobbles sampled along two profiles (A and B) on this blue-ice moraine present apparent exposure-ages ranging from 7.2 to 542.2 ka. We explore this scattered dataset by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify statistically significant trends in the data. We identify a correlation between exposure-age and distance of the cobbles from Mount Harding. In profile A, cobbles further from Mount Harding yield older exposure-ages than those that are relatively close. In profile B, cobbles closer to Mount Harding are found to have relatively older exposure-ages. In term of glacial history we suggest that the direction of ice flow changed during the period from ∼60 to 200 ka, and that multiple glacial fluctuations occurred in the mid-late Pleistocene.

  6. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault, from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan

    SciTech Connect

    der Woerd, J v; Klinger, Y; Sieh, K; Tapponnier, P; Ryerson, F; M?riaux, A

    2006-01-13

    We determine the long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault in the southeastern Indio Hills using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al isotopes to date an offset alluvial fan surface. Field mapping complemented with topographic data, air photos and satellite images allow to precisely determine piercing points across the fault zone that are used to measure an offset of 565 {+-} 80 m. A total of twenty-six quartz-rich cobbles from three different fan surfaces were collected and dated. The tight cluster of nuclide concentrations from 19 samples out of 20 from the offset fan surface implies a simple exposure history, negligible prior exposure and erosion, and yield an age of 35.5 {+-} 2.5 ka. The long-term slip rate of the San Andreas Fault south of Biskra Palms is thus 15.9 {+-} 3.4 mm/yr. This rate is about 10 mm/yr slower than geological (0-14 ka) and short-term geodetic estimates for this part of the San Andreas Fault implying changes in slip rate or in faulting behavior. This result puts new constraints on the slip rate of the San Jacinto and on the Eastern California Shear Zone for the last 35 ka. Our study shows that more sites along the major faults of southern California need to be targeted to better constrain the slip-rates over different time scales.

  7. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  8. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Barnard, P.L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, K.; Caffee, M.W.; Derbyshire, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a-1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a-1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (???300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a-1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western

  9. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Lewis A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, Katsuhiko; Caffee, Marc W.; Derbyshire, Edward

    2005-07-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a -1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a -1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (˜300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a -1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western

  10. Using 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the evolution of the Purgatorio active fault in the Andean forearc, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Benavente; Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Fabrizio, Delgado; Marianne, Saillard; Sarah, Hall R.; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Active transpressive deformation has been occurring along the Andean hyperarid forearc for the last 3 Myrs but many of these faults are still not described even if able to produce large damaging earthquakes. Active faulting along the northern part of the Arica Bend can be recognized due to the presence of well-preserved and sharp fault scarps indicating recent surface slip. During the Mio-Pliocene, deposition within the forearc continental basins resulted in the formation of vast fan deposits and conglomerates of the Moquegua Formation, which can be considered as bedrock in this exposure study (~45-4 Ma; Tosdal et al., 1984; Sebrier et al., 1988a; Roperch et al., 2006). The typical vertical Purgatorio fault scarps offset both the Moquegua bedrock and several younger geomorphic features associated with <300kyrs climatic and 400 years old volcanic extreme events. This study focus on quantifying slip rate variations in time along a 5-meters high vertical fault scarp to understand how the fault is evolving. These results are achieved via surface exposure dating of the sampled seismically broken cobbolds of the Moquegua formation outcroping vertically along the fault scarp. These samples are well-suited to the application of in situ produced cosmogenic radionuclides for surface exposure dating, as the hyperarid region has extremely low erosion rates. We sampled the scarp away from any significant drainage so as to avoid possibly disturbed areas. The sampling did involve extracting quarzite conglomeratic material along the bedrock scarp and on the upper surrounding crests. The aim has been to measure Berylium-20 TCN (Terrestrial in situ Cosmogenic Nuclides) concentrations to determine exposure age as a function of height on the scarp. This has been successfully employed on one scarp in Italy based on Chlorine-36 TCN (Palumbo et al., 2004). However, slow faults behaviour remains unclear and more contributions are needed. Quaternary activity of the Purgatorio fault system

  11. Evaluating the reliability of Late Quaternary landform ages: Integrating 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating with U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate on alluvial and fluvial deposits, Sonoran desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the reliability of Quaternary age determinations of alluvial and fluvial deposits across the Sonoran Desert (Coachella Valley and Anza Borrego) in southern California, we applied both 10Be exposure age dating of surface clasts and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate from subsurface clast-coatings to the same deposits. We consider agreement between dates from the two techniques to indicate reliable age estimates because each technique is subject to distinct assumptions and therefore their systematic uncertainties are largely independent. 10Be exposure dates should yield maximum ages when no correction is made for inheritance and post-depositional erosion is negligible. U-series dating, in contrast, provides minimum dates because pedogenic carbonate forms after deposition. Our results show that: (1) For deposits ca. 70 ka or younger, 10Be and U-series dates were generally concordant. We note, however, that in most cases U-series soil dates exceed 10Be exposure dates that are corrected for inheritance when using 10Be in modern alluvium. This suggests that 10Be concentrations of modern alluvium may exceed the 10Be acquired by late Pleistocene deposits during fluvial transport and hillslope residence (i.e., Pleistocene inherited 10Be). (2) For deposits older than ~70 ka, U-series dates are significantly younger than the 10Be dates. This implies that U-series dates in this region may significantly underestimate the depositional age of older alluvium, probably because of delayed onset of deposition, slow accumulation, or poor preservation of secondary carbonate in response to climatic controls. Thus, whenever possible, multiple dating methods should be applied to obtain reliable ages for late Quaternary deposits.

  12. In situ 10Be-26Al exposure ages at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C.P.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Arnold, J.R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Middleton, R.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of dating the surface exposure of rocks from in situ production of 10Be and 26Al has been applied to determine the age of Meteor Crater, Arizona. A lower bound on the crater age of 49,200 ?? 1,700 years has been obtained by this method. ?? 1991.

  13. First Long-Term slip-Rate Along the San Andreas Fault Based on 10Be-26Al Surface Exposure Dating : The Biskra Palms Site, 23 mm/yr for the last 30,000 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woerd, J.; Klinger, Y.; Sieh, K.; Tapponnier, P.; Ryerson, F.

    2001-12-01

    Slip-rate along the San Andreas fault is known precisely at only two locations : at Wallace Creek, 34 +/- 3 mm/yr for the past 13,500 yrs and at Cajon Creek, 24.5+/- 3 mm/yr for the past 14,500 yrs. When compared to the long-term and far-field plate motion, these rates provide important constraint on how and where strain is accommodated across the plate boundary. Here we present a new determination of the slip-rate along the San Andreas Fault at Biskra Palms, based on 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating. The studied area is located southeast of the San Gorgonio restraining bend, a complex section of the fault which has not produced a large earthquake in historical time. At Biskra Palms, the San Andreas Fault offsets an alluvial fan (T2) about 700 m. Keller et al. (1982) recognized the importance of this site and estimated the age of the offset fan surfaces based on degree of soil development between 20 and 70 kyrs, providing a very loosely constraint slip-rate between 10 and 35 mm/yr. We have analyzed 21 quartz rich cobbles from the surface of the fan, upstream, downstream and within the fault zone. 10Be and 26Al measurements yield consistent results implying simple exposure at the surface. 7 samples collected on the T2 fan surface downstream yield an average exposure age of 30.7 +/- 2.1 kyrs. The tight cluster of these ages indicate no or minor pre-exposition during transport in the small catchment upstream. 7 samples from T2 upstream from the fault yield an average exposure age of 29.5 +/- 2.8 kyrs. One additional sample of this surface (38.4+/-3.6 kyrs) is older than the others and may have been pre-exposed before deposition on the fan. 2 samples from a T2 remnant within the fault zone yield an average age of 29.6 +/- 2.6 kyrs. 4 additional samples were collected from two smaller alluvial surfaces (T3 and T4) remnant found only upstream from the fault zone and yield average ages of 33.3 and 27.3 kyrs that are similar to the age of T2. This suggest that these

  14. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potential for dating land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-07-01

    To exploit natural sedimentary archives and geomorphic landforms it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. This paper explores the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric 10Be in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or the surface exposure determination using in situ produced 10Be). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric 10Be and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of 10Be deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric 10Be deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant 10Be input for the Central Alps, and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the 10Be inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the 10Be input agreed reasonably well with the age using surface exposure or radiocarbon dating. The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced ages that were mostly too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the 10Be inventory and 10Be deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The calculated erosion rates using these scenarios seemed to be plausible with values in the range of 0-57 mm/ky. The dating of soils using 10Be has

  15. Extent of the last ice sheet in northern Scotland tested with cosmogenic 10Be exposure ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, W.M.; Hall, A.M.; Ballantyne, C.K.; Binnie, S.; Kubik, P.W.; Freeman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The extent of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) in northern Scotland is disputed. A restricted ice sheet model holds that at the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ca. 23-19 ka) the BIIS terminated on land in northern Scotland, leaving Buchan, Caithness and the Orkney Islands ice-free. An alternative model implies that these three areas were ice-covered at the LGM, with the BIIS extending offshore onto the adjacent shelves. We test the two models using cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of erratic boulders and glacially eroded bedrock from the three areas. Our results indicate that the last BIIS covered all of northern Scotland during the LGM, but that widespread deglaciation of Caithness and Orkney occurred prior to rapid warming at ca. 14.5 ka. Copyright ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The CREp program, a fully parameterizable program to compute exposure ages (3He, 10Be)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L.; Blard, P. H.; Lave, J.; Delunel, R.; Balco, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decades, cosmogenic exposure dating permitted major advances in Earth surface sciences, and particularly in paleoclimatology. Yet, exposure age calculation is a dense procedure. It requires numerous choices of parameterization and the use of an appropriate production rate. Nowadays, Earth surface scientists may either calculate exposure ages on their own or use the available programs. However, these programs do not offer the possibility to include all the most recent advances in Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating. Notably, they do not propose the most recent production rate datasets and they only offer few possibilities to test the impact of the atmosphere model and the geomagnetic model on the computed ages. We present the CREp program, a Matlab © code that computes CRE ages for 3He and 10Be over the last 2 million years. The CREp program includes the scaling models of Lal-Stone in the "Lal modified" version (Balco et al., 2008; Lal, 1991; Stone, 2000) and the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). For any of these models, CREP allows choosing between the ERA-40 atmosphere model (Uppala et al., 2005) and the standard atmosphere (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 1976). Regarding the geomagnetic database, users can opt for one of the three proposed datasets: Muscheler et al. 2005, GLOPIS-75 (Laj et al. 2004) and the geomagnetic framework proposed in the LSD model (Lifton et al., 2014). They may also import their own geomagnetic database. Importantly, the reference production rate can be chosen among a large variety of possibilities. We made an effort to propose a wide and homogenous calibration database in order to promote the use of local calibration rates: CREp includes all the calibration data published until July 2015 and will be able to access an updated online database including all the newly published production rates. This is crucial for improving the ages accuracy. Users may also choose a global production rate or use their own data

  17. Long-term erosion and interglacial period exposure in Western Greenland from meteoric 10Be in ice-bound sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graly, J. A.; Corbett, L.; Bierman, P. R.; Neumann, T.; Rood, D. H.; Finkel, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    To examine the history of surface exposure and erosion in areas of Western Greenland presently covered by ice, we measured the concentration of meteoric 10Be in ice-bound fine sediment at three locations: Kangerlussuaq (67.1°N), Ilulissat (69.4°N), and Upernavik (72.5°N). Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Ilulissat and Upernavik range from 2×106 to 2×108 atoms/g and are statistically indistinguishable from each other. Meteoric 10Be concentrations at Kangerlussuaq range from 2×106 to 5×107 atoms/g and are significantly lower than the values found at the northern two sites. Through comparison to typical meteoric 10Be distribution in soils, source soil ages can be estimated at each of these locations. These estimates suggest on the order of 105 years of exposure at the northern sites and on the order of 104 years of exposure at Kangerlussuaq. Because meteoric 10Be is lost from the soil system both by erosion and isotope decay, these exposure ages represent a minimum length of cumulative interglacial exposure. This exposure signal likely developed over several Late Pliocene and Pleistocene interglacial periods and prior to the onset of Northern hemisphere glaciation, ~2.7 Ma before present. To further constrain the glacial history of Western Greenland implied from the meteoric 10Be data, we constructed forward models of interglacial period exposure and glacial period erosion. The high levels of meteoric 10Be at Upernavik and Ilulissat imply erosion rates below 5 m/My and some preservation of pre-glacial regolith. The lower levels of meteoric 10Be at Kangerlussuaq can be explained with erosion rates as high as 20 m/My. Because of the substantial debris fluxes in modern Kangerlussuaq glaciers [Knight, et al., 2002], erosion rates greater than 10 m/My are likely. Meteoric 10Be inventories at Kangerlussuaq under 10-20 m/My of long-term erosion imply substantial interglacial exposure and the slow evacuation of sediment by glacial transport. These results suggest that

  18. 10Be exposure dating of Holocene moraines in the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, Alan; Zimmerman, Susan; Finkel, Robert; Schaefer, Jeorg; Clark, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Constraint on the extent and timing of Holocene glaciations is critical to addressing standing hypotheses that ascribe climatic fluctuations to changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns, or anthropogenic forcing. In the terrestrial record, such constraint typically relies on chronologies obtained from 10Be exposure dating of moraine deposits. However, the short exposure time of Holocene moraines, particularly those formed during the Little Ice Age (LIA), makes obtaining precise chronologies extremely challenging. To date, only a handful of LIA deposits in two locations (New Zealand and the Swiss Alps) have been successfully dated with 10Be. Here, we report new 10Be exposure ages from LIA and Neoglacial moraines from multiple sites in the Sierra Nevada (Lyell, Maclure, and Palisade glaciers). The Sierran LIA record will be compared to those from New Zealand and the Swiss Alps to test whether LIA deglaciation was globally synchronous. This result would support the contention that the LIA was terminated by anthropogenically-driven warming. Chronology from the neoglacial deposits will be used to test whether the timing of the return to glacial conditions in the Sierras correlates to a southward shift in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which has been hypothesized to increase El Nino-like conditions in the Pacific Ocean. This record should be ideal for testing this hypothesis since precipitation in the Sierras is highly sensitive to El Nino conditions.

  19. Earth surface erosion and weathering from the 10Be (meteoric)/9Be ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Wittmann, Hella

    2012-10-01

    The isotope ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to the mineral-derived stable isotope 9Be discloses both the Earth surface denudation rate and its weathering intensity. We develop a set of steady state mass balance equations that describes this system from a soil column over the hillslope scale to an entire river basin. The prerequisites making this new approach possible are: (1) the 9Be concentration of parent rock (typically 2.5±0.5 ppm in granitic and clastic sedimentary lithologies) is known; (2) both Be isotopes equilibrate between the fluids decomposing rock and reactive solids formed during weathering; and (3) a critical spatial scale is exceeded at which the fluxes of both isotopes into and out of the weathering zone are at steady state over the time scale of weathering (typically ˜10 kyr). For these cases the isotope ratios can be determined in bulk sediment or soil, on leachates from the reactive (adsorbed and pedogenic mineral-bound) phase in sediment or soil, and even on the dissolved phase in river water. The 10Be/9Be ratio offers substantial advantages over the single-isotope system of meteoric 10Be. The latter system allows to directly determine erosion rates only in the case that 10Be is fully retentive in the weathering zone and that riverine sorting has not introduced grain size-dependent 10Be concentration gradients in sediments. We show the feasibility of the 10Be/9Be tracer approach at the river scale for sediment and water samples in the Amazon basin, where independent estimates of denudation rates from in situ-produced 10Be exist. We furthermore calculate meaningful denudation rates from a set of published 10Be/9Be ratios measured in the dissolved load of globally distributed rivers. We conclude that this isotope ratio can be used to reconstruct global paleo-denudation from sedimentary records.

  20. Earth surface erosion and weathering from the 10Be (meteoric)/9Be ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Wittmann, H.; Dannhaus, N.

    2012-12-01

    A perfect clock of the stability of the Earth surface is one that combines a first isotope the flux of which depends on the release rate during erosion, and a second isotope produced at constant rate. The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be is such a system. We provide a quantitative framework for its use. In a weathering zone some of the 9Be, present typically in 2.5ppm concentrations in silicate minerals, is released and partitioned between a reactive phase (adsorbed to clay and hydroxide surfaces, given the high partition coefficients at intermediate pH), and into the dissolved phase. The combined mass flux of both phases is defined by the soil formation rate and a mineral dissolution rate - and is hence proportional to the chemical weathering rate and the denudation rate. At the same time, the surface of the weathering zone is continuously exposed to fallout of meteoric 10Be. This 10Be percolates into the weathering zone where it mixes with dissolved 9Be. Both isotopes may exchange with the adsorbed Be, given that equilibration rate of Be is fast relative to soil residence times. Hence a 10Be/9Be(reactive) ratio results in soils from which the total denudation rate can be calculated. A prerequisite is that the flux of meteoric 10Be is known from field experiments or from global production models [1], that the 9Be concentration in bedrock (mostly 2.5ppm) is known [2], and that the reactive Be can be chemically extracted from soil or sediment [3]. In rivers, when reactive Be and dissolved Be equilibrate, a catchment-wide denudation rate can be determined from both sediment and a sample of filtered river water, where the sediment 10Be/9Be ratio is independent of grain size. We have tested this approach in sediment-bound Be and dissolved Be in water of the Amazon and Orinoco basin. The reactive Be was extracted from sediment by combined hydroxylamine and HCl leaches [2]. In the Amazon trunk stream, the Orinoco, Apure, and La Tigra river 10Be

  1. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potentiality for dating land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-05-01

    To exploit natural archives and geomorphic objects it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. We explored the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric Be-10 in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or surface exposure dating using in situ produced Be-10). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric Be-10 and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of Be-10 deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric Be-10 deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant Be-10 input for the Central Alps and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the Be-10 inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the Be-10 input agreed reasonably well with the expected age (obtained from surface exposure or radiocarbon dating). The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced mostly ages that were too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the Be-10 inventory and Be-10 deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The estimated erosion rates are in a reasonable range. The dating of soils using Be-10 has several potential error sources. Analytical errors as well as errors

  2. Understanding complex exposure history of Mount Hampton, West Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 10Be in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, Ana; Rodes, Angel; Stuart, Finlay; Smellie, John

    2016-04-01

    Combining stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides is an established tool for revealing the complexities of long-term landscape development. To date most studies have concentrated on 21Ne and 10Be in quartz. We have combined different chemical protocols for extraction of cosmogenic 10Be from olivine, and measured concentrations in olivine from lherzolite xenoliths from the peak of Mount Hampton (~3,200 m), an 11 Ma shield volcano on the West Antarctic rift flank. We combine this data with cosmogenic 3He (and 21Ne) in the olivines in order to unravel the long-term environmental history of the region. The mean 3He/21Ne ratio (1.98 ± 0.22) is consistent with the theoretical value and previous determinations. 10Be/3He ratios (0.012 to 0.018) are significantly lower than the instantaneous production ratio (~0.045). The data are consistent with 1-3 Ma of burial. The altitude of the volcano rules out over-topping of the peak by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet only possible burial could be generated by the growth of an ice cap although this contradicts the absence of evidence for ice cover. The 3He-10Be data can also be generated during episodic erosion of the volcanic ash over the last few million years. The data requires a minimum depth of 1 to 2.5 m for the samples during a minimum age of 5 Ma and maximum long-term erosion rate of ~0.5 m/Ma with at least one erosive episode reflecting short-term erosion rate of ~7 m/Ma that would have brought the samples into the surface during the last ~350 ka. Erosion in this type of landscape could be related to interglacial periods where cryostatic erosion can occur generating an increase in the erosion rate. This study shows that episodic erosion can produce stable-radioactive cosmogenic isotope systematics that are similar to those generated by exposure-burial cycles.

  3. The deep accumulation of 10Be at Utsira, southwestern Norway: Implications for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating in peripheral ice sheet landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, Jason P.; Goehring, Brent M.; Mangerud, Jan; Svendsen, John Inge

    2016-09-01

    Cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is a widely used method for constraining past ice sheet histories. We scrutinize a recently published data set of cosmogenic 10Be data from erratic boulders in Norway used to constrain the deglaciation of the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet to 20 ka. Our model of the 10Be inventory in glacial surfaces leads us to conclude that the chronology may be afflicted by the deep subsurface accumulation of 10Be during long-lasting ice-free periods that resulted in 10Be ages >10% too old. We suggest that the majority of the dated erratic boulders contain a uniform level of inherited muon-produced 10Be and were derived from bedrock depths >2.5 m and most likely ~4 m. The implication of our finding is that for landscapes that experience long ice-free periods between brief maximum glacial phases, glacial erosion of >5 m is required to remove detectable traces of inherited 10Be.

  4. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of tors and erratics, Cairngorm Mountains, Scotland: Timescales for the development of a classic landscape of selective linear glacial erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, W.M.; Hall, A.M.; Mottram, R.; Fifield, L.K.; Sugden, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of tors within glaciated regions has been widely cited as evidence for the preservation of relic pre-Quaternary landscapes beneath protective covers of non-erosive dry-based ice. Here, we test for the preservation of pre-Quaternary landscapes with cosmogenic surface exposure dating of tors. Numerous granite tors are present on summit plateaus in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland where they were covered by local ice caps many times during the Pleistocene. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al data together with geomorphic relationships reveal that these landforms are more dynamic and younger than previously suspected. Many Cairngorm tors have been bulldozed and toppled along horizontal joints by ice motion, leaving event surfaces on tor remnants and erratics that can be dated with cosmogenic nuclides. As the surfaces have been subject to episodic burial by ice, an exposure model based upon ice and marine sediment core proxies for local glacial cover is necessary to interpret the cosmogenic nuclide data. Exposure ages and weathering characteristics of tors are closely correlated. Glacially modified tors and boulder erratics with slightly weathered surfaces have 10Be exposure ages of about 15 to 43 ka. Nuclide inheritance is present in many of these surfaces. Correction for inheritance indicates that the eastern Cairngorms were deglaciated at 15.6 ?? 0.9 ka. Glacially modified tors with moderate to advanced weathering features have 10Be exposure ages of 19 to 92 ka. These surfaces were only slightly modified during the last glacial cycle and gained much of their exposure during the interstadial of marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 5 or earlier. Tors lacking evidence of glacial modification and exhibiting advanced weathering have 10Be exposure ages between 52 and 297 ka. Nuclide concentrations in these surfaces are probably controlled by bedrock erosion rates instead of discrete glacial events. Maximum erosion rates estimated from 10Be range from 2.8 to 12.0 mm/ka, with

  5. 10Be exposure age chronology of the last glaciation in the Krkonoše Mountains, Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Zbyněk; Braucher, Régis; Traczyk, Andrzej; Laetitia, Léanni; AsterTeam

    2014-02-01

    A new chronology of the last glaciation is established for the Krkonoše (Giant) Mountains, Central Europe, based on in-situ produced 10Be in moraine boulders. Exposure ages and Schmidt Hammer rebound values obtained for terminal moraines on the northern and southern flank of the mountains suggest that the oldest preserved moraines represent early phases of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Large moraines at the outlet of the Snowy Cirques (Śnieżne Kotły) and in the middle part of the Úpa (Obří důl) trough were deposited around 21 ka while a series of smaller moraines above the LGM deposits represent readvances that occurred no later than 18.1 ± 0.6 ka, 15.7 ± 0.5 ka, 13.5 ± 0.5 ka and 12.9 ± 0.7 ka. An exposure age of 13.8 ± 0.4 ka obtained for protalus ramparts at the foot of the Úpská jáma Cirque headwall indicates that glaciers advanced only in north- to east-facing cirques during the Lateglacial. The last glacier fluctuation was synchronous with the Younger Dryas cold event. The timing of local glacier advances during the last glacial episode correlates with the late Weichselian glacier phases in the Alps and in the Bavarian/Bohemian Forest.

  6. 10Be exposure dating of onset and timing of Neoglacial glacier advances in the Ecrins massif, French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Deline, Philip; Carcaillet, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Alpine glaciers are known to be highly sensitive to change in temperature and precipitation on decadal to centennial time scales. For two decades, numerous studies on Holocene climate revealed a period marked by abrupt cold reversals (e.g. 8.2 ka event) with increasing frequency and magnitude after the Holocene Climatic Optimum, during the so-called Neoglacial period (roughly the last 4 ka). State-of-the-art studies indicate that largest alpine glaciers failed to exceed their Little Ice Age (LIA) extent during these LIA Type-Events, unlike certain smaller glaciers. In the French Alps, very few investigations were conducted to date on Holocene glacier variability. Almost all studies focused on the most glacierized area: the Mont Blanc massif, where suitable organic remains to apply radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology are available. Other glacierized massifs are poorly studied, without any Holocene/Neoglacial glacier chronology up to now. Here, we present the results of a study focusing on six glacier forefields distributed in the Ecrins massif. Detailed geomorphological mapping and in-situ produced 10Be dating were carried on multi-crested so-called "LIA composite moraines". The targeted ridges are located in distal position with respect to late LIA drift in order to identify Holocene cold pulses that have led to (or slightly exceeded) LIA-like glacier extent. The 35 10Be ages obtained revealed that the onset of Neoglacial occurred at ~4.2 ka, and that at least two other advances were recorded at ~3.3 ka and ~0.85 ka. One site has yielded a nearly complete Neoglacial record as four discrete events have been dated. These results highlight the potential of lateral moraine ridge stratigraphy which could yield accurate record when sufficiently preserved, but also the different preservation of landforms along the glacier margin which could censor the record.

  7. Examples of sackungen in the French Western Alps and their geochronology based on the 10Be cosmic ray exposure dating method (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippolyte, J.; Bourles, D. L.; Braucher, R.; Léanni, L.; Chauvet, F.; Lebatard, A.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Keddadouche, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the French Alps, sackung scarps were often interpreted as surface traces of active faults. A detailed mapping of the Arc and Rognier mountains shows that these scarps result from deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD). They are short (less than 2.1 km long), numerous and organized in swarms (5.3 km long at the Arc; 9 km long at Rognier). There are mainly uphill facing scarps developed on steep slopes. Open tension cracks are present at ridge tops. These sackung fractures created ridge-top troughs, closed depressions and multiple-crests landforms. That the sackung scarps are parallel to the contour lines, and that they result from opening of fractures or from normal slips, indicates that they are controlled by topography and gravity. In the Western Alps, glacial erosion and subsequent debuttressing of oversteepened slopes seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of sackungen. However, gradual loss of rock strength, groundwater fluctuations, subsidence due to evaporite dissolution and earthquake shaking, may contribute to their formation. For a better understanding of the origin of sackungen, chronological data are crucial. We used the cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating method for deciphering the activity of the Arc and Rognier sackungen. This method allows quantification of the exposure duration of a surface to cosmic rays, by measuring the amount of accumulated cosmogenic nuclides in surficial rocks. Because sackung scarps usually form in hard rocks containing quartz, we used the 10Be cosmogenic nuclide which is produced in situ by spallation reactions on Si and O (36Cl can be used for limestone). The measurements were performed at ASTER, the French accelerator mass spectrometry facility located at the CEREGE laboratory in Aix-en-Provence. The CRE dating method allows direct dating of most of the geomorphologic structures involved in sackungen: sackung fault scarps, rock slopes, debris slopes, screes, rock glaciers, glacier-polished rock surface

  8. Preliminary Vertical Slip Rate for the West Tahoe Fault from six new Cosmogenic 10Be Exposure Ages of Late Pleistocene Glacial Moraines at Cascade Lake, Lake Tahoe, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, I. K. D.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Kent, G. M.; Owen, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The West Tahoe Fault is the primary range bounding fault of the Sierra Nevada at the latitude of Lake Tahoe. It is a N-NW striking, east dipping normal fault that has a pronounced onshore quaternary scarp extending from highway 50 southwest of Meyers, CA to Emerald Bay. At Cascade Lake, the fault cuts and progressively offsets late Pleistocene right lateral moraines. The fault vertically offsets the previously mapped Tahoe moraine ~83 m and the Tioga moraine ~23 m, measured from lidar data. Seventeen samples were collected for 10Be cosmogenic age analysis from boulders on both the hanging and footwalls of the fault along the crests of these moraines.We report here the initial analysis of 6 of these boulders and currently await processing of the remainder. The 10Be exposure ages of 3 boulders each on the younger Tioga and older Tahoe moraines range from 12.7 +/- 1.6 to 20.7 +/- 3.3 ka and 13.3 +/- 2.1 to 72.5 +/- 8.8 ka, respectively. Using the oldest ages as minima, these preliminary results suggest that the slip rate has averaged ~1 mm/yr since the penultimate glaciation, in accord with estimates of previous workers, and place additional bounds on the age of glaciation in the Lake Tahoe basin. The Last Glacial Maxima and penultimate glaciation near Lake Tahoe thus appear to coincide with the Tioga and Tahoe II glaciations of the Eastern Sierra.

  9. Deglaciation of Antarctica since the Last Glacial Maximum - what can we learn from cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David

    2015-04-01

    Ice volume changes at the coastal margins of Antarctica during the global LGM are uncertain. The little evidence available suggests that behaviour of the East and West Antarctic Ice Sheets are markedly different and complex. It is hypothesised that during interglacials, thinning of the Ross Ice Shelf, a more open-water environment and increased precipitation, allowed outlet glaciers draining the Transantarctic Mnts and fed by interior Ice Sheets to advance during moist warmer periods, out of phase with colder arid periods. In contrast, glacier dynamics along the vast coastal perimeter of East Antarctica is strongly influenced by Southern Ocean conditions. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al chronologies, although restricted to ice-free oasis and mountains flanking drainage glaciers, has become an invaluable, if not unique, tool to quantify spatial and temporal Pleistocene ice sheet variability over the past 2 Ma. Despite an increasing number of well documented areas, extracting reliable ages from glacial deposits in polar regions is problematic. Recycling of previously exposed/ buried debris and continual post-depositional modification leads to age ambiguities for a coeval glacial landform. More importantly, passage of cold-based ice can leave a landform unmodified resulting in young erratics deposited on ancient bedrock. Advances in delivering in-situ radiocarbon to routine application offer some relief. Exposure ages from different localities throughout East Antarctica (Framnes Mnts, Lutzow-Holm Bay, Vestfold Hills) and West Antarctica (Denton Ranges, Hatherton Glacier, Shackleton Range) highlight some of the new findings. This talk presents results which quantify the magnitude and timing of paleo-ice sheet thickness changes, questions the validity of an Antarctic LGM and discusses the complexities encountered in the often excessive spread in exposure ages.

  10. The Lesser Himalaya stripped naked: tecto-climatic induced fluvial response during the Quaternary inferred from in situ 10Be exposure ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swander, Z.; Dosseto, A.; Fink, D.; Mifsud, C.

    2011-12-01

    Deciphering a catchment's response to climatic and tectonic forcings requires a spatially extensive geochronology of aggradation-degradation. The Alaknanda River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, constitutes an ideal area for studying this question. From its glacial headwaters sourcing sediment from 7,000+ meter peaks, fueled by glacial meltwater and the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) that annually brings the river to sustained flood levels; the Alaknanda River transports a tremendous volume of sediment to the fertile floodplain and delta of the Ganga River. Seven study sites lie within a 200km tectonically active stretch of the river valley transecting the Lesser Himalayan lithological units; demarcated by the Main Central and Main Boundary Thrusts. Twenty bedrock strath surface exposure ages, spreading over two orders of magnitude (102-104 years), were established by measuring the cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentration of beryllium-10. A majority of the bedrock exposure ages support a prior hypothesis for climate driven onset of early-mid Holocene erosion, which resulted in the cessation of catchment-wide fluvial aggradation period at 8ka (Juyal et al. 2010) and culminated with renewed incision of underlying bedrock. Incision rates have a narrow range of 3-7 mm×yr-1 suggesting spatial uniformity, and agree largely with previous estimates (4 mm×yr-1; Barnard et al. 2001).

    When comparing the Holocene aggradation-degradation transition to paleoclimate records from the Guliya Ice Core (Thompson et al. 1997), an apparent correlation exists with the waxing and waning of the ISM as postulated by Juyal et al. (2010). However, preceding the Last Glacial Maximum, a sustained decline in the ISM strength coincided with both periods of active alluvial deposition and erosion. Two episodes of valley wide aggradation occur during extensive regional glaciation 49-25ka, and

  11. 10Be, OSL/IRSL Luminescence and 14C Cross-Dating of a Series of Abandoned Alluvial Surfaces Laterally Offset by the Dead Sea Fault, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beon, M.; Jaiswal, M.; Al-Qaryouti, M.; Moumani, K.; Burr, G. S.; Chen, Y.; Klinger, Y.; Abdelghafoor, M.; Suppe, J.

    2010-12-01

    Active tectonics studies are often limited by the uncertainties in accurately and precisely dating Late Quaternary deposits, especially alluvial deposits that often lack organic matter datable by 14C method. This is the case along the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF), the southernmost segment of the Dead Sea Fault, which delineates the 1000-km long plate boundary between the Arabia plate and the Sinai sub-plate. Geodetic, geomorphic and geologic studies converge to a fault slip rate of 5 ± 2 mm/a. Yet, long-term Late Pleistocene slip rates cover a wide range due to large uncertainties, mostly related to the dispersion of 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) ages. The maximum slip rate since ~100 ka is up to a value of 11 mm/a, possibly suggesting significant variations in fault activity with time. In order to reduce the uncertainty on the Late Pleistocene slip rate and draw further conclusions regarding the seismic behavior of the WAF, we targeted one of the sites previously investigated for detailed morphotectonic analysis and 10Be CRN dating and we apply other chronometers, such as Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating on quartz and feldspar minerals, and 14C dating when possible. The site consists in an abandoned bajada composed of four alluvial surface levels, offset by the WAF. We extensively sampled the terraces F2 and F4, which are offset by 160 ± 8 m and 626 ± 37 m, respectively. Our samples are collected from ~50-cm deep pits on the top of the terraces. On F2, we collected one OSL sample downstream from the fault and two upstream, where land snail shells were also found. Preliminary OSL ages agree on ~8 ± 2 ka upstream, also consistent with a 14C date, whereas the OSL age downstream is much older, ~41 ± 4 ka. On F4, we collected three samples downstream from the fault and two upstream. Preliminary OSL ages cluster between ~32 ± 4 ka and ~46 ± 5 ka. Five of the OSL samples have been collected at a similar location to surficial cobbles for 10Be, both on

  12. The 10Be contents of SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Vajda, S.; Kruse, T.; Herzog, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    Several authors have explored the possibility that the Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) came from Mars. The spallogenic gas contents of the SNC meteorites have been used to: constrain the sizes of the SNC's during the last few million years; to establish groupings independent of the geochemical ones; and to estimate the likelihood of certain entries in the catalog of all conceivable passages from Mars to Earth. The particular shielding dependence of Be-10 makes the isotope a good probe of the irradiation conditions experienced by the SNC meteorites. The Be-10 contents of nine members of the group were measured using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. The Be-10 contents of Nakhla, Governador Valadares, Chassigny, and probably Lafayette, about 20 dpm/kg, exceed the values expected from irradiation of the surface of a large body. The Be-10 data therfore do not support scenario III of Bogard et al., one in which most of the Be-10 in the SNC meteorites would have formed on the Martian surface; they resemble rather the Be-10 contents found in many ordinary chondrites subjected to 4 Pi exposures. The uncertainties of the Be-10 contents lead to appreciable errors in the Be-10 ages, t(1) = -1/lambda ln(1 Be-10/Be-10). Nonetheless, the Be-10 ages are consistent with the Ne-21 ages calculated assuming conventional, small-body production rates and short terrestrial ages for the finds. It is believed that this concordance strengthens the case for at least 3 different irradiation ages for the SNC meteorites. Given the similar half-thicknesses of the Be-10 and Ne-21 production rates, the ratios of the Be-10 and Ne-21 contents do not appear consistent with common ages for any of the groups. In view of the general agreement between the Be-10 and Ne-21 ages it does not seem useful at this time to construct multiple-stage irradiation histories for the SNC meteorites.

  13. 10Be cosmic-ray exposure dating of moraines and rock avalanches in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps): Evidence of two glacial advances during the Late Glacial/Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenet, Marie; Brunstein, Daniel; Jomelli, Vincent; Roussel, Erwan; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Mokadem, Fatima; Biette, Melody; Robert, Vincent; Léanni, Laëtitia

    2016-09-01

    Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) dating of moraines allow glacier fluctuations and past climate change reconstructions. In the French Alps, there is a lack of moraine dating for the Late Glacial/Holocene transition period. Here we present a chronology of glacier advances in the Upper Romanche valley (French Alps - Massif des Ecrins) based on 10Be CRE dating. CRE ages of moraines of 13.0 ± 1.1 ka and 12.4 ± 1.5 ka provide evidence for two stages of glacial advance or standstill at the end of the Late Glacial. The CRE dating of a rock avalanche deposit at 12.2 ± 1.5 ka is attributed to post-glacial debuttressing and reveals rapid deglaciation at the end of the Late Glacial. A CRE age of 7.1 ± 0.7 ka of a second mass-wasting, whose triggering factor is unidentified so far, indicates that up to an altitude of 2300 m a.s.l., the valley was ice-free as of ∼7 kyr at the latest. The re-evaluation of 21 moraine 10Be CRE ages from nine glacial valleys across the Alps shows multiple glacial advances occurring at the Late Glacial/Holocene transition. These results lead to a re-evaluation of the importance of cooling events during the Allerød and the Younger Dryas in the Alps.

  14. The Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and its contribution to meltwater pulse 1a: Constraining ice sheet history with geomorphological mapping and 10Be exposure dating on Svalbard's southern cape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothaft, D. B.; Koffman, T.; Schaefer, J. M.; Young, N. E.; Hormes, A.; Briner, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Pinpointing the sources of meltwater pulse (MWP) 1a—the most abrupt period of sea level rise during the last glacial termination—remains one of paleoclimatology's greatest challenges, with implications for the understanding of rapid climate change, isostatic rebound, and past ocean circulation. Here, we present an annotated geomorphological map of a southern region of Svalbard, Norway, that we will use in the interpretation of a soon-to-be published 10Be chronology of this study area where no cosmogenic nuclide exposure data has yet been produced. From this map, we infer historic ice sheet thickness, flow rate, and erosivity. Together, this data will enable us to constrain ice sheet volume change over time in southern Svalbard. The map identifies raised beaches at an altitude of 40 m, indicating an ice sheet thickness of 400-800 m during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) when compared to other shoreline data from the region and ice sheet models. We also observed an abundance of glacially smoothed features in valleys, despite an absence of such features at higher elevations. This could suggest a transition from warm-based, erosive ice to cold-based, non-destructive ice with increasing elevation. It is also possible that mountain peaks in this region were not glaciated at LGM. It is important to assess the historic erosivity of an ice sheet because cosmogenic nuclides may be inherited from prior interstadials when the bedrock was deglaciated, if not "reset" by erosion. This can result in erroneously old exposure dates. If this portion of the Svalbard Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBSIS) did contribute largely to MWP-1a, then we would expect exposure dates from sites differing in elevation by 100 m or more to fall within a 500-year range, centered around 14 ka. Expeditions to collect samples for exposure dating at other field sites in southern Svalbard, scheduled for the coming field season, will help to further inform our understanding of the SBSIS deglaciation and the MWP

  15. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  16. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  17. 10Be in bauxite and commercial aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, R.; Klein, J.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Albrecht, A.; Xue, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Gregory, J.

    1994-06-01

    Five different samples of commercial aluminum have 10Be concentrations that range from a low of 40 × 10 6 to a high of 100 × 10 6 (atom 10Be)/(g Al). The beryllium-10 is probably produced in the atmosphere and introduced into aluminum ore deposits in varying amounts by rainwater during ore genesis. One modern ore, a bauxite from Haiti, contains ~ 6 × 10 9 atom 10Be/(g sample) or 5.7 × 10 10 atom 10Be/(g Al). Geologically older, allocthonous bauxite from Arkansas contains considerably less 10Be; this observation suggests that 10Be can be used to constrain the age of the deposit. The presence of 10Be in commercial aluminum makes it inadvisable to add modern Al to small samples in which very low levels of 10Be are to be determined.

  18. 10Be accumulation in a soil chronosequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavich, M.J.; Brown, L.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the concentration of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be in soil samples from various horizons at six sites, including three independently dated Rappahannock River terraces and a previously undated Piedmont soil to which we have assigned an age. All of the incident 10Be can be accounted for in one of these soils and a second is within a factor of two. In three soils, whose concentrations vary widely with depth, a significant fraction of the incident 10Be cannot be accounted for. Incomplete sampling, and enhanced Be mobility caused by organic components, are the probable reasons for the low inventory of Be from these three soils. Overall, the data from these six sites indicate that 10Be accumulation could be used to assign ages to soils if Be is not mobilized and lost from the soil profile. ?? 1984.

  19. Reconstructing Former Sea Cliff Chronologies using Cosmogenic 10Be Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, J.; Rosser, N. J.; Petley, D. N.; Densmore, A.; Lim, M.

    2010-12-01

    The long-term evolution of coastal cliffs is poorly constrained, with implications for future coastal planning, for estimates of coastal sediment generation and for models of coastal landform evolution. While general consensus has been reached on principles governing the evolution of sea cliffs and shore platforms, process rates and the relative importance of bedrock material properties and environmental boundary conditions have not been established in any quantitative way. This is primarily the result of a lack of calibration data due to the destruction of previous cliff positions through erosive processes. A recurrent problem is that rates of erosion and retreat are often comparable to measurement uncertainties over short time scales and across representative spatial extents. Therefore, long-term rates of retreat for rock coasts remain unknown and the magnitude and pattern of coastal change during the Holocene remains at best anecdotal. With this research we address these issues by reconstructing former cliff chronologies at Staithes, UK using cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations measured across the shore platform. While individual samples provide little certainty as to their true exposure age due to variability in topographic shielding through time, the differences in CRN concentrations taken in transect normal to the cliff are indicative of the recession rate. This relationship forms the basis of our reconstruction. Studying erosion using the concentration of cosmogenically-derived 10Be within quartz has a proven track record. This type of analysis involves the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the concentration of cosmogenic 10Be that has accumulated in the upper portion of the Earth’s surface. Our model of CRN accumulation assumes: negligible down-wearing of the shore platform following cliff recession, supported by studies that have directly measured erosion rates, and evidenced in the present foreshore morphology at the study

  20. Cosmogenic 10Be and Noble Gases in Diogenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Lindner, L.; van der Borg, K.; Loeken, Th.; Scherer, P.; Schultz, L.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: A recent reevaluation of the 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar cosmic-ray exposure ages of eight non-Antarctic and three Antarctic diogenite falls led to a consistent set of exposure ages with a major cluster at 22 Ma and a possible second cluster around 40 Ma [1]. These clusters coincide with two major peaks in the exposure-age distributions of the genetically related eucrites and howardites [2], but the scarcity of young diogenites is remarkable [3]. An update of the exposure-age distribution for diogenites, including nine separate Antarctic falls, will be presented and possible differences in exposure history between Antarctic and non-Antarctic diogenites will be discussed. The exposure-age distributions of eucrites and howardites are still controversial [2,3], as conventional shielding corrections--on the basis of the 22Ne/21Ne ratio--cannot be applied. Therefore, the use of other shielding parameters, such as 10Be or 26Al, is considered. We examined the relation between 10Be contents and 22Ne/21Ne ratios in diogenites to obtain more insight into the shielding sensitivity of the 10Be production rate. Experimental: In addition to the existing database of more than 30 noble gas analyses [4] we carried out noble gas measurements on 5 non-Antarctic diogenites and on 12 Antarctic samples from 9 separate falls. On the same samples 10Be was measured by AMS. The experimental uncertainties in the 10Be values are 2-3%, those in the 22Ne/21Ne ratios are 0.5-1.0%. Results and Conclusions: The major exposure-age cluster at 22 Ma contains about 45% of the diogenite falls, indicating a major impact on its parent body. However, the presence of several younger diogenites suggests that this collisional event was not necessarily as destructive as previously suggested [3]. Four diogenites show exposure ages around 40 Ma, indicating a second major impact on the HED parent body. Although some Antarctic diogenites have unique mineralogical features [5,6], we didn't find any evidence

  1. 10Be distribution in soils from Merced River terraces, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavich, M.J.; Brown, L.; Harden, J.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution and residence time of cosmogenic 10Be in clay-rich soil horizons is fundamental to understanding and modelling the migration of 10Be on terrestrial sediments and in groundwater solutions. We have analyzed seven profiles of clay-rich soils developed from terrace sediments of the Merced River, California. The terraces and soils of increasing age are used to compare the 10Be inventory with a simple model of accumulation, decay and erosion. The data show that the distribution of 10Be varies with soil horizon clay content, that the residence time of 10Be in these horizons exceeds 105 years, and that to a rough approximation the inventory of 10Be in a thoroughly sampled soil profile fits the equation: N = (q - Em)(1 - e-????)/?? where q is delivery rate, E is erosion rate, m is the concentration of 10Be in the eroding surface layer, ?? is the decay constant, and t is the age of the depositional unit from which the soil has developed. The general applicability of this model is uncertain and warrants further testing in well-calibrated terrace sequences. ?? 1986.

  2. Cosmogenic 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl in sanidine and quartz from Chilean ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kober, F.; Alfimov, V.; Kubik, P. W.; Synal, H.-A.

    2007-06-01

    Our initial results indicate that three cosmogenic nuclides: 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl can be analyzed in sanidine. To uncover complex exposure histories or marked changes in denudation rates over time several nuclides with different half-lives (or stable) must be measured. Because of its shorter half-life, the combination of 36Cl and a long-lived nuclide 10Be or stable nuclide 21Ne will provide more information than the pairs 10Be and 26Al or 10Be and 21Ne (in quartz). Sanidine (alkali feldspar) is a common high temperature mineral and often dominates the phenocryst assemblage in silicic to intermediate volcanic rocks. Bedrock surfaces studied come from the Oxaya (erupted 19-23 Ma) and Lauca (erupted 2.7 Ma) ignimbrites of northern Chile. Quartz and sanidine phenocrysts coexist; therefore, we can check the viability of sanidine through direct comparison with nuclide concentrations in quartz. In addition, as quartz has no target for 36Cl in significant abundance we show that the unique power of sanidine is that 36Cl can be measured. We have obtained very good agreement between 10Be and 21Ne concentrations measured in sanidine and coexisting quartz. No meteoric 10Be was apparent in these sanidines. Concentrations of all three nuclides in mineral separates from rock sample CN309 from the Lauca ignimbrite in the Western Cordillera agree well and correspond to minimum exposure ages of 30-50 ka. 10Be and 21Ne measured in both sanidine and quartz from three rock samples from the Oxaya ignimbrite (CN19, CN23, CN104a) in the Western Escarpment record low average landscape modification rates (<0.70 m/Ma) over the last several million years. In contrast, 36Cl data from sanidine in CN23 seem to indicate shorter minimum exposures and more rapid maximum erosion rates.

  3. Production Rate of Cosmogenic 10Be in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, D. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Riebe, C. S.; Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is widely used for determining exposure ages, soil production rates, and catchment-wide erosion rates. To date, measurements have been almost exclusively in the mineral quartz (SiO2), which is resistant to weathering and easily cleaned of meteoric 10Be contamination. However, this limits the method to quartz-bearing rocks and requires specialized laboratories due to the need for large quantities of hydrofluoric acid (HF). Here, we present initial results for 10Be production in the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). Magnetite offers several advantages over quartz; it is (1) present in mafic rocks, (2) easily collected in the field, (3) quickly and easily separated in the lab, and (4) digested without HF. In addition, 10Be can be measured in both detrital quartz and magnetite from the same catchment to yield information about the intensity of chemical weathering (Rogers et al., this conference). The 10Be production rate in magnetite relative to quartz was determined for a granitic boulder from Mt. Evans, Colorado, USA. The boulder was crushed and homogenized to facilitate production rate comparisons among various minerals. We separated magnetite using a combination of hand magnets, froth flotation, and a variety of selective chemical dissolutions in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate solution, 5% nitric acid (HNO3) and 1% HF/HNO3. Six aliquots of magnetite were analyzed for 10Be and compared to quartz. Three aliquots that were not exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 were contaminated with meteoric 10Be, probably associated with residual mica. Three aliquots that were exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 treatments agreed to within 2% measurement uncertainty. Our preliminary results indicate that the relative production rate by mass of 10Be in magnetite and quartz is 0.462 × 0.012. Our results are similar to theoretically predicted values. Recently updated excitation functions for neutron and proton spallation reactions allow us to partition 10Be production in quartz and magnetite among

  4. Shielding Effects on 10Be and 26Al in Diogenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Lindner, L.; van der Borg, K.; Loeken, Th.; Schultz, L.

    1995-09-01

    Due to the attenuation of primary particles and the variations in secondary part fluxes with depth, production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are affected by the s shape of the irradiated object. The effects of shielding conditions on the produduction rates of noble gases can be estimated on the basis of the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne r [1]. For the production of cosmogenic radionuclides, shielding studies mainly fo on large meteorites like St. Severin [2], Knyahinya [3], Chico [4] and Jilin [5] estimated preatmospheric radii between 25 and 85 cm. The 10Be and 26Al production were also measured in three smaller meteorites, but the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne rat were obscured by large amounts of trapped neon [6]. Therefore we carried out a systematic study on the 10Be and 26Al activities as a function of the 22Ne/21Ne in 7 non-Antarctic and 15 Antarctic diogenite samples. Diogenites show exposure long enough (>10 Ma) to have reached saturation levels for 10Be and 26Al and are similar to ordinary chondrites with respect to the target element composition fo production of 10Be, 26Al and Ne isotopes. The measured 10Be and 26Al activities were normalized to average diogenite compo on the basis of ICP and XRF measurements and the experimental production rate eq of [7] and [8]. For the Antarctic samples with known terrestrial ages [9] correc were made for radioactive decay. In figure 1, the resulting 10Be and 26Al production rates are plotted against the 22Ne/21Ne ratios, which were measured on the same The solid lines represent the results of an exponential fitting procedure, from two samples were excluded: EET83246 because of SCR-produced 26Al and LEW88008 be of an anomalously low 26Al/10Be ratio, which is not yet understood. Figure 1 illustrates that the 10Be and 26Al production rates are similarly affect shielding conditions: both 10Be and 26Al decrease about 30 - 40% when going from objects with low 22Ne/21Ne ratios (<1.10) to small objects with high 22Ne/21Ne r (>1.25). Recently

  5. Exposure age and erosional history of an upland planation surface in the US Atlantic Piedmont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanford, S.D.; Seidl, M.A.; Ashley, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The upland planation surface in the Piedmont of central New Jersey consists of summit flats, as much as 130 km2 in area, that truncate bedding and structure in diabase, basalt, sandstone, mudstone and gneiss. These flats define a low-relief regional surface that corresponds in elevation to residual hills in the adjacent Coastal Plain capped by a fluvial gravel of late Miocene age. A Pliocene fluvial sand is inset 50 m below the upland features. These associations suggest a late Miocene or early Pliocene age for the surface. To assess exposure age and erosional history, a 4??4 m core of clayey diabase saprolite on a 3 km2 remnant of the surface was sampled at six depths for atmospherically produced cosmogenic 10Be. The measured inventory, assuming a deposition rate of 1??3 x 106 atoms cm-2 a-1, yields a minimum exposure age of 227 000 years, or, assuming continuous surface erosion, a constant erosion rate of 10 m Ma-1. Because the sample site lies about 60 m above the aggradation surface of the Pliocene fluvial deposit, and itself supports a pre-Pliocene fluvial gravel lag, this erosion rate is too high. Rather, episodic surface erosion and runoff bypassing probably have produced an inventory deficit. Reasonable estimates of surface erosion (up to 10 m) and bypassing (up to 50 per cent of total precipitation) yield exposure ages of as much as 6??4 Ma. These results indicate that (1) the surface is probably of pre-Pleistocene age and has been modified by Pleistocene erosion, and (2) exposure ages based on 10Be inventories are highly sensitive to surface erosion and runoff bypassing. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  6. The drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and a new Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Björck, Svante; Caffee, Marc W.; Fredin, Ola; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2015-04-01

    An important constraint on the reliability of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is the derivation of tightly controlled production rates. We present a new dataset for 10Be production rate calibration from Mount Billingen, southern Sweden, the site of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, an event dated to 11,620 ± 100 cal yr BP. Nine samples of flood-scoured bedrock surfaces and depositional boulders and cobbles unambiguously connected to the drainage event yield a reference 10Be production rate of 4.09 ± 0.22 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the CRONUS Lm scaling and 3.93 ± 0.21 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD general spallation scaling. We also recalibrate the reference 10Be production rates for four sites in Norway and combine these with the Billingen results to derive a tightly clustered Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate of 4.12 ± 0.10 (4.12 ± 0.25 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the Lm scaling scheme and 3.96 ± 0.10 (3.96 ± 0.24 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD scaling scheme.

  7. Radiation exposure for manned Mars surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1990-03-01

    The Langley cosmic ray transport code and the Langley nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are used to quantify the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar proton flares through the Martian atmosphere. Surface doses are estimated using both a low density and a high density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere which, in the vertical direction, provides a total of 16 g/sq cm and 22 g/sq cm of protection, respectively. At the Mars surface during the solar minimum cycle, a blood-forming organ (BFO) dose equivalent of 10.5 to 12 rem/yr due to galactic cosmic ray transport and attenuation is calculated. Estimates of the BFO dose equivalents which would have been incurred from the three large solar flare events of August 1972, November 1960, and February 1956 are also calculated at the surface. Results indicate surface BFO dose equivalents of approximately 2 to 5, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10 rem per event, respectively. Doses are also estimated at altitudes up to 12 km above the Martian surface where the atmosphere will provide less total protection.

  8. The lost sunspot cycle: New support from 10Be measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, C.; Inceoglu, F.; Knudsen, M. F.; Olsen, J.; Fogtmann-Schulz, A.

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that the shortage in the number of spots on the surface of the Sun between 1790 and 1830, known as the Dalton minimum, contained an extra cycle that was not identified in the original sunspot record by Wolf. Though this cycle was shorter and weaker than the average solar cycle, it shifted the magnetic parity of the solar magnetic field of the earlier cycles. This extra cycle is sometimes referred to as the "lost solar cycle" or "cycle 4b". Here we reanalyse 10Be measurements with annual resolution from the North Greenland Ice Core Project in order to investigate if the hypothesis regarding a lost sunspot cycle is supported by these measurements. Specifically, we make use of the fact that the Galactic cosmic rays, responsible for forming 10Be in the Earth's atmosphere, are affected differently by the open solar magnetic field during even and odd solar cycles. This enables us to evaluate if the numbering of cycles earlier than cycle 5 is correct. For the evaluation, we use Bayesian analysis, which reveals that the lost sunspot cycle hypothesis is likely to be correct. We also discuss whether this cycle 4b is a real cycle or a phase catastrophe, and what implications this has for our understanding of stellar activity cycles in general.

  9. Smoothing Polymer Surfaces by Solvent-Vapor Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2003-03-01

    Ultra-smooth polymer surfaces are of great importance in a large body of technical applications such as optical coatings, supermirrors, waveguides, paints, and fusion targets. We are investigating a simple approach to controlling surface roughness: by temporarily swelling the polymer with solvent molecules. As the solvent penetrates into the polymer, its viscosity is lowered, and surface tension forces drive surface flattening. To investigate sorption kinetics and surface-smoothing phenomena, a series of vapor-deposited poly(amic acid) films were exposed to dimethyl sulfoxide vapors. During solvent exposure, the surface topology was continuously monitored using light interference microscopy. The resulting power spectra indicate that high-frequency defects smooth faster than low-frequency defects. This frequency dependence was studied by depositing polymer films onto a series of 2D sinusoidal surfaces and performing smoothing experiments. Results show that the amplitudes of the sinusoidal surfaces decay exponentially with solvent exposure time, and the exponential decay constants are proportional to surface frequency. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Extending standard mask lithography exposure technique to spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Daniela; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-06-01

    Similar to planar lithography, the use of a mask to produce multiple copies of a binary master sample is also possible in the case of spherical surfaces. Evidently, the spherical mask needs to have the opposite radius of curvature of the desired substrate, and additional problems arising from the curved geometry have to be taken into consideration. Inhomogeneities of the illumination impinging on the resist-coated surface negatively influence the exposure result. Ways of overcoming these difficulties to obtain satisfactory results for the implementation of the exposure in a conventional mask aligner are shown. Despite a lowered contrast due to back reflections and a varying distance between mask and substrate, exposure results of sufficient quality are achieved with the help of an adapted aperture and the use of water as an immersion fluid.

  11. A note of caution on the use of boulders for exposure dating of depositional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Hetzel, R.; Kuhlmann, J.; Ramos, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Exposure dating of boulders has been widely applied to determine the age of depositional surfaces under the assumption that the pre-depositional nuclide component in most boulders is negligible (e.g. Bierman et al., 1995; van der Woerd et al., 2006). Here we present a case study on fluvial terraces at the active mountain front of the eastern Andes, where this assumption is clearly invalid, because sandstone boulders (n = 13) at two sites contain a highly variable inherited 10Be component and have apparent 10Be ages that exceed the age of the respective surface by up to 93 ka. Likewise, boulders from active stream channels (n = 5) contain a substantial inherited 10Be component, equivalent to 5-48 ka of exposure. The age of the fluvial terraces is well determined by 10Be depth profiles on sand samples, which allow to correct for the pre-depositional nuclide component. At site 1, three terraces have 10Be ages of 3.20 ± 0.42 ka (T2), 11.11 ± 0.87 ka (T3), and 16.0 ± 1.1 ka (T4). The age of T3 is furthermore confirmed by a calibrated 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 ka BP. At site 2, terrace T3 has an age of 13.5 ± 2.1 ka (derived on a 10Be depth profile), while boulders indicate apparent ages from 14 to 31 ka. The average inherited 10Be concentration of sand grains - determined from depth profiles and stream sediments - is small and equivalent to 1-3 ka of exposure, whereas the mean inheritance of the boulders is an order of magnitude higher. This causes great caution by determining erosion rates. The huge contrast is related to the different provenance and transport history of sand and boulders. While the sand is derived from rapidly eroding Miocene sediments exposed near the mountain front, the boulders originate from Triassic sandstones in the internal part of the fold-and-thrust belt. On their way to the mountain front the boulders were temporarily stored and irradiated in alluvial fans that are currently reworked. Sediment deposition in intramontane basins and

  12. Recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Xie, Xingjun; Beck, Warren; Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Studies of cosmogenic 10Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of 10Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make 10Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as 10Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes 10Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using 10Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  13. Rapid thinning of the Welsh Ice Cap at 20-19 ka based on 10Be ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Philip D.; Glasser, Neil F.; Fink, David

    2016-01-01

    New 10Be ages from the summits of three mountain areas of North Wales reveal a very similar exposure timing as the Welsh Ice Cap thinned after the global Last Glacial Maximum. Eight bedrock and one boulder sample gave a combined arithmetic mean exposure age of 19.08 ± 0.80 ka (4.2%, 1σ). Similar exposure ages over a 320 m vertical range (824 to 581 m altitude) show that ice cap thinning was very rapid and spatially uniform. Using the same production rate and scaling scheme, we recalculated six published 10Be exposure ages from the nearby Arans, which also covered a similar elevation range from 608 to 901 m and obtained an arithmetic mean of 19.41 ± 1.45 ka (7.5%, 1σ). The average exposure age of all 15 accepted deglaciation ages is 19.21 ± 1.07 (5.6%, 1σ). The complete dataset from North Wales provides very strong evidence indicating that these summits became exposed as nunataks at 20-19 ka. This result provides important insight to the magnitude of ice surface lowering and behavior of the Welsh Ice Cap during the last deglaciation that can be compared to other ice masses that made up the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  14. Testing a luminescence surface-exposure dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliganic, Luke A.; Meyer, Michael; Gehring, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has shown that the relationship between the luminescence signal (optically stimulated [OSL] and infra-red stimulated [IRSL]) and depth into a rock surface can be used to estimate the length of time since that rock surface has been exposed to sunlight (Sohbati et al., 2012), thus serving as a means for surface-exposure dating. Despite the potential of this new dating tool, few published studies have tested or used this technique. Here, we present the results of two tests of the method. First, we perform laboratory bleaching experiments using two unexposed bedrock samples of different lithologies (granite and quartzite). Sub-samples were bleached for various durations (0 to 100,000 s) in a solar simulator, and IRSL/OSL-depth profiles were measured and fitted using the model of Sohbati et al. (2012). Results of fitting for each sub-sample were then compared. Second, we used a granite boulder from a known age moraine (1850 CE) to test the reproducibility of bleaching depth curves. Multiple cores were collected from the same ~5 cm2 surface area of the boulder, and IRSL-depth profiles were measured and modelled. While our systematic tests confirm the general physical basis of luminescence surface-exposure dating method, we found unexpected scatter in both adjacent bleaching depth curves and the fitting parameters of isochronous rock surfaces for some of our samples. Potential sources of error, including small-scale lithological variabilities and implications for accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. Sohbati, R., Murray, A.S., Chapot, M.S., Jain, M., Pederson, J. (2012) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating. Journal of Geophysical Research 117 (B9), B09202. doi.org/10.1029/2012JB009383.

  15. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied. The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile. In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  16. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  17. sup 10 Be study of rapid erosion in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chenfeng You; Juchin Chen National Taiwan Univ., Taipei ); Typhoon Lee; Jason Jiunsan Shen ); Brown, L. )

    1988-11-01

    Cosmogenic {sup 10}Be was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry in soils and sediments to study the erosion of Taiwan, which has the highest denudation rate in the world. The river sediments in Taiwan have very low {sup 10}Be concentrations, around 5 million atoms per gram, about 1/45 the world wide average. This is the direct consequence of its high sediment yield of ore than 1,000 mg/cm{sup 2}/yr, 70 times the world average. Combining these values the authors found that, for Taiwan as a whole, the {sup 10}Be output to the sea only slightly exceeds the input from the rain, a situation typical of many areas around the world. Therefore, even in this example of extremely rapid erosion, {sup 10}Be seems to remain a useful indicator for erosion status. The total {sup 10}Be inventory found in a soil profile from a geologically stable area is at least 18% of the maximum possible inventory. The minimum age thus estimated for the soil is 0.11 Ma, in reasonable agreement with estimates from other means. The maximum erosion rate for this area thus estimated is at most 0.14 mg/cm{sup 2}/yr, four orders of magnitude slower than the average value observed for Taiwan. They also demonstrate that the shelf sediments around Taiwan have received the admixing of a {sup 10}be rich component from the ocean and would give a poor estimate for material eroded from Taiwan.

  18. Short and long-term delivery rates of meteoric 10Be to terrestrial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Well-constrained, long-term average meteoric 10Be deposition rates are important when meteoric 10Be is used as a chronometer or tracer of Earth surface processes. To constrain meteoric 10Be delivery to terrestrial soils, we estimate time-integrated 10Be deposition rates from meteoric 10Be inventories measured in dated soils and compare these results to a new synthesis of short-term measurements of 10Be in precipitation. Comparison of these long-term rates to short-term measurements suggests that short-term measurements likely predict long-term meteoric 10Be deposition rates within uncertainties of ~ 20%. In precipitation measurements, it is possible to deconvolve the contribution of atmospherically-produced "primary" meteoric 10Be from "recycled" meteoric 10Be delivered by terrestrial dust if a second isotope is measured that quantifies either the recycled or primary components of meteoric 10Be deposition. We use dust-concentration dependent differences between 7Be and 10Be measurements to make new estimates of the recycled contribution to total meteoric 10Be flux delivered to the Earth's surface. These dust-corrected data show a strong linear dependence between precipitation amount and primary meteoric 10Be flux. Concentrations of primary meteoric 10Be in mid- and low-latitude precipitation vary predictably by latitude between 0.63 · 10 4 and 2.05 · 10 4 atoms/cm 3 of precipitation, providing a first-order estimate of primary meteoric 10Be deposition for a given latitude and precipitation rate.

  19. Solar Wind Implantation Model for 10Be in Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a model for the incorporation of 10Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, 10Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This 10Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting 10Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of 10Be at the surface of the Sun is ~0.1 10Be cm-2 s-1. Scaling up the contemporary 10Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 105 would increase the production rate to 104 10Be cm-2 s-1. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model 10Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted 10Be would have been of the order of 1012 10Be g-1 in CAIs, consistent with initial10Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  20. Do Fungi Transport 10Be During Wood Degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conyers, G.; Granger, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Meteoric cosmogenic 10Be is increasingly used to determine erosion and soil transport rates. To calculate these rates, it is assumed that 10Be is a conservative passive tracer of soil particles. However, there is experimental evidence that beryllium is mobilized in natural soils complexed with organic acids. For example, up to 50% of beryllium can be mobilized by humic acids in soils at pH 7 (Takahashi et al., 1999). Beryllium is also known to be taken up in plants such as tobacco and vegetables (World Health Organization, 1990) at ppm levels, primarily as organic acid chelates. It is not known to what extent biological beryllium transport in the environment affects the cosmogenic 10Be budget, or how it influences beryllium mobility. In this study, we address a problem recognized early in the development of meteoric 10Be methods. It has been observed that decayed organic matter in soils and sediments contains very high concentrations of 10Be of up to 109-1010 atoms/g (Lundberg, et al., 1983). On the other hand, living trees contain much lower concentrations of 106 atoms/g (Klein et al., 1982). The driving question for this study is how 10Be becomes bound to decayed organic matter. Direct fallout seems unlikely as the residence time of organic matter in soil is too short. One possibility is that 10Be is transported by fungi. Wood-degrading fungi are known to transport and bioaccumulate metals from large areas, facilitated by acids such as oxalic acid in the fungal hyphae. To test the hypothesis that fungi transport 10Be, we analyzed both intact and fungally degraded wood of oak, hickory, and hemlock. From these data, we reached two conclusions (observations?): 1) Oak has a 10Be concentration of about 2x106 at/g, similar to that observed by Klein et al. (1982). Hickory has a significantly higher concentration of about 3x107 atoms/g, confirming observations that hickory bioaccumulates beryllium. Using these data, the inventory of 10Be in a temperate forest is expected

  1. An inter-comparison of 10Be and 26Al AMS reference standards and the 10Be half-life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Smith, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We have completed a survey and inter-comparison of several 10Be and 26Al standard reference materials (SRMs) that are in routine use at various AMS laboratories to assess their relative values and the accuracy of their quoted nominal ratios. The accelerator measurement cycle, analysis procedure and setup used at the ANTARES AMS facility for this survey are described. We focused on a new set of 10Be and 26Al serial dilutions of standard reference materials (SRMs) prepared by Kuni Nishiizumii at the University of California, Berkeley, and found excellent systematic reproducibility and internal consistency. For other standard materials, minor deviations are evident even when the results have been recalibrated to a common half-life. In particular, we confirm that the NIST 10Be SRM-4325 has a 14% greater 10Be/Be ratio than that certified by NIST when it is calibrated against other SRMs whose ratios have been normalized to a common 1.5 Ma 10Be half-life. In order to investigate this apparent discrepancy, we report on the results of an absolute, normalization independent, measure of the NIST-4325 10Be/Be ratio. Within the constraints of this type of measurement and its systematic errors, we determine an absolute value for the 10Be/Be SRM-4325 ratio in the range 26,050 to 24,800 × 10-15 in support of the certified value of 26,800 × 10-15 given by NIST. We hesitate to directly infer as a consequence that the 10Be half-life is 1.34 Ma because such an inference is contingent on a direct and accurate specific activity in the parent solution, which at present is not available.

  2. Dating chert using in-situ produced 10Be: Possible complications revealed on landslide scarps through a comparison with 36Cl applied to coexisting limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerathe, Swann; Braucher, Régis; Lebourg, Thomas; Leani, Leatitia; Manetti, Michel; Bourles, Didier

    2013-04-01

    This abstract and presentation highlights potential complications that may arise while using in situ produced 10Be to date diagenetic silica (chert)exposure or burial event. The initiation and evolution of large gravitational collapses in sedimentary rocks were constrained using cosmic ray exposure dating. Because these collapses occurred in a stratigraphic level composed of chert (diagenetic silica) concretions interbedded in limestone layers, their development was studied by performing in situ-produced 36Cl and 10Be concentration measurements in both the limestone and coexisting diagenetic silica (chert), respectively. Following the routinely used decontamination and preparation protocols for 10Be produced in diagenetic silica, large discrepancies were observed with exposure ages determined by 36Cl within carbonate for samples originating from the same scarp. While 36Cl exposure ages were clustered as expected for a unique single gravitational event, 10Be exposure ages were scattered along the same studied scarps. To determine the origin of such a bias, petrological investigations were carried out for chert (diagenetic silica). Thin sections highlighted a complex mineralogical texture characterized by remnant silicified ooids showing calcitic cores, calcite inclusions and a dominant amorphous hydrated silica (grain > 20 μm). To decipher and characterize the potential origins of the excess measured 10Be within diagenetic silica, all samples were first reprocessed following the routine decontamination protocol (HCL-H2SiF6 leachings and three partial HF dissolutions) but starting from three different grain size fractions (GS1: 1000-500, GS2: 500-250 and GS3: 250-50 μm). The resulting concentrations clearly showed a decreasing 10Be content as a function of the grain size, but still yielded 10Be exposure ages significantly higher than 36Cl counterparts. Because potential adsorption of 10Be at the surface of amorphous silica grains was suspected, partial dissolution

  3. SOLAR WIND IMPLANTATION MODEL FOR {sup 10}Be IN CALCIUM-ALUMINUM INCLUSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, Glynn E.; Caffee, Marc W. E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed

    2010-12-10

    We propose a model for the incorporation of {sup 10}Be within calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites. In this model, {sup 10}Be is produced by energetic particle reactions in the proto-solar atmosphere of a more active proto-Sun characterized by energetic particle fluxes higher than contemporary particle fluxes. This {sup 10}Be is incorporated into the solar wind that is then implanted into CAI precursor material. This production mechanism is operational in the contemporary solar system implanting {sup 10}Be in lunar materials. The contemporary production rate of {sup 10}Be at the surface of the Sun is {approx}0.1 {sup 10}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Scaling up the contemporary {sup 10}Be production in the proto-Sun by a factor of 10{sup 5} would increase the production rate to 10{sup 410}Be cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Using this enhanced production value in conjunction with refractory mass inflow rates at 0.06 AU from the proto-Sun we model {sup 10}Be concentrations in CAI precursors. We calculate the content of solar-wind-implanted {sup 10}Be would have been of the order of 10{sup 1210}Be g{sup -1} in CAIs, consistent with initial{sup 10}Be content found from boron-beryllium isotopic systematics in CAIs.

  4. New assignments for 10Be states from the 12C( 12C, 14O) 10Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.; von Oertzen, W.; Schulz, Ch.; Wheldon, C.

    2007-05-01

    The two-proton pick-up reaction 12C( 12C, 14O) 10Be has been measured at 211.4 MeV incident energy to study the structure of 10Be states. This reaction populates most strongly 0 + and 2 + two-proton hole-configurations in the Ip-shell, but also odd-parity states. A two-step mechanism is needed in the latter case with particle-hole excitations of the type (lp) -1(2sld) 1 in inelastic excitation (including neutron excitations) in the one step, and the pick-up of a pair of protons from 12C in the other step. For all observed states the oscillatory structure of the angular distributions is characteristic of their spins, as can be verified for states with known spins. In this way we can make the firm spin assignments of 4 + and 3 - for the states at 11.8 MeV and 10.55 MeV, respectively. From the reaction mechanism, which offers optimum conditions to populate the 4 + configuration in the Ip-shell, and from the J(J+l)-rule for excitation energies within a rotational band we conclude, that the assigned 4 + state is most probably a member of the ground state band of 10Be.

  5. Residential and commercial painters' exposure to lead during surface preparation.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Peter F; Materna, Barbara L; Harrington, David; Uratsu, Connie

    2002-01-01

    The California Painters Project was a 2-year intervention research project aimed at preventing lead poisoning among a group of residential and commercial painters in San Francisco, Calif. As part of this project 12 contractors invited project staff to conduct employee exposure monitoring. Twenty-five full-shift samples were collected, with 8-hr TWA results ranging from 0.8 to 550 microg/m3 (arithmetic mean: 57 microg/m3). Six of the 25 samples (24%) were above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit; all of these involved dry manual sanding or uncontrolled power sanding. Fifty-eight 30-minute task-specific samples also were collected. The arithmetic mean concentration results for heat gun use, wet sanding, and open flame burning were all under 10 microg/m3; the mean concentration for HEPA-exhausted power sanding was 33 microg/m3; dry manual scraping, 71 microg/m3; dry manual sanding, 420 microg/m3; and uncontrolled power sanding, 580 microg/m3. Analysis and modeling based on the 30-min results for dry manual sanding and uncontrolled power sanding indicate that painters' full-shift exposures often exceed 500 microg/m3 and the OSHA assigned level of protection for a half-mask air-purifying respirator. These results are cause for concern because both of these surface preparation methods are widely performed wearing half-mask respirators. The data show that HEPA-exhausted power sanding reduces paint dust exposure levels by approximately 80 to 90%. These tools should be more widely promoted as a safer alternative work method. PMID:11843421

  6. 10Be Production in the Atmosphere by Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Herbst, Klaudia; Heber, Bernd; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    2013-06-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei and energetic protons produced in solar flares and accelerated by coronal mass ejections are the main sources of high-energy particles of extraterrestrial origin in near-Earth space and inside the Earth's atmosphere. The intensity of galactic cosmic rays inside the heliosphere is strongly influenced by the modulation of the interstellar source particles on their way through interplanetary space. Among others, this modulation depends on the activity of the Sun, and the resulting intensity of the energetic particles in the atmosphere is an indicator of the solar activity. Therefore, rare isotopes found in historical archives and produced by spallation reactions of primary and secondary hadrons of cosmic origin in the atmosphere, so-called cosmogenic nuclides, can be used to reconstruct the solar activity in the past. The production rate of 10Be, one of the cosmogenic nuclides most adequate to study the solar activity, is presented showing its variations with geographic latitude and altitude and the dependence on different production cross-sections present in literature. In addition, estimates for altitude integrated production rates of 10Be at different locations since the early nineteen sixties are shown.

  7. A 10Be Chronology of Late Pleistocene and Holocene Glaciation in the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baber, M.; Kelly, M. A.; Russell, J. M.; Loomis, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Although the retreat of glaciers in East Africa has been monitored over the last century, longer-term records of African glacier fluctuations are scarce. The Rwenzori Mountains, located on the border of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, host the largest glacial system in Africa and provide an opportunity for extensive investigation of past glaciations. We mapped and applied surface exposure (10Be) dating to glacial moraines deposited since the end of the last ice age in the Rwenzori Mountains to test the feasibility of 10Be dating at this site and to develop a chronology of glacial fluctuations. Our study is the first to use 10Be dating of glacial features in Africa and is possible because the Rwenzori host quartz-rich lithologies. By comparing the timing of Rwenzori glacial advances with other paleoclimate records from East Africa, we also will examine the climatic conditions which influenced tropical glacier fluctuations. Osmaston (1989) mapped moraines in the Rwenzori Mountains, documenting three stages of Pleistocene and Holocene glaciations, the Mahoma, Omurubaho and Lac Gris stages. The Mahoma stage moraines are estimated to be older than 17,980 ± 780 yr BP (D. M. Livingstone, 1962) by basal 14C dating of sediments from Lake Mahoma, situated in large lateral moraine at 2990 m asl. The age of the Omurubaho stage moraine is estimated from a basal 14C age (7,730 ± 150 yr BP) Lower Kitandara Lake (3990 m asl) and dammed by an Omurubaho stage moraine. The Lac Gris moraines are estimated at ~150-700 yr BP (de Heinzelin, 1953; Bergström, 1955) based on rates of lichen growth and plant colonization on moraines about 200 m below current glacial positions on Mt. Stanley. Though considerable uncertainty remains for the ages of these glacier deposits, these three stages most likely represent ages from the LGM to the LIA. We present two new 10Be ages of boulders from two moraines in the Nyamagusani Valley, ~4000 m asl. Sample KOP-2 (4033 m asl) is from the

  8. ISSUES IN UNDERSTANDING DERMAL EXPOSURES RESULTING FROM CONTACT WITH CONTAMINATED SURFACES, MEASURING SURFACE CONTAMINATION, AND CHARACTERIZING TRANSFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although monitoring for surface contamination in work with radioactive materials and dermal monitoring of pesticide exposure to agricultural workers have been standard practice for 50 years, regular surface sampling and dermal monitoring methods have only been applied to indust...

  9. Meteoric 10Be in Lake Cores as a Measure of Climatic and Erosional Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, R. E.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Utilization of meteoric 10Be as a paleoenvironmental proxy has the potential to offer new insights into paleoprecipitation records and paleoclimate models, as well as to long-term variations in erosion with climate. The delivery of meteoric 10Be to the surface varies with precipitation and its strong adsorption to sediment has already proven useful in studies of erosion. Thus, it is likely meteoric 10Be concentrations in lake sediments vary under both changing climate and changing sediment influx. Assessment of the relative importance of these changes requires the comparison of 10Be concentrations in well-dated lake cores with independent paleoenvironmental proxies, including oxygen isotope, pollen, and charcoal records, as well as variation in geochemical composition of the sediments. Blacktail Pond details 15,000 years of climatic change in the Yellowstone region. We develop a new model framework for predicting meteoric 10Be concentrations with depth in the core, based on sedimentation rates of both lake-derived and terrigenous sediments and changes in the flux of meteoric 10Be with precipitation. Titanium concentrations and previously determined 10Be concentrations in wind-derived loess provide proxies for changing delivery of 10Be to the lake by terrigenous sources. We use existing paleoenvironmental data obtained from this core and the surrounding region to develop models for changing rainfall across the region and predict meteoric 10Be delivery to the lake by precipitation. Based on a suite of ~10 models, sedimentation rate is the primary control of meteoric 10Be in the Blacktail Pond core unless terrestrial input is very high, as it was post-glacial in the early Holocene when the lake experienced a high influx of loess and terrigenous sediments. We used these models to inform sample selection for 10Be analysis along the Blacktail pond core. Core sediments are processed for meteoric 10Be analysis using sequential digestions and standard extraction procedures

  10. 10Be analysis of a Quaternary weathering profile in the Virginia Piedmont.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavich, M.J.; Brown, Louis; Valette-Silver, J. Nathalie; Klein, Jeffrey; Middleton, Roy

    1985-01-01

    Samples from a residual weathering profile in the Virginia Piedmont have been analyzed for cosmogenic 10Be. Concentrations are highest in clay-rich soil and decrease exponentially to a depth of about 15 m. Despite uncertainties about the processes by which 10Be may be intercepted before entering the solum and eroded after incorporation, a minimum age may be calculated for the regolith. This calculation is based on the delivery rate of 10Be and its decay rate and suggests that this residual profile developed during a period no shorter than 8 × 105 yr. The calculated minimum age may be within a factor of 2 of maximum-age estimates based on surface lowering by erosion and on the rate of rock weathering to saprolite. The vertical distribution of 10Be in the profile could result from a steady-state balance of deposition, weathering, radioactive decay, and erosion.

  11. A model-based evaluation of sedimentary reconstructions of 10Be production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Lewis; Plancherel, Yves; Khatiwala, Samar; Henderson, Gideon

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric production of 10Be is small when solar activity and, therefore, solar magnetic field and total solar irradiance are strong. Variations in solar activity affect climate and the production of other climate-relevant isotopes, such as 14C. Solar activity is thus an important variable to constrain. Since 10Be production is clearly related to solar activity and the cycle of beryllium is simpler than that of carbon, 10Be records in ice cores have been used to reconstruct total solar irradiance variability. Unfortunately, 10Be records in ice cores are not only affected by variations in atmospheric production, but are also modulated by changes in wind patterns since spatiotemporal atmospheric 10Be gradients are quite large. In that context, sedimentary 10Be records from the abyssal ocean could be of great interest: since the residence time of 10Be in the ocean is thought to be comparable to the overturning time-scale of the ocean, spatial 10Be gradients may be relatively weaker than those in the atmosphere. Under these conditions, regional oceanic variability should only weakly affect the distribution of 10Be in the ocean and local sedimentary 10Be records are expected to represent the global average 10Be production better than 10Be measured in ice cores. We here show results from a global ocean model of 10Be that we use to investigate the spatial variability of simulated sedimentary 10Be records and test the sensitivity of the 10Be sedimentary flux to uncertainties in the circulation field and in the particle chemistry of beryllium. Our ocean model is based on the Transport Matrix method. The surface 10Be input fluxes are taken from atmospheric model simulations. Our model experiments, constrained by available dissolved 10Be data, show that there exist regions in the ocean where the sedimentary 10Be flux is relatively insensitive to changes in input patterns and magnitudes, assumed particle chemistry and flux patterns, and ocean circulation. We submit that

  12. Exposure and risk assessment of zinc in Japanese surface waters.

    PubMed

    Naito, Wataru; Kamo, Masashi; Tsushima, Koji; Iwasaki, Yuichi

    2010-09-15

    In recent years, due to concerns on the potential effects of zinc on aquatic biota, zinc is receiving particular attention from regulatory agencies. A comprehensive exposure and risk assessment of zinc in Japanese surface waters was conducted to provide a scientific basis for developing realistic risk reduction measures for zinc. Emissions from corrosion contribute approximately 37% of the total zinc emissions to surface water in Japan. The zinc concentration distributions estimated using 12 years of monitoring data from 2075 sites by a maximum likelihood method indicated that the mean concentrations have gradually declined. The threshold concentrations (HC5 and PHC5) derived from organism- and population-level species sensitivity distributions were estimated to be 27 and 107 microg/L for total zinc, respectively. The risk characterization identified that during 1991-2002, 14.5-26.8% of the monitoring sites likely exceeded the HC5, whereas only 0.7-3.5% likely exceeded the PHC5. Evaluation of the effect of stormwater runoff to zinc concentrations in a river showed that zinc concentrations in river water increased significantly from roadway drainage flowing into the river. The cost-effectiveness analyses demonstrated that enforcement of the zinc national effluent standard may be effective at a certain level for public water areas in Japan; however, the degree of the effectiveness is highly dependent on the characteristics (e.g., sources and background) of the watersheds. An emissions and exposure assessment along with cost-effectiveness analysis is crucial for developing realistic and appropriate ecological risk management of zinc. The zinc RAD in Japan illustrated that in any "state-of-the science" method used, some degree of ecological risk from zinc can be observed in some Japanese water environments. On the other hand, zinc is a beneficial material for human industrial activities. Because zinc is an element, its role in industrial activities would be difficult

  13. 26Al/10Be dating of an aeolian dust mantle soil in western New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Adrian; Fink, David; Chappell, John; Melville, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Aeolian dust mantle soils are an important element of many landscapes in south-eastern Australia, though the age of these aeolian deposits has not been radiometrically determined. At Fowlers Gap in western New South Wales, surface cobbles of silcrete and quartz overlie a stone-free, aeolian dust mantle soil, which has a thickness of about 1.6 m. The clay-rich aeolian dust deposit in turn lies upon a buried silcrete and quartz stone layer. Modelling in-situ cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be concentrations measured in both the surface quartz stones and in the buried quartz layer of rocks, reveals that each has experienced a complex exposure-burial history. Due to the absence of quartz stones or sand at intermediate depths, our cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be modelling was not able to determine a definitive mechanism of stone pavement formation and stone burial. Various scenarios of stone formation, transport, burial and exhumation were tested that constrain the age of the deposit to range from 0.9 ± 0.2 Ma to 1.8 ± 0.2 Ma, based largely on different assumptions taken for the time-dependency of the net sedimentation rate. This corresponds with the initiation of the Simpson Desert dune fields and the deflation of lakes in central Australia, which probably responded to the shift to longer-wavelength, larger-amplitude Quaternary glacial cycles at around 1 Ma. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify those parameters which better constrained model outputs. Within model errors, which largely are the result of analytical errors in measured 26Al and 10Be concentrations, all three competing theories of colluvial wash, upward displacement of stones, and cumulic pedogenesis are possible mechanisms for the formation of the surface stone pavement.

  14. Calibrating a long-term meteoric 10Be accumulation rate in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, Lucas; Graly, Joseph; Bierman, Paul; Rood, Dylan

    2010-10-01

    Using 13 samples collected from a 4.1 meter profile in a well-dated and stable New Zealand fluvial terrace, we present the first long-term accumulation rate for meteoric 10Be in soil (1.68 to 1.72 × 106 at/(cm2·yr)) integrated over the past ˜18 ka. Site-specific accumulation data, such as these, are prerequisite to the application of meteoric 10Be in surface process studies. Our data begin the process of calibrating long-term meteoric 10Be delivery rates across latitude and precipitation gradients. Our integrated rate is lower than contemporary meteoric 10Be fluxes measured in New Zealand rainfall, suggesting that long-term average precipitation, dust flux, or both, at this site were less than modern values. With accurately calibrated long-term delivery rates, such as this, meteoric 10Be will be a powerful tool for studying rates of landscape change in environments where other cosmogenic nuclides, such as in situ 10Be, cannot be used.

  15. Determination of cosmogenic production rates of 10Be, 3He and 3H in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Erik T.; Trull, Thomas W.; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Raisbeck, Grant; Bourlès, Didier; Yiou, Françoise; Marty, Bernard

    2000-10-01

    To improve our understanding of present-day cosmogenic production systematics of 10Be, 3H and 3He, we exposed three sets of targets of purified water at altitudes of 620, 3810 and 4745 m in the Mont Blanc Massif of the French Alps. In addition, tanks were stored 1780 m underground to quantify 3He contributions from decay of "inherited" tritium initially present in the water. After analyses of 3He and 10Be, both the summit and tunnel 3H- 3He tanks were re-degassed and stored underground for an additional year. The stored summit tanks were then analyzed to determine cosmogenic 3H levels by the 3He ingrowth method, and the tunnel tanks used to re-determine inherited tritium. Production rates (in atoms per g H 2O per year) for direct production of 3He and 10Be were 1824±52 and 112±9; 1013±16 and 70±5; and 134±58 and 5.9±0.7 at the three elevations, respectively. We determined production ratios of 0.32±0.08 for 3H: 3He and 20.2±1.5 for ( 3H+ 3He): 10Be. Our 10Be production rates, when normalized for inter-laboratory calibration and for differences in geomagnetic latitude of exposure, are somewhat lower than results of a similar experiment undertaken by Nishiizumi et al. (1996). Our 3H: 3He ratio is consistent with theoretical and meteorite estimates (Kruger and D. Heymann, 1968), but considerably lower than values assumed in many exposure age studies of igneous rocks (e.g., (Kurz, 1986; Trull et al., 1995)).

  16. Quantifying Sub-Glacial Abrasion at Jakobshavn Isbræ: A Novel Approach Using In Situ 10Be Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, N. E.; Briner, J. P.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Warm-based ice sheets and glaciers incontrovertibly erode and modify the terrain that they mantle; yet precise estimates of the rate and magnitude of sub-glacial erosion are rare. Estimates of sub-glacial erosion occurring beneath ice sheets, such as the Greenland Ice Sheet, are particularly important because they can provide key insights into sediment availability at ice-sheet margins that influences ice-sheet stability. Furthermore, estimates of sub-glacial erosion can help inform predictive geophysical ice-sheet models that incorporate a basal sliding parameter. Here, we take advantage of a detailed ice-margin history at Jakobshavn Isbræ over the last ~7,500 years, combined with in situ 10Be measurements from strategic bedrock locations, to quantify the rate of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-based margins. Our bedrock samples are from 1) locations that deglaciated ~7,500 years ago and have remained ice-free through present day, and 2) locations that also deglaciated ~7,500 years ago, but were re-occupied by the ice-margin during the last few hundred years. After accounting for the slightly different exposure histories between bedrock locations, and despite the short duration in ice-cover, initial 10Be measurements reveal a detectable difference in 10Be concentrations between the two bedrock surfaces. We hypothesize that the offset in 10Be concentrations reveals the magnitude of sub-glacial abrasion beneath Jakobshavn Isbræ's land-terminating margins.

  17. Unexpected Delivery of Meteoric 10Be to Critical Zone Soils, Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.; Bierman, P. R.; Wyshnytsky, C.; Rood, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Using meteoric 10Be in geomorphic studies requires knowing its long-term delivery rate to the earth surface. Delivery rates vary by latitude due to the influence of geomagnetic field intensity and solar activity and locally due to differences in precipitation and rates of dustfall accumulation, which are responsible for depositing primary and recycled meteoric 10Be to geomorphic surfaces, respectively. Because influences on delivery rate vary in space and time, recent studies emphasize the use of inventory sites where the total concentration of meteoric 10Be is measured on stable landforms of known age to determine site-specific, long-term delivery rates. To date, measured long-term delivery rates typically have fallen within the range of expected rates for the site's latitude and modern annual rate of precipitation, including minor contributions of dust to the total inventory of meteoric 10Be. Here, we present the results of a meteoric 10Be inventory measured on a Pinedale (~15 ka) moraine within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Front Range, Colorado. We report a long-term delivery rate of meteoric 10Be for this site of 4.2 to 4.6 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr, significantly higher than the expected delivery rate (1 to 1.3 × 106 atoms/cm2/yr) for it's latitude (40 degrees) and annual precipitation rate (85-95 cm/yr). A detailed analysis of soils in the Front Range (of various age) indicate that long-term dust accumulation rates are less than ~0.1 grams/cm2/kyr and therefore do not significantly influence the total amount of meteoric 10Be delivered to geomorphic surfaces. When applied to measured concentrations of meteoric 10Be in soils within the Gordon Gulch CZO catchment, our high, inventory-based delivery rate suggests that hillslopes are 10 to 40 ka younger (all post-LGM) than suggested by published precipitation based delivery rates. Furthermore, this result, combined with a long-term delivery rate calibrated nearby on the High Plains (1200 m lower in

  18. Dry heat exposures of surface exposed and embedded Bacillus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary technique used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts. Often, manufacturing procedures require heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. The existing specifications, however, do not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit if the hardware is exposed without controlled relative humidity. The intent of this study was to provide adequate data on the DHMR technique to support modification of four aspects of current requirements; expansion of acceptable time and temperature combinations used for spacecraft dry heat microbial reduction processes above 125° C, determining the effect that humidity has on spore lethality as a function of temperature, understanding the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance and to investigate the extended exposure requirement for materials that might contain embedded microorganisms. Spores from two bacterial species were tested, B. atrophaeus ATCC 9372 and B. sp. ATCC 29669, under three conditions encompassing 5 temperature points. Embedded experiments utilized a silicone rubber polymer that is commonly used on robotic spacecraft, and surface exposed experiments were performed under both ambient and vacuum-controlled humidity conditions. The results obtained support the use of DHMR protocols that extend the maximum temperature range from 125° C to 170° C, with either controlled or ambient humidity. If implemented, this will give projects bioburden reduction credit for shorter treatments at extended temperatures, and allow spacecraft to be processed in more readily available and less expensive facilities that do not have humidity control, with significant cost and schedule benefits. The study also demonstrated that the required heating time for materials presumed to have embedded bioburden is conservative.

  19. Lichenometry and Cosmogenic Surface Exposure Dating of Possible Fossil Talus Deposits, Devil's Lake State Park, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenhauer, K. J.; Weber, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Lichenometry and cosmogenic surface exposure dating have been highly successful in deciphering landform evolution in tectonically active regions, but have not been widely applied in mid-continent settings. We propose to test the idea that many of the talus deposits in Devil's Lake State Park (DLSP) are ancient, fossil, periglacial deposits that have been frozen in space and time not moving since ~18,000 years ago. Our results may provide valuable information that could be applied to other settings and may also offer information on the effects of 2nd order climatic events such as the Little Ice Age of the 16th-19th centuries, and also help determine the relation between the last glacial maximum about 18ky ago and its related timing to major mass sediment movements. Our preliminary data was collected methodologically offering tight, unimodal peaks of lichen diameters/ages for Aspicilia cinerea and Dimelaena oreina most consistent with the idea that the deposits have not moved since the last ice age. A growth curve for Dimelaena oreina was established through the use of a neighboring cemetery giving a local growth rate of 67.13mm/100yr with R=68. Size-distribution results for DLSP peaked at only 65.2mm. This suggests that current talus block lichen cover is not a record of the first generation. We will pair our lichenometric results with the future use of 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the ages of the 3 major talus deposits themselves (as opposed to lichen initialization ages) which should allow us to test our initial hypothesis, enhance our lichenometry data set, and begin to develop a more robust sampling strategy for further work. Deciphering the landform evolution of this area would offer insight to past landslides and mass debris flows.

  20. Tracing hillslope sediment production and transport with in situ and meteoric 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungers, Matthew C.; Bierman, Paul R.; Matmon, Ari; Nichols, Kyle; Larsen, Jennifer; Finkel, Robert

    2009-12-01

    We use in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be, analyzed in soils from 28 pits on four hillcrest-parallel transects along a 14° hillslope in the Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, as tracers of soil production and transport. We rely upon amalgamation both to investigate and smooth spatial variability in 10Be concentrations. Lidar indicates that the hillslope is topographically complex and that soil is moved downslope diffusively until it encounters the ephemeral channel network and is rapidly exported. In situ-produced 10Be, measured in depth profiles, indicates that over millennial timescales, soils are mixed above the soil-saprolite boundary. In contrast, meteoric 10Be concentrations increase with depth and are correlated to concurrent increases of dithionite-extractable Al and pH, observations explained by similar Al and Be mobility in the soil. The concentrations of both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be increase downslope proportional to the maximum soil particle path length. The data suggest virtual downslope soil velocities of 1.1-1.7 cm yr-1 in a well-mixed active transport layer ˜60 cm thick. The thickness of this transport layer is constant downslope and depends on the rooting depth and consequent root wad thickness of downed trees on the slope, both of which reflect depth to the soil/saprolite boundary. Both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be suggest that soil production is balanced by surface denudation at rates between 10 and 13 m Myr-1. Soil residence times on the slope range from 21 to 33 kyr based on the meteoric 10Be inventories. Major element geochemical analysis suggests little if any elemental loss during soil transport downslope.

  1. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  2. Reactive and dissolved meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Hella; Dannhaus, Nadine; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Suessenberger, Annette; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Maurice, Laurence; Filizola, Naziano; Gaillardet, Jerome; Christl, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be has been established as a weathering and erosion proxy where meteoric 10Be/9Be ratios in reactive phases of secondary weathering products leached from detrital Amazonian river sediment were measured[1]. For this dataset, we derived a new 10Be-based mass balance, which compares the fluxes exported during erosion and weathering, Fout, calculated by the sum of [10Be]reac multiplied by gauging-derived sediment discharge and [10Be]dissmultiplied by water discharge, to the meteoric depositional flux Fin. This assessment allows evaluating the weathering state of the Amazon basin. Further, in order to assess equilibration of reactive phases in the water column, we measured (10Be/9Be)reac ratios leached from suspended sediments for two depth profiles of the Amazon (55m depth) and Madeira (12m depth) Rivers, their corresponding surface dissolved 10Be/9Be ratios, as well as dissolved ratios of smaller Amazon tributaries (Beni, Madre de Dios) to compare with published reactive ratios[1]. In these rivers, modest pH and salinity fluctuations help to constrain a 'simple' system that might however still be affected by seasonally changing isotopic compositions between water and suspended sediment[2] and seasonal fluctuations of TSS and TDS[3]. The 10Be-based mass balance shows that in Andean source areas Fout/Fin ≡1, indicating a balance between ingoing and exported flux, whereas in the Shield headwaters, Fout/Fin=0.3, indicating a combination of decay of 10Be during storage and little export of 10Be associated with particulate and dissolved loads. In central Amazonia, the export of 10Be decreases slightly relative to its atmospheric flux as evidenced by Fout/Fin=0.8 for the Amazon and Madeira Rivers. This value is interpreted as being close to steady state, but its modification could be due to additions of Shield-derived sediment to sediment carried in the main river[4]. Regarding the depth profiles, our

  3. Dynamics of erosion in a compressional mountain range revealed by 10Be paleoerosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, P.; Hoke, G. D.; Fosdick, J. C.; Wittmann, H.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understanding the evolution of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge evolution predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based landscape evolution models predict catchment-wide erosion maxima that lag behind a rock uplift pulse. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S where extensive previous work documents deformation, climate and sediment accumulation histories. Sandstone samples spanning 8.8 to 1.8 Ma were collected from the previously dated wedge-top (Iglesia) and foredeep basins (Bermejo) for quartz purification and 10Be extraction. 10Be concentrations due to burial and exhumation were estimated and subtracted from the measured concentrations and yielded the inherited 10Be concentrations, which were then corrected for sample magnetostratigraphic age. The inherited concentrations were then used to calculate paleoerosion rates. We modeled various pre-burial and post-burial exposure scenarios in order to assess potential sources of uncertainty in the recovered paleoerosion rates. The modeling results reveal that pre-burial and post-burial exposure periods only marginally affect our results. By combining the 10Be-derived paleoerosion rates and geomorphic observations with detrital zircon provenance, we document the isolation of the wedge-top basin, which was later reconnected by an upstream migrating pulse of erosion in a process that was directly controlled by thrust activity and base level. The data further indicate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags maximum rates of deformation and subsidence over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic

  4. Cosmogenic 10Be constraints on Little Ice Age glacial advances in the eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon; Liu, Gengnian; Yi, Chaolu; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-04-01

    Presumed Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances, represented by a set of fresh, sharp-crested, boulder covered and compact moraines a few hundred meters downstream from modern glaciers, have been widely recognized in the Central Asian highlands. However, few studies have constrained the formation ages of these moraines. We report 31 10Be exposure ages from presumed LIA moraines in six glacial valleys in the Urumqi River headwater area and the Haxilegen Pass area of the eastern Tian Shan, China. Our results reveal that the maximum LIA glacial extent occurred mainly around 430 ± 100 yr, a cold and wet period as indicated by proxy data from ice cores, tree rings, and lake sediments in Central Asia. We also dated a later glacial advance to 270 ± 55 yr. However, 10Be exposure ages on several presumed LIA moraines in front of small, thin glaciers are widely scattered and much older than the globally recognized timing of the LIA. Historical topographic maps indicate that most glaciers were more extensive in the early 1960s, and two of our 10Be sample sites were located close to the ice front at that time. Boulders transported by these small and thin glaciers may be reworked from deposits originally formed prior to the LIA glacial advances, producing apparently old and widely scattered exposure ages due to varied nuclide inheritance. Other published ages indicated an earlier LIA advance around 790 ± 300 yr in the easternmost Tian Shan, but in our study area the more extensive advance around 430 ± 100 yr likely reworked or covered deposits from this earlier event.

  5. Particle trajectories on hillslopes: Implications for particle age and 10Be structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-09-01

    Many geomorphic systems act as conveyor belts onto which material is loaded at a particular rate and is transported in one direction toward another system that serves as a sink. As the material travels, it ages, it changes in grain size, it accumulates cosmogenic radionuclides, it adsorbs or releases nutrients, and it weathers. Here I address the hillslope conveyor. As many geochemical processes are depth-dependent, the depth history of a particle becomes important to know. I calculate soil particle trajectories in the horizontal-depth plane and address three cases, one in which horizontal speeds decline exponentially with depth, a second in which they are uniform with depth, and a third in which horizontal speeds are also uniform but all profile values are vertically well-mixed. Vertical speeds are governed by continuity in an incompressible medium and by the boundary condition of zero vertical particle speed at the soil surface. Particle trajectories must therefore become surface parallel at the surface. Knowledge of soil particle trajectories allows calculation of residence times and concentration profiles of 10Be in the soil. The results inform strategies for interpretation of nuclide concentrations in soils and stream sediments and for inference of transport rate profiles. In all steady cases, the particle age and 10Be structure are uniform with distance from the divide. When significant vertical gradients in horizontal speed occur, the patterns of particle age and of 10Be concentration are dominated by the depth scale of the transport process. In unmixed cases, the particle age and 10Be concentration in near-surface samples can greatly exceed the vertically averaged values, reflecting the fact that the vertical speeds of particles slow dramatically as they near the surface. In cases in which horizontal speed varies significantly with depth, the vertically averaged concentration of 10Be within the soil can significantly underpredict the mean 10Be concentration

  6. Headwall erosion rates from cosmogenic (10) Be in supraglacial debris, Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Dirk; Egholm, David

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are widespread within the Himalaya and other steep mountain ranges. They testify to active erosion of ice-free bedrock hillslopes that tower above valley glaciers, sometimes more than 1 km high. It is long known that debris cover significantly reduces surface ablation rates and thereby influences glacial mass balances; but its dynamic evolution along with climatic and topographic changes is poorly studied. Better understanding the coupling of ice-free bedrock hillslopes and glaciers in steep mountains requires means to assess headwall erosion rates. Here, we present headwall erosion rates derived from 10Be concentrations in the ablation-dominated medial moraine of the Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya. We combine our empirical, field-based approach with a numerical model of headwall erosion and glacial debris transport to assess permissible patterns of headwall erosion on the ice-free bedrock hillslopes surrounding the Chhota Shigri Glacier. Our five samples, each separated by approximately 500 m along the glacier, consist of an amalgamation of >1000 surface clasts with grain sizes between ˜1 and ˜30 mm that were taken from the medial moraine. Our results show that 10Be concentrations increase downglacier from ˜3×104 to ˜6×104 atoms g‑1, yielding headwall erosion rates of ˜1.3-0.6 mm yr‑1. The accumulation of 10Be during debris residence on the ice surface can only account for a small fraction (<20%) of the downglacier increase. Other potential explanations include (1) heterogeneous source areas with differences average productions rates, and (2) homogeneous source areas but temporally variable headwall erosion rates. We use the 10Be-derived headwall erosion rates to define debris supply rates from ice-free bedrock hillslopes in the numerical ice model iSOSIA. Headwall debris that is deposited in the ablation zone of the ice surface becomes englacial, is passively advected with the ice and emerges in the ablation zone where

  7. Headwall erosion rates from cosmogenic (10) Be in supraglacial debris, Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Dirk; Egholm, David

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are widespread within the Himalaya and other steep mountain ranges. They testify to active erosion of ice-free bedrock hillslopes that tower above valley glaciers, sometimes more than 1 km high. It is long known that debris cover significantly reduces surface ablation rates and thereby influences glacial mass balances; but its dynamic evolution along with climatic and topographic changes is poorly studied. Better understanding the coupling of ice-free bedrock hillslopes and glaciers in steep mountains requires means to assess headwall erosion rates. Here, we present headwall erosion rates derived from 10Be concentrations in the ablation-dominated medial moraine of the Chhota Shigri Glacier, Indian Himalaya. We combine our empirical, field-based approach with a numerical model of headwall erosion and glacial debris transport to assess permissible patterns of headwall erosion on the ice-free bedrock hillslopes surrounding the Chhota Shigri Glacier. Our five samples, each separated by approximately 500 m along the glacier, consist of an amalgamation of >1000 surface clasts with grain sizes between ˜1 and ˜30 mm that were taken from the medial moraine. Our results show that 10Be concentrations increase downglacier from ˜3×104 to ˜6×104 atoms g-1, yielding headwall erosion rates of ˜1.3-0.6 mm yr-1. The accumulation of 10Be during debris residence on the ice surface can only account for a small fraction (<20%) of the downglacier increase. Other potential explanations include (1) heterogeneous source areas with differences average productions rates, and (2) homogeneous source areas but temporally variable headwall erosion rates. We use the 10Be-derived headwall erosion rates to define debris supply rates from ice-free bedrock hillslopes in the numerical ice model iSOSIA. Headwall debris that is deposited in the ablation zone of the ice surface becomes englacial, is passively advected with the ice and emerges in the ablation zone where it

  8. Formation age and geomorphologic history of the Lonar impact crater deduced from in- situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, A.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sekine, Y.; Goto, K.; Komatsu, G.; Kumar, P.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsui, T.

    2013-12-01

    Impact cratering is a dominant surface modification process on planetary surfaces. In the inner solar system, the large majority of impacts occur on bodies covered by primitive igneous rocks. However, most of the impacts remaining on Earth surface are on different rock types than that of the inner planet and hence geologic knowledge derived from Earth's surface cannot be translated readily. The Lonar crater is a 1.88-km-diameter crater located on the Deccan basaltic traps in India (ca. 65 Ma), and is one of a few craters on Earth bombarded directly on basaltic lava flows. Thus, the Lonar crater provides a rare opportunity to study impact structures on the basaltic surfaces of other terrestrial planets and the Moon. Since the ages of terrestrial impact structures is a key to understand geomorphological processes after the impact, various dating methods have been applied to the Lonar Crater such as fission track (Storzer and Koeberl, 2004), radiocarbon (Maloof, 2010), thermoluminescence (Sengupta et al., 1997), and 40Ar/39Ar (Jourdan et al., 2011). Yet, a large discrepancy between these methods ranging from ca. 1.79 to 570 ka has been resulted. Here we report surface exposure ages based on in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in order to obtain a precise age of the Lonar crater formation as well as to study the geomorphologic evolution. The samples are collected from the topographic highs on the rim of the crater and from the ejecta blanket. Exposure ages together with newly obtained radiocarbon age of pre-impact soil indicate much younger ages than that of obtained from 40Ar/39Ar method. This suggests the potential bias because of inherited 40Ar in impact glass. Systematically young exposure age from the rim samples compared to the samples from the ejecta blanket indicate that the rim of the Lonar crater is being actively eroded. Spatial distributions of geomorphic ages observed from the Lonar creator is not the same as the pattern reported from the well

  9. Dating offset fans along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault using cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, A.; Schwartz, D.P.; Finkel, R.; Clemmens, S.; Hanks, T.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in samples collected from exposed boulders (n = 20) and from buried sediment (n = 3) from offset fans along the San Andreas fault near Little Rock, California, yielded ages, ranging from 16 to 413 ka, which increase with distance from their source at the mouth of Little Rock Creek. In order to determine the age of the relatively younger fans, the erosion rate of the boulders and the cosmogenic nuclide inheritance from exposure prior to deposition in the fan were established. Cosmogenic nuclide inheritance values that range between 8.5 ?? 103 and 196 ?? 103 atoms 10Be g-1 quartz were determined by measuring the concentrations and ratios of 10Be and 26Al in boulders (n = 10) and fine sediment (n = 7) at the outlet of the present active stream. Boulder erosion rate, ranging between 17 and 160 mm k.y.-1, was estimated by measuring 10Be and 26Al concentrations in nearby bedrock outcrops (n = 8). Since the boulders on the fans represent the most resistant rocks in this environment, we used the lowest rate for the age calculations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine ages of 16 ?? 5 and 29 ?? 7 ka for the two younger fan surfaces. Older fans (older than 100 ka) were dated by analyzing 10Be and 26Al concentrations in buried sand samples. The ages of the three oldest fans range between 227 ?? 242 and 413 ?? 185 ka. Although fan age determinations are accompanied by large uncertainties, the results of this study show a clear trend of increasing fan ages with increasing distance from the source near Little Rock Creek and provide a long-term slip rate along this section of the San Andreas fault. Slip rate along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault for the past 413 k.y. can be determined in several ways. The average slip rate calculated from the individual fan ages is 4.2 ?? 0.9 cm yr-1. A linear regression through the data points implies a slip rate of 3.7 ?? 1.0 cm yr-1. A most probable slip rate of 3.0 ?? 1.0 cm yr-1 is

  10. Surface-exposure ages of Front Range moraines that may have formed during the Younger Dryas, 8.2 cal ka, and Little Ice Age events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Madole, R.; Kubik, P.; McDonald, R.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-exposure (10Be) ages have been obtained on boulders from three post-Pinedale end-moraine complexes in the Front Range, Colorado. Boulder rounding appears related to the cirque-to-moraine transport distance at each site with subrounded boulders being typical of the 2-km-long Chicago Lakes Glacier, subangular boulders being typical of the 1-km-long Butler Gulch Glacier, and angular boulders being typical of the few-hundred-m-long Isabelle Glacier. Surface-exposure ages of angular boulders from the Isabelle Glacier moraine, which formed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) according to previous lichenometric dating, indicate cosmogenic inheritance values ranging from 0 to ???3.0 10Be ka.11Surface-exposure ages in this paper are labeled 10Be; radiocarbon ages are labeled 14C ka, calendar and calibrated radiocarbon ages are labeled cal ka, and layer-based ice-core ages are labeled ka. 14C ages, calibrated 14C ages, and ice core ages are given relative to AD 1950, whereas 10Be ages are given relative to the sampling date. Radiocarbon ages were calibrated using CALIB 5.01 and the INTCAL04 data base Stuiver et al. (2005). Ages estimated using CALIB 5.01 are shown in terms of their 1-sigma range. Subangular boulders from the Butler Gulch end moraine yielded surface-exposure ages ranging from 5 to 10.2 10Be ka. We suggest that this moraine was deposited during the 8.2 cal ka event, which has been associated with outburst floods from Lake Agassiz and Lake Ojibway, and that the large age range associated with the Butler Gulch end moraine is caused by cosmogenic shielding of and(or) spalling from boulders that have ages in the younger part of the range and by cosmogenic inheritance in boulders that have ages in the older part of the range. The surface-exposure ages of eight of nine subrounded boulders from the Chicago Lakes area fall within the 13.0-11.7 10Be ka age range, and appear to have been deposited during the Younger Dryas interval. The general lack of inheritance in

  11. Constraints on the sedimentation history of San Francisco Bay from 14C and 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanGeen, A.; Valette-Silver, N. J.; Luoma, S.N.; Fuller, C.C.; Baskaran, M.; Tera, F.; Klein, J.

    1999-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization around San Francisco Bay as well as mining and agriculture in the watersheds of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers have profoundly modified sedimentation patterns throughout the estuary. We provide some constraints on the onset of these erosional disturbances with 10Be data for three sediment cores: two from Richardson Bay, a small embayment near the mouth of San Francisco Bay, and one from San Pablo Bay, mid-way between the river delta and the mouth. Comparison of pre-disturbance sediment accumulation determined from three 14C-dated mollusk shells in one Richardson Bay core with more recent conditions determined from the distribution of 210Pb and 234Th [Fuller, C.C., van Geen, A., Baskaran, M, Anima, R.J., 1999. Sediment chronology in San Francisco Bay, California, defined by 210Pb, 234Th, 239,240Pu.] shows that the accumulation rate increased by an order of magnitude at this particular site. All three cores from San Francisco Bay show subsurface maxima in 10Be concentrations ranging in magnitude from 170 to 520 x 106 atoms/g. The transient nature of the increased 10Be input suggests that deforestation and agricultural develop- ment caused basin-wide erosion of surface soils enriched in 10Be. probably before the turn of the century.

  12. Arctic ocean water mass distribution and particle flux from dissolved 10Be and 9Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Porcelli, D.; Andersson, P.; Halliday, A. N.; Kubik, P. W.; Hattendorf, B.; Guenther, D.

    2003-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean basin is confined by landmasses similar to the Mediterranean. There is only little deep water formed seasonally on the shelves of the Arctic Ocean despite the low temperatures. This is due to a freshwater lid at the surface which originates from the Arctic rivers. The deeper Arctic Ocean water masses can thus only be renewed at comparatively low rates via the only deep connection to the Atlantic Ocean, the Fram Strait. At the same time the biogenic particulate fluxes in the central Arctic Ocean are very low due to perennial sea ice cover and detrital particle fluxes from either eolian or riverine sources are also very low. We will present the first combined dissolved 10Be (cosmogenic) and ^9Be (continental sources) depth profiles from water samples of the major deep basins of the Arctic Ocean collected during the Swedish Arctic Ocean 2001 expedition. Be is 5-10 times less particle-reactive than other previously investigated radionuclides such as Th or Pa and should therefore even at the relatively low Arctic Ocean renewal rates serve as a quasi-conservative tracer for different origins of water masses (Atlantic Ocean/Norwegian Sea, Pacific Ocean, Arctic Shelves). ^9Be and Nd isotope analyses provide complementary information to cosmogenic 10Be on the pathways of dissolved material originating from the Arctic continents. Results obtained ten years ago at similar locations as in our study indicated a uniform distribution of 10Be at low values of 500±100 atoms/g suggesting restricted input and efficient homogenisation. In contrast, our new results show that in 2001 the inflowing waters from the Atlantic are traced by 10Be concentrations of up to 1100 atoms/g. Preliminary measurements indicate relatively low ^9Be concentrations around 10 pMol/litre resulting in 10Be/^9Be ratios of ˜ 1 x 10-7 in the deep Arctic Ocean. In addition, the surface 10Be concentrations vary considerably. It will be discussed wether this is a consequence of a seasonal

  13. 10Be Content in Suevite Breccia from the Bosumtwi Impact Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: According to the current understanding of meteorite impact processes, surface target material is transported from a crater in the form of ejecta or is vaporized/melted (e.g., [1]). The formation model of tektites from the surface of the target rocks has been established using the 10Be content of tektites (e.g., [2]), and chemical comparison with the possible target surface material (e.g., [3]); it was also reproduced by computer modeling (e.g., [4]). On the other hand, some observations ([5, 6]) suggest that part of the surface material may be incorporated into the crater-fill. The aim of this study is to check if surface-derived material is present in suevitic breccias to better understand formation mechanisms of fallback breccias. Also, 10Be can be used to trace contamination of rocks in the top layer of the suevitic layer by meteoric (lake) water. This abstract is an update (based on more data now available) of the previous report presented during the Metsoc75 conference. Samples: The Bosumtwi crater was chosen as study site because of its relatively large size (10.5 km in diameter), young age of 1.07 Ma [7], good state of preservation, and availability of core samples. Clasts from suevitic breccia selected for this study come from the LB-07A and LB-08A cores that are located within the crater and represent fallback breccia (e.g., [7]). Of 41 analyzed samples (22 single clasts and 21 matrix samples - 11 of those being monomictic breccia), 36 came from core LB-07A (in the zone outside the central uplift) and represent depths of 333.7 - 407.9 m and 5 are from core LB-08A (on the flank of the central uplift) from depths 239.5 - 264.9 m. Methods: For each sample, 0.8 g of finely grounded material from clasts containing in situ produced and meteoric 10Be was dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 by microwave digestion. A 9Be carrier (1 mg or 0.6 mg, 10Be/9Be ratio: 2.82±0.31*10-15 [2? uncertainty]) was added to the sample, and then Be was chemically

  14. Eroding and Inflating the Atacama Desert, Chile: Insights Through Cosmogenic 10-Be, 26-Al and 21-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimsath, A. M.; Jungers, M. C.; Amundson, R.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Enigmas of the Atacama Desert are as abundant as the hypotheses formulated to explain them. This fascinating and extreme landscape attracts scientists from disparate disciplines, spawning remarkable insights into the connections between climate, tectonics, biota and landscape evolution. Recent work explores such connections on timescales ranging from millions to thousands of years. Both the timing of the onset of hyperaridity in the Atacama and its relationship to the uplift of the Andes are especially well-debated topics. Similarly enigmatic, but less widely studied, are the connections between the timing of hyperaridity and the surface morphology of the region. Specifically, the extent, nature, and timing of formation for the extensive salars across the Atacama are undeniably linked to the climate history of the region. Adjacent to the extensive salars are landscapes that appear to be shaped by processes more typically associated with temperate landscapes: rilling and gullying, extensive terrace deposition, steep fault scarps, landslide deposits, and extensive fan and paleosurface deposits. Our primary goal in this project is to establish chronologies and rates for the surface processes driving landscape evolution for two field regions in the Atacama. To achieve this goal we are also testing and expanding upon the burial dating methodology (Balco and Shuster, 2009) that couples the stable cosmogenic nuclide, 21Ne, with the radiogenic nuclides, 10Be and 26Al. Here we present new results from remarkably different field settings from the north-central Atacama. The southern region, inland from Antofagasta, is relatively well studied to determine how the onset of hyperaridity impacted water-driven processes. The northern region, north of the Rio Loa and Calama, differs most notably by the enormous basin fills of salt (e.g. Salar de Llamara and Salar Grande) and evidence of more extensive recently active salars. Across both regions we use in 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne to

  15. TRANSFER OF PESTICIDES FROM SURFACES TO FOODS FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since small children spend much of their time in contact with contaminated surfaces, residues of pesticides found on floors and other surfaces contribute to their aggregate exposures. Any dislodgeable pesticide residues on hands and surfaces may be transferred to foods while bei...

  16. Atrazine and total triazines: Exposure patterns in midwestern surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.P.; Baker, D.B.

    1996-10-01

    Distributions of atrazine and total triazine exposures for aquatic organisms in the midwestern United States and Canada were characterized using the most complete datasets available, with attention to the sampling pattern used in obtaining the data. Distributions were established form stantaneous concentrations and for 96-hour and 21-day running averages. Time weighting and annualization were important to avoid distorted estimates of exposure concentrations; failure to use appropriate procedures can lead to order-of-magnitude errors in estimates of benchmarks such as the 90th percentile concentration. Atrazine and total triazine concentrations are characterized by strong seasonality, with elevated concentrations for a period of 6 to 10 weeks following application in May or June. Concentrations decline during July, August, and September, and for the rest of the year are near detection limit. Concentrations in running water are strongly influenced by storm runoff, with much higher concentrations during run off than during low-flow periods between run off events. Thus aquatic organisms in running waters experience pulsed exposures interspersed with recovery periods. 90th percentile concentrations were calculated for a number of rivers, streams, lakes, and reservoirs for comparison with ecological effects data. Total triazine concentrations are only slightly higher than atrazine concentrations in those waters for which comparisons were possible.

  17. Influence of reflected UV irradiance on occupational exposure from combinations of reflective wall surfaces.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joanna; Parisi, Alfio V

    2013-09-01

    Outdoor workers who occupationally spend large periods of time exposed to ultraviolet irradiance are at increased risk of developing certain types of non-melanoma skin cancer in addition to being prone to erythema and eye damage. UV exposure to workers is affected by a number of factors including geographic location, season, individual biological factors and the local surroundings. Urban environments can provide surrounds that contain surfaces that reflect UV radiation which can enhance UV exposure to construction workers, in both the vertical as well as horizontal plane. However it was unknown how different constructed configurations of the surfaces may additionally influence UV exposure for a worker, such as corners opposed to walls. This study shows that for highly UV reflective surfaces the influence on erythemal UV exposure is approximately the same regardless of constructive type, but there is statistically significant difference observed for lower UV reflecting surfaces in conjunction with constructive type. This is comparable to influence of body site on relative UV exposure, and together may provide a method that may assist in reduction in UV exposures. Regression analysis provides a more effective means to determine a UV reflective factor for a surface type, than previously used averaging methods. Additionally, this knowledge may be used by workers, workplaces and advisory bodies to assist with developing further protective strategies that aim to provide more moderate UV exposures to outdoor workers.

  18. Molecules production/losses on surfaces under plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.

    2008-10-01

    The production/losses of molecules on surfaces such as walls plasma reactors is interesting for numerous applications but especially for plasma/catalyst coupling used in air treatment devices. The processes like adsorption, desorption, surface production or destruction of molecules on different surfaces are crucial to understand the kinetics of molecule oxidation by air plasma. These mechanisms are studied for C2H2, NO and NO2 molecules in a low pressure discharge (1mbar) in a 50 cm long tube with IR tunable diodes to perform time resolved in situ measurements during the plasma ``on'' phase as well as after switching off the plasma.Surfaces are treated by different plasmas (capacitive or DC discharge) in Ar, O2, N2 or air, for several pretreatment durations, injected powers, with pulsed or continuous plasma. These parameters are used to separate cleaning of adsorption sites from adsorption of reacting species which could both induce losses of molecules considered on surface. After these different pre-treatment procedures, two kinds of experiments are made:i)the study of molecule losses on pre-treated surfaces by introducing a controled amount of molecules in the closed tube reactor; this gives information about the adsorption of the introduced molecule on vacant sites or its reactivity with species already adsorbed during the pre-treatment ii)the production of molecules by a N2 or O2 plasma reacting with species adsorbed on wall during pretreatment.

  19. Flint mining in prehistory recorded by in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be.

    PubMed

    Verri, G; Barkai, R; Bordeanu, C; Gopher, A; Hass, M; Kaufman, A; Kubik, P; Montanari, E; Paul, M; Ronen, A; Weiner, S; Boaretto, E

    2004-05-25

    The development of mining to acquire the best raw materials for producing stone tools represents a breakthrough in human technological and intellectual development. We present a new approach to studying the history of flint mining, using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations. We show that the raw material used to manufacture flint artifacts approximately 300,000 years old from Qesem Cave (Israel) was most likely surface-collected or obtained from shallow quarries, whereas artifacts of the same period from Tabun Cave (Israel) were made of flint originating from layers 2 or more meters deep, possibly mined or quarried by humans.

  20. Analysis of the relation between exposure parameters and critical dimension by response surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Dong-Soo; Sohn, Young-Soo; Bak, Heungin; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2001-08-01

    It is important to know the relationship between the soft bake conditions and the Dill exposure parameters in order to control the lithographic process well. It has been reported that exposure parameter A can be significantly affected by the soft bake conditions, while the exposure parameters B and C show no dependency on the soft bake conditions. The exposure parameters have been considered less important in 193 nm chemically amplified resist (CAR) simulation. Since the critical dimension variation depends on the exposure parameters, if we know the relationship between them it would be helpful in developing resist and resist process. In this paper the profiles of a 193nm CAR were simulated with the various Dill exposure parameters and the results were analyzed by response surface model. The response surface methodology (RSM) approach was used to analyze the influence of independent factors on a dependent response, and to optimize each process. A method of steepest ascent was utilized to produce first-order models, which were verified by lack of fit testing. As optimum operation points were approached, a second-order model was fitted and analyzed. The Dill exposure parameter C affects critical dimension greatly whereas A and B have much less effect. Among parameters other than exposure parameters, PEB time and PEB temperature are great factors to affect critical dimension. Even small change of them can make great critical dimension changes. Process optimization for the target response value as well as process latitude was possible through the use of the response surface.

  1. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with 10Be marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Zhou, Y.; Heinola, K.; Pettersson, J.; Conroy, S.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Widdowson, A.

    2016-03-01

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a 10Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011-2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm2 sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The 10Be/9Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the 10B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4-1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  2. The effects of environmental exposure on reusable surface insulation for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, P. O.; Morrison, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Coated specimens of reusable surface insulation (RSI) were exposed to alternate radiant heating and atmospheric exposure cycles to study the effects of surface contamination on the RSI coating. Different methods of heating were employed on clean and artificially contaminated specimens to determine the contributions of heating conditions to coating devitrification.

  3. Surface exposure dating of moraines and alluvial fans in the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; García Morabito, Ezequiel; Haghipour, Negar; Christl, Marcus; Likermann, Jeremías; Tobal, Jonathan; Yamin, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    The role of tectonics versus climate in controlling the evolution of alluvial fans in discussed controversially. The southern Central Andes and their forelands provide a perfect setting to study climate versus tectonic control of alluvial fans. On the one hand, the region is tectonically active and alluvial fan surfaces are offset by faults. The higher summits, on the other hand, are glaciated today, and glacial deposits document past periods of lower temperatures and increased precipitation. We applied 10Be surface exposure dating on 5 fan terraces 4 moraines of the Ansilta range (31.6°S - 69.8°W) using boulders and amalgamated pebbles to explore their chronological relationship. From youngest to oldest, the alluvial fan terraces yield minimum ages of 15 ± 1 ka (T1), 97 ± 9 ka (T2), 141 ± 9 ka (T3), 286 ± 14 ka (T4) and 570 ± 57 ka (T5). Minimum ages derived from moraines are 14 ± 1 ka (M1), 22 ± 2 ka (M2), 157 ± 14 ka (M3) and 351 ± 33 ka (M4), all calculations assuming no erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. The moraines document glacial advances during cold periods at the marine isotope stages (MIS) 2, 6 and 10. The terraces T1, T3 seem to be geomorphologic counterparts during MIS 2 and 6. We suggest that T2, T4 and T5 document aggradation during the cold periods MIS 5d, 8 and 14 in response to glacial advances, although the respective moraines are not preserved. Our results highlight: i) the arid climate in the Southern Central Andes favors the preservation of glacial and alluvial deposits allowing landscape and climate reconstructions back to ~570 ka), ii) alluvial deposits correlate with moraines or fall into cold glacial times, so that climate, and in particular the existence of glaciers, seems to be the main forcing of alluvial fan formation at our study site. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary

  4. 10Be and U-series dating of late Quaternary landforms along the southern San Jacinto fault: Implications for temporal slip rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Fletcher, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Robust age control on faulted landforms with well-constrained offsets is essential to documenting the heterogeneous behavior of a fault zone over time. However, showing late Quaternary temporal slip rate variation is often challenging due to the difficultly of obtaining reliable ages for Quaternary deposits. Exposure ages from cosmogenic isotopes can be significantly affected by surface processes, and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate provides only minimum ages because carbonate accumulation occurs after deposition. Fortunately, the controlling factors for the resulting age uncertainties of each method are relatively independent from each other, so a combination of cosmogenic isotope and U-series dating may significantly improve the reliability of landform dating and yield more robust slip rate estimates. We present preliminary results of this dual-dating approach at 4 sites along the southern San Jacinto fault zone in California: 2 sites along the Coyote Creek fault, and 2 sites along the Clark fault. These results show age agreement between the two dating methods. Along the southern Clark fault, a 10Be depth profile model age of 34.5 ±6.6 ka and a U-series age of 33.2 ±1.1 ka were obtained for an offset Q2b fan surface, and a Q3b surface yielded a weighted mean 10Be surface exposure age of 5.9 ±1.5 ka, similar to an U-series age of 6.3 ±0.4 ka. Along the northern Coyote Creek fault, preliminary data indicate a 10Be surface exposure age of 11.3 ±3.4 ka and a U-series age of 11.7 ±1.8 ka for an offset Q3a surface, and a 10Be surface exposure age of 6.9 ±1.0 ka and a U-series age of 7.8 ± 0.9 ka for an offset Q3b surface. The remarkable consistency among ages from the two dating methods suggest that: (1) U-series ages of pedogenic carbonate clast rinds closely approach depositional ages of the host alluvium; (2) erosion may be negligible at the sampled sites; and (3) inherited 10Be has been accurately quantified (via depth profile) for the late

  5. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  6. Geltape method for measurement of work related surface contamination with cobalt containing dust: correlation between surface contamination and airborne exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, O M; Olsen, E; Christensen, J M; Vinzent, P; Petersen, O H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The geltape method is a new method for optical measurement of total amount of dust on surfaces. The objectives were to study the potential applicability of this method to measurements of work related cobalt exposure during painting of plates with cobalt dye. METHODS--Consecutive series of work related geltape prints were taken from surfaces inside and outside the ventilation cabins of two plate painters during two full working days. The amount of dust picked up by the geltapes was measured optically with a field monitor. Also, personal air samples were collected on filters at the different work processes. In the laboratory the contents of cobalt on the geltape prints and the filters were measured with inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. RESULTS--The key results were: (a) when the geltape prints were taken from surfaces inside the cabins the optically measured area of the geltapes covered with total dust (area (%)) correlated well with the chemically measured amount of cobalt present on the geltapes. Linear correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.91 for geltape prints taken on the floor and 0.94 for prints taken on the ceiling; (b) the cumulative airborne cobalt exposure, calculated from data on work related exposure by personal sampling, correlated with the area (%) of geltape prints taken from the ceiling of the cabin (R2 = 0.98); (c) the geltape method could be used to distinguish both between work processes with different levels of cobalt exposure, and between plate painters subjected to significant differences in airborne cobalt exposure. CONCLUSION--The geltape method could produce measures of the work related exposures as well as whole day exposure for cobalt. The geltape results correlated with measurements of personal airborne cobalt exposure. In this industry the profile of exposure is well-defined in time, and it seems reasonable to apply this fast and low cost method in routine exposure surveillance to obtain a more detailed

  7. Evolution of surface stress during oxygen exposure of clean Si(111), Si(100), and amorphous Si surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Flötotto, D. Wang, Z. M.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2014-01-14

    The evolutions of the surface stress of Si(111)-7 × 7, Si(100)-2 × 1, and a-Si surfaces upon oxygen exposure at pO{sub 2} = 1 × 10{sup −4} Pa and room temperature have been investigated in a comparative manner using a specimen-curvature based technique. To this end, a generally applicable, dedicated set of experiments has been devised and performed to deduce and correct for the surface stress change owing to oxygen reaction(s) at the (poorly-defined) back face of the specimen only. On this basis, it could be demonstrated that exposure of clean Si(111)-7 × 7, Si(100)-2 × 1 and a-Si surfaces to pure oxygen gas results in compressive surface stress changes for all three surfaces due to the incorporation of oxygen into Si backbonds. The measured surface stress change decreases with decreasing atomic packing density at the clean Si surfaces, which complies well with the less-densily packed Si surface regions containing more free volume for the accommodation of adsorbed O atoms.

  8. Detrital 10Be Response to the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake and Quantifying Evacuation of Coseismic Landslide Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Godard, V.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Scherler, D.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xie, K.; Bellier, O.; Bourles, D. L.; Ansberque, C.

    2014-12-01

    In reverse fault-bounded high relief mountain ranges, large-magnitude earthquakes contribute to the topographic growth by co- and inter-seismic surface uplift on the hanging wall. Meanwhile, they also trigger widespread landslides along ridge lines or hillslopes. Coseismic landsliding lowers relief and causes a phase of high erosion in the period following the quake. The net effect of large-magnitude earthquakes in topographic evolution of active orogens partially depends on how fast the landslide debris are being evacuated out of the mountain range. The 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, China activated the Longmen Shan reverse fault system in eastern Tibetan plateau, also induced enormous amount of landslides, volume comparable to the coseismic uplift, providing an excellent opportunity to address the question. We use cosmogenic 10Be concentration in river sand as a tracer to study the sediment routing process of coseismic landslide debris, because landslide debris contains low 10Be concentration. We sampling annually during 2008-2013, at 19 locations along the rivers that traverse the fault ruptures, with upstream catchment area varying between 4.4 km2 and 21775 km2, including 10 catchments sampled before Wenchuan earthquake in 2004 and 2005. A comparison with pre-earthquake measurements show reduced 10Be concentration at all sites. This dilution is more significant for small catchments on short range-front rivers: mostly half to one-fourth, and down to one-fifth in some cases. Multi-year time series of 10Be concentration at single sites show roughly constant level of dilution six years after the quake, with moderate temporal fluctuations, which may be related to the variation in precipitation and storm intensity. Under the assumption of constant dilution rate and a depth-mixing of 10Be concentration for landslide input, a simple calculation indicates it would take ~ 200 to 3000 years to completely evacuate the landslides debris within range-front transverse rivers

  9. Erosion rates and landscape evolution of the lowlands of the Upper Paraguay river basin (Brazil) from cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupim, Fabiano do Nascimento; Bierman, Paul R.; Assine, Mario Luis; Rood, Dylan H.; Silva, Aguinaldo; Merino, Eder Renato

    2015-04-01

    The importance of Earth's low sloping areas in regard to global erosion and sediment fluxes has been widely and vigorously debated. It is a crucial area of research to elucidate geologically meaningful rates of land-surface change and thus the speed of element cycling on Earth. However, there are large portions of Earth where erosion rates have not been well or extensively measured, for example, the tropical lowlands. The Cuiabana lowlands are an extensive low-altitude and low-relief dissected metamorphic terrain situated in the Upper Paraguay river basin, central-west Brazil. Besides exposures of highly variable dissected metamorphic rocks, flat residual lateritic caps related to a Late Cenozoic planation surface dominate interfluves of the Cuiabana lowlands. The timescale over which the lowlands evolved and the planation surface developed, and the rate at which they have been modified by erosion, are poorly known. Here, we present measurements of in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be in outcropping metamorphic bedrock and clastic-lateritic caps to quantify rates of erosion of the surface and associated landforms in order to better understand the Quaternary landscape evolution of these lowlands. Overall, slow erosion rates (mean 10 m/Ma) suggest a stable tectonic environment in these lowlands. Erosion rates vary widely between different lithologies (range 0.57 to 28.3 m/Ma) consistent with differential erosion driving regional landform evolution. The lowest erosion rates are associated with the low-relief area (irregular plains), where clastic-laterite (mean 0.67 m/Ma) and quartzite (mean 2.6 m/Ma) crop out, whereas the highest erosion rates are associated with dissection of residual hills, dominated by metasandstone (mean 11.6 m/Ma) and phyllite (mean 27.6 m/Ma). These data imply that the Cuiabana lowland is comprised of two dominant landform sets with distinct and different dynamics. Because the planation surface (mostly lowlands) is lowering and losing mass more

  10. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect

  11. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of

  12. Modification of the Surface Properties of Polyimide Films using POSS Deposition and Oxygen Plasma Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Ghose, Sayata; Connell, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Topographically rich surfaces were generated by spray-coating organic solutions of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, octakis (dimethylsilyloxy) silsesquioxane (POSS), on Kapton HN films and exposing them to radio frequency generated oxygen plasma. Changes in both surface chemistry and topography were observed. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy indicated substantial modification of the POSS-coated polyimide surface topographies as a result of oxygen plasma exposure. Water contact angles varied from 104 deg for unexposed POSS-coated surfaces to approximately 5 deg, for samples exposed for 5 h. Modulation of the dispersive and polar contributions to the surface energy was determined using van Oss Good Chaudhury theory.

  13. Millennial Rates of Sea Cliff Retreat Derived From Cosmogenic 10Be and Coastal Platform Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, M. D.; Ellis, M. A.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observation of cliff erosion are often limited to relatively short timescales (a few decades), which are within the timeframe of anthropogenic modification of the coast and may be shorter than the recurrence interval for erosion events. Here we present long-term (centennial-millennial) averaged rates of sea cliff retreat for chalk cliffs in SE England derived from cosmogenic isotopes and coastal morphology. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in situ flint samples collected from three transects across the coastal platform in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate averaged over several hundred years. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. Additionally, we use high-resolution (1m) multibeam bathymetry to map the extent of the coastal platform based on the surface texture in order to infer the position of the coast at ~8 ka. The difference in position to the current coastline provides estimates of Holocene-averaged rates of cliff erosion for all chalk cliffed coastline in the region. Comparison to historic records of cliff retreat reveals key similarities and differences between long and short-term signals. In certain locations, there are significant discrepancies (either faster or slower) between historic records and long-term rates of retreat. Each type of discrepancy may be the result of human interaction with the coastal environment, whether that interaction is local or non-local, and it is worthwhile noting that sites of relatively low historic rates of erosion are likely subject to high-magnitude, low-frequency failure events that could have devastating effects on human lives and infrastructure in areas that are considered to be low risk.

  14. Effect of Atomic Oxygen Exposure on Surface Resistivity Change of Spacecraft Insulator Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundari, Noor Danish Ahrar; Khan, Arifur Rahman; Chiga, Masaru; Okumura, Teppei; Masui, Hirokazu; Iwata, Minoru; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Cho, Mengu

    Spacecraft surface charging can lead to arcing and a loss of electricity generation capability in solar panels or even loss of a satellite. The charging problem may be further aggravated by atomic oxygen (AO) exposure in Low Earth orbits, which modifies the surface of materials like polyimide, Teflon, anti-reflective coatings, cover glass etc, used on satellite surfaces, affecting materials properties, such as resistivity, secondary electron emissivity and photo emission, which govern the charging behavior. These properties are crucial input parameters for spacecraft charging analysis. To study the AO exposure effect on charging governing properties, an atomic oxygen exposure facility based on laser detonation of oxygen was built. The facility produces AO with a peak velocity value around 10-12km/s and a higher flux than that existing in orbit. After exposing the polyimide test material to the equivalent of 10 years of AO fluence at an altitude of 700-800 km, surface charging properties like surface resistivity and volume resistivity were measured. The measurement was performed in a vacuum using the charge storage decay method at room temperature, which is considered the most appropriate for measuring resistivity for space applications. The results show that the surface resistivity increases and the volume resistivity remains almost the same for the AO exposure fluence of 5.4×1018 atoms cm-2.

  15. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne; Clowdsley, Martha; Qualls, Garry; Blattnig, Steve; Lee, Kerry; Fry, Dan; Stoffle, Nicholas; Simonsen, Lisa; Slaba, Tony; Walker, Steven; Zapp, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large Solar Particle Event (SPE). Longer duration missions have both SPE and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) risks. SPE exposure can contribute significantly toward cancer induction in combination with GCR. As mission duration increases, mitigation strategies must address the combined risks from SPE and GCR exposure. In this paper, full mission exposure assessments were performed for the proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, previously developed radiation shielding models for a proposed lunar habitat and rover were utilized. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for the proposed timelines. Mission exposure results, assessed in terms of effective dose, are presented for the proposed timelines and recommendations are made for improved astronaut shielding and safer operational practices.

  16. Radiation exposure to the orbiting lunar station and lunar surface related to reusable nuclear shuttle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation environment created by the Reusable Nuclear Vehicle (RNS) in performing its normal mission functions while in the lunar vicinity and the impact of that environment on the Orbiting Lunar Station (OLS) and/or the lunar surface are examined. Lunar surface exposures from the operating reactor were evaluated for both the arrival and departure burns and while there is little probability that manned bases would lie along the paths in which measurable exposures would be recorded, the analyses do indicate the need to consider this possibility in planning such operations. Conclusions supported by the analyses and recommended operational constraints for the RNS are presented.

  17. Bone surface deposition of /sup 241/Am in a person with occupational exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.; Kathren, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    We have measured the /sup 241/Am concentrations in the vicinity of bone surfaces in 11 samples of cortical bone from a man whose occupational exposure occurred 25 to 27 years before death. Concentrations in bone surface deposits ranged between 44 and 185 Bq/cm/sup 3/; concentrations in subjacent bone ranged between 0 and 8.4 Bq/cm/sup 3/. Thicknesses of the bone surface deposits were in the range 0.6 to 1.2 ..mu..m. An analysis of dose rates indicates that bone surface deposits contributed 40% or more of the terminal dose rate to bone surface tissues. Half-lives for the reduction of bone surface concentrations are estimated at 4.8 to 24 years, compared with the 100-year estimates obtained by using current ICRP methodologies. These data are important for the estimation of the dose rate to bone surface tissues for radiation protection. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Malespin, C; Mahaffy, P; Grotzinger, J P; Vasconcelos, P M; Milliken, R E; Malin, M; Edgett, K S; Pavlov, A A; Hurowitz, J A; Grant, J A; Miller, H B; Arvidson, R; Beegle, L; Calef, F; Conrad, P G; Dietrich, W E; Eigenbrode, J; Gellert, R; Gupta, S; Hamilton, V; Hassler, D M; Lewis, K W; McLennan, S M; Ming, D; Navarro-González, R; Schwenzer, S P; Steele, A; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Vaniman, D; Vasavada, A; Williford, K; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F

    2014-01-24

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced (3)He, (21)Ne, and (36)Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  19. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  20. In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Malespin, C; Mahaffy, P; Grotzinger, J P; Vasconcelos, P M; Milliken, R E; Malin, M; Edgett, K S; Pavlov, A A; Hurowitz, J A; Grant, J A; Miller, H B; Arvidson, R; Beegle, L; Calef, F; Conrad, P G; Dietrich, W E; Eigenbrode, J; Gellert, R; Gupta, S; Hamilton, V; Hassler, D M; Lewis, K W; McLennan, S M; Ming, D; Navarro-González, R; Schwenzer, S P; Steele, A; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Vaniman, D; Vasavada, A; Williford, K; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F

    2014-01-24

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced (3)He, (21)Ne, and (36)Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation. PMID:24324273

  1. POTENTIAL INHALATION EXPOSURE TO VOLATILE CHEMICALS IN WATER-BASED HARD-SURFACE CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential inhalation exposure of building occupants to volatile chemicals in water-based hard-surface cleaners was evaluated by analyzing 267 material safety data sheets (MSDSs). Among the 154 chemicals reported, 44 are volatile or semi-volatile. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) r...

  2. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  3. In Situ-produced vs. Meteoric 10Be in Hillslope Soils: One Isotope, Two Tracers, Different Stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungers, M. C.; Bierman, P. R.; Matmon, A.; Cox, R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    In situ-produced and meteoric 10Be are both powerful tools for tracing the production and transport of hillslope sediment. In situ-produced 10Be is used to infer sediment production rates as well as investigate sediment sources and transport. Meteoric 10Be may also be useful for inferring sediment production and transport rates in some landscapes, especially those that lack the target minerals for in situ-produced 10Be. Few studies have investigated the insights gained by a comparing in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be inventories. We present a series of paired 10Be inventories from different climatic and tectonic regimes to illustrate both the value and the potential pitfalls of coupling these geomorphic tracers. The mean in situ and meteoric 10Be near surface (within a meter) inventories for our field areas are as follows: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 3.6 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 3.3 x 1010 atoms cm-2; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.6 x 106 atoms cm-2 and 3.0 x 109 atoms cm-2; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: no in situ data and 3.87 x 1010 atoms cm-2; North Island, New Zealand: no in situ data and 1.8 x 109 atoms cm-2; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 1.86 x 107 atoms cm-2 and 8.0 x 109 atoms cm-2. The associated inferred soil residence times, respectively, are: Great Smoky Mountains, NC, USA: 40.9 ky and 25.6 ky; Laurely Fork, PA, USA: 2.9 ky and 2.3 ky; Oregon Coast Range, OR, USA: n/a and 30ky; North Island, New Zealand: n/a and 1.5 ky; and Amparafaravola, Madagascar: 21 ky and 6.2 ky. Soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be assume a global average delivery rate of 1.3 x 106 atoms cm-2 yr-1. These soil residence times are minimum values that assume that all in situ and meteoric 10Be is accounted for. Discrepancies between inferred soil residence times most likely highlight some error in assumptions regarding meteoric 10Be retention in the soil mantles that we sampled. For example, if meteoric 10Be is not retained at the near surface where we collected our samples

  4. Repeated exposure of acidic beverages on esthetic restorative materials: An in-vitro surface microhardness study

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Steffy M.; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A manifold increase in the consumption of aerated beverages has witnessed a twin increase in tooth wear and raised demand for esthetic restorative materials. This study aimed to evaluate the surface microhardness changes of esthetic restorative materials following treatment with aerated beverages in an in-vitro situation. Material and Methods The initial surface microhardness of the restorative materials GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji IX, Nano Glass ionomer, Resin and Nano composite was recorded. These materials were studied under 3 groups that included those exposed to the acidic beverages daily, weekly once in a month and those that had no exposures at all. The final surface microhardness of the materials was recorded following experimentation and was subjected to statistical comparisons. Results The restorative materials were compared for their surface microhardness changes following respective treatments using the T-test and One-way ANOVA analysis. Inter-comparisons between the groups showed statistical significance (p<.05), when treated with both the beverages. The five restorative materials revealed surface microhardness loss; the maximum reduction noticed with the Nano glass ionomer cement tested (p<.0005). Conclusions The surface microhardness of restorative materials markedly reduced upon repeated exposures with acidic beverages; the product with phosphoric acid producing the maximum surface microhardness loss. Key words:Restorative materials, acidic beverages, surface microhardness, resin composites, glass ionomers. PMID:27398183

  5. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqiu; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110mAg from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent experimental efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. The nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  6. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  7. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  8. Surface characterization of gallium nitride modified with peptides before and after exposure to ionizing radiation in solution.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Nolan, Michael W; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-12-30

    An aqueous surface modification of gallium nitride was employed to attach biomolecules to the surface. The modification was a simple two-step process using a single linker molecule and mild temperatures. The presence of the peptide on the surface was confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, the samples were placed in water baths and exposed to ionizing radiation to examine the effects of the radiation on the material in an environment similar to the body. Surface analysis confirmed degradation of the surface of GaN after radiation exposure in water; however, the peptide molecules successfully remained on the surface following exposure to ionizing radiation. We hypothesize that during radiation exposure of the samples, the radiolysis of water produces peroxide and other reactive species on the sample surface. Peroxide exposure promotes the formation of a more stable layer of gallium oxyhydroxide which passivates the surface better than other oxide species.

  9. Temporal variation of optimal UV exposure time over Korea: risks and benefits of surface UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar UV radiation in a wavelength range between 280 to 400 nm has both positive and negative influences on human body. Surface UV radiation is the main natural source of vitamin D, providing the promotion of bone and musculoskeletal health and reducing the risk of a number of cancers and other medical conditions. However, overexposure to surface UV radiation is significantly related with the majority of skin cancer, in addition other negative health effects such as sunburn, skin aging, and some forms of eye cataracts. Therefore, it is important to estimate the optimal UV exposure time, representing a balance between reducing negative health effects and maximizing sufficient vitamin D production. Previous studies calculated erythemal UV and vitamin-D UV from the measured and modelled spectral irradiances, respectively, by weighting CIE Erythema and Vitamin D3 generation functions (Kazantzidis et al., 2009; Fioletov et al., 2010). In particular, McKenzie et al. (2009) suggested the algorithm to estimate vitamin-D production UV from erythemal UV (or UV index) and determined the optimum conditions of UV exposure based on skin type Ⅱ according to the Fitzpatrick (1988). Recently, there are various demands for risks and benefits of surface UV radiation on public health over Korea, thus it is necessary to estimate optimal UV exposure time suitable to skin type of East Asians. This study examined the relationship between erythemally weighted UV (UVEry) and vitamin D weighted UV (UVVitD) over Korea during 2004-2012. The temporal variations of the ratio (UVVitD/UVEry) were also analyzed and the ratio as a function of UV index was applied in estimating the optimal UV exposure time. In summer with high surface UV radiation, short exposure time leaded to sufficient vitamin D and erythema and vice versa in winter. Thus, the balancing time in winter was enough to maximize UV benefits and minimize UV risks.

  10. Deciphering the Glacial-Interglacial Landscape History in Greenland Based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo Inversion of Existing 10Be-26Al Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunk, A.; Knudsen, M. F.; Larsen, N. K.; Egholm, D. L.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Surface exposure dating with cosmogenic nuclides is a dating method under continuous development. It is particularly useful for dating ice-sheet fluctuations in glacial environments, which is essential to increase our understanding of past climate fluctuations and glacial dynamics. Constraining the landscape history in previously glaciated terrains may be difficult, however, due to unknown erosion rates and the presence of inherited nuclides. The potential use of cosmogenic nuclides in landscapes with a complex history of exposure and erosion is therefore often quite limited. In this study, we investigate the landscape history in eastern and western Greenland by applying a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion approach to the existing 10Be-26Al data from these regions. The new MCMC approach allows us to constrain the most likely landscape history based on comparisons between simulated and measured cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. It is a fundamental assumption of the model approach that the exposure history at the site/location can be divided into two distinct regimes: i) interglacial periods characterized by zero shielding due to overlying ice and a uniform interglacial erosion rate, and ii) glacial periods characterized by 100 % shielding and a uniform glacial erosion rate. We incorporate the exposure/burial history in the model framework by applying a threshold value to the global marine benthic d18O record and include the threshold value as a free model parameter, hereby taking into account global changes in climate. The other free parameters include the glacial and interglacial erosion rates as well as the timing of the Holocene deglaciation. The model essentially simulates numerous different landscape scenarios based on these four parameters and zooms in on the most plausible combination of model parameters. Here, we apply the MCMC-model to the concentrations of 10Be and 26Al measured in three previous studies of glacial fluctuations in Greenland

  11. A Numerical Model to Assess Soil Fluxes from Meteoric 10Be Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, B.; Govers, G.; Vanacker, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Smolders, E.; Baken, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be may be mobile in the soil system. The latter hampers a direct translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into spatial variations in erosion and deposition rates. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows us to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system. The Be2D model is then used to analyse the potential impact of human-accelerated soil fluxes on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile including particle migration, chemical leaching and bioturbation, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes from creep, water and tillage erosion. Model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can indeed be related to erosion and deposition, across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. However, quantification of the effects of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed spatial patterns in 10Be data. Moreover, our simulations suggest that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to unravel human impact on soil fluxes when soils have a high retention capacity for meteoric meteoric 10Be. Application of the Be2D model to existing data sets shows that model parameters can reliably be constrained, resulting in a good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories. This confirms the suitability of the Be2D model as a robust tool to underpin quantitative interpretations of spatial variability in meteoric 10Be data for eroding landscapes.

  12. Daily surface UV exposure and its relationship to surface pollutant measurements.

    PubMed

    Barnard, W F; Saxena, V K; Wenny, B N; DeLuisi, J J

    2003-02-01

    For the past 30 years, the stratospheric ozone layer has decreased in the Northern Hemisphere. The main effect of this ozone decrease was an expected increase in the UV radiation at the Earth's surface, but there has been no clear evidence of an increasing urban trend in surface UV. This study shows that specific air pollutants can reduce the increased surface levels of UV radiation and offers an explanation for why the expected surface UV increases have not been observed, especially in urban regions. A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) UV monitoring site at the University of California at Riverside combined with air pollution data from a site operated by the California Air Resources Board in Rubidoux, CA, provided the basis of this study. The 1997 South Coast Ozone Study (SCOS-97) provided three key ingredients: black carbon, PM10 concentrations, and collocated radiometric measurements. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data were used to provide the stratospheric ozone levels that were included in the statistical model. All of these input parameters would be used to test this study's hypothesis: the expected increase of surface UV radiation, caused by decreases in stratospheric ozone, can be masked by increases in anthropogenic emissions. The values for the pollutants were 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. averages of the instrument's values taken during summer 1997. A statistical linear regression model was employed using the stratospheric ozone, black carbon, PM10, and surface ozone concentrations, and the sin (theta) and cos (theta). The angle theta is defined by theta = 2pi (Julian date/365). This model obtained a coefficient of determination of 0.94 with an uncertainty level (p value) of less than 0.3% for all of the variables in the model except ground-level ozone. The final model, regressed against a data set from a remote, western North Carolina site, resulted in a coefficient of determination of 0.92. The model shows that black carbon can

  13. Development of a health risk-based surface contamination cleanup standard for occupational exposure to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Damian, Paul

    2011-02-01

    A health risk-based surface contamination cleanup standard (SCS) for beryllium (BE) was developed to facilitate the safe transfer of property (equipment and buildings) previously used in BE-related processes. Previous SCSs for BE were primarily based on Department of Energy (DOE) housekeeping criteria rather than health risks. Quantitative health risk assessment methods were used to develop an occupational SCS that explicitly considers the relevant exposure pathways and toxicity endpoints, including both cancer and non-cancer endpoints. For the cancer endpoint at the 1E-06 risk level, the analysis resulted in an SCS of 17 μg/100 cm(2) based on resuspension of settled dust and subsequent inhalation exposure only (BE is regulated as a carcinogen by the inhalation route only). For the non-cancer endpoint, the analysis resulted in an SCS of 0.07 μg/100 cm(2) based on dermal absorption, incidental ingestion following dermal contact, and inhalation. The non-cancer SCS was determined virtually entirely by the dermal absorption exposure pathway, with negligible contributions from the incidental ingestion and inhalation pathways. This analysis shows that application of the non-cancer SCS in BE monitoring and control programs will adequately protect workers from both the cancer and non-cancer health effects of BE when surface contamination is the primary source of BE exposure.

  14. Reconstruction of glacier fluctuations in the Western Alps since the LGM using OSL surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Benjamin; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Providing tight spatial/temporal constraints on late-Pleistocene glacier fluctuations remains an important challenge for understanding glacier response to climate change. In most mountainous settings, paleo-glacier reconstructions are limited because they lack precise temporal constraint, which would enable their use as a paleoclimate proxy. OSL-surface exposure dating has been recently proposed [Sohbati et al., 2011] and offers the potential to improve paleo-glacier reconstruction. Because the OSL signal is sensitive to light, OSL-signal bleaching within a rock sample depends on its exposure time and environmental conditions, and can therefore be used to date the exposure time of glacially-polished bedrock or erratic boulders. However, successful application of this technique first requires calibration and validation. Here, we focus on the Mer de Glace glacier (Mont Blanc massif, France) where the post-LGM glacier dynamics remain poorly constrained with numerous short glacier re-advances occuring during the mid-Pleistocene and Holocene [LeRoy et al., 2015]. First, the different parameters involved in OSL surface exposure dating were calibrated. Vertical transect of polished bedrock surfaces with known exposure ages (from 10 to 165 years) from the Montenvers train station (1913 m a.sl.) to the present-day position of the Mer de Glace (1600 m a.s.l.) was sampled. Secondly, we sampled the Trelaporte transect where exposed bedrock surfaces are of uniform lithology. Here, we will apply similar approach on a much longer timescale, from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~24 ka, Coutterand et al., 2006) to the present day. OSL data from rock slices show increasing exposure age with elevation which is consitent with glacier thinning since the Little Ice Age. Moreover, our results confirmed the possibility to first calibrate the model parameters on known-age surface and use it to constrain the exposure time for nearby bedrock surfaces. In summary, OSL-surface exposure dating

  15. 10Be concentrations of Red soils in Southwest Japan and its possibility of dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maejima, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nakano, C.

    2004-08-01

    10Be concentrations of six Red soils distributed in Southwest Japan ranged from 0.8 × 108 to 2.7 × 109 atoms g-1, and minimum absolute ages were estimated by inventory of meteoric 10Be. The results are follows: Red soils on Toyota derived from granite (⩽25 ka), Kashii derived from Tertiary shale (⩽24 ka), Akiyoshidai derived from limestone (⩽110 ka), Okinawa Island derived from Kunigami gravel bed (⩽9 ka) and Ogasawara Island derived from agglomerate and Boninite (⩽22 and ⩽7 ka) were obtained, respectively. Soil age except with Akiyoshidai indicated younger age. It suggested that the loss of 10Be from the soil was caused by leaching of 10Be or by soil erosion, and 10Be is susceptible to leaching out from these Red soils under the humid climate condition such as Southwest Japan.

  16. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  17. A 420 Year Annual 10Be Record from the WAIS Divide Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, T. E.; Welten, K. C.; Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Annual ice layers archive the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be, which is in turn an important proxy for solar activity, complementary to the 14C tree ring archive. Although production is primarily determined by the strength of the solar magnetic field 10Be deposition is also determined by local weather phenomena and snow accumulation rates, especially within shorter timescales. Accordingly, multiple ice core records of varying locations and accumulation rates are necessary to build a representative 10Be archive. We are presently engaged in a study to obtain continuous 10Be and 36Cl records in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core, a high snow accumulation site analogous to the GISP2 core from Greenland (Finkel and Nishiizumi1997). Here we present an annual resolution record of 10Be in the WAIS Divide core spanning the last 420 years including the Maunder (1645-1715 AD) and Dalton (1790-1830 AD) solar minima. Preliminary results for the periods of 1580-1740 and 1945-2006 AD show that the10Be flux during the Maunder Minimum was ~60% higher than in the last 60 years (4.8 vs. 3.0 x 105 atoms yr-1 cm-2). Although the low sunspot numbers during the Maunder Minimum suggest little change in solar activity, the 10Be data show that the heliomagnetic field strength continued to vary in a 11-year cycle, as observed in other annual 10Be records (e.g., Beer et al. 1990; Berggren et al. 2009). The 10Be record for the WAIS Divide core will be compared to 10Be records of Greenland ice cores as well as the 14C tree ring record. Acknowledgment. This work was supported by NSF grants ANT-0839042 and 0839137. Beer J. et al. 1990.Nature 347, 164. Finkel R. C. and Nishiizumi K. 1997.J. Geophys. Res. 102, 26,699. Berggren A.- M., et al. 2009. Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L11801.

  18. Aluminum 26, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl depth profiles in the Canyon Diablo iron meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Michlovich, E.S.; Elmore, D.; Vogt, S.; Lipschutz, M.E.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-11-25

    The authors have measured activities of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl in 12 fragments of the iron meteorite Canyon Diablo and have constructed production rate-versus-depth profiles of those radionuclides. Profiles determined using differential particle fluxes calculated with the LAHET code system are in good agreement with {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl experimental data, but the agreement for {sup 36}Cl was obtained only after neutron-induced cross sections were modified. Profiles calculated with lunar particle fluxes are much lower than experimental Canyon Diablo profiles. The cosmic ray exposure ages of most samples are near 540 m.y. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  20. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  1. Cutaneous exposure scenarios for engineered nanoparticles used in semiconductor fabrication: a preliminary investigation of workplace surface contamination

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Michele; Brenner, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies are ongoing in the fields of nanotoxicology and exposure science; however, gaps remain in identifying and evaluating potential exposures from skin contact with engineered nanoparticles in occupational settings. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify potential cutaneous exposure scenarios at a workplace using engineered nanoparticles (alumina, ceria, amorphous silica) and evaluate the presence of these materials on workplace surfaces. Methods: Process review, workplace observations, and preliminary surface sampling were conducted using microvacuum and wipe sample collection methods and transmission electron microscopy with elemental analysis. Results: Exposure scenarios were identified with potential for incidental contact. Nanoparticles of silica or silica and/or alumina agglomerates (or aggregates) were identified in surface samples from work areas where engineered nanoparticles were used or handled. Conclusions: Additional data are needed to evaluate occupational exposures from skin contact with engineered nanoparticles; precautionary measures should be used to minimize potential cutaneous exposures in the workplace. PMID:25000112

  2. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  3. 10Be in ice - four decades, two ice sheets, 15 deep coring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Ann-Marie; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2010-05-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous studies of 10Be in ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland have comprised a significant source of information on climate, solar activity and geomagnetic field intensity over the past 800 000 years. There is, however, a large variability in the available 10Be records in terms of resolution and time coverage. We here present a comprehensive summary of results that have been put forward since the 1960s. Marine sediment was the first type of natural archive in which 10Be was detected (Arnold, 1956), and a decade later McCorkell et al. (1967) pioneered the ice archive field by counting 10Be beta activity in samples from Camp Century, Greenland. The method demands a large amount of material; in this case 1.2×106 litres of water were used. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS, Raisbeck et al. (1978) undertook the second study of 10Be in polar ice, measuring 10Be concentrations in ice from Dome C, Antarctica. The AMS technique is exclusively used today for measurements of 10Be in small ice volumes (

  4. A preliminary study on the use of (10)Be in forensic radioecology of nuclear explosion sites.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, N E; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Takatsuji, T; Hoshi, M; Fukutani, S; Ditchburn, R G; Zondervan, A

    2008-02-01

    Cosmogenic (10)Be, known for use in dating studies, unexpectedly is also produced in nuclear explosions with an atom yield almost comparable to (e.g.) (137)Cs. There are major production routes via (13)C(n, alpha)(10)Be, from carbon dioxide in the air and the organic explosives, possibly from other bomb components and to a minor extent from the direct fission reaction. Although the detailed bomb components are speculative, carbon was certainly present in the explosives and an order of magnitude calculation is possible. The (n, alpha) cross-section was determined by irradiating graphite in a nuclear reactor, and the resulting (10)Be estimated by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) giving a cross-section of 34.5+/-0.7mb (6-9.3MeV), within error of previous work. (10)Be should have applications in forensic radioecology. Historical environmental samples from Hiroshima, and Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) showed two to threefold (10)Be excesses compared with the background cosmogenic levels. A sample from Lake Chagan (a Soviet nuclear cratering experiment) contained more (10)Be than previously reported soils. (10)Be may be useful for measuring the fast neutron dose near the Hiroshima bomb hypocenter at neutron energies double those previously available. PMID:17904707

  5. Geomagnetic field intensity and quantitative paleorainfall reconstruction from Chinese loess using 10Be and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, W.; zhou, W.; Li, C.; Wu, Z.; White, L.; Xian, F.

    2011-12-01

    7Be is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols, usually encapsulated in rain or snow. Numerous studies have shown that its flux to the ground is proportional to rainfall amount. Unfortunately, with a half life of only a few weeks, this observation has little relevance for reconstruction past rainfall amounts in paleosoils. Fortunately, 7Be has a long-lived sister isotope (10Be) with a half life of ~1.5 Ma which can be used for such purposes. There are a number of complications, however. First, 10Be atmospheric production rate changes when the geomagnetic field intensity changes. Secondly, 10Be half life is long enough that 10Be which fell to the ground attached to dust some time in the past can become resuspended, meaning that there are two sources of 10Be, one meteoric, and the other recycled aeolian dust. Fortunately, we have found a method to deconvolute this knotty situation and have applied it to soils of the Chinese Loess Plateau, allowing us to reconstruct records of both geomagnetic field intensity and paleorainfall. To do so, we use the additional parameters magnetic susceptibility and coercivity to help define the inherited amount of each component, and to define what fraction of the variations in 10Be are associated with magnetic field fluctuations, versus that linked to rainfall variations. We also use a sediment age/depth model to convert 10Be concentration to 10Be flux, and finally, we use the modern 7Be vs. rainfall relationship and 10Be/7Be atmospheric production rate ratio to calculate quantitative paleorainfall rates. We have used these techniques to generate several such records ranging from the Holocene to MIS13 (Circa 525 ka BP), and will compare some of these to U-series dated speleothem records of δ18O.

  6. Unsteady late Pleistocene incision of streams bounding the Colorado Front Range from measurements of meteoric and in situ 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dühnforth, Miriam; Anderson, Robert S.; Ward, Dylan J.; Blum, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Dating of gravel-capped strath terraces in basins adjacent to western U.S. Laramide Ranges is one approach to document the history of late Cenozoic fluvial exhumation. We use in situ 10Be measurements to date the broad surfaces adjacent to the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, and compare these calculated ages with results from meteoric 10Be measurements. We analyze three sites near Boulder, Colorado (Gunbarrel Hill, Table Mountain, and Pioneer) that have been mapped as the oldest terrace surfaces with suggested ages ranging from 640 ka to the Plio-Pleistocene transition. Our in situ 10Be results reveal abandonment ages of 95 ± 129 ka at Table Mountain, 175 ± 27 ka at Pioneer, and ages of 251 ± 10 ka and 307 ± 15 ka at Gunbarrel Hill. All are far younger than previously thought. Inventories of meteoric 10Be support this interpretation, yielding ages that are comparable to Table Mountain and ˜20% lower than Pioneer in situ ages. We argue that lateral beveling by rivers dominated during protracted times of even moderate glacial climate, and that vertical incision rates of several mm/yr likely occurred during times of very low sediment supply during the few interglacials that were characterized by particularly warm climate conditions. In contrast to the traditional age chronology in the area, our ages suggest that the deep exhumation of the western edge the High Plains occurred relatively recently and at an unsteady pace.

  7. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne M.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Qualls, Garry D.; Blattnig, Steve B.; Lee, Kerry T.; Fry, Dan J.; Stoffle, Nicholas N.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Slaba, Tony C.; Walker, Steven A.; Zapp, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. Both galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) environments pose a risk to astronauts for missions beyond LEO. The GCR environment, which is made up of protons and heavier ions covering a broad energy spectrum, is ever present but varies in intensity with the solar cycle, while SPEs are sporadic events, consisting primarily of protons moving outward through the solar system from the sun. The GCR environment is more penetrating and is more difficult to shield than SPE environments, but lacks the intensity to induce acute effects. Large SPEs are rare, but they could result in a lethal dose, if adequate shielding is not provided. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large SPE. Longer missions also require planning for large SPEs; adequate shielding must be provided and operational constraints must allow astronauts to move quickly to shielded locations. The dominant risk for longer missions, however, is GCR exposure, which accumulates over time and can lead to late effects such as cancer. SPE exposure, even low level SPE exposure received in heavily shielded locations, will increase this risk. In addition to GCR and SPE environments, the lunar neutron albedo resulting mainly from the interaction of GCRs with regolith will also contribute to astronaut risk. Full mission exposure assessments were performed for proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, radiation shielding models were developed for a proposed lunar habitat and rover. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for

  8. Eight Million Years of Land-Based Antarctic Ice Sheet Stability Recorded By In Situ 10Be from the ANDRILL-1B Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, J. D.; Corbett, L. B.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) to Pliocene warmth provides a critical way to gauge its sensitivity to climate change. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the Pliocene behavior of the EAIS, however. For instance, global sea level estimates for the mid-Pliocene warm period range from <10 m to >30 m, and numerous cosmogenic nuclide and sedimentological studies from the Transantarctic Mountains imply extreme landscape stability over the last several Myr whereas ocean records suggest orbital-scale instability of at least marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. These stabilist versus dynamicist views are difficult to resolve because onshore records are generally biased toward intervals of expanded ice cover and limited to areas with exposed land, while marine sediments typically provide indirect evidence for conditions on land and cannot distinguish between marine versus land-based ice sheet collapse. The AND-1B marine sediment core drilled beneath the Ross Ice Shelf contains a remarkably complete late Cenozoic sequence of glacial diamictons sourced from the adjacent EAIS, intercalated with open-water sediments likely associated with West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse. We measured concentrations of in situ 10Be - produced only when ice cover is reduced and the landscape is exposed - in eight samples of glacially-derived quartz sand from AND-1B spanning parts of the last 8 Myr. Decay-corrected concentrations are low and show a long-term decline from 13,000 atoms/g to 1000 atoms/g over the record. These low values and the monotonic trend suggest that land-based ice sheet sectors have experienced little, if any, exposure during the past 8 Myr; the 10Be concentrations we measured are equivalent to only centuries or a few kyr of surface exposure. Perhaps more likely, the small quantities of 10Be were produced prior to the establishment of a full EAIS in the mid-Miocene, and reflect deeply-exhumed and thus 10Be-poor material that has been radioactively

  9. Preliminary Cosmogenic Surface Exposure Ages on Laurentide Ice-sheet Retreat and Opening of the Eastern Lake Agassiz Outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leydet, D.; Carlson, A. E.; Sinclair, G.; Teller, J. T.; Breckenridge, A. J.; Caffee, M. W.; Barth, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology for the eastern outlets of glacial Lake Agassiz holds important consequences for the cause of Younger Dryas cold event during the last deglaciation. Eastward routing of Lake Agassiz runoff was originally hypothesized to have triggered the Younger Dryas. However, currently the chronology of the eastern outlets is only constrained by minimum-limiting radiocarbon ages that could suggest the eastern outlets were still ice covered at the start of the Younger Dryas at ~12.9 ka BP, requiring a different forcing of this abrupt climate event. Nevertheless, the oldest radiocarbon ages are still consistent with an ice-free eastern outlet at the start of the Younger Dryas. Here we will present preliminary 10-Be cosmogenic surface exposure ages from the North Lake, Flat Rock Lake, glacial Lake Kaministiquia, and Lake Nipigon outlets located near Thunder Bay, Ontario. These ages will date the timing of the deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet in the eastern outlet region of glacial Lake Agassiz. This will provide an important constraint for the hypothesized freshwater forcing of the cause of Younger Dryas cold event.

  10. 10Be dating of the Narsarsuaq moraine in southernmost Greenland: evidence for a late-Holocene ice advance exceeding the Little Ice Age maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, K.; Carlson, A. E.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-08-01

    In southernmost Greenland near Narsarsuaq, the terminal Narsarsuaq moraine was deposited well outside of a historical Little Ice Age (LIA) moraine adjacent to the modern ice margin. Using 10Be surface exposure dating, we determine Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment at 1.51 ± 0.11 ka. A second set of 10Be ages from a more ice-proximal position shows that ice has been within or at its historical (i.e., LIA) extent since 1.34 ± 0.15 ka. Notably, Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment was coincident with climate amelioration in southern Greenland. Southern Greenland warming at ˜1.5 ka was also concurrent with the end of the Roman Warm Period as climate along the northern North Atlantic sector of Europe cooled into the Dark Ages. The warming of southern Greenland and retreat of ice from the Narsarsuaq moraine is consistent with studies suggesting possible anti-phase centennial-scale climate variability between northwestern Europe and southern Greenland. Other southernmost Greenland ice-margin records do not preclude a pre-LIA ice-margin maximum, potentially concurrent with a Narsarsuaq advance prior to ˜1.51 ka, but also lack sufficient ice-margin control to confirm such a correlation. We conclude that there is a clear need to further determine whether a late-Holocene pre-LIA maximum was a local phenomenon or a regional southern Greenland ice maximum, and if this advance and retreat reflects a regional fluctuation in climate.

  11. Monopole transitions to cluster states in 10Be and 9Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2016-08-01

    Isoscalar monopole transitions from the ground states to cluster states in 10Be and 9Li are investigated using 6He+ α and 6He+ t cluster models, respectively. In 10Be, significant monopole strengths are obtained for 6He+ α cluster resonances of 10Be(03,4 +) above the α -decay threshold, whereas the strengths for 6He+ t cluster resonances in 9Li are not enhanced because of the large fragmentation of strengths in the corresponding energy region. The monopole transition to 10Be(02+) with the molecular orbital structure is relatively weak compared with those to 6He+ α cluster resonances. Monopole strength distributions do not directly correspond to distributions of 6He(0+)+ α and 6He(0+)+ t components but reflect the component of the deformed 6He cluster with a specific orientation, which is originally embedded in the ground state.

  12. River fluxes to the sea from the ocean's 10Be/9Be ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be to the stable isotope 9Be is proposed here to be a flux proxy of terrigenous input into the oceans. The ocean's dissolved 10Be/9Be is set by (1) the flux of meteoric 10Be produced in the atmosphere; (2) the denudational flux of the rivers discharging into a given ocean basin; (3) the fraction of 9Be that is released from primary minerals during weathering (meaning the 9Be transported by rivers in either the dissolved form or adsorbed onto sedimentary particles and incorporated into secondary oxides); and (4) the fraction of riverine 10Be and 9Be actually released into seawater. Using published 10Be/9Be data of rivers for which independent denudation rate estimates exist we first find that the global average fraction of 9Be released during weathering into river waters and their particulate load is 20% and does not depend on denudation rate. We then evaluate this quantitative denudation rate proxy by using published dissolved seawater Be isotope data and a compilation of global river loads (15Gt/yr). We find that the measured global average oceanic dissolved 10Be/9Be ratio of about 0.9E-7 is satisfied by the mass balance if only 6.5% of the dissolved and reactive riverine Be is eventually released to the open ocean by boundary exchange. Except for the South Atlantic and the South Pacific, in which the 10Be/9Be ratio is dominated by Be advected through ocean circulation, good agreement results between 10Be/9Be ratios predicted by denudation rates and measured ocean 10Be/9Be ratios when we establish this mass balance for individual ocean basins. As the seawater 10Be/9Be ratio is faithfully recorded in marine chemical precipitates the 10Be/9Be ratio extracted from authigenic sediments can now serve to estimate relative changes in terrigenous input into the oceans back through time on a global and on a basin scale.

  13. River fluxes to the sea from the oceanʼs 10Be/9Be ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien

    2014-02-01

    The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be to the stable isotope 9Be is proposed here to be a flux proxy of terrigenous input into the oceans. The ocean's dissolved 10Be/9Be is set by (1) the flux of meteoric 10Be produced in the atmosphere; (2) the denudational flux of the rivers discharging into a given ocean basin; (3) the fraction of 9Be that is released from primary minerals during weathering (meaning the 9Be transported by rivers in either the dissolved form or adsorbed onto sedimentary particles and incorporated into secondary oxides); and (4) the fraction of riverine 10Be and 9Be actually released into seawater. Using published 10Be/9Be data of rivers for which independent denudation rate estimates exist we first find that the global average fraction of 9Be released during weathering into river waters and their particulate load is 20% and does not depend on denudation rate. We then evaluate this quantitative proxy for terrigenous inputs by using published dissolved seawater Be isotope data and a compilation of global river loads. We find that the measured global average oceanic dissolved 10Be/9Be ratio of about 0.9×10-7 is satisfied by the mass balance if only about 6% of the dissolved and adsorbed riverine Be is eventually released to the open ocean after escaping the coastal zone. When we establish this mass balance for individual ocean basins good agreement results between 10Be/9Be ratios predicted from known river basin denudation rates and measured ocean 10Be/9Be ratios. Only in the South Atlantic and the South Pacific the 10Be/9Be ratio is dominated by advected Be and in these basins the ratio is a proxy for ocean circulation. As the seawater 10Be/9Be ratio is faithfully recorded in marine chemical precipitates the 10Be/9Be ratio extracted from authigenic sediments can now serve to estimate relative changes in terrigenous input into the oceans back through time on a global and on an ocean basin scale.

  14. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Majer, M.; Milin, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Acosta, L.

    2009-08-26

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  15. Dermal exposure to methamphetamine hydrochloride contaminated residential surfaces: surface pH values, volatility, and in vitro human skin.

    PubMed

    Salocks, Charles B; Hui, Xiaoying; Lamel, Sonia; Qiao, Peter; Sanborn, James R; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated pH effects on [(14)C] d-methamphetamine hydrochloride ([(14)C]-meth HCl) percutaneous penetration in vitro and volatility and stability in aqueous solution, on solid surface, or human skin using the finite dose technique and flow through diffusion cells. Results show that when the pH level exceeds 4 or 5, the nonvolatile [(14)C]-meth HCl salt becomes unstable, likely converting to its volatile freebase form. Additionally, contaminated smooth, dense surfaces retain and transfer more [(14)C]-meth HCl than those with rough, loose surfaces, especially under acidic conditions. Skin surface pH is a critical factor affecting the rate and magnitude of dermal absorption. [(14)C]-Meth HCl penetrates into and through the human cadaver skin quickly following exposure. [(14)C]-Meth HCl retained in the skin layer is released into the receptor fluid even if the contact material has been removed. Future exploration of decontaminant and removal procedure efficacies and their effect on dermal penetration of [(14)C]-meth HCl is recommended.

  16. Studies of Itokawa's Surface Exposure by Measurements of Cosmic-ray Produced Nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Uesugi, M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    We plan to investigate the evolutionary history of surface materials from 25143 Itokawa, the Hayabusa samples. Our studies are based on the measurement of nuclides produced in asteroidal surface materials by cosmic rays. Cosmogenic radionuclides are used to determine the duration and nature of the exposure of materials to energetic particles. Our goals are to understand both the fundamental processes on the asteroidal surface and the evolutionary history of its surface materials. They are also key to understanding the history of Itokawa's surface and asteroid-meteoroid evolutionary dynamics. To achieve our key goals, in particular reconstructing the evolutionary histories of the asteroidal surface, we proposed: (1) characterizing Itokawa particles using SXCT, SXRD, and FE-SEM without modification of the sample; (2) embedding each particle in acrylic resin, then slicing a small corner with an ultra-microtome and examining it using super-STEM and SIMS for characterizing surface morphology, space weathering, and oxygen three-isotope analysis; and finally (3) measuring small amounts of cosmogenic radionuclides (104-105 atoms) in Hayabusa samples by AMS. However, we have to modify our plan due to unexpected situation.

  17. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  18. Preparation of ASTER in-house 10Be/9Be standard solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braucher, R.; Guillou, V.; Bourlès, D. L.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Keddadouche, K.; Nottoli, E.

    2015-10-01

    Since its commissioning in 2006, the commercially available certificated National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material NIST SRM 4325 is used at the French national facility ASTER (CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence) to normalize 10Be measurements. This standard solution being no longer disposable, we thus decided to produce in-house standards. As a first attempt, a STD-12 standard (10Be/9Be = (4.939 ± 0.053) × 10-12) has been prepared from 2.5 kg of marine sediments with an adapted chemical protocol. Then, a 10Be enriched solution of known concentration being available, a STD-11 standard (10Be/9Be = (1.191 ± 0.013) × 10-11) that will be used at ASTER in the near future to calibrate 10Be measurements and its dilution to the 10-14 level (STD-14 (10Be/9Be = (5.468 ± 0.064) × 10-14)) have been prepared from it.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew S.; Chapot, Melissa S.; Jain, Mayank; Pederson, Joel

    2012-09-01

    We pioneer a technique of surface-exposure dating based upon the characteristic form of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) bleaching profile beneath a rock surface; this evolves as a function of depth and time. As a field illustration of this new method, the maximum age of a premier example of Barrier Canyon Style (BCS) rock art in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA, is constrained. The natural OSL signal from quartz grains is measured from the surface to a depth of >10 mm in three different rock samples of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone. Two samples are from talus with unknown daylight exposure histories; one of these samples was exposed at the time of sampling and one was buried and no longer light exposed. A third sample is known to have been first exposed 80 years ago and was still exposed at the time of sampling. First, the OSL-depth profile of the known-age sample is modeled to estimate material-dependent and environmental parameters. These parameters are then used to fit the model to the corresponding data for the samples of unknown exposure history. From these fits we calculate that the buried sample was light exposed for ˜700 years before burial and that the unburied sample has been exposed for ˜120 years. The shielded surface of the buried talus sample is decorated with rock art; this rock fell from the adjacent Great Gallery panel. Related research using conventional OSL dating suggests that this rockfall event occurred ˜900 years ago, and so we deduce that the rock art must have been created between ˜1600 and 900 years ago. Our results are the first credible estimates of exposure ages based on luminescence bleaching profiles. The strength of this novel OSL method is its ability to establish both ongoing and prior exposure times, at decadal to millennial timescales or perhaps longer (depending on the environmental dose rate) even for material subsequently buried. This has considerable potential in many archeological, geological and geo

  20. Giant Surface Conductivity Enhancement in a Carbon Nanotube Composite by Ultraviolet Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Orloff, Nathan D; Twedt, Kevin A; Lam, Thomas; Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Zhao, Minhua; Natarajan, Bharath; Scott, Keana C; Marksz, Eric; Nguyen, Tinh; Douglas, Jack F; McClelland, Jabez; Garboczi, Edward; Obrzut, Jan; Liddle, J Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotube composites are lightweight, multifunctional materials with readily adjustable mechanical and electrical properties-relevant to the aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods industries as high-performance structural materials. Here, we combine well-established and newly developed characterization techniques to demonstrate that ultraviolet (UV) light exposure provides a controllable means to enhance the electrical conductivity of the surface of a commercial carbon nanotube-epoxy composite by over 5 orders of magnitude. Our observations, combined with theory and simulations, reveal that the increase in conductivity is due to the formation of a concentrated layer of nanotubes on the composite surface. Our model implies that contacts between nanotube-rich microdomains dominate the conductivity of this layer at low UV dose, while tube-tube transport dominates at high UV dose. Further, we use this model to predictably pattern conductive traces with a UV laser, providing a facile approach for direct integration of lightweight conductors on nanocomposite surfaces.

  1. Giant Surface Conductivity Enhancement in a Carbon Nanotube Composite by Ultraviolet Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Orloff, Nathan D; Twedt, Kevin A; Lam, Thomas; Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Zhao, Minhua; Natarajan, Bharath; Scott, Keana C; Marksz, Eric; Nguyen, Tinh; Douglas, Jack F; McClelland, Jabez; Garboczi, Edward; Obrzut, Jan; Liddle, J Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotube composites are lightweight, multifunctional materials with readily adjustable mechanical and electrical properties-relevant to the aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods industries as high-performance structural materials. Here, we combine well-established and newly developed characterization techniques to demonstrate that ultraviolet (UV) light exposure provides a controllable means to enhance the electrical conductivity of the surface of a commercial carbon nanotube-epoxy composite by over 5 orders of magnitude. Our observations, combined with theory and simulations, reveal that the increase in conductivity is due to the formation of a concentrated layer of nanotubes on the composite surface. Our model implies that contacts between nanotube-rich microdomains dominate the conductivity of this layer at low UV dose, while tube-tube transport dominates at high UV dose. Further, we use this model to predictably pattern conductive traces with a UV laser, providing a facile approach for direct integration of lightweight conductors on nanocomposite surfaces. PMID:27468781

  2. Dating Plio-Pleistocene glacial sediments using the cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides 10Be and 26Al

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balco, G.; Stone, J.O.H.; Jennings, C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides 26Al and 10Be to date Plio-Pleistocene glacial sediment sequences. These two nuclides are produced in quartz at a fixed ratio, but have different decay constants. If a sample is exposed at the surface for a time and then buried by overburden and thus removed from the cosmic-ray flux, the 26Al/10Be ratio is related to the duration of burial. We first attempted to date pre-Wisconsinan tills by measuring 26Al and 10Be in fluvial sediments beneath them and applying the method of "burial dating," which previous authors have used to date river sediment carried into caves. This method, however, requires simplifying assumptions about the 26Al and 10Be concentrations in the sediment at the time of burial. We show that these assumptions are not valid for river sediment in glaciated regions. 26Al and 10Be analyses of such sediment do not provide accurate ages for these tills, although they do yield limiting ages in some cases. We overcome this difficulty by instead measuring 26Al and 10Be in quartz from paleosols that are buried by tills. We use a more general mathematical approach to determine the initial nuclide concentrations in the paleosol at the time it was buried, as well as the duration of burial. This technique provides a widely applicable improvement on other means of dating Plio-Pleistocene terrestrial glacial sediments, as well as a framework for applying cosmogenic-nuclide dating techniques in complicated stratigraphic settings. We apply it to pre-Wisconsinan glacial sediment sequences in southwest Minnesota and eastern South Dakota. Pre-Wisconsinan tills underlying the Minnesota River Valley were deposited 0.5 to 1.5 Ma, and tills beneath the Prairie Coteau in eastern South Dakota and adjacent Minnesota were deposited 1 to 2 Ma.

  3. [sup 14]C and [sup 10]Be evidence for no incursion of the Lake Michigan lobe in northern Illinois from ca. 170 to 25 ka

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, B.B. ); Pavich, M.J. )

    1994-04-01

    Uncorrected [sup 10]Be inventories of a 2.7 m-long section of core indicate surface exposure lasting 115 ka during development of the Sangamon Geosol and 30 ka for a soil complex developed in overlying loessial sediment (Robein Silt). The latter estimate is in agreement with [sup 14]C assays in the region. Taking into account the age of overlying late Wisconsin drift, the new data indicate an age of about 170 ka for the onset of Sangamon pedogenesis in northern Illinois. Previous to this study, there have been no numerical-age determinations for the start of the last interglacial in northern IL. The data confirm a previous hypothesis that the Lake Michigan Lobe did not invade IL contemporaneous with deposition of Roxana Silt, or during the other period of midcontinental loess deposition suggest by TL ages of ca. 70 to 85 ka. The core was collected immediately south of the IL-WI border (42[degree] 30 minutes N, 88[degree] 30 minutes W) near Hebron, IL. Buried by 14 m of late Wisconsin drift, and the interval assayed for [sup 10]Be included 2.0 m of pedogenically-altered Illinoian sand and gravel, and 0.7 m of Wisconsin silt. One AMS [sup 14]C assay of carbonized fragments from the A-horizon of the Sangamon Geosol yielded an age of 38,500 [+-] 5,000 yr B.P.; conventional [sup 14]C ages for the overlying silt are from wood fragments (24,780 [times] 360 yr B.P.) and a bulk soil sample (26,030 [+-] 450 yr B.P.). The range of ages is typical for this stratigraphic sequence in IL. The [sup 10]Be concentration in the lowest part of the silt is 600 atoms/gm. This value is three times greater than the concentration typical of calcareous Mississippi River valley loess and of the C-horizon of the Sangamon Geosol in the core. High concentration of [sup 10]Be in the Robein Silt likely was caused by redeposition of [sup 10]Be-rich B-horizon material eroded from soil profiles elsewhere in the paleobasin.

  4. Chronology of glaciations in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Iberia) during the Last Glacial Cycle based on in situ-produced 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Bourlès, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula preserve a valuable record of past glaciations that may help reconstruct past atmospheric circulation patterns in response to cooling events in the North Atlantic Ocean. Available chronologies for the glacial record of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are mainly based on radiocarbon and luminescence dating of glacial-related sediments, suggest that glaciers recorded their Glacial Maximum (GM) during MIS 3 and experienced a later Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) advance. This LGM extent is not established yet, preventing a fair correlation with available Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) based chronologies for the glacial record of the Pyrenees and the Sistema Central. We present a glacial reconstruction and a 10Be CRE chronology for the Porma valley, in the southern slope of the central Cantabrian Mountains. Glacial evidence at the lowest altitudes correspond to erratic boulders and composite moraines whose minimum 10Be CRE age of 113.9 ± 7.1 ka suggests that glaciers were at their maximum extent during MIS 5d, most likely in response to the minima in summertime insolation of the Last Glacial Cycle. Recessional moraines preserved within the glacial maximum limits allow the assessment of subsequent glacier advances or stagnations. The most remarkable advance took place prior to 55.7 ± 4.0 ka (probably at the end of MIS 4), consistently with minimum radiocarbon ages previously reported for lacustrine glacial-related deposits in the Cantabrian Mountains. A limited number of 10Be CRE ages from a composite moraine suggest a possible advance of the Porma glacier coeval with the global LGM; the glacier front attributed to the LGM would be placed within the margins of the previous GM like in the western Pyrenees. Erratic boulders perched on an ice-moulded bedrock surface provided a mean 10Be CRE age of 17.7 ± 1.0 ka, suggesting that part of the recessional moraine sequence corresponds to minor advances or stagnations of the glacier fronts

  5. Surface-exposure Dating of Late Quaternary Glacial Advances in the Cordillera Blanca, Peruvian Andes (9°-10°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Zehner, S. P., Jr.; Bowen, D. R.; Rodbell, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    New 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on lateral moraines bordering Querococha Valley (9°44.6' S, 77°21.6' W) in the southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru, indicate that late-glacial (˜16 ka) ice extended as much as 15 km downvalley from the headwall(s). With the glacier terminus at ˜3900 masl and the headwall at ˜5200 masl, THAR reconstruction (THAR=0.45) places the late-glacial equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) at ˜4485 masl, as compared to an estimated modern ELA of ˜5100 masl. The late-glacial Querococha advance was coeval with late-glacial advances at the Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (10°00'S, 77°16'W; peaks ˜5600 masl), ˜35 km to the south, where we have dated multiple moraines. Surface-exposure ages (10Be) indicate that the largest lateral moraines from Jeullesh Valley at NJR are compound features deposited during both the local last glacial maximum (˜30 ka) and a late-glacial readvance (˜15 ka). Late-glacial moraines are the largest lateral moraines in neighboring Quenua Ragra and Tuco valleys. The timing of the late-glacial advances in the Cordillera Blanca suggests a link to increased precipitation associated with Heinrich Event I (˜17 ka). Additional new 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on a moraine crossing a side valley in the upper reaches of Jeullesh Valley are early Holocene (˜9-11 ka), suggesting retreat of 3-4 km from the late-glacial terminal position in ˜4 kyr. Using the same THAR methodology, the late-glacial ELA in Jeullesh Valley was ˜4815 masl and the early Holocene ELA was ˜4995 masl. The active, west-dipping Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault (CBNF) vertically offsets the crests of 10Be-dated moraines in six valleys where we have profiled CBNF scarps: Jeullesh, Quenua Ragra, and Tuco valleys in the NJR massif; and Llaca, Cojup, and Querococha valleys in the south-central Cordillera Blanca (9°28'-45'S, 77°28'-21'W). In Jeullesh Valley, the CBNF scarp offsets both late

  6. Using the 10-Be Grain Size Dependency in Alluvial Sediments to Investigate Hillslope and Channel Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmont, P.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Gosse, J.

    2006-12-01

    The method for estimating basin-wide erosion rates from in situ produced 10-Be in alluvial sediments has matured over the past decade; nevertheless, several applications have not been fully explored. Foremost among these is identifying hillslope weathering and erosion processes through a study of the cosmogenic inventories of specific grain-size fractions of alluvial sediment. We applied a nested sampling strategy to two (6-12 km 2) basins on the Olympic Peninsula, western Washington State, to investigate how cosmogenic nuclides are sequestered across different alluvial grain sizes. Alluvium was sampled near the mouth and headwaters of each basin. The 10-Be concentration in river-borne quartz was measured for two grain-size fractions, medium-sized sand (0.25 - 0.50 mm) and an amalgamation of 80+ cobbles (22.6 - 90 mm). Extensive granulometry was conducted at each site and several different methods were used to qualify weathering intensity of channel boulders, which differs substantially for the two basins. We observed different concentrations of 10-Be in all eight grain size fractions. At both headwater sites the cobbles consistently exhibit 25% lower 10-Be concentrations, compared to sand. In contrast, the cobbles in the downstream sites differed with one basin exhibiting 22% higher 10-Be concentration compared to sand and the other site exhibiting 55% lower 10-Be concentration in the cobbles, compared to sand. A GIS was used to extract basin morphological metrics including basin hypsometry, hillslope gradient and channel gradient. Concentrations of 10-Be at the headwater sites are best explained by shielding of the coarser grain size fraction and its delivery to the channel by deep-seated landslide processes. The contrasting grain-size dependency at the two downstream sites requires a more complex interplay between hillslope and channel processes including cobble weathering and grain size reduction during fluvial transport. Although preliminary, these results

  7. A thin transition film formed by plasma exposure contributes to the germanium surface hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumei, Lai; Danfeng, Mao; Zhiwei, Huang; Yihong, Xu; Songyan, Chen; Cheng, Li; Wei, Huang; Dingliang, Tang

    2016-09-01

    Plasma treatment and 10% NH4OH solution rinsing were performed on a germanium (Ge) surface. It was found that the Ge surface hydrophilicity after O2 and Ar plasma exposure was stronger than that of samples subjected to N2 plasma exposure. This is because the thin GeO x film formed on Ge by O2 or Ar plasma is more hydrophilic than GeO x N y formed by N2 plasma treatment. A flat (RMS < 0:5 nm) Ge surface with high hydrophilicity (contact angle smaller than 3°) was achieved by O2 plasma treatment, showing its promising application in Ge low-temperature direct wafer bonding. Project supported by the Key Project of Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61534005), the National Science Foundation of China (No. 61474081), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CB632103), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province (No. 2015D020), and the Science and Technology Project of Xiamen City (No. 3502Z20154091).

  8. Paleoseismology of Upper Plate Faults in the Chilean Covergent Margin: Insights from 10BE and OSL Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Cortes, J. A.; Binnie, S.; Robinson, R.; Toledo, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Chilean convergent margin is the locus of most of the largest subduction earthquakes recorded in history. Slip deficit along this plate boundary is absorbed by elastic deformation of the upper plate. Numerical models and geodetic data suggest a fully elastic behaviour of the overriding crust and that deformation is balanced between inter- and co-seismic phases earthquake cycle; thus, non permanent deformation should be expected. However,the topographic surface of the coastal area, especially in the arid northern region of Chile (18°-26°S), shows clear evidences of permanent deformation expressed as kilometric-long fault scarps produced by normal faults. It suggests that normal faulting is a regional-scale extended process characteristic of the near surface structure of the upper plate. Some unanswered, yet critical, questions in this plate boundary are the present activity of these faults and the causal relationship between them and the subduction earthquake cycle. In order to answer these questions we conducted a paleoseismological project aimed at understanding the most recent activity of the upper plate faults in northern Chile. Here, we present the first results of two main faults located nearby the city of Antofagasta and the Mejillones Peninsula. One of these faults corresponds to the main strand of the Atacama Fault System whereas the other is the Mejillones Fault. At least 18 trenches were excavated for paleoseismological logging across these faults. OSL samples were extracted from wedge shaped colluvium and 10Be exposures ages were determined in alluvial surfaces displaced by the faults. Our results indicate that fault scarps were formed during Late Pleistocene-Holocene with a fault slip rate of 0.3 to 0.6 m/ky. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these faults generated large Mw~7 earthquakes with recurrence interval of many thousands years. In the Mejillones Fault, we determined that the elapsed time since the last large earthquake Mw~6.7 is ~3 ky BP

  9. Cosmogenic 10Be and Paleoaccumulation Rates at WAIS Divide from 12-19 kyr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Caffee, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be in polar ice samples are affected by variations in solar activity, geomagnetic field strength, atmospheric mixing and annual snow accumulation rates. We are presently engaged in a study to obtain a continuous 10Be record in a deep ice core (WDC06A) that was drilled at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide, a site with an average snow accumulation rate of ~20 cm weq/yr, similar to the GISP2 site in Greenland. We previously reported 10Be in annual layers in the top 114 m of WDC06A (Woodruff et al. 2011) and 10Be and 36Cl at decadal resolution in the top 560 m (Welten et al. 2009), and are now measuring 10Be in samples from a depth of 1800-2500 m, corresponding to preliminary ages of 10-20 kyr BP. We separated 10Be from ice samples of 300-600 g, following procedures described previously (Finkel and Nishiizumi 1997) and measured 10Be concentrations by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME lab. So far, we measured 10Be in 50 ice samples with ages between 12.3-13.9 kyr BP, at a resolution of ~30 yr/sample, and 50 samples from 15.6-19.0 kyr BP at an average resolution of ~70 yr/sample. The 10Be depth profile shows a relative constant value of (28 ± 3) x 10^3 atoms/g for samples younger than 18 kyr BP and a value of (41 ± 3) x 10^3 atoms/g for ice from 18.2-19.0 kyr BP. These values are 50-120% higher than the average concentration of 18.4 x 10^3 atoms/g for WAIS Divide ice samples from the last 420 year of snow accumulation. Although the higher 10Be concentrations in ice from the last glacial stage can be partly attributed to a 10-20% lower geomagnetic field strength (and thus a higher global 10Be production rate), they are mainly due to lower snow accumulation rates during the last glacial stage. After applying corrections for changes in geomagnetic field strength based on the SINT-800 record, we derive average snow accumulation rates of 13-15 cm weq/yr for the age interval of 12-18 kyr BP and of ~10 cm weq/yr for 18.2-19.0 kyr

  10. 10Be measurements at MALT using reduced-size samples of bulk sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho; Oniyanagi, Itsumi; Wasada, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In order to establish 10Be measurements on reduced-size (1-10 mg) samples of bulk sediments, we investigated four different pretreatment designs using lacustrine and marginal-sea sediments and the AMS system of the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT) at The University of Tokyo. The 10Be concentrations obtained from the samples of 1-10 mg agreed within a precision of 3-5% with the values previously determined using corresponding ordinary-size (∼200 mg) samples and the same AMS system. This fact demonstrates reliable determinations of 10Be with milligram levels of recent bulk sediments at MALT. On the other hand, a clear decline of the BeO- beam with tens of micrograms of 9Be carrier suggests that the combination of ten milligrams of sediments and a few hundred micrograms of the 9Be carrier is more convenient at this stage.

  11. Surface analytical study of the corrosion behaviour of chromate passivated Al 2014 A T-6 during salt fog exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treacy, G. M.; Wilcox, G. D.

    2000-03-01

    Surface analysis, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and laser induced mass analysis (LIMA), was carried out on chromate conversion coated aluminium alloy 2014 A T-6 prior to, and after, exposure to a neutral sodium chloride salt fog environment. From XPS, no chromium could be detected at these surfaces after a 48-h salt fog exposure. AES also indicated that the chromium content decreased after a 24-h salt fog exposure. However, from depth profiling, carried out using AES prior to and after a 24-h salt fog exposure, the chromium concentration was observed to increase within a few nanometres of the surface, and appeared unaffected by the exposure to the corrosive salt fog environment. During exposure, dark stains were observed to develop on these surfaces within 48 h. LIMA, carried out on these stained areas, indicated the presence of Fe, CN and Cu species, as well as aluminium hydroxide species, indicating that this initial coating failure may occur at copper-containing intermetallic sites on these surfaces. It would appear that the appearance of black stains on these surfaces is the first indication of coating failure, rather than the development of white corrosion product (WCP), as the appearance of such stains coincided with the loss of chromate species from the surface.

  12. Airborne benzene exposures from cleaning metal surfaces with small volumes of petroleum solvents.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Dana M; Kerger, Brent D; Unice, Kenneth M; Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Madl, Amy K; Sahmel, Jennifer E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-06-01

    Airborne benzene concentrations were measured in a room with controlled air exchange during surface cleaning with two petroleum-based solvents (a paint thinner and an engine degreaser). The solvents were spiked with benzene to obtain target concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1% by volume in the liquid. Personal samples on the worker and area samples up to 1.8m away were collected over 12 events (n=84 samples) designed to examine variation in exposure with solvent type, cleaning method (rag wipe or spatula scrape), surface area cleaned, air exchange rate, solvent volume applied, and distance from the cleaned surface. Average task breathing zone concentrations of benzene represented by 18-32 min time-weighted averages were 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 0.27 ppm, when the solvents contained approximately 0.003, 0.008, and 0.07% benzene. Solvent benzene concentration, volume applied, and distance from the handling activities had the greatest effect on airborne concentrations. The studied solvent products containing 0.07% benzene (spiked) did not exceed the current OSHA permissible exposure limit of 1 ppm (averaged over 8h) or the ACGIH Threshold Limit Value of 0.5 ppm, in any of the tested short-term exposure scenarios. These data suggest that, under these solvent use scenarios, petroleum-based solvent products produced in the United States after 1978 likely did not produce airborne benzene concentrations above those measured if the concentration was less than 0.1% benzene. PMID:23088855

  13. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Lucy A.; Davies, Catrin M.; Coakley, Raymond D.; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Henderson, Ashley G.; Zeman, Kirby L.; Worthington, Erin N.; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Cholon, Deborah; Bennett, William D.; Riordan, John R.; Boucher, Richard C.; Tarran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induces mucus obstruction and the development of chronic bronchitis (CB). While many of these responses are determined genetically, little is known about the effects CS can exert on pulmonary epithelia at the protein level. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that CS exerts direct effects on the CFTR protein, which could impair airway hydration, leading to the mucus stasis characteristic of both cystic fibrosis and CB. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that CS rapidly decreased CFTR activity, leading to airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion (i.e., dehydration). Further studies revealed that CS induced internalization of CFTR. Surprisingly, CS-internalized CFTR did not colocalize with lysosomal proteins. Instead, the bulk of CFTR shifted to a detergent-resistant fraction within the cell and colocalized with the intermediate filament vimentin, suggesting that CS induced CFTR movement into an aggresome-like, perinuclear compartment. To test whether airway dehydration could be reversed, we used hypertonic saline (HS) as an osmolyte to rehydrate ASL. HS restored ASL height in CS-exposed, dehydrated airway cultures. Similarly, inhaled HS restored mucus transport and increased clearance in patients with CB. Thus, we propose that CS exposure rapidly impairs CFTR function by internalizing CFTR, leading to ASL dehydration, which promotes mucus stasis and a failure of mucus clearance, leaving smokers at risk for developing CB. Furthermore, our data suggest that strategies to rehydrate airway surfaces may provide a novel form of therapy for patients with CB.—Clunes, L. A., Davies, C. M., Coakley, R. D., Aleksandrov, A. A., Henderson, A. G., Zeman, K. L., Worthington, E. N., Gentzsch, M., Kreda, S. M., Cholon, D., Bennett, W. D., Riordan, J. R., Boucher, R. C., Tarran, R. Cigarette smoke exposure induces CFTR internalization and insolubility, leading to airway surface liquid dehydration. PMID:21990373

  14. Exposure assessment of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol in surface waters of the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Robert; D'Aco, Vincent J; Anderson, Paul D; Buzby, Mary E; Caldwell, Daniel J; Cunningham, Virginia L; Ericson, Jon F; Johnson, Andrew C; Parke, Neil J; Samuelian, John H; Sumpter, John P

    2009-12-01

    An evaluation of measured and predicted concentrations of 17-ethinylestradiol in surface waters of the United States and Europe was conducted to develop expected long-term exposure concentrations for this compound. Measured environmental concentrations (MECs) in surface waters were identified from the literature. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were generated for European and U.S. watersheds using the GREAT-ER and PhATE models, respectively. The majority of MECs are nondetect and generally consistent with model PECs and conservative mass balance calculations. However, the highest MECs are not consistent with concentrations derived from conservative (worst-case) mass balance estimates or model PECs. A review of analytical methods suggests that tandem or high-resolution mass spectrometry methods with extract cleanup result in lower detection limits and lower reported concentrations consistent with model predictions and bounding estimates. Based on model results using PhATE and GREAT-ER, the 90th-percentile low-flow PECs in surface water are approximately 0.2 and 0.3 ng/L for the United States and Europe, respectively. These levels represent conservative estimates of long-term exposure that can be used for risk assessment purposes. Our analysis also indicates that average concentrations are one to two orders of magnitude lower than these 90th-percentile estimates. Higher reported concentrations (e.g., greater than the 99th-percentile PEC of approximately 1 ng/L) could result from methodological problems or unusual environmental circumstances; however, such concentrations are not representative of levels generally found in the environment, warrant special scrutiny, and are not appropriate for use in risk assessments of long-term exposures. PMID:19645524

  15. Airborne benzene exposures from cleaning metal surfaces with small volumes of petroleum solvents.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Dana M; Kerger, Brent D; Unice, Kenneth M; Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Madl, Amy K; Sahmel, Jennifer E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-06-01

    Airborne benzene concentrations were measured in a room with controlled air exchange during surface cleaning with two petroleum-based solvents (a paint thinner and an engine degreaser). The solvents were spiked with benzene to obtain target concentrations of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1% by volume in the liquid. Personal samples on the worker and area samples up to 1.8m away were collected over 12 events (n=84 samples) designed to examine variation in exposure with solvent type, cleaning method (rag wipe or spatula scrape), surface area cleaned, air exchange rate, solvent volume applied, and distance from the cleaned surface. Average task breathing zone concentrations of benzene represented by 18-32 min time-weighted averages were 0.01 ppm, 0.05 ppm, and 0.27 ppm, when the solvents contained approximately 0.003, 0.008, and 0.07% benzene. Solvent benzene concentration, volume applied, and distance from the handling activities had the greatest effect on airborne concentrations. The studied solvent products containing 0.07% benzene (spiked) did not exceed the current OSHA permissible exposure limit of 1 ppm (averaged over 8h) or the ACGIH Threshold Limit Value of 0.5 ppm, in any of the tested short-term exposure scenarios. These data suggest that, under these solvent use scenarios, petroleum-based solvent products produced in the United States after 1978 likely did not produce airborne benzene concentrations above those measured if the concentration was less than 0.1% benzene.

  16. Evidence for Multiple Sources of 10 Be in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielandt, Daniel; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Ivanova, Marina A.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t 1/2 = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of 10Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We report Li-Be-B isotope measurements of CAIs from CV chondrites, including CAIs that formed with the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of ~5 × 10-5 (canonical CAIs) and CAIs with Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects (FUN-CAIs) characterized by 26Al/27Al ratios much lower than the canonical value. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of four distinct fossil 10Be/9Be isochrons, lower in the FUN-CAIs than in the canonical CAIs, and variable within these classes. Given that FUN-CAI precursors escaped evaporation-recondensation prior to evaporative melting, we suggest that the 10Be/9Be ratio recorded by FUN-CAIs represents a baseline level present in presolar material inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud, generated via enhanced trapping of galactic cosmic rays. The higher and possibly variable apparent 10Be/9Be ratios of canonical CAIs reflect additional spallogenesis, either in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of 10Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for 10Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide with periods of intense particle irradiation occurring on timescales significantly shorter than the formation interval of canonical CAIs.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE SOURCES OF {sup 10}Be IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wielandt, Daniel; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R.; Ivanova, Marina A.

    2012-04-01

    Beryllium-10 is a short-lived radionuclide (t{sub 1/2} = 1.4 Myr) uniquely synthesized by spallation reactions and inferred to have been present when the solar system's oldest solids (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) formed. Yet, the astrophysical site of {sup 10}Be nucleosynthesis is uncertain. We report Li-Be-B isotope measurements of CAIs from CV chondrites, including CAIs that formed with the canonical {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratio of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} (canonical CAIs) and CAIs with Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects (FUN-CAIs) characterized by {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratios much lower than the canonical value. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of four distinct fossil {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isochrons, lower in the FUN-CAIs than in the canonical CAIs, and variable within these classes. Given that FUN-CAI precursors escaped evaporation-recondensation prior to evaporative melting, we suggest that the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio recorded by FUN-CAIs represents a baseline level present in presolar material inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud, generated via enhanced trapping of galactic cosmic rays. The higher and possibly variable apparent {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios of canonical CAIs reflect additional spallogenesis, either in the gaseous CAI-forming reservoir, or in the inclusions themselves: this indicates at least two nucleosynthetic sources of {sup 10}Be in the early solar system. The most promising locale for {sup 10}Be synthesis is close to the proto-Sun during its early mass-accreting stages, as these are thought to coincide with periods of intense particle irradiation occurring on timescales significantly shorter than the formation interval of canonical CAIs.

  18. Surface exposure dating of Little Ice Age ice cap advances on Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy; Jomelli, Vincent; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Swingedouw, Didier; Favier, Vincent; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA: 1200-1920 AD) glacier advances in Greenland often form the most extensive positions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) ice cap and margins since the Early Holocene. Across Greenland these advances are commonly represented by un-vegetated moraines, usually within 1-5 km of the present ice margin. However, chronological constraints on glacier advances during this period are sparse, meaning that GrIS and ice cap behavior and advance/retreat chronology remains poorly understood during this period. At present the majority of ages are based on historical accounts, ice core data, and radiocarbon ages from proglacial threshold lakes. However, developments in the accuracy and precision of surface exposure methods allow dating of LIA moraine boulders, permitting an opportunity to better understand of ice dynamics during this period. Geomorphological mapping and surface exposure dating (36Cl) were used to interpret moraine deposits from the Lyngmarksbræen on Disko Island, West Greenland. A Positive Degree Day (PDD) model was used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and mass balance changes for two distinct paleo-glacial extents. Three moraines (M1, M2, and M3) were mapped in the field, and sampled for 36Cl surface exposure dating. The outermost moraine (M1) was of clearly different morphology to the inner moraines, and present only in small fragments. M2 and M3 were distinct arcuate termino-lateral moraines within 50 m of one another, 1.5 km from the present ice margin. The weighted average of four 36Cl ages from M1 returned an early Holocene age of 8.4 ± 0.6 ka. M2 (four samples) returned an age of 0.57 ± 0.04 ka (1441 AD) and M3 (four samples) returned an age of 0.28 ± 0.02 ka (1732 AD). These surface exposure ages represent the first robustly dated Greenlandic ice cap moraine sequence from the LIA. The two periods of ice cap advance and marginal stabilisation are similar to recorded periods of LIA GrIS advance in west Greenland, constrained

  19. In situ produced 10Be depth profiles and luminescence data tracing climatic and tectonic control on terrace formation, Danube River, Central Europe, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Braucher, Régis; Novothny, Ágnes; Csillag, Gábor; Fodor, László; Molnár, Gábor; Madarász, Balázs; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    The terrace sequence of the Hungarian part of the Danube valley preserves a record of varying tectonic uplift rates along the river course and throughout several climate stages. To establish the chronology of formation of these terraces, two different dating methods on alluvial terraces were used: 1) in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be, which yield the time of abandonment of the terrace and 2) luminescence dating, which provides burial ages of the sediment. In situ produced cosmogenic 10Be samples originated from vertical depth profiles to enable the determination of both the exposure time and the denudation rate at each locality. We used Monte Carlo approach to model the denudation rate-corrected exposure ages. Post-IR IRSL measurements were carried out on K-feldspar samples to obtain the ages of sedimentation. The highest and oldest terrace remnants (tIV-VI) yield a minimum 10Be exposure age of 800 ka close to MIS 22, the onset of major continental glaciations of Quaternary age, suggesting climatic signal of the abandonment of the uppermost terrace levels. For the lower terraces it was possible to reveal close correlation with MIS stages using IRSL ages. The new chronology enables the distinction of tIIb (60-110 ka; MIS 4-5d) and tIIIa (130-190 ka; MIS 6) in the study area. Surface denudation rates were well constrained by the cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles between 5.9 m/Ma and 10.0 m/Ma for all terraces. Maximum incision rates of the Danube were calculated for middle and late Pleistocene times. These rates were increasing from west to east, toward the more elevated Transdanubian Range from 0.05 mm/a to 0.12 mm/a. Incision rates derived from the age of the low terraces (0.13 mm/a) may suggest a slight acceleration of uplift towards present. Our research was supported by the OTKA PD83610, PD100315, NK60455, K062478, K83150 and F042799, the French-Hungarian Balaton-Tét Project (FR-32/2007; TÉT_11-2-2012-0005), the Bolyai János Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy

  20. Proteins on ribosome surface: Measurements of protein exposure by hot tritium bombardment technique

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kolb, Vyacheslav A.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    1997-01-01

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [Goldanskii, V. I., Kashirin, I. A., Shishkov, A. V., Baratova, L. A. & Grebenshchikov, N. I. (1988) J. Mol. Biol. 201, 567–574] has been applied to measure the exposure of proteins on the ribosomal surface. The technique is based on replacement of hydrogen by high energy tritium atoms in thin surface layer of macromolecules. Quantitation of tritium radioactivity of each protein has revealed that proteins S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21 of the small subunit, and proteins L7/L12, L9, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, and L27 of the large subunit are well exposed on the surface of the Escherichia coli 70 S ribosome. Proteins S8, S10, S12, S16, S17, L14, L20, L29, L30, L31, L32, L33, and L34 have virtually no groups exposed on the ribosomal surface. The remaining proteins are found to be exposed to lesser degree than the well exposed ones. No additional ribosomal proteins was exposed upon dissociation of ribosomes into subunits, thus indicating the absence of proteins on intersubunit contacting surfaces. PMID:9371771

  1. Annual solar UV exposure and biological effective dose rates on the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. R.; Bérces, A.; Kerékgyárto, T.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) environment of Mars has been investigated to gain an understanding of the variation of exposure throughout a Martian year, and link this flux to biological effects and possible survival of organisms at the Martian surface. To gain an idea of how the solar UV radiation varies between different regions, including planned landing sites of two future Mars surface missions, we modelled the total solar UV surface flux throughout one Martian year for two different dust scenarios. To understand the degree of solar UV stress on micro-organisms and/or molecules essential for life on the surface of Mars, we also calculated the biologically effective dose (BED) for T7 and Uracil in relevant wavelength regions at the Martian surface as a function of season and latitude, and discuss the biological survival rates in the presence of Martian solar UV radiation. High T7/Uracil BED ratios indicate that even at high latitudes where the UV flux is significantly reduced, the radiation environment is still hostile for life due to the persisting UV-C component of the flux.

  2. Dehydration-Driven Solvent Exposure of Hydrophobic Surfaces as a Driving Force in Peptide Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Ulmschneider, Martin; DiNola, Alfredo; Amadei, Andrea; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the nature of hydration of pure hydrophobic surfaces changes with the length scale considered: water hydrogen-bonding networks adapt to small exposed hydrophobic species, hydrating or 'wetting' them at relatively high densities, whereas larger hydrophobic areas are 'dewetted' [Chandler D (2005), Nature 29:640-647]. Here we determine whether this effect is also present in peptides by examining the folding of a {beta}-hairpin (the 14-residue amyloidogenic prion protein H1 peptide), using microsecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Two simulation models are compared, one explicitly including the water molecules, which may thus adapt locally to peptide configurations, and the other using a popular continuum approximation, the generalized Born/surface area implicit solvent model. The results obtained show that, in explicit solvent, peptide conformers with high solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area indeed also have low hydration density around hydrophobic residues, whereas a concomitant higher hydration density around hydrophilic residues is observed. This dewetting effect stabilizes the fully folded {beta}-hairpin state found experimentally. In contrast, the implicit solvent model destabilizes the fully folded hairpin, tending to cluster hydrophobic residues regardless of the size of the exposed hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the rate of the conformational transitions in the implicit solvent simulation is almost doubled with respect to that of the explicit solvent. The results suggest that dehydration-driven solvent exposure of hydrophobic surfaces may be a significant factor determining peptide conformational equilibria.

  3. Exposure to particle number, surface area and PM concentrations in pizzerias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.; Viola, A.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify exposure to particles emitted by wood-fired ovens in pizzerias. Overall, 15 microenvironments were chosen and analyzed in a 14-month experimental campaign. Particle number concentration and distribution were measured simultaneously using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The surface area and mass distributions and concentrations, as well as the estimation of lung deposition surface area and PM 1 were evaluated using the SMPS-APS system with dosimetric models, by taking into account the presence of aggregates on the basis of the Idealized Aggregate (IA) theory. The fraction of inhaled particles deposited in the respiratory system and different fractions of particulate matter were also measured by means of a Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor (NSAM) and a photometer (DustTrak DRX), respectively. In this way, supplementary data were obtained during the monitoring of trends inside the pizzerias. We found that surface area and PM 1 particle concentrations in pizzerias can be very high, especially when compared to other critical microenvironments, such as the transport hubs. During pizza cooking under normal ventilation conditions, concentrations were found up to 74, 70 and 23 times higher than background levels for number, surface area and PM 1, respectively. A key parameter is the oven shape factor, defined as the ratio between the size of the face opening in respect to the diameter of the semicircular oven door, and particular attention must also be paid to hood efficiency.

  4. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M.; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-09-01

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45°N, 51.06°W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic 10Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average 10Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65-90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on 10Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26-115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high 10Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP.

  5. 10Be climate fingerprints during the Eemian in the NEEM ice core, Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Sturevik-Storm, Anna; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Berggren, Ann-Marie; Muscheler, Raimund; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Vinther, Bo M.; Usoskin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Several deep Greenland ice cores have been retrieved, however, capturing the Eemian period has been problematic due to stratigraphic disturbances in the ice. The new Greenland deep ice core from the NEEM site (77.45°N, 51.06°W, 2450 m.a.s.l) recovered a relatively complete Eemian record. Here we discuss the cosmogenic 10Be isotope record from this core. The results show Eemian average 10Be concentrations about 0.7 times lower than in the Holocene which suggests a warmer climate and approximately 65–90% higher precipitation in Northern Greenland compared to today. Effects of shorter solar variations on 10Be concentration are smoothed out due to coarse time resolution, but occurrence of a solar maximum at 115.26–115.36 kyr BP is proposed. Relatively high 10Be concentrations are found in the basal ice sections of the core which may originate from the glacial-interglacial transition and relate to a geomagnetic excursion about 200 kyr BP. PMID:25266953

  6. Dilute Nuclear States: {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.

    2008-11-11

    The experimental evidence for dilute {alpha}-particle states in {sup 12}C, {sup 10}Be and {sup 14}C is discussed. The question of the location of the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV {sup 12}C state remains unresolved, as does the existence of possible analogue states in {sup 14}C.

  7. Using 10Be records to identify possible 14C calibration uncertainties during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimund, Muscheler

    2010-05-01

    The Intcal04 and Intcal09 radiocarbon calibration records are based on multiple tree-ring 14C data sets for Holocene period (Reimer et al. 2004, Reimer et al. 2009). While the dendrochronolgical dating of the trees is supposedly free of errors there are differences between various 14C data sets that underlie the 14C calibration curve. Due to lack of knowledge about the reasons for the differences the Intcal04/09 calibration curves provide a smoothed average of the underlying 14C records. Therefore, problems in one or several of the underlying 14C records would translate directly into errors in the 14C age calibration. Additional knowledge about expected variations in the 14C production rate could help to improve the calibration record since it would allow us to assess how well the different 14C records represent the atmospheric 14C concentration. I propose that 10Be records could be used as additional criteria to chose which of the published 14C records should be preferred (or given stronger weight) for the construction of the calibration curve. Alternatively, 10Be records could point to periods where 14C data should be re-measured in order to improve the calibration curve. I will show for some case studies that the 10Be records from the Greenland ice cores (Muscheler et al. 2004, Vonmoos et al. 2006) indeed provide useful information to scrutinise the Intcal04/09 calibration curve, which could help to improve the 14C calibration curve during the Holocene. Especially shorter-term changes are strongly dampened in the Intcal04/09 calibration record. However, 10Be and some 14C records do exhibit more variability as compared to the calibration record. Therefore, the combined 10Be/14C approach could add confidence that these should be reflected in the 14C calibration record. References: Muscheler, R., Beer, J. et al., 2004. Changes in the carbon cycle during the last deglaciation as indicated by the comparison of 10Be and 14C records. Earth and Planetary Science Letters

  8. 10Be-derived Himalayan denudation rates and sediment budgets in the Ganga basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Lavé, Jérôme; France-Lanord, Christian; Leanni, Laetitia; Puchol, Nicolas; Charreau, Julien; Bourlès, Didier

    2012-06-01

    The Himalayas represent the archetype of mountain building due to active continental collision and are considered in many studies as the locus of intense interactions between climate, denudation and tectonics. Estimates of modern denudation rates across the entire range remain, however, relatively sparse. In this study, in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be concentrations were measured in detritic quartz in order to determine basin-scale denudation rates for the central part of the Himalayan range. River sand was sampled over several years in the main trans-Himalayan rivers, from the Himalayan front to the Ganga outlet in Bangladesh. The calculated 10Be denudation rates of the trans-Himalayan river basins range from 0.5 to 2.4 mm yr-1 (average 1.3 mm yr-1) and vary by up to a factor of 3 between sampling years. These denudation rates strongly contrast with the 0.007 mm yr-1 denudation rate of southern tributary basins draining the Indian craton. This work also shows that in the Ganga basin, no systematic evolution of average 10Be concentrations is observed during floodplain transfer, implying that distal samples can be used to estimate the integrated denudation rate of the whole central Himalayan range. Samples from the Ganga in Bangladesh display remarkably low variability in 10Be concentration, implying an average Himalayan denudation rate of 1.0-1.1 mm yr-1. However, within the floodplain, several samples suggest a recent perturbation of sediment transport dynamics with a recent increase in the relative sediment contribution from southern tributaries. The Himalayan sediment flux, deduced from the 10Be denudation rate of the range, is 610±230 Mt yr-1. This flux is consistent, within uncertainty, with sediment fluxes derived from sediment gauging. The similarity of the two flux estimates suggests that Himalayan erosion fluxes have remained stable over the last centuries, even if the large uncertainties associated with each method hamper more precise assessments.

  9. Characterization of exposures among cemented tungsten carbide workers. Part II: Assessment of surface contamination and skin exposures to cobalt, chromium and nickel.

    PubMed

    Day, Gregory A; Virji, M Abbas; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2009-05-01

    Cobalt, chromium and nickel are among the most commonly encountered contact allergens in the workplace, all used in the production of cemented tungsten carbides (CTC). Exposures to these metal-containing dusts are frequently associated with skin sensitization and/or development of occupational asthma. The objectives of this study were to assess the levels of cobalt, chromium and nickel on work surfaces and on workers' skin in three CTC production facilities. At least one worker in each of 26 work areas (among all facilities) provided hand and neck wipe samples. Wipe samples were also collected from work surfaces frequently contacted by the 41 participating workers. Results indicated that all surfaces in all work areas were contaminated with cobalt and nickel, with geometric means (GMs) ranging from 4.1 to 3057 microg/100 cm(2) and 1.1-185 microg/100 cm(2), respectively; most surfaces were contaminated with chromium (GM=0.36-67 microg/100 cm(2)). The highest GM levels of all metals were found on control panels, containers and hand tools, whereas lowest levels were on office and telecommunication equipment. The highest GM levels of cobalt and nickel on skin were observed among workers in the powder-handling facility (hands: 388 and 24 microg; necks: 55 and 6 microg, respectively). Levels of chromium on workers' skin were generally low among all facilities. Geometric standard deviations associated with surface and skin wipe measurements among work areas were highly variable. Exposure assessment indicated widespread contamination of multiple sensitizing metals in these three facilities, suggesting potential transfer of contaminants from surfaces to skin. Specific action, including improved housekeeping and training workers on appropriate use and care of personal protective equipment, should be implemented to reduce pathways of skin exposure. Epidemiologic studies of associated adverse health effects will likely require more biologically relevant exposure metrics to

  10. The Last Glacial Maximum at 44°S documented by a 10Be moraine chronology at Lake Ohau, Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Aaron E.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Denton, George H.; Barrell, David J. A.; Birkel, Sean D.; Andersen, Bjørn G.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Finkel, Robert C.; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M.

    2013-02-01

    Determining whether glaciers registered the classic Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ˜26,500-˜19,000 yrs ago) coevally between the hemispheres can help to discriminate among hypothesized drivers of ice-age climate. Here, we present a record of glacier behavior from the Southern Alps of New Zealand during the 'local LGM' (LLGM). We used 10Be surface-exposure dating methods and detailed glacial geomorphologic mapping to produce a robust chronology of well-preserved terminal moraines deposited during the LLGM near Lake Ohau on central South Island. We then used a glaciological model to estimate a LLGM glacier snowline and atmospheric temperature from the Ohau glacier record. Seventy-three 10Be surface-exposure ages place culminations of terminal moraine construction, and hence completions of glacier advances to positions outboard of present-day Lake Ohau, at 138,600 ± 10,600 yrs, 32,520 ± 970 yrs ago, 27,400 ± 1300 yrs ago, 22,510 ± 660 yrs ago, and 18,220 ± 500 yrs ago. Recessional moraines document glacier recession into the Lake Ohau trough by 17,690 ± 350 yrs ago. Exposure of an ice-molded bedrock bench located inboard of the innermost LLGM moraines by 17,380 ± 510 yrs ago indicates that the ice tongue had receded about 40% of its overall length by that time. Comparing our chronology with distances of retreat suggests that the Ohau glacier terminus receded at a mean net rate of about 77 m yr-1 and its surface lowered by 200 m between 17,690 and 17,380 yrs ago. A long-term continuation of ice retreat in the Ohau glacier catchment is implied by moraine records at the head of Irishman Stream valley, a tributary of the Ohau glacier valley. The Irishman Stream cirque glacier advanced to produce a set of Lateglacial moraines at 13,000 ± 500 yrs ago, implying that the cirque glacier was less extensive prior to that advance. We employed a glaciological model, fit to these mapped and dated LLGM moraines, to derive snowline elevations and temperature parameters from the

  11. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  12. Exposure simulation for pharmaceuticals in European surface waters with GREAT-ER.

    PubMed

    Schowanek, Diederik; Webb, Simon

    2002-05-10

    The Geo-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers (GREAT-ER) model was developed as an aquatic chemical exposure prediction tool for use within environmental risk assessment (ERA) schemes and river basin management. The GREAT-ER software calculates the distribution of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) of consumer chemicals in surface waters, for individual river stretches, as well as representative average PECs for entire catchments. The system uses an ARC/INFO-ArcView (ESRI) based Geographical Information System (GIS) for data storage and visualization, combined with simple mathematical models for prediction of chemical fate. Use of GREAT-ER 1.03 to derive PECs is illustrated for Ethinyl Oestradiol, Paracetamol, Aspirin, Dextropropoxyphene, Clofibrate and Oxytetracycline in three river basins, i.e. Aire (UK), Lambro (Italy) and Rur (Germany). In contrast with household consumer chemicals the transformation of pharmaceuticals in the human body needs to be incorporated in the emission estimation. The "PECinitial" of these pharmaceuticals in surface waters ranges from >1 microg/l (Oxytetracycline and Paracetamol) down to <1 ng/l (Ethinyl Oestradiol). Risk characterization employing PECs or measured environmental concentrations (MECs) and predicted-no-effect-concentrations (PNECs) from available ecotoxicity data is also reported. PMID:11988357

  13. Consideration of geomorphological uncertainties with terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND): combining Schmidt-hammer and 10Be dating, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    As the importance of glaciers as key indicators of global change has increased during recent years, investigating Holocene glaciers chronologies has gained higher attention accordingly. One reason is the need for a better understanding of the climate - glacier relationship. Comparative studies play a major role in this field of research owing to the natural diversity of glacier behaviour. Detailed Holocene glacier chronologies are, furthermore, necessary to verify and eventually adjust glacier models indispensable for many attempts to predict future glacier changes. The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the few key study areas on the Southern Hemisphere where, in general, evidence is still sparse compared to its Northern counterpart. Improvement and reassessment of the Late Holocene glacier chronology in this region is, therefore, an important goal of current research. Recently, terrestrial (in situ) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating has been increasingly applied to Holocene moraines in New Zealand and elsewhere. In the context of numerical ("absolute") dating techniques, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) seems to have been established as an alternative to the previously dominating radiocarbon (14C) dating of organic material (plant remains, organic-rich soil layers etc.) buried beneath or within moraines. Precision and time resolution achieved by the newest laboratory standards and procedures (Schaefer et al. 2009) is truly a milestone and will promote future attempts of TCND in any comparable context. Maybe, TCND has the potential to at least partially replace radiocarbon (14C) dating in its dominating role for the "absolute" dating of Holocene glacial deposits. By contrast, field sampling for TCND often lacks appropriate consideration of geomorphological uncertainties. Whereas much effort is made with the high precision results achieved in the laboratory, the choice of boulders sampled on Holocene moraines is often purely made

  14. Identifying signals of Late Pleistocene climate change from cosmogenic 10Be chronologies of moraines in the western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, B. J. C.; Licciardi, J. M.; Leonard, E. M.; Munroe, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating has become the most widely applied method of developing ages of terminal moraines in the western U.S. Advances in the precision of analytical measurements along with a more accurate understanding of spatial and temporal variations in the production of in situ 10Be have improved the accuracy of cosmogenic exposure dating of moraines. Such improvements afford more accurate assessment of the impact of regional and global-scale climate changes of the Late Pleistocene on glaciation in the western U.S. A great number of new and recalculated cosmogenic 10Be exposure ages of moraines are considered here to identify the most probable drivers of changes in ice extent at the end of the last glacial period. The last Pleistocene glaciation culminated in the western U.S. during marine oxygen isotope stage 2, before or during the onset of the global Last Glacial Maximum at ca. 26.5 ka. Terminal moraine abandonment in several ranges corresponds to the end of the Last Glacial Maximum at ca. 19.0 ka. This observation indicates that most mountain glaciers started retreating in step with the decline of global ice volume, and possibly in response to rising insolation at northern middle latitudes. In some regions, such as the Northern Rocky Mountains and the Great Basin, mountain glaciers apparently advanced to or persisted near their maximum terminus positions well after the start of global deglaciation, during the interval of the Oldest Dryas/Heinrich Stadial 1 (ca. 19.0-14.6 ka). Although changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns during this time likely affected mountain glacier extent, rapid ice retreat commenced in nearly all settings by 17.0-16.0 ka. This indication of warming prior to the onset of the Bølling-Allerød interval at ca. 14.6 ka is consistent with records from elsewhere at northern middle latitudes, and supports the hypothesis that warming of the region was in phase with a global rise in atmospheric CO2. This

  15. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records using meteoric 10Be flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, B.; Balco, G.; Ridge, J. C.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. An age estimate for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves implies a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these events by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. We are generating such a record at present. First, we are analyzing short varve sections at high temporal resolution to evaluate the magnitude of solar variability signals; a single section analyzed so far displays interannual variability with a period consistent

  16. Cobalt and chromium exposure affects osteoblast function and impairs the mineralization of prosthesis surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Gartland, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ions and nanoparticles equivalent to those released through tribo-corrosion of prosthetic metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings and taper junctions are detrimental to osteoblast activity and function in vitro when examined as individual species. Here we examined the effects of Co(2+):Cr(3+) and Co(2+):Cr(6+) combinations on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cellular activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization to better reflect clinical exposure conditions in vivo. We also assessed the effect of Co(2+):Cr(3+) combinations and Co:Cr nanoparticles on SaOS-2 cell osteogenic responses on grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated, and hydroxyapatite-coated prosthesis surfaces. Cellular activity and ALP activity were reduced to a greater extent with combination treatments compared to individual ions. Co(2+) and Cr(3+) interacted additively and synergistically to reduce cellular activity and ALP activity, respectively, while the Co(2+) with Cr(6+) combination was dominated by the effect of Cr(6+) alone. Mineralization by osteoblasts was greater on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces compared to grit-blasted and plasma-sprayed titanium-coated surfaces. Treatments with Co(2+):Cr(3+) ions and Co:Cr nanoparticles reduced the percentage mineralization on all surfaces, with hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces having the least reduction. In conclusion, our data suggests that previous studies investigating individual metal ions underestimate their potential clinical effects on osteoblast activity. Furthermore, the data suggests that hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces may modulate osteoblast responses to metal debris.

  17. Radiative 10Be(n, γ)11Be capture at thermal and astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The modified potential cluster model with the forbidden states and the classification of states according to the Young tableaux, which are irreducible representations of permutation symmetric group SU(4), was used in this paper. Within the framework of this model the possibility of describing the experimental data available for the total reaction cross sections and the reaction rate of neutron radiative capture on 10Be at thermal and astrophysical energies has been shown.

  18. Solar Ion Processing of Itokawa Grains: Constraints on Surface Exposure Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical TEM observations obtained to date reveal that a significant sub-population of grains returned from the surface of asteroid Itokawa have had their outer 30-100 nm processed by space weathering effects. Although the effects include some surface deposition of condensed impact vapor and isolated impact melt splashes, much of the width of the space weathered outer margins or "rims" on grains is derived from solar wind processing of the original host grain. Similar to what has long been reported for some lunar grains, the ion-processed rims on Itokawa grains exhibit varing degrees and depths of penetration of atomic-displacement ion damage, resulting in complete amorphization for some rims (particularly in plagioclase), or formation of highly defective but still crystalline structures in others (particularly in pyroxene and olivine). Possibly different from lunar grains, however, is the presence of isolated internal cavities or voids in Itokawa grain rims, which may be implantation "bubbles" due to accumulating implanted solar wind H and/or He. For a given mineral exposed at a particular set of long term solar wind conditions, the level of ion damage in a given grain rim, the depth of damage penetration represented by the rim width, and the formation or lack of formation of implantation bubbles can all be linked to the time spent by the grain in an uncovered state on the topmost, space-exposed, regolith surface. For the lunar case, we have previously shown that with reasonable assumptions about solar wind characteristics over time, a model can be developed to estimate this exposure time based on the width of amorphous rims on lunar grains. Here we report on an expansion of the model to cover exposure time information contained in the array of solar ion-induced features in Itokawa grains.

  19. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  1. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  2. 10Be measured in a GRIP snow pit and modeled using the ECHAM5-HAM general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, U.; Beer, J.; Jouzel, J.; Feichter, J.; Kubik, P.

    2008-03-01

    10Be measured in a Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) snow pit (1986-1990) with a seasonal resolution is compared with the ECHAM5-HAM GCM run. The mean modeled 10Be concentration in ice (1.0.104 atoms/g) agrees well with the measured value (1.2.104 atoms/g). The measured 10Be deposition flux (88 atoms/m2/s) also agrees well with the modeled flux (69 atoms/m2/s) and the measured precipitation rate (0.67 mm/day) agrees with the modeled rate (0.61 mm/day). The mean surface temperature of -31°C estimated from δ 18O is lower than the temperature measured at a near-by weather station (-29°C) and the modeled temperature (-26°C). During the 5-year period the concentrations and deposition fluxes, both measured and modeled, show a decreasing trend consistent with the increase in the solar activity. The variability of the measured and modeled concentrations and deposition fluxes is very similar suggesting that the variability is linked to a variability in production rather than the local meteorology.

  3. COMMON ISSUES IN HUMAN AND ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PARTITIONING, KINETICS, AND UPTAKE AT BIOLOGICAL EXCHANGE SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exogenous chemicals enter organisms through critical surfaces in the lung, gills, gut, and skin. Transfer across these boundaries is the first step in characterizing the ratio of tissue dose to external exposure. Surface processes and fugacity are important elements of both human...

  4. Reconciling tectonic shortening, sedimentation and spatial patterns of erosion from 10Be paleo-erosion rates in the Argentine Precordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val, Pedro; Hoke, Gregory D.; Fosdick, Julie C.; Wittmann, Hella

    2016-09-01

    The temporal evolution of erosion over million-year timescales is key to understand the development of mountain ranges and adjacent fold-and-thrust belts. While models of orogenic wedge dynamics predict an instantaneous response of erosion to pulses of rock uplift, stream-power based models predict that catchment-wide erosion maxima significantly lag behind a pulse of rock uplift. Here, we explore the relationships between rock uplift, erosion, and sediment deposition in the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt at 30°S. Using a combination of 10Be-derived paleo-erosion rates, constraints on re-exposure using 26Al/10Be ratios, geomorphic observations and detrital zircon provenance, we demonstrate that the attainment of maximum upland erosion rates lags the maximum rate of deformation over million-year timescales. The magnitudes and causes of the erosional delays shed new light on the catchment erosional response to tectonic deformation and rock uplift in orogenic wedges.

  5. Estimated crop yield losses due to surface ozone exposure and economic damage in India.

    PubMed

    Debaje, S B

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we estimate yield losses and economic damage of two major crops (winter wheat and rabi rice) due to surface ozone (O3) exposure using hourly O3 concentrations for the period 2002-2007 in India. This study estimates crop yield losses according to two indices of O3 exposure: 7-h seasonal daytime (0900-1600 hours) mean measured O3 concentration (M7) and AOT40 (accumulation exposure of O3 concentration over a threshold of 40 parts per billion by volume during daylight hours (0700-1800 hours), established by field studies. Our results indicate that relative yield loss from 5 to 11% (6-30%) for winter wheat and 3-6% (9-16%) for rabi rice using M7 (AOT40) index of the mean total winter wheat 81 million metric tons (Mt) and rabi rice 12 Mt production per year for the period 2002-2007. The estimated mean crop production loss (CPL) for winter wheat are from 9 to 29 Mt, account for economic cost loss was from 1,222 to 4,091 million US$ annually. Similarly, the mean CPL for rabi rice are from 0.64 to 2.1 Mt, worth 86-276 million US$. Our calculated winter wheat and rabi rice losses agree well with previous results, providing the further evidence that large crop yield losses occurring in India due to current O3 concentration and further elevated O3 concentration in future may pose threat to food security.

  6. Erosion rills offset the efficacy of vegetated buffer strips to mitigate pesticide exposure in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Stehle, Sebastian; Dabrowski, James Michael; Bangert, Uli; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory risk assessment considers vegetated buffer strips as effective risk mitigation measures for the reduction of runoff-related pesticide exposure of surface waters. However, apart from buffer strip widths, further characteristics such as vegetation density or the presence of erosion rills are generally neglected in the determination of buffer strip mitigation efficacies. This study conducted a field survey of fruit orchards (average slope 3.1-12.2%) of the Lourens River catchment, South Africa, which specifically focused on the characteristics and attributes of buffer strips separating orchard areas from tributary streams. In addition, in-stream and erosion rill water samples were collected during three runoff events and GIS-based modeling was employed to predict losses of pesticides associated with runoff. The results show that erosion rills are common in buffer strips (on average 13 to 24 m wide) of the tributaries (up to 6.5 erosion rills per km flow length) and that erosion rills represent concentrated entry pathways of pesticide runoff into the tributaries during rainfall events. Exposure modeling shows that measured pesticide surface water concentrations correlated significantly (R(2)=0.626; p<0.001) with runoff losses predicted by the modeling approach in which buffer strip width was set to zero at sites with erosion rills; in contrast, no relationship between predicted runoff losses and in-stream pesticide concentrations were detected in the modeling approach that neglected erosion rills and thus assumed efficient buffer strips. Overall, the results of our study show that erosion rills may substantially reduce buffer strip pesticide retention efficacies during runoff events and suggest that the capability of buffer strips as a risk mitigation tool for runoff is largely overestimated in current regulatory risk assessment procedures conducted for pesticide authorization.

  7. Improved Timing of Deglaciation of the Southwestern Scandinavian Ice Sheet Using 10Be Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, D.; Briner, J. P.; Svendsen, J. I.; Mangerud, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present 28 new 10Be ages from glacial erratic boulders to constrain Scandinavian Ice Sheet deglaciation along the major fjord system of Boknafjorden in southwest Norway. Results indicate ages in the range 20-14 ka and complement our previous findings that the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) had retreated some 400 km as early as ~20 ka (Svendsen et al., 2015) and further corroborate that this was followed by a second pulse of deglaciation at ~16 ka. After the immediate coast was rendered an ice-free corridor at ~20 ka, our new suite of ages identifies ~16 ka as a period of a possible culmination of re-advance, and almost certainly the onset of a subsequent period of retreat. These findings are promising for the possibility of long lake sediment archives from areas around the mouth of Boknafjorden. Additionally, by coupling our new 10Be ages of erratic boulders from sea level and from summits bordering Boknafjorden with topographic profiles and rudimentary ice-sheet profile calculations (Benn and Hulton, 2010), we are able to estimate spatial and temporal Scandinavian Ice Sheet history along both vertical and horizontal transects. Our results not only fill chronological gaps and add to a growing database of ages of deglaciation from the southwest Norway, but also provide new constraints for a three-dimensional reconstruction of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet during deglaciation.

  8. Meteoric 10Be in volcanic materials and its behavior during acid-leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Minoru; Hiyagon, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Imamura, Mineo

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the chemical and isotopic behavior of beryllium (Be) during acid leaching for removing meteoric 10Be in volcanic samples. Determination of the Be isotopic ratio in the leachate was carried out using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Elemental distribution of Be and other incompatible elements including boron (B) were also examined by ion microprobe (SIMS) for a deeper understanding of their chemical behavior in volcanic samples. SIMS analysis show that Be is concentrated in the groundmass together with B. However, the behavior of their elements during acid leaching is quite different. The Be concentration decreases through progressive leaching, while the concentration of B remains constant. Furthermore, the variation in the Be isotopic ratio after acid leaching is different between the two samples, neither of which has altered minerals under microscopic observation. It is demonstrated that meteoric 10Be resides in a rather narrow region of the rock and can be removed by acid leaching with minimum loss of the main host phase of Be.

  9. Calculated values of atomic oxygen fluences and solar exposure on selected surfaces of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. R.; Pippin, H. G.; Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) fluences and solar exposure have been modeled for selected hardware from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The atomic oxygen exposure was modeled using the microenvironment modeling code SHADOWV2. The solar exposure was modeled using the microenvironment modeling code SOLSHAD version 1.0.

  10. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Beck, J. Warren; Kong, Xianghui; An, Zhisheng; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Zhenkun; Xian, Feng; Ao, Hong

    2015-04-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19 (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996). These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess

  11. Water Mass Distribution and Particle Flux in the Arctic Ocean From Dissolved 10Be and 9Be Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Porcelli, D.; Andersson, P.; Halliday, A. N.; Kubik, P. W.; Hattendorf, B.; Guenther, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean basin is confined by landmasses similar to the Mediterranean. There is only little deep water formed seasonally on the shelves of the Arctic Ocean despite the low temperatures. This is due to a freshwater lid at the surface which originates from the Arctic rivers. The deeper Arctic Ocean water masses can thus only be renewed at comparatively low rates through the only deep connection to the Atlantic Ocean, the Fram Strait. At the same time the biogenic particulate fluxes in the central Arctic Ocean are very low due to perennial sea ice cover and the organic matter produced in the surface waters is remineralised efficiently. Detrital particle fluxes from either eolian or riverine sources are also very low. We will present the first combined dissolved 10Be (cosmogenic) and 9Be (continental sources) depth profiles from water samples of the major deep basins of the Arctic Ocean collected during the Swedish Arctic Ocean 2001 expedition. Be is 5-10 times less particle-reactive than other previously investigated radionuclides such as Th or Pa and should therefore even at the relatively low Arctic Ocean renewal rates serve as a quasi-conservative tracer for different origins of water masses (Atlantic Ocean/Norwegian Sea, Pacific Ocean, Arctic Shelves). 9Be and Nd isotope analyses provide complementary information on the pathways of dissolved material originating from the Arctic continents. Results obtained ten years ago at similar locations as in our study indicated a uniform distribution of 10Be at low values of 500 +/- 100 atoms/g suggesting restricted input and efficient homogenisation. In contrast, our new results show that in 2001 the inflowing waters from the Atlantic are traced by 10Be concentrations of up to 1100 atoms/g. In addition, the surface concentrations vary considerably. It will be discussed wether this is a consequence of a seasonal/decadal variability in the distribution of surface water masses, which has been deduced from oceanographic

  12. Quantifying denudation rates on inselbergs in the central Namib Desert using in situ-produced cosmogenic {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, H.A.P.; Summerfield, M.A.; Seidl, M.A.

    1999-05-01

    In situ-produced cosmogenic isotope concentrations in bedrock surfaces provide valuable estimates of site-specific, long-term rates of denudation and provide constraints for numerical landscape-evolution models. Measurements of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al from graphite inselbergs in the arid to hyperarid central Namib Desert, Namibia, indicate a mean rate of summit lowering of 5.07 {+-} 1.1 m/m.y. over the past {ge} 10{sup 5} yr. The persistence of an arid climate in the region suggests that a similar rate may have prevailed for the past {approximately} 10 m.y. and possibly throughout much of the Cenozoic. Some samples have complex exposure histories that can be explained by the mode of inselberg weathering and mass wasting. The denudation rates estimated here are an order of magnitude higher than those reported for inselbergs in a significantly more humid environment in South Australia. This difference may largely be due to active salt weathering in the central Namib as a result of high levels of coastal fog precipitation.

  13. Cosmogenic 10Be Age Constraints on the Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Wohlfarth, B.; Lunkka, J.

    2011-12-01

    An important question in climate science is how ice sheets will respond to a climate warmer than present. Because our understanding of how these changes will occur remains limited, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a climate warmer than present along with understanding their contribution to sea-level rise. We will present new cosmogenic 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. By constraining the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, we will establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, improving our understanding of ice-sheet response to warming climates.

  14. OSL and Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Fluvial Terraces on the Northeast Pamir Margin, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Chen, J.; Yang, H.; Li, T.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.; Bufe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Along the northeast Pamir margin in northwest China, flights of late Pleistocene fluvial terraces span actively deforming structures. We present detailed results on three terraces that we dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and cosmogenic 10Be techniques. Quartz OSL dating of two different grain sizes (4-11 and 90-180 μm) revealed the fine-grain quartz fraction overestimates the terrace ages by up to an order of magnitude. Two-mm, small-aliquot, coarse-grain quartz OSL ages, calculated using the finite mixture model, yielded stratigraphically consistent ages within error and dated times of terrace deposition to ~15 ka, ~18.5 ka, and ~75 ka. We speculate the observed grain-size dependence of OSL ages is likely related to the mode of transport of the grains in the fluvial system, with coarser grains sizes spending more time on sand bars where they are more thoroughly bleached than grains in the turbid, commonly episodic flows that carry the silt fraction. Our study suggests that, in flashy, turbid fluvial systems, coarse-grain OSL samples are likely to yield more reliable depositional ages than will fine-grain samples. Cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles date the times of terrace abandonment to ~8 ka, ~15 ka, and ~75 ka, yielding ages in overall agreement with the coarse-grain OSL ages. These ages are generally consistent with other dated terraces in the region that place their deposition and subsequent abandonment during the last deglaciation (13-18 ka) and suggest the formation of these terraces on the margins of the Tarim Basin and along the flanks of the Tian Shan is climatically controlled.

  15. Tectonic control on 10Be-derived erosion rates in the Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Dirk; Bookhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2014-02-01

    Erosion in the Himalaya is responsible for one of the greatest mass redistributions on Earth and has fueled models of feedback loops between climate and tectonics. Although the general trends of erosion across the Himalaya are reasonably well known, the relative importance of factors controlling erosion is less well constrained. Here we present 25 10Be-derived catchment-averaged erosion rates from the Yamuna catchment in the Garhwal Himalaya, northern India. Tributary erosion rates range between ~0.1 and 0.5 mm yr-1 in the Lesser Himalaya and ~1 and 2 mm yr-1 in the High Himalaya, despite uniform hillslope angles. The erosion-rate data correlate with catchment-averaged values of 5 km radius relief, channel steepness indices, and specific stream power but to varying degrees of nonlinearity. Similar nonlinear relationships and coefficients of determination suggest that topographic steepness is the major control on the spatial variability of erosion and that twofold to threefold differences in annual runoff are of minor importance in this area. Instead, the spatial distribution of erosion in the study area is consistent with a tectonic model in which the rock uplift pattern is largely controlled by the shortening rate and the geometry of the Main Himalayan Thrust fault (MHT). Our data support a shallow dip of the MHT underneath the Lesser Himalaya, followed by a midcrustal ramp underneath the High Himalaya, as indicated by geophysical data. Finally, analysis of sample results from larger main stem rivers indicates significant variability of 10Be-derived erosion rates, possibly related to nonproportional sediment supply from different tributaries and incomplete mixing in main stem channels.

  16. 10Be dating reveals early-middle Holocene age of the Drygalski Moraines in central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronauer, Sandra L.; Briner, Jason P.; Kelley, Samuel E.; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    We reconstruct the history of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin on the Nuussuaq Peninsula in central West Greenland through the Holocene using lake sediment analysis and cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating of the prominent Drygalski Moraines. Erratics perched on bedrock outboard of the Drygalski Moraines constrain local deglaciation to ∼9.9 ± 0.6 ka (n = 2). Three Drygalski Moraine crests yield mean 10Be ages of 8.6 ± 0.4 ka (n = 2), 8.5 ± 0.2 ka (n = 3), and 7.6 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) from outer to inner. Perched erratics between the inner two moraines average 7.8 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) and are consistent with the moraine ages. Sediments from a proglacial lake with a catchment area extending an estimated 2 km beneath (inland of) the present ice sheet terminus constrain an ice sheet minimum extent from 5.4 ka to 0.6 ka. The moraine chronology paired with the lake sediment stratigraphy reveals that the ice margin likely remained within ∼2 km of its present position from ∼9.9 to 5.4 ka. This unexpected early Holocene stability, preceded by rapid ice retreat and followed by minimum ice extent between ∼5.4 and 0.6 ka, contrasts with many records of early Holocene warmth and the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation maximum. We suggest ice margin stability may instead be tied to adjacent ocean temperatures, which reached an optimum in the middle Holocene.

  17. 26Al/10Be burial dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site's lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160-220 ka.

  18. Age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus determined with (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Bin; Granger, Darryl E

    2009-03-12

    The age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus, commonly known as 'Peking Man', has long been pursued, but has remained problematic owing to the lack of suitable dating methods. Here we report cosmogenic (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating of quartz sediments and artefacts from the lower strata of Locality 1 in the southwestern suburb of Beijing, China, where early representatives of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus were discovered. This study marks the first radioisotopic dating of any early hominin site in China beyond the range of mass spectrometric U-series dating. The weighted mean of six meaningful age measurements, 0.77 +/- 0.08 million years (Myr, mean +/- s.e.m.), provides the best age estimate for lower cultural layers 7-10. Together with previously reported U-series dating of speleothem calcite and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy, as well as sedimentological considerations, these layers may be further correlated to S6-S7 in Chinese loess stratigraphy or marine isotope stages (MIS) 17-19, in the range of approximately 0.68 to 0.78 Myr ago. These ages are substantially older than previously supposed and may imply early hominin's presence at the site in northern China through a relatively mild glacial period corresponding to MIS 18.

  19. 26Al/10Be Burial Dating of Xujiayao-Houjiayao Site in Nihewan Basin, Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hua; Shen, Guanjun; Li, Haixu; Xie, Fei; Granger, Darryl E.

    2015-01-01

    The Xujiayao-Houjiayao site in Nihewan Basin is among the most important Paleolithic sites in China for having provided a rich collection of hominin and mammalian fossils and lithic artifacts. Based on biostratigraphical correlation and exploratory results from a variety of dating methods, the site has been widely accepted as early Upper Pleistocene in time. However, more recent paleomagnetic analyses assigned a much older age of ∼500 ka (thousand years). This paper reports the application of 26Al/10Be burial dating as an independent check. Two quartz samples from a lower cultural horizon give a weighted mean age of 0.24 ± 0.05 Ma (million years, 1σ). The site is thus younger than 340 ka at 95% confidence, which is at variance with the previous paleomagnetic results. On the other hand, our result suggests an age of older than 140 ka for the site’s lower cultural deposits, which is consistent with recent post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating at 160–220 ka. PMID:25706272

  20. Cosmic rays 10Be biennal data and their relationship to aurorae and sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attolini, M. R.; Cecchini, S.; Castagnoli, G. C.; Galli, M.; Nanni, T.

    1985-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (C.R.) variations which should give information on three dimensional aspects of the heliospheric magnetic fields and on the solar wind, which modulate their influx into the Solar System were studied. In order to decode the information from the C.R. series it is necessary to know the mechanisms through which the modulation is produced. It it clear that a balance of effects with sources at different heliospheric latitudes results in the modulated C.R. intensity. It is found that the modulation of 10Be in polar ice may be due to at least two main contributions: (1) negative and in phase with the Solar flare activity modulating the cosmic ray flux in Forbush-type decreases, and (2) positive in phase with the appearance of large wind streams situated at both polar coronal holes. It is found that the high heliolatitude activity is related to a stable periodicity of 11.1y whereas the low heliolatitude activity contributes to the wondering of the solar cycles.

  1. The impact of geomagnetic spikes on the production rates of cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Alexandre; Gallet, Yves; Usoskin, Ilya; Livermore, Philip W.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    2015-04-01

    We seek corroborative evidence of the geomagnetic spikes detected in the Near East ca. 980 BC and 890 BC in the records of the past production rates of the cosmogenic nuclides 14C and 10Be. Our forward modeling strategy rests on global, time-dependent, geomagnetic spike field models feeding state-of-the-art models of cosmogenic nuclide production. We find that spike models with an energy budget in line with presently inferred large-scale flow at Earth's core surface fail to produce a visible imprint in the nuclide record. Spike models able to reproduce the intensity changes reported in the Near East require an unaccountably high-magnitude core flow, yet their computed impact on cosmogenic isotope production rates remains ambiguous. No simple and unequivocal agreement is obtained between the observed and modeled nuclide records at the epochs of interest. This indicates that cosmogenic nuclides cannot immediately be used to confirm the occurrence of these two geomagnetic spikes.

  2. Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet: Preliminary 10Be Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Marcott, S. A.; Pekka Lunka, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Carlson, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The response of ice sheets to a warming climate is not well understood. Because we are limited in our understanding of present dynamics, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a warming climate along with their contribution to sea-level rise. These reconstructions also serve as critical constraints for ice sheet modeling efforts. Here, we present a suite of new 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland, that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. Preliminary dates from southern Finland, beginning at the Salpausselka Youngers Dryas moraine (11.5 ± 0.7 ka, n=2), inland southern Finland near Jyvaskyla (11.5 ± 0.5ka, n=2), and coastal Finland (~60km from Gulf of Bothnia) near Vimpeli (11.5 ± 0.4ka, n=1) indicate a rapid retreat following the Younger Dryas for Southern Finland (~500km within uncertainty of ages). Preliminary dates also exist for Northern Finland, near Inari (10.3 ± 0.5ka, n=2). Additional ages now being processed at PRIME Lab, Purdue University, which will establish a basis for SIS retreat from all sampled sites, will also be presented. These new data will help to constrain the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, and establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, which will improve our understanding of ice-sheet response to a warming climate.

  3. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel coatings with tunable surface exposure of hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Villain, Arthur; Ku, David N; Corté, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient bone anchoring is a major limitation of artificial substitutes for connective osteoarticular tissues. The use of coatings containing osseoconductive ceramic particles is one of the actively explored strategies to improve osseointegration and strengthen the bone-implant interface for general tissue engineering. Our hypothesis is that hydroxyapatite (HA) particles can be coated robustly on specific assemblies of PVA hydrogel fibers for the potential anchoring of ligament replacements. A simple dip-coating method is described to produce composite coatings made of microscopic hydroxyapatite (HA) particles dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix. The materials are compatible with the requirements for implant Good Manufacturing Practices. They are applied to coat bundles of PVA hydrogel fibers used for the development of ligament implants. By means of optical and electronic microscopy, we show that the coating thickness and surface state can be adjusted by varying the composition of the dipping solution. Quantitative analysis based on backscattered electron microscopy show that the exposure of HA at the coating surface can be tuned from 0 to over 55% by decreasing the weight ratio of PVA over HA from 0.4 to 0.1. Abrasion experiments simulating bone-implant contact illustrate how the coating cohesion and wear resistance increase by increasing the content of PVA relative to HA. Using pullout experiments, we find that these coatings adhere well to the fiber bundles and detach by propagation of a crack inside the coating. These results provide a guide to select coated implants for anchoring artificial ligaments. PMID:25482413

  4. Origin of orbital debris impacts on Long Duration Exposure Facility's (LDEF) trailing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital debris tracked by the US Space Command is mostly in near circular orbit around the Earth. If small debris were in the same types of orbits, there would be very few orbital debris impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility's (LDEF's) trailing surfaces. However, at least 15 percent of the impacts found on the trailing A03 gold surface was found to be orbital debris impacts. This measurement suggests that the orbital distribution of small debris is not the same as that of larger debris. Although this is not a total surprise, since modelling of satellite breakups has predicted different distributions, it does raise questions as to what types of orbits could be responsible for these impacts. A model was developed to explain these LDEF results. The model calculates the expected debris impact crater distribution around LDEF, as a function of debris orbital parameters. The results show that only low inclination and highly elliptical orbits could be responsible for these impacts. The most common object left in this type of orbit is an orbital transfer stage, used by the US and ESA to place objects into geosynchronous orbit, and inclinations near 28 and 7 degrees for the US and ESA, respectively. Even large fragments from satellites, which break up in these types of orbits, are difficult to observe from the ground; consequently, little is known about the number and characteristics of breakups in these orbits. The LDEF data suggest that these objects are breaking up. The LDEF data also suggest that the ratio of the contribution of small debris from this type of orbit to the contribution from circular orbits is about an order of magnitude larger than the same ratio for debris tracked by the US Space Command.

  5. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel coatings with tunable surface exposure of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Moreau, David; Villain, Arthur; Ku, David N; Corté, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient bone anchoring is a major limitation of artificial substitutes for connective osteoarticular tissues. The use of coatings containing osseoconductive ceramic particles is one of the actively explored strategies to improve osseointegration and strengthen the bone-implant interface for general tissue engineering. Our hypothesis is that hydroxyapatite (HA) particles can be coated robustly on specific assemblies of PVA hydrogel fibers for the potential anchoring of ligament replacements. A simple dip-coating method is described to produce composite coatings made of microscopic hydroxyapatite (HA) particles dispersed in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix. The materials are compatible with the requirements for implant Good Manufacturing Practices. They are applied to coat bundles of PVA hydrogel fibers used for the development of ligament implants. By means of optical and electronic microscopy, we show that the coating thickness and surface state can be adjusted by varying the composition of the dipping solution. Quantitative analysis based on backscattered electron microscopy show that the exposure of HA at the coating surface can be tuned from 0 to over 55% by decreasing the weight ratio of PVA over HA from 0.4 to 0.1. Abrasion experiments simulating bone-implant contact illustrate how the coating cohesion and wear resistance increase by increasing the content of PVA relative to HA. Using pullout experiments, we find that these coatings adhere well to the fiber bundles and detach by propagation of a crack inside the coating. These results provide a guide to select coated implants for anchoring artificial ligaments. PMID:25482413

  6. Selecting scenarios to assess exposure of surface waters to veterinary medicines in Europe.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuel K; Stamm, Christian; Fenner, Kathrin

    2007-07-01

    Registering a veterinary medicinal product (VMP) in the European Union requires assessing its potential to contaminate surface waters (SW) on a European scale. VMP are spread to land in manure or excreted during grazing and may enter SW through runoff, erosion, or leaching. Since the factors driving these processes vary largely across Europe, it is necessary to identify characteristic conditions, so-called scenarios, under which VMP enter SW. These scenarios may guide the parameterization of mechanistic fate models to predict environmental concentrations for environmental risk assessment. A number of such scenarios for pesticides and VMP have been developed rather pragmatically. Here, we describe how a geo-referenced European database of driving factors was used to divide the European environment into groups with similar conditions for SW contamination by VMP. Out of these groups, relevant exposure scenarios in Europe were selected by a simple scoring system. Comparing these to the existing scenarios showed that a number of situations are not well covered. The newly identified scenarios are primarily located in hilly areas of Central Europe and the Mediterranean, and in Eastern European plains with a continental climate. We recommend that they are included in the technical guidelines for higher-tier assessment of VMP. PMID:17695913

  7. Surface exposure dating of glacial lake shorelines: implications for constraining ice margin positions and meltwater outbursts during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin; Schaefer, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) played an important role in the climate variability of the last deglaciation, notably through large discharges of meltwater to the North Atlantic that disturbed the ocean's circulation and heat transport. Deglaciation of the northeastern sector of the LIS was complex and included the development of large ice-dammed lakes that were confined within the main river valleys draining northward into Ungava Bay. The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador ice dome, but large uncertainties regarding the position and dynamic of the ice margin through time currently limit our understanding of these glacial lakes. In the Ungava lowlands, glacial lake Naskaupi invaded the George River valley, leaving a series of well-developed shorelines and deltas. These spectacular raised shorelines are 10 to 20 meters wide and can be followed for several kilometers. Our field investigations and remote sensing analysis indicate that Lake Naskaupi experienced a complex history, as shown by the succession of shorelines that likely reflect the opening of new topographic outlets during ice retreat. Constraining the timing of the different phases of the lake and its drainage has traditionally been challenging, as organic material suitable for radiocarbon dating is scarce or lacking. Recent progress in Surface Exposure Dating (SED) by cosmogenic nuclides now inspires novel approaches to glacial and deglacial geomorphology. Here we apply 10Be SED to boulders that form part of these shorelines and mark the main (high-level) stage of Lake Naskaupi. We sampled 4-6 multi-meter size boulders at 4 different sites. Preliminary results show high internal consistency and, indicate that the main lake phase developed very late in the regional deglaciation, which extends from about 8500 to 6800 cal. yr BP (Dyke and Prest, 1987). We also present SED results from boulders deposited by a substantial outburst flood presumably associated with

  8. Entero- and parechovirus distributions in surface water and probabilities of exposure to these viruses during water recreation.

    PubMed

    Lodder, W J; Schijven, J F; Rutjes, S A; de Roda Husman, A M; Teunis, P F M

    2015-05-15

    Numerous studies have reported quantitative data on viruses in surface waters generated using different methodologies. In the current study, the impact of the use of either cell culture-based or molecular-based methods in quantitative microbial risk assessment was assessed. Previously and newly generated data on the presence of infectious human enteroviruses (HEV) and enterovirus and parechovirus RNA were used to estimate distributions of virus concentrations in surface waters. Because techniques for the detection of infectious human parechoviruses (HPeV) in surface waters were not available, a 'Parallelogram Approach' was used to estimate their concentrations based on the ratio infectious HEV/HEV RNA. The obtained virus concentrations were then used to estimate the probability of exposure for children during recreation in such virus contaminated surface waters. Human enterovirus cell culture/PCR ratios ranged from 2.3 × 10(-3) to 0.28. This broad range of ratios indicates that care should be taken in assuming a fixed ratio for assessing the risk with PCR based virus concentrations. The probabilities of exposure to both enteroviruses and parechoviruses were calculated, using our Parallelogram Approach for the calculation of infectious parechoviruses. For both viruses it was observed that the detection method significantly influenced the probability of exposure. Based on the calculated culture data, PCR data, and the ingestion volume, it was estimated that the mean probabilities of exposure, of recreating children, to surface water containing viruses were 0.087 (infectious enteroviruses), 0.71 (enterovirus particles), 0.28 (parechovirus particles) and 0.025 (calculated infectious parechoviruses) per recreation event. The mean probabilities of exposure of children recreating in surface water from which drinking water is produced to infectious enteroviruses were estimated for nine locations and varied between 1.5 × 10(-4) - 0.09 per recreation event. In this study

  9. Entero- and parechovirus distributions in surface water and probabilities of exposure to these viruses during water recreation.

    PubMed

    Lodder, W J; Schijven, J F; Rutjes, S A; de Roda Husman, A M; Teunis, P F M

    2015-05-15

    Numerous studies have reported quantitative data on viruses in surface waters generated using different methodologies. In the current study, the impact of the use of either cell culture-based or molecular-based methods in quantitative microbial risk assessment was assessed. Previously and newly generated data on the presence of infectious human enteroviruses (HEV) and enterovirus and parechovirus RNA were used to estimate distributions of virus concentrations in surface waters. Because techniques for the detection of infectious human parechoviruses (HPeV) in surface waters were not available, a 'Parallelogram Approach' was used to estimate their concentrations based on the ratio infectious HEV/HEV RNA. The obtained virus concentrations were then used to estimate the probability of exposure for children during recreation in such virus contaminated surface waters. Human enterovirus cell culture/PCR ratios ranged from 2.3 × 10(-3) to 0.28. This broad range of ratios indicates that care should be taken in assuming a fixed ratio for assessing the risk with PCR based virus concentrations. The probabilities of exposure to both enteroviruses and parechoviruses were calculated, using our Parallelogram Approach for the calculation of infectious parechoviruses. For both viruses it was observed that the detection method significantly influenced the probability of exposure. Based on the calculated culture data, PCR data, and the ingestion volume, it was estimated that the mean probabilities of exposure, of recreating children, to surface water containing viruses were 0.087 (infectious enteroviruses), 0.71 (enterovirus particles), 0.28 (parechovirus particles) and 0.025 (calculated infectious parechoviruses) per recreation event. The mean probabilities of exposure of children recreating in surface water from which drinking water is produced to infectious enteroviruses were estimated for nine locations and varied between 1.5 × 10(-4) - 0.09 per recreation event. In this study

  10. Global analysis of the stream power law parameters based on worldwide 10Be denudation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, M.-A.; Mudd, S. M.; Attal, M.

    2016-09-01

    The stream power law, expressed as E = KAmSn - where E is erosion rate [LT - 1], K is an erodibility coefficient [T - 1L (1 - 2m)], A is drainage area [L 2], S is channel gradient [L/L], and m and n are constants - is the most widely used model for bedrock channel incision. Despite its simplicity and limitations, the model has proved useful for topographic evolution, knickpoint migration, palaeotopography reconstruction, and the determination of rock uplift patterns and rates. However, the unknown parameters K, m, and n are often fixed arbitrarily or are based on assumptions about the physics of the erosion processes that are not always valid, which considerably limits the use and interpretation of the model. In this study, we compile a unique global data set of published basin-averaged erosion rates that use detrital cosmogenic 10Be. These data (N = 1457) enable values for fundamental river properties to be empirically constrained, often for the first time, such as the concavity of the river profile (m/n ratio or concavity index), the link between channel slope and erosion rate (slope exponent n), and substrate erodibility (K). These three parameters are calculated for 59 geographic areas using the integral method of channel profile analysis and allow for a global scale analysis in terms of climatic, tectonic, and environmental settings. In order to compare multiple sites, we also normalize n and K using a reference concavity index m/n = 0.5. A multiple regression analysis demonstrates that intuitive or previously demonstrated local-scale trends, such as the correlation between K and precipitation rates, do not appear at a global scale. Our results suggest that the slope exponent is generally > 1, meaning that the relationship between erosion rate and the channel gradient is nonlinear and thus support the hypothesis that incision is a threshold controlled process. This result questions the validity of many regional interpretations of climate and/or tectonics where

  11. Holocene Deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet: Preliminary 10Be Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzone, J. K.; Clark, P. U.; Marcott, S. A.; Lunkka, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Caffee, M. W.; Carlson, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The response of ice sheets to a warming climate is not well understood. Because we are limited in our understanding of present dynamics, reconstructing the deglaciation of former ice sheets allows for a better understanding of how past ice sheets responded to a warming climate along with their contribution to sea-level rise. These reconstructions also serve as critical constraints for ice sheet modeling efforts. Here, we present a suite of new 10Be ages from erratic boulders along three transects spanning southern to northern Sweden and Finland, that improve our understanding of the deglaciation of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) beginning ~ 11.7ka through its final demise during the early Holocene. Dates from southern Finland, beginning at the Salpausselka Younger Dryas moraine (11.5 × 0.7 ka, n=4), inland southern Finland near Jyvaskyla (11.5 × 0.5ka, n=2), and coastal Finland (~60km from Gulf of Bothnia) near Vimpeli (11.5 × 0.4ka, n=4) indicate a rapid retreat following the Younger Dryas for Southern Finland (~500km within uncertainty of ages). Preliminary dates also exist for Northern Finland, near Inari (10.8 × 0.5ka, n=4) and near Oulu (10.5 × 0.6 ka, n = 4) suggesting a later retreat in the north. Dates from southern Sweden, near Skovde (12.73 × 0.8ka, n=4) to Mora (10.41 × 0.6ka, n=5) suggest a slower retreat (over ~400km). Lastly, dates in Northwestern Sweden suggest a final termination of the SIS around 9.4 × 0.7ka (n = 3). Additional ages are now being processed at PRIME Lab, Purdue University, which will further strengthen our understanding of SIS retreat from all sampled sites. These new data will help to constrain the Holocene deglaciation of the SIS and its associated retreat rates, and establish the SIS contribution to Holocene sea level rise, which will improve our understanding of ice-sheet response to a warming climate.

  12. Contrasting Modern and 10Be- derived erosion rates for the Southern Betic Cordillera, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, N.; Vanacker, V.; Kubik, P.

    2012-04-01

    In Europe, Southeast Spain was identified as one of the regions with major treat of desertification in the context of future land use and climate change. During the last years, significant progress has been made to understand spatial patterns of modern erosion rates in these semi-arid degraded environments. Numerous European projects have contributed to the collection of modern erosion data at different spatial scales for Southeast Spain. However, these data are rarely analysed in the context of long-term changes in vegetation, climate and human occupation. In this paper, we present Modern and Holocene denudation rates for small river basins (1 to 10 km2) located in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. Long-term erosion data were derived from cosmogenic nuclide analyses of river-borne sediment. Modern erosion data were quantified through analysis of sediment deposition volumes behind check dams, and represent average erosion rates over the last 10 to 40 years. Modern erosion rates are surprisingly low (mean erosion rate = 0.048 mm y-1; n=36). They indicate that the steep, sparsely vegetated hillslopes in the Betic Cordillera cannot directly be associated with high erosion rates. 10Be -derived erosion rates integrate over the last 37500 to 3500 years, and are roughly of the same magnitude. They range from 0.013 to 0.243 mm y-1 (mean denudation rate = 0.062 mm y-1 ± 0.054; n=20). Our data suggest that the modern erosion rates are similar to the long-term erosion rates in this area. This result is in contrast with the numerous reports on human-accelerated modern erosion rates for Southeast Spain. Interestingly, our new data on long-term erosion rates show a clear spatial pattern, with higher erosion rates in the Sierra Cabrera and lower erosion rates in Sierra de las Estancias, and Sierra Torrecilla. Preliminary geomorphometric analyses suggest that the spatial variation that we observe in long-term erosion rates is related to the gradient in uplift rates of the Betic

  13. Reduction of exposure to solvents and formaldehyde in surface-coating operations in the woodworking industry.

    PubMed

    Rosén, G; Andersson, I M; Juringe, L

    1990-06-01

    A 1-year study has been performed at a company which manufacturers office furniture, and can be subdivided into three phases: measurement of exposure prior to remedial measures; remedial measures whose purpose was to reduce exposure; and new measurements after remedial measures. Remedial measures concentrated on changes which would reduce exposure to solvents. These measures fall into two categories: (i) the training of employees about the way airborne pollutants spread and ways of avoiding exposure; and (ii) locating and eliminating important sources of emission. Employees were trained mainly by the PIMEX (PIcture Mix EXposure) method for showing them how exposure depended on methods of work and conditions at the workplace. The most important sources of solvent emissions were pin-pointed by the GridMap method. The results show that exposure can be greatly reduced through training, adjustment of existing equipment and minor technical measures. This is the case even when exposure is initially at a concentration which is clearly below hygienic limit values. This approach should also reduce exposure to formaldehyde, though this could not be evaluated because the raw materials used changed during the study.

  14. Paleoseismology of the Mejillones Fault, northern Chile: Insights from cosmogenic 10Be and optically stimulated luminescence determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CortéS A., J.; GonzáLez L., Gabriel; Binnie, S. A.; Robinson, R.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Vargas E., G.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken the first paleoseismological study on an upper plate fault in Chile. The selected structure was the Mejillones Fault, which is marked by a conspicuous fault-scarp. Using cosmogenic 10Be and OSL dating and detailed sedimentary logging of trenches, we have constrained the abandonment of two alluvial surfaces by fault activity at ca. 35 ka and ca.14 ka. Based on stratigraphic observation we characterized the fault evolution in four intervals over the last ca. 35 ka. During the first three intervals the fault had a steady slip rate of 0.61 ± 0.26 m/ka. The fourth interval is delineated by the last vertical fault slip and the accumulation of un-deformed hillslope deposits after ca. 3.3 ka and has a slip rate of 0.22 ± 0.06 m/ka. The younger surface abandonment was caused by two Mw ˜ 7 paleoearthquakes with a recurrence interval of 5.0 ± 3.5 ka. The third interval is characterized by the interaction of hillslope deposits and aseismic slip and/or centimeter scale seismic slip events. At ca. 3.5 ka, a last large (Mw ˜ 6.6) earthquake took place. The recurrence intervals of large (Mw > 8.5) subduction earthquakes do not appear to be the same as the recurrence intervals of the Mw ˜ 7 events on the upper plate Mejillones Fault.

  15. Nanoscale surface modifications and formation of conical structures at aluminum surface induced by single shot exposure of soft x-ray laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Masahiko; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Imazono, Takashi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Faenov, Anatoly Ya.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Inogamov, Nail A.; Khohlov, Viktor A.; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.; Skobelev, Igor Yu.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Shepelev, Vadim V.

    2011-01-01

    We irradiated the soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, a duration time of 7 ps, and fluences of up to 27 mJ/cm{sup 2} to aluminum (Al) surface. After the irradiation process, the modified surface was observed with the visible microscope, the scanning electron microscope, and the atomic force microscope. The surface modifications caused by the SXRL pulses were clearly seen, and it was found that the conical structures having about 70-150 nm in diameters were formed under a single pulse shot. The conical structures were formed in the features with the average depth of about 40 nm, and this value was in accordance with the attenuation length of the SXRL beam for Al. However, those conical structures were deconstructed under the multiple pulse shots exposure. Thermomechanical modeling of SXRL laser interaction with Al surface, which explains nanostructure surface modification, was provided.

  16. Measurement of proton production cross sections of {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al from elements found in lunar rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, J.M.; Kim, K.; Englert, P.A.J.

    1996-07-01

    Cosmic rays penetrate the lunar surface and interact with the lunar rocks to produce both radionuclides and stable nuclides. Production depth profiles for long-lived radionuclides produce in lunar rocks are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). For a particular radionuclide these production depth profiles can be interpreted to give an estimate for the solar proton flux over a time period characterized by the half life of the radionuclide under study. This analysis is possible if and only if all the cross sections for the interactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are well known. In practice, the most important cross sections needed are the proton production cross sections, because 98% of solar cosmic rays and {similar_to}87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons. The cross sections for the production of long-lived radionuclides were very difficult to measure before the development of AMS and only in recent years has significant progress been made in determining these essential cross sections. Oxygen and silicon are major constituents of lunar rocks. We have reported already {sup 14}C production cross sections from O and Si for proton energies 25-500 MeV, and O(p,x){sup 10}Be from 58 160 MeV[6]. Here we present new measurements for the cross sections O(p,x){sup 10}Be,O(p,x){sup 7}Be, Si(p,x){sup 7}Be,Si(p,x){sup 26}Al, and Si(p,x){sup 22}Na from {approximately}30 - 500 MeV.

  17. Application of in situ-produced 10Be to the study of Australian stone line induced by termite activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Gurarie, E.; Bourles, D.; Braucher, R.; Brown, E.; Anan, R.; Gilkes, R.; Meunier, J. D.; Varajao, C.

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the genesis of a stoneline sequence located at the border of the Yilgarn Craton in southwest Austrtalia. The sequence was selected because a well-defined line of siliceous pebbles traces the limit between a typical tropical saprolite and a soil almost entirely composed of termite nests, providing an opportunity to study the role of biological processes in stoneline genesis. A roadcut along the Boyup Brook Road provided the opportunity to examine and sample a 100 m wide section of weathering mantle developed on a gently sloping hill. The sequence consists, from base to top, of three main weathering layers: a gneiss- and schist-inherited yellow saprolite that includes subvertical quartz veins ; a 10 to 20 cm thick stone line composed primarily of angular quartz pebble; and a 40 to 50 cm thick dark brown surficial soil rich in both active and dormant termite nests. The distribution of these layers does not vary significantly across the hill, but quartz rich veins are most abundant in the central part of the hill. Kaolinite and quartz are the major mineralogical components throughout the sequence. There is little variation in grain size distributions, other than a modest increase in the >63 micron fractions of surface samples due to termite activity (mixing of minerals with woody and grassy debris). Chemical and mineralogical analyses were used to characterise the weathering layers and to investigate the role of termite colonies. We determined the in situ produced 10Be contents of samples collected from a depth profile through the quartz-rich schist and of pebbles from the stoneline at distances up to 40 m from central quartz veins. The 10Be depth profile shows a simple exponential decrease with depth, consistent with attenuation of cosmic ray neutrons and erosion at a rate of 20 mMyr, consistent with rates of excavation by termites. The pebbles from the stoneline have nearly constant 10Be concentrations that are approximately

  18. Drivers of foraminiferal and bulk-sedimentary 10Be/9Be ratios in a marine sediment record offshore of sub-tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, M. H.; Abrajevitch, A.; Srncik, M.; Fifield, L. K.; De Deckker, P.; Heslop, D.; Roberts, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Meteoric 10Be (half-life of ~1.5 My) is produced in the atmosphere via cosmic ray spallation of 16O, following which it is quickly transported to Earth's surface by precipitation. This process concentrates 10Be in the ocean, where it is thought to remain with a residence time of ~500-1000 years prior to export to the marine sedimentary record largely associated with sorption to the surface of settling clay particles. The bulk beryllium isotopic composition of marine clays hence reflects the convoluted factors of 10Be production and varying scavenging efficiency/terrigenous input. However, measurements of meteoric 10Be/9Be incorporated in the calcium carbonate tests of foraminifera (and hence presumably isolated from the dilution effects of sediment-bound terrigenous 9Be) may have the potential to provide useful chronological control for marine sediment records. Here we present 10Be/9Be results from a ~42 m-long sediment core collected off the NW coast of Australia (MD00-2361: 113°28.63‧E, 22°04.92‧S, 1805 m water depth). Measurements of δ18O on Globigerinoides ruber, supported by magnetostratigraphy, indicate that the record extends back >1.2 Ma. This independent chronology, in conjunction with excellent carbonate preservation at this site, allows preliminary evaluation of foraminiferal 10Be as a chronometer. We also evaluate the relationship between sedimentary 10Be/9Be ratios, regional surface ocean conditions as inferred from the δ18O stratigraphy and low-resolution Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca ratios, as well as large-scale changes in regional fluvial input as reconstructed from high-resolution XRF scanning profiles.

  19. Can the bis(diboranyl) structure of B(4)H(10) be observed? The story continues.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Vinutha; Duke, Brian J

    2004-12-13

    Pathways for the conversion of the unknown bis(diboranyl) isomer of tetraborane(10) (B(4)H(10)) to the known arachno isomer have been determined for the first time with the use of an electron correlation ab initio quantum chemical method and without the use of constraints in determination of the transition structures. Two isomers of tetraborane(10), one new, with a pentacoordinated boron atom have been found on the theoretical potential energy surface. Several other pathways for molecular rearrangement of tetraborane(10) have also been characterized. The theoretical method was MP2 theory with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The most likely pathway for the conversion of the bis(diboranyl) isomer of tetraborane(10) to the arachno isomer is a concerted pathway with two pentacoordinated intermediates. The highest energy transition state for this pathway lies 27.7 kcal/mol above the bis(diboranyl) isomer. At the same level of the theory, the bis(diboranyl) isomer lies 9.2 kcal/mol above the known arachno isomer. The two isomers with a pentacoordinated boron atom lie 12.5 and 13.1 kcal/mol above the arachno isomer.

  20. Spatial Patterns of Airborne Exposures of Tungsten and Cobalt in Fallon, Nevada, From Lichens and Surface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, P. R.; Speakman, R. J.; Ridenour, G.; Glascock, M. D.; Farris, C.; Witten, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes spatial patterns of airborne exposures of heavy metals in Fallon, Nevada, where a cluster of childhood leukemia has been on-going since 1997. Lichen chemistry, the measurement and interpretation of element concentrations in lichens, and surface sediment chemistry were used. Lichens were collected from within as well as from well outside of Fallon. Surface sediments were collected in a gridded spatial pattern, also within and outside of Fallon. Both the lichen and the surface sediment samples were measured chemically for a large suite of metals and other elements. Lichens indicate that Fallon itself has a high dual airborne exposure of tungsten and cobalt relative to sites well away from the town. Surface sediments samples also show high peaks of tungsten and cobalt within Fallon with nothing more than background contents away from the town. The tungsten and cobalt peaks coincide spatially with one another, with the highest values located right at a "hard-metal" facility that processes these metals. This present research confirms earlier research on total suspended particulates showing that Fallon is distinct in Nevada for its high dual exposure of airborne tungsten and cobalt and that the source of these two metals can be pinpointed to the hard-metal industry that exists just north of Highway 50 and west of Highway 95. While it is still not possible to conclude that high airborne exposure of tungsten and/or cobalt causes childhood leukemia, it can now be concluded beyond reasonable doubt that Fallon is unique environmentally due to its high airborne concentrations of tungsten and cobalt. Given that Fallon's cluster of childhood leukemia is the "most convincing cluster ever reported," it stands to reason that additional biomedical research should directly test the leukogenecity of combined airborne exposures of tungsten and cobalt.

  1. Early surface microhardness of a resin composite exposed to a pulse-delayed curing exposure: a comparison of a tungsten halogen and a plasma arc lamp, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ray, Noel J; Lynch, Christopher D; Burke, Francis M; Hannigan, Ailish

    2005-12-01

    Surface microhardness numbers of a commercial resin composite have been compared after exposure to a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and plasma arc (PAC) lamp respectively, using two exposure protocols. The effect of increased tip-to-composite distance has also been compared. Exposure with the PAC lamp tested is more appropriate to the early finishing of composite restorations after placement and curing than with the QTH. However both lamps were capable of producing comparable surface hardness, with appropriate exposure protocols. The effect of increased tip-to-composite distance was generally not significant between the lamps for continuous exposure. PMID:16411575

  2. U-Th and 10Be constraints on sediment recycling in proglacial settings, Lago Buenos Aires, Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogez, Antoine; Herman, Frédéric; Pelt, Eric; Norton, Kevin; Darvill, Christopher; Christl, Marcus; Morvan, Gilles; Reuschlé, Thierry; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    The sedimentary cycle includes the formation by erosion of rocks, transport and deposition. While erosion and deposition can be documented, the history of sediments between the time it is extracted from the rocks and ultimately deposited into basins remains a major challenge. However, the mechanism of transfer and alteration of the sediments during transport plays a key role in the evolution of basins, feedbacks between erosion and climate, and glacial-interglacial variability of sediment transport and weathering. This is particularly true in proglacial settings because large overdeepenings, in particular, are potential sediment traps for which the efficiency at evacuating those sediments is largely unknown. The Lago Buenos Aires moraines in Patagonia are particularly interesting because they are imbricated from the older in the outer part to the younger in the inner part of the system. We sampled fine grained sediments from these moraines and measured U-Th isotopes in the 4-50 μm silicate fraction. Deposition ages were refined using 10Be exposure ages. We show first that the comminution ages model can be improved by measuring also Th isotopes, from which weathering rates can be deduced. Moreover we show from our data that there is a time lag of 300 kyr on average between erosion and deposition in the moraine. This could be attributed to the long residence time of sediments in the lake overdeepening. This conclusion raises perspectives about the transport times and dynamic of the sediments during a whole sedimentary cycle, and the subsequent effect on weathering. This conclusion could also contradict some assumptions commonly made for our erosion rates/sediment fluxes reconstructions based on river sediments analysis, in recently deglaciated catchments.

  3. High-precision 10Be chronology of moraines in the Southern Alps indicates synchronous cooling in Antarctica and New Zealand 42,000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Samuel E.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Andersen, Bjørn G.; Barrell, David J. A.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Schwartz, Roseanne; Finkel, Robert C.; Doughty, Alice M.

    2014-11-01

    Millennial-scale temperature variations in Antarctica during the period 80,000 to 18,000 years ago are known to anti-correlate broadly with winter-centric cold-warm episodes revealed in Greenland ice cores. However, the extent to which climate fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere beat in time with Antarctica, rather than with the Northern Hemisphere, has proved a controversial question. In this study we determine the ages of a prominent sequence of glacial moraines in New Zealand and use the results to assess the phasing of millennial climate change. Forty-four 10Be cosmogenic surface-exposure ages of boulders deposited by the Pukaki glacier in the Southern Alps document four moraine-building events from Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3) through to the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (∼18,000 years ago; LGM). The earliest moraine-building event is defined by the ages of nine boulders on a belt of moraine that documents the culmination of a glacier advance 42,000 years ago. At the Pukaki locality this advance was of comparable scale to subsequent advances that, from the remaining exposure ages, occurred between 28,000 and 25,000, at 21,000, and at 18,000 years ago. Collectively, all four moraine-building events represent the LGM. The glacier advance 42,000 years ago in the Southern Alps coincides in Antarctica with a cold episode, shown by the isotopic record from the EPICA Dome C ice core, between the prominent A1 and A2 warming events. Therefore, the implication of the Pukaki glacier record is that as early as 42,000 years ago an episode of glacial cold similar to that of the LGM extended in the atmosphere from high on the East Antarctic plateau to at least as far north as the Southern Alps (∼44°S). Such a cold episode is thought to reflect the translation through the atmosphere and/or the ocean of the anti-phased effects of Northern Hemisphere interstadial conditions to the southern half of the Southern Hemisphere. Regardless of the mechanism, any

  4. Effect of Air Exposure on Surface Properties, Electronic Structure, and Carrier Relaxation in PbSe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey Y.; McGuire, John A.; Schulze, Roland K.; Tretiak, Olexandr; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor

    2010-04-27

    Effects of air exposure on surface properties, electronic structure, and carrier relaxation dynamics in colloidal PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. We show that exposure of NC hexane solutions to air under ambient conditions leads to rapid oxidation of NCs such that up to 50% of their volume is transformed into PbO, SeO{sub 2}, or PbSeO{sub 3} within 24 h. The oxidation is a thermally activated process, spontaneous at room temperature. The oxidation-induced reduction in the size of the PbSe “core” increases quantum confinement, causing shifts of the PL band and the absorption onset to higher energies. The exposure of NC solutions to air also causes rapid (within minutes) quenching of PL intensity followed by slow (within hours) recovery during which the PL quantum yield can reach values exceeding those observed prior to the air exposure. The short-term PL quenching is attributed to enhanced carrier trapping induced by adsorption of oxygen onto the NC surface, while the PL recovery at longer times is predominantly due to reduction in the efficiency of the “intrinsic” nonradiative interband recombination caused by the increase of the band gap in oxidized NCs. Although the analysis of subnanosecond relaxation dynamics in air-exposed NCs is complicated by a significant enhancement in fast carrier trapping, our picosecond PL measurements suggest that air exposure likely has only a weak effect on Auger recombination and also does not significantly affect the efficiency of carrier multiplication. We also show that the effects of air exposure are partially suppressed in PbSe/CdSe core/shell structures.

  5. Effect of air exposure on surface properties, electronic structure, and carrier relaxation in PbSe nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey Y; McGuire, John A; Schulze, Roland K; Tretiak, Olexandr; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Klimov, Victor I

    2010-04-27

    Effects of air exposure on surface properties, electronic structure, and carrier relaxation dynamics in colloidal PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. We show that exposure of NC hexane solutions to air under ambient conditions leads to rapid oxidation of NCs such that up to 50% of their volume is transformed into PbO, SeO2, or PbSeO3 within 24 h. The oxidation is a thermally activated process, spontaneous at room temperature. The oxidation-induced reduction in the size of the PbSe "core" increases quantum confinement, causing shifts of the PL band and the absorption onset to higher energies. The exposure of NC solutions to air also causes rapid (within minutes) quenching of PL intensity followed by slow (within hours) recovery during which the PL quantum yield can reach values exceeding those observed prior to the air exposure. The short-term PL quenching is attributed to enhanced carrier trapping induced by adsorption of oxygen onto the NC surface, while the PL recovery at longer times is predominantly due to reduction in the efficiency of the "intrinsic" nonradiative interband recombination caused by the increase of the band gap in oxidized NCs. Although the analysis of subnanosecond relaxation dynamics in air-exposed NCs is complicated by a significant enhancement in fast carrier trapping, our picosecond PL measurements suggest that air exposure likely has only a weak effect on Auger recombination and also does not significantly affect the efficiency of carrier multiplication. We also show that the effects of air exposure are partially suppressed in PbSe/CdSe core/shell structures. PMID:20369900

  6. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  7. Study of cluster structures in 10Be and 16C neutron-rich nuclei via break-up reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    Projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH2) target are used in order to study the spectroscopy of 10Be and 16C nuclei. For the present experiment we used 10Be and 16C beams delivered by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS, and the CHIMERA 4π multi-detector. 10Be and 16C structures are studied via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments. The 4He+6He break-up channel allowed us to study the spectroscopy of 10Be; in particular we find evidence of a new state in 10Be at 13.5 MeV excitation energy. The 16C nucleus is studied via 6He-10Be correlation; we find the fingerprint of a possible state at about 20.6 MeV

  8. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  9. A continuous ice-core 10Be record from Mongolian mid-latitudes: Influences of solar variability and local climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Knudsen, M. F.; Olsen, J.; Karoff, C.; Herren, P.-A.; Schwikowski, M.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.

    2016-03-01

    High-resolution 10Be records used for studies of detailed changes in atmospheric 10Be production rates predominantly derive from polar ice cores. In this study, we present the first 10Be record from a mid-latitude ice core. The ice core derives from the Tsambagarav mountain range located in the Mongolian Altai region. The new 10Be concentration record spans the period from AD 1550 to 2009, while the flux record extends from AD 1816 to 2009. The 10Be concentration in the Tsambagarav ice core ranges between ∼ 1.5 ×104 and ∼ 10 ×104 atomsg-1, whereas the 10Be flux changes from ∼0.02 to ∼0.15 atoms cm-2 s-1. The average 10Be flux at Tsambagarav is four times higher than the average 10Be flux recorded in the NGRIP and Dome Fuji ice cores, which is in accordance with model predictions. In general, the long-term trends observed in the Tsambagarav 10Be concentration and flux records are reasonably similar to those observed in the NGRIP ice core. A comparison between the Tsambagarav 10Be record, group sunspot numbers (GSNs), and solar modulation potentials based on 14C in tree rings suggests that the Maunder Minimum was associated with a prolonged maximum in 10Be concentrations at Tsambagarav, whereas the Dalton Minimum was associated with a minor increase in the 10Be concentration and flux that was delayed relative to the primary minimum in GSNs. The sulphate record from Tsambagarav shows that large positive anomalies in the sulphate concentration are associated with negative anomalies in the 10Be concentration. A concurrent positive sulphate anomaly may explain why the main phase of the Dalton Minimum is subdued in the 10Be record from Tsambagarav. Spectral analysis indicates that the 11-yr solar-cycle signal may have influenced the new 10Be record, but the evidence supporting a direct link is ambiguous. Local and regional climatic changes, such as cyclonic versus anticyclonic conditions and related storm tracks, most likely played a significant role for the 10

  10. Uniform metal patterning on micromachined 3D surfaces using multistep exposure of UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriadi, Arief; Berauer, Frank; Yasunaga, Akari; Pan, Alfred I.; Vander Plas, Hubert A.

    2002-07-01

    Focal depth limitations prevent use of normal lithography tools and processes on three-dimensional structures. A relatively little known form of uniform metal trace patterning over extreme 3-D structured wafers by a multi-step exposure method, called stitching technology, has recently been developed by Hewlett-Packard Company, with equipment support from the Ultratech Stepper Company, the result of which is being reported in this paper. The basic idea is to slice the metal lines to be patterned into topographic layers that can each be exposed in one step. Patches of patterned metal lines can thus be stitch-ed to one another (thus, the term stitching). Exposure of one photo-resist layer by stitching takes several individual exposures at different focus planes. A patent has been applied for this method on behalf of the Hewlett Packard Company. Results of the present investigation demonstrate the superior uniformity of metal trace pattern over 350-um deep trenches produced by multi-step exposure, as compared to the conventional single-step exposure method, typically used on planar semiconductor wafer. The integrated method offers an enabling technology for patterning of extensive topography typically required for a multitude of MEMS structures and designs, novel interconnect structures as well as advanced packaging applications. The method is simple, accurate and relatively low-cost in comparison with other 3-D exposure techniques available and capable of 3-D structure patterning.

  11. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  12. Cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements. Implications for landscape evolution in deserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Poths, J.; Olinger, C.T.

    1995-07-01

    The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor mantling landforms in arid regions of the world, has been previously attributed to erosion by wind and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated at the land surface in a time-transgressive manner. A newly proposed model for pavement evolution differs from these models in that pavement clasts are continuously maintained at the land surface in response to deposition and pedogenic modification of windblown dust. In-situ cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure ages on volcanic and alluvial landforms in the Mojave Desert of California are used to understand pavement evolution over geologic time scales and to test this new model. These exposure ages are stratigraphically consistent, show internal consistency at each site, and, for stone pavements adjacent to pristine, continuously exposed volcanic bedrock, are indistinguishable at the 1{sigma} level. We conclude that stone pavements are born at the surface and that pavements may provide one of the longest-term records of geologic, hydrologic, and climatic processes operating on desert surfaces. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Multiple 10Be records revealing the history of cosmic-ray variations across the Iceland Basin excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho; Kamata, Kanae; Maejima, Shun; Sasaki, Sho; Sasaki, Nobuyoshi; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Fujita, Shuji; Motoyama, Hideaki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is a proxy of cosmic-ray flux, and its natural records provide vital information about the past intensity variability of the geomagnetic field and solar activity. 10Be records also serve as powerful tools for global synchronization among a variety of paleoarchives and for elucidating sedimentary processes on natural remanent magnetization acquisition. However, high-resolution (multi-decadal to multi-centennial) records of 10Be are scarce, especially those older than several tens of thousands of years. Here we present multiple high-resolution 10Be records of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion interval (ca. 170-200 kyr ago) obtained from sediment cores (authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio) and an ice core (atmospheric 10Be flux). Comparing sedimentary 10Be records with relative paleointensity from the same cores, we found differences in the magnetic lock-in depth, even between adjacent cores. The 10Be-proxy records from the sediment and ice cores exhibit common characteristics: an asymmetric large-scale variation, a ∼7-kyr quasi-plateau around the maximum with a characteristic mid-term depression, and multi-millennial fluctuations in cosmic-ray flux during this interval. Minimal-synchronized and stacked 10Be records show that maximum cosmic-ray flux occurred 188.5-190.0 kyr ago and was double the present flux. A wavelet analysis of the stacked curve reveals dominant 4-kyr and secondary 8-kyr periodicities, both of which can be interpreted as intrinsic geomagnetic cycles. The wavelet spectrum of the high-resolution ice-core record shows a periodicity of 1.7 kyr and somewhat intermingled multi-centennial cycles around the maxima of 10Be, which likely represent solar cycles in this period. High-resolution 10Be records from multiple paleoarchives provide both a robust proxy record of cosmic-ray flux and a valuable tool for detailed global synchronization based on cosmic-ray variations.

  14. Beryllium-Boron Systematics of Refractory Inclusions in CR2 and CV3 Chondrites: Evidence for 10Be Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, E.; Wadhwa, M.; Simon, S.; Grossman, L.

    2016-08-01

    Be-B systematics of Allende (CV3), Axtell (CV3), and NWA 5028 (CR2) CAIs suggests that 10Be was distributed heterogeneously in the early solar system which implies that 10Be was produced in the solar nebula by irradiation of nebular gas or dust.

  15. Anterior cingulate cortex surface area relates to behavioral inhibition in adolescents with and without heavy prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Robyn; Moore, Eileen M; Glass, Leila; Infante, M Alejandra; Tapert, Susan F; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Mattson, Sarah N; Riley, Edward P

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with behavioral disinhibition, yet the brain structure correlates of this deficit have not been determined with sufficient detail. We examined the hypothesis that the structure of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) relates to inhibition performance in youth with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (AE, n = 32) and non-exposed controls (CON, n = 21). Adolescents (12-17 years) underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging yielding measures of gray matter volume, surface area, and thickness across four ACC subregions. A subset of subjects were administered the NEPSY-II Inhibition subtest. MANCOVA was utilized to test for group differences in ACC and inhibition performance and multiple linear regression was used to probe ACC-inhibition relationships. ACC surface area was significantly smaller in AE, though this effect was primarily driven by reduced right caudal ACC (rcACC). AE also performed significantly worse on inhibition speed but not on inhibition accuracy. Regression analyses with the rcACC revealed a significant group × ACC interaction. A smaller rcACC surface area was associated with slower inhibition completion time for AE but was not significantly associated with inhibition in CON. After accounting for processing speed, smaller rcACC surface area was associated with worse (i.e., slower) inhibition regardless of group. Examining processing speed independently, a decrease in rcACC surface area was associated with faster processing speed for CON but not significantly associated with processing speed in AE. Results support the theory that caudal ACC may monitor reaction time in addition to inhibition and highlight the possibility of delayed ACC neurodevelopment in prenatal alcohol exposure. PMID:26025509

  16. Changes of Ocular Surface and the Inflammatory Response in a Rabbit Model of Short-Term Exposure Keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Szu-Yuan; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Huai-Wen; Hu, Fung-Rong; Chen, Wei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ocular surface change and the inflammatory response in a rabbit model of short-term exposure keratopathy. Methods Short term exposure keratopathy by continuous eyelid opening was induced in New Zealand white rabbits for up to 4 hours. Ultrasound pachymetry was used to detect central total corneal thickness. In vivo confocal microscopy and impression cytology were performed to evaluate the morphology of ocular surface epithelium and the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Immunohistochemistry for macrophage,neutrophil, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells were performed to classify the inflammatory cells. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was performed to detect ocular surface change.The concentrations of IL-8, IL-17, Line and TNF-αwere analyzed by multiplex immunobead assay. TUNEL staining was performed to detect cellular apoptosis. Results Significant decrease ofcentral total cornealthickness were found within the first 5 minutes and remained stable thereafter, while there were no changes of corneal epithelial thickness.No significant change of corneal, limbal and conjunctival epithelial morphology was found by in vivo confocal microscopy except the time dependent increase of superficial cellular defects in the central cornea. Impression cytology also demonstrated time dependent increase of sloughing superficial cells of the central cornea. Aggregations ofinflammatory cells were found at 1 hour in the limbal epithelium, 2 hours in the perilimbal conjunctival epithelium, and 3 hours in the peripheral corneal epithelium.In eyes receiving exposure for 4 hours, the infiltration of the inflammatory cells can still be detected at 8 hours after closing eyes.Immunohistochemical study demonstrated the cells to be macrophages, neutrophils, CD4-T cells and CD-8 T cells.SEM demonstrated time-depending increase of intercellular border and sloughing of superficial epithelial cells in corneal surface. Time dependent increase of IL-8, IL-17 and TNF-α in

  17. Modification of polymeric surface for improved adhesion via electron beam exposure

    DOEpatents

    Kelber, Jeffry A.

    1989-01-01

    Treating polymer surfaces, e.g., Teflon, particularly very thin surfaces, e.g., 50-10,000 .ANG. with low energy electron radiation, e.g., 100-1000 eV, in a high vacuum environment, e.g., less than 10.sup.-6 Torr, to enhance the ability of the surface to be adhered to a variety of substrates.

  18. Results of the "Komplast" experiment on the long-term exposure of materials specimens on the ISS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumov, Andrey; Novikov, Lev

    The "Komplast" materials experiment was designed by the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center together with Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University and other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out since 1998. The aim of the experiment is to study the complex effects of space factors on specimens of various materials. Eight “Komplast” panels fitted with material specimens equipped UV-sensors and temperature sensors were located on the International Space Station (ISS) Functional Cargo Block (FGB) module exterior surface. The panels were sent into orbit with the FGB when it launched on November 20, 1998. Two of these panels were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle Discovery after 12 years of LEO exposure. The uniqueness of the "Komplast" experiment determined by long duration of open space exposure, which is much longer than in other similar experiments. For example LDEF: 1984-1990, МЕЕР (Space Station «Mir»): 1996-1997, MISSE-1, -2 (ISS): 1,5-2 years. In this work reveals laboratory research results of some materials specimens, which had been exposed on “Komplast” panels. A distinctive feature of this research was additional irradiation of specimens by atomic oxygen and electrons with energies of ~ 1-8 MeV in laboratory. In the interpretation of the experiment results was taken into account the specimens exposure temperature conditions on the ISS exterior surface and the conditions of their sunlit, defined by the above-mentioned sensors readings. Lot of attention was paid to the investigation of rubber materials specimens. The deformation, mechanical and relaxation characteristics were defined for the specimens. Also were investigations the seals-ability of model rubber seals after the long-term outer exposure. It was determined conservation volumetric deformation and relaxation characteristics of the exposed specimens and the localization of structural changes in the thin

  19. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, L.; Berger, E.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-10-01

    We use the observed effects of solar wind ion irradiation and the accumulation of solar flare particle tracks recorded in Itokawa grains to constrain the rates of space weathering and yield information about regolith dynamics. The track densities are consistent with exposure at mm depths for 104-105 years. The solar wind damaged rims form on a much faster timescale, <103 years.

  20. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  1. A Model for Interpreting 10Be Basin-Wide Erosion Rates in Post-Glacial Environments, Northwest Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fame, M. L.; Owen, L. A.; Balco, G.; Spotila, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful interpretation of in-situ cosmogenic 10Be basin-wide erosion rates in slowly eroding postglacial catchments is complicated because 10Be is inherited through shifts between glacial and fluvial regimes and ice shielding prevents 10Be production. Such environments do not attain isotopic and landscape steady state, conditions necessary for the current method of calculating basin-wide erosion rates. We propose an alternate set of assumptions, specific to postglacial regions, which make it possible to calculate basin-wide erosion rates in the post-glacial Highlands of NW Scotland. From 20 Scottish basins basin-wide 10Be concentrations range from 2.129 x 104 to 4.870 x 104 atoms/g qtz. Average 10Be concentrations from shallow till and bank deposits within the basins are 2.856 x 104 atoms/g qtz, similar to the basin-wide concentrations, whereas average bedrock concentrations in the basins are 1.747 x 105 atoms/g qtz. This suggests that during the postglacial time most active sediment is derived from reworked deposits rather then sub-aerially eroded bedrock. Therefore, we make the simplifying assumption that most bedrock erosion occurs during glaciation. A deeply buried till that has experienced no nuclide production since deglaciation has a 10Be concentration of 6.810 x 103 atoms/g qtz and allows us to estimate how much of the 10Be in basin-wide samples was produced since deglaciation. A glacial ice thickness of only 2 m would shield all 10Be production; therefore we assume that no 10Be production occurred during glacial periods and that all production occurs during interglacial periods. Using 100 ka as the approximate duration of a Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycle, comprised of a 15 ka interglacial period and an 85 ka glacial period, and the aforementioned assumptions we have derived a numerical model to calculate basin-wide glacial erosion rates in NW Scotland.

  2. Measurement of proton production cross sections of (sup 10)Be and (sup 26)Al from elements found in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K.; Englert, P. A. J.; Caffee, M.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; McHargue, L.; Castaneda, C.; Vincent, J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    Cosmic rays penetrate the lunar surface and interact with the lunar rocks to produce both radionuclides and stable nuclides. Production depth profiles for long-lived radionuclides produce in lunar rocks are measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). For a particular radionuclide these production depth profiles can be interpreted to give an estimate for the solar proton flux over a time period characterized by the half life of the radionuclide under study. This analysis is possible if and only if all the cross sections for the interactions of all cosmic ray particles with all elements found in lunar rocks are well known. In practice, the most important cross sections needed are the proton production cross sections, because 98% of solar cosmic rays and (similar to)87% of galactic cosmic rays are protons. The cross sections for the production of long-lived radionuclides were very difficult to measure before the development of AMS and only in recent years has significant progress been made in determining these essential cross sections. Oxygen and silicon are major constituents of lunar rocks. We have reported already C-14 production cross sections from O and Si for proton energies 25-500 MeV, and O(p,x)(sup 10)Be from 58 160 MeV[6]. Here we present new measurements for the cross sections O(p,x)Be-10,O(p,x)Be-7, Si(p,x)Be-7,Si(p,x)Al-26, and Si(p,x)Na-22 from approximately 30 - 500 MeV.

  3. Rate of fluvial incision in the Central Alps constrained through joint inversion of detrital 10Be and thermochronometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M.; Leith, K.; Bodin, T.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Catchment-wide cosmogenic nuclide concentration (CNCs) measurements of erosion rates have revolutionized the interpretation of processes responsible for generating mountainous landscapes. However, surface processes can vary within a single catchment, leading to spatial and temporal variations in erosion rates. This is particularly apparent for landscapes that have transient topographic features due to changes in tectonics or inherited glacial topography. Detrital thermochronometry provides a means to assess where modern sediment is derived as a function of elevation, and constrains the relative erosion rates across a catchment. To solve the corresponding inverse problem, we build on the Bayesian interpretation of probability of observing a detrital age (Avdeev et al., 2011) and use a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample both the parameter space and also the model complexity. Rivers within the Codera watershed of the Bergell Intrusion (Central European Alps) have incised into a glacial valley. We integrate constraints from detrital apatite fission track ages and detrital 10Be concentrations to interrogate the primary erosion processes shaping this Alpine landscape and constrain rates of erosion across the catchment. We find that modern erosion rates within most downstream portions of the landscape are too low to permit the inferred ˜500 m of incision during the most recent interglacial. Based on the spatial pattern of modern erosion rates, we predict that if the incised fluvial valley was formed solely during interglacial periods, incision is likely to have initiated almost 400,000 years BP. We explore the potential for this type of analysis to study inaccessible landscapes currently covered by ice. Avdeev, B., Niemi, N.A., Clark, M.K., 2011. Doing more with less: Bayesian estimation of erosion models with detrital thermochronometric data. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 305 (3), 385-395.

  4. Beryllium geochemistry in soils: Evaluation of 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals as a basis for age models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barg, E.; Lal, D.; Pavich, M.J.; Caffee, M.W.; Southon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Soils contain a diverse and complex set of chemicals and minerals. Being an 'open system', both in the chemical and nuclear sense, soils have defied quantitative nuclear dating. However, based on the published studies of the cosmogenic atmospheric 10Be in soils, its relatively long half-life (1.5 Ma), and the fact that 10Be gets quickly incorporated in most soil minerals, this radionuclide appears to be potentially the most useful for soil dating. We therefore studied the natural variations in the specific activities of 10Be with respect to the isotope 9Be in mineral phases in eight profiles of diverse soils from temperate to tropical climatic regimes and evaluated the implications of the data for determining the time of formation of soil minerals, following an earlier suggestion [Lal et al., 1991. Development of cosmogenic nuclear methods for the study of soil erosion and formation rates. Current Sci. 61, 636-639.]. We find that the 10Be/9Be ratios in both bulk soils and in the authigenic mineral phases are confined within a narrower range than in 10Be concentrations. Also, the highest 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals are observed at the soil-rock interface as predicted by the model. We present model 10Be/9Be ages of the B-horizon and the corresponding soil formation rates for several soil profiles. The present study demonstrates that the 10Be/9Be ratios in the authigenic phases, e.g. clay and Fe-hydroxides, can indeed be used for obtaining useful model ages for soils younger than 10-15 Ma. However, the present work has to be pushed considerably further, to take into account more realistic age models in which, for instance, downward transport of 10Be and clays, and in-situ dissolution of clay minerals at depths, altering the 10Be/9Be ratios of the acidic solutions, are included. We show that in the case of younger soils (< 1 Ma) studied here, their 10Be inventories and 10Be/9Be ratios have been significantly disturbed possibly by mixing with transported

  5. Interaction of gases with lunar materials. [surface properties of lunar fines, especially on exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties of lunar fines were investigated. Results indicate that, for the most part, these properties are independent of the chemical composition and location of the samples on the lunar surface. The leaching of channels and pores by adsorbed water vapor is a distinguishing feature of their surface chemistry. The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, severely impedes the leaching process. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains. The characteristics of Apollo 17 orange fines were evaluated and compared with those of other samples. The interconnecting channels produced by water vapor adsorption were found to be wider than usual for other types of fines. Damage tracks caused by heavy cosmic ray nuclei and an unusually high halogen content might provide for stronger etching conditions upon exposure to water vapor.

  6. New ways of using an old isotopic system - meteoric 10-Be is back and ready to do geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, P.; Reusser, L.; Pavich, M.

    2009-04-01

    Meteoric 10-Be, produced in the atmosphere and delivered in precipitation, is an important tracer of sediment and geomorphic processes. This talk will review several decades of work measuring 10-Be adhered to soil and sediment collected from varied terrains around the world. We will then present new data and modeling approaches demonstrating the rich potential but complex, dynamic nature of this isotope system. Considering all of these data, we will examine the utility of meteoric10-Be, produced in the atmosphere and delivered in precipitation, as a tracer of watershed and hillslope sediment transport processes at a variety of spatial scales. We will finish the talk by examining uncertainties that require additional research to resolve. After a brief hay-day in the 1980s, tracing sediment down rivers, dating a few terraces, and following sediment through subduction zones, meteoric or garden variety 10-Be was largely forgotten. It's been lurking somewhere in the dark corners of isotope geoscience while its more famous but difficult-to-measure twin, the 10-Be produced in quartz, got all the attention. Recently, several research groups have again begun to build upon the excellent foundation constructed by those working in the 1980s and early 1990s. New data from a series of soil pits on hillslopes from around the world suggest that meteoric 10-Be is mobile in the soil column moving from the more acidic, organic-rich A-horizon to the B-horizon. Meteoric 10-Be concentrations are well correlated with both soil pH and extractable Al suggesting that Be is retained in Al-rich grain coatings that we know, from numerous attempts to purify riverine quartz, survive fluvial transport all too well. The important take-away message is that meteoric 10-Be is mobile in soil fluids while in situ 10-Be only moves with the quartz grains in which it resides. Depth profiles of in situ and meteoric 10-Be can be quite different, helping us to learn about rates of soil stirring and 10-Be

  7. Combination of in situ cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) and Schmidt-hammer dating for the investigation of Late-Holocene lateral moraines in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, S.

    2009-04-01

    absolute' age of the boulder surfaces was needed to allow the construction of a dating curve by reliable fixed points to, radiocarbon (14C) dating could not provide those information because of the lack of organic material indisputable be related to the glacier advance forming the moraine ridges. On base on these considerations, this study comprises the first attempt to combine in situ (terrestrial) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating with Schmidt-hammer measurements for the dating of Holocene moraines and the reconstruction of a regional glacier chronology. Cosmogenic 10Be dating has the important advantage of delivering an ‘absolute' age for the exposure of boulder or bedrock surfaces, i.e. the same surface tested with the Schmidt-hammer. One disadvantage of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is, however, the limited number of boulders sampled due to high costs. From this background, a combination with the Schmidt-hammer technique seems ideal as the latter could provide measurement of a large number of boulders. The Schmidt-hammer measurements can, on the other hand, help with the selection of representative boulders for cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating avoiding boulders that have been exposed to post-depositional movement (e.g. rotation). Results from the application of this combined ‘multi-proxy-approach' at Strauchon Glacier in Westland/Tai Poutini National Park and Hooker Glacier in Mt Cook/Aoraki National Park on large lateral moraine complex with several individual moraine ridges proof its potential. Three pre-‘Little Ice Age' moraine sequences each related to an individual Late-Holocene Little Ice Age-type event unambiguously distinguished by Schmidt-hammer measurements provides cosmogenic (10Be) ages of 2,400/2,500 a BP, c. 1,700 a BP, and c. 1,000/1,100 a BP. The preliminary construction of a dating curve based on both Schmidt-hammer and cosmogenic (10Be) dating results shows high significance and confirms the successful

  8. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    MAXWELL, SUSAN K.; MELIKER, JAYMIE R.; GOOVAERTS, PIERRE

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps. PMID:19240763

  9. Nano-scale three dimensional surface relief features using single exposure counterpropagating multiple evanescent waves interference phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Chua, Jeun Kee; Tan, Sia Kim; Lin, Qun Yin

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, fabrication of nano-scale 3-D features by total internal reflection generated single exposure counter propagating multiple evanescent waves interference lithography (TIR-MEWIL) in a positive tone resist is investigated numerically. Using a four incident plane waves configuration from an 364nm wavelength illumination source, the simulated results indicate that the proposed technique shows potential in realizing periodic surface relief features with diameter as small as 0.08lambda and height-to-diameter aspect ratio as high as 10. It is also demonstrated that the sensitivity of multiple evanescent waves' interference depends on the polarization and phase of the incident plane waves, and can be tailored to obtain different geometry features. A modified cellular automata algorithm has been employed to simulate three-dimensional photoresist profiles that would result from exposure to the studied evanescent waves interference configurations.

  10. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Meliker, J.R.; Goovaerts, P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps. ?? 2010 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

  11. Using meteoric 10Be to constrain the age and structure of the frontal wedge at the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalla, C.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D.; Motoyama, I.; Fisher, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present new meteoric 10Be concentration data from marine sediments recovered during International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Exp. 343 that help constrain the age and internal structure of the frontal prism at the Japan trench in the vicinity of the 2011 Tohoku-oki M9 earthquake rupture. Exp. 343 recovered sediments from an ~200 m interval of the frontal wedge at site C0019. Core and log observations identify the plate boundary décollement at ~820 mbsf, which separates a deformed sedimentary wedge from relatively undeformed underthrust sediments. However, reconstructions of the structural evolution of the wedge are difficult because of similarity in lithology between sediments from the incoming and overriding plate, and the chaotic character of seismic reflectors in the frontal wedge. We utilize the radiogenic decay of 10Be (t1/2 =1.36 Ma) in marine sediments to constrain variations in sediment age with depth in core C0019. Meteoric 10Be was isolated from marine sediments at the University of Vermont using total fusion and 10Be/9Be ratios were measured at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre. Concentrations of meteoric 10Be in core C0019 range from 1.7x107 to 2.1x109 atm/g and are consistent with 10Be concentrations at nearby DSDP sites 436 and 434. We calculate 10Be sediment ages for analyzed samples assuming a range of initial 10Be concentrations from 1.6 to 2.1x109 atm/g. These concentrations are constrained by a 10Be sample co-located with a radiolarian micropaleontology sample at 780 mbsf that yields a Quaternary age, and from previously reported 10Be concentrations for Quaternary sediments in nearby DSDP cores. 10Be and radiolarian micropaleontology samples from similar depths yield consistent ages for late Miocene to Quaternary sediments (R2 = 0.89). Calculated 10Be ages range from 0-10 Ma, with ~50% of analyzed samples yielding ages <2 Ma. Repetition and inversion of high (109 atm/g) and low (107 atm/g) concentration sediments with

  12. Controlling surface roughness in vapor-deposited poly(amic acid) films by solvent-vapor exposure.

    PubMed

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Letts, Stephan A; Cook, Robert C

    2004-07-20

    A series of vapor-deposited poly(amic acid) (PAA) films were exposed to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) vapors to investigate sorption kinetics and surface smoothing phenomena. Gravimetric sorption and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) results are both consistent with frontal (case II) diffusion. These experiments suggest that the solvent front is defined by a sharp interface that delineates the swollen material from the unswollen material. Solvent-vapor smoothing was studied by first depositing PAA onto rough aluminum surfaces, and then, during solvent-vapor exposure, the surface topology was continuously monitored using a light interference microscope. The resulting time-dependent power spectra indicate that high-frequency defects smooth faster than low-frequency defects. This frequency dependence was further investigated by depositing PAA onto a series of sinusoidal surfaces and exposing them to solvent vapor inside a flow channel. The sinusoidal amplitudes decay exponentially with time, with decay constants that are proportional to the surface frequency. To explain the physics of surface smoothing, a two-parameter model is presented and agrees qualitatively with experimental data.

  13. Estimating dermal transfer of copper particles from the surfaces of pressure-treated lumber and implications for exposure.

    PubMed

    Platten, William E; Sylvest, Nicholas; Warren, Casey; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Harmon, Steve; Bradham, Karen; Rogers, Kim; Thomas, Treye; Luxton, Todd Peter

    2016-04-01

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper based formulations. Micronized copper (nano to micron sized particles) has become the preferred treatment formulation. There is a lack of information on the release of copper, the fate of the particles during dermal contact, and the copper exposure level to children from hand-to-mouth transfer. For the current study, three treated lumber products, two micronized copper and one ionic copper, were purchased from commercial retailers. The boards were left to weather outdoors for approximately 1year. Over the year time period, hand wipe samples were collected periodically to determine copper transfer from the wood surfaces. The two micronized formulations and the ionic formulation released similar levels of total copper. The amount of copper released was high initially, but decreased to a constant level (~1.5mgm(-2)) after the first month of outdoor exposure. Copper particles were identified on the sampling cloths during the first two months of the experiment, after which the levels of copper were insufficient to collect interpretable data. After 1month, the particles exhibited minimal changes in shape and size. At the end of 2-months, significant deterioration of the particles was evident. Based on the wipe sample data, a playground visit may result in a potential exposure to 2.58mg of copper, which is near or exceeds the daily tolerable upper intake limits for children under the age of 8, if completely ingested through hand-to-mouth transfer. While nanoparticles were found, there is not enough information to estimate the exposure from the released particles due to a lack of published literature on copper carbonate.

  14. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-01-01

    We use the observed effects of solar wind ion irradiation and the accumulation of solar flare particle tracks recorded in Itokawa grains to constrain the rates of space weathering and yield information about regolith dynamics. The track densities are consistent with exposure at mm depths for 104-105 years. The solar wind damaged rims form on a much faster timescale, <10(exp 3) years.

  15. Task-based lead exposures and work site characteristics of bridge surface preparation and painting contractors.

    PubMed

    Virji, M Abbas; Woskie, Susan R; Pepper, Lewis D

    2009-02-01

    This study of bridge painters working for small contractors in Massachusetts investigated the causes of elevated blood lead levels and assessed their exposure to lead. Bridge work sites were evaluated for a 2-week period during which personal and area air samples and information on work site characteristics and lead abatement methods were gathered. Short-duration personal inhalable samples collected from 18 tasks had geometric means (GM) of 3 microg/m(3) to 7286 microg/m(3). Full-shift, time-weighted average (TWA) inhalable samples (>or=6 hours) collected from selected workers and work sites had GMs of 2 microg/m(3) to 15,704 microg/m(3); 80% of samples exceeded the permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 50 microg/m(3), on average by a factor of 30. Area inhalable samples collected from three locations ranged from 2 microg/m(3) to 40,866 microg/m(3) from inside the containment, 2 microg/m(3) to 471 microug/m(3) from a distance of <6 meters, and 2 microg/m(3) to 121 microg/m(3) from >6 meters from the containment. Seventy nine percent of the area samples from inside the containment exceeded the PEL on average by a factor of 140. Through observations of work site characteristics, opportunities for improving work methods were identified, particularly the institution of engineering controls (which were only occasionally present) and improvement in the design and construction of the containment structure. The high levels of airborne lead exposures indicate a potential for serious exposure hazard for workers and environmental contamination, which can be mitigated through administrative and engineering controls. Although these data were collected over 10 years ago, a 2005 regulatory review by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of its lead in construction standard reported that elevated lead exposures and blood lead levels, high occurrence of noncompliance with the lead standard, and nonimplementation of newer technology especially among small painting

  16. Evidence of production/losses of NO on a pyrex surface under and after plasma exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Ionikh, Yury; Rousseau, Antoine

    2009-10-01

    Molecules production on plasma exposed surfaces is of great interest for plasma/catalyst coupling used in air treatment. Interaction of real surfaces with reactive plasmas is barely studied and surface-produced molecules can provide a valuable fingerprint of the underlying processes (adsorption, desorption, recombination, chemical reactions). We use CCP discharge in 60 cm pyrex tube with in-situ tunable laser diagnostics to monitor evolution of NO and NO2. The tube surface is pre-treated using either Ar, O2, N2 or air plasma and then two types of experiments are performed i) molecules production in a pure O2 plasma reacting with adsorbed species ii) the study of molecules losses/conversion on the surface by introducing a controlled amount of NO/NO2 in the reactor. It was found that after N2 plasma pre-treatment, pyrex surface is covered with nitrogen species that initiate NO production when exposed to O2 plasma. Assuming these species are N atoms, their density was estimated [Nads]=3.10^13 cm-2, what gives an assessment of the surface active sites density. Similarly, O2 plasma leaves adsorbed oxygen species with [Oads] 2.10^14 cm-2. These species are capable of NO oxidation to NO2 and inhibit NO2 adsorption on pyrex (which is pronounced after N2 and Ar plasma preparation).

  17. Inducing surface morphologies in polymer films through exposure to non-solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Chad; Tun, Zin; Forrest, James

    2014-03-01

    Non-solvents are generally considered to have no lasting effect on polymer materials and are commonly employed in the production or processing of thin film polymer samples. Through a combination of atomic force microscopy and neutron reflectivity experiments we show that some non-solvents have the ability to drastically alter a film's surface morphology on the nanometer scale. An explanation for the structuring process is presented and reinforced through theoretical considerations of surface chains. These results suggest that caution should be exercised when making use of non-solvents wherever nanoscale surface properties are of importance.

  18. Regolith production and transport at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, Part 2: Insights from meteoric 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Nicole; Kirby, Eric; Bierman, Paul; Slingerland, Rudy; Ma, Lin; Rood, Dylan; Brantley, Susan

    2013-09-01

    Regolith-mantled hillslopes are ubiquitous features of most temperate landscapes, and their morphology reflects the climatically, biologically, and tectonically mediated interplay between regolith production and downslope transport. Despite intensive research, few studies have quantified both of these mass fluxes in the same field site. Here we present an analysis of 87 meteoric 10Be measurements from regolith and bedrock within the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO), in central Pennsylvania. Meteoric 10Be concentrations in bulk regolith samples (n = 73) decrease with regolith depth. Comparison of hillslope meteoric 10Be inventories with analyses of rock chip samples (n = 14) from a 24 m bedrock core confirms that >80% of the total inventory is retained in the regolith. The systematic downslope increase of meteoric 10Be inventories observed at SSHO is consistent with 10Be accumulation in slowly creeping regolith (~ 0.2 cm yr-1). Regolith flux inferred from meteoric 10Be varies linearly with topographic gradient (determined from high-resolution light detection and ranging-based topography) along the upper portions of hillslopes at SSHO. However, regolith flux appears to depend on the product of gradient and regolith depth where regolith is thick, near the base of hillslopes. Meteoric 10Be inventories at the north and south ridgetops indicate minimum regolith residence times of 10.5 ± 3.7 and 9.1 ± 2.9 ky, respectively, similar to residence times inferred from U-series isotopes in Ma et al. (2013). The combination of our results with U-series-derived regolith production rates implies that regolith production and erosion rates are similar to within a factor of two on SSHO hillcrests.

  19. Cell-based metabolomics for assessing chemical exposure and toxicity of environmental surface waters (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals (e.g. fish) to monitor/as...

  20. Cell-based Metabolomics for Assessing Chemical Exposure and Toxicity of Environmental Surface Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals/fish to monitor/assess contaminant exposu...

  1. Clustering of adhesion receptors following exposure of insect blood cells to foreign surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Zhuang, Shufei; Pilas, Barbara; Bee, Charles Mark; Kanost, Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses of insects involve interactions of two main classes of blood cells (hemocytes) known as granular cells and plasmatocytes. In response to a foreign surface, these hemocytes suddenly transform from circulating, non-adherent cells to cells that interact and adhere to each other and the foreign surface. This report presents evidence that during this adhesive transformation the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins lacunin and a ligand for peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin are released by granular cells and bind to surfaces of both granular cells and plasmatocytes. ECM protein co-localizes on cell surfaces with the adhesive receptors integrin and neuroglian, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ECM protein(s) secreted by granular cells are hypothesized to interact with adhesion receptors such as neuroglian and integrin by cross linking and clustering them on hemocyte surfaces. This clustering of receptors is known to enhance the adhesiveness (avidity) of interacting mammalian immune cells. The formation of ring-shaped clusters of these adhesion receptors on surfaces of insect immune cells represents an evolutionary antecedent of the mammalian immunological synapse. PMID:15894002

  2. Studying 10Be and 11Be Halo States through the (p,d) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; (Pcb)2 Collaboration; Tigress Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03-93ER40789 (Colorado School of Mines).

  3. New experimental investigation of the structure of 10Be and 16C by means of intermediate-energy sequential breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.; Acosta, L.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-02-01

    10Be and 16C spectroscopy has been investigated by analyzing their breakup events on CH2 and CD2 targets. Breakup fragments have been detected by means of the CHIMERA detector. In particular, we investigated cluster decays of 10Be in 4He+6He and of 16C in 6He+10Be and 4He+6He+6He . From the relative energy analysis of breakup fragments, we investigate the spectroscopy of excited states of projectile nuclei. In the 10Be case we observe known states at 9.51, 10.16, 10.6, and 11.8 MeV. Further, we suggest the existence of a new state at 13.5 MeV, possibly 6+ as indicated from angular correlation analysis. The relative energy (Erel+Eth) spectrum of 16C, reconstructed starting from 6He+10Be correlations, shows a peak at about 20.6 MeV, probably related to the existence of an high-lying excited state. Non-vanishing yields are also seen in the triple coincidences 4He+6He+6He .

  4. Roter Kamm Impact Crater, Namibia: Age Constraints from K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Fission Track, 10Be-26Al Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Klein, J.; Matsuda, J.; Nagao, K.; Reimold, W. U.; Storzer, D.

    1992-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. The Roter Kamm impact crater is located in the Namib Desert in Namibia. The impact occurred in Precambrian granitic-granodioritic orthogneisses of the 1200-900-Ma-old Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex. The granites are invaded by quartz veins and quartz-feldspar-pegmatites. Gariep metasediments probably overlaid the Namaqualand complex at the time of the impact (Reimold and Miller, 1989). Previous estimates for the crater age are not well constrained: regional geology suggests an age of 5-10 Ma, while the only available ^40Ar-^39Ar age (Hartung et al., 1991) is 3.7 Ma. Fission tracks measured in apatites from granites found on or near the crater rim were not completely reset by the impact and suggest an uplift event around 20 Ma ago (Storzer et al., 1990). We are using several approaches to bracket the age of the crater: we have measured melt breccia and pseudotachylite K-Ar ages, and apatite fission track ages in several rim granites. We are comparing Rb-Sr isotope data for rim granites with known ages of regional resetting events (Allsopp et al., 1979). Finally, we are using ^10Be-^26Al measured by accelerator mass spectrometry to determine surface exposure ages for quartz excavated during the impact event. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The target rock composition and stratigraphy at Roter Kamm is relatively complicated. Melt breccias formed from pegmatites, gneisses, or schists, while pseudotachylites probably formed from gneissic basement or quartz-feldspar-pegmatites (Reimold and Miller, 1989). Whole rock Rb-Sr data for several granites yield 1498 Ma, and mineral separates from sample URK-M indicate an "age" of 466 Ma; these ages are similar to those of country rocks from the general area of the northwestern Cape/southern Namibia (Allsopp et al., 1979) which indicate two widespread regional resetting events at ca. 700 Ma (related to the Pan-African orogenic deformation), and ca. 500 Ma, related to a subsequent metamorphic event. For K-Ar ages, we

  5. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  6. Constraining Regolith Production on a Hillslope Over Long Timescales: Interpreting In Situ 10Be Concentrations on an Evolving Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Duehnforth, M.; Kelly, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ produced 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations provide geomorphologists with a quantitative tool to calculate regolith production rates in a variety of landscapes. However, the power of CRN dating is limited by the care with which these hard-earned numbers are interpreted. As rock is exhumed through the weathered zone, it accumulates in situ produced CRNs. Most studies assume a steady-state condition to calculate regolith production rates from 10Be concentrations obtained from rock at the base of mobile regolith; ignoring decay, the regolith production rate becomes simply Poe-H/z*/[10Be]. Although the balance of regolith production and the spatial pattern of divergence required to maintain steady regolith thickness is valid in some landscapes, steady-state is unlikely on hillslopes where time scales for generating soils are longer than climatic cycles. We report in situ 10Be concentrations to calculate production rates for mobile regolith in 8 soil pits along north- and south-facing slopes in Gordon Gulch, an intensively studied catchment in the Boulder Creek CZO. Gordon Gulch hillslopes exhibit variable regolith and saprolite thicknesses over gneissic and granitic parent rock; mean regolith thickness is 0.65 m. Local denudation rates in nearby catchments are 25 ± 8 m/Ma (Dethier and Lazarus, 2006). The mean residence time of mobile regolith in Gordon Gulch catchment is therefore 20-45 ka; less than half of this time is spent in Holocene climatic conditions. Although Gordon Gulch presently has mean annual temperature (MAT) ~4°C, it was likely at least 6°C cooler during the Last Glacial Maximum, meaning that periglacial conditions likely dominated. We therefore anticipate that parent rock could be more rapidly damaged by increased frost-cracking, and regolith transport be enhanced by increased frost-heave; thus steady-state conditions cannot be assumed over this timescale. To develop strategies for interpretation of 10Be, we employ a 1D

  7. Measurement of 26Al for atmospheric and climate research and the potential of 26Al/ 10Be ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Wagenbach, D.; Wallner, A.; Wild, E. M.

    2007-06-01

    The measurement of the paired cosmogenic radionuclides 26Al and 10Be in environmental samples has potential applications in atmospheric and climate research. For this study, we report the first measurements of the 26Al/10Be atomic ratio in tropospheric aerosol samples from sites in Europe and Antarctica performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These initial results show that the 26Al/10Be atomic ratio in tropospheric aerosols averages 1.78 × 10-3 and does not vary significantly between the different locations. We also report results of systematic investigations of the ionization and detection efficiency which we performed to improve the measurement precision for 26Al by AMS. Maximum detection efficiencies of up to 9 × 10-4 (in units of 26Al atoms detected/initial) were achieved for chemically pure Al2O3, while for atmospheric samples we reached efficiencies of up to 2.2 × 10-4.

  8. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  9. 13C(n,α0)10Be cross section measurement with sCVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Belloni, F.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section measurements performed at the Van de Graaff facility of the Joint Research Centre Geel. The 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section was measured relative to the 12C(n, α0)9Be cross section at 14.3 MeV and 17.0 MeV neutron energies. The measurements were performed with an sCVD (single-crystal chemical vapor deposition) diamond detector which acted as sample and as sensor simultaneously. A novel analysis technique was applied, which is based on the pulse-shape analysis of the detector's ionization current. This technique resulted in an efficient separation of background events and consequently in a well-determined selection of the nuclear reaction channels 12C(n, α0)9Be and 13C(n, α0)10Be.

  10. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  11. A new 10Be record recovered from an Antarctic ice core: validity and limitations to record the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Mélanie; Bard, Edouard; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides provide the only possibility to document solar activity over millennia. Carbon-14 (14C) and beryllium-10 (10Be) records are retrieved from tree rings and ice cores, respectively. Recently, 14C records have also proven to be reliable to detect two large Solar Proton Events (SPE) (Miyake et al., Nature, 2012, Miyake et al., Nat. Commun., 2013) that occurred in 774-775 A.D. and in 993-994 A.D.. The origin of these events is still under debate but it opens new perspectives for the interpretation of 10Be ice core records. We present a new 10Be record from an ice core from Dome C (Antarctica) covering the last millennium. The chronology of this new ice core has been established by matching volcanic events on the WAIS Divide ice core (WDC06A) that is the best dated record in Antarctica over the Holocene (Sigl et al., JGR, 2013, Sigl et al., Nat. Clim. Change, 2014). The five minima of solar activity (Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton) are detected and characterized by a 10Be concentration increase of ca. 20% above average in agreement with previous studies of ice cores drilled at South Pole and Dome Fuji in Antarctica (Bard et al., EPSL, 1997; Horiuchi et al., Quat. Geochrono., 2008) and at NGRIP and Dye3 in Greenland (Berggren et al., GRL, 2009). The high resolution, on the order of a year, allows the detection of the 11-year solar cycle. Sulfate concentration, a proxy for volcanic eruptions, has also been measured in the very same samples, allowing a precise comparison of both 10Be and sulfate profiles. We confirm the systematic relationship between stratospheric eruptions and 10Be concentration increases, first evidenced by observations of the stratospheric volcanic eruptions of Agung in 1963 and Pinatubo in 1991 (Baroni et al., GCA, 2011). This relationship is due to an increase in 10Be deposition linked to the role played by the sedimentation of volcanic aerosols. In the light of these new elements, we will discuss the limitations and

  12. High-resolution authigenic 10Be/9Be records : A proxy indicator of the past geomagnetic field variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcaillet, J.; Thouveny, N.; Bourlès, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    At global scale, the synchronicity of abnormal directions of the paleomagnetic field and minimum intensities supports the hypothesis of a relationship between the occurrence of excursions and/or polarity changes and the collapse of the dipolar component. We present quantitative evaluations of relationships between 10Be production rate variations and geomagnetic events using high resolution authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and continuous paleointensity records measured in three marine sediment sequences located on the Portuguese margin, (MD95-2042 and MD95-2040), and in the Western Pacific, (MD97-2140). Since 10Be concentrations measured in marine sediments not only depend on 10Be production rates but also on oceanic and sedimentary effects, authigenic (i.e. adsorbed onto particles from the water column) 10Be concentrations were normalized to their related authigenic 9Be concentrations in order to account for these disturbing effects on the sedimentation rate as well as on the chemical and granulometric composition of the sediments. Due to their different sources, only the soluble form of both beryllium isotopes may indeed have been homogenized in the water column before deposition in the sediment. The measured 10Be/9Be ratios increase significantly at all identified excursions and reversals, associated with decreased paleointensities, consistently with the expected relationship between magnetic moment and cosmic ray flux (Q/Qo=(M/Mo)-1/2). Our results confirm the global occurrence of well-recognized and well-dated phases of low geomagnetic moments associated to well known geomagnetic excursions, short events or polarity reversals that occurred between 0 and 300 ka BP and between 0.6 and 1.3 Ma BP: the Laschamp excursion, the Blake event, the Jamaica/Pringle falls excursion, the Brunhes-Matuyama Reversal, the upper and lower Jaramillo transitions and the Cobb Mountain event. They strengthen the validity of recently reported excursions: Icelandic basin, Calabrian Ridge 0

  13. Combination of in situ cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) and Schmidt-hammer dating for the investigation of Late-Holocene lateral moraines in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, S.

    2009-04-01

    absolute' age of the boulder surfaces was needed to allow the construction of a dating curve by reliable fixed points to, radiocarbon (14C) dating could not provide those information because of the lack of organic material indisputable be related to the glacier advance forming the moraine ridges. On base on these considerations, this study comprises the first attempt to combine in situ (terrestrial) cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating with Schmidt-hammer measurements for the dating of Holocene moraines and the reconstruction of a regional glacier chronology. Cosmogenic 10Be dating has the important advantage of delivering an ‘absolute' age for the exposure of boulder or bedrock surfaces, i.e. the same surface tested with the Schmidt-hammer. One disadvantage of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is, however, the limited number of boulders sampled due to high costs. From this background, a combination with the Schmidt-hammer technique seems ideal as the latter could provide measurement of a large number of boulders. The Schmidt-hammer measurements can, on the other hand, help with the selection of representative boulders for cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) surface exposure dating avoiding boulders that have been exposed to post-depositional movement (e.g. rotation). Results from the application of this combined ‘multi-proxy-approach' at Strauchon Glacier in Westland/Tai Poutini National Park and Hooker Glacier in Mt Cook/Aoraki National Park on large lateral moraine complex with several individual moraine ridges proof its potential. Three pre-‘Little Ice Age' moraine sequences each related to an individual Late-Holocene Little Ice Age-type event unambiguously distinguished by Schmidt-hammer measurements provides cosmogenic (10Be) ages of 2,400/2,500 a BP, c. 1,700 a BP, and c. 1,000/1,100 a BP. The preliminary construction of a dating curve based on both Schmidt-hammer and cosmogenic (10Be) dating results shows high significance and confirms the successful

  14. Tissue reaction and surface morphology of absorbable sutures after in vivo exposure.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Miguel G S; Weissman, Ruben; Reis, Sílvia R A

    2006-10-01

    Tissue reaction to suture materials depends mainly on how the polymer they are composed of interacts with the tissues. There are few in vivo studies evaluating the suture material modifications resulting from its interaction with tissues. This paper aimed to study rat subcutaneous tissue reaction to irradiated polyglactin 910, polydioxanone, poliglecaprone 25 and chromic gut and its correlation with the ultra-structural alterations the materials undergo. The histological alterations were studied on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th and 14th day after suture implantations. In these periods, the materials were removed from the tissues and their surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Irradiated polyglactin 910 stimulated the formation of multinucleated giant cells and its filaments underwent cleavage and dissolution. In potydioxanone, a few inflammatory cells and scar fibrosis was observed, and triangular cracks appeared on its surface. Around the poliglecaprone 25, a diffused infiltration of a few mononuclear cells and fibrosis was recorded and formation of craters was observed on its surface. Chromic gut induced necrosis and granulation tissue and underwent dissolution in the tissues during the studied periods. In this study, it was observed that suture materials induced differentiated tissue reactions and morphologic surface changes, suggesting that indications should be individualized. PMID:16977393

  15. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond. PMID:24243162

  16. Degradation of the pesticide carbofuran on clay and soil surfaces upon sunlight exposure.

    PubMed

    Mountacer, H; Atifi, A; Wong-Wah-Chung, P; Sarakha, M

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the photolysis of carbofuran has been undertaken under sunlight conditions and at the surface of model supports such as clay films and different soils collected from two different sites in Morocco (Tirs and Dahs). In all conditions, an efficient degradation occurred owing to direct light absorption and also to photoinduced processes involving either clays or natural organic matter moities. On kaolin films, the photodegradation kinetics appears to follow a first-order process that clearly depends on the film thickness. The diffusion of carbofuran from the lower part to the illuminated surface was found to be negligible when compared to the photolysis process within the range of 20-70 μm. Thus, the photolysis rate constant at the surface of the solid support, k (0), was evaluated to be 7.0 × 10(-3) min(-1). Under these experimental conditions, the quantum yield was found equal to 2.1 × 10(-4). On soil surfaces, the disappearance rate constant was mainly attributed to photoinduced processes arising from natural organic matter. From the analytical point of view, the products were formed through (1) hydroxylation on the aromatic ring, (2) homolytic scission of the carbamate C-O bond leading to radical species formation, and (3) photohydrolysis of the carbamate C-O bond.

  17. Colloidal stability of gold nanorod solution upon exposure to excised human skin: Effect of surface chemistry and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nouf N; Al-Qaoud, Khaled M; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Khalil, Enam A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the colloidal stability of gold nanorods (with positive, negative and neutral surface charge) in solution upon contact with excised human skin. UV-vis absorption, plasmon peak broadening index (PPBI%) and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to follow nanoparticles aggregation in solution. Our results show that positively charged gold nanorods aggregate extensively upon exposure to excised human skin compared to negatively and neutrally charged gold nanorods. Skin-induced aggregation of cationic gold nanorods was linked to the adsorption of proteins released from the dermis layer to the surface of gold nanorods. Protein adsorption significantly screen nanorod's effective surface charge and induce their aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the presence of polyethylene glycol polymer on the surface of cationic gold nanorods minimize this aggregation significantly by providing steric repulsion (non-electrostatic stabilization mechanism). This work highlights the importance of evaluating the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution upon contact with skin, which is a "usually overlooked" parameter when studying the nanoparticle-skin interaction. PMID:26923289

  18. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Isotopic Compositions in Meteoritic Hibonite: Implications for Origin of 10Be and Early Solar System Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Chang; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Lee, Typhoon

    2010-08-01

    NanoSIMS isotopic measurements of Li, Be, and B in individual hibonite grains extracted from the Murchison meteorite revealed that 10B excesses correlate with the 9Be/11B ratios in 26Al-free PLAty hibonite Crystals. From these data, an initial 10Be/9Be = (5.5 ± 1.6) × 10-4 (2σ) and 10B/11B = 0.2508 ± 0.0015 can be inferred. On the other hand, chondritic boron isotopic compositions were found in 26Al-bearing Spinel-HIBonite spherules, most likely due to contamination with normal boron. No 7Li excesses due to 7Be decay were observed. When combined with previously reported data, the new data yield the best defined 10Be/9Be = (5.3 ± 1.0) × 10-4 (2σ) and 10B/11B = 0.2513 ± 0.0012 for PLACs. A comparison of this value and the best constrained 10Be/9Be = (8.8 ± 0.6) × 10-4 in CV Ca-Al-rich inclusions supports a heterogeneous distribution of 10Be and its protosolar irradiation origin. We consider two possible irradiation scenarios that could potentially lead to the observed Li-Be-B isotopic compositions in PLACs. Although in situ irradiation of solids with hibonite chemistry seems to provide the simplest explanation, more high quality data will be needed for quantitatively constraining the irradiation history.

  19. Cosmogenic 10Be Depth Profile in top 560 m of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Caffee, M. W.; Edwards, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be in polar ice samples are a function of variations in solar activity, geomagnetic field strength, atmospheric mixing and annual snow accumulation rates. The 10Be depth profile in ice cores also provides independent chronological markers to tie Antarctic to Greenland ice cores and to tie Holocene ice cores to the 14C dendrochronology record. We measured 10Be concentrations in 187 samples from depths of 0-560 m of the main WAIS Divide core, WDC06A. The ice samples are typically 1-2 kg and represent 2-4 m of ice, equivalent to an average temporal resolution of ~12 years, based on the preliminary age-depth scale proposed for the WDC core, (McConnell et al., in prep). Be, Al and Cl were separated using ion exchange chromatography techniques and the 10Be concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at PRIME lab. The 10Be concentrations range from 8.1 to 19.1 x 10^3 at/g, yielding an average of (13.1±2.1) x 10^3 at/g. Adopting an average snow accumulation rate of 20.9 cm weq/yr, as derived from the age-depth scale, this value corresponds to an average 10Be flux of (2.7±0.5) x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2. This flux is similar to that of the Holocene part of the Siple Dome (Nishiizumi and Finkel, 2007) and Dome Fuji (Horiuchi et al. 2008) ice cores, but ~30% lower than the value of 4.0 x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2 for GISP2 (Finkel and Nishiizumi, 1997). The periods of low solar activity, known as Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, show ~20% higher 10Be concentrations/fluxes than the periods of average solar activity in the last millennium. The maximum 10Be fluxes during some of these periods of low solar activity are up to ~50% higher than average 10Be fluxes, as seen in other polar ice cores, which makes these peaks suitable as chronologic markers. We will compare the 10Be record in the WAIS Divide ice core with that in other Antarctic as well as Greenland ice cores and with the 14C treering record. Acknowledgment. This

  20. Orbital forcing of the East Asian summer monsoon based on quantitative paleorainfall records from Chinese Loess using 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, W.; White, L.; Cheng, L.; Wu, Z.; zhou, W.; Kong, X.

    2013-12-01

    Here we outline a method for deriving quantitative records of paleoprecipitation using meteoric 10Be flux as recorded in Quaternary loess sediments, and apply this method to derive a ~500ka rainfall record from Chinese loess. The method involves measuring loess 10Be concentration by AMS, then applying corrections for radioactive decay, recycled 10Be in reaerosolized dust, and for variations in geomagnetic field to correct for atmospheric 10Be production rate variations. 10Be flux is calculated by multiplying the corrected 10Be concentrations with loess accumulation rate, where the later is derived from a (non-orbitally tuned) timescale determined from correlating variations in loess magnetic susceptibility with U/Th dated Chinese speleothem δ18O records. The dependence of 10Be flux on rainfall rate is determined using modern observations of 7Be flux in rainfall, and atmospheric 10Be/7Be cosmogenic nuclide production ratios. Modern rainfall on the Chinese Loess Plateau has been shown to be primarily a function of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) intensity. Our 10Be rainfall proxy shows that glacial to peak interglacial rainfall rates in this region have varied by about a factor of two over the last 0.5 Ma. Our results suggests EASM intensity during interglacials MIS11, MIS 9c and MIS13 were all comparable (~850 mm/yr), but slightly less (by ~8%) than for MIS1, and about 15% less than for MIS5e, which is similar to the high latitude ice volume pattern of response except for MIS11. We note that the 10Be rainfall record of MIS13 differs from typical Chinese loess magnetic susceptibility records that suggest MIS13 was the strongest EASM of the last 6 interglacials. Our record instead indicates a relative subdued MIS13 EASM, more consistent with the Antarctic EPICA ice core deuterium or marine δ18O records. We correlate our results with orbital forced solar insolation variations at high and low latitudes as well as with interhemispheric insolation gradients. We find

  1. Using 10-Be in sediment to understand the long-term behavior of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Paul; Rood, Dylan; Corbett, Lee; Nelson, Alice; Shakun, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    We have used in situ and meteoric cosmogenic 10-Be, measured in sediment and rock, to understand better the history and erosional processes of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the many thousand to several million-year time scale. Measured concentrations of in situ 10-Be constrain Holocene emergence histories at the head of Igaliku fiord in southern Greenland. We sampled two well-preserved gravel beach ridges that are the highest marine deposits. Below one beach ridge, we sampled 4 quartzite outcrops at progressively lower elevations and above a nearby beach ridge, we sampled an erratic boulder and the underlying bedrock. We also sampled a beach ridge at a similar elevation at Qassiarsuk on Tunulliarfik Fiord about 20 km away. The data show rapid emergence after 11 ky. All three beach ridges (average and standard error of 6, 6 and 10 clast ages) have the same age (10.98±0.09, 11.07±0.51ky, and 10.96±0.33 ky). Ages of outcrops below the beach ridges are in stratigraphic order and show steady emergence; the outcrop just above modern high water has an age of 8.80 ky. The bedrock/boulder ages from above the beach ridge are slightly younger (10.45 and 10.73 ky, respectively), consistent with inheritance of about 1400 atoms/g 10-Be in beach clasts. Low levels of inheritance in deglacial beach gravels are consistent with the 10-Be content of clasts collected directly from the GIS in western Greenland. Most clasts have the equivalent of only a few hundred to a few thousand atoms/g 10-Be. Sand-sized sediment collected from outwash streams exiting the ice margin at Kangerlussuaq (western Greenland), Narsarsuaq (southern Greenland), and Tasilaq (eastern Greenland) has two to five thousand atoms/g of 10-Be - several times the median amount of in situ 10-Be measured in clasts collected from the ice. These data indicate efficient erosion by the ice sheet of both pre-glacial and interglacial regolith at least near the ice sheet margins. In contrast, chemical and meteoric 10-Be

  2. Surface exposure dates of cirque basin deglaciation along a western Ireland transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. M.; Clark, J.; Clark, P. U.; McCabe, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (20ka -11ka), variations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), accompanied by changes in North Atlantic Deep Water production, caused centennial-to-millennial abrupt climate change. Because of Ireland's proximity to North Atlantic deep-water convection sites, changes in climate associated with variations in the AMOC would be particularly pronounced there, and are recorded by fluctuations of the Irish Ice Sheet. Many of Ireland's mountains also hosted cirque glaciers during the last glaciation, which would have been particularly sensitive to abrupt climate changes of the last deglaciation. Dating of cirque glacier moraines with cosmogenic nuclides can provide a millennial-scale reconstruction of variability in these highly sensitive cirque glaciers. We report 11 new 10Be ages from two cirques basins in County Mayo, western Ireland. A moraine adjacent to Lougaharry Lough near Killary Harbour suggests deglaciation at 13.81 × 0.14 ka during the Bølling-Allerød interval. Two moraines, one inner and one outer, at Lough Accorymore on Achill Island returned ages of 17.04 × 0.31 ka and 18.43 × 0.79 ka, respectively. Both Accorymore dates are Oldest Dryas in age and suggest variability during the millennial-scale Clogher Head Stadial in Ireland. To develop a more regional reconstruction of glacier-climate variability during the last deglaciation, we have also sampled moraines from cirque basins spanning western Ireland from County Kerry in the south to County Donegal in the north. Boulders were sampled from a total of 23 moraines from seven additional cirques to provide this more expansive coverage.

  3. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind ion irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are widely known to alter the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies.

  4. Exposure of fibrinogen receptors in human platelets by surface proteolysis with elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H; De Mars, D D; Lenox, R H

    1986-01-01

    Human platelets that were preincubated with porcine elastase aggregated spontaneously upon the addition of fibrinogen. Maximal aggregation to fibrinogen was observed with platelets pretreated with an elastase concentration of 111 micrograms/ml, and half-maximal aggregation occurred after treatment with 11 micrograms/ml elastase. Binding of radiolabeled fibrinogen to elastase-treated platelets was specific, saturable, and showed a single class of 48,400 +/- 9,697 fibrinogen-binding sites per platelet with a dissociation constant of 6.30 +/- 1.48 X 10(-7) M. ATP, apyrase, and the stimulators of platelet adenylate cyclase forskolin, prostaglandin E1, prostacyclin, and N6, 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP did not inhibit the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. EDTA completely blocked the initiation of aggregation and reversed the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa completely blocked the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Immunoprecipitates with these antibodies obtained from detergent extracts of surface-radiolabeled, intact, and elastase-treated platelets contained the glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. We conclude that surface proteolysis by low concentrations of elastase can expose fibrinogen-binding sites associated with GPIIb and GPIIIa on the platelet surface, resulting in spontaneous aggregation upon the addition of fibrinogen. These findings may be relevant to hemostatic changes observed in patients with increased levels of circulating elastase. Images PMID:3005363

  5. The study of the geomagnetic excursions and the relative intensities from Chinese loess 10Be over the past 130 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Xian, F.; Beck, J.; An, Z.; Wu, Z.; Liu, M.; Chen, M.; Priller, A.; Kutschera, W.; Jull, A. T.; Yu, H.; Song, S.; Cheng, P.; Kong, X.

    2009-12-01

    Chinese loess is well-known archive for the paleogeomagnetic and paleoclimatic studies [Zhou et al., 1990; An et al., 1990; Zhu et al., 2007]. However, earlier efforts to extract weak geomagnetic excursion signals from Chinese loess 10Be were always unsuccessful due to the complexities of loess 10Be, which results in the fact that loess 10Be was only used as a climatic proxy [Shen et al., 1992; Beer et al.,1993; Gu et al.,1996]. Meanwhile, knowledge on the precise stratigraphic horizons of geomagnetic excursions with a reliable dating [Channell, 2006], on whether the short-lived excursions such as Blake can not be recorded in paleosol unit are still controversial. Here, we present the reconstructed past 130ka geomagnetic excursions and relative paleointensities for the first time from 10Be records in two Chinese loess sections. Results are comparative with those of independent geomagnetic research on Atlantic and Pacific sediments. The derived Laschamp and Blake events lie in the loess-paleosol (L1SS1 and S1SS3) corresponding to mid MIS 3 and 5e respectively. Our studies prove the potential application of the complex loess 10Be for long-term geomagnetic tracing and provide new evidence to answer the long-existing debates on the precise stratigraphic horizon of geomagnetic excursions. Our study suggests the potential application of loess-paleosol 10Be for reconstructing geomagnetic intensity variations spanning the whole Quaternary. References 1. Zhou, L. P., F. Oldfield, A. G. Wintle, S. G. Robinson, and J. T. Wang (1990), Partly pedogenic origin of magnetic variations in Chinese loess, Nature, 346, 737-739. 2. An, Z. S., T. S. Liu, Y. C. Lu, S. C. Porter, G. Kukla, X. H. Wu, and Y. M. Hua (1990), The long-term paleomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-paleosol sequence in Central China, Quat. Int., 7-8, 91-95. 3. Zhu, R. X., R. Zhang, C. L. Deng, Y. X. Pan, Q. S. Liu, and Y. B. Sun (2007), Are Chinese loess deposits essentially continuous?, Geophys. Res. Lett

  6. Cosmogenic 10Be Chronologies of Moraines and Glacially Scoured Bedrock in the Teton Range, with Implications for Paleoclimatic Events and Tectonic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Pierce, K. L.; Thackray, G. D.; Finkel, R. C.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.

    2015-12-01

    At its Pleistocene maximum, the greater Yellowstone glacial system consisted of an ice cap on the Yellowstone Plateau joined by glaciers from adjacent high mountains, including the Teton Range. In prior research, we obtained 112 exposure ages from moraines and bedrock in this region. These chronologies identified asynchronous outlet glacier culminations around the periphery of the Yellowstone glacier complex, supporting a model of spatial and temporal progressions in buildup and decay of the various ice source regions. Here we build on this previous work and present >30 recently developed 10Be exposure ages on glacial features in the Teton Range. Although the Tetons harbored a relatively small portion of the greater Yellowstone ice complex, glaciers in this range left behind some of the region's best-preserved moraine sequences and scoured bedrock. Ongoing investigations are focused on developing moraine chronologies in several drainages on the eastern and western Teton Range fronts, and obtaining exposure ages along scoured bedrock transects in glacial troughs upvalley from the dated moraines to define rates of ice recession. Notably, our dating campaign includes lateral moraines that are offset by the Teton fault, providing a rare opportunity to establish direct constraints on integrated long-term slip rates. All new and previously obtained 10Be ages are calculated using recently published calibrations and scaling of 10Be production rates. Initial results show that massive lateral moraines in selected drainages are several thousands of years older than adjacent distal end moraines, implying that the laterals were constructed during an earlier phase of the last glaciation and then acted to topographically confine subsequent ice advances. Mean ages of ca. 17-16 ka from terminal moraine loops along with limiting ages from scoured bedrock upvalley of the moraines indicate glacier culminations followed by the onset of rapid ice retreat long after the end of the global

  7. Analysis of Microcrafters in Materials Specimens after Long-Term Exposure on ISS Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaevich, S. K.; Aleksandrov, N. G.; Shumov, A. E.; Novikov, L. S.; Chernik, V. N.; Samokhina, M. S.; Golden, J. L.; Graves, R. F.; Kravchenko, M.; Christiansen, E. L.; Henkener, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Komplast" experiment has been carried out on the ISS by the Khrunichev Space Center jointly with other Russian scientific centers since 1998. The experiment incorporates the "Komplast" cartridges on the FGB exterior, which are fitted with materials specimens and sensors. The cartridges were sent into orbit together with FGB on 20 November 1998. In March 2011, two of the cartridges were taken back from the ISS by the "Discovery" American space shuttle after being exposed in the open space for 12 years. In the framework of this experiment the subject of analysis is the effect of the space environment on the exposed specimens of various materials. This report covers the analysis results of the surface morphology of various materials taken from the "Komplast" cartridges exposed to hits of micrometeors and micronic particles of space debris. Analysis is made of microcraters of 5 to 250 mcm in specimens of polished metals and silicone comprised in the sensor for micrometeoric particles. The report represents optic and scanning electron microscope images of craters formed in the specimens by high-velocity and low-velocity particles impacting the surface. By virtue of the electronic microscope, data on composition of the substance in the craters and of the substance of the low-velocity particles are obtained. The data make it possible to differentiate the particles as the natural-origin particles or anthropogenic-origin space debris particles. Distribution of craters and low-velocity particles in the size range of 5 to 50 mcm is obtained. The data are compared with the existing models of fluxes of natural-origin and artificial-origin microparticles on the ISS orbit. Inhomogeneous particles of complicated configuration are discovered on the surface of the analyzed specimens, whose origin are not uniquely determined and are to be the subject of further study.

  8. Synchronizing the North American Varve Chronology with Greenland ice core records during late MIS 2 using Meteoric 10Be Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, Benjamin D.; Balco, Greg; Ridge, Jack C.; Rood, Dylan H.; Bierman, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    The North American Varve Chronology (NAVC) is a floating 5700-year sequence of glacial lake varves deposited in the Connecticut River Valley of the northeast US ~18,000-12,500 years ago. The NAVC is an annually resolved record of regional climate and ice-marginal processes at 40-45° N latitude, near the margin of the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). NAVC deposition occurred at the same time as rapid and abrupt Arctic and North Atlantic climate changes that took place during the last deglaciation. Age calibration estimates for the NAVC based on radiocarbon dated plant macrofossils in individual varves imply a relationship between ice-marginal events recorded by the NAVC and climate events recorded in Greenland ice cores. For example, the retreat rate of the LIS up the Connecticut River Valley increased during the Bolling warming in Greenland, a readvance of the LIS margin took place during the Older Dryas cold period, and a correlation between an outburst flood from glacial Lake Iroquois and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period supports the hypothesis that the flood affected North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. On the other hand, a doubling of the ice-margin retreat rate recorded by the NAVC around 16,000 years ago coincides with a relatively cold period in Greenland. Our goal is to investigate the precise time relationship between these two records by synchronizing the NAVC with the Greenland ice core time scale using atmospherically-produced 10Be. Existing 10Be flux records, including those from Greenland ice cores, exhibit solar variability on a range of time scales. Because this variability is globally synchronous, a 10Be flux record for the NAVC can, in principle, be used to align NAVC and ice core timescales. In the first phase of this research we tested this potential by generating 10Be flux records for two 80-year varve sequences and analyzing them using multi-taper spectral analysis for determination of statistically significant periodicities. We were

  9. Dental ceramics coated with bioactive glass: Surface changes after exposure in a simulated body fluid under static and dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, L.; Kontonasaki, E.; Zorba, T.; Chatzistavrou, X.; Pavlidou, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Sklavounos, S.; Koidis, P.

    2003-07-01

    Bioactive materials develop a strong bond with living tissues through a carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite layer, similar to that of bone. The fabrication of a thin bioactive glass coating on dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, could provide a bioactive surface, which in combination with a tissue regenerative technique could lead to periodontal tissues attachment. The aim of this study was the in vitro investigation of the surface structure changes of dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, coated with a bioactive glass heat-treated at 950 °C, after exposure in a simulated body fluid (SBF) under two different soaking conditions. Coating of dental ceramics with a bioactive glass resulted in the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. The growth of a well-attached carbonate apatite layer on their surface after immersion in a simulated body fluid is well evidenced under both experimental conditions, although in static environment the rate of apatite growth is constant and the grown layers seem to be more dense and compact compared with the respective layers observed on specimens under dynamic conditions.

  10. 10Be-derived denudation rates from the Burdekin catchment: The largest contributor of sediment to the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Jacky; Bartley, Rebecca; Chappell, John; Austin, Jenet M.; Fifield, Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Thompson, Chris J.; Furuichi, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs) such as Beryllium-10 (10Be) are now routinely used to reconstruct erosional rates over tens of thousands of years at increasingly large basin scales (> 100,000 km2). In Australia, however, the approach and its assumptions have not been systematically tested within a single, large drainage basin. This study measures 10Be concentrations in river sediments from the Burdekin catchment, one of Australia's largest coastal catchments, to determine long-term (> 10,000 years), time-integrated rates of sediment generation and denudation. A nested-sampling design was used to test for effects of increasing catchment scale on nuclide concentrations with upstream catchment areas ranging from 4 to 130,000 km2. Beryllium-10 concentrations in sediment samples collected from the upstream headwater tributaries and mid-stream locations range from 1.8 to 2.89 × 105 atoms g- 1 and data confirm that nuclide concentrations are well and rapidly mixed downstream. Sediment from the same tributaries consistently yielded 10Be concentrations in the range of their upstream samples. Overall, no decrease in 10Be concentrations can be observed at the range of catchment scales measured here. The mean denudation rate for all river sediment samples throughout the Fanning subcatchment (1100 km2) is 18.47 m Ma- 1, which compares with the estimate at the end of the Burdekin catchment (130,000 km2) of 16.22 m Ma- 1. Nuclide concentrations in the lower gradient western and southern catchments show a higher degree of variability, and several complications emerged as a result of the contrasting geomorphic processes and settings. This study confirms the ability of TCNs to determine long-term denudation rates in Australia and highlights some important considerations in the model assumptions that may affect the accuracy of limited sampling in large, low-gradient catchments with long storage times.

  11. Observations of historical sea cliff retreat rates exceed long-term estimates derived from cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Historical observation of coastal retreat are limited to relatively short timescales (< 150 years), during which time humans may have modified the coastal environment. There is growing concern that rates of coastal change may be accelerated in the face of anticipated stormier climates and rising sea level, yet there is little knowledge of rates of coastal change prior to the relatively brief historical records. In order to make predictions about potential future coastal change it is important to establish baseline conditions averaged over longer time periods. Here we present analysis of sea cliff retreat throughout the Holocene averaged for chalk cliffs in south-east England using cosmogenic isotopes. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in-situ flint samples collected from three transects across coastal platforms in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate during the Holocene. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. We find that cliff retreat rates during the Holocene were significantly slower (2-6 cm yr-1) than those derived from recent historical observations (15-25 cm yr-1). Modelled accumulation of 10Be requires retreat rates that increase rapidly in recent times, potentially reflecting human modification of the coastal sediment budget through construction of sea defences, flood defenses and aggregate extraction. Therefore knowledge of past human activity at the coastline may be important in anticipating future rates of coastal retreat.

  12. Effects of artificial tears on rabbit ocular surface healing after exposure to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiu; Cao, Hong; Lin, Tong; Gong, Lan

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effect of different artificial tears on healing the drug-induced keratopathy. To this aim, 64 rabbits received topical administration of 0.01% benzalkonium chloride to establish models and were divided into four groups. The control group received ocular saline solution (Saline), while the others were treated with Refresh Plus® (RF), Hycosan® (H) and Systane® Ultra (SU). Surface abnormalities were examined daily using slit-lamp. Fluorescein staining, histopathological and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination were performed at day 0, 2 weeks, and 1 and 2 months. A significant difference was observed between RF and SU, but not between H and SU at 2 weeks. TEM examination revealed new microvilli close to the cavity surface, and the number of microvilli in SU was greater than in H at 2 weeks and 1 month. Based on the results, the effect in the SU group was the most significant. Eye drops with nontoxic preservative such as SU are an alternative to treat drug-induced keratopathy. PMID:26890221

  13. Influence of virtual height exposure on postural reactions to support surface translations.

    PubMed

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Chua, Romeo; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-06-01

    As fear of falling is related to the increased likelihood of falls, it is important to understand the effects of threat-related factors (fear, anxiety and confidence) on dynamic postural reactions. Previous studies designed to examine threat effects on dynamic postural reactions have methodological limitations and lack a comprehensive analysis of simultaneous kinetic, kinematic and electromyographical recordings. The current study addressed these limitations by examining postural reactions of 26 healthy young adults to unpredictable anterior-posterior support-surface translations (acceleration=0.6m/s(2), constant velocity=0.25m/s, total displacement=0.75m) while standing on a narrow virtual surface at Low (0.4cm) and High (3.2m) virtual heights. Standing at virtual height increased fear and anxiety, and decreased confidence. Prior to perturbations, threat led to increased tonic muscle activity in tibialis anterior, resulting in a higher co-contraction index between lower leg muscles. For backward perturbations, muscle activity in the lower leg and arm, and center of pressure peak displacements, were earlier and larger when standing at virtual height. In addition, arm flexion significantly increased while leg, trunk and center of mass displacements remained unchanged across heights. When controlling for leaning, threat-related factors can influence the neuro-mechanical responses to an unpredictable perturbation, causing specific characteristics of postural reactions to be facilitated in young adults when their balance is threatened. PMID:27264411

  14. Effects of artificial tears on rabbit ocular surface healing after exposure to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiu; Cao, Hong; Lin, Tong; Gong, Lan

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effect of different artificial tears on healing the drug-induced keratopathy. To this aim, 64 rabbits received topical administration of 0.01% benzalkonium chloride to establish models and were divided into four groups. The control group received ocular saline solution (Saline), while the others were treated with Refresh Plus® (RF), Hycosan® (H) and Systane® Ultra (SU). Surface abnormalities were examined daily using slit-lamp. Fluorescein staining, histopathological and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination were performed at day 0, 2 weeks, and 1 and 2 months. A significant difference was observed between RF and SU, but not between H and SU at 2 weeks. TEM examination revealed new microvilli close to the cavity surface, and the number of microvilli in SU was greater than in H at 2 weeks and 1 month. Based on the results, the effect in the SU group was the most significant. Eye drops with nontoxic preservative such as SU are an alternative to treat drug-induced keratopathy.

  15. Coexistence of {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, N.; Ito, M.; Milin, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.

    2008-06-15

    The coexistence of the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n and {alpha}+t+t cluster structures in the excited states of {sup 10}Be has been discussed. In the previous analysis, all the low-lying states of {sup 10}Be were found to be well described by the motion of the two valence neutrons around two {alpha} clusters. However, the {alpha}+t+t cluster structure was found to coexist with the {alpha}+{alpha}+n+n structure around E{sub x}=15 MeV, close to the corresponding threshold. We have introduced a microscopic model to solve the coupling effect between these two configurations. The K=0 and K=1 states are generated from the {alpha}+t+t configurations due to the spin coupling of two triton clusters. The present case of {sup 10}Be is one of the few examples in which completely different configurations of triton-type ({alpha}+t+t three-center) and {alpha}-type ({alpha}+{alpha}+n+n two-center) clusters coexist in a single nucleus in the same energy region.

  16. Applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the study of indicators of exposure to selected genotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Helmenstine, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect and analyze certain genotoxic chemicals, their metabolites, and selected deoxyribonucleic acid/ribonucleic acid (DNA/RNA) adducts that may be produced from exposure to specific toxins. Substances examined included nucleic acid (purine/pyrimidine) etheno adducts of adenine and cytosine and carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene and aflatoxins. SERS was shown to be an effective tool for sensitive, selective detection and analysis of these genotoxins and related substances. Detection was accomplished even at such low concentrations as might be present in biological systems, and in minute volumes of approximately one microliter per sample. Most substances were found to possess unique spectral signatures and could be distinguished from other chemicals in this study. The sample molecules were also analyzed in body fluids (e.g., plasma, serum, and urine) and adducted to DNA. In this study SERS was demonstrated to open a new dimension in chemical analysis not previously available by utilizing other spectroscopies or methods of chemical detection. Special attention was given to the various factors affecting the quality and reproducibility of a SERS spectrum, emphasizing the importance of optimization of Raman cross-scattering enhancement. Methods for adapting SERS to deal with specific research problems and for expanding the capabilities of SERS to address the health effects from human exposure to toxic pollutants were addressed in the concluding remarks section of this manuscript.

  17. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the oldest glacial successions in the Himalayan orogen: Ladakh Range, northern India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Caffee, M.W.; Bovard, K.R.; Finkel, R.C.; Sharma, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and alluvial fan sediments define the timing of five glacial advances over at least the last five glacial cycles in the Ladakh Range of the Transhimalaya. The glacial stages that have been identified are: the Indus Valley glacial stage, dated at older than 430 ka; the Leh glacial stage occurring in the penultimate glacial cycle or older; the Karglacial stage, occurring during the early part of the last glacial cycle; the Bazgo glacial stage, at its maximum during the middle of the last glacial cycle; and the early Holocene Khalling glacial stage. The exposure ages of the Indus Valley moraines are the oldest observed to date throughout the Himalayan orogen. We observe a pattern of progressively more restricted glaciation during the last five glacial cycles, likely indicating a progressive reduction in the moisture supply necessary to sustain glaciation. A possible explanation is that uplift of Himalayan ranges to the south and/or of the Karakoram Mountains to the west of the region may have effectively blocked moisture supply by the south Asian summer monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies, respectively. Alternatively, this pattern of glaciation may reflect a trend of progressively less extensive glaciation in mountain regions that has been observed globally throughout the Pleistocene. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  18. An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-15

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

  19. Applications of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for the Study of Indicators of Exposure to Selected Genotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmenstine, Anne Marie

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS) was used to detect and analyze certain genotoxic chemicals, their metabolites, and selected deoxyribonucleic acid/ribonucleic acid (DNA/RNA) adducts that may be produced from exposure to specific toxins. Substances examined included nucleic acid (purine/pyrimidine) etheno adducts of adenine and cytosine and carcinogens benzo (a) pyrene and aflatoxins. SERS was shown to be an effective tool for sensitive, selective detection and analysis of these genotoxins and related substances. Detection was accomplished even at such low concentrations as might be present in biological systems, and in minute volumes of approximately one microliter per sample. Most substances were found to possess unique spectral signatures and could be distinguished from other chemicals in this study. The sample molecules were also analyzed in body fluids (e.g. plasma, serum, and urine) and adducted to DNA. In this study SERS was demonstrated to open a new dimension in chemical analysis not previously available by utilizing other spectroscopies or methods of chemical detection. Special attention was given to the various factors affecting the quality and reproducibility of a SERS spectrum, emphasizing the importance of optimization of Raman cross-scattering enhancement. Methods for adapting SERS to deal with specific research problems and for expanding the capabilities of SERS to address the health effects from human exposure to toxic pollutants were addressed in the concluding remarks section of this manuscript.

  20. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    PubMed

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality.

  1. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    PubMed

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality. PMID:21479012

  2. Spatial patterns of mobile regolith thickness and meteoric 10Be in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, N.; Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BcCZO) aims to understand the history, architecture and evolution of hillslopes found within the diverse topography and climate regimes of the Colorado Front Range. This information is crucial for testing and developing models of hillslope evolution, giving especial consideration to the production and downslope transport of mobile regolith on the hillslopes. Here, we present the results of a systematic study aiming to document spatial patterns of mobile regolith thickness and meteoric Beryllium-10 (10Be) concentrations in the Gordon Gulch basin of the BcCZO. Gordon Gulch lies within the unglaciated portion of the Colorado Front Range and is thought to be an artifact of long-term steady state evolution. The basin is characterized by mixed bedrock-soil mantled hillslopes, with intermittent bedrock outcrops (tors) on ~10% of slopes. It is currently unclear how the hillslopes of Gordon Gulch have evolved given the variable rock type and strength (i.e., fracture spacing), gradients (steep slopes in lower basin compared to gradual in the upper), and hillslope aspects (north versus south facing hillslopes, with varying tree types and soil moisture for frost cracking and heaving) that exist within the basin. Furthermore, climate data suggest that the current climate regime (relatively warm) is representative of only 20% of the last 65 ka. Mobile regolith thickness measurements provide a snapshot of hillslope evolution in the basin given these controls, and meteoric 10Be can used to constrain residence times and trace mobile regolith transport. We measure mobile regolith thickness as the depth to immobile weathered bedrock and/or saprolite. Preliminary analysis of over 200 soil pits reveals a high degree of variability in mobile regolith thickness. In general, the mobile regolith cover is thinner on the south facing slopes than the north facing and a general thickening of mobile regolith occurs on steeper slopes, especially along

  3. EBL2, a flexible, controlled EUV exposure and surface analysis facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    te Sligte, Edwin; Koster, Norbert; Molkenboer, Freek; Deutz, Alex

    2016-05-01

    TNO is building EBL2 as a publicly accessible test facility for EUV lithography related development of photomasks, pellicles, optics, and other components. EBL2 will consist of a Beam Line, an XPS system, and sample handling infrastructure. EBL2 will accept a wide range of sample sizes, including EUV masks with or without pellicles. All types of samples will be loaded using a standard dual pod interface. EUV masks returned from EBL2 will retain their NXE compatibility. The Beam Line provides high intensity EUV irradiation from a Sn-fueled EUV source. EUV intensity, pupil, spectrum, and repetition rate are all adjustable. In-situ measurements by ellipsometry will enable real time monitoring of the sample condition. The XPS will be capable of analyzing the full surface area of EUV masks and pellicles, as well as performing angle resolved analysis on smaller samples. Sample transfer between the XPS and the Beam Line will be possible without breaking vacuum.

  4. Proximal surface caries detection with direct-exposure and rare earth screen/film imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, R.C.; McDavid, W.D.; Barnwell, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    This laboratory study compared five imaging systems for their diagnostic accuracy in detection of proximal surface dental caries. Ten viewers provided data on radiographic detectability of carious lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of each system was determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves by comparing viewer data with the true state of the teeth as determined microscopically. D-speed film marginally outperformed the other four systems, but the three screen/film systems matched the diagnostic accuracy of E-speed film. Radiation reductions between 62% and 92% were achieved with the screen/film systems when compared to the two conventional dental films. The feasibility of designing a screen/film bite-wing cassette was shown, but the poor diagnostic accuracy of the present bite-wing system indicated a need for a new technology in caries detection.

  5. Microscopic analysis of Be,1110 elastic scattering on protons and nuclei, and breakup processes of 11Be within the 10Be +n cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The density distributions of 10Be and 11Be nuclei obtained within the quantum Monte Carlo model and the generator coordinate method are used to calculate the microscopic optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of these nuclei on protons and 12C at energies E <100 MeV/nucleon. The real part of the OP is calculated using the folding model with the exchange terms included, while the imaginary part of the OP that reproduces the phase of scattering is obtained in the high-energy approximation. In this hybrid model of OP the free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts obtained by fitting the experimental data. The well-known energy dependence of the volume integrals is used as a physical constraint to resolve the ambiguities of the parameter values. The role of the spin-orbit potential and the surface contribution to the OP is studied for an adequate description of available experimental elastic scattering cross-section data. Also, the cluster model, in which 11Be consists of a n -halo and the 10Be core, is adopted. Within the latter, the breakup cross sections of 11Be nucleus on 9Be,93Nb,181Ta , and 238U targets and momentum distributions of 10Be fragments are calculated and compared with the existing experimental data.

  6. Northern San Andreas Fault slip rates on the Santa Cruz Mountain section: 10Be dating of an offset alluvial fan complex, Sanborn County Park, Saratoga, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guns, K. A.; Prentice, C. S.; DeLong, S. B.; Kiefer, K.; Blisniuk, K.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    To better assess seismic hazard and fault behavior along the southern peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area on the Santa Cruz Mountain section of the San Andreas Fault, we combine field observations and high-resolution lidar topography data with 10Be exposure dating on offset landforms to estimate geologic fault slip rates. Our mapping at Sanborn County Park near Saratoga reveals a progression of alluvial fans and debris flows offset from their upstream sources by dextral slip on the San Andreas Fault. These upstream sources are 3 drainages, Todd Creek, Service Road Creek and Aubry Creek. Coarse alluvial deposits from each of these creeks contain large Tertiary sandstone boulders of varying size and abundance, derived from the Vaqueros Formation, that allow us to constrain the provenance of offset alluvial deposits to their upstream sources. Initial reconstruction, based on clast-count data on lithology and size from Todd Creek (n=68), Service Road Creek (N=32) and the offset deposits (n=68), suggest ≥140 m of dextral fault movement. Initial 10Be cosmogenic dating of sandstone boulders on an offset deposit from Service Road Creek yields a maximum date of 8 ka, a date uncorrected for hillslope residence and fluvial transport of inherited 10Be concentrations. These data suggest a minimum slip rate of at least 17 mm/yr on the Santa Cruz Mountain section of the San Andreas Fault in the peninsula. Ongoing analysis will refine this fault slip rate. Our preliminary data underscore the potential of this site to provide geologic slip rate estimates, and therefore answer a question critical to seismic hazard assessment, in a region where steep terrain, mass wasting, vegetation and urban development have generally made slip rate estimates challenging to obtain.

  7. 10Be in Quartz Gravel from the Gobi Desert and Evolutionary History of Alluvial Sedimentation in the Ejina Basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history of the Gobi deserts developed from alluvial sediments in arid regions has great significance in unraveling changes in both tectonic activity and climate. However, such work is limited by a lack of suitable dating material preserved in the Gobi Desert, but cosmogenic 10Be has great potential to date the Gobi deserts. In the present study, 10Be in quartz gravel from the Gobi deserts of the Ejina Basin in Inner Mongolia of China has been measured to assess exposure ages. Results show that the Gobi Desert in the northern margin of the basin developed 420 ka ago, whereas the Gobi Desert that developed from alluvial plains in the Heihe River drainage basin came about during the last 190 ka. The latter developed gradually northward and eastward to modern terminal lakes of the river. These temporal and spatial variations in the Gobi deserts are a consequence of alluvial processes influenced by Tibetan Plateau uplift and tectonic activities within the Ejina Basin. Possible episodes of Gobi Desert development within the last 420 ka indicate that the advance/retreat of alpine glaciers during glacial/interglacial cycles might have been the dominant factor to influencing the alluvial intensity and water volume in the basin. Intense floods and large water volumes would mainly occur during the short deglacial periods.

  8. Solar Particle Event Exposures and Local Tissue Environments in Free Space and on Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M. Y.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Atwell, W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) are a concern to space missions outside Earth s geomagnetic field. The September 29, 1989 SPE is the largest ground-level event since February 23, 1956. It is an iron-rich event for which the spectra are well measured. Because ten times this event matches the ground level data of the February 1956 SPE, it is suggested that an event with ten-times the scaled spectra of the September 29, 1989 SPE be used as a worst case SPE for spacecraft design. For the worst case SPE, the input spectra were reconstructed using Nymmik's (1995) model for protons, the O and Fe ion spectra of Tylka et al. (1997) to evaluate the iron enhancement ratio, and the Solar Energetic Particle Baseline (SEPB) composition of McGuire et al. (1986) for the heavy ions. The necessary transport properties of the shielding materials and the astronaut s body tissues are evaluated using the HZETRN code. Three shield configurations (assumed to be aluminum) are considered: space suit taken as 0.3 g/sq cm, helmet/pressure vessel as 1 g/sq cm, and equipment room of 5 g/sq cm. A shelter is taken as 10 g/sq cm on the Martian surface. The effect of shielding due to the Martian atmosphere is included. The astronaut geometry is taken from the computerized anatomical man (CAM) model.

  9. Search for the isovector monopole resonance via the 28Si(10Be,10B+ γ)28Al reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Michael; e11021 Collaboration Team

    2013-10-01

    The isovector giant monopole resonance (IVGMR) is a fundamental mode of collective oscillation in which the neutron and proton fluids in a nucleus radially expand and contract in an out-of-phase manner. Observation of the IVGMR has been difficult due to the lack of a probe that will excite only its non-spin-flip (ΔS = 0) transitions. The IVGMR's spin-transfer (ΔS = 1) counterpart, the isovector spin giant monopole resonance, is much more strongly excited at bombarding energies higher than 60 MeV/ u. By way of the (10Be,10B+ γ) charge-exchange reaction, the selectivity for the excitation of the IVGMR can be gained. In this probe, the superallowed Fermi transition 10Be(0+,g.s.) -->10B(01+,1.74 MeV, T = 1) allows a nearly pure isolation of the ΔS = 0 component by detecting the 1022 keV gamma rays from the deexcitation of the 10B. We measured the double differential cross sections for the 28Si(10Be,10B+ γ) reaction at 100 MeV/ u using the large acceptance S800 Spectrometer at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory with the GRETINA array detecting the gamma rays emitted from the 10B ejectile. In this presentation, we will report preliminary reults of the IVGMR in 28Al. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  10. Grand solar minima and maxima deduced from 10Be and 14C: magnetic dynamo configuration and polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inceoglu, F.; Simoniello, R.; Knudsen, M. F.; Karoff, C.; Olsen, J.; Turck-Chiéze, S.; Jacobsen, B. H.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: This study aims to improve our understanding of the occurrence and origin of grand solar maxima and minima. Methods: We first investigate the statistics of peaks and dips simultaneously occurring in the solar modulation potentials reconstructed using the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) 10Be and IntCal13 14C records for the overlapping time period spanning between ~1650 AD to 6600 BC. Based on the distribution of these events, we propose a method to identify grand minima and maxima periods. By using waiting time distribution analysis, we investigate the nature of grand minima and maxima periods identified based on the criteria as well as the variance and significance of the Hale cycle during these kinds of events throughout the Holocene epoch. Results: Analysis of grand minima and maxima events occurring simultaneously in the solar modulation potentials, reconstructed based on the 14C and the 10Be records, shows that the majority of events characterized by periods of moderate activity levels tend to last less than 50 years: grand maxima periods do not last longer than 100 years, while grand minima can persist slightly longer. The power and the variance of the 22-year Hale cycle increases during grand maxima and decreases during grand minima, compared to periods characterized by moderate activity levels. Conclusions: We present the first reconstruction of the occurrence of grand solar maxima and minima during the Holocene based on simultaneous changes in records of past solar variability derived from tree-ring 14C and ice-core 10Be, respectively. This robust determination of the occurrence of grand solar minima and maxima periods will enable systematic investigations of the influence of grand solar minima and maxima episodes on Earth's climate.

  11. Assessment of DNA damages caused by exposure of bacterial cells and spores to the Mars surface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Schuerger, Andrew; Robles-Martinez, Jose; Douki, Thierry; Nicholson, Wayne

    Joint NASA and ESA missions are planned for the next decade to investigate the possibility of present or past life on Mars [1]. Evidence of extraterrestrial life will likely rely on the de-tection of biomarkers, highlighting the importance of preventing forward contamination not only with viable microorganisms, but also with biomolecules that could compromise the valid-ity of life-detection experiments [2-4]. The designation of DNA as a high-priority biomarker makes it necessary to evaluate its persistence in extraterrestrial environments, and the effects of exposure on its biological activity. To accomplish this, we deposited naked DNA, cells and spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 or B. pumilus SAFR-032, or cells of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1 onto spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons. Samples were exposed to a simulated Mars surface environment as described in detail previously [4, 5] for various periods of time, and DNA damage was assessed by a number of measurements. Double-and single-strand breaks were measured by neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis, and DNA bipyrimidine pho-toproducts were measured by HPLC-mass spectrometry, as described previously [6, 7]. Loss of functionality of DNA to serve as a template for replication by DNA polymerase was measured using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay [8]. In all cases, DNA damage was directly correlated with time of exposure to simulated martian solar radiation (UV, visible, and infrared wavelengths). Exposure of samples to Mars surface conditions, but shielded from solar radiation, did not result in appreciable damage over the time periods tested, relative to controls. DNA contained within cells or spores was much less susceptible to damage than was naked DNA. Using the qPCR assay, we found that inactivation of naked DNA or DNA extracted from exposed spores of B. subtilis followed a multiphasic dose-response, and that a fraction of DNA molecules retained functionality after

  12. The camp century 10Be record: Implications for long-term variations of the geomagnetic dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Jürg; Andree, Michael; Oeschger, Hans; Siegenthaler, Ulrich; Bonani, G.; Hofmann, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Nessi, M.; Suter, M.; Wölfli, W.; Finkel, R.; Langway, C.

    1984-11-01

    10Be concentrations measured in ice samples from Camp Century, Greenland, show short term variations which in general correspond to the 100-200 year "wiggles" in the 14C tree ring record. There is, however, no evidence for a long term variation over the last 5000 years. This constancy is in contrast to the approximately sinusoidal variation of the atmospheric 14C concentration which has generally been attributed to a changing geomagnetic dipole moment. This discrepancy implies that the 14C trend might stem from other causes such as changes of oceanic circulation processes or from higher production rates during the Wisconsin rather than from variation in the geomagnetic field.

  13. Surface exposure chronology of the Waimakariri glacial sequence in the Southern Alps of New Zealand: Implications for MIS-2 ice extent and LGM glacial mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rother, Henrik; Shulmeister, James; Fink, David; Alexander, David; Bell, David

    2015-11-01

    During the late Quaternary, the Southern Alps of New Zealand experienced multiple episodes of glaciation with large piedmont glaciers reaching the coastal plains in the west and expanding into the eastern alpine forelands. Here, we present a new 10Be exposure age chronology for a moraine sequence in the Waimakariri Valley (N-Canterbury), which has long been used as a reference record for correlating glacial events across New Zealand and the wider Southern Hemisphere. Our data indicate that the Waimakariri glacier reached its maximum last glaciation extent prior to ∼26 ka well before the global last glaciation maximum (LGM). This was followed by a gradual reduction in ice volume and the abandonment of the innermost LGM moraines at about 17.5 ka. Significantly, we find that during its maximum extent, the Waimakariri glacier overflowed the Avoca Plateau, previously believed to represent a mid-Pleistocene glacial surface (i.e. MIS 8). At the same time, the glacier extended to a position downstream of the Waimakariri Gorge, some 15 km beyond the previously mapped LGM ice limit. We use a simple steady-state mass balance model to test the sensitivity of past glacial accumulation to various climatic parameters, and to evaluate possible climate scenarios capable of generating the ice volume required to reach the full local-LGM extent. Model outcomes indicate that under New Zealand's oceanic setting, a cooling of 5 °C, assuming modern precipitation levels, or a cooling of 6.5 °C, assuming a one third reduction in precipitation, would suffice to drive the Waimakariri glacier to the eastern alpine forelands (Canterbury Plains). Our findings demonstrate that the scale of LGM glaciation in the Waimakariri Valley and adjacent major catchments, both in terms of ice volume and downvalley ice extent, has been significantly underestimated. Our observation that high-lying glacial surfaces, so far believed to represent much older glacial episodes, were glaciated during the LGM

  14. Early Holocene and Late Pleistocene slip rates of the southern Dead Sea Fault determined from 10Be cosmogenic dating of offset alluvial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le BéOn, Maryline; Klinger, Yann; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; MéRiaux, Anne-Sophie; Finkel, Robert C.; Elias, Ata; Mayyas, Omar; Ryerson, Frederick J.; Tapponnier, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Two sites located along the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) segment of the Dead Sea Fault are targeted for tectonic-morphological analysis. 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) dating of embedded cobbles is used to constrain the age of offset alluvial surfaces. At the first site a 48 ± 7 m offset alluvial fan, for which 10Be CRN model ages average 11.1 ± 4.3 ka, yield a slip rate of 5.4 ± 2.7 mm/a, with conservative bounds of 1.3-16.4 mm/a. At the second site the scattered distributions of the 10Be CRN ages from an offset bajada attest to the complex processes involved in sediment transport and emplacement. There, two offsets were identified. The 160 ± 8 m offset of an incised alluvial fan dated at 37 ± 5 ka shows a slip rate of 4.5 ± 0.9 mm/a, with a conservative minimum value of 3.2 mm/a. A larger offset, 626 ± 37 m, is derived from a prominent channel incised into the bajada. Cobbles from the bajada surface have ages from 33 to 141 ka, with a mean of 87 ± 26 ka. A slip rate of 8.1 ± 2.9 mm/a is derived from the mean age, with conservative bounds of 3.8-22.1 mm/a. These results and other published slip rates along the linear WAF segment, from GPS to geological time scales, lack the resolution to fully resolve the question of temporal variations versus consistency of the fault slip rate of the WAF. Yet, given the uncertainties, they are not inconsistent with each other.

  15. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and UV/irradiation exposure change surface and chemical structures of Pre-Production Resin Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, C. N.; Neal, A.; Park, S.; Mielke, R.; Tsapin, A. I.; Bhartia, R.; Salas, E.; Hug, W.; Behar, A. E.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial interactions with synthetic polymers in open ocean is poorly understood. Plastics are a major and persistent contaminant of ocean waters. Many of these plastics are contaminated with toxic and synthetic chemicals that persist in the environment with minimal degradation. The purpose of this study is to look at the effects that microbial biofilm communities have on both surface and chemical structures of pre-production resin pellets (PRPs). Pseudomonas aeruignosa was grown with PRPs under multiple growth and nutrient conditions. These conditions were combined with varying lengths of UV exposures common to ocean environments. Material degradation of the PRPs and the changing surface and chemical structures of these synthetic polymers was evaluated using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray microtomography, and ArcGIS mapping. This study correlates with previous studies conducted on environmental PRP's , collected on the 2009 Project Kaisei expedition in the Subtropical Convergence Zone of the North Pacific Gyre. Further studies are needed to develop a full understanding of degradation rates of synthetic polymers in oceanic environments.

  17. CERAMIDE AND SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE ACT AS PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY-ELICITED DAMAGE-ASSOCIATED MOLECULAR PATTERNS: CELL SURFACE EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Sun, Jinghai; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Separovic, Duska

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that appear on the surface of tumor cells after their therapy treatment may have important roles either as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or signals for phagocytes influencing the disposal of these cells. Treatment of SCCVII and CAL27 cells, models of mouse and human squamous cell carcinoma respectively, by photodynamic therapy (PDT) resulted in the presentation of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phposphate (S1P) on the cell surface. This was documented by anti-ceramide and anti-S1P antibody staining followed by flow cytometry. The exposure of these key sphingolipid molecules on PDT-treated tumor cells was PDT dose-dependent and it varied in intensity with different photosensitizers used for PDT. The above results, together with the finding that both ceramide and S1P can activate NFκB signaling in macrophages co-incubated with PDT-treated tumor cells, establish that these two sphingolipids can act as DAMPs stimulating inflammatory/immune reactions critical for tumor therapy response. PMID:24713544

  18. Placing Absolute Timing on Basin Incision Adjacent to the Colorado Front Range: Results from Meteoric and in Situ 10BE Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehnforth, M.; Anderson, R. S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    A sequence of six levels of gravel-capped surfaces, mapped as Pliocene to Holocene in age, are cut into Cretaceous shale in the northwestern part of the Denver Basin immediately adjacent to the Colorado Front Range (CFR). The existing relative age constraints and terrace correlations suggest that the incision of the Denver Basin occurred at a steady and uniform rate of 0.1 mm yr-1 since the Pliocene. As absolute ages in this landscape are rare, they have the potential to test the reliability of the existing chronology, and to illuminate the detailed history of incision. We explore the timing of basin incision and the variability of geomorphic process rates through time by dating the three highest surfaces at the northwestern edge of the Denver Basin using both in situ and meteoric 10Be concentrations. As the tectonic conditions have not changed since the Pliocene, much of the variability of generation and abandonment of alluvial surfaces likely reflects the influence of glacial-interglacial climate variations. We selected Gunbarrel Hill (mapped as pre-Rocky Flats (Pliocene)), Table Mountain (mapped as Rocky Flats (early Pleistocene)), and the Pioneer surface (mapped as Verdos (Pleistocene, ~640 ka)) as sample locations. We took two amalgamated clast samples on the Gunbarrel Hill surface, and dated depth profiles using meteoric and in situ 10Be on the Table Mountain and Pioneer surfaces. In addition, we measured the in situ 10Be concentrations of 6 boulder samples from the Table Mountain surface. We find that all three surfaces are significantly younger than expected and that in situ and meteoric age measurements largely agree with each other. The samples from the pre-Rocky Flats site (Gunbarrel Hill) show ages of 250 and 310 ka, ignoring post-depositional surface erosion. The ages of the Table Mountain and Pioneer sites fall within the 120 to 150 ka window. These absolute ages overlap with the timing of the penultimate glaciation during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6

  19. Regolith evolution on the millennial timescale from combined U-Th-Ra isotopes and in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis in a weathering profile (Strengbach catchment, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Van der Woerd, J.; Viville, D.; Pelt, E.; Kali, E.; Lerouge, C.; Ackerer, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Négrel, P.

    2016-11-01

    U-Th-Ra disequilibria, cosmogenic in situ 10Be concentrations and major and trace element concentrations have been analyzed in a 2 m-deep weathering profile sampled at the summit of the granitic Strengbach catchment (France). The data have been used to independently estimate both the long-term regolith production and denudation rates and the weathering and erosion rates. Modeling of the 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium variations in the lower part of the profile yields a regolith production rate of 12 ± 4 mm/kyr (30 ± 10 T/km2/yr), while modeling of the high-resolution 10Be concentration profile leads to an exposure age of 19.7 ± 2.2 kyr, an inherited concentration of 15,000 ± 1,000 at/g in quartz and a mean denudation rate of 22 ± 10 mm/kyr (37 ± 15 T/km2/yr). The consistency between production and denudation rates suggests that, on a millennial timescale, the regolith mass balance at the summit of the catchment is close to a steady state, even if the watershed may have been impacted by Quaternary climatic changes and by recent anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., 20th century acid rain and recent afforestation efforts). The results also indicate that physical erosion is likely the dominant long-term process of regolith denudation in the catchment. Furthermore, the comparison of the long-term production and denudation rates and of weathering and erosion rates determined from the depth profile analyses with the current weathering and erosion rates estimated at the outlet of the watershed based on monitoring of the water chemistry and sediment fluxes suggests that physical erosion may have varied more than the chemical weathering flux during the last 150 kyr. Although very few other sites with U-series, in situ 10Be and stream monitoring data are available for comparison, the current data suggest that (1) the mass balance steady state of regolith might be commonly achieved in soil mantled landscapes, and (2) physical erosion has varied much more than

  20. Long-term background denudation rates of southern and southeastern Brazilian watersheds estimated with cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Gonzalez, Veronica; Bierman, Paul R.; Fernandes, Nelson F.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-09-01

    In comparison to humid temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, less is known about the long-term (millennial scale) background rates of erosion in Southern Hemisphere tropical watersheds. In order to better understand the rate at which watersheds in southern and southeastern Brazil erode, and the relationship of that erosion to climate and landscape characteristics, we made new measurements of in situ produced 10Be in river sediments and we compiled all extant measurements from this part of the country. New data from 14 watersheds in the states of Santa Catarina (n = 7) and Rio de Janeiro (n = 7) show that erosion rates vary there from 13 to 90 m/My (mean = 32 m/My; median = 23 m/My) and that the difference between erosion rates of basins we sampled in the two states is not significant. Sampled basin area ranges between 3 and 14,987 km2, mean basin elevation between 235 and 1606 m, and mean basin slope between 11 and 29°. Basins sampled in Rio de Janeiro, including three that drain the Serra do Mar escarpment, have an average basin slope of 19°, whereas the average slope for the Santa Catarina basins is 14°. Mean basin slope (R2 = 0.73) and annual precipitation (R2 = 0.57) are most strongly correlated with erosion in the basins we studied. At three sites where we sampled river sand and cobbles, the 10Be concentration in river sand was greater than in the cobbles, suggesting that these grain sizes are sourced from different parts of the landscape. Compiling all cosmogenic 10Be-derived erosion rates previously published for southern and southeastern Brazil watersheds to date (n = 76) with our 14 sampled basins, we find that regional erosion rates (though low) are higher than those of watersheds also located on other passive margins including Namibia and the southeastern North America. Brazilian basins erode at a pace similar to escarpments in southeastern North America. Erosion rates in southern and southeastern Brazil are directly and positively related to

  1. Effects of Ambient High Temperature Exposure on Alumina-Titania High Emittance Surfaces for Solar Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.; Wheeler, Donald R.; MacLachlam, Brian J.

    1998-01-01

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr) at high temperatures (1457 F (827 C)) for an extended period (approximately 2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 F (316 C) to l500 F (816 C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples, were characterized prior to and after heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1,200 F (649 C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1,000 F (538 C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1,500 F (816 C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1,200 F (649 C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled with spalling off the substrate noticeable at several locations. Based

  2. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  3. Effects of short-term repeated exposure to different flooring surfaces on the behavior and physiology of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Schütz, K E; Cox, N R

    2014-05-01

    during the stand-off period. We observed no major effect of the repeated stand-off exposure. In summary, adding rubber matting onto concrete surfaces for stand-off purposes is beneficial for animal welfare. A well-managed wood chip surface offered the best welfare for dairy cows removed from pasture, and the findings of this study confirm that a concrete surface decreases the welfare of cows removed from pasture.

  4. Grain-size dependent concentration of cosmogenic 10Be and erosion dynamics in a landslide-dominated Himalayan watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchol, Nicolas; Lavé, Jérôme; Lupker, Maarten; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Gallo, Florian; France-Lanord, Christian

    2014-11-01

    For documenting recent or Late Quaternary erosion rates at the scale of a small watershed, or even an entire mountain range, the use of in-situ terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN), such as 10Be, in river sediments has become widespread over the last decade. In mountainous settings, however, landslides may induce a two-fold complication in the cosmogenic nuclide budget. First, they may episodically deliver large amounts of sediment with low TCN concentrations to the river channel. Second, they may generate a grain-size-concentration dependence in these sediments. However, studies that have explored grain-size dependence in landslide-dominated areas have reached differing conclusions and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study focuses on the Khudi Khola river basin, a small drainage basin in the central Himalayas. The area is characterized by steep slopes, heavy rainfall, and high sediment production rates. Importantly, the watershed contains a large area of active landsliding. In-situ 10Be was analyzed in sediments of grain sizes ranging from 75 μm to ~ 4 cm, collected from five locations: upstream, downstream, and in the small tributaries which drain the landslides. In all sampling locations, including those situated upstream of the landslides, the finest grains (75-250 μm) are two to four times more concentrated in 10Be than the largest clasts (> 4.7 mm). We developed a numerical slope model which includes a low level of background soil erosion and episodic denudation from large mass-wasting events. We then introduced a coarsening of average grain-size with soil-depth to the model. Our simulation shows that the data available for this valley are compatible with a scenario in which landslides deliver coarse grains to the channel that are less concentrated in TCN and have deeper provenance. Best-fit estimates of the model parameters suggest recurrence times of 3000 to 9000 years for a major landslide on the same slope, and mean long

  5. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  6. Late Quaternary Glacial Chronology in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica, Investigated Using Cosmogenic Cl-36 Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Potter, R.; Horn, S.; Orvis, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The role of the tropics in past and future climate change has garnered significant attention in recent decades, but debate still exists over climate linkages between the tropics and the middle and high latitudes. Glaciers in tropical mountains are highly sensitive indicators of climate, and glacial landforms left behind by past glacier fluctuations provide key evidence of paleoclimate trends and their forcing mechanisms. We investigated late Quaternary glacial chronology from two glaciated valleys on the Chirripó massif in the Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. Previous studies in this highland have constrained the most recent deglaciation to 12.4-9.7 ka cal BP based on radiocarbon dates on basal sediments of glacial lakes within the cirque at the head of the Morrenas Valley. However, no studies have been conducted to constrain the ages of the moraines located down valley. We dated the formation ages of these moraines in the Morrenas and Talari valleys using cosmogenic Cl-36 surface exposure dating. Our results indicate a major glacial event ~21-18 ka, broadly synchronous with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Glaciers during this period advanced 3.2-3.4 km down valley on both sides of the Chirripó massif. Our ages also suggest periods of glacial retreat or standstills ~18-10 ka before complete deglaciation of this highland ~10 ka. These results provide insight into the timing and extent of glacial events in this tropical highland that is of critical importance for reconstructing regional and global climate patterns.

  7. Results of the Komplast experiment on the long-term exposure of materials specimens on the ISS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumov, A. E.; Novikov, L. S.; Shaevich, S. K.; Aleksandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.; Nikishin, E. F.; Chernik, V. N.; Petukhov, V. P.; Voronina, E. N.; Sedov, V. V.; Salnikova, I. A.; Babaevskiy, P. G.; Kozlov, N. A.; Deev, I. S.; Startsev, O. V.; Shindo, D. J.; Golden, J. L.; Kravchenko, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Komplast materials experiment was designed by Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center together with Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University and other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out by Mission Control Moscow since 1998. The purpose of this experiment is to study the complex effect of the low Earth orbit environment on samples of various spacecraft materials. On November 20, 1998 the Komplast experiment began with the launch of the first International Space Station module Zarya, or Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Eight Komplast panels with samples of materials and sensors were installed on the outer surface of FGB module. Two of eight experiment panels were retrieved during Russian extravehicular activity in February 2011 after 12 years of space exposure and were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle "Discovery" on the STS-133/ULF-5 mission in March 2011. The article presents the results obtained from this unique long-duration experiment on board of the International Space Station.

  8. Rates of sediment supply to arroyos from upland erosion determined using in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clapp, Erik M.; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Pavich, Milan; Caffee, Marc A.

    2001-01-01

    Using 10Be and 26Al measured in sediment and bedrock, we quantify rates of upland erosion and sediment supply to a small basin in northwestern New Mexico. This and many other similar basins in the southwestern United States have been affected by cycles of arroyo incision and backfilling several times in the past few millennia. The sediment generation (275 ± 65 g m−2 yr−1) and bedrock equivalent lowering rates (102 ± 24 m myr−1) we determine are sufficient to support at least three arroyo cycles in the past 3,000 years, consistent with rates calculated from a physical sediment budget within the basin and regional rates determined using other techniques. Nuclide concentrations measured in different sediment sources and reservoirs suggest that the arroyo is a good spatial and temporal integrator of sediment and associated nuclide concentrations from throughout the basin, that the basin is in steady-state, and that nuclide concentration is independent of sediment grain size. Differences between nuclide concentrations measured in sediment sources and reservoirs reflect sediment residence times and indicate that subcolluvial bedrock weathering on hillslopes supplies more sediment to the basin than erosion of exposed bedrock.

  9. Weathering histories of Chinese loess deposits based on uranium and thorium series nuclides and cosmogenic {sup 10}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z.Y. |; Lal, D.; Liu, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The long, continuous deposition of dust in the Chinese loess plateau offers an unique opportunity to study the nature of soil weathering in a wide range of climatic conditions. In this paper we report on measurements of concentrations of U- and Th-series nuclides and of major cations in 150 loess and paleosol samples from five sites, going back 2.5 Ma. Using the results for {sup 10}Be concentrations in these soils, we determined the absolute amounts of water added to several soil units and obtained: (1) first-order leaching constants for U and several cations and (2) the compositions of the soils contributing to the dust-source regions and of the dust at deposition. Further, based on analyses of {sup 230}Th in soils deposited in the past ca. 140 ka, we determined when the soils weathered in the source regions. We conclude that most of the weathering in the dust-source regions may have occurred during the interglacials. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. 10Be evidence for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal in the EPICA Dome C ice core.

    PubMed

    Raisbeck, G M; Yiou, F; Cattani, O; Jouzel, J

    2006-11-01

    An ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica, is the oldest ice core so far retrieved. On the basis of ice flow modelling and a comparison between the deuterium signal in the ice with climate records from marine sediment cores, the ice at a depth of 3,190 m in the Dome C core is believed to have been deposited around 800,000 years ago, offering a rare opportunity to study climatic and environmental conditions over this time period. However, an independent determination of this age is important because the deuterium profile below a depth of 3,190 m depth does not show the expected correlation with the marine record. Here we present evidence for enhanced 10Be deposition in the ice at 3,160-3,170 m, which we interpret as a result of the low dipole field strength during the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal, which occurred about 780,000 years ago. If correct, this provides a crucial tie point between ice cores, marine cores and a radiometric timescale. PMID:17080088

  11. Detailed diesel exhaust characteristics including particle surface area and lung deposited dose for better understanding of health effects in human chamber exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, Aneta; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Rissler, Jenny; Sallsten, Gerd; Xu, Yiyi; Pagels, Joakim H.; Albin, Maria; Österberg, Kai; Strandberg, Bo; Eriksson, Axel; Bohgard, Mats; Bergemalm-Rynell, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Several diesel exhaust (DE) characteristics, comprising both particle and gas phase, recognized as important when linking with health effects, are not reported in human chamber exposure studies. In order to understand effects of DE on humans there is a need for better characterization of DE when performing exposure studies. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify detailed DE characteristics during human chamber exposure. Additionally to compare to reported DE properties in conducted human exposures. A wide battery of particle and gas phase measurement techniques have been used to provide detailed DE characteristics including the DE particles (DEP) surface area, fraction and dose deposited in the lungs, chemical composition of both particle and gas phase such as NO, NO2, CO, CO2, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes, benzene, toluene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eyes, nose and throat irritation effects were determined. Exposure conditions with PM1 (<1 μm) mass concentration 280 μg m-3, number concentration 4 × 105 cm-3 and elemental to total carbon fraction of 82% were generated from a diesel vehicle at idling. When estimating the lung deposited dose it was found that using the size dependent effective density (in contrast to assuming unity density) reduced the estimated respiratory dose by 132% by mass. Accounting for agglomerated structure of DEP prevented underestimation of lung deposited dose by surface area by 37% in comparison to assuming spherical particles. Comparison of DE characteristics reported in conducted chamber exposures showed that DE properties vary to a great extent under the same DEP mass concentration and engine load. This highlights the need for detailed and standardized approach for measuring and reporting of DE properties. Eyes irritation effects, most probably caused by aldehydes in the gas phase, as well as nose irritation were observed at exposure levels below current occupational exposure limit

  12. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  13. 26Al - 10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochron burial dating in combination with luminescence dating of two Danube terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, Stephanie; Braumann, Sandra; Lüthgens, Christopher; Fiebig, Markus; Häuselmann, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The Quaternary sediment record in the Vienna Basin is influenced by two main factors: (1) the tectonic development of a pull apart basin along a sinistral strike slip fault system between the Eastern Alps and the West Carpathians and by (2) strongly varying sediment supply during the Plio- and Pleistocene. From the Late Pannonian (8.8 Ma) onward a large-scale regional uplift (Decker et al., 2005) controls terrace formation in the Vienna Basin. The main sediment supply into the Vienna Basin originates from the Danube, and subordinately from tributaries to the south such as Piesting, Fischa, Leitha and from the north by the river March. Today the Danube forms a large floodplain that is bordered to the north by one large Pleistocene terrace, the Gänserndorf Terrace that is situated 17 m above todays water level. Farther to the east a smaller terrace, the Schlosshof Terrace, reaches 25 m above todays water level. These terrace levels are tilted by movement of underlying blocks (Peresson, 2006). Both, the Schlosshof and Gänserndorf terraces consist of successions of up to 2 m thick gravel beds with intercalated sand layers or -lenses that may locally reach thicknesses up to 0.8 m. At each terrace one gavel pit was selected to calculate the time of terrace deposition by luminescence dating in combination with 26Al/10Be cosmogenic nuclide isochrone dating (Balco and Rovery, 2008). Five quartz stones from the base of each terrace were physically and chemically processed to obtain Al and Be oxides for Acceleration Mass Spectrometry. Sand samples for luminescence dating were taken above the cosmogenic nuclide samples from the closest suitable sand body. Decker et al., 2005. QSR 24, 307-322 Peresson, 2006 Geologie der österreichischen Bundesländer Niederösterreich 255-258 Balco and Rovey, 2008. AJS 908, 1083-1114 Thanks to FWF P 23138-N19, OMAA 90öu17

  14. Production Rates of Noble Gases in the Near-Surface Layers of Europa by Energetic Charged Particles and the Potential for Determining Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2003-01-01

    The surface of Europa is expected to be extremely active, undergoing tectonic and/or tidal geological activity and sputtering/ deposition, as well as impact cratering. Determination of the actual age of the surface at one or more places would greatly simplify trying to sort out what processes are occurring, and at what rate. If there is K present, as the spectral and compositional modeling discussed predict, it should be possible, in principle, to determine K-Ar crystallization ages. Whether or not there is K present, a consideration of the environment suggests we can determine an energetic particle exposure age if we can make in situ measurements of the abundances of major elements and of noble gas isotopes. This requires instrumentation that is within reach of current technology. In this paper, we calculate production rates for noble-gas isotopes in a simplified Europan surface, to quantify the amount of light noble gases produced by exposure to energetic particles.

  15. Surface morphology of Diplodon expansus (Küster, 1856; Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae) gill filaments after exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine herbicide.

    PubMed

    Nogarol, Larissa Rosa; Brossi-Garcia, Ana Luiza; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Brazilian endemic species Diplodon expansus (Küster, 1856) is found in freshwater bodies in the country's southeast, in large anthropogenic influence regions especially with an extensive agriculture emphasis. One of the main pesticides used in the species occurrence region is the atrazine herbicide, which has a great contamination potential in the aquatic environment. Therefore, several studies into its toxicity in aquatic systems have been developed. However, the tested concentrations are usually very high and rarely found in the environment and the short-term exposure responses in other aquatic organisms such as native bivalves are still scarce. Thus, this study sought to consider the potential effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of atrazine herbicide on the surface morphology of gill filaments of the bivalve D. expansus under laboratory-controlled conditions after short-term exposure. None of the animals died before the end of the experiment. The main alterations were observed on the frontal surface of filaments, which include mucus accumulation, cilia loss, and disruption. Mucus increased secretion and accumulation in the frontal filaments region preceded as a protective mechanism. Cilia loss and disruption on the frontal surface of the gill filament indicated that ciliated frontal cells were more sensitive to atrazine exposure and these alterations may cause gills functional damages, compromising the uptake of food particles and respiration. Therefore, higher sublethal concentrations of atrazine may compromise the survival and consequently the population of D. expansus in agriculture areas after a longer period of continuous exposure.

  16. Estimating source-attributable health impacts of ambient fine particulate matter exposure: global premature mortality from surface transportation emissions in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambliss, S. E.; Silva, R.; West, J. J.; Zeinali, M.; Minjares, R.

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to ambient fine particular matter (PM2.5) was responsible for 3.2 million premature deaths in 2010 and is among the top ten leading risk factors for early death. Surface transportation is a significant global source of PM2.5 emissions and a target for new actions. The objective of this study is to estimate the global and national health burden of ambient PM2.5 exposure attributable to surface transportation emissions. This share of health burden is called the transportation attributable fraction (TAF), and is assumed equal to the proportional decrease in modeled ambient particulate matter concentrations when surface transportation emissions are removed. National population-weighted TAFs for 190 countries are modeled for 2005 using the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model. Changes in annual average concentration of PM2.5 at 0.5 × 0.67 degree horizontal resolution are based on a global emissions inventory and removal of all surface transportation emissions. Global population-weighted average TAF was 8.5 percent or 1.75 μg m-3 in 2005. Approximately 242 000 annual premature deaths were attributable to surface transportation emissions, dominated by China, the United States, the European Union and India. This application of TAF allows future Global Burden of Disease studies to estimate the sector-specific burden of ambient PM2.5 exposure. Additional research is needed to capture intraurban variations in emissions and exposure, and to broaden the range of health effects considered, including the effects of other pollutants.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN AGGREGATE SURFACE SAMPLING METHOD FOR USE IN ASSESSING DERMAL EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing screenin...

  18. Dectin-1 and IL-17A suppress murine asthma induced by Aspergillus versicolor but not Cladosporium cladosporioides due to differences in beta-glucan surface exposure1

    PubMed Central

    Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Gibson, Aaron M.; Bass, Stacey A.; Budelsky, Alison L.; Reponen, Tiina; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence supporting a role for mold exposure in the pathogenesis and expression of childhood asthma. Aspergillus versicolor and Cladosporium cladosporioides are common molds that have been implicated in asthma. In a model of mold-induced asthma, mice were repeatedly exposed to either A. versicolor or C. cladosporioides spores. The two molds induced distinct phenotypes and this effect was observed in both Balb/c and C57BL/6 strains. C. cladosporioides induced robust airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilia, and a predominately Th2 response, while A. versicolor induced a strong Th17 response and neutrophilic inflammation, but very mild AHR. Neutralization of IL-17A resulted in strong AHR and eosinophilic inflammation following A. versicolor exposure. In Dectin-1 deficient mice, A. versicolor exposure resulted in markedly attenuated IL-17A and robust AHR compared to wild type mice. In contrast, C. cladosporioides induced AHR and eosinophilic inflammation independent of IL-17A and Dectin-1. A. versicolor, but not C. cladosporioides, spores had increased exposure of beta-glucans on their surface and were able to bind Dectin-1. Thus, the host response to C. cladosporioides was IL-17A- and Dectin1-independent, while Dectin-1 and IL-17A-dependent pathways were protective against the development of asthma after exposure to A. versicolor. PMID:22962686

  19. Dectin-1 and IL-17A suppress murine asthma induced by Aspergillus versicolor but not Cladosporium cladosporioides due to differences in β-glucan surface exposure.

    PubMed

    Mintz-Cole, Rachael A; Gibson, Aaron M; Bass, Stacey A; Budelsky, Alison L; Reponen, Tiina; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana

    2012-10-01

    There is considerable evidence supporting a role for mold exposure in the pathogenesis and expression of childhood asthma. Aspergillus versicolor and Cladosporium cladosporioides are common molds that have been implicated in asthma. In a model of mold-induced asthma, mice were repeatedly exposed to either A. versicolor or C. cladosporioides spores. The two molds induced distinct phenotypes, and this effect was observed in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains. C. cladosporioides induced robust airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilia, and a predominately Th2 response, whereas A. versicolor induced a strong Th17 response and neutrophilic inflammation, but very mild AHR. Neutralization of IL-17A resulted in strong AHR and eosinophilic inflammation following A. versicolor exposure. In Dectin-1-deficient mice, A. versicolor exposure resulted in markedly attenuated IL-17A and robust AHR compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, C. cladosporioides induced AHR and eosinophilic inflammation independent of IL-17A and Dectin-1. A. versicolor, but not C. cladosporioides, spores had increased exposure of β-glucans on their surface and were able to bind Dectin-1. Thus, the host response to C. cladosporioides was IL-17A- and Dectin-1-independent, whereas Dectin-1- and IL-17A-dependent pathways were protective against the development of asthma after exposure to A. versicolor.

  20. Occupational Exposure to Cobalt and Tungsten in the Swedish Hard Metal Industry: Air Concentrations of Particle Mass, Number, and Surface Area

    PubMed Central

    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Pettersson, Carin; Husby, Bente; Arvidsson, Helena; Westberg, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to cobalt in the hard metal industry entails severe adverse health effects, including lung cancer and hard metal fibrosis. The main aim of this study was to determine exposure air concentration levels of cobalt and tungsten for risk assessment and dose–response analysis in our medical investigations in a Swedish hard metal plant. We also present mass-based, particle surface area, and particle number air concentrations from stationary sampling and investigate the possibility of using these data as proxies for exposure measures in our study. Personal exposure full-shift measurements were performed for inhalable and total dust, cobalt, and tungsten, including personal real-time continuous monitoring of dust. Stationary measurements of inhalable and total dust, PM2.5, and PM10 was also performed and cobalt and tungsten levels were determined, as were air concentration of particle number and particle surface area of fine particles. The personal exposure levels of inhalable dust were consistently low (AM 0.15mg m−3, range <0.023–3.0mg m−3) and below the present Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 10mg m−3. The cobalt levels were low as well (AM 0.0030mg m−3, range 0.000028–0.056mg m−3) and only 6% of the samples exceeded the Swedish OEL of 0.02mg m−3. For continuous personal monitoring of dust exposure, the peaks ranged from 0.001 to 83mg m−3 by work task. Stationary measurements showed lower average levels both for inhalable and total dust and cobalt. The particle number concentration of fine particles (AM 3000 p·cm−3) showed the highest levels at the departments of powder production, pressing and storage, and for the particle surface area concentrations (AM 7.6 µm2·cm−3) similar results were found. Correlating cobalt mass-based exposure measurements to cobalt stationary mass-based, particle area, and particle number concentrations by rank and department showed significant correlations for all measures except for particle

  1. Ionic liquid assisted chemical strategy to TiO2 hollow nanocube assemblies with surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure for enhanced photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengli; Liu, Baocang; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yuxi; Shi, Ying; Feng, Xue; An, Xiaoting; Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Realization of anionic nonmetal doping and high energy crystal facet exposure in TiO2 photocatalysts has been proven to be an effective approach for significantly improving their photocatalytic performance. A facile strategy of ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry by simply hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres composed of TiO2 nanoparticles with an ionic liquid of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate without any other additives is developed to create highly active anatase TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies. With this one-pot ionic liquid assisted etching process, the surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy {001} crystal facets exposure can be readily realized simultaneously. Compared with the benchmark materials of P25 and TiO2 nanostructures with other hierarchical architectures of hollow spheres, flaky spheres, and spindles synthesized by hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres with nonionic liquid of NH4F, the TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies used as efficient photocatalysts show super high photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, and rhodamine B, due to their surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure. The ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry is facile and robust and may be a general strategy for synthesizing other metal oxides with high energy crystal facets and surface doping for improving photocatalytic activity. PMID:24881462

  2. Distribution of 2,4-D in air and on surfaces inside residences after lawn applications: comparing exposure estimates from various media for young children.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, M G; Lewis, R G; Brinkman, M C; Burkholder, H M; Hines, C E; Menkedick, J R

    2001-11-01

    We collected indoor air, surface wipes (floors, table tops, and window sills), and floor dust samples at multiple locations within 11 occupied and two unoccupied homes both before and after lawn application of the herbicide 2,4-D. We measured residues 1 week before and after application. We used collected samples to determine transport routes of 2,4-D from the lawn into the homes, its subsequent distribution between the indoor surfaces, and air concentration as a function of airborne particle size. We used residue measurements to estimate potential exposures within these homes. After lawn application, 2,4-D was detected in indoor air and on all surfaces throughout all homes. Track-in by an active dog and by the homeowner applicator were the most significant factors for intrusion. Resuspension of floor dust was the major source of 2,4-D in indoor air, with highest levels of 2,4-D found in the particle size range of 2.5-10 microm. Resuspended floor dust was also a major source of 2,4-D on tables and window sills. Estimated postapplication indoor exposure levels for young children from nondietary ingestion may be 1-10 microg/day from contact with floors, and 0.2-30 microg/day from contact with table tops. These are estimated to be about 10 times higher than the preapplication exposures. By comparison, dietary ingestion of 2,4-D is approximately 1.3 microg/day.

  3. Distribution of 2,4-D in air and on surfaces inside residences after lawn applications: comparing exposure estimates from various media for young children.

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, M G; Lewis, R G; Brinkman, M C; Burkholder, H M; Hines, C E; Menkedick, J R

    2001-01-01

    We collected indoor air, surface wipes (floors, table tops, and window sills), and floor dust samples at multiple locations within 11 occupied and two unoccupied homes both before and after lawn application of the herbicide 2,4-D. We measured residues 1 week before and after application. We used collected samples to determine transport routes of 2,4-D from the lawn into the homes, its subsequent distribution between the indoor surfaces, and air concentration as a function of airborne particle size. We used residue measurements to estimate potential exposures within these homes. After lawn application, 2,4-D was detected in indoor air and on all surfaces throughout all homes. Track-in by an active dog and by the homeowner applicator were the most significant factors for intrusion. Resuspension of floor dust was the major source of 2,4-D in indoor air, with highest levels of 2,4-D found in the particle size range of 2.5-10 microm. Resuspended floor dust was also a major source of 2,4-D on tables and window sills. Estimated postapplication indoor exposure levels for young children from nondietary ingestion may be 1-10 microg/day from contact with floors, and 0.2-30 microg/day from contact with table tops. These are estimated to be about 10 times higher than the preapplication exposures. By comparison, dietary ingestion of 2,4-D is approximately 1.3 microg/day. PMID:11713005

  4. Coupling data from U-series and 10Be CRN to evaluate soil steady-state in the Betic Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2015-04-01

    The regolith mantel is produced by weathering of bedrock through physical and biochemical processes. At the same time, the upper part of the regolith is eroded by gravity mass movements, water and wind erosion. Feedback's between production and erosion of soil material are important for soil development, and are essential to reach long-term steady-state in soil chemical and physical properties. Nowadays, long-term denudation rates of regolith can be quantified by using in-situ cosmogenic nuclides (CRN). If the soil thickness remains constant over sufficiently long time, soil production rates can be determined. However, the a priori assumption of long-term steady-state can be questionable in highly dynamic environments. In this study, we present analytical data from two independent isotopic techniques, in-situ cosmogenic nuclides and Uranium series disequilibrium. The disequilibrium of Uranium isotopes (238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra) is an alternative method that allows assessing soil formation rates through isotopic analysis of weathering products. Nine soil profiles were sampled in three different mountain ranges of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain): Sierra Estancias, Filabres, Cabrera. All soils overly fractured mica schist and are very thin (< 60cm). In each soil profile, we sampled 4 to 6 depth slices in the soil profile, the soil-bedrock interface and (weathered) bedrock. Three of the nine soil profiles were sampled for U-series isotope measurements at EOST (University of Strasbourg). The surface denudation rates (CRN) are about the same in the Sierra Estancias and Filabres (26 ± 10 mm/ky) and increase up to 103 ± 47 mm/ky in the Sierra Cabrera. The spatial variation in soil denudation rates is in agreement with the variation in catchment-wide denudation rates presented by Bellin et al. (2014) which present the highest rates in the Sierra Cabrera (104-246mm/kyr). Moreover it roughly coincides with the pattern of long-term exhumation of the Betic Cordillera. Results

  5. A preliminary study of direct 10Be2+ counting in AMS using the super-halogen anion BeF3-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yun-Chong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Wei-Jian; Zhao, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Zhen-Kun; Zhao, Guo-Qing; Liu, Qi; Lu, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Wen-Nian; Huang, Chun-Hai

    2015-10-01

    The key to effective 10Be measurements by AMS is to efficiently suppress the interference of the isobar 10B and at the same time optimize 10Be transmission. In this work, a new approach of measuring 10Be by AMS has been studied. It uses the super-halogen anion of beryllium, BeF3-, which inherently suppresses 10B interference by nearly 5 orders of magnitude because the accompanying BF3- anion is rarely formed. The resulting 10B suppression factor is not as high as that achieved with energy degrader foils, but the 10B and 10Be separation in the final ionization detector was found to result in sufficient total 10B suppression for 10Be2+ to be counted directly at ∼6 MeV energies. Although the stripping yield from 10BeF3- to 10Be2+ is not as large as that from 10BeO-, this inefficiency is compensated by avoiding the reduction in transmission due to charge fraction splitting and optical transmission losses after the degrader foil. This paper summarizes our first observation of the direct 10Be2+ counting approach using the 3 MV multi-element system at the Xi'an AMS.

  6. 10Be in ice at high resolution: Solar activity and climate signals observed and GCM-modeled in Law Dome ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Joel; Heikkilä, Ulla; van Ommen, T. D.; Smith, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Changes in solar activity modulate the galactic cosmic ray flux, and in turn, the production rate of 10Be in the earth's atmosphere. The best archives of past changes in 10Be production rate are the polar ice cores. Key challenges in interpreting these archives as proxies for past solar activity lie in separating the useful solar activity (or production) signal from the interfering meteorological (or climate) signal, and furthermore, in determining the atmospheric source regions of 10Be deposited to the ice core site. In this study we use a new monthly resolution composite 10Be record, which spans the past decade, and a general circulation model (ECHAM5-HAM), to constrain both the production and climate signals in 10Be concentrations at the Law Dome ice core site, East Antarctica. This study differs from most previous work on 10Be in Antarctica due to the very high sample resolution achieved. This high resolution, through a time period where accurate instrumental measurements of solar activity and climate are available, allows us to examine the response of 10Be concentrations in ice to short-term (monthly to annual) variations in solar activity, and to short-term variations in climate, including seasonality. We find a significant correlation (r2 = 0.56, P < 0.005, n = 92) between observed 10Be concentrations and solar activity (represented by the neutron counting rate). The most pervasive climate influence is a seasonal cycle, which shows maximum concentrations in mid-to-late-summer and minimum concentrations in winter. Model results show reasonable agreement with observations; both a solar activity signal and seasonal cycle in 10Be are captured. However, the modeled snow accumulation rate is too high by approximately 60%. According to the model, the main atmospheric source region of 10Be deposited to Law Dome is the 30-90°S stratosphere (~50%), followed by the 30-90°S troposphere (~30%). An enhancement in the fraction of 10Be arriving to Law Dome from the

  7. A new value for the half-life of 10Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korschinek, G.; Bergmaier, A.; Faestermann, T.; Gerstmann, U. C.; Knie, K.; Rugel, G.; Wallner, A.; Dillmann, I.; Dollinger, G.; von Gostomski, Ch. Lierse; Kossert, K.; Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M.; Remmert, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 10Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of 10Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of 10Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the 10Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched 10Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of 9Be. We then determined the initial 10Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant 10Be/ 9Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the 10Be concentration and activity yields a 10Be half-life of T1/2 = 1.388 ± 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. [11]), found a value of 1.386 ± 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for 10Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 ± 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  8. Using 10Be erosion rates and fluvial channel morphology to constrain fault throw rates in the southwestern Sacramento River Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, is a critical region for California water resources, agriculture, and threatened or endangered species. This landscape is affected by an extensive set of levees that enclose artificial islands created for agricultural use. In addition to their importance for sustaining agriculture, this levee system also supports extensive transport and power transmission infrastructure and urban/suburban development. These levees are susceptible to damage from even moderate ground shaking by either a large earthquake on one of the high-activity faults in the nearby San Francisco Bay region, or even a moderate earthquake on one of the low-activity faults in the Delta region itself. However, despite this danger the earthquake hazards in this region are poorly constrained due to our lack of understanding of faults in and near the Delta region. As part of an effort to better constrain the seismic hazard associated with known, but poorly constrained, faults in the region, a geomorphic analysis of the Dunnigan Hills, northwest of Woodland, CA, is being combined with cosmogenic 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates. The Dunnigan Hills are a low-relief (maximum elevation 87 m) landscape generated by fault-bend folding above the west-vergent Sweitzer reverse fault that soles into a blind east-vergent reverse fault. These faults have been imaged by seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity indicates that this system is actively propagating to the east. However, the throw rates on the faults in this system remain unconstrained, despite the potential for significant shaking such as that experienced in the nearby April, 1892 earthquake sequence between Winters and Vacaville, Ca, ~25 km to the south, which has been estimated at magnitude 6.0 or greater. Geomorphic and cosmogenic 10Be analyses from 12 catchments draining the eastern flank of the Dunnigan Hills will be used to infer vertical rock uplift rates to better constrain

  9. Catchment-scale denudation and chemical erosion rates determined from 10Be and mass balance geochemistry (Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestland, Erick A.; Liccioli, Caterina; Soloninka, Lesja; Chittleborough, David J.; Fink, David

    2016-10-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles have, as a central component, estimates of physical and chemical erosion rates. These erosion rates are becoming better quantified by the development of a global database of cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be (CRN) analyses of soil, sediment, and outcrops. Here we report the denudation rates for two small catchments (~ 0.9 km2) in the Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia as determined from 10Be concentrations from quartz sand from the following landscape elements: 1) dissected plateaux, or summit surfaces (14.10 ± 1.61 t km- 2 y- 1), 2) sandstone outcrops (15.37 ± 1.32 t km- 2 y- 1), 3) zero-order drainages (27.70 ± 1.42 t km- 2 y- 1), and 4) stream sediment which reflect a mix of landscape elements (19.80 ± 1.01 t km- 2 y- 1). Thus, the more slowly eroding plateaux and ridges, when juxtaposed with the more rapidly eroding side-slopes, are leading to increased relief in this landscape. Chemical erosion rates for this landscape are determined by combining cosmogenic denudation rates with the geochemical mass balance of parent rock, soil and saprolite utilizing zirconium immobility and existing mass balance methods. Two different methods were used to correct for chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite zone that is shielded at depth from CRN production. The corrected values are higher than uncorrected values: total denudation of 33.24 or 29.11 t km- 2 y- 1, and total chemical erosion of 15.64 or 13.68 t km- 2 y- 1. Thus, according to these methods, 32-40% of the denudation is taking place by chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite below CRN production depth. Compared with other similar areas, the overall denudation and chemical erosion rates are low. In most areas with sub-humid climates and tectonic uplift, physical erosion is much greater than chemical erosion. The low physical erosion rates in these Mt. Lofty Range catchments, in what is a relatively active tectonic setting, are thought to be due to low rainfall intensity

  10. A New Approach for Estimating Background Rates of Erosion Using Concentration of Meteoric 10-Be Adhered to River Sediment: Application to the Rapidly Eroding Waipaoa Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, L. J.; Bierman, P. R.; Pavich, M.; Finkel, R.

    2007-12-01

    New and existing data suggest that the concentration of atmospherically- produced, meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment provides a proxy for basin-scale erosion rates. Although the widely applied method of analyzing in situ produced 10-Be in river sediments has proven useful for estimating pre-anthropogenic rates of erosion in a variety of environments, there are lithologic limitation. In contrast, measuring the concentration of meteoric 10-Be adhered to river sediment allows erosion rate analysis in landscapes underlain by quartz-deficient or fine-grained lithologies, as well as in basins where the concentration of quartz varies spatially. By assuming that basins are in an overall isotopic steady-state, that erosion is rapid enough that decay is negligible, and that the integrated delivery rate of 10-Be from the atmosphere (D10-Be) can be estimated, basin-scale mass loss rates (Ms) can be solved by equating the 10-Be flux in from the atmosphere with the flux of 10-Be out of the basin on sediment (C10-Be) and expressed as sediment yield per unit area (Ys). Fin = Fout D10-Be * A = Ms * C10-Be Ms = (D10-Be * A)/ C10-Be Ys = D10-Be / C10-Be To validate this new approach, we examined the limited data that do exist and found reasonable correspondence between erosion rates estimated from meteoric 10-Be concentrations and estimated by other means. As a first application, we use meteoric 10-Be in river sediment to estimate basin-scale erosion rates from catchments within and near the mud-stone dominated Waipaoa River Basin draining the tectonically active east coast of New Zealand's North Island. Near total conversion of indigenous forest to pasture over the past century in the Waipaoa Basin has resulted in some of the most dramatic and widespread erosional features on the planet, and contemporary sediment yields that rank among the highest in the world (~7 million kg/(km2 * yr)). The amount of meteoric 10-Be adhered to eight river sediment samples suggests that modern

  11. MODELED RESIDENTIAL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN VIA DERMAL SURFACE RESIDUE CONTACT AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model has been applied to estimate residential chlorpyrifos exposure and dace to children via the non-dietary ingestion and dermal residue contact pathways. Time-location-activity data for 2825 children were sampled from national surveys to generat...

  12. Exposure to Phthalate Emitted from Vinyl Flooring and Sorbed to Interior Surfaces, Dust, Airborne Particles and Human Skin

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an urgent need to characterize potential risk to human health and the environment that arises from the manufacture and use of tens of thousands of chemicals. Computational tools and approaches for characterizing and prioritizing exposure are required: to provide input f...

  13. Monitoring of waterborne pathogens in surface waters in amsterdam, the Netherlands, and the potential health risk associated with exposure to cryptosporidium and giardia in these waters.

    PubMed

    Schets, F M; van Wijnen, J H; Schijven, J F; Schoon, H; de Roda Husman, A M

    2008-04-01

    The water in the canals and some recreational lakes in Amsterdam is microbiologically contaminated through the discharge of raw sewage from houseboats, sewage effluent, and dog and bird feces. Exposure to these waters may have negative health effects. During two successive 1-year study periods, the water quality in two canals (2003 to 2004) and five recreational lakes (2004 to 2005) in Amsterdam was tested with regard to the presence of fecal indicators and waterborne pathogens. According to Bathing Water Directive 2006/7/EC, based on Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococcus counts, water quality in the canals was poor but was classified as excellent in the recreational lakes. Campylobacter, Salmonella, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia were detected in the canals, as was rotavirus, norovirus, and enterovirus RNA. Low numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were detected in the recreational lakes, despite compliance with European bathing water legislation. The estimated risk of infection with Cryptosporidium and Giardia per exposure event ranged from 0.0002 to 0.007% and 0.04 to 0.2%, respectively, for occupational divers professionally exposed to canal water. The estimated risk of infection at exposure to incidental peak concentrations of Cryptosporidium and Giardia may be up to 0.01% and 1%, respectively, for people who accidentally swallow larger volumes of the canal water than the divers. Low levels of viable waterborne pathogens, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, pose a possible health risk from occupational, accidental, and recreational exposure to surface waters in Amsterdam. PMID:18281429

  14. Effects of prenatal exposure to surface-coated nanosized titanium dioxide (UV-Titan). A study in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are smaller than 100 nm and designed to improve or achieve new physico-chemical properties. Consequently, also toxicological properties may change compared to the parent compound. We examined developmental and neurobehavioral effects following maternal exposure to a nanoparticulate UV-filter (UV-titan L181). Methods Time-mated mice (C57BL/6BomTac) were exposed by inhalation 1h/day to 42 mg/m3 aerosolized powder (1.7·106 n/cm3; peak-size: 97 nm) on gestation days 8-18. Endpoints included: maternal lung inflammation; gestational and litter parameters; offspring neurofunction and fertility. Physicochemical particle properties were determined to provide information on specific exposure and deposition. Results Particles consisted of mainly elongated rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2) with an average crystallite size of 21 nm, modified with Al, Si and Zr, and coated with polyalcohols. In exposed adult mice, 38 mg Ti/kg was detected in the lungs on day 5 and differential cell counts of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed lung inflammation 5 and 26-27 days following exposure termination, relative to control mice. As young adults, prenatally exposed offspring tended to avoid the central zone of the open field and exposed female offspring displayed enhanced prepulse inhibition. Cognitive function was unaffected (Morris water maze test). Conclusion Inhalation exposure to nano-sized UV Titan dusts induced long term lung inflammation in time-mated adult female mice. Gestationally exposed offspring displayed moderate neurobehavioral alterations. The results are discussed in the light of the observed particle size distribution in the exposure atmosphere and the potential pathways by which nanoparticles may impart changes in fetal development. PMID:20546558

  15. Roughening, recession, and chemical alteration of marble and limestone sample surfaces during atmospheric exposure in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Youngdahl, C.A.; Doe, B.R.

    1986-02-01

    Marble and limestone surfaces were exposed to atmospheric conditions at four eastern US sites and were monitored for changes in surface chemistry, surface roughness/recession, and weight. The effect of acid deposition, to which calcareous materials are especially sensitive, was of particular interest. Results are described for the first year of testing, and aspects of a preliminary equation to relate damage to environmental factors are discussed. Thus far, findings support that acid deposition substantially damages marble and limestone surfaces. Improvements in methods to reduce uncertainties in the quantitative contributions of important chemical species are outlined for the ongoing effort.

  16. Lunar surface dynamics: Some general conclusions and new results from Apollo 16 and 17. [exposure age determination of lunar rocks, boulders, and craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, G.; Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.; Ralston, C.; Walker, R.; Yuhas, D.

    1974-01-01

    Exposure ages of Apollo 17 rocks as measured by tracks and the Kr-Kr rare gas method are reported. Concordant ages of 22 - or + 1 million year (my) are obtained for the station 6 boulder sample 76315. This value is interpreted as the time when the station 6 boulder was emplaced in its present position. Reasonable agreement is also obtained by the two methods for another station 6 boulder, sample 76015. Discordant ages (respectively 5 and 28 my by the track and rare gas methods) are obtained for the station 7 boulder sample, 77135, indicating that the boulder was emplaced at least 5 my ago. The 72 my exposure age of 75035, in general agreement with previous measurements of approximately 85 my for another Camelot boulder, may well date the formation of Camelot. Rock 76015 was split and one surface exposed to the sky through a very small solid angle.

  17. Late Holocene denudation rates and sediment fluxes in the Po basin from source to sink based on in situ cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Hella; Malusà, Marco; Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    We constrain the long-term sediment delivery within the Po basin from source to lowland sink using sediment fluxes from in situ 10Be-derived denudation rates and compare these to published short-term estimates from gauging. We measured in situ 10Be concentrations in nearly all Alpine and Apennine upstream catchments draining to the Po River and in the Po lowlands down to the Po delta, respectively. In the upstream reaches of the Po basin, short-term sediment interception in dams and reservoirs and long-term sediment trapping in periglacial lakes may modify 10Be concentrations, whereas in lowland reaches, sediment burial and storage may affect nuclide concentrations. From the comparison of 10Be nuclide data measured upstream of dam influence to those measured downstream of major dams, we find that the average 10Be signal is not significantly modified. In the lowland reaches, we find that the average 10Be concentration is only marginally modified by floodplain processes, as 26Al/10Be ratios do not show differential decay due to burial and 21Ne concentrations change only slightly along the floodplain reach. Thus we interpret the average 10Be concentration of lowland samples to reflect the average 10Be concentration of all upstream catchments in terms of a preservation of the source area erosion signal. The close similarity in 10Be concentrations from the sources to the Po lowland sink suggests that LGM denudation rates prior to sediment trapping in periglacial lakes were similar to today's, as the sediment now contained in the Po lowlands must have been eroded from the orogen and deposited in the lowlands prior to lake formation. This source-sink assessment shows the robustness of cosmogenic 10Be as erosion rate tracer. From these in situ 10Be-derived denudation rates integrating over the last few thousand years, we constrain the sediment contributions of the Alpine and Apennine source areas arriving at the Po delta. In total, ca. 60 Mt/yr of sediment are exported to

  18. Use of a variable exposure photographic pyrometer to measure surface temperatures on a hemispherical-face model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Henley, W. C., Jr.; Snow, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a photographic pyrometer for nonintrusive measurement of high temperature surfaces in a wind tunnel test is described. The advantages of the pyrometer for measuring surfaces whose unique shape makes use of thermocouples difficult are pointed out. The use of computer operated densitometers or optical processors for the data reduction is recommended.

  19. Hillslope lowering rates and mobile-regolith residence times from in situ and meteoric 10Be analysis: Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Wyshnytzky, C.; Ouimet, W. B.; Dethier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mobile regolith is produced as weathered saprolite is entrained into the mobile layer. The rate of mobile-regolith production and its residence time on hillslopes shapes the topography and evolution of hillslopes. We calculate the production rate of mobile regolith and the mobile-regolith residence times on active hillslopes in Gordon Gulch, within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO), Colorado. We find mobile-regolith production rates (average 3.1 cm/ka) and residence times (average 10-20 ka) derived from both in situand meteoric methods agree. Lowering-rates derived from our study are also comparable to basin-averaged denudation rates for small basins in the Colorado Front Range (Dethier and Lazarus, 2006). In this study, we have measured both in situ and meteoric 10Be in saprolite and mobile regolith separately. We find that, on average, two-thirds of in situ 10Be is produced within saprolite, and that at least one-tenth of the meteoric 10Be inventories are stored in saprolite. In the case of in situ 10Be, this simply reflects the exponential fall-off in production rates through a thin mobile-regolith cover. In the case of meteoric 10Be, our calculations suggest that >40% of the meteoric 10Be deposition occurs within the saprolite. Most studies that utilize 10Be report residence times and soil-production rates based on concentrations in either the mobile regolith or saprolite; therefore, our 10Be data highlight the importance of clearly identifying mobile and immobile portions of the regolith, constraining its 10Be inventory, and use of consistent terminology for the mobile-layer.

  20. Late Quaternary slip rate gradient defined using high-resolution topography and 10Be dating of offset landforms on the southern San Jacinto Fault zone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, Kimberly; Rockwell, Thomas; Owen, Lewis A.; Oskin, Michael; Lippincott, Caitlin; Caffee, Marc W.; Dortch, Jason

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest the San Jacinto fault zone may be the dominant structure accommodating PA-NA relative plate motion. However, because the late Quaternary slip history of the southern San Andreas fault system is insufficiently understood, it is difficult to evaluate the partitioning of deformation across the plate boundary and its evolution. Landforms displaced by the Clark fault of the southern San Jacinto fault zone were mapped using high-resolution airborne laser-swath topography and selected offset landforms were dated using cosmogenic 10Be. Beheaded channels at Rockhouse Canyon, displaced by 500 ± 70 m and 220 ± 70 m, have been dated to 47 ± 8 ka and 28 ± 9 ka, respectively. Farther south, near the southern Santa Rosa Mountains, an alluvial deposit displaced by 51 ± 9 m has been dated to 35 ± 7 ka. From these sites, the slip rate of the Clark fault is determined to diminish southward from 8.9 ± 2.0 to 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr. This implies a slip-rate decrease along the Clark fault from Anza southeastward to its surface termination near the Salton Trough, where slip is transferred to the Coyote Creek fault, and additional deformation is compensated by folding and thrusting in the basin. These data suggest that since ˜30 to 50 ka, the slip rate along the southern San Jacinto fault zone has been lower than, or equivalent to, the rate along the southernmost San Andreas fault. Accordingly, either the slip rate of the San Jacinto fault has substantially decreased since fault initiation, or fault slip began earlier than previously suggested.

  1. Using 10Be and 26Al to determine sediment generation rates and identify sediment source areas in an arid region drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Erik M.; Bierman, Paul R.; Caffee, Marc

    2002-06-01

    We measured 10Be and 26Al in 64 sediment and bedrock samples collected throughout the arid, 187 km 2 Yuma Wash drainage basin, southwestern Arizona. From the measurements, we determine long-term, time-integrated rates of upland sediment generation (81±5 g m -2 year -1) and bedrock equivalent lowering (30±2 m Ma -1) consistent with other estimates for regions of similar climate, lithology, and topography. In a small (˜8 km 2), upland sub-basin, differences in nuclide concentrations between bedrock outcrops and hillslope colluvium suggest weathering of bedrock beneath a colluvial cover is a more significant source of sediment (40×10 4 kg year -1) than weathering of exposed bedrock surfaces (10×10 4 kg year -1). Mixing models constructed from nuclide concentrations of sediment reservoirs identify important sediment source areas. Hillslope colluvium is the dominant sediment source to the upper reaches of the sub-basin channel; channel cutting of alluvial terraces is the dominant source in the lower reaches. Similarities in nuclide concentrations of various sediment reservoirs indicate short sediment storage times (<10 3 years). Nuclide concentrations, measured in channel sediment from tributaries of Yuma Wash and in samples collected along the length of the Wash, were used to construct mixing models and determine sediment sources to the main stem channel. We find an exponential decrease in the channel nuclide concentrations with distance downstream, suggesting that as much as 40% of sediment discharged from Yuma Wash has been recycled from storage within basin fill alluvium. Sediment generation and denudation rates determined from the main stem are greater (25%) than rates determined from upland sub-basins suggesting that, currently, sediment may be exported from the basin more quickly than it is being generated in the uplands. Independence of nuclide concentration and sediment grain size indicates that channels transport sediment in discrete pulses before rapidly

  2. Atmospheric constituents and surface-level UVB: Implications for a paleoaltimetry proxy and attempts to reconstruct UV exposure during volcanic episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Goracke, Byron D.; Dalton, Sean M.

    2016-11-01

    Chemical and morphological features of spores and pollens have been linked to changes in solar ultraviolet radiation (specifically UVB, 280-315 nm) at Earth's surface. Variation in UVB exposure as inferred from these features has been suggested as a proxy for paleoaltitude; such proxies are important in understanding the uplift history of high altitude plateaus, which in turn is important for testing models of the tectonic processes responsible for such uplift. While UVB irradiance does increase with altitude above sea level, a number of other factors affect the irradiance at any given place and time. In this modeling study we use the TUV atmospheric radiative transfer model to investigate dependence of surface-level UVB irradiance and relative biological impact on a number of constituents in Earth's atmosphere that are variable over long and short time periods. We consider changes in O3 column density, and SO2 and sulfate aerosols due to periods of volcanic activity, including that associated with the formation of the Siberian Traps. We find that UVB irradiance may be highly variable under volcanic conditions and variations in several of these atmospheric constituents can easily mimic or overwhelm changes in UVB irradiance due to changes in altitude. On the other hand, we find that relative change with altitude is not very sensitive to different sets of atmospheric conditions. Any paleoaltitude proxy based on UVB exposure requires confidence that the samples under comparison were located at roughly the same latitude, under very similar O3 and SO2 columns, with similar atmospheric aerosol conditions. In general, accurate estimates of the surface-level UVB exposure at any time and location require detailed radiative transfer modeling taking into account a number of atmospheric factors; this result is important for paleoaltitude proxies as well as attempts to reconstruct the UV environment through geologic time and to tie extinctions, such as the end-Permian mass

  3. Changes in humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and in skin and respiratory surfaces of catfish, Saccobranchus fossilis, following copper exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Tripathi, D.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Immunologic responses and stereoscan analysis of the skin and gill surfaces were performed in the air-breathing catfish, Saccobranchus fossilis (Bloch) following sublethal exposure to copper. At 0.056, 0.1, and 0.32 mg/liter of Cu, a dose-dependent decrease in red and white blood cell counts, hemoglobin content, and packed cell volume values were observed at the end of experiment, i.e., 28 days. Fish exposed to Cu concentrations had lower antibody titer values, reduced numbers of splenic and kidney plaque-forming cells, and higher counts of splenic lymphocytes when compared to the control group. Cellular immune responses were evaluated by the rejection of eye allografts. Fish exposed to 0.32 mg/liter for 28 days showed 2-3 days delay in the eye-allograft rejection. Reduced phagocytic activity against sheep red blood cells was observed in Cu-treated fish. Exposure to 0.32 mg/liter of Cu for 7 days causes surface architectural abnormalities in the arrangement of microvilli on the surface of superficial epidermal cells of the skin. Hypersecretion of mucous, loss of shape, size, and structural arrangement of epidermal cells, and mucous goblet cells were observed following Cu exposure. An increased number of active tubular dilated mucous cells were also noticed. Accumulation of mucous suggests a molecular interaction between mucous glycoproteins and toxic Cu ions. Fish exposed to 0.32 mg/liter for 7 days showed edema, fusion of secondary gill lamellae at many places, and degeneration of epithelial cells. Marked ultrastructural alterations in the arrangement of microridges and intervening grooves of gill lamellae were noted. It is suggested that these degenerative changes in gill lamellae are responsible for respiratory and osmoregulatory dysfunction.

  4. Dual 10Be isotope systems constrain the source of sediment and rate of erosion for the tropical Barron River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Reusser, L. J.; Portenga, E.; Matmon, A.; Rood, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand source of sediment and rate of erosion for Barron River catchment, which heads on the Atherton Tablelands of northeast Australia, crosses the northern Queensland escarpment and drains into the Coral Sea, we collected fluvial sediment and measured both in situ and meteoric 10Be contents on the medium sand fraction. We collected fourteen samples from rivers and streams including large regional drainages and small tributaries. The upland basins are characterized by lower relief and less precipitation than the steeper and wetter escarpment basins. One sample is quartz sand from the Coral Sea beach at Yorkey's Knob, below the escarpment. Sand from the Barron River upstream of the escarpment integrates the upland basins and has an in situ 10Be concentration of 2.31±0.84 x105atoms/g and an erosion rate of 17.2 m/My (calculated using the CRONOS on-line calculator). This is similar to a major upland tributary (2.51±0.40 x105 atoms/g; 15.2 m/My) and two smaller upstream tributaries (20.5 m/My and 21.4 m/My). Escarpment streams have less in situ 10Be in their sediment (mean = 1.64±0.55 x 105 atoms/g, n=8) and higher basin area-weighted erosion rates (37.2 m/My). Based on the in situ measurements, the uplands are eroding at approximately half the rate of the escarpment basins. The beach sand has an in situ 10Be concentration (2.75±0.19 x 105 atoms/g) similar to the upland sediment suggesting that the source of beach sand is the larger but more slowly eroding Tablelands. In contrast, the meteoric 10Be concentrations of Barron River sand-sized sediment collected above the escarpment is ~4 fold lower (2.55x107 atoms/g) than the average meteoric 10Be concentration of the 8 escarpment samples (9.94±4.49 x107 atoms/g). This discrepancy cannot be explained by differences in annual average precipitation which ranges only from 1.9 to 2.3 m/yr but likely results from the deep mobility of meteoric 10Be in oxic Tableland soils. Considering meteoric 10Be as a

  5. OSIRIS observations of meter-sized exposures of H2O ice at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and interpretation using laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Pajola, M.; Groussin, O.; Auger, A.-T.; Oklay, N.; Fornasier, S.; Feller, C.; Davidsson, B.; Gracia-Berná, A.; Jost, B.; Marschall, R.; Poch, O.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; La Forgia, F.; Keller, H. U.; Kührt, E.; Lowry, S. C.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Agarwal, J.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertini, I.; Boudreault, S.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; De Cecco, M.; Debei, S.; Güttler, C.; Fulle, M.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Küppers, E.; Lara, L.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez Moreno, J. L.; Marzari, F.; Michalik, H.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-11-01

    Since OSIRIS started acquiring high-resolution observations of the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, over one hundred meter-sized bright spots have been identified in numerous types of geomorphologic regions, but mostly located in areas receiving low insolation. The bright spots are either clustered, in debris fields close to decameter-high cliffs, or isolated without structural relation to the surrounding terrain. They can be up to ten times brighter than the average surface of the comet at visible wavelengths and display a significantly bluer spectrum. They do not exhibit significant changes over a period of a few weeks. All these observations are consistent with exposure of water ice at the surface of boulders produced by dislocation of the weakly consolidated layers that cover large areas of the nucleus. Laboratory experiments show that under simulated comet surface conditions, analog samples acquire a vertical stratification with an uppermost porous mantle of refractory dust overlaying a layer of hard ice formed by recondensation or sintering under the insulating dust mantle. The evolution of the visible spectrophotometric properties of samples during sublimation is consistent with the contrasts of brightness and color seen at the surface of the nucleus. Clustered bright spots are formed by the collapse of overhangs that is triggered by mass wasting of deeper layers. Isolated spots might be the result of the emission of boulders at low velocity that are redepositioned in other regions.

  6. Linking the10Be continental record of Lake Baikal to marine and ice archives of the last 50 ka: Implication for the global dust-aerosol input

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Peck, J.; King, J.; Colman, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present here a 10Be profile from the continental sediments of Lake Baikal (the world's largest fresh water lake), which, for the first time, shows the ??? 40 ka 10Be enhancement and a pattern that strongly matches those from the marine and ice records for the last 50 ka. This finding provides a new horizon for global and regional correlation of continental archives. Additionally, our VADM-predicted 10Be production confirms and further strengthens a common global cause (geomagnetic field intensity) for the change in atmospheric 10Be over the last 50 ka. We also show that most of the 10Be inventory to the lake has been provided by riverine input, but with a significant addition from direct precipitation and dust-aerosol fallout. We estimate a higher dust-aerosol contribution of 10Be during the Holocene and interstadial stage 3 (22-50 ka) as compared with the glacial period (12-22 ka). Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Carbon monoxide concentration and exposure time effects on the depth of CO penetration and surface color of raw and cooked beef longissimus lumborum steaks.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, A; Guzek, D; Głąbska, D; Wierzbicka, A

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure time (0, 7, 14, and 21days) and concentration in gas mixture on depth of penetration and the surface color of raw and cooked striploin steaks. Seven packaging treatments were evaluated: vacuum, vacuum after 48h of exposure to 0.1%, 0.3% or 0.5% CO (mixed with 30% CO2 and 69.5-69.9% N2), and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) containing the same gas mixtures. CO penetration depth increased as exposure times and CO concentration in gas mixtures increased (p<0.05). However, the carboxymyoglobin that formed did not always turn brown during thermal treatment. In cooked samples treated with 0.3% and 0.5% CO-MAP, a red carboxymyoglobin border was visible at the cross section, whereas other CO packaging treatments had its partial or total browning. To create a red color in raw and avoid a red boarder in cooked beef, up to 0.5% CO in vacuum packages and only 0.1% for MAP can be recommended. PMID:27337678

  8. Carbon monoxide concentration and exposure time effects on the depth of CO penetration and surface color of raw and cooked beef longissimus lumborum steaks.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, A; Guzek, D; Głąbska, D; Wierzbicka, A

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure time (0, 7, 14, and 21days) and concentration in gas mixture on depth of penetration and the surface color of raw and cooked striploin steaks. Seven packaging treatments were evaluated: vacuum, vacuum after 48h of exposure to 0.1%, 0.3% or 0.5% CO (mixed with 30% CO2 and 69.5-69.9% N2), and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) containing the same gas mixtures. CO penetration depth increased as exposure times and CO concentration in gas mixtures increased (p<0.05). However, the carboxymyoglobin that formed did not always turn brown during thermal treatment. In cooked samples treated with 0.3% and 0.5% CO-MAP, a red carboxymyoglobin border was visible at the cross section, whereas other CO packaging treatments had its partial or total browning. To create a red color in raw and avoid a red boarder in cooked beef, up to 0.5% CO in vacuum packages and only 0.1% for MAP can be recommended.

  9. Unraveling the Quaternary river incision in the Moselle valley (Rhenish Massif, Germany): new insights from cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) of the Main Terrace complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; Harmand, Dominique; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Brückner, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Throughout the whole river network of the Rhenish Massif, the terrace complex of the so-called Main Terrace forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley (plateau valley) and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this Main Terrace complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature in the terrace flight; it is often used as a reference level to identify the start of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The latter probably reflects the major tectonic pulse that affected the whole Massif and was related to an acceleration of the uplift rates (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). The Main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley and are characterized by a constant absolute elevation of their base along a 150 km-long reach. Despite that various hypotheses have been proposed to explain this horizontality (updoming, faulting...), all studies assumed an age of ca. 800 ka for the YMT, mainly based on the questionable extrapolation of palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. Therefore, a reliable chronological framework is still required to unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the Moselle valley. In this study, we apply cosmogenic nuclide dating (10Be/26Al) to fluvial sediments pertaining to the Main Terrace complex or to the upper Middle Terraces. Several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct sampling strategies: (i) depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-)surface is well preserved and did not experience much postdepositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and (ii) the isochron technique where the sediment thickness exceeds 3 m. Cosmogenic nuclide ages recently obtained for three rivers in the Meuse catchment in the western Rhenish Massif demonstrated that the Main Terraces were younger than expected and their abandonment was diachronic along the

  10. Constraints on regolith formation and erosion rates at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, PA, determined using meteoric 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    New meteoric 10Be data from 73 samples of bulk regolith collected along north- and south-facing hillslopes at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO) provide first-order constraints on the timescales of regolith formation. The SSHO is located in the presently temperate climate zone of central Pennsylvania; however, sustained periglacial climate during the time of maximal extent of the Laurentide ice sheet (~19-21 ka) and deforestation during mid-19th Century charcoal production may have exerted significant influence on regolith production. Here, we quantify soil residence times and corresponding rates of regolith production and erosion on the north- and south-facing slopes at SSHO, using meteoric 10Be in samples of regolith collected at 25 locations along each hillslope from ridge top to toe slope. Hillslopes within the SSHO are relatively planar, but exhibit a pronounced asymmetry; north-facing slopes are steeper (~20°) than south-facing slopes (~15°). Meteoric 10Be concentrations decrease systematically with depth at all 6 profile sites. Meteoric 10Be inventories are similar at the north and south ridgetop sites (1.89 ± 0.55 at/cm2 and 1.63 ± 0.41 at/cm2, respectively) and generally increase with position downslope. Assuming that the delivery of meteoric 10Be to regolith is balanced by its removal via erosion, the total meteoric 10Be inventories at the north and south ridgetops are consistent with soil 10Be residence times of 10.5 ± 3 ky and 9.1 ± 2 ky, and with steady lowering rates of ~ 16 m/My and ~ 19 m/My, respectively. Increases in meteoric 10Be inventories downslope are consistent with relatively slow creep, with transport velocities of 0.45 cm/y and 0.38 cm/y for the north and south hillslopes, respectively. Comparison of our results with previously-published estimates of regolith production rates inferred from U-series disequilibrium reveals that estimates of steady-state erosion calculated using meteoric 10Be are considerably

  11. Authigenic 10Be/9Be Ratio Signatures of the Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Linked to Geomagnetic Dipole Moment Variation During and Since the Brunhes/Matuyama Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Ménabréaz, L.; Valet, J. P.; Valery, G.; Choy, S.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rate of cosmogenic nuclides is linked to the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) by a non-linear inverse relationship. Large amplitude GDM variations associated with reversals and excursions can potentially be reconstructed using time variation of the cosmogenic beryllium-10 (10Be) production recorded in ocean sediments. Downcore profiles of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) in oceanic cores provide independent and additional records of the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity and complete previous information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI). Here are presented new authigenic 10Be/9Be results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and from the top of core MD05-2930 collected in the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Completing data of Ménabréaz et al. (2012, 2014), these results provide the first continuous 10Be production rate sedimentary record covering the last 800 ka. Along these cores, authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio peaks are recorded - within methodological errors - at the stratigraphic level of RPI lows. High-resolution chronologies (δ18O-derived) lead to interpret these peaks as successive global 10Be overproduction events triggered by geomagnetic dipole lows present in the PISO-1500 and Sint-2000 stacks. The largest amplitude 10Be production enhancement is synchronous to the very large decrease of the dipole field associated with the last polarity reversal (772 ka). It is consistent in shape and duration with the peak recorded in core MD90-0961 from the Maldive area (Indian Ocean) (Valet et al. 2014). Two significant 10Be production enhancements are coeval with the Laschamp (41 ka) and Icelandic basin (190 ka) excursions, while 10Be production peaks of lower amplitude correlate to other recognized excursions such as the Blake (120 ka), Pringle-Falls (215 ka), Portuguese Margin (290 ka), Big Lost (540 ka) among others. This study provides new data on the amplitude and timing of dipole field variations

  12. Surface-rain interactions: differences in copper runoff for copper sheet of different inclination, orientation, and atmospheric exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Goidanich, Sara; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the diffuse dispersion of metals from outdoor constructions such as roofs and facades are necessary for environmental risk assessment and management. An existing predictive model has been compared with measured data of copper runoff from copper sheets exposed at four different inclinations facing four orientations at two different urban sites (Stockholm, Sweden, and Milan, Italy) during a 4-year period. Its applicability has also been investigated for copper sheet exposed at two marine sites(Cadiz, Spain, for 5 years, and Brest, France, for 9 years). Generally the model can be used for all given conditions. However, vertical surfaces should be considered as surfaces inclined 60-80 due to wind driven effects. The most important parameters that influence copper runoff, and not already included in the model, are the wind and rain characteristics that influence the actual rainfall volume impinging the surface of interest.

  13. The effects of nitric acid and silane surface treatments on carbon fibers and carbon/vinyl ester composites before and after seawater exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Tye A.

    This research focuses on carbon fiber treatment by nitric acid and 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate silane, and how this affects carbon/vinyl ester composites. These composites offer great benefits, but it is difficult to bond the fiber and matrix together, and without a strong interfacial bond, composites fall short of their potential. Silanes work well with glass fiber, but do not bond directly to carbon fiber because its surface is not reactive to liquid silanes. Oxidizing surface treatments are often prescribed for improved wetting and bonding to carbon, but good results are not always achieved. Furthermore, there is the unanswered question of environmental durability. This research aimed to form a better understanding of oxidizing carbon fiber treatments, determine if silanes can be bonded to oxidized surfaces, and how these treatments affect composite strength and durability before and after seawater exposure. Nitric acid treatments on carbon fibers were found to improve their tensile strength to a constant level by smoothing surface defects and chemically modifying their surfaces by increasing carbonyl and carboxylic acid concentrations. Increasing these surface group concentrations raises fiber polar energy and causes them to cohere. This impedes wetting, resulting in poor quality, high void content composites, even though there appeared to be improved adhesion between the fibers and matrix. Silane was found to bond to the oxidized carbon fiber surfaces, as evidenced by changes in both fiber and composite properties. The fibers exhibited low polarity and cohesion, while the composites displayed excellent resin wetting, low void content, and low seawater weight gain and swelling. On the contrary, the oxidized fibers that were not treated with silane exhibited high polarity and fiber cohesion. Their composites displayed poor wetting, high void content, high seawater weight gain, and low swelling. Both fiber treatment types resulted in great improvements

  14. Resrad-recycle: a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing radioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kassas, Bassel; Yu, Charley; Amish, John; LePoire, Dave; Chen, Shih-Yew; Williams, W A; Wallo, A; Peterson, H

    2004-11-01

    RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

  15. RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

    2004-11-01

    RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

  16. Estimating Dermal Transfer of Copper Particles from the Surfaces of Pressure-Treated Lumber and Implications for Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper ba...

  17. Using meteoric 10Be to track soil erosion and transport within a forested watershed, Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, PA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    This study presents new meteoric 10Be data from 30 hillslope and bedrock core samples, data which allow for estimation of soil residence times and inferred rates of soil erosion in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). The Shale Hills CZO is located in the temperate climate of central Pennsylvania and comprises a first-order watershed developed on a Fe-rich, organic-poor, Silurian-aged shale. Two major perturbations to the landscape have occurred at the Shale Hills CZO in the geologically recent past, including significant periglacial activity until the retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet (~15 ka) and deforestation during early colonial land-use. Meteoric 10Be depth profiles were measured from bulk soil samples (n=16) collected at three locations along a planar hill-slope on the southern ridge of the catchment, representing the ridge top, mid- and foot-slope; samples were amalgamated over 10 cm depth intervals to the base of the soil (depth to hand auger refusal). Soil and rock chip samples (n=14) were also collected and analyzed along a 24 m deep core drilled into the northern ridge top. Meteoric 10Be was extracted from each sample using a total fusion method and analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. All meteoric 10Be concentration profiles show a declining trend with depth, with >50% of the 10Be held in the upper-most decimeters of the soil. Meteoric 10Be inventories are high at the mid- and foot-slope sites, at 3.71 ± 0.02 x 10^10 at/cm^2 and 3.69 ± 0.02 x 10^10 at/cm^2, respectively. The ridge top site has a lower inventory of 1.90 ± 0.01 x 10^10 at/cm^2, while the meteoric 10Be inventory for soil at the deep core site (also on a ridge top) is 4.09 ± 0.07 x 10^9 at/cm^2. Bedrock samples from the core contain at least an additional 1.07 x 10^10 at/cm^2 10Be. If we assume that soils sampled at the Shale Hills CZO formed in place, and that 10Be delivery has been constant over time (1.8 x 10^6 atoms/cm^2 x y) and balanced by

  18. Depth-dependent Concentrations of Cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, HEc, NEc, and ARc in the Old Woman Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavielle, B.; Nishiizumi, K.; Marti, K.; Jeannot, J.-P.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.

    1995-09-01

    We report measurements of 1OBe7 26AI, 36CI, and of light noble gases in 6 samples of the type IIB Old Woman iron meteorite. The aim of this work is to study the depth dependence of the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in iron meteorites. Old Woman is a large single mass of 2753 kg. Five samples have been taken from a slice of about 100 cm x 50 cm. One other sample was located roughly 40 cm above the center of the slice in a perpendicular direction. The distances between any two samples vary from 36.5 cm to 57.5 cm. Studies of cosmogenic nuclides in samples of known locations are very useful for the validation of models describing the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Cosmogenic radionuclides were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Partial results have been reported earlier [1]. Concentrations of 4He, 21Ne and 38Ar in aliquots of the samples were determined by conventional mass spectrometry using an isotopic dilution method. The ratio 3He/4He appears to be almost constant with a value of 0.12 - ().13. This is about half the value generally observed in iron meteorites. Similar low ratios have been previously observed in some irons and in chondritic metal and reflect diffusion losses of 3H 12,31. The ratios 4He/38Ar, 4He/21Ne and 36Ar/38Ar are similar to those observed in iron meteorites indicating no significant losses of 4He. The measured ratio S = 4He/21Ne which represents one of the best indicators of shielding depth in iron meteorites, varies from 310 to 375 in samples from the slice. By using this as a shielding parameter, profiles were obtained for the different nuclides investigated in this work. Systematic decreases from the surface to the center of the meteorite are observed and the center of the meteoroid can be determined. As expected from nuclear systematics, the ratio 36Cl/36Ar is almost constant. The ratio 36Cl/10Be is relatively constant with a mean value of 4.7 indicating that the

  19. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Alvarez, David A; Taylor, Julia A; vom Saal, Frederick S; Nagel, Susan C; Tillitt, Donald E

    2015-08-15

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrations present in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities. PMID:25917777

  20. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Alvarez, David A.; Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Nagel, Susan C.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrationspresent in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities.

  1. Characterization of Missouri surface waters near point sources of pollution reveals potential novel atmospheric route of exposure for bisphenol A and wastewater hormonal activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Alvarez, David A; Taylor, Julia A; vom Saal, Frederick S; Nagel, Susan C; Tillitt, Donald E

    2015-08-15

    Surface water contamination by chemical pollutants increasingly threatens water quality around the world. Among the many contaminants found in surface water, there is growing concern regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals, based on their ability to interfere with some aspect of hormone action in exposed organisms, including humans. This study assessed water quality at several sites across Missouri (near wastewater treatment plants and airborne release sites of bisphenol A) based on hormone receptor activation potencies and chemical concentrations present in the surface water. We hypothesized that bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol would be greater in water near permitted airborne release sites and wastewater treatment plant inputs, respectively, and that these two compounds would be responsible for the majority of activities in receptor-based assays conducted with water collected near these sites. Concentrations of bisphenol A and ethinylestradiol were compared to observed receptor activities using authentic standards to assess contribution to total activities, and quantitation of a comprehensive set of wastewater compounds was performed to better characterize each site. Bisphenol A concentrations were found to be elevated in surface water near permitted airborne release sites, raising questions that airborne releases of BPA may influence nearby surface water contamination and may represent a previously underestimated source to the environment and potential for human exposure. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of surface water samples were predictive of wastewater input, although the lower sensitivity of the ethinylestradiol ELISA relative to the very high sensitivity of the bioassay approaches did not allow a direct comparison. Wastewater-influenced sites also had elevated anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic equivalence, while sites without wastewater discharges exhibited no antagonist activities.

  2. Detection of erosion events using 10Be profiles: example of the impact of agriculture on soil erosion in the Chesapeake Bay area (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valette-Silver, J. N.; Brown, L.; Pavich, M.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1986-01-01

    10Be concentration, total carbon and grain-size were measured in cores collected in undisturbed estuarine sediments of three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. These cores were previously studied by Davis [1] and Brush [2,3] for pollen content, age and sedimentation rate. In this work, we compare the results obtained for these various analyses. In the cores, we observed two increases in 10Be concentration concomitant with two major changes in the pollen composition of the sediments. These two pollen changes each correspond to well-dated agricultural horizons reflecting different stages in the introduction of European farming techniques [2]. In the Chesapeake Bay area, the agricultural development, associated with forest clearing, appears to have triggered the erosion, transport, and sedimentation into the river mouths of large quantities of 10Be-rich soils. This phenomenon explains the observed rise in the sedimentation rate associated with increases in agricultural land-use. ?? 1986.

  3. Francisella tularensis LVS surface and membrane proteins as targets of effective post-exposure immunization for tularemia.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeffrey C; Sutherland, Marjorie D; Harton, Marisa R; Molins, Claudia R; Anderson, Rebecca V; Heaslip, Darragh G; Bosio, Catharine M; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis causes disease (tularemia) in a large number of mammals, including man. We previously demonstrated enhanced efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy for tularemia by postexposure passive transfer of immune sera developed against a F. tularensis LVS membrane protein fraction (MPF). However, the protein composition of this immunogenic fraction was not defined. Proteomic approaches were applied to define the protein composition and identify the immunogens of MPF. MPF consisted of at least 299 proteins and 2-D Western blot analyses using sera from MPF-immunized and F. tularensis LVS-vaccinated mice coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 24 immunoreactive protein spots containing 45 proteins. A reverse vaccinology approach that applied labeling of F. tularensis LVS surface proteins and bioinformatics was used to reduce the complexity of potential target immunogens. Bioinformatics analyses of the immunoreactive proteins reduced the number of immunogen targets to 32. Direct surface labeling of F. tularensis LVS resulted in the identification of 31 surface proteins. However, only 13 of these were reactive with MPF and/or F. tularensis LVS immune sera. Collectively, this use of orthogonal proteomic approaches reduced the complexity of potential immunogens in MPF by 96% and allowed for prioritization of target immunogens for antibody-based immunotherapies against tularemia.

  4. Quaternary downcutting rate of the new river, Virginia, measured from differential decay of cosmogenic {sup 26}Al and {sup 10}Be in cave-deposited alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    Granger, D.E.; Kirchner, J.W.; Finkel, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 26}Al and {sup 10}Be in quartz can be used to date sediment burial. Here we use {sup 26} Al and {sup 10}Be in cave-deposited river sediment to infer the time of sediment emplacement. Sediment burial dates from a vertical sequence of caves along the New River constrain its Quaternary downcutting rate to 27.3{+-}4.5 m/m.y. and may provide evidence of regional tectonic tilt. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Rate and style of ice stream retreat constrained by new surface-exposure ages: The Minch, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradwell, Tom; Small, David; Fabel, Derek; Dove, Dayton; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Clark, Chris; Consortium, Britice-Chrono

    2016-04-01

    Chronologically constrained studies of former ice-sheet extents and dynamics are important for understanding past cryospheric responses and modelling future ice-sheet and sea-level change. As part of the BRITICE-CHRONO project, we present new geomorphological and chronological data from a marine-terminating ice stream system in NW Europe that operated during the Late Weichselian Glaciation. A suite of 51 cosmogenic-nuclide exposure ages from ice sheet moraines and glacially transported boulders constrain the maximum extent of the ice sheet on the continental shelf (~28 ka BP) and its subsequent retreat, between ~27 and 16 ka BP, into a large marine embayment (ca. 7000 km2; the Minch, NW Scotland). Recently acquired swath bathymetry and acoustic sub-bottom profiler data reveal several large transverse grounding-zone wedges up to 40 m thick and 5 km wide with diagnostic acoustic-facies architecture. These seabed sediment wedges mark former quasi-stable positions of grounded marine-terminating ice-stream fronts; their size and thickness suggest long-lived stillstands of the order of centuries. Statistically significant clusters of exposure ages from glacial deposits on islands and intervening headlands shed important new light on the age of these marine grounding-zone wedges and, by inference, the rate and timing of Minch palaeo-ice stream retreat. We find strong evidence for episodic ice stream retreat on the continental shelf between ~28-24 ka BP, in the outer Minch between ~24-22 ka BP, and in the central Minch between 22-18.5 ka BP. In contrast, final ice stream deglaciation (<18 ka) across the deepest parts of the inner Minch embayment, was probably rapid and uninterrupted - with the ice sheet margin at or close to the present-day coastline in NW Scotland by 16.1 ka BP. It is hoped that these results will form the empirical basis for future ice-sheet modelling of this dynamically sensitive sector of the British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  6. Endocrine disrupting chemicals-Linking internal exposure to vitellogenin levels and ovotestis in Abramis brama from Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Reinen, Jelle; Suter, Marc J-F; Vögeli, A Christiane; Fernandez, Mariana F; Kiviranta, Hannu; Eggen, Rik I L; Vermeulen, Nico P E

    2010-11-01

    The exposure of male bream from three Dutch freshwater locations to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and corresponding effects are described in this study. Fish specimen displaying reproductive disorders associated with high levels of plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations and occurrence of ovotestis (OT) were investigated. To provide information on the full spectrum of EDCs in fish tissue, adipose tissue samples of individual fish were analyzed for nearly 130 chemicals targeting different compound classes (bisphenols, alkylphenols, pesticides, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and biphenyls (PBBs)) and steroid hormones. To establish whether tissue from specimen with reproductive disorders shows a spectrum of EDCs that is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that of controls free of symptoms, bioassay-directed fractionation was performed using the recombinant yeast estrogen screen (YES), the E-Screen bioassay, the human sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1) inhibition assay, and the coumestrol-based estrogen receptor α (ERα) high resolution screening (HRS) assay. No differences in estrogenicity could be observed between the cases and controls and steroidal estrogens accounted for the majority of estrogenicity found in the complex mixtures. In this study, the combination of the different assays employed to measure total estrogenicity and the SULT1E1 inhibition does not predict the outcome of unwanted physiological effects, however, it can be used to determine the presence of EDCs in fish samples and their estrogenic effects. PMID:21787654

  7. Nanomechanical and surface properties of rMSCs post-exposure to CAP treated UHMWPE wear particles

    PubMed Central

    Preedy, Emily Callard; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2016-01-01

    Wear debris generated by ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) used in joint replacement devices has been of concern due to reductions of the implant longevity. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been used to improve the wear performance of UHMWPE. Our aim was to investigate the elastic and adhesive properties of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs), through AFM, after exposure to UHMWPE wear debris pre- and post-CAP treatment. The results indicated that the main changes in cell elasticity and spring constant of MSC exposed to wear particles occurred in the first 24 h of contact and the particle concentration from 0.5 to 50 mg/l did not play a significant role. For UHMWPE treated for 7.5 min, with progression of the wear simulation the results of the CAP treated samples were getting closer to the result of untreated samples; while with longer CAP treatment this was not observed. From the Clinical Editor Joint replacements are now common clinical practice. However, the use of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) still poses a concern, due to the presence of wear debris. The authors here investigated the effects of wear debris after cold atmospheric plasma treatment on rat mesenchymal stem cells. The positive results provided new strategies in future design of joint replacement materials. PMID:26554392

  8. Endocrine disrupting chemicals-Linking internal exposure to vitellogenin levels and ovotestis in Abramis brama from Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Reinen, Jelle; Suter, Marc J-F; Vögeli, A Christiane; Fernandez, Mariana F; Kiviranta, Hannu; Eggen, Rik I L; Vermeulen, Nico P E

    2010-11-01

    The exposure of male bream from three Dutch freshwater locations to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and corresponding effects are described in this study. Fish specimen displaying reproductive disorders associated with high levels of plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations and occurrence of ovotestis (OT) were investigated. To provide information on the full spectrum of EDCs in fish tissue, adipose tissue samples of individual fish were analyzed for nearly 130 chemicals targeting different compound classes (bisphenols, alkylphenols, pesticides, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and biphenyls (PBBs)) and steroid hormones. To establish whether tissue from specimen with reproductive disorders shows a spectrum of EDCs that is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that of controls free of symptoms, bioassay-directed fractionation was performed using the recombinant yeast estrogen screen (YES), the E-Screen bioassay, the human sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1) inhibition assay, and the coumestrol-based estrogen receptor α (ERα) high resolution screening (HRS) assay. No differences in estrogenicity could be observed between the cases and controls and steroidal estrogens accounted for the majority of estrogenicity found in the complex mixtures. In this study, the combination of the different assays employed to measure total estrogenicity and the SULT1E1 inhibition does not predict the outcome of unwanted physiological effects, however, it can be used to determine the presence of EDCs in fish samples and their estrogenic effects.

  9. Variable and Extreme Irradiation Conditions in the Early Solar System Inferred from the Initial Abundance of 10Be in Isheyevo CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Rollion-Bard, Claire

    2013-02-01

    A search for short-lived 10Be in 21 calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from Isheyevo, a rare CB/CH chondrite, showed that only 5 CAIs had 10B/11B ratios higher than chondritic correlating with the elemental ratio 9Be/11B, suggestive of in situ decay of this key short-lived radionuclide. The initial (10Be/9Be)0 ratios vary between ~10-3 and ~10-2 for CAI 411. The initial ratio of CAI 411 is one order of magnitude higher than the highest ratio found in CV3 CAIs, suggesting that the more likely origin of CAI 411 10Be is early solar system irradiation. The low (26Al/27Al)0 [<= 8.9 × 10-7] with which CAI 411 formed indicates that it was exposed to gradual flares with a proton fluence of a few 1019 protons cm-2, during the earliest phases of the solar system, possibly the infrared class 0. The irradiation conditions for other CAIs are less well constrained, with calculated fluences ranging between a few 1019 and 1020 protons cm-2. The variable and extreme value of the initial 10Be/9Be ratios in carbonaceous chondrite CAIs is the reflection of the variable and extreme magnetic activity in young stars observed in the X-ray domain.

  10. The geomagnetic dipole moment variation between 250 and 800 ka BP reconstructed from the authigenic 10Be/9Be signature in West Equatorial Pacific sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménabréaz, Lucie; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Vidal, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio, proxy of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, was measured in sediments deposited in the West Equatorial Pacific (Gulf of Papua; 10°25 S; 146°15 E), in order to reconstruct the geomagnetic dipole moment variations in the 250-800 ka time interval, independently from paleomagnetic methods. The pelagic clayey-carbonate muds continuously deposited between marine isotope stages 8 and 20 were subsampled every 10 cm. The 10Be production rate record reconstructed for the 250-800 ka interval is described and compared over the same time interval with global paleomagnetic stacks (SINT-2000 and PISO-1500). The highlighted cosmogenic 10Be overproductions appear to be triggered by the series of Geomagnetic Dipole Lows (GDL) that have occurred since the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal. Calibration using absolute values of the geomagnetic dipole moment drawn from a paleomagnetic database produces a new record of the dipole moment variations over the 250-800 ka time interval. The timing and amplitude of the GDL succession revealed by such records will contribute to improving knowledge of the geodynamo rhythms and rate of changes at millennial to million year scales.

  11. Occurrence of bisphenol A in surface water, drinking water and plasma from Malaysia with exposure assessment from consumption of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Santhi, V A; Sakai, N; Ahmad, E D; Mustafa, A M

    2012-06-15

    This study investigated the level of bisphenol A (BPA) in surface water used as potable water, drinking water (tap and bottled mineral water) and human plasma in the Langat River basin, Malaysia. BPA was present in 93% of the surface water samples at levels ranging from below limit of quantification (LOQ; 1.3 ng/L) to 215 ng/L while six fold higher levels were detected in samples collected near industrial and municipal sewage treatment plant outlets. Low levels of BPA were detected in most of the drinking water samples. BPA in tap water ranged from 3.5 to 59.8 ng/L with the highest levels detected in samples collected from taps connected to PVC pipes and water filter devices. Bottled mineral water had lower levels of BPA (3.3±2.6 ng/L) although samples stored in poor storage condition had significantly higher levels (11.3±5.3 ng/L). Meanwhile, only 17% of the plasma samples had detectable levels of BPA ranging from 0.81 to 3.65 ng/mL. The study shows that BPA is a ubiquitous contaminant in surface, tap and bottled mineral water. However, exposure to BPA from drinking water is very low and is less than 0.01% of the tolerable daily intake (TDI).

  12. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis on the surface of raw shelled almonds by exposure to steam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Oh, Se-wook; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Reyes-De-Corcuera, Jose I; Powers, Joseph R; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of steam treatment on the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on the surface of raw almonds. Two cultivars, 'Nonpareil' and 'Mission', were studied. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated on the surface of raw almonds, which were then treated with steam (93 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C) for 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 s. After steam treatment, samples were plated on xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) and overlay (OV) XLD as a selective and nonselective agar for Salmonella, respectively, to investigate the extent of sublethal injury in Salmonella. Steam treatment of raw almonds effectively reduced Salmonella Enteritidis, and the effect was pronounced with increasing treatment time. After 65 s of steam treatment, reductions in Salmonella Enteritidis populations were 5.7 log and 5.8 log for 'Nonpareil' and 4.0 log and 4.1 log for 'Mission' when enumerated on XLD and OV XLD, respectively. There was no significant difference in population estimates determined with XLD and OV XLD over time (P > 0.05). The effect of the steam treatment was significantly different between two almond cultivars. Salmonella inoculated onto 'Mission' was more resistant to the steam treatment than that on 'Nonpareil', indicating that varietal differences must be considered in the application of steam for the disinfection of raw almonds. The present investigation revealed the potential usefulness of steam treatments for the control of pathogens in raw almonds.

  13. Exposure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionalized polystyrene latex nanoparticles: influence of surface charge on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Akihisa; Kuriyama, Yuta; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Novel nanoparticles with unique physicochemical characteristics are being developed with increasing frequency, leading to higher probability of nanoparticle release and environmental accumulation. Therefore, it is important to assess the potential environmental and biological adverse effects of nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the toxicity and behavior of surface-functionalized nanoparticles toward yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The colony count method and confocal microscopy were used to examine the cytotoxicity of manufactured polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles with various functional groups (amine, carboxyl, sulfate, and nonmodified). S. cerevisiae were exposed to PSL nanoparticles (40 mg/L) dispersed in 5-154 mM NaCl solutions for 1 h. Negatively charged nanoparticles had little or no toxic effect. Interestingly, nanoparticles with positively charged amine groups (p-Amine) were not toxic in 154 mM NaCl, but highly toxic in 5 mM NaCl. Confocal microscopy indicated that in 154 mM NaCl, the p-Amine nanoparticles were internalized by endocytosis, whereas in 5 mM NaCl they covered the dead cell surfaces. This demonstrates that nanoparticle-induced cell death might to be related to their adhesion to cells rather than their internalization. Together, these findings identify important factors in determining nanoparticle toxicity that might affect their impact on the environment and human health.

  14. Altered Traffic of Cardiolipin during Apoptosis: Exposure on the Cell Surface as a Trigger for "Antiphospholipid Antibodies".

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Valeria; Capozzi, Antonella; Recalchi, Serena; Signore, Michele; Mattei, Vincenzo; Garofalo, Tina; Misasi, Roberta; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Sorice, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been reported to induce changes in the remodelling of membrane lipids; after death receptor engagement, specific changes of lipid composition occur not only at the plasma membrane, but also in intracellular membranes. This paper focuses on one important aspect of apoptotic changes in cellular lipids, namely, the redistribution of the mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL). CL predominantly resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane, even if the rapid remodelling of its acyl chains and the subsequent degradation occur in other membrane organelles. After death receptor stimulation, CL appears to concentrate into mitochondrial "raft-like" microdomains at contact sites between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, leading to local oligomerization of proapoptotic proteins, including Bid. Clustering of Bid in CL-enriched contacts sites is interconnected with pathways of CL remodelling that intersect membrane traffic routes dependent upon actin. In addition, CL association with cytoskeleton protein vimentin was observed. Such novel association also indicated that CL molecules may be expressed at the cell surface following apoptotic stimuli. This observation adds a novel implication of biomedical relevance. The association of CL with vimentin at the cell surface may represent a "new" target antigen in the context of the apoptotic origin of anti-vimentin/CL autoantibodies in Antiphospholipid Syndrome. PMID:26491702

  15. Exposure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionalized polystyrene latex nanoparticles: influence of surface charge on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Akihisa; Kuriyama, Yuta; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Novel nanoparticles with unique physicochemical characteristics are being developed with increasing frequency, leading to higher probability of nanoparticle release and environmental accumulation. Therefore, it is important to assess the potential environmental and biological adverse effects of nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the toxicity and behavior of surface-functionalized nanoparticles toward yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The colony count method and confocal microscopy were used to examine the cytotoxicity of manufactured polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles with various functional groups (amine, carboxyl, sulfate, and nonmodified). S. cerevisiae were exposed to PSL nanoparticles (40 mg/L) dispersed in 5-154 mM NaCl solutions for 1 h. Negatively charged nanoparticles had little or no toxic effect. Interestingly, nanoparticles with positively charged amine groups (p-Amine) were not toxic in 154 mM NaCl, but highly toxic in 5 mM NaCl. Confocal microscopy indicated that in 154 mM NaCl, the p-Amine nanoparticles were internalized by endocytosis, whereas in 5 mM NaCl they covered the dead cell surfaces. This demonstrates that nanoparticle-induced cell death might to be related to their adhesion to cells rather than their internalization. Together, these findings identify important factors in determining nanoparticle toxicity that might affect their impact on the environment and human health. PMID:23448545

  16. Altered Traffic of Cardiolipin during Apoptosis: Exposure on the Cell Surface as a Trigger for “Antiphospholipid Antibodies”

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Valeria; Capozzi, Antonella; Recalchi, Serena; Signore, Michele; Mattei, Vincenzo; Garofalo, Tina; Misasi, Roberta; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Sorice, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been reported to induce changes in the remodelling of membrane lipids; after death receptor engagement, specific changes of lipid composition occur not only at the plasma membrane, but also in intracellular membranes. This paper focuses on one important aspect of apoptotic changes in cellular lipids, namely, the redistribution of the mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL). CL predominantly resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane, even if the rapid remodelling of its acyl chains and the subsequent degradation occur in other membrane organelles. After death receptor stimulation, CL appears to concentrate into mitochondrial “raft-like” microdomains at contact sites between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, leading to local oligomerization of proapoptotic proteins, including Bid. Clustering of Bid in CL-enriched contacts sites is interconnected with pathways of CL remodelling that intersect membrane traffic routes dependent upon actin. In addition, CL association with cytoskeleton protein vimentin was observed. Such novel association also indicated that CL molecules may be expressed at the cell surface following apoptotic stimuli. This observation adds a novel implication of biomedical relevance. The association of CL with vimentin at the cell surface may represent a “new” target antigen in the context of the apoptotic origin of anti-vimentin/CL autoantibodies in Antiphospholipid Syndrome. PMID:26491702

  17. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Influence of Surface Charge and Dose on Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Di Bona, Kristin R.; Xu, Yaolin; Gray, Marquita; Fair, Douglas; Hayles, Hunter; Milad, Luckie; Montes, Alex; Sherwood, Jennifer; Bao, Yuping; Rasco, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly utilized for biomedical, industrial, and commercial applications due to their unique properties and potential biocompatibility. However, little is known about how exposure to iron oxide NPs may affect susceptible populations such as pregnant women and developing fetuses. To examine the influence of NP surface-charge and dose on the developmental toxicity of iron oxide NPs, Crl:CD1(ICR) (CD-1) mice were exposed to a single, low (10 mg/kg) or high (100 mg/kg) dose of positively-charged polyethyleneimine-Fe2O3-NPs (PEI-NPs), or negatively-charged poly(acrylic acid)-Fe2O3-NPs (PAA-NPs) during critical windows of organogenesis (gestation day (GD) 8, 9, or 10). A low dose of NPs, regardless of charge, did not induce toxicity. However, a high exposure led to charge-dependent fetal loss as well as morphological alterations of the uteri (both charges) and testes (positive only) of surviving offspring. Positively-charged PEI-NPs given later in organogenesis resulted in a combination of short-term fetal loss (42%) and long-term alterations in reproduction, including increased fetal loss for second generation matings (mice exposed in utero). Alternatively, negatively-charged PAA-NPs induced fetal loss (22%) earlier in organogenesis to a lesser degree than PEI-NPs with only mild alterations in offspring uterine histology observed in the long-term. PMID:26694381

  18. Using (1)(0)Be cosmogenic isotopes to estimate erosion rates and landscape changes during the Plio-Pleistocene in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Paul H G M; Placzek, Christa J; Fink, David; Dosseto, Anthony; Roberts, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic (10)Be, measured in quartz from chert and river sediment around the Cradle of Humankind (CoH), are used to determine basin-averaged erosion rates and estimate incision rates for local river valleys. This study focusses on the catchment area that hosts Malapa cave with Australopithecus sediba, in order to compare regional versus localized erosion rates, and better constrain the timing of cave formation and fossil entrapment. Basin-averaged erosion rates for six sub-catchments draining the CoH show a narrow range (3.00 ± 0.28 to 4.15 ± 0.37 m/Mega-annum [Ma]; ±1σ) regardless of catchment size or underlying geology; e.g. the sub-catchment with Malapa Cave (3 km(2)) underlain by dolomite erodes at the same rate (3.30 ± 0.30 m/Ma) as the upper Skeerpoort River catchment (87 km(2)) underlain by shale, chert and conglomerate (3.23 ± 0.30 m/Ma). Likew