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Sample records for 10cr-1mo-1w-vnbn steel forging

  1. Steel forgings: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbett, E.G.; Melilli, A.S.

    1997-12-31

    Steel is supplied in many product forms, most of which are produced in terms of basic dimensions such as width and thickness, or diameter and with length describing quantity. Forgings and castings by contrast are diverse in shape and form and are individually made for a specific purpose, either as self contained units such as crankshafts, valve bodies or turbine rotors, or as discrete components to be fabricated into a larger assembly, as for example a nozzle for a pressure vessel. The specification and testing of forgings is therefore more varied, complex, and demanding than is the case for other product forms. This is augmented by the fact that forgings are often expected to give better reliability and service performance than can be expected when the same part is fabricated from sections of other steel product forms, if this were in fact practical. Given these unique circumstances the exchange of ideas on forging manufacturing techniques and experience, materials data and service experience has been an essential driving force in developing forging techniques and applications in every industrial field. The format of the symposium was similar to that of Williamsburg, focusing on the scope of the subcommittee in the areas of pressure vessel and nuclear forgings, turbine and generator forgings, general industrial forgings, and test methods for forgings. Separate abstracts were prepared for 17 papers.

  2. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  3. 2014 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel: Fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels-Effect of hydrogen, forging strain rate, and forging temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Forged stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. During service, tritium diffuses into the reservoir walls and radioactively decays to helium-3. Tritium and decay helium cause a higher propensity for cracking which could lead to a tritium leak or delayed failure of a tritium reservoir. The factors that affect the tendency for crack formation and propagation include: Environment; steel type and microstructure; and, vessel configuration (geometry, pressure, residual stress). Fracture toughness properties are needed for evaluating the long-term effects of tritium on their structural properties. Until now, these effects have been characterized by measuring the effects of tritium on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of specimens fabricated from experimental forgings in the form of forward-extruded cylinders. A key result of those studies is that the long-term cracking resistance of stainless steels in tritium service depends greatly on the interaction between decay helium and the steels’ forged microstructure. New experimental research programs are underway and are designed to measure tritium and decay helium effects on the cracking properties of stainless steels using actual tritium reservoir forgings instead of the experimental forgings of past programs. The properties measured should be more representative of actual reservoir properties because the microstructure of the specimens tested will be more like that of the tritium reservoirs. The programs are designed to measure the effects of key forging variables on tritium compatibility and include three stainless steels, multiple yield strengths, and four different forging processes. The effects on fracture toughness of hydrogen and crack orientation were measured for type 316L forgings. In addition, hydrogen effects on toughness were measured for Type 304L block forgings having two different yield strengths. Finally, fracture toughness properties of type 304L

  4. 77 FR 14445 - Application for a License To Export Steel Forging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Steel Forging Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(b) ``Public Notice of... Spain. December 15, 2011 head steel head steel February 7, 2012 forging. forging will be XR175...

  5. High yttria ferritic ODS steels through powder forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-05-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developed for future nuclear reactors. ODS Fe-18%Cr-2%W-0.2%Ti steels with 0, 0.35, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% Y2O3 (all compositions in weight%) dispersion were fabricated by mechanical alloying of elemental powders. The powders were placed in a mild steel can and forged in a stream of hydrogen gas at 1473 K. The steels were forged again to final density. The strength of ODS steel increased with yttria content. Though this was accompanied by a decrease in tensile elongation, all the steels showed significant ductility. The ductility in high yttria alloys may be attributed to improved inter-particle bonding between milled powders due to reduction of surface oxides by hydrogen. This may permit development of ODS steels with yttria contents higher than the conventional limit of 0.5%. It is suggested that powder forging is a promising route to fabricate ODS steels with high yttria contents and improved ductility.

  6. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... Commission. ACTION: Institution of five-year reviews concerning the antidumping duty orders on forged... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India and... (``Commerce'') issued antidumping duty orders on imports of forged stainless steel flanges from India and...

  7. Influence of free forging conditions on austenitic grain growth in constructional steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagulyaeva, S. V.; Potanina, V. S.; Vinograd, M. I.

    1984-02-01

    The initial period of austenitic grain growth in heating of a hot forged billet of 50G-SSh steel and of forgings after free forging is characterized by the formation of a mixed grain structure of No. 8 fine grains and No. 3-0 coarse.

  8. Friction and wear in hot forging of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Daouben, E.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Deltombe, R.; Dubois, A.; Truong-Dinh, N.; Lazzarotto, L.

    2007-04-07

    In the field of hot forging of steels, the mastering of wear phenomena enables to save cost production, especially concerning tools. Surfaces of tools are protected thanks to graphite. The existing lubrication processes are not very well known: amount and quality of lubricant, lubrication techniques have to be strongly optimized to delay wear phenomena occurrence. This optimization is linked with hot forging processes, the lubricant layers must be tested according to representative friction conditions. This paper presents the first part of a global study focused on wear phenomena encountered in hot forging of steels. The goal is the identification of reliable parameters, in order to bring knowledge and models of wear. A prototype testing stand developed in the authors' laboratory is involved in this experimental analysis. This test is called Warm and Hot Upsetting Sliding Test (WHUST). The stand is composed of a heating induction system and a servo-hydraulic system. Workpieces taken from production can be heated until 1200 deg. C. A nitrided contactor representing the tool is heated at 200 deg. C. The contactor is then coated with graphite and rubs against the workpiece, leaving a residual track on it. Friction coefficient and surface parameters on the contactor and the workpiece are the most representative test results. The surface parameters are mainly the sliding length before defects occurrence, and the amplitude of surface profile of the contactor. The developed methodology will be first presented followed by the different parts of the experimental prototype. The results of experiment show clearly different levels of performance according to different lubricants.

  9. Friction and wear in hot forging of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daouben, E.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Deltombe, R.; Dubois, A.; Truong-Dinh, N.; Lazzarotto, L.

    2007-04-01

    In the field of hot forging of steels, the mastering of wear phenomena enables to save cost production, especially concerning tools. Surfaces of tools are protected thanks to graphite. The existing lubrication processes are not very well known: amount and quality of lubricant, lubrication techniques have to be strongly optimized to delay wear phenomena occurrence. This optimization is linked with hot forging processes, the lubricant layers must be tested according to representative friction conditions. This paper presents the first part of a global study focused on wear phenomena encountered in hot forging of steels. The goal is the identification of reliable parameters, in order to bring knowledge and models of wear. A prototype testing stand developed in the authors' laboratory is involved in this experimental analysis. This test is called Warm and Hot Upsetting Sliding Test (WHUST). The stand is composed of a heating induction system and a servo-hydraulic system. Workpieces taken from production can be heated until 1200°C. A nitrided contactor representing the tool is heated at 200°C. The contactor is then coated with graphite and rubs against the workpiece, leaving a residual track on it. Friction coefficient and surface parameters on the contactor and the workpiece are the most representative test results. The surface parameters are mainly the sliding length before defects occurrence, and the amplitude of surface profile of the contactor. The developed methodology will be first presented followed by the different parts of the experimental prototype. The results of experiment show clearly different levels of performance according to different lubricants.

  10. Anisotropie embrittlement in high-hardness ESR 4340 steel forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, G. B.; Anctil, A. A.; Desisto, T. S.; Kula, E. B.

    1983-08-01

    ESR 4340 steel forgings tempered to a hardness of HRC 55 exhibit a severe loss of tensile ductility in the short transverse direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp-crack fracture toughness. Brittle behavior is associated with regions of smooth intergranular fracture which are aligned with microstructural banding. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis indicates some intergranular segregation of phosphorus and sulfur in these regions. The anisotropic embrittlement is attributed to an interaction of nonequilibrium segregation on solidification with local equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries during austenitizing. This produces defective regions of enhanced intergranular impurity segregation which are oriented during forging. The regions are prone to brittle fracture under impact conditions and abnormal sensitivity to environmental attack during low strain-rate deformation. A relatively sparse distribution of these defects (˜10cm-3) accounts for the discrepancy between smooth bar and blunt-notch tests vs sharp-crack tests. Isotropie properties are restored by homogenization treatment. For application of these steels at extreme hardness levels, homogenization treatment is essential.

  11. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  12. Parameter Optimization During Forging Process of a Novel High-Speed-Steel Cold Work Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Sun, Yanliang; Li, Qiang; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The forging of high-speed-steel (HSS) roll has always been a technical problem in manufacturing industry. In this study, the forging process of a novel HSS cold work roll was simulated by deform-3D on the basis of rigid-viscoplastic finite element model. The effect of heating temperature and forging speed on temperature and stress fields during forging process was simulated too. The results show that during forging process, the temperature of the contact region with anvils increases. The stress of the forging region increases and distributes un-uniformly, while that of the non-forging region is almost zero. With increasing forging time, Z load on anvil increases gradually. With increasing heating temperature or decreasing forging speed, the temperature of the whole billet increases, while the stress and Z load on anvil decrease. In order to ensure the high efficiency and safety of the forging process, the heating temperature and the forging speed are chosen as 1160 °C and 16.667 mm/s, respectively.

  13. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  14. Standard specification for forged carbon and alloy steel flanges for low-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998 and published October 1998.

  15. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  16. Anisotropic embrittlement in high-hardness ESR 4340 steel forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.; Anctil, A.A.; DeSisto, T.S.; Kula, E.B.

    1983-08-01

    ESR 4340 steel forgings tempered to a hardness of HRC 55 exhibit a severe loss of tensile ductility in the short transverse direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp-crack fracture toughness. Brittle behavior is associated with regions of smooth intergranular fracture aligned with microstructural banding Scanning Auger microprobe analysis indicates intergranular segregation of phosphorus and sulfur. The anisotropic embrittlement is attributed to an interaction of nonequilibrium segregation on solidification with local equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries during austenitizing. The regions are prone to brittle fracture under impact conditions and abnormal sensitivity to environmental attack during low strain-rate deformation. A relatively sparse distribution of these defects accounts for the discrepancy between smooth bar and blunt-notch tests vs sharp-crack tests. Isotropic properties are restored by homogenization treatment. For application of these steels at extreme hardness levels, homogenization treatment is essential.

  17. Nine percent nickel steel heavy forging weld repair study. [National Transonic Wind Tunnel fan components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Gerringer, A. H.; Brooks, T. G.; Berry, R. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of making weld repairs on heavy section 9% nickel steel forgings such as those being manufactured for the National Transonic Facility fan disk and fan drive shaft components was evaluated. Results indicate that 9% nickel steel in heavy forgings has very good weldability characteristics for the particular weld rod and weld procedures used. A comparison of data for known similar work is included.

  18. Determination of Optimal Forging Conditions for Void Elimination in Large Steel Ingots =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nathan

    The presence of internal voids is commonly observed throughout the casting and solidification of large size ingots. Their mechanical closure is generally achieved during the initial deformation of a hot forming process. The present work focuses on the determination of optimal forging conditions for void elimination in large steel ingots with respect to the involved materials and industrial processes. A state of the art is compiled as initial research in order to develop a solid background in void elimination theory. An extensive review of void closure models is presented and characterisation techniques are discussed. It is shown that current void closure models lack application to industrial scale forgings. An analysis of the industrial partner's open die forging procedure ensues and characteristic forging sequences are introduced. Feasibility for further forging analysis using experimental data is evaluated and successfully proposed. A novel method for fast calculating void closure models is developed. Rational polynomial functions are established for the calculation of material dependant constants. 3D mapping is used to evaluate the influence of the triaxiality state and material parameters. The void closure model is validated for use on high strength steels from the industrial partner. Void closure is modeled and simulated during an open die forging sequence. The effect of in-billet void positioning is studied and the forging sequence effectiveness for void closure is validated and characterized for different zones. An original combination of data from relative void closure and volumetric strain rate provides a way for forging optimisation. Novel software for successful open die slab forging, Forge Calculus, is developed based on large amounts of experimental data. The in-house code provides fundamental information for setting forging standards. Future development concerning real time prediction of forging quality is discussed.

  19. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-02-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  20. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  1. 76 FR 8773 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... steel flanges from India and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  2. The development and production of thermo-mechanically forged tool steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.

    1973-01-01

    A development program to establish the feasibility and applicability of high energy rate forging procedures to tool steel spur gears was performed. Included in the study were relatively standard forging procedures as well as a thermo-mechanical process termed ausforming. The subject gear configuration utilized was essentially a standard spur gear having 28 teeth, a pitch diameter of 3.5 inches and a diametral pitch of 8. Initially it had been planned to use a high contact ratio gear design, however, a comprehensive evaluation indicated that severe forging problems would be encountered as a result of the extremely small teeth required by this type of design. The forging studies were successful in achieving gear blanks having integrally formed teeth using both standard and thermo-mechanical forging procedures.

  3. Inclusion engineering for improved fatigue response in forged AISI 4140 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.R.; Michal, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    Small elemental additions to a steel melt can increase the flow stress of MnS inclusions, making them less deformable during hot working. This condition, called inclusion shape control, is a powerful tool for improving transverse fatigue life of 4140 steel. This research explored the effects of forging on changing the shape and distribution of MnS inclusions, and their role as fatigue initiation sites. The steels in the test matrix were chosen to examine forging effects on inclusions in steel with high and low sulfur levels. One heat had been treated for inclusion shape control. Billets, 127-mm (5-in.) in diameter and 248-mm (9.7-in) high, from bar stock of three heats of inert-gas-shielded/bottom poured (IGS) AISI 4140 steel were upset forged at 1,200 C (2,200 F) to a 50% reduction. A two-dimensional FEM program was used to model the forging process. FEM results at discrete elements were compared with the fatigue response of specimens machined from actual forgings to contain those elements in their gage sections. Both transverse and longitudinal fatigue specimens were machined, and heat treated to obtain a tempered martensite microstructure of approximately 38 HRC. The specimens were tested in tension cycling (R = 0.1) at {sigma}{sub max} = 825 to 965 MPa (120 to 140 ksi). Fatigue results were normalized to a single stress level using a modified Smith-Watson-Topper function. The normalized results were correlated with position in the forgings and calculated effective strains due to forging at those locations. Metallography and fractography were also used to examine inclusion morphologies in regions of low and high local effective strains.

  4. Study on Carbide in Forged and Annealed H13 Hot Work Die Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Liangliang; Li, Longfei

    2015-10-01

    The present work studied the carbides in forged and annealed H13 hot work die steel. The carbides were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analyzed with quantitative chemical analysis method. The carbide types, qualities and compositions in dependence on temperatures were thermodynamically calculated by Thermo-Calc software and compared with the experimental results. In the final, methods for carbide improvement were discussed. The results are as follows. The primary carbides and the carbide segregation are improved after the hot-forging operation. The carbides in the hot-forged and annealed H13 steel are M7C3, M6(C, N) and M(C, N) which is accordance with the calculated results. Trace Mg added to the H13 steel leads to an increase of primary carbide nucleation and a decrease of primary carbide size.

  5. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  6. Controlled Forging of a Nb Containing Microalloyed Steel for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaie, Davood; Hosseini Benhangi, Pooya; Fazeli, Fateh; Mazinani, Mohammad; Zohourvahid Karimi, Ebrahim; Ghandehari Ferdowsi, Mahmoud Reza

    2012-12-01

    Controlled forging of microalloyed steels is a viable economical process for the manufacture of automotive parts. Ferrite grain refinement and precipitation hardening are the major microstructural parameters to enhance the mechanical properties of the forged components. In the current study, a modified thermomechanical treatment for additional ferrite grain refinement is developed by exploiting the effect of Nb in increasing the T NR (no recrystallization temperature) and via phase transformation from a pancaked austenite. This is accomplished by performing the final passes of forging below the T NR temperature followed by a controlled cooling stage to produce a mixture of fine grained ferrite, small scaled acicular ferrite as well as a limited amount of martensite. The effect of processing parameters in terms of forging strain, cooling rate and aging condition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon, Nb containing microalloyed steel is investigated. An attempt is made to identify a suitable microstructure that provides a proper combination of high strength and good impact toughness. The processing-microstructure relationships for the proposed novel forging procedure are discussed, and directions for further improvements are outlined.

  7. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-04-14

    The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

  8. Effect of technological factors on the properties of forged austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Napara-Volgina, S.G.

    1994-11-01

    The conditions for the production of austenitic stainless steel Kh18N10, Kh18N12M2, and Kh23N18 (i.e., Cr18Ni10, Cr18N12Mo2, and Cr23Ni18) by forging porous blanks have been studied and optimized. In many cases, the properties of these steels are determined by the production technology: the duration, temperature, and heating medium used in the presintering and the duration and temperature of the heating for forging the blanks. In each specific case the choice of fabrication conditions depends on the shape and purpose of the part. Simple parts with plane-parallel ends without changes in section along the height can be produced by hot forging without presintering of the powder blanks. Complex parts require hot forging at high temperatures (1150-1200{degrees}C) of presintered blanks. If the stainless steels do not have to meet stringent ductility requirements but must possess high strength, the blanks can be heated at 950-1050{degrees}C without a protective gas atmosphere.

  9. Effects of Austenitizing and Forging on Mechanical Properties of MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbirowo, S.; Adjiantoro, B.; Romijarso, T. B.

    2017-05-01

    Laterite steels might be used for alternative armored steels. Their properties can be improved in various ways, such as by heat treatment. This paper reports the influences of tempering temperature on the hardness and microstructure of the modified MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 steels. Samples were austenitized at 1200, 1000, and 800°C and forged at 100, 75, and 50 tons. Mechanical properties consisted of Hardness measurement was conducted by Brinell indentation and metallographic observation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that increasing forging force until 100 tons can decrease hardness. The formation of the microstructure consists of tempered martensite containing ferrite and dual phase perlite. The presence of void and porous can also decrease hardness. Decreasing austenizing temperature from 1200 °C to 800°C can increase material strength and hardness.

  10. 2016 Accomplishments. Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Forging process effects on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-precharged stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Forged austenitic stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed to contain tritium at high pressure. These steels are highly resistant to tritium-assisted fracture but their resistance can depend on the details of the forging microstructure. During FY16, the effects of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-exposed-and-aged Type 304L stainless steel were studied. Forgings were produced from a single heat of steel using four types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy-rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The objective of the study was to characterize the J-Integral fracture toughness properties as a function of the industrial strain rate and temperature. The second objective was to measure the effects of tritium and decay helium on toughness. Tritium and decay helium effects were measured by thermally precharging the as-forged specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for up to five years at -80°C to build-in decay helium prior to testing. The results of this study show that the fracture toughness properties of the as-forged steels vary with forging strain rate and forging temperature. The effect is largely due to yield strength as the higher-strength forgings had the lower toughness values. For non-charged specimens, fracture toughness properties were improved by forging at 871°C versus 816°C and Screw-Press forgings tended to have lower fracture toughness values than the other forgings. Tritium exposures reduced the fracture toughness values remarkably to fracture toughness values averaging 10-20% of as-forged values. However, forging strain rate and temperature had little or no effect on the fracture toughness after tritium precharging and aging. The result was confirmed by fractography which indicated that fracture modes

  11. The effects of composition and thermal path on hot ductility of forging steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Brendan M.

    This work examines the effects of composition and thermal path on the hot ductility of several forging steels with varied aluminum and nitrogen content. The primary mechanisms and controlling factors related to hot ductility are identified with a focus on the role of precipitates and segregation. The unique thermal paths and solidification structures of large cross-section forging ingots are discussed. Hot ductility testing is performed in a manner that approximates industrial conditions experienced by large cross-section forging ingots. A computer model for precipitation of aluminum nitride and vanadium nitride in austenite is presented. Industrial material is examined for comparison to experimental findings. It is found that increased aluminum and nitrogen content coarsens the as-solidified structure. The combined effects of microsegregation and uphill diffusion during deformation allow for carbide precipitation at prior austenite grain boundaries which reduces the hot ductility.

  12. Microstructural changes in as-cast M2 grade high speed steel during hot forging

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomashchi, M.R. . Metallurgy Dept.); Sellars, C.M. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1993-10-01

    High speed steels have a complex carbide pattern in the as-cast state which has to be modified to achieve the desired properties of adequate toughness, hot hardness, and wear resistance. The High speed steels have a complex carbide pattern in the as-cast state which has to be modified to achieve the desired properties of adequate toughness, hot hardness, and wear resistance. The effects of hot forging and postdeformation annealing on carbide distribution and morphology in M2 grade high speed steel were studied, and it was shown that hot forging accelerates the spheroidization rate of M[sub 6]C carbide with little effect on coarsening. The mechanism responsible for such acceleration is dominated by mechanical disintegration of M[sub 6]C carbide plates, while diffusion-controlled spheroidization was not significant. For MC carbide particles, coarsening was the dominant mechanism, but it was not possible to ascertain whether diffusion had been unaffected by deformation or even increased by a factor that could be as high as 10,000 times. Annealing after deformation accelerated spheroidization which was attributed to the damaging of carbide plates during forging rather than an increase in diffusion rate, since the matrix was almost substructure-free in the annealed condition, i.e., lack of short-circuiting paths for diffusion.

  13. Effects of Different Forging Processes on Microstructure Evolution for 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Dashan; Zhu, Lingling; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Peipei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2017-10-01

    Forging experiments were designed and carried out on a 3150 kN hydraulic press to investigate the effects of different processes on the microstructure evolution for 316LN steel. The forging processes included single-pass (upsetting) and multipass (stretching) deformations, and the experimental results indicated that the average grain size varied with forging processes. Moreover, the size had distinct differences at different positions in the workpiece. Meanwhile, numerical simulations were implemented to study the influence of temperature, strain, and strain rate on microstructure evolution. The results of experiments and simulations comprehensively demonstrated that dynamic, static, and meta-dynamic recrystallization could coexist in the hot forging process and that the recrystallization process could easily occur under the conditions of higher temperature, larger strain, and higher strain rate. Moreover, the temperature had more significant influence on both recrystallization and grain growth. A higher temperature could not only promote the recrystallization but also speed up the grain growth. Therefore, a lower temperature is beneficial to obtain refinement grains on the premise that the recrystallization can occur completely.

  14. Effects of Different Forging Processes on Microstructure Evolution for 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Dashan; Zhu, Lingling; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Peipei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2017-07-01

    Forging experiments were designed and carried out on a 3150 kN hydraulic press to investigate the effects of different processes on the microstructure evolution for 316LN steel. The forging processes included single-pass (upsetting) and multipass (stretching) deformations, and the experimental results indicated that the average grain size varied with forging processes. Moreover, the size had distinct differences at different positions in the workpiece. Meanwhile, numerical simulations were implemented to study the influence of temperature, strain, and strain rate on microstructure evolution. The results of experiments and simulations comprehensively demonstrated that dynamic, static, and meta-dynamic recrystallization could coexist in the hot forging process and that the recrystallization process could easily occur under the conditions of higher temperature, larger strain, and higher strain rate. Moreover, the temperature had more significant influence on both recrystallization and grain growth. A higher temperature could not only promote the recrystallization but also speed up the grain growth. Therefore, a lower temperature is beneficial to obtain refinement grains on the premise that the recrystallization can occur completely.

  15. Tribo-thermal fatigue of the steel used for the forging die construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumeanu, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Frequently the durability of the forging dies is firstly determined by the non-isothermal fatigue wear, which causes the cracks appearance on their internal surfaces, much more before their abrasion wear to reach the limit value. In these conditions it is necessary to design the forging dies firstly by the point of view of the non-isothermal fatigue wear. For a correctly choosing and using of metallic material, it is necessary to determine their intrinsic characteristics regarding its cyclic non-isothermal stresses durability. The experimental determination of these characteristics implies a lot of experiments, which are done in specific conditions, different from those used for isothermal mechanical fatigue durability determination. The paper presents the experimental results concerning intrinsic characteristic determination of the forging dies steel. Based on these results there were determined specific equations which characterize this kind of stresses, and the diagrams that represent their graphic image. These data can be used both in designing and exploitation of the forging dies.

  16. Simulation of Deformation Texture Evolution During Multi Axial Forging of Interstitial Free Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurao, N. P.; Kumar, P.; Sarkar, A.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Suwas, Satyam

    2013-04-01

    Bulk texture measurement of multi-axial forged body center cubic interstitial free steel performed in this study using x-ray and neutron diffraction indicated the presence of a strong {101}<111> single texture component. Viscoplastic self-consistent simulations could successfully predict the formation of this texture component by incorporating the complicated strain path followed during this process and assuming the activity of {101}<111> slip system. In addition, a first-order estimate of mechanical properties in terms of highly anisotropic yield locus and Lankford parameter was also obtained from the simulations.

  17. Effect of Aluminum Content on Wear Resistance of Hot-Forged Multiphase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Masoud Ibrahim; Farahat, Ahmed Ismail Zaky; Al-Jarrah, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    A medium-carbon steel was alloyed with Mn, Cr, Si, and Al to obtain carbide-free bainite steel. The thermomechanics and chemistry of steel were used to produce medium carbon containing four phases: ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and chromium carbide. The morphologies of different phases were characterized and analyzed by using optical and scanning electron microscopes. An abrasive dry sliding wear (pin on ring) of two types of medium-carbon, hot-forged steels containing different aluminum contents was investigated at different pressures and sliding velocities. The sliding duration time was 30 minutes under dry sliding conditions. The wear rate of Alloy 1 and 2 revealed negligible wear rates at low velocity and pressure. On the other hand, the wear rate highly increased to maximum at maximum velocity and pressure for Alloy 1 and 2. Alloy steel 2 of 2 pct Al revealed a maximum wear rate of 720 mg/min compared with 160.8 mg/min for Alloy 1 contains 1 pct Al. Experimental results showed that increased aluminum content is directly proportional to the ferrite volume fraction, which greatly influences the wear resistance performance and mechanical properties of the two types of steel.

  18. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behavior of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, A. J.; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2017-02-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix. Here, we perform analyses based on the Rice-Tracey (RT) void growth model, supported by instrumented Charpy and J-integral fracture toughness testing at ambient temperature, to characterize the degree of void growth ahead of both a V-notch and crack in 304L stainless steel. We show that the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 304L steel exhibits a lower critical void growth at the onset of fracture than that observed in forged 304L steel, which ultimately results in HIP'd steel exhibiting lower fracture toughness at initiation and impact toughness. Although the reduction in toughness of HIP'd steel is not detrimental to its use, due to the steel's sufficiently high toughness, the study does indicate that HIP'd and forged 304L steel behave as subtly different materials at a microstructural level with respect to their fracture behavior.

  19. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behavior of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, A. J.; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2017-05-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix. Here, we perform analyses based on the Rice-Tracey (RT) void growth model, supported by instrumented Charpy and J-integral fracture toughness testing at ambient temperature, to characterize the degree of void growth ahead of both a V-notch and crack in 304L stainless steel. We show that the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 304L steel exhibits a lower critical void growth at the onset of fracture than that observed in forged 304L steel, which ultimately results in HIP'd steel exhibiting lower fracture toughness at initiation and impact toughness. Although the reduction in toughness of HIP'd steel is not detrimental to its use, due to the steel's sufficiently high toughness, the study does indicate that HIP'd and forged 304L steel behave as subtly different materials at a microstructural level with respect to their fracture behavior.

  20. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon Low Alloy Forged Steels by Polymer Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandan, B. R.; Pramod, V.; Ramesha, C. M.; Sharanraj, V.

    2017-08-01

    Medium carbon low alloy forged steels were investigated (EN18, EN19, EN 24, and EN25) with respect to their mechanical properties by polymer quenching. The effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) H‑(O‑CH2‑CH2)n‑OH as a quenchant was studied by varying polymer concentration (10% and 30%) to investigate the mechanical properties and their metallographic structures. The study was carried out on the medium carbon low alloy forged steels in heat treated condition by hardening in the polymer quenchant. The quenched samples were step tempered at 5750C and at 2200C sequentially for 60 min each. Hardness, tensile strength, Charpy impact strength and metallographic were carried out on the untreated and heat treated specimens. The step tempering process of the specimen gives the high strength with high hardenability. The specimen quenched in the polymer solution exhibited the best mechanical properties, viz., as received samples. The mechanical properties are found increased in the polymer quenchant because of the slow and uniform cooling rate of the polymer. The microstructural examination of the specimens were found to have justified reason for the increment recorded in some of the mechanical properties, as it displayed a high proportion of the martensitic phase.

  1. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  2. Effect of Hot Forging on Microstructural Evolution and Impact Toughness in Ultra-high Carbon Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kang, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a hot forging ratio on the microstructural variation and tensile properties of ultra-high carbon low alloy steel was investigated. Scanning electron microscopic analyses depict that with an increase in the hot forging ratio, the thickness of the network and acicular proeutectoid cementite decreased. Moreover, the lamella spacing and thickness of the eutectoid cementite decreased and broke up into particle shapes, which then became spheroidized as the hot forging ratio increased. Furthermore, when the forging ratio exceeded 65%, the network and acicular shape of the as-cast state disappeared. By increasing the hot forging ratio, the tensile strength and elongation remained below 50%, but they increased rapidly with an increase in the forging ratio. Strength and elongation were not affected by the thickness of the proeutectoid and eutectoid cementites, but were greatly affected by the shape of the proeutectoid cementite. Due to the decrease in the austenite grain size, as well as the spheroidization of the cementite, the tensile strength and elongation sharply increased.

  3. Improvement of fracture toughness of forging steels microalloyed with titanium by accelerated cooling after hot working

    SciTech Connect

    Linaza, M.A.; Romero, J.L.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.; Urcola, J.J. )

    1993-11-01

    Ti addition is becoming common practice in the fabrication of many grades of engineering steels. In general it is used with the aim of refining the microstructure through the inhibiting effect to grain coarsening exerted by small TiN precipitates. Although a number of recommendations are made for obtaining the maximum yield of fine TiN precipitates, nonetheless a certain proportion of the precipitate volume fraction is usually in the form of coarse TiN precipitates. Several authors suggest that such coarse TiN particles are simply ineffective in pinning the grain boundaries without impairing other properties. In a recent paper it was shown that these coarse TiN particles act as cleavage nucleation sites, impairing the fracture toughness of steel with coarse ferrite-pearlite microstructures. The present work reports further fracture toughness results and fracture mechanisms for Ti treated microalloyed forging steels. They show that after hot working and accelerated cooling transforming the austenite mainly in an acicular microstructure, ductile rupture results without any cleavage nucleated in the coarse TiN particles, as occurred when the same material had a coarse ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

  4. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  5. An Electron Microprobe Determination of Microscopic Elemental Homogeneity of Hot-Cross-Rolled and High-Energy-Rate Forged 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1981-02-17

    Electron microprobe analysis shows that iron, manganese, and nickel are inhomogeneously distributed in hot-cross-rolled plate and high-energy-rate forgings of 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn steel but that chromium is homogeneously distributed. Increases in iron content correlate with decreases in manganese and nickel. Rolling and forging flow lines occur in regions with high iron and low manganese and nickel. High-energy-rate forging increases inhomogeneity. Inhomogeneities are suspected to exist in the original ingot, where they are given directionality by rolling and are enhanced by high-energy-rate forging. This report discusses this study.

  6. Tensile behavior of an austenitic stainless steel subjected to multidirectional forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonova, M.; Sorokopudova, J.; Bondareva, E.; Belyakov, A.; Kaibyshev, R.

    2014-08-01

    The mechanical behavior of a chromium-nickel austenitic stainless steel with submicrocrystalline structures produced by multidirectional forging (MDF) to a total strain of ~ 4 at temperatures of 700 and 600°C was studied. This processing resulted in the formation of uniform ultrafine grained structure with an average crystallite size of 360 and 300 nm, respectively, and high dislocation density. The tensile tests were carried out in a wide temperature range 20-650°C. At ambient temperature, the yield stress (YS) comprised 900 MPa and 730 MPa in the samples subjected to MDF at 600 and 700°C, respectively. It should be noted that this strength was achieved along with elongations of 16% and 22% in the samples subjected to MDF at 600 and 700°C. The YS decreased and elongation-to-failure tends to increase with increasing test temperature and approaching 235 MPa and 51%, respectively, at 650°C. Effect of temperature on mechanical behavior of stainless steel with submicrocrystalline structure is discussed.

  7. Effect of chromium and manganese nitride alloying on the evolution of the fine structure in powder hot-forged steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonova, A. A.; Baglyuk, G. A.; Kurovskii, V. Ya.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of alloying with chromium and manganese nitrides is studied on a fine crystal structure of powder iron produced by hot forging. The features of the fine structure and the phase composition are found to strongly depend on the kind of alloying nitrides. It has been shown that the introduction of both nitrides in the initial composition of powder mixture causes an increase in the lattice parameter of a matrix, its defectiveness, and the dislocation density, which results in an increase in the hardness of steel alloyed with nitrides. The defectiveness of the matrix crystal lattice, the dislocation density, and the hardness of hot-forged steels are slightly higher when manganese nitride is used as a nitrogen-bearing additive.

  8. Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1989-05-19

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  10. The Influence of Temperature on the Frictional Behavior of Duplex-Coated Die Steel Rubbing Against Forging Brass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimzadeh, I.; Ashrafizadeh, F.

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of die life under hot forging of brass alloys is considered vital from both economical and technical points of view. One of the best methods for improving die life is duplex coatings. In this research, the influence of temperature on the tribological behavior of duplex-coated die steel rubbing against forging brass was investigated. The wear tests were performed on a pin-on-disk machine from room temperature to 700 °C; the pins were made in H13 hot work tool steel treated by plasma nitriding and by PVD coatings of TiN-TiAlN-CrAlN. The disks were machined from a two-phase brass alloy too. The results revealed that the friction coefficient of this tribosystem went through a maximum at 550 °C and decreased largely at 700 °C. Furthermore, the formation of Cr2O3 caused the reduction of friction coefficient at 700 °C. PVD coatings proved their wear resistance up to 550 °C, well above the working temperature of the brass forging dies.

  11. The Influence of Forge Reduction Ratio on the Tensile and Impact Properties of a Low-Alloy ESR (Electroslag Remelting) Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    phenomenon occurs. The ESR steel investigated was a low sulphur (0.002%) - . AISI 4340 grade in the heat treated condition. Attention is also directed toward...MRL-R-985 THE INFLUENCE OF FORGE REDUCTION RATIO ON THE TENSILE AND IMPACT PROPERTIES OF A LOW-ALLOY ESR STEEL G.M. Weston LEC I . ;T E; ’ :cX NMI 5- i...RESEARCH LABORATORIES REPORT MRL-R-98 5 THE INFLUENCE OF FORGE REDUCTION RATIO ON THE TENSILE AND IMPACT PROPERTIES OF A LOW-ALLOY ESR STEEL G.M. Weston

  12. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground SISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  13. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot-forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1987-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground AISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  14. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot-forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1987-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground AISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  15. Microstructure and Texture Evolution in Cold Rotary Forging of Spur Bevel Gears of 20CrMnTi Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinghui; Dong, Liying; Hua, Lin; Zhuang, Wuhao

    2016-03-01

    The microstructure of cold rotary forged gears greatly affects their working life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to reveal the evolution of microstructure and texture that occurs during the cold rotary forging of spur bevel gears of 20CrMnTi alloy steel. The evolution of grains of the gear tooth is investigated through optical microscopy. By employing scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, the evolution of the cementite particles and the texture of the gear tooth is also revealed. The results indicate that the grain size distribution is non-uniform from the tooth profile to its center. The cementite particles in the tooth profile are finer and more uniformly distributed than those in the tooth center. After cold rotary forging, the tooth center has a combination of α- and γ-fibers, and the γ-fibers are more developed than the α-fibers, while most of the components in the tooth profile are assembled along the α-fibers.

  16. Efficient process design for closure and healing of voids in open die forging of superhigh C-steel shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seong-Hoon; Lim, Hyung-Cheol; Lee, Howon; Lee, Young-Seon

    2013-05-01

    In this study, simulation and experimental works are carried out to propose the efficient forging process design for manufacturing workroll made of 1.5wt%C high carbon steel. New forging process design is composed of incremental upsetting, diffusion boding and cogging process for efficient void closure and healing. Since the voids lie along the longitudinal direction of the ingot, the ingot is gradually deformed only in its radial direction during incremental upsetting until void closure takes place. After that, the closed voids are healed by diffusion bonding process in order to assign the strong bonding strength to the closed void and to prevent the re-opening of the closed voids during successive incremental upsetting and cogging process. Experimental works are also carried out to validate the proposed forging process design. In addition, the effect of temperature of diffusion bonding on bonding strength of the closed void is investigated. Finally, the analyses on microstructure at the diffusion-bonded interface and mechanical properties by tensile test are carried out as well. It was found out through simulation and experimental works that the quick void closure takes place by incremental upsetting and the closed void is strongly joined by diffusion bonding. It was confirmed that the process design proposed in this study can be applicable to manufacture the super high carbon workroll with microstructurally soundness.

  17. Influence of local mechanical properties of high strength steel from large size forged ingot on ultrasonic wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont-Marillia, Frederic; Jahazi, Mohamad; Lafreniere, Serge; Belanger, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In the metallurgical industry, ultrasonic inspection is routinely used for the detection of defects. For the non-destructive inspection of small high strength steel parts, the material can be considered isotropic. However, when the size of the parts under inspection is large, the isotropic material hypothesis does not necessarily hold. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation in mechanical properties such as grain size, Young's modulus, Poissons ratio, chemical composition on longitudinal and transversal ultrasonic wave velocities. A 2 cm thick slice cut from a 40-ton bainitic steel ingot that was forged and heat treated was divided into 875 parallelepiped samples of 2x4x7 cm3. A metallurgical study has been performed to identify the phase and measure the grain size. Ultrasonic velocity measurements at 2.25 MHz for longitudinal and transversal waves were performed. The original location of the parallelepiped samples in the large forged ingot, and the measured velocities were used to produce an ultrasonic velocity map. Using a local isotropy assumption as well as the local density of the parallelepiped samples calculated from the chemical composition of the ingot provided by a previously published study, Youngs modulus and Poissons ratio were calculated from the longitudinal and transversal wave velocities. Micro-tensile test was used to validate Youngs modulus obtained by the ultrasonic wave velocity and an excellent agreement was observed.

  18. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  19. Effect of Austenitizing Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Semi-High-Speed Steel Cold-Forged Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Da-Le; Liu, Chang-Sheng

    2009-10-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of semi-high-speed steel (S-HSS) cold-forged rolls was investigated. Low-temperature austenitizing below 1313 K induced carbide coarsening during subsequent tempering at 973 K due to the nucleation effect of undissolved M7C3. On the other hand, the heavy dissolution of M7C3 above 1353 K caused the fine carbide formation on lath and plate boundaries, which retarded the subgrain growth during tempering. The increase in strength with increasing austenitizing temperature was attributed to the fine carbide distribution and the high dislocation density. Furthermore, as the austenitizing temperature increased, the impact energy markedly reduced, due to the large prior austenite grain size and the high strength. Finally, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties, an optimal austenitizing temperature range between 1313 and 1333 K was determined.

  20. Influence of minimum quantity lubrication parameters on tool wear and surface roughness in milling of forged steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lutao; Yuan, Songmei; Liu, Qiang

    2012-05-01

    The minimum quantity of lubrication (MQL) technique is becoming increasingly more popular due to the safety of environment. Moreover, MQL technique not only leads to economical benefits by way of saving lubricant costs but also presents better machinability. However, the effect of MQL parameters on machining is still not clear, which needs to be overcome. In this paper, the effect of different modes of lubrication, i.e., conventional way using flushing, dry cutting and using the minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) technique on the machinability in end milling of a forged steel (50CrMnMo), is investigated. The influence of MQL parameters on tool wear and surface roughness is also discussed. MQL parameters include nozzle direction in relation to feed direction, nozzle elevation angle, distance from the nozzle tip to the cutting zone, lubricant flow rate and air pressure. The investigation results show that MQL technique lowers the tool wear and surface roughness values compared with that of conventional flood cutting fluid supply and dry cutting conditions. Based on the investigations of chip morphology and color, MQL technique reduces the cutting temperature to some extent. The relative nozzle-feed position at 120°, the angle elevation of 60° and distance from nozzle tip to cutting zone at 20 mm provide the prolonged tool life and reduced surface roughness values. This fact is due to the oil mists can penetrate in the inner zones of the tool edges in a very efficient way. Improvement in tool life and surface finish could be achieved utilizing higher oil flow rate and higher compressed air pressure. Moreover, oil flow rate increased from 43.8 mL/h to 58.4 mL/h leads to a small decrease of flank wear, but it is not very significant. The results obtained in this paper can be used to determine optimal conditions for milling of forged steel under MQL conditions.

  1. Analog Studies of Thermomechanical Fatigue and Abrasive Wear of Cast and Forged Steels for "Autoforge" Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, M. S.; Mironova, Yu. S.; Mukhametzyanova, G. F.; Novikova, I. E.; Novikov, V. Yu.

    2014-07-01

    Processes of thermomechanical fatigue and abrasive wear of suspension-cast precipitation-hardening ferrite-carbide steel 30T6NTiC-1.5 and standard steel 4Kh5MFS are studied. The dominant kinds of fracture typical for dies for semisolid stamping are determined. The factors and parameters of cyclic temperature and force loading are shown to produce a selective action on the competing kinds of damage of the die steels. A comparative analysis of the properties of the steels is performed. Steel 30T6NTiC-1.5 is shown to have substantial advantages over steel 4Kh5FMS traditionally used for making "Autoforge" dies.

  2. Influence of Temperature and Holding Time on the Interaction of V, Al, and N in Microalloyed Forging Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.; Cryderman, Robert; Van Tyne, Chester J.

    2014-09-01

    A medium-carbon vanadium microalloyed steel (38MnSiVS5) with three different aluminum levels (0.006, 0.020, and 0.03 wt pct) was used to examine the interaction of vanadium, aluminum, and nitrogen during the heating and cooling cycle for forging. The thermal cycle was simulated using a Gleeble® 1500. Hold times varied from 5 to 45 minutes and temperature varied from 1323 K to 1523 K (1050 °C to 1250 °C). Thermal simulation specimens and as-received material were characterized by quantitative metallography, hardness, and chemical analysis of electrolytically extracted precipitates. The hardness was observed to be relatively constant for all aluminum levels after all thermal simulations at and above 1423 K (1150 °C). Hardness, pearlite fraction, and austenite grain size decreased with increasing aluminum content at the two lowest temperatures examined, which were 1323 K and 1373 K (1050 °C and 1100 °C). The amount of vanadium precipitated in the lowest aluminum steel was very consistent, approximately 70 pct, for the thermal simulations. The amount of precipitated vanadium decreased with increasing amount of aluminum nitride for the 0.03 wt pct Al level.

  3. A Microstructural Study on the Observed Differences in Charpy Impact Behavior Between Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Adam J.; Cooper, Norman I.; Bell, Andrew; Dhers, Jean; Sherry, Andrew H.

    2015-11-01

    With near-net shape technology becoming a more desirable route toward component manufacture due to its ability to reduce machining time and associated costs, it is important to demonstrate that components fabricated via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) are able to perform to similar standards as those set by equivalent forged materials. This paper describes the results of a series of Charpy tests from HIP'd and forged 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steel, and assesses the differences in toughness values observed. The pre-test and post-test microstructures were examined to develop an understanding of the underlying reasons for the differences observed. The as-received microstructure of HIP'd material was found to contain micro-pores, which was not observed in the forged material. In tested specimens, martensite was detectable within close proximity to the fracture surface of Charpy specimens tested at 77 K (-196 °C), and not detected in locations remote from the fracture surface, nor was martensite observed in specimens tested at ambient temperatures. The results suggest that the observed changes in the Charpy toughness are most likely to arise due to differences in as-received microstructures of HIP'd vs forged stainless steel.

  4. Σ3 CSL boundary distributions in an austenitic stainless steel subjected to multidirectional forging followed by annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonova, Marina; Kuzminova, Yuliya; Fang, Xiaoying; Wang, Weiguo; Kaibyshev, Rustam; Belyakov, Andrey

    2014-12-01

    The effect of processing and annealing temperatures on the grain boundary characters in the ultrafine-grained structure of a 304-type austenitic stainless steel was studied. An S304H steel was subjected to multidirectional forging (MDF) at 500-800°C to total strains of ~4, followed by annealing at 800-1,000°C for 30 min. The MDF resulted in the formation of ultrafine-grained microstructures with mean grain sizes of 0.28-0.85 μm depending on the processing temperature. The annealing behaviour of the ultrafine-grained steel was characterized by the development of continuous post-dynamic recrystallization including a rapid recovery followed by a gradual grain growth. The post-dynamically recrystallized grain size depended on both the deformation temperature and the annealing temperature. The recrystallization kinetics was reduced with an increase in the temperature of the preceding deformation. The grain growth during post-dynamic recrystallization was accompanied by an increase in the fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries, which was defined by a relative change in the grain size, i.e. a ratio of the annealed grain size to that evolved by preceding warm working (D/D0). The fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries sharply rose to approximately 0.5 in the range of D/D0 from 1 to 5, which can be considered as early stage of continuous post-dynamic recrystallization. Then, the rate of increase in the fraction of Σ3n CSL boundaries slowed down significantly in the range of D/D0 > 5. A fivefold increase in the grain size by annealing is a necessary condition to obtain approximately 50% Σ3n CSL boundaries in the recrystallized microstructure.

  5. Contributions of Vanadium to Properties of Heat Treated Medium Carbon Forging Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothleutner, L. M.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Glodowski, R. J.; Speer, J. G.; Matlock, D. K.

    Potential benefits of vanadium in heat treated medium carbon bar steels are considered by reviewing examples from several recent studies. Emphasis is placed on microstructural development, strength, and fatigue performance after conventional and induction heat treating. Potential areas for future research are identified.

  6. Assessment of densification and mechanical property of AISI 8630 steel composition on different heat treatments produced through hot upsetting powder preform forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Y. G.; Sankaranarayanan, S. Raman; Pandey, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the densification, mechanical properties, microstructural and fractrography effects of AISI 8630 steel composition developed through powder preform forging under different heat treated conditions. Sintered preforms of different aspect ratios such as 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 were hot upset forged to disc shape to different height strain to analysis the densification mechanism. Certain relationships relating strains, Poisson's ratio relating densification have revealed the effect of preform geometry on densification kinetics and resulted in the polynomial expression with justified regression coefficient greater the 0.9 or unity. The preforms of aspect ratio of 1.1 were hot upset forged to square cross section bars and transferred to different quenching medium like oil, water, furnace and air to assess its mechanical properties. Comparing the temperament of the heat treatments, sintered forged homogenised water quenched sample upshot in the maximum Tensile strength with least per centage elongation andthe furnace cooled sample shows the maximum toughness with desirable per centage elongation and least tensile strength. Microstructure stated the presence of varying ferrite and pearlite distribution and fractograph studies has disclosed the mixed mode of failure on the effect of varying heat treatments progression has affected the properties significantly.

  7. Energy audit of three energy-conserving devices in a steel-industry demonstration program. Task I. Hague forge furnaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lownie, H.W.; Holden, F.C.

    1982-06-01

    A program to demonstrate to industry the benefits of installing particular types of energy-conserving devices and equipment was carried out. One of these types of equipment and the results obtained under production conditions in commercial plants are described. The equipment under consideration includes improved forge furnaces and associated heat-recovery components. They are used to heat steel to about 2300 F prior to hot forging. The energy-conserving devices include improved insulation, automatic air-fuel ratio control, and a ceramic recuperator that recovers heat from hot combustion gases and delivers preheated air to high-temperature recirculating burners. Twelve Hague furnaces and retrofit packages were purchased and installed by eleven host forge shops that agree to furnish performance data for the purpose of demonstrating the energy and economic savings that can be achieved in comparison with existing equipment. Fuel savings were reported by comparing the specific energy consumption (Btu's per pound of steel heated) for each Hague furnace with that of a comparison furnace. Economic comparisons were made using payback period based on annual after-tax cash flow. Payback periods for the Hague equipment varied from less than two years to five years or more. In several cases, payback times were high only because the units were operated at a small fraction of their available capacity.

  8. Developments in forging ingot production at BethForge Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, J.E.; Focht, R.B.; Reppert, K.F.; Tihansky, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    BethForge manufactures precision custom forgings for diverse applications including turbine and generator rotors, components for nuclear reactors and other pressure vessels, and rolls for steel and aluminum rolling mills. This paper will discuss the production of forging ingots for BethForge at the modernized steel making facility in Steelton, PA. The facility is operated as part of a joint effort with Pennsylvania Steel Technologies, Inc. (also a wholly owned subsidiary of Bethlehem Steel) and consists of a 150 ton (136 metric ton) DC electric arc furnace, a ladle refining station including a ladle furnace and ladle degasser, and teeming facilities which include bottom pouring and vacuum stream degassing. Steel is produced for BethForge ingots as well as continuously cast for the Pennsylvania Steel Technologies product lines. Forging, heat treating and machining operations remain at Bethlehem, PA and ingots as large as 130 inches diameter (3,300 mm) and 290 tons (263 metric tons) are hot transported the 90 mile (145 km) distance from Steelton to Bethlehem in specially constructed insulated railcars. In addition to describing the facilities and operations, the presentation will focus on solutions to several of the unique engineering and technical challenges realized in successfully bringing this operation on line.

  9. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-12-31

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  10. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  11. Microstructure and yield strength effects on hydrogen and tritium induced cracking in HERF (high-energy-rate-forged) stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M J; Tosten, M H

    1989-01-01

    Rising-load J-integral measurements and falling-load threshold stress intensity measurements were used to characterize hydrogen and tritium induced cracking in high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 21-6-9 stainless steel. Samples having yield strengths in the range 517--930 MPa were thermally charged with either hydrogen or tritium and tested at room temperature in either air or high-pressure hydrogen gas. In general, the hydrogen isotopes reduced the fracture toughness by affecting the fracture process. Static recrystallization in the HERF microstructures affected the material's fracture toughness and its relative susceptibility to hydrogen and tritium induced fracture. In hydrogen-exposed samples, the reduction in fracture toughness was primarily dependent on the susceptibility of the microstructure to intergranular fracture and only secondarily affected by strength in the range of 660 to 930 MPa. Transmission-electron microscopy observations revealed that the microstructures least susceptible to hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking contained patches of fully recrystallized grains. These grains are surrounded by highly deformed regions containing a high number density of dislocations. The microstructure can best be characterized as duplex'', with soft recrystallized grains embedded in a hard, deformed matrix. The microstructures most susceptible to hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture showed no well-developed recrystallized grains. The patches of recrystallized grains seemed to act as crack barriers to hydrogen-induced intergranular fracture. In tritium-exposed-and-aged samples, the amount of static recrystallization also affected the fracture toughness properties but to a lesser degree. 7 refs., 25 figs.

  12. Prediction and control of segregations in CrMoV steel ingot for monoblock HLP rotor forgings using experimental results obtained from 8 ton sand mold ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Akihiro; Yamada, Hitohisa; Takenouchi, Tomoo

    1997-12-31

    Remarkable segregation was observed in the modified super clean CrMoV steel forgings for electric power generation applications. Therefore, to make the mechanism clear, effect of such elements as Mn, Ni, Cr and Mo on segregation was studied, using 8 ton sand mold ingots, the solidification time of which corresponds to that of 100 ton ingot. As a result, the authors found that factors controlling the segregation are {delta}-solidification ratio, mean partition coefficient, density difference of molten steels between bulk and segregated liquid at the solidification front and so on. These factors can be calculated from chemical composition of steels. Then, based on prediction model obtained from the experimental results, chemical composition and shape of ingot were tried to be changed. As for chemical composition, such elements as Mo which is heavy and {delta}-former were kept low in the specification range. And, as for ingot shape, height to diameter ratio H/D was kept high to shorten the solidification time. The carbon segregation along the axis of ingot was kept relatively low by this ingot design. The eutectic Nb (C,N) inclusions which give bad effect on the toughness were also investigated. The conditions for the formation of such inclusions were made clear and then predicted and controlled by the calculation from chemical composition. By this technical development, quality of ingot for HLP rotor forgings was extremely improved.

  13. Weldability Characteristics of Sintered Hot-Forged AISI 4135 Steel Produced through P/M Route by Using Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Joby; Muthukumaran, S.; Pandey, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Present investigation is an attempt to study the weldability characteristics of sintered hot-forged plates of AISI 4135 steel produced through powder metallurgy (P/M) route using matching filler materials of ER80S B2. Compacts of homogeneously blended elemental powders corresponding to the above steel were prepared on a universal testing machine (UTM) by taking pre-weighed powder blend with a suitable die, punch and bottom insert assembly. Indigenously developed ceramic coating was applied on the entire surface of the compacts in order to protect them from oxidation during sintering. Sintered preforms were hot forged to flat, approximately rectangular plates, welded by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) processes with aforementioned filler materials. Microstructural, tensile and hardness evaluations revealed that PCGTAW process with low heat input could produce weldments of good quality with almost nil defects. It was established that PCGTAW joints possess improved tensile properties compared to the base metal and it was mainly attributed to lower heat input, resulting in finer fusion zone grains and higher fusion zone hardness. Thus, the present investigation opens a new and demanding field in research.

  14. Forging Advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry Barnett

    2003-03-01

    Many mechanical designs demand components produced to a near net shape condition to minimize subsequent process steps. Rough machining from slab or bar stock can quickly and economically produce simple prismatic or cylindrical shapes. More complex shapes can be produced by laser engineered net shaping (LENS), casting , or forging. But for components that require great strength in mission critical applications, forging may be the best or even the only option. However, designers of these parts may and often do lack the detailed forging process knowledge necessary to understand the impact of process details such as grain flow or parting line placement on both the forging process and the characteristics of the forged part. Economics and scheduling requirements must also be considered. Sometimes the only viable answer to a difficult problem is to re-design the assembly to reduce loading and enable use of other alternatives.

  15. Surface decarburization behavior and its adverse effects of air-cooled forging steel C70S6 for fracture splitting connecting rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-lei; Xie, li-yao; Liu, Guang-lei; Chen, lie; Liu, Ya-zheng; Li, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Surface decarburization behavior and its adverse effects of air-cooled forging steel C70S6 for automobile engine fracture splitting connecting rod were investigated comprehensively by mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology analysis. The results show that the surface decarburization in the outer surface of the fracture splitting at the big end bore and the micro-cracks in the decarburized layer are result in the uneven and spalling fracture surfaces of the waster connecting rod product. Besides, partial decarburization is produced between 900 °C and 1250 °C for heating 2 h, and decarburization sensitivity reach maximum at 1150 °C, but no complete decarburization forms for heating 2 h at 650-1250 °C. The decarburized depth follows a parabolic law with the increase of the heating time from 0.5 h to 12 h, and the decarburization sensitivity coefficient is 2.05×10-5 m·s-1/2 at 1200 °C. For the connecting rod manufacturing, surface decarburization must be under effective control during the hot forging process but not the control cooling process.

  16. New Trends in Forging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Hagen, T.; Knigge, J.; Elgaly, I.; Hadifi, T.; Bouguecha, A.

    2011-05-01

    Limited natural resources increase the demand on highly efficient machinery and transportation means. New energy-saving mobility concepts call for design optimisation through downsizing of components and choice of corrosion resistant materials possessing high strength to density ratios. Component downsizing can be performed either by constructive structural optimisation or by substituting heavy materials with lighter high-strength ones. In this context, forging plays an important role in manufacturing load-optimised structural components. At the Institute of Metal Forming and Metal-Forming Machines (IFUM) various innovative forging technologies have been developed. With regard to structural optimisation, different strategies for localised reinforcement of components were investigated. Locally induced strain hardening by means of cold forging under a superimposed hydrostatic pressure could be realised. In addition, controlled martensitic zones could be created through forming induced phase conversion in metastable austenitic steels. Other research focused on the replacement of heavy steel parts with high-strength nonferrous alloys or hybrid material compounds. Several forging processes of magnesium, aluminium and titanium alloys for different aeronautical and automotive applications were developed. The whole process chain from material characterisation via simulation-based process design to the production of the parts has been considered. The feasibility of forging complex shaped geometries using these alloys was confirmed. In spite of the difficulties encountered due to machine noise and high temperature, acoustic emission (AE) technique has been successfully applied for online monitoring of forging defects. New AE analysis algorithm has been developed, so that different signal patterns due to various events such as product/die cracking or die wear could be detected and classified. Further, the feasibility of the mentioned forging technologies was proven by means

  17. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  18. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  19. Impact of Temperature on Cooling Structural Variation of Forging Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesova, Marianna; Czan, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    The article is focused on the issue of die forging in the automotive industry. The cooling effect of temperature on the structure of forged die are under review. In the article, there is elaborated the analysis of theoretical knowledge in the field, focusing on die forging and experimentally proven effect of the cooling rate on the final structure of forged dies made of hypoeutectic carbon steel C56E2.

  20. Influence of Solution Treatment Duration on Microstructural Features of an Industrial Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Vasile Dănuţ; Răducanu, Doina; Angelescu, Mariana Lucia; Vintilă, Adrian Nicolae; Şerban, Nicolae; Dan, Ioan; Cojocaru, Elisabeta Mirela; Cinca, Ion

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural changes induced by solution treatment of an industrial forged F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel alloy were studied, in order to emphasize how component phases are influenced by heat treatment temperature and duration. The solution treatment was done at a temperature of 1100°C, with variable holding times: 0.6 ks (10 min), 3.6 ks (60 min) and 10.8 ks (180 min). Scanning electron microscopy-electron backscattered diffraction was used as main characterization technique, to obtain and analyse data referring to microstructural features, such as: nature and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation. It was shown that in all studied cases the microstructure consisted of a mixture of about 45% δ-Fe (ferrite) and 55% γ-Fe (austenite). Besides δ-Fe and γ-Fe phases, other phases were also identified, such as τ-phase (chromium-iron carbide), σ-phase (chromium-iron) and δ-(Cr-Fe) (ferrite).

  1. Steel, bars, forgings, and tubing 0.80Cr 1.8Ni 0.25Mo (0.38-0.43C) special aircraft quality cleanliness, normalized and tempered. (SAE standard)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock. These products have been used typically for parts required to meet stringent magnetic particle inspection criteria, having sections 3.5 inches (89 mm) and under in nominal thickness at time of heat treatment, and requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing a minimum hardness of 30 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and also for parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications. Certain design and processing procedures may cause these products to become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking after heat treatment; ARP 1110 recommends practices to minimize such conditions. These products are not recommended for use in parts heat treated to a tensile strength range having a maximum over 220 ksi (1517 MPa) or where the high transverse properties of vacuum-arc-remelted or electroslag remelted steel are required. Alloy: 4340 UNS Number: G4340.

  2. Heat treatment of forging dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovnar, S. A.; Kadnikov, S. A.

    1987-08-01

    In forging-die production there is a considerable range of forging dies which are promising for a changeover into advanced heat treatment involving bulk temper hardening and surface hardening using induction heating. The heat treatment suggested provides a saving of material resources as a result of improving the life of forging dies by a factor of 1.5-3 depending on the grade of die steel. As a result of induction hardening of forging dies, after temper hardening close to the boundary of the hardened layer a zone of reduced hardness forms whose unfavorable effect may be reduced by using before induction surface hardening bulk warming in a furnace or deep induction heating with a reduced energy concentration in the heating zone to the tempering temperature in the temper hardening cycle. In order to improve the uniformity of induction surface hardening for dies with a complex working shape it is desirable to use heating at reduced power with an increase in heating time.

  3. Military Process Specification for Type 46XX Powder-Forged Weapon Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-20

    one with low carbon or carburizing steels (Figure 18). Fracture Toughness Only one paper contained fracture toughness data for P/F 10XX steels . The...201-213. 8. Brown, G. T., "The Core ’Properties of a Range of Powder-Forged Steels ’ for Carburizing Applications," Powder Metallurgy, vol. 20, no...621205H84001, Dover, NJ: ARRADC0M, October 1980. Smith, A. 0., "Hardenability of Forged Alloy Steel Powders for Carburizing Ap- plications," Inland

  4. Electrical heating of forging billets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, R.E.; Weldon, W.F.

    1982-11-01

    Recent and ongoing research concerned with homopolar generators operated in a pulse mode and making use of kinetic energy storage principles has led to the application of these techniques to forging billet heating. Most forging billet heating is done using fuel-fired furnaces, but use of electric induction heating is increasing. The homopolar pulse billet heating (HPBH) process is described and its capabilities are evaluated relative to furnace and induction heating. Conclusions are that applications for this new process will most likely be in the heating of stainless steel and superalloy billets, particularly if present research efforts are successful in reducing costs.

  5. The thermal modeling of large axisymmetric forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tyne, C. J.; Focht, R. B.; Nelson, T. D.; Reese, W.

    1994-09-01

    Three thermal models for simulating the heating cycles used for large forgings were developed. They were designed for accuracy, user friendliness, and rapid calculation on a personal computer. The results that are obtained from these models are the temperature profiles that occur within the ingot, forging or roll at various depths from the surface. The values for these temperature versus time curves can be used to examine several features about the heat treatment process. The example presented in this paper showed the effect of heating rate and hold at 704 °C on the surface-to-center temperature difference that occurs in a medium carbon steel ingot.

  6. HYDRODYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE FORGING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRODYNAMICS), (*FORGING, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LUBRICANTS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), DIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , STRAIN...MECHANICS), BERYLLIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , CASTING ALLOYS , PRESSURE, FAILURE(MECHANICS).

  7. Isothermal Roll Forging of T55 Compressor Blades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    VI LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Some Stages in Cold Roll-Forging of Compressor Blade 4 in 17 - 4PH Steel 2 Single Pass Isothermal Rolling of 0.375...operations in blade manufacture by this method are shown in Figure 1 for a cold-rolled compressor blade in 17 - 4PH steel used in a Solar turbine. In the...34’■ ’y^ at ̂ ^PP Figure 1, Some Stages in Cold Steel (#76-2679) Roll-Forging of Compressor Blade in 17 - 4PH 2.2 THE ISOTHERMAL ROLL

  8. High-energy rate forgings of wedges. Characterization of processing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  9. Cold Rotary Forging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    highly non-uniform in the as- forged and thermal treated conditions. Because of the magnitude of the stresses, no determination can be made as to their effects on tube fatigue life. 39 ...strength after forging. This behavior was attributed to the bauschinger effect. It was possible to recover the strength by,a thermal treatment at 800oF...that both compressive and tensile residual stresses were observed. However, in general, the stresses were low. The thermal treatments which

  10. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  11. Forging Long Shafts On Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilghman, Chris; Askey, William; Hopkins, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal-forging apparatus produces long shafts integral with disks. Equipment based on modification of conventional isothermal-forging equipment, required stroke cut by more than half. Enables forging of shafts as long as 48 in. (122 cm) on typical modified conventional forging press, otherwise limited to making shafts no longer than 18 in. (46cm). Removable punch, in which forged material cools after plastic deformation, essential novel feature of forging apparatus. Technology used to improve such products as components of gas turbines and turbopumps and of other shaft/disk parts for powerplants, drive trains, or static structures.

  12. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging are utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. An additional hemisphere forging was done which failed prematurely. Analysis and comparison with available fracture data for AL2O3 indicated possible causes of the failure. Examination of previous forgings indicated an increase in grain boundary cavitation with increasing strain.

  13. Modeling of Closed-Die Forging for Estimating Forging Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Debashish; Das, Santanu; Chatterjee, Avik; Bhattacharya, Anirban

    2017-02-01

    Closed die forging is one common metal forming process used for making a range of products. Enough load is to exert on the billet for deforming the material. This forging load is dependent on work material property and frictional characteristics of the work material with the punch and die. Several researchers worked on estimation of forging load for specific products under different process variables. Experimental data on deformation resistance and friction were used to calculate the load. In this work, theoretical estimation of forging load is made to compare this value with that obtained through LS-DYNA model facilitating the finite element analysis. Theoretical work uses slab method to assess forging load for an axi-symmetric upsetting job made of lead. Theoretical forging load estimate shows slightly higher value than the experimental one; however, simulation shows quite close matching with experimental forging load, indicating possibility of wide use of this simulation software.

  14. Fallon FORGE Well Lithologies

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z text file of the downhole lithologic interpretations in the wells in and around the Fallon FORGE site. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  15. Partners: Forging Strong Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Ellen, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This newsletter issue asserts that sound, effective relationships in which diverse groups of people and organizations work together toward a common goal are the basis of the collaborative efforts in education that can accomplish change. The first article, "Partners: Forging Strong Relationships" (Sarah E. Torian), briefly describes the…

  16. Productivity and the forging industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocking, A.

    The ways in which the machinery, manpower, material, and money may be applied in more productive and profitable ways within the forging industry of South Africa are discussed from a practical viewpoint. The basic aspects of forging plant selection are discussed in an attempt to help management within the industry make the best choice of forging machine and correctly choose its capacity for the market sector for which it is aimed. Some information is given on furnaces and ancillary forging equipment as well as on estimates of the cost of heating in the forge.

  17. Development of high purity large forgings for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Sato, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The recent increase in the size of energy plants has been supported by the development of manufacturing technology for high purity large forgings for the key components of the plant. To assure the reliability and performance of the large forgings, refining technology to make high purity steels, casting technology for gigantic ingots, forging technology to homogenize the material and consolidate porosity are essential, together with the required heat treatment and machining technologies. To meet these needs, the double degassing method to reduce impurities, multi-pouring methods to cast the gigantic ingots, vacuum carbon deoxidization, the warm forging process and related technologies have been developed and further improved. Furthermore, melting facilities including vacuum induction melting and electro slag re-melting furnaces have been installed. By using these technologies and equipment, large forgings have been manufactured and shipped to customers. These technologies have also been applied to the manufacture of austenitic steel vessel components of the fast breeder reactors and components for fusion experiments.

  18. Forging Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.; Glasgow, T. K.; Moracz, D. J.; Austin, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding of mild steel prevents surface cracking when alloy contacts die. Continual need for improvements in properties of alloys capable of withstanding elevated temperatures. Accomplished by using oxide-dispersion-strengthed superalloys such as Inconel Alloy MA 6000. Elevated tensile properties of forged alloy equal those of hot-rolled MA 6000 bar. Stress-rupture properties somewhat lower than those of bar stock but, at 1,100 degrees C, exceed those of strongest commercial single crystal, directionally solidified and conventionally cast superalloys.

  19. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  20. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... section, plates, forgings, forged and rolled fittings, and rolled and forged bars and shapes used in the... temperatures under §§ 154.174(b) and 154.176(b). (b) for a minimum temperature, determined under §§ 154,174(b... that minimum temperature. (c) If a steel grade that is not listed in Table 1 has the...

  1. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... section, plates, forgings, forged and rolled fittings, and rolled and forged bars and shapes used in the... temperatures under §§ 154.174(b) and 154.176(b). (b) for a minimum temperature, determined under §§ 154,174(b... that minimum temperature. (c) If a steel grade that is not listed in Table 1 has the...

  2. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section, plates, forgings, forged and rolled fittings, and rolled and forged bars and shapes used in the... temperatures under §§ 154.174(b) and 154.176(b). (b) for a minimum temperature, determined under §§ 154,174(b... that minimum temperature. (c) If a steel grade that is not listed in Table 1 has the...

  3. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... section, plates, forgings, forged and rolled fittings, and rolled and forged bars and shapes used in the... temperatures under §§ 154.174(b) and 154.176(b). (b) for a minimum temperature, determined under §§ 154,174(b... that minimum temperature. (c) If a steel grade that is not listed in Table 1 has the...

  4. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... section, plates, forgings, forged and rolled fittings, and rolled and forged bars and shapes used in the... temperatures under §§ 154.174(b) and 154.176(b). (b) for a minimum temperature, determined under §§ 154,174(b... that minimum temperature. (c) If a steel grade that is not listed in Table 1 has the...

  5. Comparison of pitting fatigue life of ausforged and standard forged AISI M-50 and AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Standard forged and ausforged spur gears made of vacuum-induction-melted, consumable-electrode, vacuum-arc-remelted AISI M-50 steel were tested under conditions that produced fatigue pitting. The gears were 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) in pitch diameter and had tip relief. The M-50 standard forged and ausforged test results were compared with each other. They were then compared with results for machined vacuum-arc-remelted AISI 9310 gears tested under identical conditions. Both types of M-50 gears had lives approximately five times that of the 9310 gears. The life at which 10 percent of the M-50 ausforged gears failed was slightly less than that at which the M-50 standard forged gears failed. The ausforged gears had a slightly greater tendency to fail by tooth fracture than did the standard forged gears, most likely because of the better forging and grain flow pattern of standard forged gears.

  6. Process modeling and development for three axisymmetric net shape forgings

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gizawy, A.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Aerospace Engineering)

    1992-03-01

    The results of dynamic material modeling experiments are reported on aluminum alloys 6061 and 7050, and steel alloy 4340. This information was used to accurately describe the variables in the various constitutive equations used in computer modeling programs. A description of the experimental equipment used to deform the specimens and gather data was given. Previously reported work regarding computer modeling of interface friction and the forging process was reviewed. Using dynamic flow models, three different axisymmetric parts were analyzed for their potential for being produced by net shape or near net shape forging processes. Two aluminum alloy parts were recommended as potential candidates while the steel part was not a potential candidate. Recommendations for processing conditions were also given. 18 refs.

  7. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  8. Investigations on Forging Dies with Ceramic Inserts by means of Finite-Element-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, B.-A.; Schaefer, F.; Bistron, M.

    2007-05-17

    The tools in hot forging processes are exposed to high thermal and mechanical loadings. Tempering of the tool edge layer occurs as a result of thermal loadings. This leads to a gradual hardness loss of the tool material and increase of wear over forging cycles. Hence, the tool life in hot forging is mainly limited by wear. An extension of the die service life can be achieved by the use of ceramic inserts. The integration of ceramics into the die base plate made of hot-work steel is realised by active brazing, whereby it possible to apply ceramic in region with high wear. It has to be ensured in the design process of ceramic inserts for forging dies that no critical tensile stresses occur in the ceramics. A reliable design of the ceramic inserts is possible only through consideration of brazing and forming process. The development of a Finite-Element-model for the design of forging dies with ceramic inserts is the intention of the work presented in this paper. At first the forging process with a conventional die is analyzed concerning abrasive die wear to identify regions with high wear risk applying a modified Archard model. Based on the results of wear calculation, a forging die with ceramic inserts is investigated in terms of joint stresses at the end of the active brazing process. Subsequently, the forging process considering the residual stresses caused by joining is simulated in order to obtain the die stress in use.

  9. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Thamboo, Samuel V.; Yang, Ling

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  10. Calculation of recovery plasticity in multistage hot forging under isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhbankov, Iaroslav G; Perig, Alexander V; Aliieva, Leila I

    2016-01-01

    A widely used method for hot forming steels and alloys, especially heavy forging, is the process of multistage forging with pauses between stages. The well-known effect which accompanies multistage hot forging is metal plasticity recovery in comparison with monotonic deformation. A method which takes into consideration the recovery of plasticity in pauses between hot deformations of a billet under isothermal conditions is proposed. This method allows the prediction of billet forming limits as a function of deformation during the forging stage and the duration of the pause between the stages. This method takes into account the duration of pauses between deformations and the magnitude of subdivided deformations. A hot isothermal upsetting process with pauses was calculated by the proposed method. Results of the calculations have been confirmed with experimental data.

  11. Effect of Die Strength and Work Piece Strength on the Wear of Hot Forging Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; Van Tyne, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the strength ratio extracted from an Archard model for wear is used to describe the wear rates expected in hot forging dies. In the current study, the strength ratio is the strength of the hot forging die to the strength of the work piece. Three hot forging die steels are evaluated. The three die steels are FX, 2714, and WF. To determine the strength of the forging die, a continuous function has been developed that describes the yield strength of three die steels for temperatures from 600 to 700 °C and for times up to 20 h (i.e., tempering times of up to 20 h). The work piece material is assumed to be AISI 1045. Based on the analysis, the wear resistance of WF should be superior and FX should be slightly better than 2714. Decreasing the forging temperature increases the strength ratio, because the strength of the die surface increases faster than the flow strength of AISI 1045. The increase in the strength ratio indicates a decrease in the expected wear rate.

  12. Steel - Structural, reinforcing; Pressure vessel, railway

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book contains specifications for structural steel used in various constructions; concrete reinforcement; plate and forgings for boilers and pressure vesseles; rails, axles, wheels and other accessories for railway service.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording the...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  18. Process modelings and simulations of heavy castings and forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dianzhong; Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Pei; Kang, Xiuhong; Fu, Paixian; Li, Yiyi

    2013-05-01

    The Materials Process Modeling Division, IMR, CAS has been promoting for more than 10 years research activities on modeling and experimental studies on heavy castings and forgings. In this report, we highlight some selected achievements and impacts in this area: To satisfy domestic strategic requirements, such as nuclear and hydraulic power, marine projects and high speed rail, we have developed a number of casting and forging technologies, which combine advanced computing simulations, X-ray real time observation techniques and industrial-scaled trial experiments. These technologies have been successfully applied in various industrial areas and yielded a series of scientific and technological breakthroughs and innovation. Important examples of this strategic research include the hot-processing technologies of the Three Gorge water turbine runner, marine crankshaft manufacturers, backup rolls for hot rolling mills and the production of hundreds-ton steel ingot.

  19. Analysis of the thermo-mechanical deformations in a hot forging tool by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L-Cancelos, R.; Varas, F.; Martín, E.; Viéitez, I.

    2016-03-01

    Although programs have been developed for the design of tools for hot forging, its design is still largely based on the experience of the tool maker. This obliges to build some test matrices and correct their errors to minimize distortions in the forged piece. This phase prior to mass production consumes time and material resources, which makes the final product more expensive. The forging tools are usually constituted by various parts made of different grades of steel, which in turn have different mechanical properties and therefore suffer different degrees of strain. Furthermore, the tools used in the hot forging are exposed to a thermal field that also induces strain or stress based on the degree of confinement of the piece. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the assembly is determined by the contact between the different pieces. The numerical simulation allows to analyse different configurations and anticipate possible defects before tool making, thus, reducing the costs of this preliminary phase. In order to improve the dimensional quality of the manufactured parts, the work presented here focuses on the application of a numerical model to a hot forging manufacturing process in order to predict the areas of the forging die subjected to large deformations. The thermo-mechanical model developed and implemented with free software (Code-Aster) includes the strains of thermal origin, strains during forge impact and contact effects. The numerical results are validated with experimental measurements in a tooling set that produces forged crankshafts for the automotive industry. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental tests. Thereby, a very useful tool for the design of tooling sets for hot forging is achieved.

  20. Powder Metallurgy Forged Gear Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Unclassified) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) D. H. Ro, B. L. Ferguson, S. Pillay, D. T. Ostberg 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month...Method Water Atomized SelecCion -Initial Alloy Distribution Prealloyed -Particle Size Distribution -100 Mesh kForging Quality) Uxmtpaction -Lubricant Zinc

  1. Designing and testing a high-velocity self-forging fragment. [Design using PETRA computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.

    1982-10-01

    An explosive system has been designed to propel a 215-g mild steel self-forging fragment at a velocity of 6 km/s. The design was obtained using the hydrodynamic code PETRA. Flash radiography and penetration results are reported for experiments based on this design.

  2. Heat treatment of large forgings with heating in the intercritical temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astaf'ev, A. A.; Sal'kova, S. S.

    1990-10-01

    In large forgings the investigated Mn-Ni-Mo-steels provide with slow cooling rates of 30-50°C/h a mixed ferritic-pearlitic-bainitic structure with a bainite content of not less than 30%. Such steels must have a low carbon content (about 0.1%) to increase the quantity of ferrite in the ferritic-pearlitic mixture and the necessary quantity of alloy elements to obtain the required stability of the supercooled austenite.

  3. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Photogrammetry based system for the measurement of cylindrical forgings axis straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatočilová, Aneta; Poliščuk, Radek; Paloušek, David; Brandejs, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Dimension measurement of hot large forgings is necessary for manufacturing process and quality control. Conventional non-contact optical measurement methods are not applicable, mainly because of high temperature and large dimensions. A novel approach to the axis staightness measurement of the cylindrical forging, based on the principle of photogrammetry and edge detection, is described in this paper. Proposed system is developing under laboratory conditions, but the actual conditions of steel production are also considered. Demands on the measurement system were set by our industrial partner, producer of cylindrical forgings with length of 4 to 20 m and diameter up to 1.4 m. The system should be able to detect axis straightness deviations higher than 5 mm (system accuracy has to be better than 5 mm). Cylindrical forgings are 4 to 20 m long with diameter up to 1.4 m. The approach is based on the assumption that the actual shape of the cylindrical forging axis can be determined (in the simplest case) using four boundary curves which lie in two mutually perpendicular planes. Four boundary curves can be obtained by detecting the forgings edges in two images. The article provides results of first validation of proposed method in laboratory conditions. Measurement repeatability was validated by carrying out ten measurements of a deformed rod. Each measurement was compared with a measurement performed by industrial fringe projection scanner Atos III Triple Scan in order to verify the accuracy of the proposed method.

  5. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging was utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. Deformation studies of very fine grain Al203 revealed an apparent transition in behavior, characterized by a shift in the strain rate sensitivity from 0.5 at low stresses to near unity at higher stresses. The behavior is indicative of a shift in control between two dependent mechanisms, one of which is indicated to be cation limited diffusional creep with significant boundary enhancement. The possible contributions of slip, indicated by crystallographic texture, interface control of the diffusional creep and inhomogeneous boundary sliding are also discussed. Additional experiments indicated an independence of deformation behavior on MgO doping and retained hot pressing impurities, at least for ultrafine grained material, and also an independence of test atmosphere.

  6. Fallon FORGE Well Temp data

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z downhole temperature data for wells in and around the Fallon FORGE site. Data for the following wells are included: 82-36, 82-19, 84.31, 61-36, 88-24, FOH-3D, FDU-1, and FDU-2. Data are formatted in txt format and in columns for importing into Earthvision Software. Column headers and coordinate system information is stored in the file header.

  7. Forgings meet the challenges of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Mochnal, G.

    1996-04-01

    To meet and exceed the requirements of the customer of the future, the forging industry is entering a new era of increased productivity and technical advancements. The tools for this task have been developed as a result of a partnership among industry, government, and academia. As another consequence of this partnership, the Forging Industry Association and the Forging Industry Educational and Research Foundation are in the process of creating a Vision of the Future. This article will discuss advances in metal-forming simulation, billet heating systems, advanced die materials, and advanced forging presses.

  8. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-12-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  9. Analysis Of Potentiometric Methods Used For Crack Detection In Forging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Drbúl, Mário; Stančeková, Dana; Varga, Daniel; Martinček, Juraj; Kuždák, Viktor

    2015-12-01

    Increased use of forging tools in mass production causes their increased wear and creates pressure to design more efficient renovation process. Renovation is complicated because of the identification of cracks expanding from the surface to the core material. Given that the production of forging tools is expensive, caused by the cost of tool steels and the thermo-chemical treatment, it is important to design forging tool with its easy renovation in mind. It is important to choose the right renovation technology, which will be able to restore the instrument to its original state while maintaining financial rentability. Choosing the right technology is difficult because of nitrided and heat-treated surface for high hardness and wear resistance. Article discusses the use of non-destructive method of detecting cracks taking into account the size of the cracks formed during working process.

  10. Development of forging and heat treating practices for AMS 5737 for use at liquid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Greenlee, M.

    1981-08-10

    To achieve a combination of high yield-strength (sigma y), plane-strain fracture-toughness (K/sub IC/) and resistance to galling when turned against austenitic stainless steels in highly-loaded threaded turnbuckles in the M.F.T.F.-B (Mirror Fusion Test Facility), AMS 5737 (Fe-15Cr-25Ni-1Mo-V-Ti-Al-B), a heat-treatable Fe-base superalloy that is slightly-ferromagnetic under high magnetic fields at 4K, was chosen for large (approx. 340 kg) forged turn buckles. This report describes the forging and heat-treatment optimization program that resulted in good sigma y and K/sub IC/ over the 4 to 300K range of service-temperatures and the verification tests run on a pre-production forging and actual production parts.

  11. Automated Welding of Rotary Forge Hammers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    NUMBER OF PAGES Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA) Welding. Metal Inert Gas (MIG) Welding, 34 Metal Powder, Rotary Forge Hammers. Hardfacing 16. PRICE CODE 17...filled with required hardfacing materials ............................................... 26 8. Top and side schematic views, respectively, of forging...superalloy hardfacing deposit. In addition to the hardfacing layer, an underlying layer of buffer material must first be deposited to minimize cracking

  12. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  13. Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Falsey, John

    2005-01-01

    The powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR was designed with a relatively low gamma precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content to allow versatile heat treatment processing combined with high tensile, creep and fatigue properties. Grain size can be chiefly controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the gamma precipitate solvus temperature. However, forging process conditions can also significantly influence solution heat treatment-grain size response. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the relationships between forging process conditions and the eventual grain size of solution heat treated material. A series of forging experiments were performed with subsequent subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments, in search of suitable forging conditions for producing uniform fine grain and coarse grain microstructures. Subsolvus, supersolvus, and combined subsolvus plus supersolvus heat treatments were then applied. Forging and subsequent heat treatment conditions were identified allowing uniform fine and coarse grain microstructures.

  14. Development of powder-forged connecting rods

    SciTech Connect

    Imahashi, K.; Tsumuki, C.; Nagare, I.

    1984-01-01

    In comparison with conventional hot forging process, powder forging process has much advantage such as good dimensional accuracy, minimum scattering of weight, etc. In spite of much advantage, the powder forged parts have not been mass-produced except for relatively simple shape parts because of technical and economic problems such as low productivity. Solving these problems, powder forging process was applied to connecting rods which required fatigue strength and minimum scattering of weight, and which were complex in shape. As a result, for the first time in the world, mass-production of powder forged connecting rods was carried out, and its properties are as follows: (1) Sufficient fatigue strength; (2) Minimum scattering of weight; and (3) Good dimensional accuracy.

  15. Effect of raw materials and hardening process on hardness of manually forged knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkhaya, Suwarno

    2017-06-01

    Knives are normally made by forging process either using a machine or traditional method by means of hammering process. This present work was conducted to study the effects of steel raw materials and hardening process on the hardness of manually forged knives. The knife samples were made by traditional hammering (forging) process done by local blacksmith. Afterward, the samples were heat treated with two different hardening procedures, the first was based on the blacksmith procedure and the second was systematically done at the laboratory. The forging was done in the temperature ranged between 900-950°C, while the final temperature ranged between 650-675°C. The results showed that knives made of spring steel and heat treated in simulated condition at the laboratory obtained higher level of hardness, i.e. 62 HRC. In general, knives heat treated by local blacksmith had lower level of hardness that those obtained from simulated condition. Therefore, we concluded that the traditional knife quality in term of hardness can be improved by optimizing the heat treatment schedule.

  16. A Life Study of Ausforged, Standard Forged and Standard Machined AISI M-50 Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted at 350 K (170 F) with three groups of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.) pitch diameter spur gears made of vacuum induction melted (VIM) consumable-electrode vacuum-arc melted (VAR), AISI M-50 steel and one group of vacuum-arc remelted (VAR) AISI 9310 steel. The pitting fatigue life of the standard forged and ausforged gears was approximately five times that of the VAR AISI 9310 gears and ten times that of the bending fatigue life of the standard machined VIM-VAR AISI M-50 gears run under identical conditions. There was a slight decrease in the 10-percent life of the ausforged gears from that for the standard forged gears, but the difference is not statistically significant. The standard machined gears failed primarily by gear tooth fracture while the forged and ausforged VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and the VAR AISI 9310 gears failed primarily by surface pitting fatigue. The ausforged gears had a slightly greater tendency to fail by tooth fracture than the standard forged gears.

  17. Design of forging process variables under uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repalle, Jalaja; Grandhi, Ramana V.

    2005-02-01

    Forging is a complex nonlinear process that is vulnerable to various manufacturing anomalies, such as variations in billet geometry, billet/die temperatures, material properties, and workpiece and forging equipment positional errors. A combination of these uncertainties could induce heavy manufacturing losses through premature die failure, final part geometric distortion, and reduced productivity. Identifying, quantifying, and controlling the uncertainties will reduce variability risk in a manufacturing environment, which will minimize the overall production cost. In this article, various uncertainties that affect the forging process are identified, and their cumulative effect on the forging tool life is evaluated. Because the forging process simulation is time-consuming, a response surface model is used to reduce computation time by establishing a relationship between the process performance and the critical process variables. A robust design methodology is developed by incorporating reliability-based optimization techniques to obtain sound forging components. A case study of an automotive-component forging-process design is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method.

  18. Process modeling and development for three axisymmetric net shape forgings. Progress report 5

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gizawy, A.S.

    1992-03-01

    The results of dynamic material modeling experiments are reported on aluminum alloys 6061 and 7050, and steel alloy 4340. This information was used to accurately describe the variables in the various constitutive equations used in computer modeling programs. A description of the experimental equipment used to deform the specimens and gather data was given. Previously reported work regarding computer modeling of interface friction and the forging process was reviewed. Using dynamic flow models, three different axisymmetric parts were analyzed for their potential for being produced by net shape or near net shape forging processes. Two aluminum alloy parts were recommended as potential candidates while the steel part was not a potential candidate. Recommendations for processing conditions were also given. 18 refs.

  19. Forging technology adapted to the manufacture of nuclear PWR austenitic primary piping

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, F.; Bocquet, P.; Cheviet, A.

    1997-12-31

    To increase the safety and reduce the operating costs of the primary piping of Pressurized Water Reactor power plants, Electricite de France has encouraged its French industrial partners to change the design and manufacture of components. That resulted in the manufacturing of large forged parts in austenitic stainless steel in place of castings. The main objective of such optimization is to improve the life of new power stations, increasing their safety margin, in addition to a reduction of the in service inspection and maintenance costs. The paper presents the interest in using austenitic stainless steel in place of castings and describes the manufacturing conditions of such forgings which are applied, first, to a cold leg for the Civaux 1 unit and second, to a complete loop for the Civaux 2 unit.

  20. Forging process design for risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yongning

    In this dissertation, forging process design has been investigated with the primary concern on risk reduction. Different forged components have been studied, especially those ones that could cause catastrophic loss if failure occurs. As an effective modeling methodology, finite element analysis is applied extensively in this work. Three examples, titanium compressor disk, superalloy turbine disk, and titanium hip prosthesis, have been discussed to demonstrate this approach. Discrete defects such as hard alpha anomalies are known to cause disastrous failure if they are present in those stress critical components. In this research, hard-alpha inclusion movement during forging of titanium compressor disk is studied by finite element analysis. By combining the results from Finite Element Method (FEM), regression modeling and Monte Carlo simulation, it is shown that changing the forging path is able to mitigate the failure risk of the components during the service. The second example goes with a turbine disk made of superalloy IN 718. The effect of forging on microstructure is the main consideration in this study. Microstructure defines the as-forged disk properties. Considering specific forging conditions, preform has its own effect on the microstructure. Through a sensitivity study it is found that forging temperature and speed have significant influence on the microstructure. In order to choose the processing parameters to optimize the microstructure, the dependence of microstructure on die speed and temperature is thoroughly studied using design of numerical experiments. For various desired goals, optimal solutions are determined. The narrow processing window of titanium alloy makes the isothermal forging a preferred way to produce forged parts without forging defects. However, the cost of isothermal forging (dies at the same temperature as the workpiece) limits its wide application. In this research, it has been demonstrated that with proper process design, the die

  1. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  2. Processing and Characterization of Sub-delta Solvus Forged Hemispherical Forgings of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Rao, G. Sudarasana; Singh, Satish Kumar; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Venkatanarayana, G.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, microstructure and mechanical properties of 200 mm diameter Inconel 718 hemispherical domes processed at 1025 °C through closed die hammer forging have been investigated. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the forgings in radial and tangential directions were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, impact testing, and tensile testing. Grain size of the forgings at three different locations was fine with an average grain size of ASTM No. 8-9. The typical tensile properties of the forgings in solution-treated and aged condition were ultimate tensile strength-1450 MPa, yield strength-1240 MPa, and ductility-25%. The fine grain size achieved in forgings has been attributed to delta phase present at grain boundaries which pinned the grains during forging and prevented grain coarsening.

  3. Microstructural Evaluation of Forging Parameters for Superalloy Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falsey, John R.

    2004-01-01

    Forgings of nickel base superalloy were formed under several different strain rates and forging temperatures. Samples were taken from each forging condition to find the ASTM grain size, and the as large as grain (ALA). The specimens were mounted in bakelite, polished, etched and then optical microscopy was used to determine grain size. The specimens ASTM grain sizes from each forging condition were plotted against strain rate, forging temperature, and presoak time. Grain sizes increased with increasing forging temperature. Grain sizes also increased with decreasing strain rates and increasing forging presoak time. The ALA had been determined from each forging condition using the ASTM standard method. Each ALA was compared with the ASTM grain size of each forging condition to determine if the grain sizes were uniform or not. The forging condition of a strain rate of .03/sec and supersolvus heat treatment produced non uniform grains indicated by critical grain growth. Other anomalies are noted as well.

  4. Numerical simulation and experimental study for the die forging process of a high-speed railway brake disc hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Long; LI, Dianzhong

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of manufacturing a near-net shape forging product of a brake disk hub for the high-speed railway, the die forging process was designed and optimized in this study. Firstly, based on the measured stress-strain curves at different strain rates and the thermal-physical parameters of 40Cr A steel, a finite element model for the forging process of a high-speed railway brake disc hub was established. Then, the temperature, stress and strain fields were studied and analyzed at the pre-forging and the finial-forging stages. Besides, in order to trace the stress and strain evolution, five points at different positions were chosen on the billet, and the comparison of the state conditions was made among these points. The results have demonstrated that the product can be well formed by an elaborately designed three-stage forging process, which may reduce the metal machine allowance and the producing cost effectively. Finally, an industrial trial was made and a machined product with sound quality was obtained.

  5. Dynamic material modeling in hot forging

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gizawy, A.S. )

    1992-03-01

    A dynamic material model that characterized flow behavior in the workpiece under forging conditions was required to optimize the process and produce defect-free product at minimum cost. Constitutive equations describe the relationship between stress, strain rate, and temperature under forging conditions. Using aluminum alloy 7050, numerous deformation experiments were conducted to fully characterize constitutive equation variables. A thorough description of the experimental arrangement was provided. Flow data and efficiency data were assembled into a three-dimensional plot of temperature vs. strain rate vs. deformation efficiency to produce an efficiency map. The efficiency map provided the information required for optimization of forging process design. The results of dynamic modeling of the material were used in simulating the isothermal forging of a particular part. Recommendations concerning optimum preform design and processing conditions were reported.

  6. Mechanical Testing Development for Reservoir Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wenski, E.G.

    2000-05-22

    The goal of this project was to determine the machining techniques and testing capabilities required for mechanical property evaluation of commercially procured reservoir forgings. Due to the small size of these specific forgings, specialized methods are required to adequately machine and test these sub-miniature samples in accordance with the requirements of ASTM-E8 and ASTM-E9. At the time of project initiation, no capability existed at Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) to verify the physical properties of these reservoirs as required on the drawing specifications. The project determined the sample definitions, machining processes, and testing procedures to verify the physical properties of the reservoir forgings; specifically, tensile strength, yield strength, reduction of area, and elongation. In addition, a compression test method was also developed to minimize sample preparation time and provide a more easily machined test sample while maintaining the physical validation of the forging.

  7. Forging of FeAl intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Juarez, J.; Campillo, B.; Martinez, L.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Much activity has been concentrated on the development of intermetallic compounds with the aim of improving tensile ductility, fracture toughness and high notch sensitivity in order to develop an attractive combination of properties for high and low temperature applications. This paper reports experience in processing and forging of FeAl intermetallic of B2 type. During the experiments two different temperatures were employed, and the specimens were forged after annealing in air, 10{sup {minus}2} torr vacuum and argon. From the results it was learned that annealing FeAl in argon atmosphere prior to forging resulted in better deformation behavior than for the other two environments. For the higher forging temperature used in the experiments (700C), the as-cast microstructure becomes partially recrystallized.

  8. The Results Of The Investigation Of Thermomechanical Processing Of PM Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepanik, Stefan; Wisniewski, Bartosz; Krawiarz, Jerzy

    2007-04-07

    Hot die forging of PM steel is used to obtain products with high densities. The combination of this process with heat treatment of forgings directly after their forming is researched in order to reduce energy consumption in the manufacture of PM steel products. This work determined the influence of the cooling ratio directly after hot forging of PM steel samples on their structure and mechanical properties. The properties of the PM preforms were examined after sintering and after sintering, quenching into water and tempering for 1 h at 250, 350 and 550 deg. C, respectively, as well as after forging at given temperatures and cooling in water and air, respectively. Forged steel after quenching was tempered at the same temperature as the sintered samples. Good mechanical properties were obtained by hot forging at 1100 deg. C. Sintered steel with 0.6 % Cgraphite is characterized by good hardenability and is susceptible to plastic forming at 1100 - 940 deg. C. During its cooling in air a bainitic-martensitic structure is obtained, whereas after cooling in water the structure is martensitic. The properties of the forged steel are strongly dependent on deformation temperature and cooling conditions. The tensile strength of the forged PM steel with 0.6 Cgraphite after forming at 1100 deg. C is much higher than that of the same heat-treated as-sintered steel. Traditional heat treatment applied to materials after deformation at 1100 deg. C slightly increases properties in comparison to the material directly quenched into water. The best strength was 1585 {+-} 193 MPa, bending strength 3364 {+-} 142 MPa and hardness 588 {+-} 43 HB. Application of controlled cooling of sintered PM steel directly after close-die forging diminishes the energy consumption during product manufacture.

  9. The Results Of The Investigation Of Thermomechanical Processing Of PM Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanik, Stefan; Wiśniewski, Bartosz; Krawiarz, Jerzy

    2007-04-01

    Hot die forging of PM steel is used to obtain products with high densities. The combination of this process with heat treatment of forgings directly after their forming is researched in order to reduce energy consumption in the manufacture of PM steel products. This work determined the influence of the cooling ratio directly after hot forging of PM steel samples on their structure and mechanical properties. The properties of the PM preforms were examined after sintering and after sintering, quenching into water and tempering for 1 h at 250, 350 and 550°C, respectively, as well as after forging at given temperatures and cooling in water and air, respectively. Forged steel after quenching was tempered at the same temperature as the sintered samples. Good mechanical properties were obtained by hot forging at 1100 °C. Sintered steel with 0.6 % Cgraphite is characterized by good hardenability and is susceptible to plastic forming at 1100 - 940 °C. During its cooling in air a bainitic-martensitic structure is obtained, whereas after cooling in water the structure is martensitic. The properties of the forged steel are strongly dependent on deformation temperature and cooling conditions. The tensile strength of the forged PM steel with 0.6 Cgraphite after forming at 1100°C is much higher than that of the same heat-treated as-sintered steel. Traditional heat treatment applied to materials after deformation at 1100 °C slightly increases properties in comparison to the material directly quenched into water. The best strength was 1585 ± 193 MPa, bending strength 3364 ± 142 MPa and hardness 588 ± 43 HB. Application of controlled cooling of sintered PM steel directly after close-die forging diminishes the energy consumption during product manufacture.

  10. Metallurgical modelling of superalloy disc isothermal forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1988-08-01

    The metallurgical structure of superalloy aeroengine disc forgings is a complex function of the forging operation parameters and the post forging heat treatment. It is often desirable to obtain certain specific structures in parts of the disc which are, for instance, resistant to crack propagation and this has traditionally been accomplished by means of a series of production trials. This expensive and time consuming procedure can be considerably shortened if the development of microstructure during the forging can be accurately modelled by a suitable computer code. Described here is such a model and its use in the design of isothermal forged components. The model discribed is a fully thermally coupled viscoplasticity finite element algorithm. It treats nodal velocities as the basic unknowns and both the mesh geometry and the various metallurgical structural terms are updated by a single step Euler scheme. Facilities are available for ensuring that surface nodes follow die shapes after impingement, that flow is incompressible and that suitable surface friction forces are applied. Throughout the whole forging process (which may involve the re-meshing of severely distorted elements), the metallurgical history of elements is retained so that the effects of subsequent heat treatments can be assessed.

  11. Forging and Stamping (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-02

    performed on them. Also presented for comparison are data from a study on analogous torgings prepared by the old method. Fig. 1 shows a diagram of the...virtually all type-A discs torged from acid martensitic steel, particularly the nonvacuumed, ultrasound produces defects and zones where defects accumulate

  12. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Improves Production at a Metal Forging Plant (Modern Forge, TN, Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    In 1995, Modern Forge of Tennessee implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Piney Flats, Tennessee, forging plant. Due to the project’s implementation, the plant was able to operate with fewer compressors and improve its product quality, thus allowing it to increase productivity. The project also resulted in considerable energy and maintenance savings.

  13. Developments in HSLA steel products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paules, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The technology of microalloyed steels is expanding beyond its original emphasis on low-carbon, severely control-rolled strip and plate products. A variety of economical, high-strength, tough, as-rolled or as-forged microalloyed products are replacing more expensive heat-treated steels. Recrystallization-controlled rolling is being utilized to produce very fine ferrite grain sizes and good toughness in strip, plate and bar products processed with relatively high rolling temperatures. High-strength microalloyed long products such as railroad joint bars, truck frame rails and flat bars for truck trailer construction are replacing heat-treated parts. Microalloyed, medium-carbon forging steels are used extensively for automobile engine and suspension components. Fully pearlitic high-carbon rods are being microalloyed to enhance the properties of wire and springs.

  14. Microstructural and mechanical evolutions during the forging step of the COBAPRESS, a casting/forging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Desrayaud, Christophe; Bouvier, Véronique

    Aluminum casting/forging processes are used to produce parts for the automotive industry. In this study, we examined the influence of the forging step on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of an A356 aluminum alloy modified with strontium. Firstly, a design of samples which allows us to test mechanically the alloy before and after forging was created. A finite element analysis with the ABAQUS software predicts a maximum of strain in the core of the specimens. Observations with the EBSD technique confirm a more intense sub-structuration of the dendrite cells in this zone. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation and fatigue lives were then improved for the casting/forging samples compared to the only cast specimens. The closure of the porosities and the improvement of the surface quality during the forging step enhance also the fatigue resistance of the samples.

  15. The influence of thickness of CrN coating on the durability of hot forging dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolik, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    This article presents results which enabled the determination of the role of CrN coating and the influence of its thickness on the effectiveness of hybrid layer "nitrided layer / CrN coating" in the process of increasing the durability of forging dies. Dies coated with hybrid layers "nitrided layer / CrN coating" with various CrN coating thickness were — after different maintenance periods — subjected to metallographic testing, 3D shape testing and SEM analysis. Hardness distribution was also determined. The obtained results revealed that for all tested dies, independently from CrN coating thickness, the main mechanisms of their destruction was mechanical and thermal fatigue, and plastic deformation. It has been shown that the main role of CrN coating in the hybrid layer "nitrided layer / PVD coating" is to counteract a high temperature influence the source of which is forging on die material. In order to do so the CrN coating should be characterized by a considerably lower thermal conductivity coefficient to steel and low hardness so that it can efficiently resist fatigue processes in the forging process. Based on testing conducted by means of the sin 2 φ method, it was revealed that internal stresses are vitally important for CrN coating for fatigue resistance of hybrid layer "nitrided layer / CrN coating" during the forging process.

  16. Application of Magnetic Kinds of Nondestructive Inspection to Parts From Die Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, A. V.; Selishchev, A. I.; Idarmachev, I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities of control of the level of accumulated damage in dies for cold and hot forming as a function of the coercivity are considered. The coercivity of the material of dies for hot forging and cold stamping is studied. Formulas are obtained for determining the coercivity in steels for hot die forging in the state as delivered.

  17. 1. MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY, ACROSS FROM BUILDING NO. 114 on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY, ACROSS FROM BUILDING NO. 114 on FARLEY AVE. MARKER ON DISPLAY ITSELF READS: FORGE AND TOOLS, USED AT MIDDLE FORGE LOCATED AT PICATINNY LAKE OUTLETS 1749 TO 1880. NEARBY MARKER READS: THE MIDDLE FORGE. THE MT. HOPE IRONWORKS INCLUDING A TRACT CALLED THE MIDDLE FORGE, SUPPLIED ORDNANCE MATERIAL TO THE CONTINENTAL ARMY IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. GENERAL WASHINGTON INSPECTED THE FACILITY. THE WAR DEPARTMENT PURCHASED THE MIDDLE FORGE PORPERTY FOR AN ARMY POWDER DEPOT IN 1879-80. THE FORGE AND TOOLS WERE RECOVERED AT THE ACTUAL SITE NEAR PICATINNY PEAK. THROUGH THE YEARS, THE MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY CAME TO BE THE UNOFFICIAL SYMBOL OF PICATINNY ARSENAL. -- HISTORICAL OFFICE NO DATE - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  18. 4. FORGE, ANVIL, PEDESTAL GRINDER, AND BELT DRIVES. NOTE WATERWHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FORGE, ANVIL, PEDESTAL GRINDER, AND BELT DRIVES. NOTE WATERWHEEL NEEDLE VALVE CASTING HANGING ON THE WALL ABOVE THE FORGE. VIEW TO NORTH. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Machine Shop, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Study on Pot Forming of Induction Heater Type Rice Cookers by Forging Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Ohashi, Osamu

    This paper describes a study result on pot fabrication by the forging cast process of stainless steel with aluminum. Rice cooked with the new bowl-shaped pot for the induction heater type rice cookers is better tasting than rice cooked with the conventional cylindrical one, due to the achievement of better heat conduction and convection. The conventional pot is made of the clad sheet, consisting of stainless steel and aluminum. However, it is rather difficult to form a bowl shape from the clad sheet, primarily due to the problem of a material spring back. The fabrication of a new type of a pot was made possible by means of the adoption of a forging cast process instead of the clad sheet. In this process, iron powder is inserted between stainless steel and aluminum in order to alleviate the large difference on the coefficient of expansion between each material. It was made clear that the application of two kinds of iron particle, namely 10 μm size powder on the stainless steel side and 44 μm on the aluminum side, enables the joints to become strong enough. The joint strength of the new pot by this fabrication process was confirmed by the tests of the shear strength and the fatigue tests together with the stress analysis.

  20. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  1. 76 FR 50755 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty orders on heavy forged hand tools from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... Forged Hand Tools From China: Investigation Nos. 731-TA-457-A-D (Third Review). Issued: August 10, 2011...

  2. 49 CFR 178.59 - Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.59 Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous... service pressure of 250 psig. The following steel is authorized: (1) A longitudinal seam if forge...

  3. 49 CFR 178.59 - Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.59 Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous... service pressure of 250 psig. The following steel is authorized: (1) A longitudinal seam if forge...

  4. 49 CFR 178.59 - Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.59 Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous... service pressure of 250 psig. The following steel is authorized: (1) A longitudinal seam if forge...

  5. 49 CFR 178.59 - Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.59 Specification 8 steel cylinders with porous... service pressure of 250 psig. The following steel is authorized: (1) A longitudinal seam if forge...

  6. Computer-Aided Design of Manufacturing Chain Based on Closed Die Forging for Hardly Deformable Cu-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Maciej; Kuziak, Roman; Pidvysots'kyy, Valeriy; Nowak, Jarosław; Węglarczyk, Stanisław; Drozdowski, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Two copper-based alloys were considered, Cu-1 pct Cr and Cu-0.7 pct Cr-1 pct Si-2 pct Ni. The thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of these alloys are given in the paper and compared to pure copper and steel. The role of aging and precipitation kinetics in hardening of the alloys is discussed based upon the developed model. Results of plastometric tests performed at various temperatures and various strain rates are presented. The effect of the initial microstructure on the flow stress was investigated. Rheologic models for the alloys were developed. A finite element (FE) model based on the Norton-Hoff visco-plastic flow rule was applied to the simulation of forging of the alloys. Analysis of the die wear for various processes of hot and cold forging is presented as well. A microstructure evolution model was implemented into the FE code, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of final products were predicted. Various variants of the manufacturing cycles were considered. These include different preheating schedules, hot forging, cold forging, and aging. All variants were simulated using the FE method and loads, die filling, tool wear, and mechanical properties of products were predicted. Three variants giving the best combination of forging parameters were selected and industrial trials were performed. The best manufacturing technology for the copper-based alloys is proposed.

  7. Assembled camshaft for I. C. engines with forged powder metal cams

    SciTech Connect

    Lugosi, R.; Brauer, M.; Cook, J.

    1987-01-01

    A key element in the Automotive Industry's efforts to improve fuel economy and engine performance is the introduction of roller tappets to reduce friction in valve trains. As a result, contact stresses in excess of 200,000 psi may be experienced at the roller and cam (shaft) interface. Conventional cast iron camshafts cannot effectively carry this stress level. After studying several alternatives, the authors have developed a camshaft which promises to be a viable solution to the problem, both technically and economically. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the acceptable wear performance of an assembled camshaft containing forged powder metal lobes in a series of motored engine tests with roller hydraulic valve train. In this study, a camshaft consisting of a carbon steel tube and forged powder metal lobes (4660 composition) joined by brazing was tested at low speed and at high speed in a motored engine at approximately 250,000 psi maximum contact stress.

  8. Forging the anthropogenic iron cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Müller, Daniel B; Graedel, T E

    2007-07-15

    Metallurgical iron cycles are characterized for four anthropogenic life stages: production, fabrication and manufacturing, use, and waste management and recycling. This analysis is conducted for year 2000 and at three spatial levels: 68 countries and territories, nine world regions, and the planet. Findings include the following: (1) contemporary iron cycles are basically open and substantially dependent on environmental sources and sinks; (2) Asia leads the world regions in iron production and use; Oceania, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and the Commonwealth of Independent States present a highly production-biased iron cycle; (3) purchased scrap contributes a quarter of the global iron and steel production; (4) iron exiting use is three times less than that entering use; (5) about 45% of global iron entering use is devoted to construction, 24% is devoted to transport equipment, and 20% goes to industrial machinery; (6) with respect to international trade of iron ore, iron and steel products, and scrap, 54 out of the 68 countries are net iron importers, while only 14 are net exporters; (7) global iron discharges in tailings, slag, and landfill approximate one-third of the iron mined. Overall, these results provide a foundation for studies of iron-related resource policy, industrial development, and waste and environmental management.

  9. Anisotropic Embrittlement in High-Hardness ESR 4340 Steel Forgings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    direction which is strain-rate and humidity dependent. The anisotropy is also reflected in blunt-notch Charpy impact energy, but is absent in the sharp...evaluated both by standard Charpy impact tests and slow-bend tests on precracked Charpy specimens; sharp-crack fracture toughness (KIc) values were...Microprobe (SAM). Despite the frequent observation of intergranular fracture in Charpy impact specimens (as in Figure 3), no clear examples of

  10. Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, Anne

    The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

  11. Forging Inclusive Solutions: Experiential Earth Charter Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Forging Inclusive Solutions describes the aims, methodology and outcomes of Inclusive Leadership Adventures, an experiential education curriculum for exploring the Earth Charter. Experiential education builds meaningful relationships, skills, awareness and an inclusive community based on the Earth Charter principles. When we meet people where they…

  12. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  13. Defining a method of evaluating die life performance by using finite element models (FEM) and a practical open die hot forging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashi, J.; Foster, J.; Zante, R.

    2016-10-01

    Die wear, which is defined as a surface damage or removal of material from one or both of two solid surfaces in a sliding, rolling or impact motion relative to one another, is considered the main cause of tool failure. Wear is responsible for 70% of tool failure and a potential source of high costs; as much as 30% per forging unit in the forging industries [1]. This paper presents a unique wear prediction and measurement method for open die forging using a modified Archard equation, 3D FE simulation (to represent the actual forging process precisely) and an industrial scale forging trial. The proposed tool and experimental design is aimed at facilitating a cost effective method of tool wear analysis and to establish a repeatable method of measurement. It creates a platform to test different type of lubricants and coatings on industrial scale environment. The forging trial was carried out using 2100T Schuler Screw press. A full factorial experiment design was used on 3D simulation to identify the process setting for creating a measurable amount of tool wear. Wear prediction of 28.5 µm based on the simulation correlated with both Infinite Focus Optical Microscope and Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) measurement results of the practical trial. Thermal camera reading showed temperature raise on the area with maximum wear, which suggests that increase in contact time, causes thermal softening on tool steel. The measurement showed that abrasive wear and adhesive wear are dominant failure modes on the tool under these process conditions.

  14. A Method for Measuring the Hardness of the Surface Layer on Hot Forging Dies Using a Nanoindenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, P.; van Tyne, C. J.; Levy, B. S.

    2009-11-01

    The properties and characteristics of the surface layer of forging dies are critical for understanding and controlling wear. However, the surface layer is very thin, and appropriate property measurements are difficult to obtain. The objective of the present study is to determine if nanoindenter testing provides a reliable method, which could be used to measure the surface hardness in forging die steels. To test the reliability of nanoindenter testing, nanoindenter values for two quenched and tempered steels (FX and H13) are compared to microhardness and macrohardness values. These steels were heat treated for various times to produce specimens with different values of hardness. The heat-treated specimens were tested using three different instruments—a Rockwell hardness tester for macrohardness, a Vickers hardness tester for microhardness, and a nanoindenter tester for fine scale evaluation of hardness. The results of this study indicate that nanoindenter values obtained using a Nanoindenter XP Machine with a Berkovich indenter reliably correlate with Rockwell C macrohardness values, and with Vickers HV microhardness values. Consequently, nanoindenter testing can provide reliable results for analyzing the surface layer of hot forging dies.

  15. Development of measurement method of work hardeningbehavior in large plastic strain for sheet metal forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Nobuo; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Shirakami, Satoshi; kada, Osamu; Yoshida, Tohru; Hiwatashi, Shunji

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of accuracy improvement of sheet metal forging FE analysis, we have developed a new measurement method of work hardening behavior in large plastic strain by repeatedly performing simple shear test using pre-strained steel sheet. In this method, it is possible to measure work hardening behavior more than equivalent plastic strain 2.0. In addition, it was carried out a comparison between developed method and compression test in order to verify the validity of the results by the developed method. As a result, both results were in good agreement. The validity of developed method has been verified.

  16. Influence of vanadium on static recrystallization in warm worked microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Mateo, C.; Lopez, B.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.

    1999-12-31

    Warm forging of steels, in the range from 600 to 900 C, offers some important advantages over traditional forging procedures, with a better dimensional accuracy as well as surface quality in comparison with hot forging, and lower flow stress and therefore lower press loads in comparison with cold forging. It is well established that in hot working of V microalloyed steels, the vanadium in solid solution has a little effect on the static recrystallization kinetics between passes. In contrast, if strain induced precipitation takes place the static recrystallization is notably modified. The objective of this work is to study the effects that the application of warm working can have on the austenite static recrystallization process of vanadium microalloyed steels, considering a range of temperatures in which different precipitate volume fractions can remain undissolved in the austenite prior to deformation. The static recrystallization kinetics were determined by stress relaxation tests following the deformation by plain strain compression.

  17. FEA Based Tool Life Quantity Estimation of Hot Forging Dies Under Cyclic Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Schäfer, F.; Hadifi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hot forging dies are exposed during service to a combination of cyclic thermo-mechanical, tribological and chemical loads. Besides abrasive and adhesive wear on the die surface, fatigue crack initiation with subsequent fracture is one of the most frequent causes of failure. In order to extend the tool life, the finite element analysis (FEA) may serve as a means for process design and process optimisation. So far the FEA based estimation of the production cycles until initial cracking is limited as tool material behaviour due to repeated loading is not captured with the required accuracy. Material models which are able to account for cyclic effects are not verified for the fatigue life predictions of forging dies. Furthermore fatigue properties from strain controlled fatigue tests of relevant hot work steels are to date not available to allow for a close-to-reality fatigue life prediction. Two industrial forging processes, where clear fatigue crack initiation has been observed are considered for a fatigue analysis. For this purpose the relevant tool components are modelled with elasto-plastic material behaviour. The predicted sites, where crack initiation occurs, agree with the ones observed on the real die component.

  18. Improvements in the process of boss bar upset forging into a horizontal forging machine with the aim of joint knuckle forging quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, D. L.; Nizamov, R. S.; Kharisov, I. Zh

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for tapered composing transition shaping has been put forward in the process of upset forging with the use of an experimental tool. The results of the upset forging process with the use of a new composing transition has been computer simulated.

  19. Enhancement of Aluminum Alloy Forgings through Rapid Billet Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kervick, R.; Blue, C. A.; Kadolkar, P. B.; Ando, T.; Lu, H.; Nakazawa, K.; Mayer, H.; Mochnal, G.

    2006-06-01

    Forging is a manufacturing process in which metal is pressed, pounded or squeezed under great pressure and, often, under high strain rates into high-strength parts known as forgings. The process is typically performed hot by preheating the metal to a desired temperature before it is worked. The forging process can create parts that are stronger than those manufactured by any other metal working process. Forgings are almost always used where reliability and human safety are critical. Forgings are normally component parts contained inside assembled items such airplanes, automobiles, tractors, ships, oil drilling equipment, engines missiles, and all kinds of capital equipment Forgings are stronger than castings and surpass them in predictable strength properties, producing superior strength that is assured, part to part.

  20. Forging of helical gears: Upper bound analyses and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Choi, J. C.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, forging of helical gears has been investigated. The forging process of helical gears has been classified into two types of operations: guiding and clamping. The two types of forging of helical gears have been analyzed by using the upper-bound method. Kinematically admissible velocity fields have been developed in which an involute curve has been introduced to represent the tooth profile of the gear. Numerical calculations have been carried out to investigate the effects of various parameters such as module, number of teeth, helix angle and friction factors on the forging of helical gears. Some forging experiments were carried out with commercial aluminum alloy to show the validity of the analysis. Good agreements were found between the predicted values of the forging load and those obtained from the experimental results.

  1. Evolution of the Ultrasonic Inspection of Heavy Rotor Forgings Over the Last Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, A.; Vrana, J.; Meiser, J.; Maximini, W.; Blaes, N.

    2010-02-01

    All types of heavy forgings that are used in energy machine industry, rotor shafts as well as discs, retaining rings or tie bolts are subject to extensive nondestructive inspections before they are delivered to the customer. Due to the availability of the parts in simple shapes, these forgings are very well suited for full volmetric inspections using ultrasound. In the beginning, these inspections were carried out manually, using straight beam probes and analogue equipment. Higher requirements in reliability, efficiency, safety and power output in the machines have lead to higher requirements for the ultrasonic inspection in the form of more scanning directions, higher sensitivity demands and improved documentation means. This and the increasing use of high alloy materials for ever growing parts, increase the need for more and more sophisticated methods for testing the forgings. Angle scans and sizing technologies like DGS have been implemented, and for more than 15 years now, mechanized and automated inspections have gained importance since they allow better documentation as well as easier evaluation of the recorded data using different views (B- C- or D-Scans), projections or tomography views. The latest major development has been the availability of phased array probes to increase the flexibility of the inspection systems. Many results of the ongoing research in ultrasonic's have not been implemented yet. Today's availability of fast computers, large and fast data storages allows saving RF inspection data and applying sophisticated signal processing methods. For example linear diffraction tomography methods like SAFT offer tools for 3D reconstruction of inspection data, simplifying sizing and locating of defects as well as for improving signal to noise ratios. While such methods are already applied in medical ultrasonic's, they are still to be implemented in the steel industry. This paper describes the development of the ultrasonic inspection of heavy forgings

  2. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  3. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  4. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  5. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  6. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  7. High Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Shot-Peened Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzazadeh, M. M.; Plumtree, A.

    2012-08-01

    The uniaxial fully reversed (R = -1) long life fatigue behavior of four shot-peened engineering steels with approximately the same hardness was investigated. Shot-peening, air-cooled forged AISI 1141 and crackable AISI 1070 steels had little effect on their fatigue limits (+2.5 and -2.0 pct, respectively). In the case of a powder forged 0.5 pct C steel, an increase in the fatigue limit of 10.4 pct was observed, albeit with a large standard deviation. Shot-peening quench and tempered AISI 1151 steel decreased its fatigue limit 12.0 pct, as a result of cyclic softening. In general, the beneficial effects of shot-peening these smooth specimens were relatively small. Neither cyclic softening nor hardening occurred in the non-shot-peened steels cycled under the same conditions.

  8. A new steel for single cylinder steam turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Tsuda, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new steel, 2.25%Cr1.7%NiMoVNbW steel has been developed for the high pressure (HP)-low pressure (LP) single cylinder steam turbine rotor in combined power plants and medium/small rating thermal power plants. This steel has good creep rupture strength equivalent to that of 1%CrMoV steel which has been used as HP rotor fogings and excellent toughness and proof stress considerably superior to the conventional HP-LP single cylinder rotor steels. This paper includes the following contents: The optimization of chemical composition and heat treatment condition; the production and evaluation of a 70 tons trial rotor forging by the application of VCD (Vacuum Carbon Deoxidation) process; the production and evaluation of a 43 tons trial ingot by the application of ESR (Electroslag Remelting) ingot process; and the production and evaluation of rotor forgings for the commercial power plant.

  9. Ultrasonic Defect Characterization in Heavy Rotor Forgings by Means of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique and Optimization Methods.

    PubMed

    Fendt, Karl T; Mooshofer, Hubert; Rupitsch, Stefan J; Ermert, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive testing of steel forgings aims at the detection and classification of material inhomogeneities to ensure the components fitness for use. Due to the high price and safety critical nature of large forgings for turbomachinery, there is great interest in the application of imaging algorithms to inspection data. However, small flaw indications that cannot be sufficiently resolved have to be characterized using amplitude-based quantification. One such method is the distance gain size method, which converts the maximum echo amplitudes into the diameters of penny-shaped equivalent size reflectors. The approach presented in this contribution combines the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) with an iterative inversion scheme to locate and quantify small flaws in a more reliable way. Ultrasonic inspection data obtained in a pulse-echo configuration are reconstructed by means of an Synthetic Focusing Technique (SAFT). From the reconstructed data, the amount and approximate location of small flaws are extracted. These predetermined positions, along with the constrained defect model of a penny-shaped crack, provide the initial parametrization for an elastodynamic simulation based on the Kirchhoff approximation. The identification of the optimal parameter set is achieved through an iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method. By testing the characterization method on a series of flat-bottom holes under laboratory conditions, we demonstrate that the procedure is applicable over a wide range of defect sizes. To show suitability for large forging inspection, we additionally evaluate the inspection data of a large generator shaft forging of 0.6-m diameter.

  10. 77 FR 23496 - Boundary Revision of Valley Forge National Historical Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Boundary Revision of Valley Forge National Historical Park AGENCY: National Park... to the boundary of Valley Forge National Historical Park, pursuant to the authority specified below... ``Valley Forge National Historical Park Proposed Boundary Expansion, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania...

  11. Advanced numerical models for the thermo-mechanical-metallurgical analysis in hot forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducato, Antonino; Fratini, Livan; Micari, Fabrizio

    2013-05-01

    In the paper a literature review of the numerical modeling of thermo-mechanical-metallurgical evolutions of a metal in hot forging operations is presented. In particular models of multiaxial loading tests are considered for carbon steels. The collected examples from literature regard phases transformations, also martensitic transformations, morphologies evolutions and transformation plasticity phenomena. The purpose of the tests is to show the correlation between the mechanical and the metallurgical behavior of a carbon steel during a combination of several types of loads. In particular a few mechanical tests with heat treatment are analyzed. Furthermore, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy is considered. Such material is a multi-phasic alloy, at room temperature made of two main different phases, namely Alpha and Beta, which evolve during both cooling and heating stages. Several numerical applications, conducted using a commercial implicit lagrangian FEM code are presented too. This code can conduct tri-coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical simulations of forming processes. The numerical model has been used to carry out a 3D simulation of a forging process of a complex shape part. The model is able to take into account the effects of all the phenomena resulting from the coupling of thermal, mechanical and metallurgical events. As simulation results strongly depend on the accuracy of input data, physical simulation experiments on real-material samples are carried out to characterize material behavior during phase transformation.

  12. The effect of hot working on structure and strength of a precipitation strengthened austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Carr, M.J.; Krauss, G.

    1984-02-01

    The development of microstructure and strength during forging a ..gamma..' strengthened austenitic stainless steel, JBK-75, was investigated. The specimens were deformed in a strain range of 0.16 to 1.0, from 800 /sup 0/C to 1080 /sup 0/C at approximate strain rates of 2 (press forging) and 2 X 10/sup 3/ S/sup -1/ (high energy rate forging). Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing as-forged and forged and aged specimens. The alloy exhibited a wide variety of structures and properties within the range of forging parameters studied. Deformation at the higher strain rate via high energy rate forging resulted in unrecovered substructures and high strengths at low forging temperatures, and static recrystallization and low strengths at high temperatures. In contrast, however, deformation at the lower strain rate via press forging resulted in retention of the well developed subgrain structure and associated high strength produced at high forging temperatures and strains. At lower temperatures and strains during press forging a subgrain structure formed preferentially at high angle grain boundaries, apparently by a creep-type deformation mechanism. Dynamic recrystallization was not an important restoration mechanism for any of the forging conditions. The results are interpreted on the basis of stacking fault energy and the accumulation of strain energy during hot working. The significance of microstructural differences for equivalent deformation conditions (iso-Z, where Z is the Zener-Holloman parameter) is discussed in relation to the utilization of Z for predicting hot work structures and strengths. Aging showed that ..gamma..' precipitation is not affected by substructure and that the strengthening contributions were independent and additive. Applications for these findings are discussed in terms of process design criteria.

  13. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  14. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  15. View west of small tooling and forging dies in Blacksmith ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of small tooling and forging dies in Blacksmith Shop, Boilermakers Department, east side of building 57; during World War II approximately forty women were employed as blacksmith's forging a variety of small tools; these may be the tools they used. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Structure Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. 17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied from a photograph by Thomas S. Bronson, 'Group at Whitney Factory, 5 November 1906,' NHCHSL. The most reliable view of the fuel storage sheds and foundry, together with a view of the forge building. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. 22 CFR 121.10 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. 121.10 Section 121.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.10 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. The...

  18. 18. INTERIOR VIEW OF ROUGH FORGED TOOLS (FOREGROUND) WHICH ARE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR VIEW OF ROUGH FORGED TOOLS (FOREGROUND) WHICH ARE PRE-HEATED IN THE FURNACE (REAR RIGHT) AND THEN FORGED WITH THE BRADLEY HAMMER (LEFT) AS SHOWN BY JAMES GLASPELL - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  19. Meso- and microstructural features of steel 12GBA produced by different methods of thermomechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevyagina, Lyudmila S.; Panin, Viktor E.; Korznikov, Aleksandr V.; Gordienko, Antonina I.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of uniform isothermal forging (UF) and warm rolling (WR) on the structure of low-carbon tube steel 12GBA has been studied. It is shown that the structures of the treated steel differ significantly by the effective grain size, density of all boundaries, percentage of density of high angle boundaries (HABs) and low angle boundaries (LABs), carbide phase morphology in the perlite zone and texture of the ferrite phase. After forging steel has the greatest degree of grain refinement, maximum boundary density, and overrepresentation of LABs. This structural state of steel is characterized by a double-component texture: (001) + (111), <001> + <101>, while after warm rolling steel has a mono-component texture (111) <101>. The evident differences in the steel structure treated by WR and UF may have dual effect on the strength and plasticity properties of steel and its fracture behavior.

  20. Reliability of system for precise cold forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krušič, Vid; Rodič, Tomaž

    2017-06-01

    The influence of scatter of principal input parameters of the forging system on the dimensional accuracy of product and on the tool life for closed-die forging process is presented in this paper. Scatter of the essential input parameters for the closed-die upsetting process was adjusted to the maximal values that enabled the reliable production of a dimensionally accurate product at optimal tool life. An operating window was created in which exists the maximal scatter of principal input parameters for the closed-die upsetting process that still ensures the desired dimensional accuracy of the product and the optimal tool life. Application of the adjustment of the process input parameters is shown on the example of making an inner race of homokinetic joint from mass production. High productivity in manufacture of elements by cold massive extrusion is often achieved by multiple forming operations that are performed simultaneously on the same press. By redesigning the time sequences of forming operations at multistage forming process of starter barrel during the working stroke the course of the resultant force is optimized.

  1. Processing and structure of high-energy-rate-forged 21-6-9 and 304L forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Carr, M.J.; Krenzer, R.W.; Krauss, G.

    1981-08-10

    Two 304L and three Nitronic 40 (21-6-9) high energy rate processed forgings were studied to determine interrelationships that exist between forging history, mechanical properties, microstructure, macrostructure, and substructure. A striking observation is the wide variation in properties and structure between different forgings and also between different locations within an individual forging. Variations were related to either finishing temperature of the last forming stage or to the forming sequence. For example, lower finishing temperatures resulted in higher dislocation densities and therefore higher strengths. Higher finishing temperatures promoted dynamic recrystallization, lower dislocation densities, and lower strengths. With respect to forming sequence, locations in the forging which are formed first undergo a number of additional thermal cycles while the rest of the part is being formed. These areas are usually recrystallized and have lower dislocation densities, and therefore lower strengths relative to locations formed later in the sequence.

  2. Initial billet and forging dies shape optimization: Application on an axisymetrical forging with a hammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal

    2011-05-01

    In metal forming process, the forging die design is the most important step for products quality control. Reasonable dies shape can not only reduce raw material cost but also improving material flow and eliminating defects. The main objective of this paper is to obtain some optimal parameters of the initial billet and forging dies shape according to the simulation results of a two-step metal forming process (platting step and forging step). To develop this metal forming process optimization system several numerical tools are required: geometric modelling (CATIA V5™), FEM analysis (ABAQUS®), work-flow control and optimization computation (MODEFRONTIER®). This study is done in three stages: simulating the two-step metal forming process, building surrogate meta-models to relate response and variables and optimizing the process by using advanced optimization algorithms. In this paper, a two-step axisymmetric metal forming project was studied as an example. By using our simulation model, we get 581 correct real simulation results totally. According to all these real values, we build the surrogate meta-models and obtain Pareto points for a two-objective optimization process. The choice of a solution in all Pareto points will be done by the engineer who can choose his best values according to their criterions of project.

  3. Forging of compressor blades: Temperature and ram velocity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Zhen, K.; Chan, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Forging is one of the most widely used manufacturing process for making high-strength, structurally integrated, impact and creep-resistant Ti-6Al-4V compressor blades for jet engines. In addition, in modern metal forming technology, finite element analysis method and computer modeling are being extensively employed for initial evaluation and optimization of various processes, including forging. In this study, DEFORM, a rigid viscoplastic two-dimensional finite element code was used to study the effects of initial die temperature and initial ram velocity on the forging process. For a given billet, die temperature and ram velocity influence the strain rate, temperature distribution,and thus the flow stress of the material. The die temperature and the ram velocity were varied over the range 300 to 700 F and 15--25 in./sec, respectively, to estimate the maximum forging load and the total energy required to forge compressor blades. The ram velocity was assumed to vary linearly as a function of stroke. Based on the analysis,it was found the increasing the die temperature from 300 to 700 F decreases the forging loads by 19.9 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 43 F. Similarly, increasing the initial ram velocity from 15 to 25 in./sec decreases the forging loads by 25.2 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 36 F. The nodal temperature distribution is bimodal in each case. The forging energy required to forge the blades is approximately 18 kips *in./in.

  4. Nano-porous layer on steel surface as lubricant carrier.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hiroshi; Kawajiri, Shogo; Takahira, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2011-02-01

    In cold forging of steels, metal soap on zinc-phosphate coating is excellent lubrication system. However, the system is not only less productive, but produces hazardous wastes. In this study, an alternative lubrication system using surface porous layer is proposed. Surface oxide on low carbon steel turns into porous layer by chemical reduction using hydrogen. It is found that liquid lubricant decreases the friction coefficient in compression greatly. The porous surface enhances the decrease, especially in the cases of heavy deformation.

  5. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  6. View northeast of tooling for forging marine hardware in blacksmith ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast of tooling for forging marine hardware in blacksmith shop, east side of building 57. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Structure Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. Dynamic material modeling in hot forging. Progress report 4

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gizawy, A.S.

    1992-03-01

    A dynamic material model that characterized flow behavior in the workpiece under forging conditions was required to optimize the process and produce defect-free product at minimum cost. Constitutive equations describe the relationship between stress, strain rate, and temperature under forging conditions. Using aluminum alloy 7050, numerous deformation experiments were conducted to fully characterize constitutive equation variables. A thorough description of the experimental arrangement was provided. Flow data and efficiency data were assembled into a three-dimensional plot of temperature vs. strain rate vs. deformation efficiency to produce an efficiency map. The efficiency map provided the information required for optimization of forging process design. The results of dynamic modeling of the material were used in simulating the isothermal forging of a particular part. Recommendations concerning optimum preform design and processing conditions were reported.

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK AREA ON WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK AREA ON WEST SIDE OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING EAST. FORGE IS IN FOREGROUND, WITH THE ANVIL BLOCK JUST TO THE RIGHT AND BEHIND IT. A TRAM CAR IS UPSIDE DOWN TO THE LEFT OF THE FORGE. THE PIPE GOING INTO THE FORGE ON THE RIGHT CARRIED COMPRESSED AIR TO BLOW THE COALS. AT CENTER RIGHT ON THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS FOR THE ORE BUCKETS. AT CENTER LEFT IS A BRAKE WHEEL. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES ARE JUST BELOW THIS WHEEL. THE FRONT END OF THE TERMINAL IS JUST OFF FRAME ON THE RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. Critical current densities in Bi-2223 sinter forgings.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Fisher, B. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Harris, N. C.; Murayama, N.

    1999-07-23

    (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Bi-2223) bars, prepared by sinter forging, exhibited good phase purity and strong textures with the c axes of the Bi-2223 grains parallel to the forging direction. The initial zero-field critical current density (J{sub c}) of the bars was 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2}, but because the forged bars were uncoated, this value decreased with repeated thermal cycling. J{sub c} as a function of applied magnetic field magnitude and direction roughly followed the dependencies exhibited by Ag-sheathed Bi-2223 tapes, but the forged bars were more strongly dependent on field strength and less strongly dependent on field angle.

  10. Modeling microstructural development during the forging of Waspaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    A model for predicting the evolution of microstructure in Waspaloy during thermomechanical processing was developed in terms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), metadynamic recrystallization, and grain growth phenomena. Three sets of experiments were conducted to develop the model: (1) preheating tests to model grain growth prior to hot deformation; (2) compression tests in a Gleeble testing machine with different deformation and cooling conditions to model DRX, metadynamic recrystallization, and short time grain growth during the post deformation dwell period and cooling; and (3) pancake and closed die forging tests conducted in a manufacturing environment to verify and refine the model. The microstructural model was combined with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict microstructure development during forging of Waspaloy. Model predictions showed good agreement with microstructures obtained in actual isothermal and hammer forgings carried out at a forging shop.

  11. View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge site in foreground - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  12. Total quality management of forged products through finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, U.; Rachakonda, S.; Chandrasekharan, S.

    The paper reviews the entire thermo-mechanical history experienced by a complex shaped, high strength forged part during all stages of its manufacturing process, i.e. forging, heat treatment, and machining. It examines the current practice of selecting the process parameters using finite element simulation of forging and quenching operations on an individual basis. Some recent work related to the simulation of aging and machining operations is summarized. The capabilities of several well-known finite element codes for these individual simulations are compared. Then, an integrated simulation approach is presented which will permit the optimization of process parameters for all operations, as opposed to a single operation. This approach will ensure a total quality management of forged products by avoiding costly problems which, under the current practice, are detected only at the end of the manufacturing cycle, i.e. after final machining.

  13. 6. NORTH END OF MACHINE SHOP. FORGE SHOP (HAER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. NORTH END OF MACHINE SHOP. FORGE SHOP (HAER No. CA-326-K) ON LEFT, FORD PLANT IN DISTANCE, NE BY 60. - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Machine Shop, 1311 Canal Boulevard, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  14. Wear Mechanism of Hot Forging Die from the Viewpoint of Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mae, Y.; Poonnayom, P.; Wongkrajang, A.

    2009-02-01

    The occurrence of plastic flow, the formation of the re-quenched zone and heat cracks, etc. have been considered as the reasons for the wear of hot forging die. Besides, the diffusion of the alloying elements within the die steel into works also can be considered to be one reason, because the work contacts the die surface under high pressure and flows over the die surface developing a new surface per each forging stroke and it is repeated many times. In this study, it is assumed that a depleted zone is formed on the die surface as a result of diffusion of alloying elements within the die into the work, the depleted zone breaks away at the critical thickness, and the break-away thickness is equal to the diffusion distances of elements. From these assumptions, the wear rates were calculated. The results of calculation show the remarkable dependence of the wear rate on the temperature on the die surface, and this coincides well with the existent experimental results.

  15. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-17

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy ({alpha}+{beta}) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  16. Structural aspect of the manifestation of thermal brittleness in a maraging steel of the EI-832 type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Kruglov, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    The character of fracture, phase composition, and structure of a maraging steel of the EI-832 type in large forged pieces (90 mm and more in cross section) have been investigated. Structural factors responsible for the level of impact toughness of the steel subjected to aging in a forged state and after quenching have been revealed. It has been shown that for this steel the manifestation of thermal brittleness that is caused by precipitation of dispersed titanium carbonitrides at grain boundaries and is not eliminated upon subsequent conventional heat treatment is possible.

  17. 77 FR 16207 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Final Results of the Expedited Third...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    .... Stainless steel bar means articles of stainless steel in straight lengths that have been either hot-rolled, forged, turned, cold-drawn, cold-rolled or otherwise cold-finished, or ground, having a uniform solid... hot-rolled bar or from straightened and cut rod or wire, and reinforcing bars that have indentations...

  18. Correcting the Stress-Strain Curve in the Stroke-Rate Controlling Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Chiba, A.

    2009-05-01

    In this article, a detailed description of the friction correction, adiabatic correction, and the correction from the stroke-rate controlling process into the strain-rate controlling process on the IHS38MSV hypoeutectoid steel is provided. By using compensated data, processing maps were plotted and used to predict the optimum hot forging process. The compressive tests were performed at stroke rates ranging from 0.12 to 120 mm/s and temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1200 °C by using ThermecMaster-Z equipment. The results showed that the correction by instant friction coefficient, which was carried out on the basis of previous research, could be extended to wider experimental conditions. The corrected data from both stroke-rate controlling and strain-rate controlling processes were in good agreement with each other, indicating that the present correction from the stroke rate into the strain-rate correction is practical and appropriate.

  19. Nanoprecipitates in Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Lu, Zhao Ping; Shim, Sang Hoon

    2007-01-01

    The creep strength of ferritic steels can be substantially improved by the incorporation of a high number density of nano-scale dispersoids. Examples for such alloys are the oxide dispersion strengthened steels MA956, MA957, and PM2000. The dispersoids in these steels contain Y and Ti, or Y and Al. They can be as small as a few nanometers in size. Processing is traditionally carried out by mechanical alloying of elemental or pre-alloyed powders mixed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The goal of the present research is to identify alternative ways of producing ultrafine dispersoids. One possible way is internal oxidation, in which reactive elements dissolved in a metallic matrix are selectively oxidized. Internal oxidation experiments were carried out with Fe-Y, Fe-Ti-Y, and Fe-Al-Y precursors. Microstructural analysis showed that dispersoid dimensions as small as 10 nm could be achieved. Atomized Fe-0.25 at% Y powder was internally oxidized and consolidated by hot forging. An increase in the high-temperature creep strength by {approx} 20% was observed. Since it is likely that the composition of the precursor alloys is crucial for maximizing the number density and thermal stability of the oxides, experiments allowing the rapid screening of different compositions have been initiated.

  20. Nanoprecipitates in Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Kad, Bimal

    2008-01-01

    The creep strength of ferritic steels can be substantially improved by the incorporation of a high number density of nano-scale dispersoids. Examples for such alloys are the oxide dispersion strengthened steels MA956, MA957, and PM2000. The dispersoids in these steels contain Y and Ti, or Y and Al. They can be as small as a few nanometers in size. Processing is traditionally carried out by mechanical alloying of elemental or pre-alloyed powders mixed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The goal of the present research is to identify alternative ways of producing ultrafine dispersoids. One possible way is internal oxidation, in which reactive elements dissolved in a metallic matrix are selectively oxidized. Internal oxidation experiments were carried out with Fe-Y, Fe-Ti-Y, and Fe-Al-Y precursors. Microstructural analysis showed that dispersoid dimensions as small as 10 nm could be achieved. Atomized Fe-0.25 at% Y powder was internally oxidized and consolidated by hot forging. An increase in the high-temperature creep strength by {approx} 20% was observed. Since it is likely that the composition of the precursor alloys is crucial for maximizing the number density and thermal stability of the oxides, experiments allowing the rapid screening of different compositions have been initiated.

  1. Fracture toughness properties of welded stainless steels for tritium service

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    1994-10-01

    Studies to determine tritium exposure effects on the properties of welded steels are being conducted. In this investigation, the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) Incoloy 903 were. Fracture toughness measurements were conducted for tritium-exposed samples in the as-forged condition and compared with welded samples. Tritium-exposed HERF Incoloy 903 had fracture toughness values that were 33% lower than those for unexposed HERF Incoloy 903. Tritium-exposed welded samples had fracture toughness values that were just 8% of the unexposed HERF alloys and 28% of unexposed welded alloys.

  2. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  3. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Magnetotelluric Inversion

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    The Coso Magnetotelluric (MT) dataset of which the West Flank FORGE MT data is a subset, was collected by Schlumberger / WesternGeco and initially processed by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy. The 2011 data was based on 99 soundings that were centered on the West Flank geothermal prospect. The new soundings along with previous data from 2003 and 2006 were incorporated into a 3D inversion. Full impedance tensor data were inverted in the 1-3000 Hz range. The modelling report notes several noise sources, specifically the DC powerline that is 20,000 feet west of the survey area, and may have affected data in the 0.02 to 10 Hz range. Model cell dimensions of 450 x 450 x 65 feet were used to avoid computational instability in the 3D model. The fit between calculated and observed MT values for the final model run had an RMS value of 1.807. The included figure from the WesternGeco report shows the sounding locations from the 2011, 2006 and 2003 surveys.

  4. Abbreviated annealing of high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zablotskii, V.K.; Bartel, G.P.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigate the structural and phase transformations during the heating, holding, and cooling of high-speed steels of two basic groups: tungsten (R18, R12, R12F3, and R12F4K5) and tungsten-molybdenum (R6M5, 10R6M5, R6M5K5, R8M3, 10R8M3, and R8M3K6S) steels in the forged state. They propose a cooling regime with complete alpha-gamma recrystallization whose implementation at a Soviet steel plant has made it possible to reduce the duration of heat treatment and increase productivity by 20% in cutting the annealed high-speed steels.

  5. Fatigue crack growth properties of a cryogenic structural steel at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Konosu, Shinji; Kishiro, Tomohiro; Ivano, O.; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The structural materials of the coils of superconducting magnets utilized in thermonuclear fusion reactors are used at liquid helium (4.2 K) temperatures and are subjected to repeated thermal stresses and electromagnetic forces. A high strength, high toughness austenitic stainless steel (12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N) has recently been developed for large, thick-walled components used in such environments. This material is non-magnetic even when subjected to processing and, because it is a forging material, it is advantageous as a structural material for large components. In the current research, a large forging of 12Cr-12Ni-10Mn-5Mo-0.2N austenitic stainless steel, was fabricated to a thickness of 250 mm, which is typical of section thicknesses encountered in actual equipment. The tensile fatigue crack growth properties of the forging were examined at liquid helium temperature as a function of specimen location across the thickness of the forging. There was virtually no evidence of variation in tensile strength or fatigue crack growth properties attributable to different sampling locations in the thickness direction and no effect of thickness due to the forging or solution treatment associated with large forgings was observed.

  6. FEM simulation of hot forging process to predict microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Hong; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Song, Hong-Wu; Cheng, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Two phase titanium alloy-TC11 alloy and Superalloy-IN718 alloy are being considered for high-temperature structural applications in aero-engine because of their excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties of their forgings are sensitive to the microstructure. Therefore, it is crucial to obtain a corresponding microstructure by controlling the hot working process. For the forging of TC11 alloy, the ingot break down in the subtransus region is an important process which acted as the primary role in the transformation of lamellar structure to equiaxed one as well as its poor formability because of lower deformation temperature. In this paper, the lamellar globularization kinetics and fracture behavior during forging are studied and modeled. For the hot forging of IN718 alloy. the grain size evolution is an important process. As the δ phase in the alloy can control grain growth through the strong pinning effect, the effect of δ phase on the microstructure evolution during hot working has been considered in this paper, and the microstructure evolution model has been established. As a applications, The lamellar globularization and fracture during the subtransus cogging process of large size TC11 alloy billet, and the microstructure development during the hot forging process of IN718 alloy turbine disk have been investigated commercial FE Software with user subroutines. The prediction results showed good agreement with the actual ones.

  7. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2009-07-30

    Tritium reservoirs are constructed from welded stainless steel forgings. While these steels are highly resistant to the embrittling effects of hydrogen isotopes and helium from tritium decay; they are not immune. Tritium embrittlement is an enhanced form of hydrogen embrittlement because of the presence of helium-3 from tritium decay which nucleates as nanometer-sized bubbles on dislocations, grain boundaries, and other microstructural defects. Steels with decay helium bubble microstructures are hardened and less able to deform plastically and become more susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and its isotopes. Ductility, elongation-to-failure, and fracture toughness are reduced by exposures to tritium and the reductions increase with time as helium-3 builds into the material from tritium permeation and radioactive decay. Material and forging specifications have been developed for optimal material compatibility with tritium. These specifications cover composition, mechanical properties, and select microstructural characteristics like grain size, flow-line orientation, inclusion content, and ferrite distribution. For many years, the forming process of choice for reservoir manufacturing was high-energy-rate forging (HERF), principally because the DOE forging facility owned only HERF hammers. Today, some reservoir forgings are being made that use a conventional, more common process known as press forging (PF or CF). One of the chief differences between the two forging processes is strain rate: Conventional hydraulic or mechanical forging presses deform the metal at 4-8 ft/s, about ten-fold slower than the HERF process. The material specifications continue to provide successful stockpile performance by ensuring that the two forging processes produce similar reservoir microstructures. While long-term life storage tests have demonstrated the general tritium compatibility of tritium reservoirs, fracture-toughness properties of both conventionally forged and high

  8. The influence of deformation, annealing and recrystallisation on oxide nanofeatures in oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl; Tatlock, Gordon J.

    2017-04-01

    This work demonstrates that Y-Ti oxide nanofeatures, observed in as-extruded oxide dispersion strengthened steel, are structurally modified by cold forging. A 950 °C heat treatment promoted restructuring of the deformed particles and partial recrystallisation of the cold forged alloy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that cuboid shaped nanofeatures were deformed during forging, which resulted in high number densities of lens shaped yttrium-titanium oxide particles. Annealing the forged alloy promoted partial recrystallisation of the ferritic matrix. Particle morphology reverted from lens shaped, as witnessed in the deformed material, to cuboid shaped oxide nanofeatures, identical to those observed in as-extruded material. Precipitation distributions evaluated in both recrystallised and recovering grains were indistinguishable from those first measured in the as-extruded alloy. TEM images revealed a widespread orientation relationship between the oxide precipitates and the recrystallised grains; registration with the ferrite lattice was omnipresent in both recovering and recrystallised grains.

  9. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows

  10. Sigmatization of duplex forgings: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Crolet, J.L.; Corbineau, S.; Perrollet, C.P.

    1997-08-01

    An S31803 (22-05 alloy) duplex stainless steel flow-cross in service fin the H{sub 2}S-containing Saint-Faust gas field near Lacq was almost broken in two by a corrosion crack resulting from improper heat treatment. Sensitization had occurred much more rapidly than expected from the kinetics of sigma phase formation generally considered in the literature. None of the inspection techniques routinely employed in the oil and gas industry would have been capable of detecting this manufacturing defect. More stringent quality acceptance criteria are therefore necessary.

  11. Forge-Diffusion Bond Titanium Rotor Hub Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    beta temperature • of 1750°F, diffusion treated at 1900°F, water —quenched, and then overaged at 1300°F for two hours. Separately forged upper and... FRACTU RE SURFACE , TRIAL PANCAKE ASSEMBLIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 x - .— ~~- - -• FIGU RE PAGE 33. MEAN S/N CURVE FOR VARIOUS...optimum process to be an alpha—beta forging, forge—diffusion bonded at 1750°F , diffusion treated at 1900°F, water -quenched, and then overaged at

  12. West Flank Coso FORGE Magnetotelluric 3D Data

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-01-01

    This is the 3D version of the MT data for the West Flank FORGE area.The Coso geothermal field has had three Magnetotelluric (MT) datasets collected including surveys in 2003, 2006, and 2011. The final collection, in 2011, expanded the survey to the west and covers the West Flank of FORGE area.This most recent data set was collected by Schlumberger/WesternGeco and inverted by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy; the 2003 and 2006 data were integrated for these inversions in the present study.

  13. A New Definition of Shape Complexity Factor in Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ara, R. Hosseini; Poursina, M.; Golastanian, H.

    2007-04-01

    One of the main objectives of forging process design is to ensure adequate metal flow in the dies so that the desired finished part geometry can be obtained without any internal or external defects. This paper presents a preform design method which employs a new criterion based on shape complexity factor to determine the necessity of preform stages for axisymmetric forging parts. The presented criterion was tested on several examples using finite element method to verify the models. Comparison of the new shape complexity factor with the other ones shows that the new criterion is more accurate in estimating the number of preform stages.

  14. 76 FR 30200 - Forging Machines; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Forging Machines; Extension of the Office of Management and... contained in the Forging Machines Standard (29 CFR 1910.218). The paperwork provisions of the Standard... ensuring that forging machines used by them are in safe operating condition, and employees are able...

  15. Processing and properties of superclean ASTM A508 Cl. 4 forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, A.V.; Handerhan, K.J.; Manzo, G.J.; Simkins, G.P.

    1988-12-31

    Steels with improved resistance to temper embrittlement are now being produced using ``superclean`` steelmaking technology. This technology involves the use of scrap control, proper electric arc furnace and ladle refining furnace practices to produce steel with very low Mn, Si, P, S and other residual impurities such as Sn, As and Sb. This technology has been applied on a production basis to modified ASTM A508 Cl- 4 material intended for high temperature pressure vessel forgings. Processing and properties of this superclean material are reviewed. In addition, the cleanliness and mechanical properties are compared to conventionally melted A508 Cl. 4 material. The ``superclean`` A508 Cl. 4 mod. was found to meet all specification requirements. In addition, the superclean material was found to possess superior upper shelf CVN properties, a lower FATT{sub 50} and NDTT, along with superior microcleanliness compared to conventional material. Finally, the superclean material was found to be immune to temper embrittlement based on the short-term embrittlement treatments examined.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN, TRITIUM, AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.; Tosten, M.; Chapman, G.

    2013-09-06

    The deformation and fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium were compared to the deformation and fracture toughness properties of the same steels heat treated at 773 K or 873 K and precharged with hydrogen. Forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with aging time after precharging because of the increase in concentration of helium from tritium decay. This study shows that forged stainless steels given a prior heat treatment and then pre-charged with hydrogen also exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with increasing time at temperature. A microstructural analysis showed that the fracture toughness reduction in the heat-treated steels was due to patches of recrystallized grains that form within the forged matrix during the heat treatment. The combination of hydrogen and the patches of recrystallized grains resulted in more deformation twinning. Heavy deformation twinning on multiple slip planes was typical for the hydrogen-charged samples; whereas, in the non-charged samples, less twinning was observed and was generally limited to one slip plane. Similar effects occur in tritium pre-charged steels, but the deformation twinning is brought on by the hardening associated with decay helium bubbles in the microstructure.

  17. Modelling of the radial forging process of a hollow billet with the mandrel on the lever radial forging machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamyshev, A. P.; Nekrasov, I. I.; Pugin, A. I.; Fedulov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) has been used in scientific research of forming technological process modelling. Among the others, the process of the multistage radial forging of hollow billets has been modelled. The model includes both the thermal problem, concerning preliminary heating of the billet taking into account thermal expansion, and the deformation problem, when the billet is forged in a special machine. The latter part of the model describes such features of the process as die calibration, die movement, initial die temperature, friction conditions, etc. The results obtained can be used to define the necessary process parameters and die calibration.

  18. Electronic Portfolios in Teacher Education: Forging a Middle Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strudler, Neal; Wetzel, Keith

    2012-01-01

    At a time when implementation of electronic portfolios (EPs) is expanding, the issues of clarifying their purposes continue to plague teacher education programs. Are student-centered uses of EPs compatible with program assessment and accreditation efforts? Is this an either/or situation, or can a productive middle ground be forged? This article…

  19. Consolidation and Forging Methods for a Cryomilled Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbery, A. P.; Ahn, B.; Hayes, R. W.; Pao, P. S.; Nutt, S. R.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2008-09-01

    The method used to consolidate a cryogenically ball-milled powder is critical to the retention of superior strength along with acceptable tensile ductility in the bulk product. In this study, gas-atomized Al 5083 powder was cryomilled, hot vacuum degassed, and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) or by quasi-isostatic (QI) forging to produce low-porosity billets. The billets were then forged, either at high strain rate (without a die) or quasi-isostatically, and subsequently hot rolled to produce three 6.5-mm-thick plates. Despite extended periods at elevated temperatures and differences between the consolidation/deformation methods, a similar predominantly ultrafine grain microstructure was obtained in all three plates. The plates possessed similar ultimate tensile strengths, about 50 pct greater than standard work-hardened Al 5083. However, in terms of fracture toughness, there were significant differences between the plates. Debonding at prior cryomilled powder particle surfaces was an important fracture mechanism for “HIPped” material, leading to low toughness for crack surfaces in the plane of the plate. This effect was minimized by the implementation of double QI forging, producing plate with good isotropic fracture toughness. The type of particle boundary deformation during forging and the influence of impurities appeared to be more important in determining fracture toughness than the presence of ˜10 vol pct coarser micron-sized grains.

  20. 16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, c.1918 Photocopied from a photograph in the collection of William F. Applegate, 43 Grandview Avenue, Wallingford, Connecticut. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  1. Forging an Identity over the Life-Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiteri, Damian

    2009-01-01

    Using a social constructionist approach, this study explores the self-perceptions of young men who, when at school, were classed as boys with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). The aim is to understand how these perceptions were forged throughout the young men's life-courses resulting in changing self-identities. The study also…

  2. Sinter-forging of nanophase TiO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uchic, M.; Hofler, H.J.; Flick, W.J.; Tao, R.; Averback, R.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Kurath, P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-03-01

    Considerable effort has been directed in recent years to developing ceramic materials that can be both sintered to full density at low temperatures and processed by superplastic forming. One strategy for achieving this goal has been to reduce the particle size of the starting powder, and by anaphase processing, particles of sizes less than {approx}10 nm can now be realized. Indeed, recent studies on nanophase ceramics have demonstrated that sintering temperatures can be reduced dramatically and that nanophase ceramics have excellent potential for superplastic forming. Nevertheless, the grain growth that occurs during the processing of these new materials restricts their applicability. In nanophase (n-) TiO{sub 2}, some progress in controlling grain size has been achieved by using dopants or hot pressing. Sinter-forging offers another means to achieve this goal, although this method has been applied mostly to materials with larger grains. Studies of sinter-forging are also useful for elucidating the mechanisms of sintering and creep in ceramic materials. In the present paper, the authors examine the characteristics of sinter-forging in n-TiO{sub 2}. Only limited studies of sinter-forging have thus far been performed on well characterized powders of comparable size, and even these had a somewhat larger grain size.

  3. Family Health and Financial Literacy--Forging the Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Bonnie; Kim, Jinhee; Anderson, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    Families are at-risk of or experiencing a diminished quality of living and life in current economic times and difficult decisions are required. Health and financial literacy are the basis for wise personal and public decision making. Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals can forge connections between health and financial literacy to…

  4. Forging Consensus for Implementing Youth Socialization Policy in Northwest China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine how the provincial education media in China play a role of forging consensus among local actors responsible for the implementation of new centrally-promulgated youth socialization policy. In doing so, it also explores the tension among three of the Chinese state's claims to legitimacy: economic development,…

  5. Forging an Identity over the Life-Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiteri, Damian

    2009-01-01

    Using a social constructionist approach, this study explores the self-perceptions of young men who, when at school, were classed as boys with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). The aim is to understand how these perceptions were forged throughout the young men's life-courses resulting in changing self-identities. The study also…

  6. The Valley Forge Encampment: Epic on the Schuylkill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, John B. B., Jr.

    Valley Forge, outside Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), has long been recognized as the site of a great victory of the human spirit. Eleven thousand men including Blacks and Indians resided there during the winter of 1777-78 and triumphed over cold, starvation, nakedness, disease, and uncertainty. The encampment site was unprepared for the tattered,…

  7. The Valley Forge Encampment: Epic on the Schuylkill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, John B. B., Jr.

    Valley Forge, outside Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), has long been recognized as the site of a great victory of the human spirit. Eleven thousand men including Blacks and Indians resided there during the winter of 1777-78 and triumphed over cold, starvation, nakedness, disease, and uncertainty. The encampment site was unprepared for the tattered,…

  8. Influence of alloying elements on corrosion resistance of chromium--nickel steels in alkaline medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevskii, L.S.; Ebanoidze, D.D.; Kolesnikova, N.N.; Mosolov, A.V.; Shirokova, N.V.; Tovadze, F.N.

    1986-05-01

    The authors study the influence of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum on the behavior of chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels in concentrated alkali and alkali-chlorate solutions, simulating the media in partitioned alkali electrolysis evaporators. Defect-free forgings with no transcrystallization were obtained by pouring the steel into metal molds heated to 1400 degrees C. In the presence of molybdenum the passivation of the steels becomes more difficult, and as a result the corrosion potentials of certain steels in a chlorate-containing solution are much more negative than those of their molybdenum-free analogs.

  9. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  10. Clean/superclean steel rotors for electric utility applications

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.

    1996-12-31

    Improved cleanliness is perhaps the only approach that results in simultaneous improvement in strength and ductility at elevated temperatures as well as toughness at low temperatures of steels. In addition, superclean steels in which manganese and silicon have also been reduced provide greater resistance to stress corrosion cracking than conventional steels. Major projects are underway worldwide to promote the use of clean/superclean steel rotor and disk forgings, both for low temperature and for high temperature applications in steam and combustion turbines. An international workshop sponsored by EPRI was held in 1995 in London, at which turbine manufacturers and steelmakers discussed ongoing activities with respect to clean steels. This paper will review EPRI research in th area and provide an overview of recent developments.

  11. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mabruri, Efendi Anwar, Moch Syaiful Prifiharni, Siska Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  12. Sensitization and tunneling corrosion of austenitic type 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, C.A.; Wolynec, S.

    1998-02-01

    Sensitization of type 347 (UNS S34700) austenitic stainless steel (SS) samples removed from forged bars was investigated using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) method and the weight-loss technique of ASTM A 262, Practice B., A normal and a low-carbon steel were investigated. After solution-annealing at 1,050 C, the two steels were submitted to sensitization treatments at 550 C, 670 C, 790 C, and 910 C for times varying from 1 h to 130 h. The steel with normal carbon content also was solution-annealed at 1.140 C and submitted to the same sensitization treatments for times varying from 1 h to 62 h. Correlation between results obtained by the two techniques was very poor. The lack of correlation was ascribed to tunneling corrosion, which is typical of forged steels, in addition to intergranular corrosion resulting from sensitization. The electrochemical test was most sensitive to corrosion by sensitization. The Practice B test did not discriminate between the two types of attack. The steel solution-annealed at higher temperature was more susceptible to sensitization.

  13. Superclean steel development: A guide for utility use

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has actively encouraged and sponsored a number of research projects to develop superclean 3. 5NiCrMoV steel for low pressure turbine rotors. Such steel is highly resistant to temper embrittlement and will thus facilitate increased efficiency in electricity generation through the use of higher operating temperatures and improvements in design. Steels with impurity contents typical of the superclean specification can be manufactured for production rotors with properties that equal or exceed those for conventional 3.5NiCrMoV rotors in every detail. Of particular interest are the results that the superclean steels appear to be virtually resistant to temper embrittlement to a temperature of 500{degree}C. The objective of this users guide is to assist US utilities with decisions about when to adopt superclean steel for new or replacement rotor forgings by providing an overview of superclean steel developments and a summary of the properties to be expected of production rotor forgings. 57 refs., 26 figs.

  14. Microstructure development during conventional and isothermal hot forging of a near-gamma titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L. ); Seetharaman, V. ); Jain, V.K. . Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The breakdown of the lamellar preform microstructure in the ingot metallurgy near-gamma titanium aluminide, Ti-45.5Al-2Cr-2Nb (atomic percent), was investigated. Microstructures developed during canned, conventional hot forging were compared to those from isothermal hot forging. The higher rate of deformation in conventional forging led to considerably finer and almost completely broken-down structures in the as-forged condition. Several nontraditional approaches, including the isothermal forming of a metastable microstructure (so-called alpha forging'') and the inclusion of a short static recrystallization anneal during forging, were found to produce a more fully broken-down structure in as-isothermally forged conditions. Despite the noticeable microstructure differences after forging, a conventionally and isothermally forged material responded similarly during heat treatment. In both cases, almost totally recrystallized structures of either equiaxed gamma or transformed alpha grains surrounded by fine gamma grains were produced depending on the heat-treatment temperature. Metallography on forged and heat-treated pancake macroslices was useful in delineating small differences in composition not easily detected by analytical methods.

  15. First Results of Energy Saving at Process Redesign of Die Forging Al-Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelnjak, Tomaz; Kuzman, Karl; Kokol, Anton

    2011-05-04

    The contribution deals with eco-friendly solutions for shortened production chains of forging light alloys. During the die forging operations a remarkable amount of material goes into the flash and later on into chips during finish machining. These low value side products are rich with embedded energy therefore recycling or reprocessing could be very energy saving procedure.In cooperation with a die forging company a shortened reprocessing cycle has been studied starting from re-melting the forging flash and without additional heating to cast preforms for subsequent die forging. As such preforms have not as good formability characteristics as those done from extruded billets the isothermal forging process has been adopted. First results showed that without cracks and other defects the formability is sufficient for a broad spectrum of forgings.To improve the formability a homogenization process of cast preforms has been implemented. As the process started immediately after casting, amount of additional energy for heating was minimized. To reduce voids forging process was redesigned in a way to assure greater hydrostatic pressures in parts during forging. First results were promising therefore research is going towards improving processes without adding significantly more energy as it is needed for casting with homogenization and die forging.

  16. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point loaded beryllium bend specimens cut from hot pressed block and a forged disk. These specimens had plane proportions conforming to ASTM E 399 and covered a thickness range of from 1/32 to 1/2 in. Two sets of bend specimens were tested, one having fatigue cracks and the other 0.5 mil radius notches. One objective of the investigation was the development of techniques to produce fatigue cracks in accordance with the procedures specified in ASTM E 399. This objective was achieved for the hot pressed material. In plane cracks were not consistently produced in the specimens cut from forged stock.

  17. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE ArcGIS data 2

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    archive of ArcGIS data from the West Flank FORGE site located in Coso, California. Archive contains: 8 shapefiles polygon of the 3D geologic model polylines of the traces 3D modeled faults polylines of the fault traces from Duffield and Bacon, 1980 polygon of the West Flank FORGE site polylines of the traces of the geologic cross-sections (cross-sections in a separate archive in the GDR) polylines of the traces of the seismic reflection profiles through and adjacent to the West Flank site (seismic reflection profiles in a separate archive in the GDR) points of the well collars in and around the West Flank site polylines of the surface expression of the West Flank well paths

  18. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point loaded beryllium bend specimens cut from hot pressed block and a forged disk. These specimens had plane proportions conforming to ASTM E 399 and covered a thickness range of from 1/32 to 1/2 in. Two sets of bend specimens were tested, one having fatigue cracks and the other 0.5 mil radius notches. One objective of the investigation was the development of techniques to produce fatigue cracks in accordance with the procedures specified in ASTM E 399. This objective was achieved for the hot pressed material. In plane cracks were not consistently produced in the specimens cut from forged stock.

  19. Performance Assessment Method for a Forged Fingerprint Detection Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong Nyuo; Jun, In-Kyung; Kim, Hyun; Shin, Woochang

    The threat of invasion of privacy and of the illegal appropriation of information both increase with the expansion of the biometrics service environment to open systems. However, while certificates or smart cards can easily be cancelled and reissued if found to be missing, there is no way to recover the unique biometric information of an individual following a security breach. With the recognition that this threat factor may disrupt the large-scale civil service operations approaching implementation, such as electronic ID cards and e-Government systems, many agencies and vendors around the world continue to develop forged fingerprint detection technology, but no objective performance assessment method has, to date, been reported. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a methodology designed to evaluate the objective performance of the forged fingerprint detection technology that is currently attracting a great deal of attention.

  20. Pillars of Power: Silver and Steel of the Ottoman Empire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, N.

    The Ottoman Empire was forged over disintegrating Byzantium, stretching across Anatolia and the Balkans and ruled for almost five centuries. One crucial parameter that allowed for its quick expansion has been a combination of economic wealth and superiority of armed forces. The Ottomans succeeded in both sectors by promoting innovative technology in the field of silver and steel production for supplying their monetary system and weapons industry. Rich mines and smelting workshops provided increased output in metals, allowing for quick expansion and economic growth. Some of the major centres for silver and steel production are being discussed in this paper in conjunction with analytical data from smelting residues.

  1. Isothermal Roll Forging of T55 Compressor Blades. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Forge Deformation on Delta Ferrite Bonding 11 Microstructure of Molybdenum Alloy MT-104 Die Facings 19 12 Chemical Analysis of MT-104 Powder and...dark etching islands of delta ferrite , containing finely precipitated austenite, in a lighter etching matrix of martensite . Carbide precipitation...able as it consists of tempered martensite with discontinuous delta ferrite , and there is no evidence of heavy grain boundary carbides. All surface

  2. Internal Shear Forging Processes for Missile Primary Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-20

    34Roll Extruding Precision Seamless Pipe and Tubing ," Metal Progress, June 1977, pp. 28-31. See also "Recent Advances m in Roll Extrusion ," in Rotary...15 14 Internal roll extrusion of ribs using moving inner mandrel. 16 15 Test setup to subject tubes to continuously increasing wall...angles in extrusion , drawing, and shear forging, shown here for cold tube extrusion . .. .. . ... .. ... . .. 23 19 Buildup in various stages of shear

  3. Occurrence of shear bands in isothermal, hot forging

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Lahoti, G.D.

    1982-02-01

    The paper is a continuation of previously reported work on deformation and unstable flow in hot forging and hot torsion. The instability criterion is employed to interpret data and shear band observations. In addition, computer simulations were run to obtain detailed strain, strain rate, and stress histories. This analysis formed the basis for workability maps which delineate safe regimes for hot working in terms of strain rate and temperature. 34 refs.

  4. Forging Alliances in Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research (FAIRR): A Logic Model.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simone V; Khetani, Mary A; Yinusa-Nyahkoon, Leanne; McManus, Beth; Gardiner, Paula M; Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2017-07-01

    In a patient-centered care era, rehabilitation can benefit from researcher-clinician collaboration to effectively and efficiently produce the interdisciplinary science that is needed to improve patient-centered outcomes. The authors propose the use of the Forging Alliances in Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research (FAIRR) logic model to provide guidance to rehabilitation scientists and clinicians who are committed to growing their involvement in interdisciplinary rehabilitation research. We describe the importance and key characteristics of the FAIRR model for conducting interdisciplinary rehabilitation research.

  5. A Short Study of Large Rotary Forged Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Bottom) 7 Microstructure at mid-wall of reheat treated rotary 25 forged cylinders - Martensite- Bainite 8 Martensitic microstructure of (a) normalized...also was unsatisfactory (Table 2). The microstructure at the mid-wall of both the top and bottom showed evidence of ferrite and bainite (Figs. 1 and...austenitized, and of bainite , showing that the material transformed to austenite had been in- adequately quenched, since martensite is the desired product

  6. Open-die forging of structurally porous sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Elzey, D.M.; Wadley, H.N.G.

    1999-10-01

    Structurally porous metal sandwich panels consisting of dense face sheets and porous cores of controlled relative density can be manufactured by trapping inert gas during hot isostatic pressing and modifying its distribution via subsequent thermomechanical forming. A plane-strain solution for analyzing the open-die forging of such a plastically compressible sandwich panel is developed. An effective yield potential for the face sheet/core sandwich is constructed from the Mises yield criterion for the rigid-plastic face sheet and Doraivelu et al's density-dependent yield function for the compressible core. This effective constitutive response is used in a classical slab analysis of open-die forging. The analysis predicts the upsetting force and the distributions of pressure, core relative density, and average stresses within both the face sheet and the core. During upsetting, a zone of fully constrained material (i.e., with zero lateral strain) is predicted to occur at the center of the workpiece, and this densifies first. A densification front then advances laterally from the panel center toward the outer edges. The nonuniform densification complicates the use of forging for the production of components requiring a uniform density core.

  7. Fracture behavior of warm forged and CVD tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Connor, A.

    1991-02-14

    The fracture behavior of warm forged and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tungsten was studied. Three-point bend tests were used to determine ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) of the materials using a strain based criterion for the DBTT which was arrived at by analysis of computer code modelling results of the three-point bend test. The DBTT's of the warm forged materials were found to be considerably lower than those of the CVD materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed to characterize the fracture morphologies and fracture surface compositions of the materials. All fracture surfaces were found to be comprised entirely of tungsten with significant and varying amounts of oxygen and carbon segregation. A large portion of the fracture surfaces of the warm forged materials is intergranular, although this is not always directly evident from SEM observations. The fracture surfaces of the CVD materials were clearly 100% intergranular. Results of the study suggest that the fracture paths of the different materials were related to the DBTTs. 22 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Influence of Processing Parameters on Grain Size Evolution of a Forged Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, L. A.; Páramo, P.; Salas Zamarripa, A.; de la Garza, M.; Guerrero-Mata, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure evolution of nickel-based superalloys has a great influence on the mechanical behavior during service conditions. Microstructure modification and the effect of process variables such as forging temperature, die-speed, and tool heating were evaluated after hot die forging of a heat-resistant nickel-based alloy. Forging sequences in a temperature range from 1253 to 1323 K were considered through experimental trials. An Avrami model was applied using finite element data to evaluate the average grain size and recrystallization at different evolution zones. It was observed that sequential forging at final temperatures below 1273 K provided greater grain refinement through time-dependent recrystallization phenomena. This investigation was aim to explore the influence of forging parameters on grain size evolution in order to design a fully homogenous and refined microstructure after hot die forging.

  9. Corrosion Fatigue Mechanism on Hot-Forged AA6082 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleema, N.; Gauthier, P.; Chen, X.-G.

    An attempt has been made to understand the corrosion fatigue phenomenon in AA6082 aluminum hot-forged parts. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue experiments of forged parts produced by two different feedstock materials have been performed in the lab air and in a corrosive 3.5% NaCl solution under different stress levels. The scanning electron microscopy was used to study the rupture and to identify failure modes. With corrosion and mechanical stress working together, the failure occurred earlier in the specimens subjected to a 3.5% NaCl solution as compared to those subjected to the lab air irrespective of the material forms (cast-forged or extruded-forged). The corrosion fatigue performance of these specimens with different stress levels as well as the crack initiation and propagation were elaborated. It was found that there is no significant variation in corrosion fatigue resistance for final cast-forged and extruded-forged products.

  10. Magnetic Barkhausen noise and magneto acoustic emission in pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyra Astudillo, Miriam Rocío; López Pumarega, María Isabel; Núñez, Nicolás Marcelo; Pochettino, Alberto; Ruzzante, José

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) and Magneto Acoustic Emission (MAE) were studied in A508 Class II forged steel used for pressure vessels in nuclear power stations. The magnetic experimental determinations were completed with a macro graphic study of sulfides and the texture analysis of the material. The analysis of these results allows us to determine connections between the magnetic anisotropy, texture and microstructure of the material. Results clearly suggest that the plastic flow direction is different from the forging direction indicated by the material supplier

  11. Netcast™ Shape Casting Technology: A Technological Breakthrough that Enhances the Cost Effectiveness of Aluminum Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mark; Bruski, Richard; Groszkiewicz, Daniel; Wagstaff, Bob

    A new Direct Chill (DC) casting process is introduced to semi-continuous casting where near net shaped ingots are solidified. This process is currently being used at Alcan Engineered Cast Products (ECP) facility in Jonquiere, Canada, sectioned, then forged at Alcoa Automotive, Kentucky Casting Center (KCC). Finished forgings are machined and assembled into the Ford D/EW98 platform as suspension components. A brief description of the process and the implications on the forging process are presented.

  12. Manufacturing Methods and Technology for Production Hot Forging of Alkali Halide Lenses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    Figure Page 1 Diagram of SU-103/UA IR Imager and KBr Lens 2 2 Block Diagram of Forging Process 4 3 Polariscopic Strain Photographs of 10 KBr Starting...Crystals 6 4 Polariscopic Strain Photographs of First Stage Forging 7 Numbers 084, 085, 091, 092, and 093 Polariscopic Strain Photographs of First Stage...starting configaration. It was originally thought that the amount of strain in the starting crystal would reflect the amount of strain in the forged lens

  13. Mechanical-Property Data Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Alloy. Isothermally Forged

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    mm) RCS, reheated to 1700 F (1200 K) and forged to a 5-inch (127 mm) RCS, reheated to 1500 F ( 1089 K) and forged to a 4-inch (102 mm) octagon. A final...pass at RMI was performed in a rotary forging machine at 1500 F ( 1089 K) transfoiming the octagon 4 "to a 3-1/4-inch (8.26 mm) diameter round bar. At

  14. The effect of hydrogen isotopes and helium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.; Lohmeier, D.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy-rate-forged (HERF) stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed for the containment of hydrogen and its isotopes. Hydrogen and helium, the decay product of tritium, are known to embrittle these materials. HERF stainless steels have a relatively good resistance to hydrogen-and-helium-induced embrittlement when compared to annealed stainless steels due to their high number density of dislocations, which act as traps for hydrogen and helium. However, the degree of embrittlement in these materials can vary considerably because of microstructure and yield strength variations introduced during the forging process. In this study the effect of hydrogen and tritium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel was measured as a function of HERF yield strength in the range of 660 to 930 MPa. The effect of microstructure was studied also be conducting tensile tests with HERF and annealed samples.

  15. Hot Deformation Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of a Medium Carbon Vanadium Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutrim, Rialberth M.; Rodrigues, Samuel F.; Reis, Gedeon S.; Silva, Eden S.; Aranas, Clodualdo; Balancin, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Hot forging of steel requires application of large strains, under which conditions, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is expected to take place. In this study, torsion tests were carried out on a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel (38MnSiVS5) to simulate hot forging. Deformations were applied isothermally in the temperature range 900-1200 °C at strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1 in order to observe for the occurrence of DRX and to investigate for the microstructural evolution during straining. The shape of the flow curves indicated that the recrystallization takes place during deformation. This was supported by optical microscopy performed on the quenched samples which displayed considerable amounts of recrystallized grains. It was shown that the grain size depends on straining conditions such as strain rate and temperature. Finally, it was revealed that these process parameters can considerably affect the evolution of microstructure of industrial grade steels by means of DRX.

  16. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  17. Microstructural, mechanical, corrosion and cytotoxicity characterization of the hot forged FeMn30(wt.%) alloy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    An interest in biodegradable metallic materials has been increasing in the last two decades. Besides magnesium based materials, iron-manganese alloys have been considered as possible candidates for fabrication of biodegradable stents and orthopedic implants. In this study, we prepared a hot forged FeMn30 (wt.%) alloy and investigated its microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics as well as cytotoxicity towards mouse L 929 fibroblasts. The obtained results were compared with those of iron. The FeMn30 alloy was composed of antiferromagnetic γ-austenite and ε-martensite phases and possessed better mechanical properties than iron and even that of 316 L steel. The potentiodynamic measurements in simulated body fluids showed that alloying with manganese lowered the free corrosion potential and enhanced the corrosion rate, compared to iron. On the other hand, the corrosion rate of FeMn30 obtained by a semi-static immersion test was significantly lower than that of iron, most likely due to a higher degree of alkalization in sample surrounding. The presence of manganese in the alloy slightly enhanced toxicity towards the L 929 cells; however, the toxicity did not exceed the allowed limit and FeMn30 alloy fulfilled the requirements of the ISO 10993-5 standard.

  18. Mechanical and Microstructural Characterization of an Aluminum Bearing Trip Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Alberto; Guzmán, Alexis; De Barbieri, Flavio; Artigas, Alfredo; Carvajal, Linton; Bustos, Oscar; Garza-Montes-de Oca, Nelson F.; Colás, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of a steel able to sustain the TRIP-effect were studied. The material was prepared by taking in mind the partial substitution of silicon by aluminum following a processing route that included hot forging, hot and cold rolling, intercritical annealing, and a final bainitic isothermal treatment. The mechanical properties that were obtained resulted to be above those of commercial a 780 TRIP steel. The TRIP phenomenon was confirmed by the change in retained austenite before and after deforming the steel; X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate the volume content of retained austenite. Formability of the steel under study can be rationalized in terms of the texture developed in the material.

  19. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  20. Opacity and Mass Emission Relationship in Forging Areas of Large Caliber Metal Parts Facilities,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    was tested to he 0.0058 gr/dscf. The lubricating oil used at Flinchbaugh is designated as Hot Forging Agent 201 (HF 201), manufactured by E. F. Houghton...at the New Bedford forgi, shop are designated as MacForge 599 and MacForge-, 958. MacForge 958 is water, based, containing 1? percent oil and 24...determine mass emissions from optical density at another plant, the particulate characteristics and the ptrocess imu t be very siwilar to the plant

  1. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21

    Intensive quenching (IQ) process is an alternative way of hardening (quenching) steel parts through the use of highly agitated water and then still air. It was developed by IQ Technologies, Inc. (IQT) of Akron, Ohio. While conventional quenching is usually performed in environmentally unfriendly oil or water/polymer solutions, the IQ process uses highly agitated environmentally friendly water or low concentration water/mineral salt solutions. The IQ method is characterized by extremely high cooling rates of steel parts. In contrast to conventional quenching, where parts cool down to the quenchant temperature and usually have tensile or neutral residual surface stresses at the end of quenching. The IQ process is interrupted when the part core is still hot and when there are maximum compressive stresses deep into the parts, thereby providing hard, ductile, better wear resistant parts. The project goal was to advance the patented IQ process from feasibility to commercialization in the heat-treating and forging industries to reduce significantly energy consumption and environmental impact, to increase productivity and to enhance economic competitiveness of these industries as well as Steel, Metal Casting and Mining industries. To introduce successfully the IQ technology in the U.S. metal working industry, the project team has completed the following work over the course of this project: A total of 33 manufacturers of steel products provided steel parts for IQ trails. IQT conducted IQ demonstrations for 34 different steel parts. Our customers tested intensively quenched parts in actual field conditions to evaluate the product service life and performance improvement. The data obtained from the field showed the following: Service life (number of holes punched) of cold-work punches (provided by EHT customer and made of S5 shock-resisting steel) was improved by two to eight times. Aluminum extrusion dies provided by GAM and made of hot work H-13 steel outperformed the

  2. APT characterization of high nickel RPV steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Sokolov, M. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Russell, K. F.

    2006-06-01

    The microstructures of three high nickel content pressure vessel steels have been characterized by atom probe tomography to investigate the influence of high nickel levels on the response to neutron irradiation of high and low copper pressure vessel steels. The high-nickel, low-manganese, low-copper VVER-1000 weld and forging exhibited lower than predicted levels of embrittlement during neutron irradiation. The Palisades weld exhibits a Δ T41 J of 102 °C which was significantly lower than the value of 154 °C predicted by Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2. Atom probe tomography revealed nickel-, manganese-, and silicon-enriched precipitates in both the VVER-1000 base and weld materials after neutron irradiation. A high number density of copper-, nickel-, manganese-, silicon- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were observed in the Palisades weld after neutron irradiation. Atom probe tomography also revealed high levels of phosphorus segregation to the dislocations in all three materials.

  3. Strain Rate Effects and Temperature History Effects for Three Different Tempers of 4340 VAR Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    45, pp 60-66 March, 1978. 17. C.F. Hickey, Jr. and A. A. Anctil, "Split Heat Mechanical Property Comparison of ESR and VAR 4340 Steel ", A•MMRC...Embrittlement in High Hardness ESR 4340 Steel Forgings", ANMRC Technical Report 82-1, Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center, Watertown, Mass, January, 1982...Effects and Temperature History Effects for Three Different Tempers of 4340 VAR Steel . 0 by S. Tanimura and J. Duffy DTICr:fti Army Research Office . . 1

  4. A Study of Low-Alloy Steel 40KhGF for Controlled Hot Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, A. Ya.; Reznitskii, I. B.; Yashin, Yu. D.; Mashkin, V. A.; Soldatkin, S. A.

    2003-03-01

    Results of a study of the dependence of the structure and properties of low-carbon microalloyed steel for controlled forging and rolling on the austenization temperature, the degree of deformation, and the cooling rate after the deformation are presented. It is established that the γ → α transformation in the studied steel during cooling in any mode of controlled rolling occurs in the pearlite range. As the austenization temperature is decreased and the degree of deformation increased in the process of controlled rolling, the grain size decreases and the dispersity of the pearlite increases. The mechanical properties of the studied steel are quite stable after various variants of controlled rolling.

  5. Effect of Variants of Thermomechanical Working and Annealing Treatment on Titanium Alloy Ti6Al4V Closed Die Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, V. Anil; Kumar, P. Ram

    2016-06-01

    Performance of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V pressure vessels made of closed die forged domes of route `B' (multiple step forged and mill annealed) is reported to be better than route `A' (single/two step forged and mill annealed). Analysis revealed that forgings processed through route `B' have uniformity in microstructure and yield strength at various locations within the forging, as compared to that of route `A.' It is attributed to in-process recrystallization (dynamic as well as static) of route `B' forgings as compared to limited recrystallization of route `A' forgings. Further, post-forging recrystallization annealing (RA) effect is found to be more significant for route `A' forgings in achieving uniform microstructure and mechanical properties, since route `B' forgings have already undergone similar phenomenon during the thermomechanical working process itself. Considering prime importance of yield strength, statistical scatter in yield strength values within the forgings have been evaluated for forgings of both the routes. Standard deviation in the yield strength of route `B' forgings was lower (<10 MPa) as compared to route `A' (>15 MPa), which later became lower (~10 MPa) after RA with a minor decrease in yield strength. The present work discusses these variants of thermomechanical processing along with annealing to achieve better uniformity in properties and microstructure.

  6. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  7. Metallographic problems of the production of parts from continuously cast high-speed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supov, A. V.; Aleksandrova, N. M.; Paren'kov, S. A.; Kakabadze, R. V.; Pavlov, V. P.

    1998-09-01

    It has been assumed until recently that high-speed steels cannot be produced by the method of continuous casting. Numerous attempts to use this highly efficient technology for manufacturing such steels have failed because of breakage of the cast preforms. A solution was sought in improving the design of the continuous-casting machines (CCM), increasing the level of their automation, and using rational compositions of slag-forming mixtures (SFM). The idea was that a high-speed steel can be cast only in vertical CCM. The present work concerns regimes of secondary cooling under which the structures formed in high-speed steels provide a ductility sufficient for bending the continuously cast preform without failure. Steel R6M5 cast continuously in such a machine can easily be machined into hot-rolled preforms for sheets, wire, silver-steel rods, and other final products without a forging stage.

  8. Nonmetallic inclusions in a chromium steel intended for the power engineering industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpishon, E. Yu.; Mal'Ginov, A. N.; Romashkin, A. N.; Durynin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, S. Yu.; Shitov, E. V.; Afanas'eva, L. T.; Batov, Yu. M.

    2010-06-01

    The behavior of oxygen in the course of manufacturing large steel ingots containing 1.5-20% Cr, the formation of oxides depending on the contents of deoxidizing agents and oxygen, and the composition of the oxide phase in ingots and forgings made of the steel are considered. The steel is manufactured using an arc steel-melting furnace and unit for complex treatment of steel (ASF-ACSPU technology) and the ASF-ACSPU technology and electroslag remelting (ESR). It is shown that the oxide phase composition depends on the contents of strong deoxidizing agents and oxygen and the development of secondary oxidation. Chromium- and manganese-containing spinels are characteristic species of the secondary and tertiary oxides in the chromium steel in the case of deficient aluminum and silicon.

  9. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE 3D geologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    This is an x,y,z file of the West Flank FORGE 3D geologic model. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  10. Performance of hot stacked-sinter forged Bi2223 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noudem, J. G.; Guilmeau, E.; Chateigner, D.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Bourgault, D.

    2004-08-01

    Dense Bi2223 superconductors have been successfully formed by hot stacking-forging process (HSF). Neutron diffraction measurements were used to investigate the bulk textures of HSF-Bi2223 samples. Angular dependence of transport critical current density, Jc values were measured at various temperatures and different applied magnetic fields. Several textured pieces were hot-stacked. This procedure leads to an increase of both the sample thickness and the nominal engineering critical current ( Ic), favourable hints for use of textured-Bi2223 in power generation supplies.

  11. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for USGS-142

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    2015-11-23

    Well data for the USGS-142 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, and photos of rhyolite core samples. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  12. Cold Rotary Forging of Small Caliber Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    COMPONENTS SUPPORTED. (1) 7.62mm M219 machine gun barrel (2) 7.62mm M134 mini gun ( Gau barrel) (3) .30 caliber machine gun barrel (4) 5.56=m MI6Al rifle ...barrel (5) 50 cal. M8C spotting rifle barrel (6) 7.62mm Ml4 National Match rifle bw’rel (7) other small arms weapon barrels K -. 1. FACILITIES SUPPORTED... rifle barrels was made in conjunction with the rotary forging process. From this, a purchase description was written and submitted for bid for a

  13. Pilot Plant Forging of Hydrogenated Ti-6Al-4V.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    inserted into an M-246 nickel base superalloy die block with 713C alloy flat dies positioned on the heated die block. The entire die system was enclosed...side if neceaary and identify by block number) Hydrogenation Isothermal Forging Ring Test Titanium Alloy Ti-6A1-4V Flow Stress 20. k9Sr9Xd1’ (Continue on...5 Rack used to hold Specimens during Hydrogenation 29 6 Flow Stress-Plastic Strain Relation for Ti-6AI-4V Alloy (Heat A) with Various Hydrogen

  14. Vibration control in forge hammers. [by shock wave damping in foundation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moise, F.; Lazarescu, C.

    1974-01-01

    Special measures are discussed for calculating, designing and executing a forge hammer foundation, so that the vibrations that occur during its working will not be transmitted to neighboring machinery, workrooms and offices. These vibrations are harmful to the workers near the forge hammer.

  15. Microstructure Modeling of a Ni-Fe-Based Superalloy During the Rotary Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyda, A.; Hernández-Muñoz, G. M.; Reyes, L. A.; Zambrano-Robledo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure evolution of Ni-Fe superalloys has a great influence on the mechanical behavior during service conditions. The rotary forging process offers an alternative to conventional bulk forming processes where the parts can be rotary forged with a fraction of the force commonly needed by conventional forging techniques. In this investigation, a numerical modeling of microstructure evolution for design and optimization of the hot forging operations has been used to manufacture a heat-resistant nickel-based superalloy. An Avrami model was implemented into finite element commercial platform DEFORM 3D to evaluate the average grain size and recrystallization during the rotary forging process. The simulations were carried out considering three initial temperatures, 980, 1000, and 1050 °C, to obtain the microstructure behavior after rotary forging. The final average grain size of one case was validated by comparing with results of previous experimental work of disk forging operation. This investigation was aimed to explore the influence of the rotary forging process on microstructure evolution in order to obtain a homogenous and refined grain size in the final component.

  16. A New Method for Controlling Billet Temperature During Isothermal Die Forging of a Complex Superalloy Casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Wu, Xian-Yang

    2015-09-01

    Isothermal die forging is one of near net-shape metal-forming technologies. Strict control of billet temperature during isothermal die forging is a guarantee for the excellent properties of final product. In this study, a new method is proposed to accurately control the billet temperature of complex superalloy casing, based on the finite element simulation and response surface methodology (RSM). The proposed method is accomplished by the following two steps. Firstly, the thermal compensation process is designed and optimized to overcome the inevitable heat loss of dies during hot forging. i.e., the layout and opening time of heaters assembled on die sleeves are optimized. Then, the effects of forging speed (the pressing velocity of hydraulic machine) and its changing time on the maximum billet temperature are discussed. Furthermore, the optimized forging speed and its changing time are obtained by RSM. Comparisons between the optimized and conventional die forging processes indicate that the proposed method can effectively control the billet temperature within the optimal forming temperature range. So, the optimized die forging processes can guarantee the high volume fraction of dynamic recrystallization, and restrict the rapid growth of grains in the forged superalloy casing.

  17. Sand Abrasive Wear Behavior of Hot Forged Al 6061-TiO2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, C. S.; Bharathesh, T. P.; Verma, S. M.; Keshavamurthy, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-coated TiO2 particulate reinforced Al6061 matrix composites developed using the vortex technique were hot forged at a temperature of 500 °C. A constant deformation ratio of 6:1 was adopted. Hot forged Al6061 alloy and Al6061-TiO2 composites were then subjected to heat treatment by solutionizing at a temperature of 530 °C for duration of 2 h followed by ice quenching. Both natural and artificial aging at 175 °C were performed on the quenched samples from 2 to 8 h duration in steps of 2. Microstructure, microhardness, and dry sand abrasive wear behavior of both matrix alloy and developed composites in both as-forged and heat-treated conditions have been evaluated. Worn surface studies have been carried out using scanning electron microscope. Results have revealed that nickel-coated TiO2 particles are uniformly distributed through out the matrix alloy. Microhardness of Al6061-TiO2 composites increases with increase in percentage of reinforcement. Heat-treated forged alloy and its composites possesses higher hardness when compared with the forged composites. Forged Al6061-TiO2 composites exhibited lower abrasive wear loss when compared with the forged matrix alloy. Heat treatment has a profound effect on the abrasive wear resistance of both as-forged Al6061 alloy and Al6061-TiO2 composites.

  18. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site leased... are engaged in the production of aluminum alloy forgings. Information shows that on July 28, 2010...

  19. [Research on the inner wall condition monitoring method of ring forgings based on infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-bin; Liu, Bin; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Yu-cun; Liu, Zhao-lun

    2015-01-01

    In order to grasp the inner wall condition of ring forgings, an inner wall condition monitoring method based on infrared spectra for ring forgings is proposed in the present paper. Firstly, using infrared spectroscopy the forgings temperature measurement system was built based on the three-level FP-cavity LCTF. The two single radiation spectra from the forgings' surface were got using the three-level FP-cavity LCTF. And the temperature measuring of the surface forgings was achieved according to the infrared double-color temperature measuring principle. The measuring accuracy can be greatly improved by this temperature measurement method. Secondly, on the basis of the Laplace heat conduction differential equation the inner wall condition monitoring model was established by the method of separating variables. The inner wall condition monitoring of ring forgings was realized via combining the temperature data and the forgings own parameter information. Finally, this method is feasible according to the simulation experiment. The inner wall condition monitoring method can provide the theoretical basis for the normal operating of the ring forgings.

  20. Forging; Heat Treating and Testing; Technically Oriented Industrial Materials and Process 1: 5898.05.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course provides students with advanced and exploratory experience in the area of plastic deformation of metals and in the changing of the physical characteristics of metals by the controlled application and timed removal of heat. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, safety in forge work, forging tools and equipment, industrial…

  1. 76 FR 66996 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Forging...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ...; Forging Machines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the Occupational... Machines,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for continued use in... employers to conduct and to document periodic inspections of forging machines, guards, and...

  2. Low Temperature Superplasticity of Ti-6Al-4V Processed by Warm Multidirectional Forging (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    temperature superplasticity, multidirectional forging , ultrafine grain structure , microstructure evolution 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...mail.ru, dLee.Semiatin@wpafb.af.mil Keywords: Low-temperature superplasticity, Multidirectional forging , Ultrafine grain structure , Microstructure... Metals Branch Structural Materials Division G.A. Salishchev, E.A. Kudrjavtsev, and S.V. Zherebtsov Belgorod State University July

  3. A novel process for breakdown forging of coarse-grain intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L. . Materials Directorate); McQuay, P.A. . Asian Office of Aerospace R and D); Seetharaman, V. )

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a novel hot forging process for breakdown of high-temperature intermetallic alloys which exhibit dynamic recrystallization during hot working. During typical forging processes in hydraulic processes, be they based on isothermal or conventional approaches, the ram speed (or sometimes the effective strain rate) is held constant during the forging stroke. In the method introduced here, the ram speed is increased substantially during the forging stroke as the material recrystallizes to a finer-grained structure and its hot workability increases. By this means, fracture is avoided, grain size is reduced, and processing time is decreased, thus improving material quality and reducing cost. The material used to develop and demonstrate the novel forging process was the single phase gamma titanium aluminide, Ti-51Al-2Mn.

  4. Improved Thermoelectric Performance of p-Type Bismuth Antimony Telluride Bulk Alloys Prepared by Hot Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. J.; Yin, Z. Z.; Yang, S. H.; Yu, C.; Zhu, T. J.; Zhao, X. B.

    2011-05-01

    The thermoelectric (TE) performance of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 polycrystalline alloys has been improved by a simple hot-forging process. No obvious texture was observed in the x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the hot-forged samples. Transport property measurements indicated that the hot-forged samples possessed extremely low thermal conductivities. A maximum ZT value of ˜1.1 at room temperature was obtained for the sample forged under 30 MPa pressure, being almost 50% more than that of the initial unforged alloy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations suggested that the high density of lattice defects of the hot-forged samples could be responsible for the extremely low thermal conductivities.

  5. Simulation and analysis of hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Kadkhodayan, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper hot forging process for industrial locking gear elevators is simulated and analyzed. An increase in demand of industrial locking gear elevators with better quality and lower price caused the machining process to be replaced by hot forging process. Production of industrial locking gear elevators by means of hot forging process is affected by many parameters such as billet temperature, geometry of die and geometry of pre-formatted billet. In this study the influences of billet temperature on effective plastic strain, radius of die corners on internal stress of billet and thickness of flash on required force of press are investigated by means of computer simulation. Three-dimensional modeling of initial material and die are performed by Solid Edge, while simulation and analysis of forging are performed by Super Forge. Based on the computer simulation the required dies are designed and the workpieces are formed. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data demonstrates great compatibility.

  6. Research into Oil-based Colloidal-Graphite Lubricants for Forging of Al-based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, A.; Petrov, P.; Petrov, M.

    2011-05-04

    The presented paper describes the topical problem in metal forging production. It deals with the choice of an optimal lubricant for forging of Al-based alloys. Within the scope of the paper, the properties of several oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricants were investigated. The physicochemical and technological properties of these lubricants are presented. It was found that physicochemical properties of lubricant compositions have an influence on friction coefficient value and quality of forgings.The ring compression method was used to estimate the friction coefficient value. Hydraulic press was used for the test. The comparative analysis of the investigated lubricants was carried out. The forging quality was estimated on the basis of production test. The practical recommendations were given to choose an optimal oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricant for isothermal forging of Al-based alloy.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization Algorithms for 3D Forging Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T. T.; Fourment, L.; Laroussi, M.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents several approaches for preform shape optimization in 3D forging. The process simulation is carried out using the FORGE3® finite element software, and the optimization problem regards the shape of initial axisymmetrical preforms. Several objective functions are considered, like the forging energy, the forging force or a surface defect criterion. Both deterministic and stochastic optimization algorithms are tested for 3D applications. The deterministic approach uses the sensitivity analysis that provides the gradient of the objective function. It is obtained by the adjoint-state method and semi-analytical differentiation. The study of stochastic approaches aims at comparing genetic algorithms and evolution strategies. Numerical results show the feasibility of such approaches, i.e. the achieving of satisfactory solutions within a limited number of 3D simulations, less than fifty. For a more industrial problem, the forging of a gear, encouraging optimization results are obtained.

  8. Research on the Microstructure and Mechanical Property of Ti-7Cu Alloy after Semi-Solid Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongnan; Huo, Yazhou; Zhao, Yongqing; Sun, Zhiping; Bai, Fan

    2016-06-01

    The present work is focused on the development of microstructure of Ti-7Cu alloy as a function of forging temperature and forging ratio in semi-solid state and the influence of resulting microstructure on the mechanical properties. The experimental results showed that the dynamic recrystallization occurred during semi-solid forging and the grain refinement was attained which is considered to be favorable for improving the semi-solid formability. The grain size increased with forging temperature and decreased with forging ratio. Forging temperature has a significant effect on the precipitation behavior in grain boundary regions during the semi-solid processing. More acicular-Ti2Cu tended to precipitate in grain boundary regions with higher forging temperature and finally formed precipitates zones adjacent to grain boundaries after forged at 1,100°C. High ultimate tensile strengths and low elongation have been achieved after semi-solid forging. The strength and hardness decreased with increase of forging temperature, while the ductility increased with increase of forging ratio. The relative contributions of tensile properties were attributed to the varieties of grain size and the distribution of Ti2Cu precipitates obtained by semi-solid forging.

  9. 77 FR 39997 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools, Finished or Unfinished, With or Without Handles From the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... International Trade Administration Heavy Forged Hand Tools, Finished or Unfinished, With or Without Handles From... and is amending the final results of the antidumping duty review on heavy forged hand tools, finished... Heavy Forged Hand Tools, Finished or Unfinished, With or Without Handles, From the People's Republic...

  10. 76 FR 31631 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... COMMISSION Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five- Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China. AGENCY: United States International Trade... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on heavy forged hand tools from China would be...

  11. Ultrasonic phased arrays for nondestructive inspection of forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wuestenberg, H.; Rotter, B. ); Klanke, H.P. ); Harbecke, D. )

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasonic examinations on large forgings like rotor shafts for turbines or components for nuclear reactors are carried out at various manufacturing stages and during in-service inspections. During the manufacture, most of the inspections are carried out manually. Special in-service conditions, such as those at nuclear pressure vessels, have resulted in the development of mechanized scanning equipment. Ultrasonic probes have improved, and well-adapted sound fields and pulse shapes and based on special imaging procedures for the representation of the reportable reflectors have been applied. Since the geometry of many forgings requires the use of a multitude of angles for the inspections in-service and during manufacture, phased-array probes can be used successfully. The main advantages of the phased-array concept, e.g. the generation of a multitude of angles with the typical increase of redundancy in detection and quantitative evaluation and the possibility to produce pictures of defect situations, will be described in this contribution.

  12. Microstructural and magnetic studies on thermomechanically treated HSLA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S. P.; Rao, V.; Das, S.; Mohanty, O. N.

    1990-07-01

    Thermomechanical treatment of commercial grade HSLA steel microalloyed with Nb, V and Ti has been carried out in order to obtain microstructures with spheroidised carbides evenly distributed throughout the matrix and therefore with good magnetic properties at high strength levels. Alloys were tempered after rolling-quenching, as well as forging-quenching. In both cases, rolled as well as forged, good magnetic properties were obtained at a strength of 600-620 MPa after spheroidisation of carbides. Thus, for a given level of carbon, the spheroidised carbides lead to a lower coercive force compared to the case in which they are lamellar. This is believed to be associated with lower locked-up microstresses in the former situation.

  13. Pilot Production of Powder Forged Steel Components for the 25-mm M242 Chain Gun

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-31

    Preparation of Metallographic Specimens ASTM E8-86 Tension Testing of Metallic Materials ASTM E18 -84 Rockwell Hardness and Rockwell Superficial...determined in accordance with ASTM E18 . Core hardness measurements shall be made on sectioned parts within the core region (see 6.3.1) of the part...methods contained in this specification will be incorporated into ASTM Standard Test Methods. A copy of the current draft of this military

  14. Stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the stainless steels for high-strength, heat-resistant or corrosion-resistant applications. It is a treatment of the properties and selection of stainless steels. Up-to-date information covers physical, mechanical and chemical properties of all stainless grades, including the new ferritic and duplex grades. The book covers physical metallurgy as well as processing and service characteristics, including service in corrosive environments. It deals with wrought and cast stainless steels and reviews fabrication from cold-forming to powder metallurgy.

  15. Fatigue experience from tests carried out with forged beam and frame structures in the development of the Saab aircraft Viggen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    A part of the lower side of the main wing at the joint of the main spar with the fuselage frame was investigated. This wing beam area was simulated by a test specimen consisting of a spar boom of AZ 74 forging (7075 aluminum alloy modified with 0.3 percent Ag) and a portion of a honeycomb sandwich panel attached to the boom flange with steel bolts. The cross section was reduced to half scale. However, the flange thickness, the panel height, and the bolt size were full scale. Further, left and right portions of the fuselage frame intended to carry over the bending moment of the main wing were tested. Each of these frame halves consisted of a forward and a rear forging (7079 aluminum alloy, overaged) connected by an outer and inner skin (Alclad 7075) creating a box beam. These test specimens were full scale and were constructed principally of ordinary aircraft components. The test load spectrum was common to both types of specimens with regard to percentage levels. It consisted of maneuver and gust loads, touchdown loads, and loads due to ground roughness. A load history of 200 hours of flight with 15,000 load cycles was punched on a tape. The loads were randomized in groups according to the flight-by-flight principle. The highest positive load level was 90 percent of limit load and the largest negative load was -27 percent. A total of 20 load levels were used. Both types of specimens were provided with strain gages and had a nominal stress of about 300 MN/sq m in some local areas. As a result of the tests, steps were taken to reduce the risk of fatigue damage in aircraft. Thus stress levels were lowered, radii were increased, and demands on surface finish were sharpened.

  16. Using of material-technological modelling for designing production of closed die forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, K.; Vorel, I.; Jeníček, Š.; Káňa, J.; Aišman, D.; Kotěšovec, V.

    2017-02-01

    Production of forgings is a complex and demanding process which consists of a number of forging operations and, in many cases, includes post-forge heat treatment. An optimized manufacturing line is a prerequisite for obtaining prime-quality products which in turn are essential to profitable operation of a forging company. Problems may, however, arise from modifications to the manufacturing route due to changing customer needs. As a result, the production may have to be suspended temporarily to enable changeover and optimization. Using material-technological modelling, the required modifications can be tested and optimized under laboratory conditions outside the plant without disrupting the production. Thanks to material-technological modelling, the process parameters can be varied rapidly in response to changes in market requirements. Outcomes of the modelling runs include optimum parameters for the forging part’s manufacturing route, values of mechanical properties, and results of microstructure analysis. This article describes the use of material-technological modelling for exploring the impact of the amount of deformation and the rate of cooling of a particular forged part from the finish-forging temperature on its microstructure and related mechanical properties.

  17. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  18. Optimum Design of Forging Process Parameters and Preform Shape under Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repalle, Jalaja; Grandhi, Ramana V.

    2004-06-01

    Forging is a highly complex non-linear process that is vulnerable to various uncertainties, such as variations in billet geometry, die temperature, material properties, workpiece and forging equipment positional errors and process parameters. A combination of these uncertainties could induce heavy manufacturing losses through premature die failure, final part geometric distortion and production risk. Identifying the sources of uncertainties, quantifying and controlling them will reduce risk in the manufacturing environment, which will minimize the overall cost of production. In this paper, various uncertainties that affect forging tool life and preform design are identified, and their cumulative effect on the forging process is evaluated. Since the forging process simulation is computationally intensive, the response surface approach is used to reduce time by establishing a relationship between the system performance and the critical process design parameters. Variability in system performance due to randomness in the parameters is computed by applying Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) on generated Response Surface Models (RSM). Finally, a Robust Methodology is developed to optimize forging process parameters and preform shape. The developed method is demonstrated by applying it to an axisymmetric H-cross section disk forging to improve the product quality and robustness.

  19. Effect of Forging on Microstructure, Texture, and Uniaxial Properties of Cast AZ31B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, D.; Shaha, S. K.; Behravesh, B.; Jahed, H.; Williams, B.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of open-die hot forging on cast AZ31B magnesium alloy was investigated in terms of the evolution of microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties. A refined microstructure with strong basal texture was developed in forged material. A significant increase in tensile yield and ultimate strengths by 143 and 23%, respectively, was determined as well. When tested in compression at room temperature, the forged alloy displayed significant in-plane asymmetry and unchanged yield strength compared to the cast alloy owing to the activation of 10\\bar{1}2} < 10\\bar{1}1 \\rangle extension twins in both the cast and forged conditions. However, the ultimate compressive strength for the forged material increased by 22 percent compared to the as-cast material. Microstructure and texture analysis of the fracture samples confirmed that the deformation of the forged samples was dominated by slip during tension and twin in compression. In comparison, both slip and twin were observed in the cast samples for similar testing conditions. The increase in strength of forging was attributed to the refinement of grains and the formation of strong basal texture, which activated the non-basal slip on the prismatic and pyramidal slip systems instead of extension twin.

  20. Design and Analysis of a Forging Die for Manufacturing of Multiple Connecting Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megharaj, C. E.; Nagaraj, P. M.; Jeelan Pasha, K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper demonstrates to utilize the hammer capacity by modifying the die design such that forging hammer can manufacture more than one connecting rod in a given forging cycle time. To modify the die design study is carried out to understand the parameters that are required for forging die design. By considering these parameters, forging die is designed using design modelling tool solid edge. This new design now can produce two connecting rods in same capacity hammer. The new design is required to validate by verifying complete filing of metal in die cavities without any defects in it. To verify this, analysis tool DEFORM 3D is used in this project. Before start of validation process it is require to convert 3D generated models in to. STL file format to import the models into the analysis tool DEFORM 3D. After importing these designs they are analysed for material flow into the cavities and energy required to produce two connecting rods in new forging die design. It is found that the forging die design is proper without any defects and also energy graph shows that the forging energy required to produce two connecting rods is within the limit of that hammer capacity. Implementation of this project increases the production of connecting rods by 200% in less than previous cycle time.

  1. Industrial Process Design for Manufacturing Inconel 718 Extremely Large Forged Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambielli, John F.

    2011-12-01

    Inconel 718 is a Ni-Fe-based superalloy that has been central to the gas turbine industry since its discovery in 1963. While much more difficult to process than carbon or stainless steels, among its superalloy peers Inconel 718 has relatively high forgeability and has been used to make discs, rings, shells, and structural components. A metal forming process design algorithm is presented to incorporate key criteria relevant to superalloy processing. This algorithm was applied to conceptual forging and heat treating extremely large rings of Inconel 718 of diameter 1956 mm (77in) and weight 3252 kg (7155 lb). A 3-stage standard thermomechanical (TMP) processing was used, where Stage 1 strain varied from 0.1190 to 0.2941, Stage 2 from 0.0208 to 0.0357 and Stage 3 from 0.0440 to 0.0940. This was followed by heat treatment of a solution anneal (954°C/1750°F for 4 hour hold), air cool, then a double aging (718°C/1325°F for 8 hour hold; furnace cool to 621°C/1150°F 56°C/100°F per hr; 18 hour total time for both steps). Preliminary mechanical testing was performed. Average yield strength of 951 MPa/138 ksi (longitudinal) and 979 MPa/142 ksi (axial) was achieved. Tensile strengths were 1276 MPa/185 ksi (longitudinal) and 1255 MPa/182 ksi (axial). Elongations and reduction of areas attained were, respectively, 18 (long) and 25 (axial) and 28 (long) and 27 (axial).

  2. [Research on the temperature field detection method of large cylinder forgings during heat treatment process based on infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Cun; Fu, Xian-Bin; Liu, Bin; Qi, Yan-De; Zhou, Shan

    2013-01-01

    In order to grasp the changes of the forging's temperature field during heat treatment, a temperature field detection method based on infrared spectra for large cylinder forgings is proposed in the present paper. On the basis of heat transfer a temperature field model of large barrel forgings was established by the method of separating variables. Using infrared spectroscopy the large forgings temperature measurement system was built based on the three-level interference filter. The temperature field detection of forging was realized in its heat treatment by combining the temperature data and the forgings temperature field detection model. Finally, this method is feasible according to the simulation experiment. The heating forging temperature detection method can provide the theoretical basis for the correct implementation of the heat treatment process.

  3. Approximate-model based estimation method for dynamic response of forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jie; Lu, Xinjiang; Li, Yibo; Huang, Minghui; Zou, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Many high-quality forging productions require the large-sized hydraulic press machine (HPM) to have a desirable dynamic response. Since the forging process is complex under the low velocity, its response is difficult to estimate. And this often causes the desirable low-velocity forging condition difficult to obtain. So far little work has been found to estimate the dynamic response of the forging process under low velocity. In this paper, an approximate-model based estimation method is proposed to estimate the dynamic response of the forging process under low velocity. First, an approximate model is developed to represent the forging process of this complex HPM around the low-velocity working point. Under guaranteeing the modeling performance, the model may greatly ease the complexity of the subsequent estimation of the dynamic response because it has a good linear structure. On this basis, the dynamic response is estimated and the conditions for stability, vibration, and creep are derived according to the solution of the velocity. All these analytical results are further verified by both simulations and experiment. In the simulation verification for modeling, the original movement model and the derived approximate model always have the same dynamic responses with very small approximate error. The simulations and experiment finally demonstrate and test the effectiveness of the derived conditions for stability, vibration, and creep, and these conditions will benefit both the prediction of the dynamic response of the forging process and the design of the controller for the high-quality forging. The proposed method is an effective solution to achieve the desirable low-velocity forging condition.

  4. Optimization of Thixoforging Parameters for C70S6 Steel Connecting Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkara, İsa Metin; Baydoğan, Murat

    2016-11-01

    A microalloyed steel, C70S6, with a solidification interval of 1390-1479 °C, was thixoforged in the semisolid state in a closed die at temperatures in the range 1400-1475 °C to form a 1/7 scaled-down model of a passenger vehicle connecting rod. Die design and an optimized thixoforging temperature eliminated the excessive flash and other problems during forging. Tension test samples from connecting rods thixoforged at the optimum temperature of 1440 °C exhibited nearly the same hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength as conventional hot forged samples but ductility decreased by about 45% due to grain boundary ferrite network formed during cooling from the thixoforging temperature. Thus, C70S6-grade steel can be thixoforged at 1440 °C to form flash-free connecting rods. This conclusion was also validated using FEA analysis.

  5. Optimizing noise control strategy in a forging workshop.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Hamideh; Ramazanifar, Ehsan; Bagherzadeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computer program based on a genetic algorithm is developed to find an economic solution for noise control in a forging workshop. Initially, input data, including characteristics of sound sources, human exposure, abatement techniques, and production plans are inserted into the model. Using sound pressure levels at working locations, the operators who are at higher risk are identified and picked out for the next step. The program is devised in MATLAB such that the parameters can be easily defined and changed for comparison. The final results are structured into 4 sections that specify an appropriate abatement method for each operator and machine, minimum allowance time for high-risk operators, required damping material for enclosures, and minimum total cost of these treatments. The validity of input data in addition to proper settings in the optimization model ensures the final solution is practical and economically reasonable.

  6. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for INEL-1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1979-03-01

    Well data for the INEL-1 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes caliper logs, lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, full color logs, fracture analysis, photos, and rock strength parameters for the INEL-1 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  7. Experimentation and numerical modeling of forging induced bending (FIB) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the final shape using numerical modeling has been a top priority in the field of sheet and bulk forming. Better shape prediction is the result of a better estimation of the physical stress and strain state. For experimental and numerical investigations of such estimations, simple benchmark processes are used. In this paper a benchmark process involving forging (flattening) of sheet metal between punch and die with negative clearance is proposed. The introduced material flow results in bending. Easy measurability of the angle of this bend makes this process suitable for validation purpose. Physical experiments are performed to characterize this bending angle due to flattening. Furthermore a numerical model is developed to capture this phenomenon. The main focus of this paper is the validation of the numerical model in terms of accurate prediction of the physical results.

  8. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  9. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  10. Science Education and Outreach: Forging a Path to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, James G.

    2009-05-01

    The International Year of Astronomy and the Year of Science provide singular opportunities to focus public attention on science in general and the universe in particular in 2009. But what happens on January 1, 2010? How can the science and science education communities build on the initiatives and successes of 2009 to create sustainable programs and efforts to continue to advance science education and literacy objectives for the longer term? The presenter will relate how these questions will be addressed at the annual meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in Millbrae, California, September 12-16, and how the meeting will provide an opportunity for the science, astronomy, and science education and outreach communities to contribute to the discussion and to share their answers and perspectives with the larger community, and to identify ways in which we can forge that future path together.

  11. Physics and Technological Training in Bulgarian Forge Craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Petya N.; Velcheva, Keranka G.

    2010-01-01

    The contemporary world regenerates and preserves the traditions of decorative—applied art and the national crafts. This brings up young generation and helps them to uncover the sources of national culture. In the commonly educational system the technological training realizes succession of new methods for national and applied art. The aim is examination of the national crafts as technological processes for cultivation of different metal constructions. There are enforced physical laws here. Seven basic groups of forging methods consider in Bulgarian tradition craft as heat treatment, plastic deformation and applying of different tensions. This gives information about morphology of construction after applying of stress, enlarging or decreasing of the linear sizes, structure change and the change of physical and mechanical properties.

  12. Follow-up of hearing thresholds among forge hammering workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.A.; Mikael, R.A.; Faris, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Hearing threshold was reexamined in a group of forge hammering workers investigated 8 years ago with consideration of the age effect and of auditory symptoms. Workers were exposed to impact noise that ranged from 112 to 139 dB(A)--at an irregular rate of 20 to 50 drop/minute--and a continuous background noise that ranged from 90 to 94 dB(A). Similar to what was observed 8 years ago, the present permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed a maximum notch at the frequency of 6 kHz and considerable elevations at the frequencies of 0.25-1 kHz. The age-corrected PTS and the postexposure hearing threshold were significantly higher than the corresponding previous values at the frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 8 kHz only. The rise was more evident at the low than at the high frequencies. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) values were significantly less than those 8 years ago. Contrary to the previous TTS, the present TTS were higher at low than at high frequencies. Although progression of PTS at the frequencies 0.25 and 0.5 kHz was continuous throughout the observed durations of exposure, progression at higher frequencies occurred essentially in the first 10 to 15 years of exposure. Thereafter, it followed a much slower rate. Tinnitus was significantly associated with difficulty in hearing the human voice and with elevation of PTS at all the tested frequencies, while acoustic after-image was significantly associated with increment of PTS at the frequencies 0.25-2 kHz. No relation between PTS and smoking was found. PTS at low frequencies may provide an indication of progression of hearing damage when the sensitivity at 6 and 4 kHz diminishes after prolonged years of exposure. Tinnitus and acoustic after-image are related to the auditory effect of forge hammering noise.

  13. Hot Superplastic Powder Forging for Transparent nanocrystalline Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, W. Roger

    2006-05-22

    The program explored a completely new, economical method of manufacturing nanocrystalline ceramics, Hot Superplastic Powder Forging (HSPF). The goal of the work was the development of nanocrystalline/low porosity optically transparent zirconia/alumina. The high optical transparency should result from lack of grain boundary scattering since grains will be smaller than one tenth the wavelength of light and from elimination of porosity. An important technological potential for this process is manufacturing of envelopes for high-pressure sodium vapor lamps. The technique for fabricating monolithic nanocrystalline material does not begin with powder whose particle diameter is <100 nm as is commonly done. Instead it begins with powder whose particle diameter is on the order of 10-100 microns but contains nanocrystalline crystallites <<100 nm. Spherical particles are quenched from a melt and heat treated to achieve the desired microstructure. Under a moderate pressure within a die or a mold at temperatures of 1100C to 1300C densification is by plastic flow of superplastic particles. A nanocrystalline microstructure results, though some features are greater than 100nm. It was found, for instance, that in the fully dense Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic specimens that a bicontinuous microstructure exists containing <100 nm ZrO2 particles in a matrix of Al2O3 grains extending over 1-2 microns. Crystallization, growth, phase development and creep during hot pressing and forging were studied for several compositions and so provided some details on development of polycrystalline microstructure from heating quenched ceramics.

  14. Assessment of NASA Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment Method for Multiple Forging Batch Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John (Technical Monitor); Lemsky, Joe

    2004-01-01

    NASA dual microstructure heat treatment technology previously demonstrated on single forging heat treat batches of a generic disk shape was successfully demonstrated on a multiple disk batch of a production shape component. A group of four Rolls-Royce Corporation 3rd Stage AE2100 forgings produced from alloy ME209 were successfully dual microstructure heat treated as a single heat treat batch. The forgings responded uniformly as evidenced by part-to-part consistent thermocouple recordings and resultant macrostructures, and from ultrasonic examination. Multiple disk DMHT processing offers a low cost alternative to other published dual microstructure processing techniques.

  15. Laser-dispersing of forging tools using AlN-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noelke, C.; Luecke, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.

    2014-02-01

    Forging tools for aluminum work pieces show an increased adhesive wear due to cold welding during the forging process. Laser dispersing offers at this point a great potential to fabricate protective layers or tracks with tailored properties that reduce abrasive or adhesive wear at the surface of highly stressed components. Using different process strategies, four metal ceramic compounds applied on two substrate geometries were investigated regarding their structural and mechanical properties and their performance level. The subsequent forging tests have pointed out a positive effect and less adhesive residuals on the laser dispersed tool surface.

  16. Characterization of large 2219 aluminum alloy hand forgings for the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, and stress corrosion properties of four types of 2219-T852 aluminum alloy hand forgings are presented. Weight of the forgings varied between 450 and 3500 lb at the time of heat treatment and dimensions exceeded the maximum covered in existing specifications. The forgings were destructively tested to develop reliable mechanical property data to replace estimates employed in the design of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and to establish minimum guaranteed properties for structural refinement and for entry into specification revisions. The report summarizes data required from the forgers and from the SRB Structures contractor.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of the three-layer material based on a vanadium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Nechaikina, T. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Zavodchikov, S. Yu.; Khatkevich, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    The quality of three-layer pipes has been studied; they are manufactured by hot pressing of a three-layer assembly of tubular billets followed by forging and cold rolling. The operating core is made from a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy. The protective claddings are made from corrosion-resistant steels of two grades, 08Kh17T and 20Kh13. The results of investigation into the structure and microhardness of the junction zone of steel and the vanadium alloy, which includes a contact zone and a transition diffusion layer, are reported. The 08Kh17T steel is shown to be a preferred cladding material.

  18. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  19. Temperature effects on the mechanical properties of annealed and HERF 304L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2004-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the tensile properties of annealed 304L stainless steel and HERF 304L stainless steel forgings was determined by completing experiments over the moderate range of -40 F to 160 F. Temperature effects were more significant in the annealed material than the HERF material. The tensile yield strength of the annealed material at -40 F averaged twenty two percent above the room temperature value and at 160 F averaged thirteen percent below. The tensile yield strength for the three different geometry HERF forgings at -40 F and 160 F changed less than ten percent from room temperature. The ultimate tensile strength was more temperature dependent than the yield strength. The annealed material averaged thirty six percent above and fourteen percent below the room temperature ultimate strength at -40 F and 160 F, respectively. The HERF forgings exhibited similar, slightly lower changes in ultimate strength with temperature. For completeness and illustrative purposes, the stress-strain curves are included for each of the tensile experiments conducted. The results of this study prompted a continuation study to determine tensile property changes of welded 304L stainless steel material with temperature, documented separately.

  20. Research on the Influence of Technological Forging Parameters on the Quality of Biphasic Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashekov, S. A.; Smaylova, N. T.; Alshynova, A. M.; Mashekova, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The deflected mode (DM) during the preparation of the broach in the flat and combined baizes and also on radial forging machine (RFM) was investigated for creating the rational technology of a broach and determining the optimum size of the angles of rotation and single squeeze reduction. The quantitative data was obtained by the method of final elements and the MSC.Super Forge program; the main consistent patterns of stress-strain state (SSS) distribution and temperature while modeling forging in flat and combined baizes, also on RFM with various angles of rotation and sizes of squeeze reduction were determined. The rational trial technology of forging of biphasic titanium alloys was developed and tested.

  1. A novel edge detection approach used for online dimensional measurement of heavy forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chunhai; Liu, Bin; Song, Xiaoxue

    2008-12-01

    An edge detection method was developed with capability of objectively detecting significant edges in images of high temperature forging. The issue of potential image degradation when viewing hot objects was serious concerned. The paper was absorbed in online dimensional measurement using stereovision technology. Particular characteristics of high temperature forging were described. A global self-adaptive thresholding preprocessing was used for eliminating most redundant mill scale regions and segmenting object from complex background. Then, the feature edges was detected and localized at single pixel scale. Post processing of surround suppression as final additional step was applied to improve edges detection performance by extracting genuine feature edges from edges map. The entire method was performed on a real hot forging image and the performance had been proved in experiment result. The approach was specifically designed for using in online dimensional measurement of heavy forging, but generally enough to be applied to other edge detection of any high-temperature object.

  2. 5. VIEW OF 20TON STEAMPOWERED FORGE HAMMER Manufactured by Chambersburg ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF 20-TON STEAM-POWERED FORGE HAMMER Manufactured by Chambersburg Engineering Company, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania - Juniata Shops, Blacksmith Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Second Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  3. Development of strategies for saving energy by temperature reduction in warm forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Sonia; Santos, Maite; Vadillo, Leire; Idoyaga, Zuriñe; Valbuena, Óscar

    2016-10-01

    This paper is associated to the European policy of increasing efficiency in raw material and energy usage. This policy becomes even more important in sectors consuming high amount of resources, like hot forging industry, where material costs sums up to 50% of component price and energy ones are continuously raising. The warm forging shows a clear potential of raw material reduction (near-net-shape components) and also of energy saving (forging temperature under 1000°C). However and due to the increment of the energy costs, new solutions are required by the forging sector in order to reduce the temperature below 900°C. The reported research is based on several approaches to reduce the forging temperature applied to a flanged shaft of the automotive sector as demonstration case. The developed investigations have included several aspects: raw material, process parameters, tools and dies behavior during forging process and also metallographic evaluation of the forged parts. This paper summarizes analysis of the ductility and the admissible forces of the flanged shaft material Ck45 in as-supplied state (as-rolled) and also in two additional heat treated states. Hot compression and tensile tests using a GLEEBLE 3800C Thermo mechanical simulator have been performed pursuing this target. In the same way, a coupled numerical model based on Finite Element Method (FEM) has been developed to predict the material flow, the forging loads and the stresses on the tools at lower temperature with the new heat treatments of the raw material. In order to validate the previous development, experimental trials at 850 °C and 750 °C were carried out in a mechanical press and the results were very promising.

  4. Establishment of a Process for Creep Forging Aluminum Alloy Weapon Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    the important powder particle character- istics are mean particle size and size distribution, dendritic cell size and pattern, internal voids , and...Geometry Forging No. 26 (Fig. 53) showed excellent die filling except for a slight underfill at the tallest rib. Minor cracking also occurred over a small...Much cracking and underfill In rib detal1. 0.2 750 400 1 Some cracking Trimmed weight, 3.0 lb. 0.1 830 150 - Forged

  5. Numerical analysis of rheological and tribological behavior influence on 16MnCr5 forging fibering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrus, A.; Pintilie, D.; Nedelcu, R.

    2016-10-01

    The present research work is focus on the influence of the rheological constitutive equation and friction law formulation on 16MnCr5 forging fibering. Numerical analysis using FE Forge® and Abaqus code show the importance of the rheological softening terms on the metals fibers morphology and position coordinate. Calibration of friction law and sensitivity of softening parameters corresponding to a Hansel-Spittel rheological equation have been studied.

  6. Manufacturing Methods and Technology for Production Hot Forging of Alkali Halide Lenses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Polariscopic strain photographs of 10 KBr starting crystals 12 7 Polariscopic strain photographs of first stage forging numbers 13 084, 085, 091, 092...and 093 8 Polariscopic strain photographs of first stage forging numbers 14 086, 087, 088, 089 and 090 9 Console containing electronic controls for...20 084 through 089 20 13 Double pass transmission wavefront distortion test 22 14 Lateral shearing interferometer 22 15 Polariscopic photographs of

  7. Irradiation behavior of Ti-stabilized 316L type steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodchenkov, B. S.; Kalinin, G. M.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Shamardin, V. K.; Prokhorov, V. I.; Bulanova, T. M.

    2009-04-01

    Type 316L austenitic steels are widely used for the in-vessel internal structures of fission reactors (core, core support, etc.) and for experimental irradiation facilities. The modifications of 316L Type steel (316L, 316L(N), US 316, J 316, JPCA, etc.) have been considered as structural material for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The results of investigation the irradiation behaviour of Ti-stabilized 316 L type steel (0.04 C-15 Cr-11 Ni-2.5 Mo-0.5 Ti) are presented in this work. The specimens cut out from 316L-Ti steel forging were irradiated in the SM-2 reactor up to a dose ˜4 and 10 dpa at 265 ± 15 °C. The tensile properties, fracture toughness and changes in resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) have been investigated after irradiation. The results for Ti-stabilized 316L steel were compared with those for 316L(N)-IG steel irradiated at the same condition.

  8. New heat treatment process for advanced high-strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bublíková, D.; Jeníček, Š.; Vorel, I.; Mašek, B.

    2017-02-01

    Today’s advanced steels are required to possess high strength and ductility. It can be achieved by choosing an appropriate steel chemistry which has a substantial effect on the properties obtained by heat treatment. Mechanical properties influenced the presence of retained austenite in the final structure. Steels of this group typically require complicated heat treatment which places great demands on the equipment used. The present paper introduces new procedures aimed at simplifying the heat treatment of high-strength steels with the use of material-technological modelling. Four experimental steels were made and cast, whose main alloying additions were manganese, silicon, chromium, molybdenum and nickel. The steels were treated using the Q-P process with subsequent interrupted quenching. The resulting structure was a mixture of martensite and retained austenite. Strength levels of more than 2000 MPa combined with 10-15 % elongation were obtained. These properties thus offer potential for the manufacture of intricate closed-die forgings with a reduced weight. Intercritical annealing was obtained structure not only on the basis of martensite, but also with certain proportion of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite.

  9. Ancient Blacksmiths, The Iron Age, Damascus Steels, and Modern Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    2000-09-11

    The history of iron and Damascus steels is described through the eyes of ancient blacksmiths. For example, evidence is presented that questions why the Iron Age could not have begun at about the same time as the early Bronze Age (i.e. approximately 7000 B.C.). It is also clear that ancient blacksmiths had enough information from their forging work, together with their observation of color changes during heating and their estimate of hardness by scratch tests, to have determined some key parts of the present-day iron-carbon phase diagram. The blacksmiths' greatest artistic accomplishments were the Damascus and Japanese steel swords. The Damascus sword was famous not only for its exceptional cutting edge and toughness, but also for its beautiful surface markings. Damascus steels are ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) that contain from 1.0 to 2.1%. carbon. The modern metallurgical understanding of UHCSs has revealed that remarkable properties can be obtained in these hypereutectoid steels. The results achieved in UHCSs are attributed to the ability to place the carbon, in excess of the eutectoid composition, to do useful work that enhances the high temperature processing of carbon steels and that improves the low and intermediate temperature mechanical properties.

  10. Study on application of color filters in vision system of hot forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Chao; Fang, Jianguo; Li, Di; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the quality and efficiency of forging process, it needs to execute on-line dimensional measurement of the forgings. In the paper, a laboratory color vision measuring system is set up and the combination of digital and physical filtering is adopted to improve the image quality based on the radiation characteristics of high-temperature forgings. The digital filtering technology is a kind of image processing methods, in which the R component of the forging image is removed. While, the physical filtering technology is achieved by optical filters installed in front of the CCD, in which strong self-emitted radiation from the hot parts can be filtered out. In order to evaluate the image quality, the image contrast is applied, which is generally defined as the difference value between average gray scale of object region and that of background region. In the experiments, image contrast derived with filters at different sample points set from 800°C to 1200°C is compared to determine the optimal scheme of filters to be selected. Results of experiments indicate that the application effect of filters is dissimilar when the forging is in different temperature ranges. Through comparison, the optimal selection scheme of filters is determined to derive high quality image of forgings at different temperatures, which lays a solid foundation for the subsequent image processing.

  11. Deformation, recrystallization, strength, and fracture of press-forged ceramic crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Sapphire and ruby were very difficult to press-forge because they deformed without cracking only in a limited temperature range before they melted. Spinel crystals were somewhat easier and MgO, CaO, and TiC crystals much easier to forge. The degree of recrystallization that occurred during forging (which was related to the ease and type of slip intersections) varied from essentially zero in Al2O3 to complete (i.e., random polycrystalline bodies were produced) in CaO. Forging of bi- and polycrystalline bodies produced incoherent bodies as a result of grain-boundary sliding. Strengths of the forged crystals were comparable to those of dense polycrystalline bodies of similar grain size. However, forged and recrystallized CaO crystals were ductile at lower temperatures than dense hot-pressed CaO. This behavior is attributed to reduced grain-boundary impurities and porosity. Fracture origins could be located, indicating that fracture in the CaO occurs internally as a result of surface work hardening caused by machining.-

  12. Deformation, recrystallization, strength, and fracture of press-forged ceramic crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Sapphire and ruby were very difficult to press-forge because they deformed without cracking only in a limited temperature range before they melted. Spinel crystals were somewhat easier and MgO, CaO, and TiC crystals much easier to forge. The degree of recrystallization that occurred during forging (which was related to the ease and type of slip intersections) varied from essentially zero in Al2O3 to complete (i.e., random polycrystalline bodies were produced) in CaO. Forging of bi- and polycrystalline bodies produced incoherent bodies as a result of grain-boundary sliding. Strengths of the forged crystals were comparable to those of dense polycrystalline bodies of similar grain size. However, forged and recrystallized CaO crystals were ductile at lower temperatures than dense hot-pressed CaO. This behavior is attributed to reduced grain-boundary impurities and porosity. Fracture origins could be located, indicating that fracture in the CaO occurs internally as a result of surface work hardening caused by machining.-

  13. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-10-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  14. Strain-rate dependent fatigue behavior of 316LN stainless steel in high-temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jibo; Wu, Xinqiang; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Haitao

    2017-06-01

    Low cycle fatigue behavior of forged 316LN stainless steel was investigated in high-temperature water. It was found that the fatigue life of 316LN stainless steel decreased with decreasing strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004 %s-1 in 300 °C water. The stress amplitude increased with decreasing strain rate during fatigue tests, which was a typical characteristic of dynamic strain aging. The fatigue cracks mainly initiated at pits and slip bands. The interactive effect between dynamic strain aging and electrochemical factors on fatigue crack initiation is discussed.

  15. Structure and mechanical properties of hot-deformed low-carbon martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, I. D.; Shatsov, A. A.; Zakirova, M. G.; Berezin, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in low-carbon martensitic 15Kh2G2NMFBA steel induced by its hot forging in the temperature range 1150-850°C have been studied. The calculated cracking resistance parameter I c is in agreement with its experimental value. A relation is found between the lath sizes in the martensite structure and the change in the impact toughness characteristics. A combined regime of hot deformation and hot treatment of the low-carbon martensitic steel is proposed to form submicrometer-sized structural elements and high strength and impact toughness characteristics.

  16. Heterogeneous multi-layered IF steel with simultaneous high strength and good ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yuhui; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Yonghong; Huang, Tianlin; Wu, Guilin

    2017-07-01

    Multi-layered IF steel samples were designed and fabricated by hot compression followed by cold forging of an alternating stack of cold-rolled and annealed IF steel sheets, with an aim to improve the strength of the material without losing much ductility. A very good combination of strength and ductility was achieved by proper annealing after deformation. Microstructural analysis by electron back-scatter diffraction revealed that the good combination of strength and ductility is related to a characteristic hierarchical structure that is characterized by layered and lamella structures with different length scales.

  17. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE 3D temperature model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z data of the 3D temperature model for the West Flank Coso FORGE site. Model grid spacing is 250m. The temperature model for the Coso geothermal field used over 100 geothermal production sized wells and intermediate-depth temperature holes. At the near surface of this model, two boundary temperatures were assumed: (1) areas with surface manifestations, including fumaroles along the northeast striking normal faults and northwest striking dextral faults with the hydrothermal field, a temperature of ~104˚C was applied to datum at +1066 meters above sea level elevation, and (2) a near-surface temperature at about 10 meters depth, of 20˚C was applied below the diurnal and annual conductive temperature perturbations. These assumptions were based on heat flow studies conducted at the CVF and for the Mojave Desert. On the edges of the hydrothermal system, a 73˚C/km (4˚F/100’) temperature gradient contour was established using conductive gradient data from shallow and intermediate-depth temperature holes. This contour was continued to all elevation datums between the 20˚C surface and -1520 meters below mean sea level. Because the West Flank is outside of the geothermal field footprint, during Phase 1, the three wells inside the FORGE site were incorporated into the preexisting temperature model. To ensure a complete model was built based on all the available data sets, measured bottom-hole temperature gradients in certain wells were downward extrapolated to the next deepest elevation datum (or a maximum of about 25% of the well depth where conductive gradients are evident in the lower portions of the wells). After assuring that the margins of the geothermal field were going to be adequately modelled, the data was contoured using the Kriging method algorithm. Although the extrapolated temperatures and boundary conditions are not rigorous, the calculated temperatures are anticipated to be within ~6˚C (20˚F), or one contour interval, of the

  18. Temperature and environmentally assisted cracking in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Auten, T.A.; Monter, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) can be defined as the propagation of fatigue cracks in water at rates that are anywhere from 3 to over 40 times the growth rates expected in air. In the present work, five ASTM A 508 Class 2 forgings with ladle and check analyses that ranged from 0.010 to 0.019 wt% S were tested in high purity deaerated water in the temperature range of 93 to 260 C. At 260 C these forgings did not undergo EAC, reinforcing earlier results for two similar forgings. This broad sampling indicates a strong resistance to EAC for this class of forging at 260 C. On the other hand, EAC occurred consistently in the three of these forgings that were tested below 204 C, provided the test conditions were high enough to produce a high baseline fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), where the baseline FCGR is that expected in air. At 149 C, EAC occurred at test conditions that combined to yield a baseline FCGR greater than {approx}2E-6 mm/s. At 204, 121, and 93 C, this ``critical crack growth rate`` appeared to shift to lower baseline values. The EAC that occurred at lower temperatures was a factor of 3 to 12 times higher than baseline air rates, which was not as strong as the effect for higher sulfur steels at 240 to 290 C. Also, no plateau in the growth rates occurred as it does with the higher sulfur steels. In another approach, EAC was induced at 93 and at 260 C by raising the dissolved oxygen content of the water from <10 to >15 ppb. In this case, the EAC growth rates decreased to non-EAC levels when the oxygen supply was shut off. The oxygen-related EAC occurred over a broader range of baseline growth rates than found for the EAC driven by the baseline crack tip speed. Again, this can be rationalized by the buildup of sulfur in the crack tip water, which can be associated with the higher corrosion potential of the bulk water.

  19. Building a New High School and Forging a New Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Two aging structures were replaced by Central High School in an Indiana steel town. Planning, board and administrator support, and community involvement eased negative attitudes toward the high school closures and resulted in a $36 million school that has unified the city and will serve it for over 50 years. (MLF)

  20. Implementation of state-of-the-art rotor forging evaluation to manage the oldest rotor fleet in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, A.; Steakley, M.; McCann, D.

    1995-12-31

    The average age of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) fossil fleet is almost 40 years with a large population of ``C`` grade rotors manufactured in the 1950`s. Until 1991, TVA relied upon the OEM`s to support the rotor forging assessment and establish the reinspection intervals. Based on the OEM`s recommendations most turbine/generator overhauls were governed by the forging reinspection interval. In the spring of 1992, TVA initiated an engineered forging evaluation process that involved state-of-the-art amplitude independent, target-motion based Ultrasonic And Data Processing System (UDRPS) forging inspection, forging material sampling, and fracture mechanics analysis. This paper outlines TVA`s state-of-art rotor forging evaluation program, results achieved since its introduction and the long range benefits to TVA.

  1. Hot forging of graphite-carbide composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, G.M.; Holland, L.R.

    1998-07-15

    This project was aimed at hot shaping of titanium carbide/graphite and vanadium carbide/graphite composite materials by heating them to above 2000 degrees celsius and pressing into an electrographite die. The sample was to be a preformed cylinder of powdered graphite mixed with powdered titanium or vanadium, lightly sintered. The preform would be heated in a hot press and the titanium or vanadium would react with some of the graphite to form titanium or vanadium carbide. The remaining (excess) graphite would form a composite with the carbide, and this could then be deformed plastically at temperatures well below the onset of plasticity in pure graphite. There were to be two major thrusts in the research: In the first, an electron beam furnace at Sandia Laboratory was to be used for rapid heating of the sample, which would then be transferred into the press. The second thrust was to be entirely at Alabama A and M University, and here they intended to use a heated, controlled atmosphere press to forge the graphite/carbide preforms at a steady temperature and measure their viscosity as a function of temperature. This report discusses the progress made on this project.

  2. Texture Development During Equal Channel Angular Forging of BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.R.

    1999-08-08

    Equal channel angular forging (ECAF) has been proposed as a severe plastic deformation technique for processing metals, alloys, and composites [e.g. Segal, 1995] (Fig. 1). The technique offers two capabilities of practical interest: a high degree of strain can be introduced with no change in the cross-sectional dimensions of the work-piece, hence, even greater strains can be introduced by re-inserting the work-piece for further deformation during subsequent passes through the ECAF die. Additionally, the deformation is accomplished by simple shear (like torsion of a short tube) on a plane whose orientation, with respect to prior deformations, can be controlled by varying the processing route. There is a nomenclature that has developed in the literature for the typical processing routes: A: no rotations; B{sub A}: 90 degrees CW (clockwise), 90 degrees CCW (counterclockwise), 9O degrees CW, 90 degrees CCW...; Bc: 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW, 90 degrees CW...; and C: 180 degrees, 18 0 degrees.... The impact of processing route on the subsequent microstructure [Ferasse, Segal, Hartwig and Goforth, 1997; Iwahashi, Horita, Nemoto and Langdon, 1996] and texture [Gibbs, Hartwig, Cornwell, Goforth and Payzant, 1998] has been the subject of numerous experimental studies.

  3. Movement Synchrony Forges Social Bonds across Group Divides

    PubMed Central

    Tunçgenç, Bahar; Cohen, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Group dynamics play an important role in the social interactions of both children and adults. A large amount of research has shown that merely being allocated to arbitrarily defined groups can evoke disproportionately positive attitudes toward one's in-group and negative attitudes toward out-groups, and that these biases emerge in early childhood. This prompts important empirical questions with far-reaching theoretical and applied significance. How robust are these inter-group biases? Can biases be mitigated by behaviors known to bond individuals and groups together? How can bonds be forged across existing group divides? To explore these questions, we examined the bonding effects of interpersonal synchrony on minimally constructed groups in a controlled experiment. In-group and out-group bonding were assessed using questionnaires administered before and after a task in which groups performed movements either synchronously or non-synchronously in a between-participants design. We also developed an implicit behavioral measure, the Island Game, in which physical proximity was used as an indirect measure of interpersonal closeness. Self-report and behavioral measures showed increased bonding between groups after synchronous movement. Bonding with the out-group was significantly higher in the condition in which movements were performed synchronously than when movements were performed non-synchronously between groups. The findings are discussed in terms of their importance for the developmental social psychology of group dynamics as well as their implications for applied intervention programs. PMID:27303341

  4. DESIGN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, FRACTURE TOUGHNESS, FATIGUE PROPERTIES, EXFOLIATION AND STRESS-CORROSION RESISTANCE OF 7050 SHEET, PLATE, HAND FORGINGS, DIE FORGINGS AND EXTRUSIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    Cracking, of Stress- Relieved Stretched Aluminum Alloy Extrusions", Technical Report AFML-TR-68-34, Fabruary 1968. 11. D. J. Brownhill, C. F. Babilon , 0. E...Rates of Stress-Relieved Aluminum Alloy Hand Forgings", Technical Report AFML-TR-70-10, February 1970. 12. C. F. Babilon , R. H. Wygonik, G. E

  5. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  6. Effect of submicrocrystalline state on strength and impact toughness of low-carbon 12GBA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarov, I. M.; Korznikov, A. V.; Sergeev, S. N.; Gladkovskii, S. V.; Borodin, E. M.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of intense warm deformation on the structure and mechanical properties of low-carbon 12GBA steel was investigated. A submicrocrystalline (SMC) structure with an average element size of 0.3 μm was formed in the steel by isothermal overall forging. The formation of the SMC structure resulted in a sharp increase in strength by a factor of two to three in relation to the initial coarse-grained state while retaining a sufficient level of plasticity and impact toughness. After further annealing, steels exhibit an improved set of properties; i.e., as the strength decreases slightly, the plasticity increases sharply. Impact tests at low temperatures have shown the significant advantage of the SMC state of the steel over the coarse-grained state in the impact toughness. It is established that the cold resistance in the SMC state increases because the crack propagation prevails in the overall sample fracture.

  7. Effect of Pressure and Temperature Factors on the Solidification of Cast Iron and Its Structure in Liquid Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosenushkin, E. N.; Frantsuzova, L. S.; Kozlova, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the properties and microstructure of cast iron after fabrication of grinding balls by different kinds of casting and forging, with crystallization of the metal under pressure. A mathematical model of the process of solidification of a forging in a die is presented. Joint solution of two Fourier equations of heat conduction for the melt and for the solid skin is used to derive a kinetic equation of solidification and hence to determine the rate of solidification of the forging in the die. The effect of the pressure on the structure of the crystallizing metal and the quality of the forged grinding balls that are obtained is determined.

  8. Effect of impulse vibration and noise on vasomotor function of peripheral blood vessels among pneumatic forge hammer operators.

    PubMed

    Solecki, L

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of impulse vibration and noise on vasomotor function of blood vessels among pneumatic forge hammer operators has been presented based on thermal tests (cooling). The study covered the following groups of workers; pneumatic forge hammer operators (I), pneumatic forging hammer operators (II), hammer operator's assistants (III), operators of forging presses and machines (IV) and the control group. The results of the study showed that in groups I and III it was impulse noise not vibration that caused changes in the functioning of peripheral blood vessels.

  9. Automatic simulation of a sequence of hot-former forging processes by a rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Joun, M.S.; Moon, H.K.; Shivpuri, R.

    1998-10-01

    A fully automatic forging simulation technique in hot-former forging is presented in this paper. A rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method is employed together with automatic simulation techniques. A realistic analysis model of the hot-former forging processes is given with emphasis on thermal analysis and simulation automation. The whole processes including forming, dwelling, ejecting, and transferring are considered in the analysis model and various cooling conditions are embedded in the analysis model. The approach is applied to a sequence of three-stage hot former forging process. Nonisothermal analysis results are compared with isothermal ones and the effect of heat transfer on predicted metal flows is discussed.

  10. Making randomised trials more efficient: report of the first meeting to discuss the Trial Forge platform.

    PubMed

    Treweek, Shaun; Altman, Doug G; Bower, Peter; Campbell, Marion; Chalmers, Iain; Cotton, Seonaidh; Craig, Peter; Crosby, David; Davidson, Peter; Devane, Declan; Duley, Lelia; Dunn, Janet; Elbourne, Diana; Farrell, Barbara; Gamble, Carrol; Gillies, Katie; Hood, Kerry; Lang, Trudie; Littleford, Roberta; Loudon, Kirsty; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Nelson, Annmarie; Norrie, John; Ramsay, Craig; Sandercock, Peter; Shanahan, Daniel R; Summerskill, William; Sydes, Matt; Williamson, Paula; Clarke, Mike

    2015-06-05

    Randomised trials are at the heart of evidence-based healthcare, but the methods and infrastructure for conducting these sometimes complex studies are largely evidence free. Trial Forge ( www.trialforge.org ) is an initiative that aims to increase the evidence base for trial decision making and, in doing so, to improve trial efficiency.This paper summarises a one-day workshop held in Edinburgh on 10 July 2014 to discuss Trial Forge and how to advance this initiative. We first outline the problem of inefficiency in randomised trials and go on to describe Trial Forge. We present participants' views on the processes in the life of a randomised trial that should be covered by Trial Forge.General support existed at the workshop for the Trial Forge approach to increase the evidence base for making randomised trial decisions and for improving trial efficiency. Agreed upon key processes included choosing the right research question; logistical planning for delivery, training of staff, recruitment, and retention; data management and dissemination; and close down. The process of linking to existing initiatives where possible was considered crucial. Trial Forge will not be a guideline or a checklist but a 'go to' website for research on randomised trials methods, with a linked programme of applied methodology research, coupled to an effective evidence-dissemination process. Moreover, it will support an informal network of interested trialists who meet virtually (online) and occasionally in person to build capacity and knowledge in the design and conduct of efficient randomised trials.Some of the resources invested in randomised trials are wasted because of limited evidence upon which to base many aspects of design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials. Trial Forge will help to address this lack of evidence.

  11. Irradiation and annealing behavior of 15Kh2MFA reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, K.; Bergmann, U.; Bergner, F.; Hampe, E.; Leonhardt, W.D.; Schuetzler, H.; Viehrig, H.

    1993-12-01

    This work deals with the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels used in the pressurized water reactors (PWR) of former Soviet type WWER-440. The materials under investigation were a forging (base metal 15Kh2MFA) and the corresponding weld. Charpy 5-notch specimens and tensile test specimens were irradiated in the PWR WWER-2 Rheinsberg at about 270 C up to the two neutron fluence levels of 4 {times} 10{sup 18} and 5 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Post irradiation annealing heat treatments were performed, among others a 475 C/152 h treatment of technical interest. A set of experimental data is given regarding the influence of sampling depth (through-thickness position within the forging), neutron irradiation, and annealing on the properties derived from instrumented Charpy impact testing, tensile and hardness tests. The ferrite content varies through the thickness of the forging. The variation of the mechanical properties can be explained qualitatively with the varying ferrite content. The surface layer of the forging is more sensitive to neutron irradiation than material from the 1/4-T position. To evaluate the effect of annealing heat treatment, the kinetics of the recovery process for the hardness has been investigated. The recovery coefficients for different mechanical properties and parameters have been compared. The annealing behavior is too complex to predict the effect of a large-scale annealing of an RPV on the basis of single hardness measurements.

  12. Steel Rattler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudo, Robert A.; Stotts, Larry G.

    1997-07-01

    Steel Rattler is a multi-phased project to determine the feasibility of using commercial off-the-shelf components in an advanced acoustic/seismic unattended ground sensor. This project is supported by the Defense Intelligence Agency through Sandia National Laboratories as the lead development agency. Steel Rattler uses advanced acoustic and seismic detection algorithms to categorize and identify various heavy vehicles down to the number of cylinders in the engine. This detection is accomplished with the capabilities of new, high-speed digital signal processors which analyze both acoustic and seismic data. The resulting analysis is compared against an onboard library of known vehicles and a statistical match is determined. An integrated thermal imager is also employed to capture digital thermal images for subsequent compression and transmission. Information acquired by Steel Rattler in the field is transmitted in small packets by a built-in low-power satellite communication system. The ground station receivers distribute the coded information to multiple analysis sites where the information is reassembled into coherent messages and images.

  13. Forging New Links in the Asteroid-Meteorite Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.

    1995-09-01

    Historically, the path linking telescopic measurements of asteroids with laboratory measurements of meteorites has been an arduous one full of dead ends and dark passages. However some recent successes are beginning to clear and illuminate the path. Largely these successes have come about through advances in astronomical instrumentation and dedicated surveys of main-belt asteroids down to sizes substantially smaller than what had been previously observed. In addition, the most immediate precursor precursor population to meteorites, the near-Earth asteroids, are becoming more thoroughly studied. Three new links appear to have been forged. The strongest is the previously debated link between Vesta and the HED meteorites [1,2,3]. In a new survey of small (diameter < 20 km) main-belt asteroids, Binzel and Xu [4] found 20 which have visible spectra matching that which was previously unique to Vesta and the HED meteorites. While most appeared dynamically clustered around Vesta, eight of the discovered Vesta-like asteroids bridged the orbital space between Vesta and the 3:1 Jovian resonance -- a dynamical escape hatch to the inner solar system. Thus the observations demonstrate a complete delivery route for fragments from Vesta to the Earth, implying strong confidence that HED meteorites are derived from Vesta. The broad implications are that Vesta is now the fourth planetary body for which we have known samples, thus opening a new field for meteoritics and planetary science -- the geology of Vesta. A second, but more tentative link, is the discovery [5] of at least one small main-belt asteroid, 3628 Boznemcova, whose spectrum resembles ordinary chondrite meteorites. Previously, only one Earth-crossing asteroid (1862 Apollo) appeared to provide an asteroid spectral analog to these most common meteorites. Unfortunately the discovery of just one small main-belt ordinary chondrite-like asteroid out of about 1000 surveyed does not resolve issues such as whether space

  14. Automobile bodies: Can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Richard; Clark, Joel; Kelkar, Ashish

    2001-08-01

    Although the use of aluminum in cars has been increasing for the past two decades, progress has been limited in developing aluminum auto bodies. In fact, most aluminum substitution has come in the form of castings and forgings in the transmission, wheels, etc. Car manufacturers have developed all-aluminum cars with two competing designs: conventional unibody and the spaceframe. However, aluminum is far from being a material of choice for auto bodies. The substitution of aluminum for steel is partly influenced by regulatory pressures to meet fuel efficiency standards by reducing vehicle weight, and to meet recycling standards. The key obstacles are the high cost of primary aluminum as compared to steel and added fabrication costs of aluminum panels. Both the aluminum and the automotive industries have attempted to make aluminum a cost-effective alternative to steel. This paper analyzes the cost of fabrication and assembly of four different aluminum car body designs, making comparisons with conventional steel designs at current aluminum prices and using current aluminum fabrication technology. It then attempts to determine if aluminum can be an alternative to steel at lower primary aluminum prices, and improved fabrication processes.

  15. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are

  16. TDNiCr (ni-20Cr-2ThO2) forging studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile and stress rupture properties were evaluated for forged TDNiCr (Ni-20Cr-2ThO2) and related to thermomechanical history and microstructure. Forging temperature and final annealed condition had pronounced influences on grain size which, in turn, was related to high temperature strength. Tensile strength improved by a factor of 8 as grain size changed from 1 to 150 microns. Stress-rupture strength was improved by a factor of 3 to 5 by a grain size increase from 10 to 1000 microns. Some contributions to the elevated temperature strength of very large grain material may also occur from the development of a strong texture and a preponderance of small twins. Other conditions promoting the improvement of high temperature strength were: an increase of total reduction, forging which continued the metal deformation inherent in the starting material, a low forging speed, and prior deformation by extrusion. The mechanical properties of optimally forged TDNiCr compared favorably to those of high strength sheet developed for space shuttle application.

  17. Modeling microstructure evolution in the delta process forging of superalloy IN718 turbine discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Shihong; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Zhong

    2013-05-01

    The microstructure development in the Delta Process (DP) forging of Superalloy IN718 turbine discs were predicted using the combined approach of axisymmetric finite element simulation and modeling for the dynamic recrystallization and grain growth. In order to establish the deformation constitutive equation and dynamic recrystallization models for the DP process of Superalloy IN718, the isothermal compression tests were carried out in the temperature range 950 to 1010 °C and strain rates range 0.001 to0.1s-1. Moreover, the isothermal heat treatment tests after hot deformation were conducted in the temperature range 950 to 1040°C to generate the grain growth model. The experimental results indicated the existence of the δ phase could make the activation energy of deformation increase. Furthermore, the existence of the δ phase could stimulate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization, and the grain growth was restrained due to the pinning effect of δ phase. The predicted grain size and its distribution in the DP forging of Superalloy IN718 turbine discs were compared with the actual microstructures deformed by the hot die forging. It was found that the forging with uniform fine grains could be obtained by the application of DP process to the forging of the turbine disk, in which the alloy was pre-precipitated δ phase after the baiting in the original process.

  18. Test report: effect of specimen orientation and location on the tensile properties of GTS forging 1472859

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Ryan J

    2008-02-12

    ASTM standardized tensile tests were performed on GTS WR-quality 1472859 forging (21-6- 9 material) to determine the dependence of tensile properties on specimen orientation (longitudinal vs. transverse) with respect to forging ‘grain flow’ and location within the forging. Statistical analyses of the results show that location has a statistically measurable effect on the longitudinal tensile properties (as compared to the error involved in tensile testing). However, this dependence of the properties with location, especially in the circumferential orientation, causes large variability in the results that clouds the statistical determination of any orientation effect. As a result, this forging is determined to be inhomogeneous along the forging length, with a significant range in properties observed (e.g. yield strengths from 85 to 117 ksi) and highest strength/lowest ductility in the spherical region. Additional specimens should be tested to acquire a higher resolution view of this inhomogeneity if the end use of the data is structural integrity analyses using spatially dependent properties; however, sufficient data is provided in this study to extract a statistical lower bound for conservative, homogeneous structural analysis.

  19. [A method of temperature measurement for hot forging with surface oxide based on infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cun; Qi, Yan-de; Fu, Xian-bin

    2012-05-01

    High temperature large forging is covered with a thick oxide during forging. It leads to a big measurement data error. In this paper, a method of measuring temperature based on infrared spectroscopy is presented. It can effectively eliminate the influence of surface oxide on the measurement of temperature. The method can measure the surface temperature and emissivity of the oxide directly using the infrared spectrum. The infrared spectrum is radiated from surface oxide of forging. Then it can derive the real temperature of hot forging covered with the oxide using the heat exchange equation. In order to greatly restrain interference spectroscopy through included in the received infrared radiation spectrum, three interference filter system was proposed, and a group of optimal gap parameter values using spectral simulation were obtained. The precision of temperature measurement was improved. The experimental results show that the method can accurately measure the surface temperature of high temperature forging covered with oxide. It meets the requirements of measurement accuracy, and the temperature measurement method is feasible according to the experiment result.

  20. Identification of Forged Bank of England 20 Gbp Banknotes Using IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnex, Emily

    2014-06-01

    Bank of England notes of 20 GBP denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. A principal aim of this work was to develop a method so that a small, compact ATR FTIR instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 wn from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine 20 GBP notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 wn), ν(C-H) (ca. 2900 wn) and ν(C=O) (ca. 1750 wn) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper. Further to this, with an announcement by the Bank of England to produce polymer banknotes in the future, the work has been extended using Australian polymer banknotes to show that the method would be transferable.

  1. Tailorable Burning Behavior of Ti14 Alloy by Controlling Semi-Solid Forging Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongnan; Yang, Wenqing; Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Fengying; Huo, Yazhou; Zhao, Yongqing; Song, Xuding; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    Semi-solid processing (SSP) is a popular near-net-shape forming technology for metals, while its application is still limited in titanium alloy mainly due to its low formability. Recent works showed that SSP could effectively enhance the formability and mechanical properties of titanium alloys. The processing parameters such as temperature and forging rate/ratio, are directly correlated with the microstructure, which endow the alloy with different chemical and physical properties. Specifically, as a key structural material for the advanced aero-engine, the burn resistant performance is a crucial requirement for the burn resistant titanium alloy. Thus, this work aims to assess the burning behavior of Ti14, a kind of burn resistant alloy, as forged at different semi-solid forging temperatures. The burning characteristics of the alloy are analyzed by a series of burning tests with different burning durations, velocities, and microstructures of burned sample. The results showed that the burning process is highly dependent on the forging temperature, due to the fact that higher temperatures would result in more Ti2Cu precipitate within grain and along grain boundaries. Such a microstructure hinders the transport of oxygen in the stable burning stage through the formation of a kind of oxygen isolation Cu-enriched layer under the burn product zone. This work suggests that the burning resistance of the alloy can be effectively tuned by controlling the temperature during the semi-solid forging process. PMID:28773820

  2. Non-isothermal FEM analyses of large-strain back extrusion forging

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, E.C.; Hallquist, J.O.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1986-06-19

    Back extrusion forging is a complex metal forming operation dominated by large-strain, non-isothermal deformation. NIKE2D, a fully vectorized implicit finite-element program developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was applied to a two-stage isothermal back extrusion forging process. Modeling of the forging process required special features in the FEM code such as friction and interactive rezoning that allows for remeshing of the distorted mesh while maintaining a complete history of all the state variables. To model conditions of the non-isothermal forging process required implementing TOPAZ2D, our LLNL-developed two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat conduction analysis, as a subroutine into NIKE2D. The fully coupled version maintains all the original features of both codes and can account for the contribution of heat generation during plastic deformation. NIKE/TOPAZ-2D was applied to the piercing operation of the back extrusion forging process. The thermal deformation history of the die, punch, and workpiece and the effective plastic strains were calculated.

  3. Identification of forged Bank of England £20 banknotes using IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sonnex, Emily; Almond, Matthew J; Baum, John V; Bond, John W

    2014-01-24

    Bank of England notes of £20 denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. An aim of this work was to develop a non-destructive method so that a small, compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 cm(-1) arising from νasym (CO3(2-)) from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine £20 notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 cm(-1)), ν(C-H) (ca. 2900 cm(-1)) and ν(C=O) (ca. 1750 cm(-1)) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper.

  4. Forging of Naval Brass (ASTM B16) - Finite Element Analysis using Ls Dyna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subha Sankari, T.; Sangavi, S.; Paneerselvam, T.; Venkatraman, R.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Forging is one of the important manufacturing process in which products like connecting rod, transmission shaft, clutch hubs and gears are produced. Finite element analysis (FEA) in forming techniques is of recent interest for the optimal design and determination of right manufacturing forming process. The data from the numerical results can help in providing the information for selecting the ideal process conditions. Thus aside from experimental values, simulation by the finite element analysis software's such as LS DYNA can be used for the analysis of strain distribution in forging processes. In the present work, Finite element simulation of open die forging of naval brass (ASTM B16) is done at an optimal temperature. An advanced multi physics simulation software package by the Livermore software technology cooperation LSTC - LS DYNA is utilized for the simulation of forging process. For the forging validation, experiment is conducted with a cylindrical billet having height 45 mm and diameter of 40mm. The numerical results are compared with that of experimental results carried out at the same temperature and dimensions for validation. The distribution of strain is analyzed. Energy analysis due to impact load is detailed. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, M.; Večko Pirtovšek, T.; Šetina Batič, B.; McGuiness, P.; Burja, J.; Podgornik, B.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations.

  6. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel.

    PubMed

    Godec, M; Večko Pirtovšek, T; Šetina Batič, B; McGuiness, P; Burja, J; Podgornik, B

    2015-11-05

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations.

  7. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel

    PubMed Central

    Godec, M.; Večko Pirtovšek, T.; Šetina Batič, B.; McGuiness, P.; Burja, J.; Podgornik, B.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations. PMID:26537780

  8. Texture and yield stress of pre-strained 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K.; Dreele, R.B. von; Gray, G.T. III; Chen, S.R.

    1998-08-01

    The evolution of texture and yield stress in 304L stainless steel is investigated as a function of deformation to large plastic strains. Steel bars quasi-statically upset forged at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup {minus}1} to true strains of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 were found to acquire their texture ({approximately}3.0 m.r.d.) in the first 0.5 strain with (110) poles highly aligned parallel to the compression direction independent of whether the pre-forged starting material was in a cold worked or annealed (1,050 C for 1 hour) condition. The same bars, when strained at room temperature show an incremental yield with pre-strain regardless of strain rate (10{sup {minus}1} or 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1}) or thermal history, though annealed bars yield at slightly lower stresses. At 77 K and strain rate 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1}, the annealed 304L exhibits more pronounced strain-hardening behavior than the 304L forged in a cold-worked condition.

  9. Texture and Yield Stress of Pre-Strained 304L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K.; Von Dreele, B.; Gray, G.T. III; Chen, S.R.

    1997-06-23

    The evolution of texture and yield stress in 304L stainless steel is investigated as a function of deformation to large plastic strains. Steel bars quasi-statically upset forged at a strain rate of 0.001s{sup -1} to true strains of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 were found to acquire their texture ({approximately}3.0 m.r.d.) in the first 0.5 strain with (110) poles highly aligned parallel to the compression direction independent of whether the pre-forged starting material was in a cold worked or annealed (1050 C for 1 hour) condition. The same bars, when strained at room temperature show an incremental yield with pre-strain regardless of strain rate (10{sup -1} or 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) or thermal history, though annealed bars yield at slightly lower stresses. At 77 K and strain rate 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}, the annealed 304L exhibits more pronounced strain-hardening behavior than the 304L forged in a cold-worked condition.

  10. Fracture Mechanical Measurements with Commercial Stainless Steels at 4 K and with Cp-Titanium at 173 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Mitterbacher, H.

    2010-04-01

    Using the JETT (J-Evaluation on Tensile Test) technique, measurements have been performed with commercial stainless steels in forged and cast condition for the reason of an assessment for low temperature service down to 4 K. These steels frequently used for industrial applications are designated by German Werkstoff (WNr) 1.4308 and 1.4408 cast stainless steels and a forged material with the number 1.4307. The fracture toughness tests at 4 K with forged material 1.4307 comprised apart from the base metal also the weld zone and additionally the 5% and 8% pre-strained conditions of the base metal. Fracture toughness reduced slightly for cold worked condition gradually as well as for the weld joint. The Reliability of the JETT measurements has been also checked using the ASTM E 1820—99a standard. In addition, to these measurements, commercial pure ASTM grade 2 titanium (WNr 3.7035) has been also examined using the same JETT method for the reason of industrial application and the requirement of minimum fracture toughness of 100 MPa√m was fulfilled at 173 K. Furthermore, test results performed at 7 K of pure titanium plate material (ASTM grade 1) with respect to fracture mechanical JETT method are presented.

  11. Simulation of 7050 Wrought Aluminum Alloy Wheel Die Forging and its Defects Analysis based on DEFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shiquan; Yi Youping; Zhang Yuxun

    2010-06-15

    Defects such as folding, intercrystalline cracking and flow lines outcrop are very likely to occur in the forging of aluminum alloy. Moreover, it is difficult to achieve the optimal set of process parameters just by trial and error within an industrial environment. In producing 7050 wrought aluminum alloy wheel, a rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM) analysis has been performed to optimize die forging process. Processing parameters were analyzed, focusing on the effects of punch speed, friction factor and temperature. Meanwhile, mechanism as well as the evolution with respect to the defects of the wrought wheel was studied in details. From an analysis of the results, isothermal die forging was proposed for producing 7050 aluminum alloy wheel with good mechanical properties. Finally, verification experiment was carried out on hydropress.

  12. Evaluation of Die Chilling Effects during Forging of Nimonic-80A Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriari, D.; Sadeghi, M. H.; Amiri, A.; Cheraghzadeh, M.

    2010-06-15

    Nimonic-80A is a kind of nickel-based superalloys which is used in high temperature components of land gas turbines. In this paper, the influence of four design factors: die temperature, strain rate, friction coefficient and geometry size of ring sample over the variation of internal diameters (VID) and forging load (FL) was studied. It was done by means of design methodology based on DOE-designated full factorial and FE simulations. FEM and experimental results showed that the variation of internal diameters and forging load had inverse proportion to the die temperature. Regression models were developed by using the response surface methodology (RSM) for VID and FL. Rate of the dynamic recrystallization varied depending on different amounts of die temperature. The results can be used in the semi-isothermal forging of complex part of the Nimonic-80A.

  13. Hot forging to produce pore-free near-net-shape ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, H.S.; Withers, J.C.; Loutfy, R.O.

    1988-08-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that it is possible to hot forge ceramic composites without damaging the whisker reinforcement and to reduce flaw size and population. Hot forging was investigated for the systems A1203, A1203/ZrO2, mullite, AlN, and SiC with reinforcements of SiCw and TiB2. The system Al203/SiCw was demonstrated to be forgeable at 1400 C which is 500 C lower than hot pressing temperatures. At high strain rates of greater than 0.1/sec, the density achieved was 99.7 percent with strength values comparable to hot pressing. The hot forging of ceramic-whisker composites offers the opportunity to produce low cost components and, because the process reduces the size and population of flaws, it can result in better mechanical properties with greater reliability.

  14. Simulation of 7050 Wrought Aluminum Alloy Wheel Die Forging and its Defects Analysis based on DEFORM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Quan, Huang; You-Ping, Yi; Yu-Xun, Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Defects such as folding, intercrystalline cracking and flow lines outcrop are very likely to occur in the forging of aluminum alloy. Moreover, it is difficult to achieve the optimal set of process parameters just by trial and error within an industrial environment. In producing 7050 wrought aluminum alloy wheel, a rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM) analysis has been performed to optimize die forging process. Processing parameters were analyzed, focusing on the effects of punch speed, friction factor and temperature. Meanwhile, mechanism as well as the evolution with respect to the defects of the wrought wheel was studied in details. From an analysis of the results, isothermal die forging was proposed for producing 7050 aluminum alloy wheel with good mechanical properties. Finally, verification experiment was carried out on hydropress.

  15. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements in sinter-forged YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.-F.; Bein, D.; Wiegert, R. F.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, M.; Zhao, Z.; Adenwalla, S.; Moreau, A.; Robinson, Q.; Johnson, D. L.; Hwu, S. J.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.; Ketterson, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    We report ultrasonic attenuation measurements on sinter-forged YBa2Cu2O7-δ material, which differs from ordinary sintered material in that the crystallites are preferentially oriented to form a uniaxial sample. Three peaks in attenuation, at temperatures of 250, 180, and 70 K, were observed for longitudinal waves propagating perpendicular to the forging axis, which is similar to that reported in ordinary (isotropic) polycrystalline samples. However, for both transverse and longitudinal sound propagated along the forging axis we have a different behavior, with only one peak at 180 K, showing a strong anisotropy. It is suggested that sound waves traveling parallel to and normal to the Cu-O planes may account for the anisotropic effect, and a relaxation mechanism may explain the increase in shear wave attenuation which was seen with decreasing temperature.

  16. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Behaviors for 42CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Liu, Yan-Xing; Liu, Ge; Chen, Ming-Song; Huang, Yuan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel are studied by hot tensile tests with the deformation temperature range of 1123-1373 K and strain rate range of 0.0001-0.1 s-1. Effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the flow stress and fracture strain of the studied steel are discussed in detail. Based on the experimental results, a ductile damage model is established to describe the combined effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel. It is found that the flow stress first increases to a peak value and then decreases, showing an obvious dynamic softening. This is mainly attributed to the dynamic recrystallization and material intrinsic damage during the hot tensile deformation. The established damage model is verified by hot forging experiments and finite element simulations. Comparisons between the predicted and experimental results indicate that the established ductile damage model is capable of predicting the fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel during hot forging.

  17. Photothermal, Structural, and Microstructural Characterization of SAE4320H Automotive Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Guevara, Alberto; Rojas-Rodríguez, Ignacio; Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben; Jaramillo-Vigueras, David; del Ángel-Sánchez, Karina; Rodríguez-García, Mario E.

    2017-05-01

    SAE4320H steel was characterized by photothermal radiometry spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers microhardness, to study metallurgical property changes as a result of the annealing heat treatment. Photothermal radiometry (PTR) images of hot forged and annealed SAE4320H steel were obtained to study the thermal changes, as a consequence of metallurgical microstructure changes that were produced by the heat treatment conditions. X-ray diffraction showed that the annealing process improves the crystalline quality of the SAE4320H steel and releases of any thermal stress. Widmanstatten microstructure was identified as a typical structure after the forging process. The Widmanstatten is a metallographic microstructure transformation to ferrite and pearlite which affected SAE4320H steel hardness and thermal properties. Vickers test showed that the hardness decreases as a result of the annealing process. A positive correlation between Vickers microhardness and PTR amplitude images was found, indicating that the annealing process increases the PTR signal. This methodology allows the determination of the changes in the Vickers microhardness from a non-contact and remote method as in PTR.

  18. Queen City Forging Revitalized by Oak Ridge National Lab Partnership – U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Rob; Blue, Craig

    2016-05-11

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, teamed up with Queen City Forging, the U.S. Forging Industry, and Infrared Heating Technologies to develop a rapid-infrared heating furnace to produce aluminum turbochargers.

  19. Queen City Forging Revitalized by Oak Ridge National Lab Partnership – U.S. Department of Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Mayer, Rob; Blue, Craig

    2016-07-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, teamed up with Queen City Forging, the U.S. Forging Industry, and Infrared Heating Technologies to develop a rapid-infrared heating furnace to produce aluminum turbochargers.

  20. Multi-objective optimization of gear forging process based on adaptive surrogate meta-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    In forging industry, net shape or near net shape forging of gears has been the subject of considerable research effort in the last few decades. So in this paper, a multi-objective optimization methodology of net shape gear forging process design has been discussed. The study is mainly done in four parts: building parametric CAD geometry model, simulating the forging process, fitting surrogate meta-models and optimizing the process by using an advanced algorithm. In order to maximally appropriate meta-models of the real response, an adaptive meta-model based design strategy has been applied. This is a continuous process: first, bui Id a preliminary version of the meta-models after the initial simulated calculations; second, improve the accuracy and update the meta-models by adding some new representative samplings. By using this iterative strategy, the number of the initial sample points for real numerical simulations is greatly decreased and the time for the forged gear design is significantly shortened. Finally, an optimal design for an industrial application of a 27-teeth gear forging process was introduced, which includes three optimization variables and two objective functions. A 3D FE nu merical simulation model is used to realize the process and an advanced thermo-elasto-visco-plastic constitutive equation is considered to represent the material behavior. The meta-model applied for this example is kriging and the optimization algorithm is NSGA-II. At last, a relatively better Pareto optimal front (POF) is gotten with gradually improving the obtained surrogate meta-models.

  1. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Citation Forging Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-05-01

    In the 1990s, a subsidiary of the Citation Corporation, Interstate Forging, implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Milwaukee, Wisconsin, forging plant. This improvement enabled the plant to maintain an adequate and stable pressure level using fewer compressors, which led to improved product quality and lower production downtime. The project also yielded annual energy savings of 820,000 kWh and $45,000. With a total project cost of $67,000, the plant achieved a simple payback of just 1.5 years.

  2. The Development of a Ceramic Mold for Hot-Forging of Micro-Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, Todd; Garino, Terry

    1999-06-25

    A new mold material has been developed for use in making rare-earth permanent magnet components with precise dimensions in the 10 to 1000 µm range by hot-forging. These molds are made from molds poly(methyl)methacrylate (PMMA) made by deep x-ray lithography (DXRL). An alumina bonded with colloidal silica has been developed for use in these molds. This material can be heated to 950°C without changing dimensions where it develops the strength needed to withstand the hot-fmging conditions (750°C, 100 MPa). In addition, it disintegrates in HF so that parts can be easily removed after forging.

  3. Computer modeling of wear in extrusion and forging of automotive exhaust valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulsyan, R.; Shivpuri, R.

    1995-04-01

    In an automotive engine valve forging process, the billet is cold sheared, induction heated, and fed to a mechanical press for a two-stage forging operation with the first stage being extrusion. The main limiting factor in this operation is the wear of the dies during the first stage, extrusion. In this study. abrasive wear was identified as the primary mode of wear, and computer simulation was used to investigate the effect of process variables, such as press speed, initial billet temperature, and die preheat temperature upon abrasive wear. The result generated by this study should be applicable to other part geometry and not limited just to exhaust valves.

  4. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  5. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nb-Ti-V Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, M.

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents the results of thermomechanical treatment via forging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of newly obtained microalloyed steel containing 0.28% C, 1.41% Mn, 0.027% Nb, 0.028% Ti, and 0.019% V. The investigated steel is assigned to the production of forged elements for the automotive industry. Conditions of forging using the thermomechanical processing method were developed based on plastometric tests. Continuous and double-hit compression tests were conducted using the Gleeble 3800 thermomechanical simulator. The samples were investigated in a temperature range from 900 to 1100 °C and a strain rate of 1 and 10 s-1. To determine the recrystallization kinetics of plastically deformed austenite, discontinuous compression tests of samples using the applied deformation were conducted in a temperature range from 900 to 1100 °C with isothermal holding of the specimens between successive deformations for 2-100 s. Observations of the microstructures of thin foils were conducted using a TITAN80-300 FEI transmission electron microscope. The applied thermomechanical treatment allows to obtain a fine-grained microstructure of the austenite during hot-working and production of forged parts. These acquire advantageous mechanical properties and guaranteed crack resistance after controlled cooling from the end plastic deformation temperature and successive tempering. Forgings produced using the thermomechanical treatment method, consecutively subjected to tempering in a temperature range from 550 to 650 °C, reveal values of YS0.2 which equal from 994 to 892 MPa, UTS from 1084 to 958 MPa, KV from 69 to 109 J, KV-40 from 55 to 83 J, and a hardness ranging from 360 to 300 HBW.

  6. Electron backscattering diffraction analysis of an ancient wootz steel blade from central India

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.R. Sullivan, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2009-04-15

    The electron backscattering diffraction technique was used to analyse the nature of carbides present in an ancient wootz steel blade. Bulky carbides, pro-eutectoid carbide along the prior austenite grain boundaries and fine spheroidized carbides were detected. Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to understand the texture of these carbides. The orientations of the cementite frequently occur in clusters, which points to a common origin of the members of the cluster. For the bands of coarse cementite, the origin is probably large coarse particles formed during the original cooling of the wootz cake. Pearlite formed earlier in the forging process has led to groups of similarly oriented fine cementite particles. The crystallographic texture of the cementite is sharp whereas that of the ferrite is weak. The sharp cementite textures point to the longevity of the coarse cementite throughout the repeated forging steps and to the influence of existing textured cementite on the nucleation of new cementite during cooling.

  7. Estimation of tensile strengths at 4K of 316LN forging and hot rolled plate for the ITER toroidal field coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, M.; Saito, T.; Kawano, K.; Takano, K.; Tsutsumi, F.; Chida, Y.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-06-01

    A prediction method for both yield and tensile strengths of stainless steels from room temperature to liquid helium temperature (4K) has been developed by JAEA in order to rationalize qualification tests of cryogenic structural materials used in large superconducting magnet for a fusion device. This method is to use quadratic curves which are expressed as a function of carbon and nitrogen contents and strengths at room temperature. This study shows results of tensile tests at 4K and confirmation of accuracy of prediction method for tensile strengths at 4K for large forgings and thick hot rolled plates of austenitic stainless steels, which can be used in the actual coil case of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) toroidal field (TF) coils. These products are 316LN having high nitrogen and maximum thickness is 600mm. As the results, it was confirmed that the materials which satisfied ITER design requirement can be manufactured and the tensile strengths of these products at 4K can be predicted by using appropriate quadratic curves.

  8. Rolling contact fatigue of low hardness steel for slewing ring application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Jason A.

    This thesis discusses the rolling contact fatigue of steel utilized in anti-friction bearings, also referred to as slewing bearings. These slewing bearings are utilized in cranes, excavators, wind turbines and other similar applications. Five materials composed of two different material types were tested. The two material types were high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The test specimens were processed from forged rolled rings. Two machines were evaluated a ZF-RCF and 3-Ball test machine. The evaluation was to determine which machine can best simulate the application in which the slewing bearing is utilized. Initially, each specimen will be pretested to determine the appropriate testing direction from within the forged rolled rings. Pretesting is needed in order to establish consistent failure modes between samples. The primary goal of the test is to understand the life differences and failure modes between high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The high carbon steel ring was cut into two sections, one of which was stress relieved and the other was quenched and tempered. The medium carbon alloy steel was cut into three sections, all of which were quenched and tempered to different hardness levels. The test program was dynamically adjusted based upon the previous sample's life and load. An S-N curve was then established from the 5 materials tested at two target loads. The samples were run until the first sign of a crack was detected by an eddy current. At the completion of the rolling contact test, select sample's microstructure was evaluated for crack initiation location. The selected samples were divided into four groups which represent different maximum shear stress levels. These samples displayed indications of material deformation in which the high carbon steel experienced an increased amount of cold work when compared to medium carbon alloy steel. The life of the high carbon steel was nearly equivalent to the expected life of the medium

  9. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  10. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  11. Jernberg Industries, Inc: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh.

  12. HotEye (tm) Based Coordinate Measuring Machine for Forging Industry

    SciTech Connect

    OG Technologies

    2003-06-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a 3 dimensional measurement system for the domestic forging industry based on HotEye{trademark}. This technology will allow high definition camera to accurately image a red hot object. The project marries conventional Coordinate Measurement Machine ''CMM'' technology to HotEye{trademark} technology to permit the accurate measurement of forged parts while they are at high temperature. Being able to take such measurements will dramatically reduce the amount of scrap produced by the domestic forging industry. This industry wastes a significant amount of energy because of the high rate of scrap it produces. OGT will: (1) Develop a 3D measurement sensor head that will work on a part at a temperature up to 1,450 C with an accuracy of 0.1mm or better and with a scanning speed of less than 10 seconds for an area of 100mm x 100mm. (2) Develop a Virtual-Fixturing software package to alleviate the need of precise hard fixturing. (3) Integrate the 3D measurement sensor head and the Virtual-Fixturing software into a standard CMM, both hardware (replacing the probes) and software (data format and user interface match) so that the system can automatically perform a complete preprogrammed measurement of a hot product. (4) Test and evaluate the system in a forging facility.

  13. Forging limits for an aluminum matrix composite; Part 1: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Syu, D.G.C.; Ghosh, A.K. )

    1994-09-01

    Forging limits in a discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) matrix composite, 2014 Al/15 vol pct Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], were determined by compressing samples of various cylindrical geometries under different conditions of temperature, strain rate, and lubrication and measuring the limit strains attained prior to incipient crack formation. In some cases, circumferential grids were machined on the sample surface to obtain the local fracture strain states. Crack formation was caused by the secondary tensile stresses; however, crack propagation was relatively slow and somewhat more severe at 300 C than at 400 C. The forging limit of the composite was found to be higher at 400 C than at 300 C and also higher at slower strain rates. The plane-strain forging limit of the composite at 300 C and a strain rate of 0.5 s[sup [minus]1] was less than 0.05, while that of the matrix was higher than 0.5. It was found that the forging limits can be influenced by the depth of the circumferential grids and can be lower than those for the smooth surface samples.

  14. HaploForge: A Comprehensive Pedigree Drawing and Haplotype Visualisation Web Application.

    PubMed

    Tekman, Mehmet; Medlar, Alan; Mozere, Monika; Kleta, Robert; Stanescu, Horia

    2017-08-14

    Haplotype reconstruction is an important tool for understanding the aetiology of human disease. Haplotyping infers the most likely phase of observed genotypes conditional on constraints imposed by the genotypes of other pedigree members. The results of haplotype reconstruction, when visualised appropriately, show which alleles are identical by descent despite the presence of untyped individuals. When used in concert with linkage analysis, haplotyping can help delineate a locus of interest and provide a succinct explanation for the transmission of the trait locus. Unfortunately, the design choices made by existing haplotype visualisation programs do not scale to large numbers of markers. Indeed, following haplotypes from generation to generation requires excessive scrolling back and forth. In addition, the most widely-used program for haplotype visualisation produces inconsistent recombination artefacts for the X chromosome. To resolve these issues, we developed HaploForge, a novel web application for haplotype visualisation and pedigree drawing. HaploForge takes advantage of HTML5 to be fast, portable and avoid the need for local installation. It can accurately visualise autosomal and X-linked haplotypes from both outbred and consanguineous pedigrees. Haplotypes are coloured based on identity by descent using a novel A* search algorithm and we provide a flexible viewing mode to aid visual inspection. HaploForge can currently process haplotype reconstruction output from Allegro, GeneHunter, Merlin and Simwalk. HaploForge is licensed under GPLv3 and is hosted and maintained via GitHub. Supplementary data is available from Bioinformatics online.

  15. T & I--Metalworking, Forging. Kit No. 55. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert J.

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on forging are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (metalworking). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  16. Simulation and Analysis of Finite Volume of Hot Forging Process of Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarefdoust, M.; Hosseyni, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this study the forging operations of nut has been modeled. This nut is a part which is manufactured with the help of hot forging. The aim of this research is utilizing computers in designing forming process, and in particular, modeling of hot forging in the nut and to inquire the stresses appeared on the mold. For this purpose Pro/Engineer software for modeling, and SuperForge2004 software for analyzing the process have been used. This part is formed in two stages. To enrich the results coming out of the use of the software, the findings achieved from the modeling of the first stage are compared with its analytic dissolving. In the second stage modeling of metal forming the effect of rake on increasing the stresses imposed to the die mold is studied. The aim of this research is to correct the molds and the volume of the raw materials so that we can produce high qualified parts in spite of raw material low volume and low pressure on the molds.

  17. Social Work and Engineering Collaboration: Forging Innovative Global Community Development Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorie J.

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary programs in schools of social work are growing in scope and number. This article reports on collaboration between a school of social work and a school of engineering, which is forging a new area of interdisciplinary education. The program engages social work students working alongside engineering students in a team approach to…

  18. Health hazards from oil, soot and metals at a hot forging operation.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, A H; Vorpahl, K W; French, K A; Jordan, P T; Jurinski, N B

    1976-04-01

    An extensive study of a hot forging operation was performed to characterize and quantitate worker exposures to the aerosol formed by an oil-based die lubricant and it's decomposition products. Total particulate breathing zone levels up to 65 mg/m3 and benzo (a) pyrene levels up to 2.9 mug/m3 were measured.

  19. T & I--Metalworking, Forging. Kit No. 55. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert J.

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on forging are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (metalworking). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  20. Evaluation of Subsequent Heat Treatment Routes for Near-β Forged TA15 Ti-Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhichao; Wu, Huili; Yang, He

    2016-01-01

    TA15 Ti-alloy is widely used to form key load-bearing components in the aerospace field, where excellent service performance is needed. Near-β forging technology provides an attractive way to form these complicated Ti-alloy components but subsequent heat treatment has a great impact on the final microstructure and mechanical properties. Therefore evaluation and determination of the heat treatment route is of particular significance. In this paper, for the near-β forged TA15 alloy, the formation and evolution of microstructures under different subsequent heat treatment routes (annealing, solution and aging, toughening and strengthening) were studied and the cooling mode after forging was also considered. Then, the type and characteristics of the obtained microstructures were discussed through quantitative metallographic analysis. The corresponding mechanical properties (tensile, impact toughness, and fracture toughness) and effects of microstructural characteristics were investigated. Finally, for a required microstructure and performance a reasonable heat treatment route was recommended. The work is of importance for the application and development of near-β forging technology. PMID:28773994

  1. Forging the Link between Multicultural Competence and Ethical Counseling Practice: A Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Zarus E. P.; Herlihy, Barbara Richter; Pierce, Latoya Anderson

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of multicultural competence as an essential component of ethical counseling practice is a growing trend. This article presents a historical perspective of salient events that have contributed to forging a link between multicultural competence and ethical behavior. Multicultural counseling is traced from its beginnings to its emergence…

  2. The Ties That Bind: How Social Capital Is Forged and Forfeited in Teacher Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.; Cooc, North

    2016-01-01

    The effects of social capital on school improvement make it important to understand how teachers forge, maintain, or forfeit collegial relationships. Two common explanations focused on formal organizational features and individual characteristics do not address how social capital accrues from informal dynamics of teachers' interactions in…

  3. Numerical modeling of axi-symmetrical cold forging process by ``Pseudo Inverse Approach''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halouani, A.; Li, Y. M.; Abbes, B.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2011-05-01

    The incremental approach is widely used for the forging process modeling, it gives good strain and stress estimation, but it is time consuming. A fast Inverse Approach (IA) has been developed for the axi-symmetric cold forging modeling [1-2]. This approach exploits maximum the knowledge of the final part's shape and the assumptions of proportional loading and simplified tool actions make the IA simulation very fast. The IA is proved very useful for the tool design and optimization because of its rapidity and good strain estimation. However, the assumptions mentioned above cannot provide good stress estimation because of neglecting the loading history. A new approach called "Pseudo Inverse Approach" (PIA) was proposed by Batoz, Guo et al.. [3] for the sheet forming modeling, which keeps the IA's advantages but gives good stress estimation by taking into consideration the loading history. Our aim is to adapt the PIA for the cold forging modeling in this paper. The main developments in PIA are resumed as follows: A few intermediate configurations are generated for the given tools' positions to consider the deformation history; the strain increment is calculated by the inverse method between the previous and actual configurations. An incremental algorithm of the plastic integration is used in PIA instead of the total constitutive law used in the IA. An example is used to show the effectiveness and limitations of the PIA for the cold forging process modeling.

  4. Social Work and Engineering Collaboration: Forging Innovative Global Community Development Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorie J.

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary programs in schools of social work are growing in scope and number. This article reports on collaboration between a school of social work and a school of engineering, which is forging a new area of interdisciplinary education. The program engages social work students working alongside engineering students in a team approach to…

  5. The Ties That Bind: How Social Capital Is Forged and Forfeited in Teacher Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.; Cooc, North

    2016-01-01

    The effects of social capital on school improvement make it important to understand how teachers forge, maintain, or forfeit collegial relationships. Two common explanations focused on formal organizational features and individual characteristics do not address how social capital accrues from informal dynamics of teachers' interactions in…

  6. Application of electricity to the reheating of metals prior to forming. Forging, lamination, induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courdille, R.

    1984-09-01

    The essential points characterizing the operating conditions of both electric heating and flame heating are examined for two categories: (1) reheating furnaces in small-forge, die stamping, and stamping shops; and reheating furnaces equipping the trains of rolling mills and presses. Results are used in problem solving.

  7. iPads as Placed Resources: Forging Community in Online and Off line Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowsell, Jennifer; Saudelli, Mary Gene; Scott, Ruth Mcquirter; Bishop, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on the notion of tablet technologies as placed resources (Prinsloo, 2005; Prinsloo & Rowsell, 2012) by exploring how an international research project in Australia, Canada, and the United States forged community through online spaces. There is a tendency in media and in literature to romanticize technologies like iPads as a…

  8. Influence of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Properties of the Tempered Type 410-1Mo Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, E.; Syahlan, Z. A.; Sahlan; Prifiharni, S.; Anwar, M. S.; Chandra, S. A.; Romijarso, T. B.; Adjiantoro, B.

    2017-05-01

    The modified 410-1Mo stainless steel has been developed with higher tensile strength and elongation compared to the standard 410 stainless steel. This paper reports the influence of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure, hardness, impact resistance and corrosion resistance of the modified 410-1Mo steel. The steel samples were prepared by a process sequence of induction melting, hot forging, annealing, hardening, and tempering. The microstructure of the tempered steels revealed additional phase of delta ferrite at pre-austenitizing temperatures of 950 to 1050 °C and disappeared at a temperature of 1100 °C. The steels which underwent pre-austenitizing at 1100 °C showed the largest sized lath martensite and the largest amount of retained austenite. The tempered steels maintained hardness at austenitizing temperatures of 950 °C to 1000 °C and showed an increasing hardness at austenitizing temperatures from 1000 to 1100 °C. At a range of austenitizing temperatures, it was investigated that the steels exhibited higher impact resistance at 1050 °C. The tempered steels that were pre-austenitized at 950 °C and 1100 °C showed the lowest pitting potential due to the existence of carbides and coarse-high carbon martensite, respectively.

  9. Cryo-quenched Fe-Ni-Cr alloy single crystals: A new decorative steel

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Kolopus, James A.; Lavrik, Nicolay V.; Phani, P. Sudharshan

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, a decorative steel is described that is formed by a process that is unlike that of the fabrication methods utilized in making the original Damascus steels over 2000 years ago. The decorative aspect of the steel arises from a three-dimensional surface pattern that results from cryogenically quenching polished austenitic alloy single crystals into the martensitic phase that is present below 190 K. No forging operations are involved – the mechanism is entirely based on the metallurgical phase properties of the ternary alloy. The symmetry of the decorative pattern is determined and controlled by the crystallographic orientation and symmetry of the 70%Fe,15%Ni,15%Cr alloy single crystals. Finally, in addition to using “cuts” made along principal crystallographic surface directions, an effectively infinite number of other random-orientation “cuts” can be utilized to produce decorative patterns where each pattern is unique after the austenitic-to-martensitic phase transformation.

  10. Aspects of testing and selecting stainless steels for sea water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steinsmo, U.; Rogne, T.; Drugli, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    In the period from 1980, highly alloyed stainless steels (i.e. Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE{sub N}) > 40) have been widely selected for chlorinated sea water systems in the Norwegian offshore industry. Recently failures have been reported -- severe crevice corrosion on flanges in a cooling water system and crevice corrosion at the threaded cast and forged joints in a fire water system. The failures highlights the question of corrosion testing and safe use limits for high alloyed stainless steels in sea water systems. This paper discusses three aspects regarding testing and selection of highly alloyed stainless steels for sea water application -- the relevancy of the electrochemical test methods used, the quality control system and the importance of repassivation.

  11. Cryo-quenched Fe-Ni-Cr alloy single crystals: A new decorative steel

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Kolopus, James A.; Lavrik, Nicolay V.; Phani, P. Sudharshan

    2016-08-31

    In this paper, a decorative steel is described that is formed by a process that is unlike that of the fabrication methods utilized in making the original Damascus steels over 2000 years ago. The decorative aspect of the steel arises from a three-dimensional surface pattern that results from cryogenically quenching polished austenitic alloy single crystals into the martensitic phase that is present below 190 K. No forging operations are involved – the mechanism is entirely based on the metallurgical phase properties of the ternary alloy. The symmetry of the decorative pattern is determined and controlled by the crystallographic orientation and symmetry of the 70%Fe,15%Ni,15%Cr alloy single crystals. Finally, in addition to using “cuts” made along principal crystallographic surface directions, an effectively infinite number of other random-orientation “cuts” can be utilized to produce decorative patterns where each pattern is unique after the austenitic-to-martensitic phase transformation.

  12. Effects of Material Combinations on Friction and Wear of PEEK/Steel Pairs under Oil-Lubricated Sliding Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagaki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kawabata, M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of material combinations on the friction and wear of PEEK/steel pairs are studied using blocks on a ring wear tester under oil-lubricated conditions. The rings are made of forged steel (SF540A) and a PEEK composite filled with 30 wt% carbon fibre. The surface roughness is 0.15 and 0.32 μm Ra, respectively. The blocks are also made of the same materials as the rings: the forged steel and the PEEK composite. Finished with an emery paper of #600, the surface roughness is 0.06 and 0.23 μm Ra, respectively. Sliding tests for 4 combinations of two materials are conducted. The load is increased up to 1177 N at 1 N s-1. The sliding velocity is varied in the range of 10 to 19 m s-1. In some cases, the ring temperature is measured with a thermocouple with a diameter of 0.5 mm, located 1 mm below the frictional surface. Results indicate that the forged steel’s ring and the PEEK composite’s block is the best combination among 4 combinations, because seizure does not occur under the increasing load up to 1177 N at the sliding velocity of 10-19 m s-1. In contrast, seizure occurs at 15 and 19 m s-1 in the other three combinations. However, the PEEK composite’s ring shows a lower friction coefficient as compared to the forged steel’s ring, when seizure does not occur. Wear scars are observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seizure mechanisms are then discussed.

  13. Optimizing Heat Treatment Process of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni Martensitic Stainless of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Prifiharni, S.; Mabruri, E.

    2017-05-01

    The Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels are modified into martensitic stainless steels for steam turbine blades application. The working temperature of steam turbine was around 600 - 700 °C. The improvement properties of turbine blade material is necessary to maintain steam turbine work. The previous research revealed that it has corrosion resistance of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni which is better than 13Cr stainless steels in the chloride environment. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels has been studied. The steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging. The steels were austenitized at 1000, 1050, and 1100 °C for 1 hour and were tempered at 600, 650, and 700 °C for 1 hour. The steels were then subjected to metallographic observation and hardness test of Rockwell C. The optimal heat treatment of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni was carried out austenitized in 1050 °C and tempered in 600 - 700 °C.

  14. Nanosized MX Precipitates in Ultra-Low-Carbon Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2009-02-01

    Nanosized MX precipitates in ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant 9Cr-W-Mo-VNbTiN steels were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) using carbon film replicas. The steels were prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into plates. The plates were normalized at 1100 °C for 1 hour, cooled in air, and tempered at 700 °C for 1 hour. The results show that bimodal nanosized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. The larger nanosized MX precipitates with the size of 30 to 50 nm are rich in Nb, while the smaller ones with the size of about 10 nm contain less Nb but more V. Small addition of Ti causes an increase in the number of the larger nanosized MX precipitates. The total number density of the nanosized MX precipitates in the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels is measured to be over 300/ μm2, much higher than that in conventional ferritic/martensitic steels. Short-term creep test results show that the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels with high dense nanosized MX precipitates have much higher creep rupture strength than conventional ASME-P92 steel. The strength degradation of the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels during creep is also discussed in this article.

  15. Achieving Fine Beta Grain Structure in a Metastable Beta Titanium Alloy Through Multiple Forging-Annealing Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafari, Ahmad; Ding, Yunpeng; Cui, Jianzhong; Xia, Kenong

    2016-07-01

    A coarse-grained (order of 1 mm) Ti-5553 metastable beta alloy was subjected to multiple passes of low-temperature forging and multiple forging plus annealing cycles, respectively. In the forging only processing, strain was concentrated in the shear bands formed and accumulated with each forging pass, resulting in a heterogeneous microstructure and eventual cracking along the shear bands. In contrast, the introduction of a short beta annealing after each forging step led to fine recrystallized grains (50 to 100 µm) formed in the shear bands, and a uniformly refined beta grain structure after four cycles. This is attributed to the strengthening effect of the fine grains, causing redistribution of most severe strains to the coarse grain region in the subsequent forging, consistent with the simulated results by finite element analysis. The analyses of the microstructures and simulated strain distributions revealed that the critical strain for recrystallization is between 0.2 and 0.5 and the strain to fracture to be ~0.8 to 0.9. The fine-grained (50 to 100 µm) beta alloy, however, fractured at a much smaller strain of <0.4 during the next forging step, owing to the formation of stress-induced martensitic α″ which is more prevalent in fine grains than in coarse ones.

  16. Composition Optimization and Experimental Characterization of a Novel Steel Based on CALPHAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liao, Bo; Liu, Ligang; Gao, Yukui; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2015-05-01

    A new steel with high Cr and low W, Mo contents for forged cold work roll was designed based on the composition system of traditional high-speed steel roll. The Fe-C isopleths of the steel and the mass fraction of equilibrium phases versus temperature were calculated by Thermo-Calc, and the effects of different alloying elements (W, Mo, Cr, V) on austenite, ferrite, and carbides (MC, M6C, M7C3, M23C6) were also established to optimize the composition and structure. The designed and optimized specimens were both quenched at 1100 °C and then tempered twice at 560 °C. The hardness and wear resistance of the samples were measured. The microstructures of quenched tempered and forged specimens were studied. The results show that ferrite crystallization, peritectic reaction, austenite crystallization, and the precipitation of MC, M6C, M7C3, M23C6 occur during equilibrium solidification process. The alloying elements W, Mo mainly affect the precipitation of M6C, while Cr affects the precipitated region and mass fraction of M7C3. Higher V content widens the high-temperature region of the peritectic reaction and results in a large amount of MC precipitation. The optimized composition (wt.%) for cold work roll steel is 1.30-1.35%C, 9-10%Cr, 2.5-3.0%Mo, 0.5-1.0%W, 2.5-3.0%V, 0.5-0.6%Mn, 0.5-0.6%Si. The hardness of the steel after quenching and tempering is 60.8 HRC and weight loss after 120 min is 6.2 mg. This meets the requirement of hardness and wear resistance requirements for cold work roll. The ledeburite in the optimized steel disappears after forging and the carbide network break into a large amount of tiny blocky ones dispersed in the matrix without cracks, which shows a good forgeability of the steel and rationality of the optimized composition.

  17. Evolution of the Structure and Properties of Cold-Deformed Hardened System-Alloyed Steel 10Kh3G3MF Due to Intense Thermocycling Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, D. O.; Balakhnin, A. N.; Titova, M. G.; Orlova, E. N.; Smirnov, A. I.; Simonov, Yu N.

    2013-03-01

    Processes of formation of structure and properties in intense thermocycling treatment of steel 10Kh3G3MF preliminarily subjected to quenching and 60% cold plastic deformation by the method of radial forging are studied. The dynamics of variation of the grain structure of austenite, of the temperature of the start of formation of martensite, and of the level of mechanical properties is studied after different modes of heat treatment.

  18. Effects of Cryogenic Forging and Anodization on the Mechanical Properties of AA 7075-T73 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Liao, Tien-Wei; Hsu, Wen-Nong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, high-strength AA7075 alloy samples were cryogenically forged after annealing and then subjected to solution and aging treatments. The cryogenically forged 7075-T73 alloy samples displayed equiaxed fine grains associated with abundant fine precipitates in their matrix. Compared with conventional 7075-T73 alloy samples, the cryogenically forged samples exhibited an 8-12% reduction in tensile strength and an increased fatigue strength and higher corrosion resistance. The fatigue strength measured at 107 cycles was 225 MPa in the bare samples; the strength was increased to 250 MPa in the cryogenically forged samples. The effect of anodization on the corrosion resistance of the bare samples was improved from (E corr) -0.80 to -0.61 V.

  19. Crack Growth of D6 Steel in Air and High Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, W. D.; Engstrom, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fracture and subcritical flaw growth characteristics were experimentally deter­mined for electroless nickel plated D6 steel in dry air and high pressure oxygen environments as applicable to the Lunar Module/Environmental Control System (LM/ECS) descent gaseous oxygen (GOX) tank. The material tested included forgings, plate, and actual LM/ECS descent GOX tank material. Parent metal and TIG (tungsten inert gas) welds were tested. Tests indicate that proof testing the tanks at 4000 pounds per square inch or higher will insure safe operation at 3060 pounds per square inch. Although significant flaw growth can occur during proofing, subsequent growth of flaws during normal tank operation is negligible.

  20. Effect of aluminizing treatment on the oxidation properties of 12Cr heat resisting steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Wang, Jei-Pil; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the effect of aluminization on the oxidation properties of 12Cr martensitic heat resisting steel, a specimen was prepared by forging after centrifugal casting. After aluminizing treatment under various conditions, scanning electron microscopy observation, and hardness, line profile and x-ray diffraction analysis of the alloy layer were performed. The results confirmed that the thickness of the layer of Al13Fe4, with a Vickers hardness of over 880, increased with increasing aluminizing temperature and time. Moreover, it was concluded from the results of the oxidation experiment that the oxidation properties of the aluminized specimen were improved by up to approximately 30 %.

  1. Fatigue Life Analysis and Tensile Overload Effects with High Strength Steel Notched Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    versus Aa calculated using K/p42 approach. 13 4. Ratio of fatigue life following an overload to average 14 fatigue life with no overload versus Au relative...dimensions. The material for all tests was ASTh A723, Grade 2, a high strength nickel-chromium-molybdenum steel used for pressure component forgings...results plotted using Eq. (2) to calculate Aa . The (1 + P/no) term, wiLth an arbitrary po - 10 on, was added here so that the data over the whole range

  2. High Speed Turning of H-13 Tool Steel Using Ceramics and PCBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer, Usama

    2012-09-01

    H-13 is the toughest tool steel used in machined die casting and forging dies. Due to its extreme hardness and poor thermal conductivity high speed cutting results in high temperature and stresses. This gives rise to surface damage of the workpiece and accelerated tool wear. This study evaluates the performance of different tools including ceramics and PCBN using practical finite element simulations and high speed orthogonal cutting tests. The machinability of H-13 was evaluated by tool wear, surface roughness, and cutting force measurements. From the 2D finite element model for orthogonal cutting, stresses and temperature distributions were predicted and compared for the different tool materials.

  3. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  4. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  5. Development of expert systems for the design of a hot-forging process based on material workability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, R.; Prasad, Y. V. R. K.; Sarma, V. V. S.

    2003-12-01

    Most of the time (and cost) involved in planning hot forging process is related to activities strongly dependent on human expertise, intuition, and creativity, and also to iterative procedure involving extensive experimental work. In this paper, the development of an expert system for forging process design, which emphasizes materials’ workability, is discussed. Details of the forging process design expert system, its basic modules, design and implementation details, and deliverables are explained. The system uses the vast database available on the hot workability of more than 200 technologically important materials and the knowledge acquired from a materials’ expert. The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) has been adopted to develop this expert system. The expert system can address three types of functions, namely, forging process design, materials information system, and forging defect analysis. The expert system will aid and prompt a novice engineer in designing a forging process by providing accurate information of the process parameters, lubricants, type of machine, die material, and type of process (isothermal versus non-isothermal) for a given material with a known specification or code and prior history.

  6. Effects of Process Parameters on Deformation and Temperature Uniformity of Forged Ti-6Al-4V Turbine Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shiyuan; Zhu, Dahu; Hua, Lin; Qian, Dongsheng; Yan, Sijie; Yu, Fengping

    2016-11-01

    This work is motivated by the frequent occurrence of macro- and microdefects within forged Ti-6Al-4V turbine blades due to the severely nonuniform strain and temperature distributions. To overcome the problem of nonuniformity during the blade forging operation, firstly, a 2D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element approach using the strain-compensated Arrhenius-type constitutive model is employed to simulate the real movements and processing conditions, and its reliability is verified experimentally. Secondly, two evaluation indexes, standard deviation of equivalent plastic strain and standard deviation of temperature, are proposed to evaluate the uniformity characteristics within the forged blade, and the effects of four process parameters including the forging velocity, friction factor, initial workpiece temperature and dwell time on the uniformity of strain and temperature distributions are carefully studied. Finally, the numerically optimized combination of process parameters is validated by the application in a practical process. The parametric study reveals that a reasonable combination of process parameters considering the flow resistance, flow localization and the effects of deformation and friction heating is crucial for the titanium alloy blade forging with uniformity. This work can provide a significant guidance for the design and optimization of blade forging processes.

  7. Porosity, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Parts Fabricated by Powder Compact Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Zhang, Deliang; Liang, Jiamiao; Gabbitas, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloy powders produced using a hydrogenation-dehydrogenation process and a gas atomization process, respectively, were rapidly consolidated into near-net-shaped parts by powder compact forging. The porosity, microstructure, and tensile mechanical properties of specimens cut from regions at different distances from the side surfaces of the forged parts were examined. The regions near the side surfaces contained a fraction of pores due to the circumferential tensile strain arising during the powder compact forging process, and the porosity level decreased rapidly to zero with increasing the distance from the side surface. The forged parts had a fully lamellar structure with the α + β colony sizes and α lamella thickness changing little with the distance from the side surface. The specimens cut from the regions near the side surfaces had a lower yield strength and tensile strength. The correlation of porosity with the yield strength of the specimens suggested that the reduction of load bearing areas due to the porosity and unbonded or weakly bonded interparticle boundaries was not the only reason for the lower strength, and the stress concentration at the pores and associated with their geometry also played an important role in this. It is likely that the effect of stress concentration on yield strength reduction of the forged part increases with oxygen content. The Hall-Petch relationship of the yield strength and the average α lamella thickness suggested that the strength of the fully dense and fully consolidated forged parts was increased by oxygen solution strengthening.

  8. Porosity, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Parts Fabricated by Powder Compact Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Zhang, Deliang; Liang, Jiamiao; Gabbitas, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloy powders produced using a hydrogenation-dehydrogenation process and a gas atomization process, respectively, were rapidly consolidated into near-net-shaped parts by powder compact forging. The porosity, microstructure, and tensile mechanical properties of specimens cut from regions at different distances from the side surfaces of the forged parts were examined. The regions near the side surfaces contained a fraction of pores due to the circumferential tensile strain arising during the powder compact forging process, and the porosity level decreased rapidly to zero with increasing the distance from the side surface. The forged parts had a fully lamellar structure with the α + β colony sizes and α lamella thickness changing little with the distance from the side surface. The specimens cut from the regions near the side surfaces had a lower yield strength and tensile strength. The correlation of porosity with the yield strength of the specimens suggested that the reduction of load bearing areas due to the porosity and unbonded or weakly bonded interparticle boundaries was not the only reason for the lower strength, and the stress concentration at the pores and associated with their geometry also played an important role in this. It is likely that the effect of stress concentration on yield strength reduction of the forged part increases with oxygen content. The Hall-Petch relationship of the yield strength and the average α lamella thickness suggested that the strength of the fully dense and fully consolidated forged parts was increased by oxygen solution strengthening.

  9. A simplified pseudo inverse approach for damage modeling in the cold forging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halouani, A.; Li, Y. M.; Abbès, B.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a simplified numerical method called "Pseudo Inverse Approach" (PIA) for damage prediction in metal forging process modeling and optimization. The approach is based on the knowledge of the final part shape. Some intermediate configurations are introduced and corrected by using a free surface method to consider the deformation paths. Based on the equivalent stress notion and tensile curve, a robust direct algorithm of plasticity is formulated and implemented. The plasticity is coupled with the ductile damage by using a strain based ductile damage model. The forging results obtained by the PIA are compared to those obtained by an incremental approach to show the efficiency and accuracy of the PIA, as well as the abilities to make the damage prediction.

  10. FEM analysis of spur gears forging from nano-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, D.; Luis-Pérez, C. J.; Luri, R.; León, J.

    2012-04-01

    The ECAE process is a novel technology which allows us to obtain materials with sub-micrometric and/or nanometric grain size as a result of accumulating very high levels of plastic deformation in the presence of a high hydrostatic pressure. This avoids the fracture of the material and allows us to obtain very high values of plastic deformation (ɛ >>1). Therefore, these nano-structured materials can be used as starting materials for other manufacturing processes such as: extrusion, rolling and forging, among others; with the advantage of providing nanostructure and hence, improved mechanical properties. In this present work, the forging by finite element method (FEM) of materials that have been previously processed by ECAE is analyzed. MSC. MarcTM software will be employed with the aim of analyzing the possibility of manufacturing mechanical components (spur gears) from materials nano-structured by ECAE.

  11. Structure of magnesium alloy MA14 after multistep isothermal forging and subsequent isothermal rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugmanov, D. R.; Sitdikov, O. Sh.; Markushev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Optical metallography and electron microscopy have been used to analyze the structural changes in magnesium MA14 alloy subjected to processing that combines multistep isothermal forging and isothermal rolling. It has been found that forging of a bulk workpiece leads to the formation of a structure, 85-90% of which consists of recrystallized grains with an average size of less than 5 µm. Subsequent rolling results in a completely recrystallized structure with a grain size of 1-2 µm. It is shown that the resultant structural states are characterized by grain size nonuniformity inherited from the initial hot-pressed semi-finished product. The nature and features of crystallization processes that take place in the alloy during processing are discussed.

  12. Application of multi-grid method on the simulation of incremental forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Khaled, Mahmoud; Fourment, Lionel

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation becomes essential in manufacturing large part by incremental forging processes. It is a splendid tool allowing to show physical phenomena however behind the scenes, an expensive bill should be paid, that is the computational time. That is why many techniques are developed to decrease the computational time of numerical simulation. Multi-Grid method is a numerical procedure that permits to reduce computational time of numerical calculation by performing the resolution of the system of equations on several mesh of decreasing size which allows to smooth faster the low frequency of the solution as well as its high frequency. In this paper a Multi-Grid method is applied to cogging process in the software Forge 3. The study is carried out using increasing number of degrees of freedom. The results shows that calculation time is divide by two for a mesh of 39,000 nodes. The method is promising especially if coupled with Multi-Mesh method.

  13. Fatigue life on a full scale test rig: Forged versus cast wind turbine rotor shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, J.; Rauert, T.; Dalhoff, P.; Sander, M.

    2016-09-01

    To reduce uncertainties associated with the fatigue life of the highly safety relevant rotor shaft and also to review today's design practice, the fatigue behaviour will be tested on a full scale test rig. Until now tests on full scale wind turbine parts are not common. Therefore, a general lack of experience on how to perform accelerated life time tests for those components exists. To clarify how to transfer real conditions to the test environment, the arrangements and deviations for the upcoming experimental test are discussed in detail. In order to complete investigations of weight saving potentials, next to getting a better comprehension of the fatigue behaviour by executing a full scale test, a further outcome are suggestions for the usage of cast and forged materials regarding the fatigue and the remaining life of the rotor shaft. It is shown, that it is worthwhile to think about a material exchange for the forged rotor shaft.

  14. Effect of multiaxial forging on microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-o.8Ca alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, N. Yu; Stepanov, N. D.; Salishchev, G. A.; Rokhlin, L. L.; Dobatkin, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    It was shown that multiaxial forging with continuous decrease of temperature from 450°C to 250°C turns coarse structure of the Mg-0.8Ca alloy in homogenized state with grain size of several hundreeds gm into fine structure with average grain size of about 2.1 gm. Refinement of structure is accompanied by drastic increase of mechanical properties: tensile yield strength increases from 50 MPa to 193 MPa, ultimate tensile strength increases from 78 to 308 MPa and elongation to fracture increases from 3.0% to 7.2%. The microstructural evolution during multiaxial forging is studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EBSD analysis. The mechanisms responsible for refinement of microstructure are discussed

  15. Study of Dynamic Characteristics for Hydraulic System on 300MN Die-forging Press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Tan, Jianping

    2017-06-01

    The faults such as seal breakdown and pressure sensor damage occur in 300MN Die-forging press frequently. First, the fault phenomenon and harm of the hydraulic system was compiled statistics, the theoretical analysis of the hydraulic impact of hydraulic system are carried out based on the momentum theorem; Then, the co-simulation model of hydraulic system was established by AMESim and Simulink software and the correctness was verified. Finally, the dynamic characteristics of hydraulic system for the key working condition “forging stroke changing to mold collision” was analyzed, the influences rules of system parameters such as the leak gap of valve, diameter of water way pipeline, emulsion temperature and air contain act on hydraulic system are obtained. This conclusions have a theoretical guiding significance to the improvement and maintains of high pressure and large flow hydraulic system.

  16. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure ( Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  17. Inverse method for flux characterization using infrared thermography in die forging

    SciTech Connect

    Lair, P.; Dumoulin, J.; Millan, P.

    1998-02-20

    In order to obtain high-quality pieces in advanced metallic alloys after hot die forging, a measurement methodology based on the association of infrared thermography with thermal inverse modelizations has been developed. It is based upon the maximum entropy principle. This report presents the method as well as numerical tests for the one-dimensional case. The two-dimensional case and results using some experimental data are also presented in both cases, where the noise influence is shown.

  18. [State of the locomotion system in blacksmiths working in hot forges].

    PubMed

    Druzhinin, V N; Kharitonov, V I

    1997-01-01

    Hygienic, clinical and roentgenologic studies covered locomotion apparatus in hot forging puncher blacksmiths who are exposed to several occupational hazards with vibration as the leading one. The studies covered work conditions and health state of risk group members-patients with some signs of vibration disease. Some up-to-date roentgenologic methods helped precise evaluation of occupational factors' role in bone manifestations of subclinical vibration disease.

  19. Innovative Die Material and Lubrication Strategies for Clean and Energy Conserving Forging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Shivpuri; Sailesh Babu; Lin Yang; Yijun Zhu

    2007-01-08

    The objective of this project was to develop and implement innovative die material and surface coating strategies such as composite dies and lubricated coatings to increase die lives and to reduce environmental pollution. In this project approaches and software were developed for die life optimization and optimal design of lubrication systems for hot forging. In addition, LENS applied nickel-aluminide coatings were developed and validated in the industrial environment for significant improvements in die life.

  20. Parallel investigation of double forged pure tungsten samples irradiated in three DPF devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Laas, T.; Shirokova, V.; Väli, B.; Paju, J.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Talab, A. A.; Pokatilov, A.; Parker, M.

    2015-08-01

    The double forged pure tungsten (W) samples (supplied by IAEA CRP from the FZJ team in Juelich, Germany) were irradiated in DPF (dense plasma focus) devices PF-12, "Bora" and PF-1000 by hot plasma and fast ion streams. We have used the following analytical methods: microscopy (optical and scanning electron), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electrical conductivity and microroughness measurements. The damage dependence of the tungsten grades on irradiation conditions and power flux densities of irradiation processes is discussed.

  1. The rolling texture of 18% Ni-350 maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, A. ul; Khan, A.Q. )

    1993-02-01

    Texture development in hot rolled sheet and hot forged tube of 18% Ni-350 maraging steel has been studied after various degrees of cold deformation and flow turning, respectively. Hot rolled sheet exhibited considerable mechanical anisotropy. Weak texture development was observed following flow turning compared to cold deformation. Above 80% deformation, an increase in work hardening was accompanied by an increase in the orientation density of the texture component (001)[110]. Deformation of 97% leads to the development of the texture component (111)[110], with the highest orientation density 10.3 times random and a constant orientation density of 9 times random along [var phi][sub 1] at [phi] = 55[degree] and [var phi][sub 2] = 45[degree]. This texture was correlated with the appearance of shear bands in the microstructure.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forging Process to Reproduce a 3D Aluminium Foam Complex Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Filice, Luigino; Gagliardi, Francesco; Umbrello, Domenico; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    2007-05-17

    Metallic foams represent one of the most exciting materials introduced in the manufacturing scenario in the last years. In the study here addressed, the experimental and numerical investigations on the forging process of a simple foam billet shaped into complex sculptured parts were carried out. In particular, the deformation behavior of metallic foams and the development of density gradients were investigated through a series of experimental forging tests in order to produce a selected portion of a hip prosthesis. The human bone replacement was chosen as case study due to its industrial demand and for its particular 3D complex shape. A finite element code (Deform 3D) was utilized for modeling the foam behavior during the forging process and an accurate material rheology description was used based on a porous material model which includes the measured local density. Once the effectiveness of the utilized Finite Element model was verified through the comparison with the experimental evidences, a numerical study of the influence of the foam density was investigated. The obtained numerical results shown as the initial billet density plays an important role on the prediction of the final shape, the optimization of the flash as well as the estimation of the punch load.

  3. Forming limit prediction of powder forging process by the energy-based elastoplastic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Yang; Cheng, Jung-Ho; Huang, Cheng-Chao

    2004-06-01

    An energy-based elastoplastic damage model is developed and then applied to predict the deformation and fracture initiation in powder forging processes. The fracture mechanism is investigated by the newly proposed damage model, which is based on the plastic energy dissipation. The developed formulations are implemented into finite element program ABAQUS in order to simulate the complex loading conditions. The forming limits of sintered porous metals under various operational conditions are explored by comparing the relevant experiments with the finite element analyses. The sintered iron-powder preforms of various initial relative densities (RDs) and aspect ratios are compressed until crack initiates. The deformation level of the bulged billets at fracture stroke obtained from compressive fracture tests is utilized to validate the finite element model and then the forming limit diagrams are constructed with the validated model. This model is further verified by the gear blank forging. The fracture site and corresponding deformation level are predicted by the finite element simulations. Meanwhile, the gear forging experiment is performed on the sintered preforms. The predicted results agree well with the experimental observations.

  4. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-15

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  5. eFORGE: A Tool for Identifying Cell Type-Specific Signal in Epigenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Charles E; Paul, Dirk S; van Dongen, Jenny; Butcher, Lee M; Ambrose, John C; Barrett, James E; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Iotchkova, Valentina; Frontini, Mattia; Downes, Kate; Ouwehand, Willem H; Laperle, Jonathan; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume; Bergmann, Anke K; Siebert, Reiner; Vellenga, Edo; Saeed, Sadia; Matarese, Filomena; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Herrero, Javier; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Beck, Stephan

    2016-11-15

    Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) provide an alternative approach for studying human disease through consideration of non-genetic variants such as altered DNA methylation. To advance the complex interpretation of EWAS, we developed eFORGE (http://eforge.cs.ucl.ac.uk/), a new standalone and web-based tool for the analysis and interpretation of EWAS data. eFORGE determines the cell type-specific regulatory component of a set of EWAS-identified differentially methylated positions. This is achieved by detecting enrichment of overlap with DNase I hypersensitive sites across 454 samples (tissues, primary cell types, and cell lines) from the ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and BLUEPRINT projects. Application of eFORGE to 20 publicly available EWAS datasets identified disease-relevant cell types for several common diseases, a stem cell-like signature in cancer, and demonstrated the ability to detect cell-composition effects for EWAS performed on heterogeneous tissues. Our approach bridges the gap between large-scale epigenomics data and EWAS-derived target selection to yield insight into disease etiology.

  6. Material Behavior Based Hybrid Process for Sheet Draw-Forging Thin Walled Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z.Q.; Shivpuri, R.

    2005-08-05

    Magnesium alloys are conventionally formed at the elevated temperatures. The thermally improved formability is sensitive to the temperature and strain rate. Due to limitations in forming speeds, tooling strength and narrow processing windows, complex thin walled parts cannot be made by traditional warm drawing or hot forging processes. A hybrid process, which is based on the deformation mechanism of magnesium alloys at the elevated temperature, is proposed that combines warm drawing and hot forging modes to produce an aggressive geometry at acceptable forming speed. The process parameters, such as temperatures, forming speeds etc. are determined by the FEM modeling and simulation. Sensitivity analysis under the constraint of forming limits of Mg alloy sheet material and strength of tooling material is carried out. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a conical geometry with thin walls and with bottom features. Results show that designed geometry can be formed in about 8 seconds, this cannot be formed by conventional forging while around 1000s is required for warm drawing. This process is being further investigated through controlled experiments.

  7. Cavitation and failure during hot forging of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Goetz, R.L.; Seetharaman, V.; Shell, E.B.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    The occurrence of cavity initiation and gross, free-surface fracture during subtransus hot pancake forging of Ti-6Al-4V with a transformed beta (colony) microstructure was established. Cavity initiation mechanisms were one of two distinct types. At temperatures approximately 75 C or more below the beta transus temperature (T{sub {beta}}), cavity initiation occurred at relatively low strains in the beta phase lying between the grain-boundary alpha phase and the lamellar colonies. By contrast, at temperatures near the transus (i.e., T {approx} T{sub {beta}} {minus} 25 C), cavity initiation occurred at much larger strains as a result of microfracture of partially-to-fully globularized alpha phase. Finite element method (FEM) modeling of the pancake forging process revealed that secondary tensile stresses were used to correlate both the cavity initiation and the gross free-surface fracture results to previous observations from uniaxial hot tension tests in which identical damage mechanisms had been observed. The tensile work criterion of Cockcroft and Latham (C + L) gave moderately good (quantitative) correlation between the forging and uniaxial tension behaviors. An alternate comparison based on the Rice and Tracey cavity growth model gave reasonable predictions of free-surface fracture but tended to overestimate the incidence of subsurface cavity initiation.

  8. Effects of Forging Process Parameters on Microstructure Evolution of Aluminum Alloy 7050

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Youping; Shi Yan; Yang Jihui; Lin Yongcheng

    2007-04-07

    The objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of microstructure evolution of aluminum alloy 7050 under the condition of different forging process parameters by means of combining materials physical model with finite element code. For the purpose of establishing constitutive equation and physical model of microstructure evolution, the isothermal compression test were performed by machine Gleeble 1500 on the condition of temperatures ranging from 250 deg. C to 450 deg. C and constant strain rates of 0.01s-1, 0.1s-1, 1s-1 and 10s-1. The behaviors of microstructure evolutions of aluminum alloy 7050 under difference process parameters were studied by metallographic observations. The experiment results showed that recrystallization during forming process occurred at the critical strain and the volume fraction of recrystallization changed with the temperature and strain rate. According to the results of isothermal compression test, a constitutive equation and an empirical model of DRX were obtained. A finite element code DEFORM 3D was used to analyze the influence of different forging process parameters on the behavior of microstructure evolution in details. The present model and simulation method can be served as a useful tool to predict and control the properties and shape of aluminum alloy 7050 components during forging.

  9. Simulations and Experiments of the Nonisothermal Forging Process of a Ti-6Al-4V Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a nonisothermal precision forging process of a Ti-6Al-4V first-stage impeller for the gas turbine engine was simulated using the finite element software. The simulation results such as load requirements, damage, velocity field, stress, strain, and temperature distributions are discussed in detail. Simulations predicted the maximum load requirement of about 80 MN. The maximum temperature loss was observed at the contour surface regions. The center and contour regions are the high-strained regions in the part. To validate the model, forging experiments mimicking simulations were performed in the α + β phases region (930 °C). The selected locations of the part were characterized for tensile properties at 27 and 200 °C, hardness, microstructure, grain size, and the amount of primary α phase based on the strain distribution results. The soundness of the forged part was verified using fluorescent penetrant test (Mil Std 2175 Grade A) and ultrasonic test (AMS 2630 class A1). From the experimental results, it was found that the variations in the hardness, tensile properties at room, and elevated temperature are not significant. The microstructure, grain size, and primary α phase content are nearly same.

  10. An Approach to Optimize Size Parameters of Forging by Combining Hot-Processing Map and FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. E.; Wang, X. Y.; Deng, L.

    2014-11-01

    The size parameters of 6061 aluminum alloy rib-web forging were optimized by using hot-processing map and finite element method (FEM) based on high-temperature compression data. The results show that the stress level of the alloy can be represented by a Zener-Holloman parameter in a hyperbolic sine-type equation with the hot deformation activation energy of 343.7 kJ/mol. Dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization concurrently preceded during high-temperature deformation of the alloy. Optimal hot-processing parameters for the alloy corresponding to the peak value of 0.42 are 753 K and 0.001 s-1. The instability domain occurs at deformation temperature lower than 653 K. FEM is an available method to validate hot-processing map in actual manufacture by analyzing the effect of corner radius, rib width, and web thickness on workability of rib-web forging of the alloy. Size parameters of die forgings can be optimized conveniently by combining hot-processing map and FEM.

  11. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  12. Wear Improvement of Tools in the Cold Forging Process for Long Hex Flange Nuts

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Shao-Yi; Shih, Po-Yueh

    2015-01-01

    Cold forging has played a critical role in fasteners and has been widely used in automotive production, manufacturing, aviation and 3C (Computer, Communication, and Consumer electronics). Despite its extensive use in fastener forming and die design, operator experience and trial and error make it subjective and unreliable owing to the difficulty of controlling the development schedule. This study used finite element analysis to establish and simulate wear in automotive repair fastener manufacturing dies based on actual process conditions. The places on a die that wore most quickly were forecast, with the stress levels obtained being substituted into the Archard equation to calculate die wear. A 19.87% improvement in wear optimization occurred by applying the Taguchi quality method to the new design. Additionally, a comparison of actual manufacturing data to simulations revealed a nut forging size error within 2%, thereby demonstrating the accuracy of this theoretical analysis. Finally, SEM micrographs of the worn surfaces on the upper punch indicate that the primary wear mechanism on the cold forging die for long hex flange nuts was adhesive wear. The results can simplify the development schedule, reduce the number of trials and further enhance production quality and die life. PMID:28793589

  13. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-01

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  14. Microstructure and degradation behavior of forged Fe-Mn-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhigang; Hodgson, Michael A.; Cao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a comparative study of a series of Fe-Mn-Si alloys proposed as degradable biomaterials for medical applications. Five Fe-28wt.%Mn-xSi (where x = 0 to 8 wt.%) alloys were fabricated by an arc-melting method. All the as-cast alloys were subsequently subjected to homogenization treatment and hot forging. The microstructure and phase constituents were investigated. It is found that the grain size of the as-forged alloys ranged approximately from 30 to 50 μm. The as-forged Fe-Mn-Si alloys containing Si from 2 to 6 wt.% was comprised of duplex martensitic ɛ and austenitic γ phases; however, the Si-free and 8 wt.% Si alloys only consisted of a single γ phase. After 30 days of static immersion test in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium, it is found that pitting and general corrosion occur on the sample surfaces. Potentiodynamic analysis reveals that the degradation rate of the Fe-Mn-Si alloys increased gradually with Si content up to 6 wt.%, beyond which the degradation slows down.

  15. Effects of Forging Process Parameters on Microstructure Evolution of Aluminum Alloy 7050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Youping; Shi, Yan; Yang, Jihui; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of microstructure evolution of aluminum alloy 7050 under the condition of different forging process parameters by means of combining materials physical model with finite element code. For the purpose of establishing constitutive equation and physical model of microstructure evolution, the isothermal compression test were performed by machine Gleeble 1500 on the condition of temperatures ranging from 250°C to 450°C and constant strain rates of 0.01s-1, 0.1s-1, 1s-1 and 10s-1. The behaviors of microstructure evolutions of aluminum alloy 7050 under difference process parameters were studied by metallographic observations. The experiment results showed that recrystallization during forming process occurred at the critical strain and the volume fraction of recrystallization changed with the temperature and strain rate. According to the results of isothermal compression test, a constitutive equation and an empirical model of DRX were obtained. A finite element code DEFORM 3D was used to analyze the influence of different forging process parameters on the behavior of microstructure evolution in details. The present model and simulation method can be served as a useful tool to predict and control the properties and shape of aluminum alloy 7050 components during forging.

  16. Wear Improvement of Tools in the Cold Forging Process for Long Hex Flange Nuts.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Shao-Yi; Shih, Po-Yueh

    2015-09-25

    Cold forging has played a critical role in fasteners and has been widely used in automotive production, manufacturing, aviation and 3C (Computer, Communication, and Consumer electronics). Despite its extensive use in fastener forming and die design, operator experience and trial and error make it subjective and unreliable owing to the difficulty of controlling the development schedule. This study used finite element analysis to establish and simulate wear in automotive repair fastener manufacturing dies based on actual process conditions. The places on a die that wore most quickly were forecast, with the stress levels obtained being substituted into the Archard equation to calculate die wear. A 19.87% improvement in wear optimization occurred by applying the Taguchi quality method to the new design. Additionally, a comparison of actual manufacturing data to simulations revealed a nut forging size error within 2%, thereby demonstrating the accuracy of this theoretical analysis. Finally, SEM micrographs of the worn surfaces on the upper punch indicate that the primary wear mechanism on the cold forging die for long hex flange nuts was adhesive wear. The results can simplify the development schedule, reduce the number of trials and further enhance production quality and die life.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forging Process to Reproduce a 3D Aluminium Foam Complex Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filice, Luigino; Gagliardi, Francesco; Shivpuri, Rajiv; Umbrello, Domenico

    2007-05-01

    Metallic foams represent one of the most exciting materials introduced in the manufacturing scenario in the last years. In the study here addressed, the experimental and numerical investigations on the forging process of a simple foam billet shaped into complex sculptured parts were carried out. In particular, the deformation behavior of metallic foams and the development of density gradients were investigated through a series of experimental forging tests in order to produce a selected portion of a hip prosthesis. The human bone replacement was chosen as case study due to its industrial demand and for its particular 3D complex shape. A finite element code (Deform 3D®) was utilized for modeling the foam behavior during the forging process and an accurate material rheology description was used based on a porous material model which includes the measured local density. Once the effectiveness of the utilized Finite Element model was verified through the comparison with the experimental evidences, a numerical study of the influence of the foam density was investigated. The obtained numerical results shown as the initial billet density plays an important role on the prediction of the final shape, the optimization of the flash as well as the estimation of the punch load.

  18. Weldability and mechanical property characterization of weld clad alloy 800H tubesheet forging

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; McCoy, H.E.

    1984-09-01

    The weldability of an alloy 800H forging that simulates a steam generator tubesheet is studied. Weldability was of concern because a wide range of microstructures was present in this forging. The top and portions of the bottom were weld clad with ERNiC-3 weld metal to a thickness of 19 mm similar to that anticipated for HTGR steam generators. Examinations of the clad fusion line in various regions revealed no weldability problems except possibly on the bottom portion, which contained large grains and some as-cast structure. A few microfissures were evident in this region, but no excessive hot cracking tendency was observed. The tensile properties in all areas of the clad forging were reasonable and not influenced greatly by the microstructure. The elevated-temperature tests showed strong tendency for fracture in the heat-affected zone of the alloy 800H. Creep failure at 649/sup 0/C consistently occurred in the heat-affected zone of the alloy 800H, but the creep strength exceeded the expected values for alloy 800H.

  19. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program fracture issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Large-scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture-technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials-irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed-mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress-state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low-strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture-mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring-forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). 22 refs., 18 figs.

  20. Thermomechanical steels behaviors at semi-solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traidi, K.; Favier, V.; Lestriez, P.; Debray, K.; Langlois, L.; Ranc, N.; Saby, M.; Mangin, P.

    2016-10-01

    Semisolid thixoforming is an intermediate process between casting and forging. The combination of the semi-solid state and globular microstructures leads to thixotropic properties of the material [1]. Thixoformingprocess presents several advantages such as energy efficiency, high production rates, smooth die filling, low shrinkage porosity, which together lead to near net shape capability and thus to fewer manufacturing steps than with classical methods. So far, there are only few applications of semisolid processing of highr melting point alloys [2]. Steel is a particularly challenging material to semi-solid process because of about 1400°C temperatures involved. Characterizing and modelling such semi-solid behaviour for steels is still challenging. The aim of the research work was to study the rheological properties of a suitable graded steel (LTT C38) designed for semi-solid processing. An experimental protocol was determined to characterize the thermomechanical behaviors and defect condition. Uniaxial tensile tests were carried out on semi-solid specimen having >0.8 solid fraction for different temperatures. The variation in both ductility and strength with temperature has been identified.

  1. Hot Ductility Behavior of an 8 Pct Cr Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Shuhua; Shi, Zhongping; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wantang

    2015-04-01

    The hot ductility of an 8 pct Cr roller steel was determined between 1173 K and 1473 K (900 °C and 1200 °C) at strain rates of 0.01 to 10 s-1 through tensile testing. The fracture morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and the microstructure was examined through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dependence of the hot ductility behavior on the deformation conditions, grain size, and precipitation was analyzed. The relationship between the reduction in area and the natural logarithm of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (ln Z) was found to be a second-order polynomial. When ln Z was greater than 40 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by incompatible deformation between the grains. When ln Z was between 32 and 40 s-1, the hot ductility was excellent and the main fracture mechanism was void linking. When ln Z was below 32 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by grain boundary sliding. A fine grain structure is beneficial for homogenous deformation and dynamic recrystallization, which induces better hot ductility. The effect of M7C3 carbide particles dispersed in the matrix on the hot ductility was small. The grain growth kinetics in the 8 pct Cr steel were obtained between 1373 K and 1473 K (1100 °C and 1200 °C). Finally, optimized preheating and forging procedures for 8 pct Cr steel rollers are provided.

  2. Reclamation and additional alloying of 18Ni(350) maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Salam, I.; Nasim, I.; Hussain, S.W.; Hashmi, F.H.; Khan, A.Q. )

    1994-06-01

    The possibility of gainfully utilizing grade 18Ni(350) maraging steel scrap has been investigated, along with the effect of additional alloying with niobium. A vacuum induction melting and casting furnace was used for melting and additional alloying. The cast ingots were hot forged and their properties compared with those of the stock material. The composition of the reprocessed material was found to be within the prescribed range for 18Ni(350) steel, except for some loss in titanium content. The hardness and tensile strength of the recycled steels were similar to those of the stock material. A slight decrease in hardness in the aged condition could be attributed to loss of titanium during remelting. Charpy V-notch impact testing indicated significantly higher toughness in the remelted material; this has been attributed to a homogeneous, refined microstructure and a lower level of inclusions. Additional alloying with 2% Nb not only improved the mechanical properties but also affected the amount of reverted austenite obtained after aging.

  3. Carbide Precipitation Behavior and Wear Resistance of a Novel Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Ligang; Yang, Qingxiang

    2013-06-01

    High speed steel, which contains more alloy elements, cannot be used to manufacture the forged work roll. Therefore, a novel roller steel was designed on the basis of W6Mo5Cr4V2 (M2) steel. In this study, the carbide precipitation behavior and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were investigated. The Fe-C isopleths were calculated by Thermo-Calc to determine the carbide types, which were precipitated at different temperatures. The phase transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimeter and then the characteristic temperatures were designed. The phase structures quenched from the characteristic temperatures were measured by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The typical microstructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy. The hardness and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were measured. The results show that the precipitation temperatures of austenite, MC, M6C, M23C6, and ferrite are 1360, 1340, 1230, 926, and 843 °C respectively. When the specimen is quenched from 1300 °C, only MC precipitates from the matrix. At 1220 °C, MC and M2C precipitate. At 1150 °C, all of MC, M2C and M6C precipitate. Relationship between mass fraction of different phases and temperature were also simulated by Thermo-Calc. The hardness of the novel roller steel is a little lower than that of M2 steel, however, the wear resistance of the novel roller steel is a little higher than that of M2 steel with the increase of wear time.

  4. 76 FR 5331 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan: Final Results of Sunset Reviews and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    .... They are weld-neck, used for butt-weld line connections; threaded, used for threaded line connections; slip-on and lap joint, used with stub-ends/ butt-weld line connections; socket weld, used to fit pipe...

  5. The steel scrap age.

    PubMed

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  6. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  7. Effects of heat input on the microstructure and toughness of the 8 MnMoNi 5 5 shape-welded nuclear steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Million, Karl; Datta, Ratan; Zimmermann, Horst

    2005-04-01

    A weld metal well proven in the German nuclear industry served as the basis for the certification of a shape-welded steel to be used as base material for manufacture of nuclear primary components. The outstanding properties of this steel are attributed to the extremely fine-grained and stable primary microstructure. Subsequent reheating cycles caused by neighbouring weld beads do neither lead to coarsened brittle structures in the heat-affected zone nor to increase in hardness and decrease in toughness, as is the case with wrought steel materials. One of the largest new reactor vessel design amongst today's advanced reactor projects is considered to be particularly suitable for the use of shape-welded parts in place of forgings. In addition the need for design and development of new shape-welded steel grades for other new generation reactor projects is emphasized, in which the experience gained with this research could make a contribution.

  8. Effect of microalloying elements on the structure and properties of low-carbon and ultralow-carbon cold-rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, O. A.; Fonshtein, N. M.; Storozheva, L. M.

    1994-03-01

    Cold-rolled steels used for the forged components of automobiles should exhibit high, partly mutually-exclusive properties: high forgeability with desirably high strength, resistance to aging combined with hardenability at temperatures for drying paint coatings, etc. Satisfaction of these requirements is provided to a considerable degree by microalloying. The final mechanical properties of cold-rolled steel depend on such structural parameters of hot-rolled strip as texture, the amount of dissolved C and N atoms in α-solid solution, and ferrite grain size. With constant hot rolling production schedules these structural parameters are governed by steel composition, in particular by the type of microalloying. In this work the effect is considered for dispersed microalloying elements, i.e., phosphorus, boron, titanium, and nïobium, on the final mechanical properties of low- and ultralow-carbon steels.

  9. Effect of impurities on the proneness to temper embrittlement of heat resistant Cr-Mo-V steel

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, I.A.; Kark, G.S.; Pokusaeva, V.I.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the effect of most alloying elements which are traditionaly regarded as dangerous in low-alloy structural steels--sulfur, phosphorus, copper, arsenic, antimony, tin--on the proneness to temper embrittlement of steel 25Kh1M1F which is used for making large all-forged rotors of fixed and transport medium-pressure steam turbines. On the basis of the obtained results it may be concluded that from among the investigated alloying elements only phosphorus and antimony have a statistically significant effect on the proneness of fine-grained steel 25Kh1M1F to temper embrittlement, and the embrittling effect of phosphorus is much stronger than the embrittling effect of antimony.

  10. The Effects of Helium Bubble Microstructure on Ductility in Annealed and HERF 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M.H.; Morgan, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effects of microstructure on the ambient temperature embrittlement from hydrogen isotopes and decay helium in 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel. Hydrogen and tritium-exposed 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel tensile samples were pulled to failure and then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy. This study determined that ductility differences between annealed and high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) stainless steel containing tritium and its decay product, helium, could be related to differences in the helium bubble microstructures. The HERF microstructures were more resistant to tritium-induced embrittlement than annealed microstructures because the high number density of helium bubbles on dislocations trap tritium within the matrix and away from the grain boundaries.

  11. Research on the energy conservation potential of warm forging technology. Final technical report, 28 September 1984-30 September 1985. [Warm vs hot

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, R.J.; Kalamasz, T.G.; Darden, W.S.; Moracz, D.J.

    1985-06-28

    The potential energy savings associated with the implementation of warm forging for ferrous materials in industry were investigated. It was estimated that 0.005 Q (10/sup 15/ Btu) could be saved annually if 30% of present hot forgings were converted to warm forgings. It was found that technology was not a barrier to greater utilization of warm forging. Non-technical barriers to continued implementation, such as economics, were found to be the primary hurdles barring greater utilization of the technology. 75 refs.

  12. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  13. An assessment of ultra fine grained 316L stainless steel for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Muley, Sachin Vijay; Vidvans, Amey N; Chaudhari, Gajanan P; Udainiya, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ultra fine-grained metals obtained by severe plastic deformation exhibit higher specific strength that is useful for many applications and show promise for use as body implants. This work studied the microstructural evolution, mechanical and sliding wear behavior and corrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel warm multi axially forged at 600°C. Microstructural evolution studied using electron backscatter diffraction technique and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of ultra fine-grained structure. Average grain size reduced from 30μm to 0.86μm after nine strain steps. A combination of Hall-Petch strengthening and strain hardening increased the hardness. Improved sliding wear resistance is attributed to a transition from micro cutting to wedge-forming mode of abrasive wear. Load-bearing orthopedic implants often fail from pitting initiated corrosion fatigue. Potentiodynamic tests, cyclic polarization, and FeCl3 immersion tests revealed enhanced pitting resistance of forged steel that is confirmed by Mott-Schottky analysis. This is ascribed to an increase in the grain boundary volume, and homogenization of pit inducing impurities and non-metallic phases due to severe deformation, which influenced the passive film properties. These model studies on 316L steel demonstrate that severely deformed ultra fine-grained metals have potential to deliver improved implant performance. This model study on 316L steel demonstrates that severely deformed ultra fine-grained (UFG) metals have potential to deliver improved load-bearing implant performance. It is as interesting as is unclear as to how such severely deformed UFG material behaves electrochemically in the corrosive body fluids. This work is on studying the inter-relationship between structure, and mechanical, wear, and corrosion behavior of warm multiaxially forged (MAFed) UFG 316L stainless steel. Warm MAF is a bulk processing method capable of yielding large volume of UFG material and is an easily

  14. Hot-Deformation Behavior and Hot-Processing Maps of AISI 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rong-Sheng; Jin, Miao; Guo, Bao-Feng; Liu, Xin-Gang; Chen, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The compressive deformation behaviors of 410 martensitic stainless steel were investigated on a Gleeble-1500 thermomechanical simulator, and the experimental stress-strain data were obtained. The measured flow stress was corrected for friction and temperature. A constitutive equation that accounts for the influence of strain was established, and the hot-processing maps at different strain were plotted. The microstructure evolution of the hot-deformation process was studied on the basis of microstructural observations at high temperatures. Phase-transformation experiments on 410 steel were conducted at high temperatures to elucidate the effects of temperature on the delta-ferrite content. The initial forging temperature and optimum process parameters were obtained on the basis of the processing map and the changes in the delta-ferrite content at high temperatures.

  15. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Hao, Luhan; Li, Shijian; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2011-11-01

    Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  16. Microstructure and Properties of Selective Laser Melted High Hardness Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerhahn, F.; Schulz, A.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    A secondary hardening tool steel material X110CrMoVAl 8-2 was successfully processed by selective laser melting (SLM), producing defect free samples of high density. The microstructure appeared irregular after SLM, which was attributed to locally different temper states in consequence of the SLM process pattern. By a subsequent heat treatment, a homogeneous microstructure with ultrafine carbide precipitations and a very high resulting hardness of 765 HV were achieved. The hardness came very close to that of the same material processed by spray forming and forging, whilst the SLM microstructure was significantly finer. Therefore this tool steel material was considered as highly promising for SLM manufacturing of tools, e.g. for micro tooling applications.

  17. Structure and mechanism of the formation of granular bainite in steel 20Kh2NACh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, L. S.; Svishchenko, V. V.; Cheprasov, D. P.

    1997-09-01

    At the present time the structure of granular bainite is widely used in heat treatment. The novel technologies include spheroidizing treatment of rolled stock from steel 20Kh2NACh. The composition of the steel provides a structure of granular bainite in rolled strips up to 10 mm wide with their cooling in still air from the temperature attained at the end of hot rolling. After a high-temperature tempering of the strips for 4 h the granular bainite transforms into granular pearlite which is optimum for cold forging. The available published data on the structure of granular bainite are insufficient for explaining the causes of the accelerated transformation. In this connection, it is interesting to investigate the phase composition, the microstructure, and the transformation mechanism of granular bainite.

  18. The Z-Phase in 9Cr Ferritic/martensitic Heat Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fengshi; Chen, Fuxia; Jiang, Xuebo; Xue, Bing; Zhou, Li; Jung, Woosang

    The precipitation behavior of Z-phase was investigated during long-term aging at 650°C in an ultra low carbon 9Cr ferritic/martensitic heat resistant steel. The steel was prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into a plate. The plate was normalized at 1100°C for 1h, cooled in air and tempered at 700°C for 1h. Bimodal nano-sized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. After aging at 650°C for 1200h, the Z-phase was found to nucleate on the larger nano-sized MX. The Z-phase and MX have the following orientation relationship: <112>Z-phase//<001>MX and (1bar 10){Z-phase}//(200){MX} .

  19. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prior thermo-mechanical processing to modify structure and properties of severely deformed low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrnik, J.; Lapovok, R.; Raab, G. I.

    2014-08-01

    The article focuses on the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of low carbon steel AISI 1010 performed at increased temperature. The grain refinement of ferrite structure is monitored and described with respect to different initial steel structure modified by thermal and thermomechanical (TM) treatment (TM) prior severe plastic deformation. The refinement of coarse initial ferrite structure with grain size in range of 30 - 50 gm resulted from solutioning was conducted then in two steps. Preliminary structure refinement has been achieved due to multistep open die forging process and quite uniform ferrite structure with grain size of the order of gm was obtained. The further grain refinement steel structure was then accomplished during warm Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP phi = 120°) at 300°C, introducing different strain in range of ɛef = 2.6 -4. The change of microstructure in dependence of the effective strain was evaluated by SEM and TEM study of thin foils. The high straining of steel resulted in extensive deformation of ferrite grains and formation of mixture of submicron grains structure in banded deformed structure with dense dislocation network and subgrains. The dynamic polygonization process, due to increased ECAP temperature, modified the submicrocrystalline structure formation. There was only indistinctive difference observed in structure refinement when considering different initial structure of steel. The tensile behaviour was characterized by strength increase followed by softening. None work hardening phenomenon appeared at tensile deformation of deformed bars.