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Sample records for 10exp 4 mexp

  1. Measurements of Local Heat Transfer and Pressure on Six 2-Inch-Diameter Blunt Bodies at a Mach Number of 4.95 and at Reynolds Numbers Per Foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Morton; Mayo, Edward E.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the local heat transfer and pressure distribution have been made on six 2-inch-diameter, blunt, axially symmetric bodies in the Langley gas dynamics laboratory at a Mach number of 4.95 and at Reynolds numbers per foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6). During the investigation laminar flow was observed over a hemispherical-nosed body having a surface finish from 10 to 20 microinches at the highest test Reynolds number per foot (for this configuration) of 77.4 x 10(exp 6). Though it was repeatedly possible to measure completely laminar flow at this Reynolds number for the hemisphere, it was not possible to observe completely laminar flow on the flat-nosed body for similar conditions. The significance of this phenomenon is obscured by the observation that the effects of particle impacts on the surface in causing roughness were more pronounced on the flat-nosed body. For engineering purposes, a method developed by M. Richard Dennison while employed by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation appears to be a reasonable procedure for estimating turbulent heat transfer provided transition occurs at a forward location on the body. For rearward-transition locations, the method is much poorer for the hemispherical nose than for the flat nose. The pressures measured on the hemisphere agreed very well with those of the modified Newtonian theory, whereas the pressures on all other bodies, except on the flat-nosed body, were bracketed by modified Newtonian theory both with and without centrifugal forces. For the hemisphere, the stagnation-point velocity gradient agreed very well with Newtonian theory. The stagnation-point velocity gradient for the flat- nosed model was 0.31 of the value for the hemispherical-nosed model. If a Newtonian type of flow is assumed, the ratio 0.31 will be independent of Much number and real-gas effects.

  2. Laboratory Demonstration of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph with Better than 10(exp -9) Contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert; Martinache, Frantz; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    We present coronagraphic images from the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph on NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab, showing contrasts of 5x10(exp -1) averaged from 2-4 lambda/D, in monochromatic light at 808 nm. In parallel with the coronagraph and its deformable mirror and coronagraphic wavefront control, we also demonstrate a low-order wavefront control system, giving 100 x rms suppression of introduced tip/tilt disturbances down to residual levels of 10(exp -3) lambda/D. Current limitations, as well as broadband (10% fractional bandpass) preliminary results are discussed.

  3. An Atomic Clock with 10 (exp -18) Instability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-13

    from the effects of strong initial density fluctuations in quench up experi ments and finite temperature (20). The space time dependence of the...experimental tools to address exciting topics in cosmology and gravitational physics such as Hawking radiation (13) or Unruh effect (27). References...3.2 x 10- 16/y’t (red solid lile). The blue dashed line represents the estimated combined instabiliy contributions from the Dick effect (1.4 x 10-16

  4. A vacuum (10(exp -9) Torr) friction apparatus for determining friction and endurance life of MoSx films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip B.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Spalvins, Talivaldis; Wheeler, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    The first part of this paper describes an ultrahigh vacuum friction apparatus (tribometer). The tribometer can be used in a ball-on-disk configuration and is specifically designed to measure the friction and endurance life of solid lubricating films such as MoS(x) in vacuum at a pressure of 10 exp -7 Pa. The sliding mode is typically unidirectional at a constant rotating speed. The second part of this paper presents some representative friction and endurance life data for magnetron sputtered MoS(x) films (110 nm thick) deposited on sputter-cleaned 440 C stainless-steel disk substrates, which were slid against a 6-mm-diameter 440 C stainless-steel bearing ball. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.49 to 3.6 N (average Hertzian contact pressure, 0.33 to 0.69 GPa), at a constant rotating speed of 120 rpm (sliding velocity ranging from 31 to 107 mm/s due to the range of wear track radii involved in the experiments), in a vacuum of 7 x 10 exp -7 Pa and at room temperature. The results indicate that there are similarities in friction behavior of MoS(x) films overs their life cycles regardless of load applied. The coefficient of friction (mu) decreases as load W increases according to mu = kW exp -1/3. The endurance life E of MoS(x) films decreases as the load W increases according to E = KW exp -1.4 for the load range. The load- (or contract-pressure-) dependent endurance life allows us to reduce the time for wear experiments and to accelerate endurance life testing of MoS(x) films. For the magnetron-sputtered MoS(x) films deposited on 440 C stainless-steel disks: the specific wear rate normalized to the load and the number of revolutions was 3 x 10 exp -8 mm exp 3/N-revolution; the specific wear rate normalized to the load and the total sliding distance was 8 x 10 exp -7 mm exp 3/N-m; and the nondimensional wear coefficient of was approximately 5 x 10 exp -6. The values are almost independent of load in the range 0.49 to 3.6 N (average Hertzian contact

  5. An Instrument to Measure Elemental Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei Up to 10(exp 16) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov,S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    A longstanding goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays up to and through the "knee" (approx. equal to 3 x 10 (exp 15) eV. It is not currently feasible to achieve this goal with an ionization calorimeter because the mass required to be deployed in Earth orbit is very large (at least 50 tonnes). An alternative method will be presented. This is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer using silicon microstrip detector technology. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11)- 10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a design for a new lightweight instrument with a large aperture (KLEM) will be described.

  6. A direct gravitational lensing test for 10 exp 6 solar masses black holes in halos of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    We propose a method that will be able to detect or exclude the existence of 10 exp 6 solar masses black holes in the halos of galaxies. VLBA radio maps of two milliarcsecond jets of a gravitationally lensed quasar will show the signature of these black holes - if they exist. If there are no compact objects in this mass range along the line of sight, the two jets should be linear mappings of each other. If they are not, there must be compact objects of about 10 exp 6 solar masses in the halo of the galaxy that deform the images by gravitational deflection. We present numerical simulations for the two jets A and B of the double quasar 0957 + 561, but the method is valid for any gravitationally lensed quasar with structure on milliarcsecond scales. As a by-product from high-quality VLBA maps of jets A and B, one will be able to tell which features in the maps are intrinsic in the original jet and which are only an optical illusion, i.e., gravitational distortions by black holes along the line of sight.

  7. Friction, Wear, and Evaporation Rates of Various Materials in Vacuum to 10(exp -7) mm Hg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max; Johnson, Robert L.

    1961-01-01

    The requirements for bearings and seals to operate in the environment of space dictate a new area for lubrication research. The low ambient pressures encountered in space can be expected to influence the behavior of oil, grease, and solid-film lubricants. The property of these materials most significantly affected by low ambient pressures is the evaporation rate. Various investigators have therefore measured the evaporation rates of oils and greases in vacuum as one method of establishing their relative merit for space applications (1-3). The results of this work have given some indication as to the oils and greases with the greatest stability at reduced ambient pressures. Only limited experimental work, however, has been reported in the literature for inorganic solids and soft metals which have potential use as solid lubricant films or coatings for hard alloy substrates [e.g. Reference ( 4 )]. In general, the evaporation rates of these materials would be lower than those of oils and greases. These films might therefore be very attractive as lubricants for high vacuum service.

  8. Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a Highly Polished Hemisphere-Cone in Free Flight at Mach Numbers Up to 3.14 and Reynolds Numbers Up to 24 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1961-01-01

    A highly polished hemisphere-cone having a ratio of nose radius to base radius of 0.74 and a half-angle of 14.5 was flight tested at Mach numbers up to 4.70. Temperature and pressure data were obtained at Mach numbers up to 3.14 and a free-stream Reynolds number of 24 x 10(exp 6) based on body diameter. The nose of the model had a surface roughness of 2 to 5 microinches as measured with an interferometer. The measured Stanton numbers were in good agreement with theory. Transition Reynolds numbers based on the laminar boundary-layer momentum thickness at transition ranged from 2,190 to 794. Comparison with results from previous tests of blunt shapes having a surface roughness of 20 to 40 microinches showed that the high degree of polish was instrumental in delaying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  9. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  10. Initial Results from a Search for Lunar Radio Emission from Interactions of >= 10(exp 19) eV Neutrinos and Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorham, P. W.; Liewer, K. M.; Naudet, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Using the NASA Goldstone 70m antenna DSS 14 both singly and in coincidence with the 34 m antenna DSS 13 (21.7 km to the southeast), we have acquired approximately 12 hrs of livetime in a search for predicted pulsed radio emission from extremely-high energy cascades induced by neutrinos or cosmic rays in the lunar regolith. In about 4 hrs of single antenna observations, we reduced our sensitivity to impulsive terrestrial interference to a negligible level by use of a veto afforded by the unique capability of DSS 14. In the 8 hrs of dual-antenna observations, terrestrial interference is eliminated as a background. In both observing modes the thermal noise floor limits the sensitivity. We detected no events above statistical background. We report here initial limits based on these data which begin to constrain several predictions of the flux of EHE neutrinos.

  11. 4H-SiC UV Photo Detector with Large Area and Very High Specific Detectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Shahid, Aslam; Franz, David; Xin, Xiaobin; Zhao, Jian H.; Zhao, Yuegang; Winer, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    Pt/4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes have been fabricated with the device areas up to 1 sq cm. The I-V characteristics and photo-response spectra have been measured and analyzed. For a 5 mm x 5 mm area device leakage current of 1 x 10(exp 15)A at zero bias and 1.2 x 10(exp 14)A at -IV have been established. The quantum efficiency is over 30% from 240nm to 320nm. The specific detectivity, D(sup *), has been calculated from the directly measured leakage current and quantum efficiency data and are shown to be higher than 10(exp 15) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W from 210nm to 350nm with a peak D(sup *) of 3.6 x 10(exp 15)cmH(sup 1/2)/W at 300nm.

  12. Heat-Transfer and Pressure Measurements from a Flight Test of the Third 1/18-Scale Model of the Titan Intercontinental Ballistic Missile up to a Mach Number of 3.86 and Reynolds Number per Foot of 23.5 x 10(exp 6) and a Comparison with Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, John B., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained from a flight test of a 1/18-scale model of the Titan intercontinental ballistic missile up to a Mach number of 3.86 and Reynolds number per foot of 23.5 x 10(exp 6) and are compared with the data of two previously tested 1/18-scale models. Boundary-layer transition was observed on the nose of the model. Van Driest's theory predicted heat-transfer coefficients reasonably well for the fully laminar flow but predictions made by Van Driest's theory for turbulent flow were considerably higher than the measurements when the skin was being heated. Comparison with the flight test of two similar models shows fair repeatability of the measurements for fully laminar or turbulent flow.

  13. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  14. Friction and Wear Properties of As-Deposited and Carbon Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 keV ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions per cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40% relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and wear properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to lO(exp -8) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4) mm(exp 7) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implantation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, non-diamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp-1)). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the non-diamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6

  15. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  16. A Catalog of Soft X-Ray Shadows, and More Contemplation of the 1/4 KeV Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Freyberg, M. J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Sanders, W. T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of shadows in the 1/4 keV soft X-ray diffuse background 4 (SXRB) that were identified by a comparison between ROSAT All-Sky Survey maps and DIRB&corrected IRAS 100 micron maps. These "shadows" are the negative correlations between the surface brightness of the SXRB and the column density of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISIM) over limited angular regions (a few degrees in extent). We have compiled an extensive but not exhaustive set of 378 shadows in the polar regions of the Galaxy (Absolute value (beta) > and approximately equal 20 deg.), and determined their foreground and background X-ray intensities (relative to the absorbing features), and the respective hardness ratios of that emission. The portion of the sky that was examined to find these shadows was restricted in general to regions where the minimum column density is less than and approximately equal to 4 x 10(exp 20) H/square cm, i.e., relatively high Galactic latitudes, and to regions away from distinct extended features in the SXRB such as supernova remnants and superbubbles. The results for the foreground intensities agree well with the recent results of a general analysis of the local 1/4 KeV emission while the background intensities show additional. but not unexpected scatter. The results also confirm the existence of a gradient in the hardness of the local 1/4 keV emission along a Galactic center/ anticenter axis with a temperature that varies from 10(exp 6.13) K to 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. The average temperature of the foreground component from this analysis is 10(exp 6.08) K, compared to 10(exp 6.06) K in the previous analysis. Likewise, the average temperature for the distant component for the current and previous analyses are 10(exp 6.06) K and 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. Finally, the results for the 1/4 keV halo emission are compared to the observed fluxes at 3/4 keV, where the lack of correlation suggests that the Galactic halo's 1/4 keV and 3/4 ke

  17. Suzaku View of the Neutron Star in the Dipping Source 4U 1822-37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasano, Makoto; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki; Zhang, Zhongli; Enoto, Teruaki

    2013-01-01

    The dipping X-ray source 4U 1822-37 was observed by Suzaku on 2006 Octrober 20 for a net exposure of 37 ks. The source was detected with the XIS at a 1-10 keV flux of 5.5 ×10(exp -10) erg per square centimeter per second, and with the HXD (HXD-PIN) at a 10-50 keV flux of 8.9 ×10(exp -10) erg per square centimeter per second. With HXD-PIN, the pulsation was detected at a barycentric period of 0.592437 seconds, and its change rate was reconfirmed as -2.43 × 10(exp -12) seconds per second. The 1-50 keV spectra of 4U 1822-37 were found to be very similar to those of Her X- 1 in the slopes, cutoff and iron lines. Three iron lines (Fe Kalpha, Fe XXV, and Fe XXVI) were detected, on top of a 1-50 keV continuum that is described by an NPEX model plus a soft blackbody. In addition, a cyclotron resonance scattering feature was detected significantly ( greater than 99% confidence), at an energy of 33+/-2 keV with a depth of 0.4(sup +0.6)/(sub -0.3). Therefore, the neutron star in this source is concluded to have a strong magnetic field of 2.8 × 10(exp 12) G. Further assuming that the source has a relatively high intrinsic luminosity of several times 10(exp 37) erg per second, its spectral and timing properties are consistently explained.

  18. Toward 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Texas Center for Space Research research efforts under NASA Grant No. NAG-1936 from 1 Jan. 1992 - 31 Dec. 1992 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis of global GPS data collected during the first three months of the IGS campaign, and analysis of regional data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented in the following.

  19. Towards 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1994-01-01

    Effort during the period form January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis and effects of GPS receiver antenna phase center variation; analysis of global GPS data being collected for the IGS campaign; and analysis of regional (south west Pacific) campaign data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented.

  20. Recombination of N4(+) ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y. S.; Johnsen, R.

    1991-01-01

    Using a modified high-pressure-afterglow/mass spectrometer apparatus similar to that described by Lee and Johnsen (1989), spectroscopic observations of afterglow helium plasmas, with N2 as a minor additive, were carried out in order to verify the mechanism suggested by Bates (1991) for dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions. It was found that dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions results in the formation of N2 molecules in the C 3Pi(u) (v = 0,1) state, with the recombination rate coefficient of (2.6 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -6 cu cm/sec at 300 K.

  1. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge current, terminal voltage, and mass bit measurements are performed on a coaxial gallium electromagnetic thruster at discharge currents in the range of 7-23 kA. It is found that the mass bit varies quadratically with the discharge current which yields a constant exhaust velocity of 20 km/s. Increasing the electrode radius ratio of the thruster from to 2.6 to 3.4 increases the thruster efficiency from 21% to 30%. When operating with a central gallium anode, macroparticles are ejected at all energy levels tested. A central gallium cathode ejects macroparticles when the current density exceeds 3.7 10(exp 8) A/square m . A spatially and temporally broad spectroscopic survey in the 220-520 nm range is used to determine which species are present in the plasma. The spectra show that neutral, singly, and doubly ionized gallium species are present in the discharge, as well as annular electrode species at higher energy levels. Axial Langmuir triple probe measurements yield electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV and electron densities in the range of 8 x 10(exp )20 to 1.6 x 10(exp 21) m(exp -3) . Triple probe measurements suggest an exhaust plume with a divergence angle of 9 , and a completely doubly ionized plasma at the ablating thruster cathode.

  2. Low-Temperature Rate Coefficients of C2H with CH4 and CD4 from 154 to 359 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction C2H + CH4 yields C2H2 + CH3 and C2H + CD4 yields C2HD + CD3 are measured over the temperature range 154-359 K using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. Ethynyl radicals are produced by pulsed laser photolysis of C2H2 in a variable temperature flow cell, and a tunable color center laser probes the transient removal of C2H (Chi(exp 2) Sigma(+) (0,0,0)) in absorption. The rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H with CH4 and CD4 both show a positive temperature dependence over the range 154-359 K, which can be expressed as k(sub CH4) = (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp -11) exp((-491 +/- 12)/T) and k(sub CD4) = (8.7 +/- 1.8) x 10(exp -12) exp((-650 +/- 61)/T) cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) s(exp -1), respectively. The reaction of C2H + CH4 exhibits a significant kinetic isotope effect at 300 K of k(sub CH4)/k(sub CD4) = 2.5 +/- 0.2. Temperature dependent rate constants for C2H + C2H2 were also remeasured over an increased temperature range from 143 to 359 K and found to show a slight negative temperature dependence, which can be expressed as k(sub C2H2) = 8.6 x 10(exp -16) T(exp 1.8) exp((474 +/- 90)/T) cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) s(exp -1).

  3. High Silicate Crystalline-to-Amorphous Ratios in Comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Harker, D. E.; Woodward, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Crystalline silicates, by their apparent absence in the ISM, are dust grains that experienced high temperatures in the solar nebula. Mg-rich crystalline silicates formed either by condensation from hot nebular gases (1450 K) or by the annealing of Mg-rich amorphous silicates (approx. 1000 K) in shocks in the 5-10 AU region or by radial transport into and out of the hot inner zones, e.g., T(sub d) > 1000 K at r(sub h) < 5 AU, 10(exp -6) - 10(exp -5) M(sub O)/yr, alpha = 10(exp -4) of the early solar nebula. Mg-rich crystalline silicates are found in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and produce IR spectral features in many Oort cloud comets. In May 2004, we discovered strong crystalline silicate features in the dynamically new Oort cloud comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT). Thermal emission modeling of comets Q4 and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) demonstrate that both these comets have similar, high silicate crystalline-to-amorphous ratios of 2.4 and 2.1, respectively, indicating that these icy planetesimals aggregated from similar reservoirs of material or that crystalline silicates were widely distributed within the comet-forming zone. This argues for efficient annealing mechanisms and radial mixing.

  4. High Silicate Crystalline-to-Amorphous Ratios in Comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Harker, D. E.; Wodward, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Crystalline silicates, by their apparent absence in the ISM, are dust grains that experienced high temperatures in the solar nebula. Mg-rich crystalline silicates formed either by condensation from hot nebular gases (1450 K) or by the annealing of Mg-rich amorphous silicates (approximately 1000 K) in shocks in the 5-10AU region or by radial transport into and out of the hot inner zones, e.g., T(sub d) greater than 1000K at r(sub h) less than 5AU, 10(exp -6) -10(exp -5) solar mass per year, alpha = 10(exp -4) of the early solar nebula. Mg-rich crystalline silicates are found in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and produce IR spectral features in many Oort cloud comets. In May 2004, we discovered strong crystalline silicate features in the dynamically new Oort cloud comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT). Thermal emission modeling of comets Q4 and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) demonstrate that both these comets have similar, high silicate crystalline-toamorphous ratios of 2.4 and 2.1, respectively, indicating that these icy planetesimals aggregated from similar reservoirs of material or that crystalline silicates were widely distributed within the comet-forming zone. This argues for efficient annealing mechanisms and radial mixing.

  5. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  6. Observation of a Long-Term Spin-up Trend in 4U 1538-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, B. C.; Finger, M. H.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    The high-mass X-ray pulsar 4U 153 8-52 has been continually monitored by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. These observations permit the construction of long-term pulse frequency and intensity histories. The frequency history reveals that a reversal of the long-term trend in the accretion torque, from spinning down to spinning up, has occurred, probably in 1988. This is the first time a long-term change is known to have occurred for this source, The magnitude of the average absolute value of (dot-nu / nu) is approximately 10(exp -11)/s over an interval of approximately 5 year is similar during spin-down and spin-up. Shorter term pulse frequency variations of either sign are also observed. The power density spectrum of fluctuations in angular acceleration is consistent with white noise on timescales from 16 to 1600 days. It can be well fit with a power law with a power-law index of 0.10 plus or minus 0.21 and white noise strength of (7.6 +/- 1.6) x 10(exp -21) (Hz/s(exp 2)/Hz). These observations are also used to set 95% confidence level lower and upper limits on the rate of orbital period change, -3.9< dot-P orb /P orb <2. 1, in units of 10(exp -6) yr(exp -1).

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Heat-Transfer Rate to a Series of 20 deg Cones of Various Surface Finishes at a Mach Number of 4.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jim J.

    1959-01-01

    The heat-transfer rates were measured on a series of cones of various surface finishes at a Mach number of 4.95 and Reynolds numbers per foot varying from 20 x 10(exp 6) to 100 x 10(exp 6). The range of surface finish was from a very smooth polish to smooth machining with no polish (65 micro inches rms). Some laminar boundary-layer data were obtained, since transition was not artificially tripped. Emphasis, however, is centered on the turbulent boundary layer. The results indicated that the turbulent heat-transfer rate for the highest roughness tested was only slightly greater than that for the smoothest surface. The laminar-sublayer thickness was calculated to be about half the roughness height for the roughest model at the highest value of unit Reynolds number tested.

  8. Flux to the atmosphere of CH4 and CO2 from wetland ponds on the Hudson Bay lowlands (HBLs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. David; Kelly, Carol A.; Rudd, John W. M.; Hesslein, Raymond H.; Roulet, Nigel T.

    1994-01-01

    Ponds on peatlands of the Hudson Bay lowlands (HBLs) are complex ecosystems in which the fluxes to the atmosphere of CH4 and CO2 were controlled by interacting physical and biological factors. This resulted in strong diel variations of both dissolved gas concentrations and gas fluxes to the atmosphere, necessitating frequent sampling on a 24-hour schedule to enable accurate estimates of daily fluxes. Ponds at three sites on the HBL were constant net sources of CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere at mean rates of 110-180 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d and 3700-11,000 mg CO2 m(exp -2)/d. Rates peaked in August and September. For CH4 the pond fluxes were 3-30 times higher than adjacent vegetated surfaces. For CO2 the net pond fluxes were similar in magnitude to the vegetated fluxes but the direction of the flux was opposite, toward atmosphere. Even though ponds cover only 8-12% of the HBL area, they accounted for 30% of its total CH4 flux to the atmosphere. There is some circumstantial evidence that the ponds are being formed by decomposition of the underlying peat and that this decomposition is being stimulated by the activity of N2 fixing cyanobacteria that grow in mats at the peat-water interface. The fact that the gas fluxes from the ponds were so different from the surrounding vegetated surfaces means that any change in the ratio of pond to vegetated area, as may occur in response to climate change, would affect the total HBL fluxes.

  9. Evolution of Iron K Alpha Line Emission in the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y. X.; Zhang, S. N.; Sun, X.; Durouchoux, Ph.; Chen, Wan; Cui, Wei

    2001-01-01

    GX 339-4 was regularly monitored with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer during a period (in 1999) when its X-ray flux decreased significantly (from 4.26 x 10(exp -10) to 7.6 x 10(exp -12) ergs in the 3-20 keV band), as the source settled into the 'off state.' Our spectral analysis revealed the presence of a prominent iron K alpha line in the observed spectrum of the source for all observations. The line shows an interesting evolution: it is centered at approx. 6.4 keV when the measured flux is above 5 x 10(exp -1) ergs per sq cm/s but is shifted to approx. 6.7 keV at lower fluxes. The equivalent width of the line appears to increase significantly toward lower fluxes, although it is likely to be sensitive to calibration uncertainties. While the fluorescent emission of neutral or mildly ionized iron atoms in the accretion disk can perhaps account for the 6.4 keV line, as is often invoked for black hole candidates, it seems difficult to understand the 6.7 keV line with this mechanism because the disk should be less ionized at lower fluxes (unless its density changes drastically). On the other hand, the 6.7 keV line might be due to a recombination cascade of hydrogen- or helium-like iron ions in an optically thin, highly ionized plasma. We discuss the results in the context of proposed accretion models.

  10. Vertical Transport Rates in the Stratosphere in 1993 from Observations of CO2, N2O and CH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.; Boering, Kristie A.; Daube, Bruce C., Jr.; McElroy, Michael B.; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Elkins, James W.; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Fahey, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of CO2, N2O and CH4 are analyzed to define hemispheric average vertical exchange rates in the lower stratosphere from November 1992 to October 1993. Effective vertical diffusion coefficients were small in summer, less than or equal to 1 m(exp 2)/sec at altitudes below 25 km; values were similar near the tropopause in winter, but increased markedly with altitude. The analysis suggests possibly longer residence times for exhaust from stratospheric aircraft, and more efficient transport from 20 km to the middle stratosphere, than predicted by many current models. Seasonally-resolved measurements of stratospheric CO2 and N2O provide significant new constraints on rates for global-scale vertical transport.

  11. Microstructural Evolution of Ti-6Al-4V during High Strain Rate Conditions of Metal Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Lei; Schneider, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The microstructural evolution following metal cutting was investigated within the metal chips of Ti-6Al-4V. Metal cutting was used to impose a high strain rate on the order of approx.10(exp 5)/s within the primary shear zone as the metal was removed from the workpiece. The initial microstructure of the parent material (PM) was composed of a bi-modal microstructure with coarse prior grains and equiaxed primary located at the boundaries. After metal cutting, the microstructure of the metal chips showed coarsening of the equiaxed primary grains and lamellar. These metallographic findings suggest that the metal chips experienced high temperatures which remained below the transus temperature.

  12. Toward 10(exp 10) Contrast for Terrestrial Exoplanet Detection: Demonstration of Wavefront Correction in a Shaped Pupil Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Give'on, Amir; Trauger, John T.; Carr, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy N.; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of wavefront control with shaped pupils. Contrast level is maintained across different wavelengths and 10% broadband light. Further improvements in contrast believed to have been possible with more time and parameter optimizations.

  13. The morphology of 20 x 10 exp 6 K plasma in large non-impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Loren W.; Feldman, Uri; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Doschek, George A.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Hudson, Hugh S.; Lemen, James R.; Ogawara, Yoshiaki; Strong, Keith T.; Tsuneta, Saku

    1992-01-01

    We have examined images of 10 flares observed by the Soft X-ray Telescope on-board the Yohkoh spacecraft. These images show that the hottest portion of the soft X-ray flare is located in compact regions that appear to be situated at the tops of loops. These compact regions form at, or shortly after, flare onset, and persist well into the decay phase of the flares. In some cases, the compact regions are only a few thousand kilometers in size and are small compared to the lengths of flaring loops. This is inconsistent with the smoother intensity distribution along the loops expected from models of chromospheric evaporation.

  14. Low Luminosity States of the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4. 2; Timing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Joern; Dove, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Here we present timing analysis of a set of eight Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the black hole candidate GX 339-4 that were taken during its hard/low state. On long time scales, the RXTE All Sky Monitor data reveal evidence of a 240 day periodicity, comparable to timescales expected from warped, precessing accretion disks. On short timescales all observations save one show evidence of a persistent f(qpo approximately equals 0.3 Hz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO)). The broad band (10 (exp -3) to 10 (exp2) Hz) power appears to be dominated by two independent processes that can be modeled as very broad Lorentzians with Q approximately less than - 1. The coherence function between soft and hard photon variability shows that if these are truly independent processes, then they are individually coherent, but they are incoherent with one another. This is evidenced by the fact that the coherence function between the hard and soft variability is near unity between 5 x 10 (exp -3) but shows evidence of a dip at f approximately equals 1 Hz. This is the region of overlap between the broad Lorentzian fits to the Power Spectral Density (PSD). Similar to Cyg X-1, the coherence also drops dramatically at frequencies approximately greater than 1O Hz. Also similar to Cyg X-1, the hard photon variability is seen to lag the soft photon variability with the lag time increasing with decreasing Fourier frequency. The magnitude of this time lag appears to be positively correlated with the flux of GX 339-4. We discuss all of these observations in light of current theoretical models of both black hole spectra and temporal variability.

  15. Long term microparticle impact fluxes on LDEF determined from optical survey of Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Oliver, J. P.; Cooke, W. J.; Downey, K. I.; Kassel, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Many of the IDE metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-discharge impact sensors remained active during the entire Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission. An optical survey of impact sites on the active surfaces of these sensors has been extended to include all sensors from the low-flux sides of LDEF (i.e. the west or trailing side, the earth end, and the space end) and 5-7 active sensors from each LDEF's high-flux sides (i.e. the east or leading side, the south side, and the north side). This survey was facilitated by the presence of a relatively large (greater than 50 micron diameter) optical signature associated with each impact site on the active sensor surfaces. Of the approximately 4700 impacts in the optical survey data set, 84% were from particles in the 0.5 to 3 micron size range. An estimate of the total number of hypervelocity impacts on LDEF from particles greater than 0.5 micron diameter yields a value of approximately 7 x 10(exp 6). Impact feature dimensions for several dozen large craters on MOS sensors and germanium witness plates are also presented. Impact fluxes calculated from the IDE survey data closely matched surveys of similar size impacts (greater than or equal to 3 micron diameter craters in Al, or marginal penetrations of a 2.4 micron thick Al foil) by other LDEF investigators. Since the first year IDE data were electronically recorded, the flux data could be divided into three long term time periods: the first year, the entire 5.8 year mission, and the intervening 4.8 years (by difference). The IDE data show that there was an order of magnitude decrease in the long term microparticle impact flux on the trailing side of LDEF, from 1.01 to 0.098 x 10(exp -4) m(exp 2)/s, from the first year in orbit compared to years 2-6. The long term flux on the leading edge showed an increase from 8.6 to 11.2 x 10(exp -4) m(exp -2)/s over this same time period. (Short term flux increases up to 10,000 times the background rate were recorded on the

  16. Kinetics of the Cl(2)P(J)) + CH4 Reaction: Effects of Secondary Chemistry Below 300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. J.; Keyser, Leon F.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute rate data for the Cl(2)P(J) + CH4 yields HCl + CH3 reaction have been obtained from 218 to 298 K by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at I Torr total pressure. The result at 298 K is (10.1 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s. The temperature dependence in Arrhenius form is (6.5 +/- 0.9 ) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1235 +/- 34 )/T]. The errors given are one standard deviation; overall experimental error is estimated at +/- 15%. Because of the relatively large disagreement among earlier measurements at low temperatures, the results were examined for possible effects of non-Boltzmann spin distribution and vibrational excitation of CH4, secondary chemistry of CH3 radicals, and impurities in the CH4 source. There was no significant change in the observed rate constant when an efficient spin quencher, CF4, was added and estimates indicate that vibrational partitioning in CH4 should be at the ambient reactor temperature before the start of the reaction. The results were also independent of the source of Cl atoms (microwave discharge or thermal decomposition of Cl2) and whether CH4 was purified in-situ. However, the observed rate constant did depend on initial Cl atom concentrations and to a lesser extent on CH4 concentrations. Numerical simulations were used to assess the importance of secondary chemistry over a range of reactant concentrations

  17. The nature of the compact X-ray source in the supernova remnant G27.4+0.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Becker, R. H.; Hawkins, G.; White, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray imaging data obtained with ROSAT is used to constrain the nature of the central compact source in the supernova remnant G27.4+0.0. Diffuse emission is seen from throughout the approximately 4 min diameter radio shell, while the central source remains unresolved at approximately 3 sec. We combine archival data from the Einstein HRI, IPC, and MPC with the ROSAT HRI data to define the X-ray spectra of the diffuse and point-like emission. The bulk of the shell radiation is consistent with that of a approximately 10(exp 7) K plasma, although a higher temperature component is also suggested by the data; coupled with the remnant's size and distance, we derive an age of between 500 and 2500 yr. The point source has a substantially harder spectrum, with a power-law photon index less than or approximately equal to 1. A search for periodic modulation from the point source yields upper limits ranging from 10%-35% for periods between 0.025 and 1000 s, depending on the assumed pulse shape. No aperiodic variability on timescales of from 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 8) s is required, although a factor of approximately 2 change between the Einstein and ROSAT eras is possible. We show that the point source cannot represent thermal emission from the surface of a young neutron star and is unlikely to be explained as nonthermal, Crab-like X-ray pulses or a small synchrotron nebula. The most likely models involve accretion-powered systems -- either a wind-fed neutron star with a massive companion or a low-mass X-ray binary. In all probability, this is the youngest X-ray binary in the Galaxy.

  18. Measurement of atmospheric OH by titration of near-IR fluorescent dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betterton, Eric A.; Gast, Karl

    1994-01-01

    Recent research has shown that certain polymethine dyes can be detected at ultratrace levels (greater than or equal to 6x10(exp -14) M) in solution by fluorimetry. These detection limits are possible because of the inherent sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, because the dyes fluoresce in the near infrared region where background interference is negligible, and because powerful infrared diode lasers are now available to improve the signal to noise ratio. Other work has shown that the hydroxyl radical destroys the ability of polymethine dyes to fluoresce. These observations form the basis for a new hydroxyl radical detector that is essentially a fluorometric titrator. Theoretically, the detector should show an acceptable sensitivity and response time. Assuming that the atmospheric HO concentration is about 10(exp -11) moles m(exp -3) (i.e. 10(exp 6) molecules cm(exp -3)), then 10 L of air 'titrated' with 20 mL of 10(exp -11) M dye solution (an easily detected concentration) should result in a drop in the fluorescent signal of 50 percent - a readily detectable change. At a flow rate of 3 L min(exp -1) the sampling time would be 3 minutes. The biggest potential problem is selectivity: other oxidants may also cause the fluorescence signal to be lost. The chemistry of polymethine dyes has not been studied in detail and so no quantitative data are available. However, a survey of the literature suggests that in general HO should react up to six orders of magnitude faster than HO2 and other radicals such as RO2 and RO. It should also react much more rapidly than H2O2 and O3. Thus it may be possible to discriminate kinetically against potential interfering substances. It was shown in the laboratory that 10(exp -4) M H2O2 has little effect on the absorption spectrum of the dye IR125 over a period of hours but that the band at 780 nm is slowly lost in water over a period of days even under argon in the dark. By contrast, DMSO solutions of IR125 are stable.

  19. Rate Coefficients of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 from 150 to 359 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 are measured over the temperature range 150-359 K using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The ethynyl radical is formed by photolysis of C2H2 with a pulsed excimer laser at 193 nm, and its transient absorption is monitored with a color center laser on the Q(sub 11)(9) line of the A(sup 2) Pi-Chi(sup 2) Sigma transition at 3593.68 cm(exp -1). Over the experimental temperature range 150-359 K the rate constants of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 can be fitted to the Arrhenius expressions k(sub C2H4) = (7.8 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11) exp[(134 +/- 44)/T], k(sub C2H6) = (3.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(2.9 +/- 16)/T], and k(sub H2) = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(-998 +/- 57)]/T cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The data for C2H with C2H4 and C2H6 indicate a negligible activation energy to product formation shown by the mild negative temperature dependence of both reactions. When the H2 data are plotted together with the most recent high-temperature results from 295 to 854 K, a slight curvature is observed. The H2 data can be fit to the non-Arrhenius form k(sub H2) = 9.2 x 10(exp -18) T(sup 2.17 +/- 0.50) exp[(-478 +/- 165)/T] cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The curvature in the Arrhenius plot is discussed in terms of both quantum mechanical tunneling of the H atom from H2 to the C2H radical and bending mode contributions to the partition function.

  20. Heterogeneous Uptake and Conversion of HOBr on H2SO4 at Upper Tropospheric and Stratospheric Temperatures (255 - 210 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Ashbourn, Samantha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Halogen species are known to catalytically destroy ozone in several different regions of the atmosphere. In addition to directly destroying ozone, bromine compounds can indirectly enhance ozone loss through coupling to other radical families. Hypobromous acid (HOBr), a key species in the linkage of BrOx to ClOx and HOx, is produced by the hydrolysis of BrONO2 on sulfate aerosols, and thus the heterogeneous behavior of HOBr must be understood. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 to 70 percent by weight sulfuric acid solutions. Over the temperature range 208 to 255 K, HOBr is very soluble in sulfuric acid, H(*) = 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 8) M/atm. The solubility is temperature dependent, and our results agree well with those of Waschewsky and Abbott for 60 percent by weight H2SO4. HOBr is nearly as soluble as HBr, indicating that equilibrium concentrations of HOBr could approach those of HBr in sulfuric acid aerosols. Despite the high solubility of HOBr, stratospheric aerosol volumes are not large enough to sequester a significant fraction of inorganic bromine from the gas phase. Uptake of HOBr was nearly always accompanied by reaction, producing Br2O and possibly Br2. The effect of this bromine conversion pathway on the HOx and ClOx families, particularly at temperatures as warm as 255 K, will be considered.

  1. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  2. Detection of C2H4 Neptune from ISO/PHT-S Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, B.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bezard, B.; Romani, P. N.; Lellouch, E.; Atreya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The 6-12 micrometer spectrum of Neptune has been recorded with the PHT-S instrument of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at a resolution of 0.095 micrometer. In addition to the emissions of CH4, CH3D and C2H6 previously identified, the spectrum shows the first firm identification of ethylene C2H4. The inferred column density above the 0.2-mbar level is in the range (1.1 - 3) x 10(exp 14) molecules/cm. To produce this low amount, previous photochemical models invoked rapid mixing between the source and sink regions of C2H4. We show that this requirement can be relaxed if recent laboratory measurements of CH4 photolysis branching ratios at Lyman alpha are used.

  3. Elevated Temperature Deformation of Fe-39.8Al and Fe-15.6Mn-39.4Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The elevated temperature compressive properties of binary Fe-39.8 at % Al and Fe-15.6Mn-39.4Al have been measured between 1000 and 1300 K at strain rates between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 3)/ s. Although the Mn addition to iron aluminide did not change the basic deformation characteristics, the Mn-modified alloy was slightly weaker. In the regime where deformation of FeAl occurs by a high stress exponent mechanism (n = 6), strength increases as the grain size decreases at least for diameters between approx. 200 and approx. 10 microns. Due to the limitation in the grain size-flow stress-temperature-strain rate database, the influence of further reductions of the grain size on strength is uncertain. Based on the appearance of subgrains in deformed iron aluminide, the comparison of grain diameters to expected subgrain sizes, and the grain size exponent and stress exponent calculated from deformation experiments, it is believed that grain size strengthening is the result of an artificial limitation on subgrain size as proposed by Sherby, Klundt and Miller.

  4. OSSE observations of GX 339-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabelsky, D. A.; Maltz, S. M.; Purcell, W. R.; Ulmer, M. P.; Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Jung, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) observed the Galactic black hole candidate GX 339-4 as a target of oppurtunity in 1991 September, in response to the outburst reported by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We report here on energy spectra in the 50 keV-10 MeV range obtained by OSSE. The source was detected from 50 to 400 keV at a level relative to the Crab Nebula of approximately 30%. The observed spectrum was prescribed reasonably well by a power law with an exponential cutoff; a least-squares fit yielded a photon index of 0.88 +/- 0.05 and a cutoff energy of 68 +/- 2 keV. The addition of a Compton reflection component did not significantly improve the overall fit. An optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum also provides a good fit, and the thermal Comptonization model of Sunyaev & Titarchuk, while deficient in describing the data above approximately 200 keV, cannot formally be ruled out. A pure power law with reflection does not fit the observed spectrum. During a follow-up observation made in 1991 November the intensity of the source below 100 keV had dropped by more than a factor of 40, and it was no longer detected above approximately 100 keV. The energy spectrum during the November observation could be characterized by a power law with a photon index of 2.3 +/- 0.3; the spectrum was fitted equally well with the same exponentially cutoff power-law model applied to the September observation, reduced in intensity by a factor of approximately 40. During the 1991 September observation, the luminosity in the 50-400 keV band was approximately 2 x 10(exp 37) ergs/s (assuming a distance of 4 kpc), no more than a factor of 5 below the soft X-ray luminosity of GX 339-4 observed in its X-ray high state. The luminosity during the 1991 November observation was approximately 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs/s. Extrapolations of both the exponentially cutoff power-law and Sunyaev-Titarchuk models to

  5. Meteoroid Flux from Lunar Impact Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert; Moser, Danielle; Cooke, William; Suggs, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    The flux of kilogram-sized meteoroids has been determined from the first 5 years of observations by NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program (Suggs et al. 2014). Telescopic video observations of 126 impact flashes observed during photometric conditions were calibrated and the flux of meteoroids to a limiting mass of 30 g was determined to be 6.14 x 10(exp -10) m(exp -2) yr(exp -1) at the Moon, in agreement with the Grun et al. (1985) model value of 7.5 x 10(exp -10) m(exp -2) yr(exp -1). After accounting for gravitational focusing effects, the flux at the Earth to a limiting impact energy of 3.0 x10(exp -6) kilotons of TNT (1.3 x 10(exp 7) J) was determined to be consistent with the results in Brown et al. (2002). Approximately 62% of the impact flashes were correlated with major meteor showers as cataloged in visual/optical meteor shower databases. These flux measurements, coupled with cratering and ejecta models, can be used to develop impact ejecta engineering environments for use in lunar surface spacecraft design and risk analyses.

  6. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  7. Study of Bulk and Elementary Screw Dislocation Assisted Reverse Breakdown in Low-Voltage (less than 250 V) 4H-SiC p(+)n Junction diodes. Part 1; DC Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Huang, Wei; Dudley, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Given the high density (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm) of elementary screw dislocations (Burgers vector = 1c with no hollow core) in commercial SiC wafers and epilayers, all appreciable current (greater than 1 A) SiC power devices will likely contain elementary screw dislocations for the foreseeable future. It is therefore important to ascertain the electrical impact of these defects, particularly in high-field vertical power device topologies where SiC is expected to enable large performance improvements in solid-state high-power systems. This paper compares the DC-measured reverse-breakdown characteristics of low-voltage (less than 250 V) small-area (less than 5 x 10(exp -4)/sq cm) 4H-SiC p(+)n diodes with and without elementary screw dislocations. Compared to screw dislocation-free devices, diodes containing elementary screw dislocations exhibited higher pre-breakdown reverse leakage currents, softer reverse breakdown I-V knees, and highly localized microplasmic breakdown current filaments. The observed localized 4H-SiC breakdown parallels microplasmic breakdowns observed in silicon and other semiconductors, in which space-charge effects limit current conduction through the local microplasma as reverse bias is increased.

  8. Study of Bulk and Elementary Screw Dislocation Assisted Reverse Breakdown in Low-Voltage (<250 V) 4H-SiC p+n Junction Diodes - Part 1: DC Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Huang, Wei; Dudley, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Given the high density (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm) of elementary screw dislocations (Burgers vector = lc with no hollow core) in commercial SiC wafers and epilayers, all appreciable current (greater than 1 A) SiC power devices will likely contain elementary screw dislocations for the foreseeable future. It is therefore important to ascertain the electrical impact of these defects, particularly in high-field vertical power device topologies where SiC is expected to enable large performance improvements in solid-state high-power systems. This paper compares the DC-measured reverse-breakdown characteristics of low-voltage (less than 250 V) small-area (less than 5 x 10(exp -4) sq cm) 4H-SiC p(+)n diodes with and without elementary screw dislocations. Compared to screw dislocation-free devices, diodes containing elementary screw dislocations exhibited higher pre-breakdown reverse leakage currents, softer reverse breakdown I-V knees, and highly localized microplasmic breakdown current filaments. The observed localized 4H-SiC breakdown parallels microplasmic breakdowns observed in silicon and other semiconductors, in which space-charge effects limit current conduction through the local microplasma as reverse bias is increased.

  9. Estimation of the viscosities of silicate liquids at high pressure from measurements of oxygen diffusivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubie, D. C.; Ross, C. R., II; Carroll, M. R.; Elphick, S. C.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics and evolution of a magma ocean depend significantly on the structure and physical properties of silicate liquids at high pressure. Viscosity is particularly important because of its effect on the dynamics of convection and crystal setting. Traditionally, the viscosities of silicate liquids have been measured at high pressure by falling sphere viscometry but, due to some limitations of this technique, few measurements have been made at pressures exceeding 2.5 GPa. An alternative approach, which has previously been proven up to 2 GPa, is to use high pressure measurements of oxygen self-diffusivity (D) to estimate viscosity (eta) from the Eyring relationship eta = kT/D lambda (where k is the Boltzmann constant, T is absolute temperature, and lambda is the diffusive jump distance). We have performed preliminary experiments on Na2Si4O9 liquid in order to explore the feasibility of this method up to pressures in excess of 10 GPa. Diffusion couples were prepared from glass starting materials with one half of the sample enriched in O-18 and the other half containing the natural abundance (0.2 wt percent). Diffusion experiments were performed at 1600 to 1800 C at pressures in the range of 2.5 to 10 GPa for times up to 6 minutes using a 1200 ton multianvil apparatus. Oxygen diffusivities were derived from the resulting O-18 concentration profiles, which were analyzed using an ion microprobe. At 1800 C, oxygen diffusivities increase continuously from 1 x 10(exp -10) m(exp -2) s(exp -1) at 2.5 Gpa to 5 x 10(exp -10) m(exp -2) s(exp -1) at 10 GPa. From the Eyring relationship, the viscosity of Na2SiO9 liquid is predicted to decrease by approx. 0.7 log units over this pressure range at 1800 C. These trends, which can be related to changes in the structure of the liquid at high pressure, are in agreement with results of molecular dynamics calculations. These results suggest that it should be possible to estimate the viscosities of silicate liquids up to at least 15

  10. The orbital evolution of real asteroids near the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlgren, Mats; Hahn, Gerhard; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Lundstroem, M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical integrations of the orbits of ten asteroids with osculating elements near the 4:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter have been performed over 200,000 years into the future. A variety of orbital evolutions was found, depending on the start values of the semi-major axis. The orbit of asteroid 1983 RJ4, which lies almost exactly at the resonance center, experiences large variations in eccentricity, evolving into an Earth-crosser on a time-scale of a few 10(exp 4) years. This makes this region a potential source for Apollo objects and meteoritic material, although the width of the resonance region in semi-major axis seems to be very narrow.

  11. Rate constant for the reaction of OH with CH3CCl2F (HCFC-141b) determined by relative rate measurements with CH4 and CH3CCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huder, Karin; Demore, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Determination of accurate rate constants for OH abstraction is of great importance for the calculation of lifetimes for HCFCs and their impact on the atmosphere. For HCFC-141b there has been some disagreement in the literature for absolute measurements of this rate constant. In the present work rate constant ratios for HCFC-141b were measured at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 298-358 K, with CH4 and CH3CCl3 as reference gases. Ozone was photolyzed at 254 nm in the presence of water vapor to produce OH radicals. Relative depletions of 141b and the reference gases were measured by FTIR. Arrhenius expressions for 141b were derived from each reference gas and found to be in good agreement with each other. The combined expression for HCFC-141b which we recommend is 1.4 x 10 exp -12 exp(-1630/T) with k at 298 K being 5.9 x 10 exp -15 cu cm/molec-s. This value is in excellent agreement with the JPL 92-20 recommendation.

  12. Aerodynamic Characteristics at Mach Numbers of 1.41 and 2.01 of a Series of Cranked Wings Ranging in Aspect Ratio from 4.00 to 1.74 in Combination with a Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevier, John R., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    A program has been conducted in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel to determine the effects of certain wing plan-form variations on the aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body combinations at supersonic speeds. The present report deals with the results of tests of a family of cranked wing plan forms in combination with an ogive-cylinder body of revolution. Tests were made at Mach numbers of 1.41 and 2.01 at corresponding values of Reynolds number per foot of 3.0 x 10(exp 6) and 2.5 x 10(exp 6). Results of the tests indicate that the best overall characteristics were obtained with the low-aspect-ratio wings. Plan-form changes which involved decreasing the aspect ratio resulted in higher values of maximum lift-drag ratio, in addition to large increases in wing volume. Indications are that this trend would have continued to exist at aspect ratios even lower than the lowest considered in the present tests. Increases in the maximum lift-drag ratio of about 15 percent over the basic wing were achieved with practically no increase in drag. The severe longitudinal stability associated with the basic cranked wing was no longer present (within the limits of the present tests) on the wings of lower aspect ratio formed by sweeping forward the inboard portion of the trailing edge.

  13. RF Manipulation of Ions in the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Martin, James J.; Sims, William H.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond A.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of antimatter provides the highest mass specific energy of any other known reaction. Proper harnessing of this energy holds great promise for future space propulsion systems. Many different propulsion concepts have been proposed that take advantage of antimatter, either using matter-antimatter as the primary fuel, or as a 'spark plug' for fusion and fission systems. In order to begin to address these concepts experimentally, a method of storing and transporting antimatter must be developed. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is a first-generation storage and transportation device designed to store and transport 10(exp 12) antiprotons with a storage half-life of 18 days. It uses a Penning-Malmberg ion trap with a 4T magnetic field and 20 kV potential. This will enable researchers much more flexibility in the design of antimatter experiments related to propulsion. Ions cannot be stored indefinitely in a real trap, as ion cloud instabilities develop from imperfections in manufacturing and misalignments in assembly. Previous work has been done at both the National Institute of Standards and University of California in San Diego in using RF (radio frequency) signals to both diagnose and confine the ion cloud. Two electrodes in the trap have been segmented to allow both reception and transmission of RF waves in the ion cloud. Experiments are underway to determine the number of ions and density in the cloud by "listening" to protons contained in the HiPAT. Currently we believe the density of ions stored in the trap is roughly 10(exp 15) m(exp -3). Development of non-destructive techniques is vital to the project goals, enabling continuous monitoring of the quantities stored in the system. Experimental work is also being done in identifying RF transmission frequencies that can manipulate the density of the cloud, by exchanging energy and momentum between the RF wave and the ions. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated this interaction.

  14. Electron-Temperature Dependence of the Recombination of NH4(+)((NH3)(sub n) Ions with Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Johnson, R.

    1997-01-01

    The two-body recombination of NH4(+)(NH3)(sub 2,3) cluster-ions with electrons has been studied in an afterglow experiment in which the electron temperature T, was elevated by radio-frequency heating from 300 K up to 900 K. The recombination coefficients for the n = 2 and n = 3 cluster ions were found to be equal, alpha(sub 2, sup(2)) = alpha(sub 3, sup(2)) = (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp - 6)cu cm/s, and to vary with electron temperature as T(sub c, sup -0.65) rather than to be nearly temperature-independent as had been inferred from measurements in microwave-heated plasmas.

  15. 2.4 Micron Cutoff AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb Phototransistors for Shortwave IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Swaminathan, Krishna; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Shortwave infrared detectors are critical for several applications including remote sensing and optical communications. Several detectors are commercially available for this wavelength range, but they lack sufficient gain, which limits their detectivity. The characterization results of an AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistor for shortwave IR application are reported. The phototransistor is grown using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Spectral response measurements showed a uniform responsivity between 1.2 and 2.4 micron region with a mean value of 1000 A/W. A maximum detectivity of 3.4 X 10(exp 11) cmHz1/2/W was obtained at 2 micron at -20 C and 1.3 V.

  16. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gilmore Load Cell Machine: Load Cell Calibrations to 2.22 x 10(exp 7) Newtons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    Designed in 1964 and erected in 1966, the mission of the Gilmore Load Cell Machine was to provide highly accurate calibrations for large capacity load cells in support of NASA's Apollo Program. Still in use today, the Gilmore Machine is a national treasure with no equal.

  17. Swift J2058.4+0516: Discovery of a Possible Second Relativistic Tidal Disruption Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenko, S. Bradely; Krimm, Hans A.; Horesh, Assaf; Rau, Arne; Frail, Dale A.; Kennea, Jamie A.; Levan, Andrew J.; Holland, Stephen T.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Quimby, Robert M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Greiner, Jochen; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Olivares, Felipe E.; Schady, Patricia; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery by the Swift hard X-ray monitor of the transient source Swift J2058.4+0516 (Sw J2058+05). Our multi-wavelength follow-up campaign uncovered a long-lived (duration approximately greater than months), luminous X-ray (L(sub x.iso) approximates 3 X 10(exp47) erg/s) and radio (vL(sub v.iso) approximates 10(exp 42) erg/s) counterpart. The associated optical emission, however, from which we measure a redshift of 1.1853, is relatively faint, and this is not due to a large amount of dust extinction in the host galaxy. Based on numerous similarities with the recently discovered GRB 110328A / Swift 1164449.3+573451 (Sw 11644+57), we suggest that Sw J2058+05 may be the second member of a new class of relativistic outbursts resulting from the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole. If so, the relative rarity of these sources implies that either these outflows are extremely narrowly collimated (theta < 1 deg), or only a small fraction of tidal disruptions generate relativistic ejecta. Analogous to the case of long duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we speculate that the spin of the black hole may be a necessary condition to generate the relativistic component. Alternatively, if powered by gas accretion (i.e., an active galactic nucleus), this would imply that some galaxies can transition from apparent quiescence to a radiatively efficient state of accretion on quite short time scales.

  18. Tunable CW diode-pumped Tm,Ho:YLiF4 laser operating at or near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguckin, Brendan T. (Inventor); Menzies, Robert T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A conversion efficiency of 42% and slope efficiency of 60% relative to absorbed pump power are obtained from a continuous wave diode-pumped Tm,Ho:YLiF4 laser at 2 microns with output power of 84 mW at a crystal temperature of 275 K. The emission spectrum is etalon tunable over a range of7 nm (16.3/cm) centered on 2.067 microns with fine tuning capability of the transition frequency with crystal temperature at a measured rate of -0.03/(cm)K. The effective emission cross-section is measured to be 5 x 10(exp -21) cm squared. These and other aspects of the laser performance are disclosed in the context of calculated atmospheric absorption characteristics in this spectral region and potential use in remote sensing applications. Single frequency output and frequency stabilization are achieved using an intracavity etalon in conjunction with an external reference etalon.

  19. Evidence of a new phase formation (BaTi4O9) by barium implantation into TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, S. M. M.; Bonardi, N.; Brenier, R.; Canut, B.; Thevenard, P.; Brunel, M.

    1994-10-01

    Barium ions of 140 keV energy were implanted at room temperature in TiO2 (rutile) with a fluence of 10(exp 17) ions cm(exp -2). Isochronal heat treatments were carried out in air at 1000, 1100 and 1150 C for 1 h. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in channeling geometry, X-ray diffraction at glancing incidence and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were undertaken to the physico-chemical characterization of the implanted rutile. The annealing at 1150 C leads to the formation of a new phase which have been identified as BaTi4O9 with an average grain size of about 28 nm.

  20. High-Field Fast-Risetime Pulse Failures in 4H- and 6H-SiC pn Junction Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Fazi, Christian

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation of anomalous reverse breakdown behavior in moderately doped (2-3 x 10(exp 17 cm(exp -3)) small-area micropipe-free 4H- and 6H-SiC pn junction diodes. When measured with a curve tracer, the diodes consistently exhibited very low reverse leakage currents and sharp repeatable breakdown knees in the range of 140-150 V. However, when subjected to single-shot reverse bias pulses (200 ns pulsewidth, 1 ns risetime), the diodes failed catastrophically at pulse voltages of less than 100 V. We propose a possible mechanism for this anomalous reduction in pulsed breakdown voltage relative to dc breakdown voltage. This instability must be removed so that SiC high-field devices can operate with the same high reliability as silicon power devices.

  1. Evaluation of the Snow Simulations from the Community Land Model, Version 4 (CLM4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toure, Ally M.; Rodell, Matthew; Yang, Zong-Liang; Beaudoing, Hiroko; Kim, Edward; Zhang, Yongfei; Kwon, Yonghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the simulation of snow by the Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4), the land model component of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.0.4 (CESM1.0.4). CLM4 was run in an offline mode forced with the corrected land-only replay of the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Land) and the output was evaluated for the period from January 2001 to January 2011 over the Northern Hemisphere poleward of 30 deg N. Simulated snow-cover fraction (SCF), snow depth, and snow water equivalent (SWE) were compared against a set of observations including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) SCF, the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) snow cover, the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) daily snow analysis products, snow depth from the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer (COOP) program, and Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) SWE observations. CLM4 SCF was converted into snow-cover extent (SCE) to compare with MODIS SCE. It showed good agreement, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and an average bias of -1.54 x 10(exp 2) sq km. Overall, CLM4 agreed well with IMS snow cover, with the percentage of correctly modeled snow-no snow being 94%. CLM4 snow depth and SWE agreed reasonably well with the CMC product, with the average bias (RMSE) of snow depth and SWE being 0.044m (0.19 m) and -0.010m (0.04 m), respectively. CLM4 underestimated SNOTEL SWE and COOP snow depth. This study demonstrates the need to improve the CLM4 snow estimates and constitutes a benchmark against which improvement of the model through data assimilation can be measured.

  2. A Novel Tungsten-Nickel Alloy Ohmic Contact to SiC at 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Evans, Laura J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Morris, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    A novel tungsten-nickel ohmic contact metallization on 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC capable of surviving temperatures as high as 900 C is reported. Preliminary results revealed the following: 1) ohmic contact on n-type 4H-SiC having net doping levels (Nd's) of 1.4 and 2 x 10(exp 19) per cubic centimeter, with specific contact resistances rhosNd's of 7.69 x 10(exp -4) and 5.81 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeters, respectively, after rapid thermal annealing (RTA), and 5.9 x 10(exp -3) and 2.51 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeters, respectively, after subsequent soak at 900 C for 1 h in argon, and 2) ohmic contact on n- and p-type 6H-SiC having Nd > 2 x 10(exp 19) and Na > 1 x 10(exp 20) per cubic centimeter, with rhosNd = 5 x 10(exp -5) and rhosNa = 2 X 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeter, respectively, after RTA, and rhosNd = 2.5 x 10 (exp -5) and rhosNa = 1.5 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeter after subsequent treatment at 900 C for 1 h in argon, respectively.

  3. Low Luminosity States of the Black Hole Candidate GX 339-4. 1; ASCA and Simultaneous Radio/RXTE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Dove, James B.; Fender, Robert P.; DiMatteo, Tiziana

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a series of observations of the black hole candidate GX 339-4 in low luminosity, spectrally hard states. We present spectral analysis of three separate archival Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data sets and eight separate Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data sets. Three of the RXTE observations were strictly simultaneous with 843 Mega Hertz and 8.3-9.1 Giga Hertz radio observations. All of these observations have (3-9 keV) flux approximately less than 10(exp-9) ergs s(exp-1) CM(exp -2). The ASCA data show evidence for an approximately 6.4 keV Fe line with equivalent width approximately 40 eV, as well as evidence for a soft excess that is well-modeled by a power law plus a multicolor blackbody spectrum with peak temperature approximately equals 150-200 eV. The RXTE data sets also show evidence of an Fe line with equivalent widths approximately equal to 20-1OO eV. Reflection models show a hardening of the RXTE spectra with decreasing X-ray flux; however, these models do not exhibit evidence of a correlation between the photon index of the incident power law flux and the solid angle subtended by the reflector. 'Sphere+disk' Comptonization models and Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF) models also provide reasonable descriptions of the RXTE data. The former models yield coronal temperatures in the range 20-50 keV and optical depths of r approximately equal to 3. The model fits to the X-ray data, however, do not simultaneously explain the observed radio properties. The most likely source of the radio flux is synchrotron emission from an extended outflow of extent greater than O(10 (exp7) GM/c2).

  4. Possible Detection of an Emission Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature from the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Mihara, T.; Angelini, L.; Yamada, S.; Enoto, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakajima, M.; Yoshida, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present analysis of 4U 1626-67, a 7.7 s pulsar in a low-mass X-ray binary system, observed with the hard X-ray detector of the Japanese X-ray satellite Suzaku in 2006 March for a net exposure of 88 ks. The source was detected at an average 10-60 keY flux of approx 4 x 10-10 erg / sq cm/ s. The phase-averaged spectrum is reproduced well by combining a negative and positive power-law times exponential cutoff (NPEX) model modified at approx 37 keY by a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF). The phase-resolved analysis shows that the spectra at the bright phases are well fit by the NPEX with CRSF model. On the other hand. the spectrum in the dim phase lacks the NPEX high-energy cutoff component, and the CRSF can be reproduced by either an emission or an absorption profile. When fitting the dim phase spectrum with the NPEX plus Gaussian model. we find that the feature is better described in terms of an emission rather than an absorption profile. The statistical significance of this result, evaluated by means of an F test, is between 2.91 x 10(exp -3) and 1.53 x 10(exp -5), taking into account the systematic errors in the background evaluation of HXD-PIN. We find that the emission profile is more feasible than the absorption one for comparing the physical parameters in other phases. Therefore, we have possibly detected an emission line at the cyclotron resonance energy in the dim phase.

  5. Viscoelastic Response of the Titanium Alloy Ti-6-4: Experimental Identification of Time- and Rate-Dependent Reversible and Irreversible Deformation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    In support of an effort on damage prognosis, the viscoelastic behavior of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-6-4) was investigated. This report documents the experimental characterization of this titanium alloy. Various uniaxial tests were conducted to low load levels over the temperature range of 20 to 538 C to define tensile, creep, and relaxation behavior. A range of strain rates (6x10(exp -7) to 0.001/s) were used to document rate effects. All tests were designed to include an unloading portion, followed by a hold time at temperature to allow recovery to occur either at zero stress or strain. The titanium alloy was found to exhibit viscoelastic behavior below the "yield" point and over the entire range of temperatures (although at lower temperatures the magnitude is extremely small). These experimental data will be used for future characterization of a viscoelastic model.

  6. Study of Bulk and Elementary Screw Dislocation Assisted Reverse Breakdown in Low-Voltage (< 250 V) 4H-SiC p(sup +)n Junction Diodes--Part II: Dynamic Breakdown Properties. Part 2; Dynamic Breakdown Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Fazi, Christian

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines the dynamic reverse-breakdown characteristics of low-voltage (<250 V) small-area <5 x 10(exp -4) sq cm 4H-SiC p(sup +)n diodes subjected to nonadiabatic breakdown-bias pulsewidths ranging from 0.1 to 20 microseconds. 4H-SiC diodes with and without elementary screw dislocations exhibited positive temperature coefficient of breakdown voltage and high junction failure power densities approximately five times larger than the average failure power density of reliable silicon pn rectifiers. This result indicates that highly reliable low-voltage SiC rectifiers may be attainable despite the presence of elementary screw dislocations. However, the impact of elementary screw dislocations on other more useful 4H-SiC power device structures, such as high-voltage (>1 kV) pn junction and Schottky rectifiers, and bipolar gain devices (thyristors, IGBT's, etc.) remains to be investigated.

  7. Characterization of voids formed during liquid impregnation of nonwoven multifilament glass networks as related to composite processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahale, Anant D.; Prudhomme, Robert K.; Rebenfeld, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    A technique based on matching the refractive index of an invading liquid to that of a fiber mat was used to study entrapment of air ('voids') that occurs during forced in-plane radial flow into nonwoven multifilament glass networks. The usefulness of this technique is demonstrated in quantifying and mapping the air pockets. Experiments with a series of fluids with surface tensions varying from 28 x 10(exp -3) to 36 x 10(exp -3) N/m, viscosities from 45 x 10(exp -3) to 290 x 10(exp -3) Pa.s, and inlet flow rates from 0.15 x 10(exp -6) to 0.75 x 10(exp -6) m(exp 3)/s, showed that void content is a function of the capillary number characterizing the flow process. A critical value of capillary number, Ca = 2.5 x 10(exp -3), identifies a zone below which void content increases exponentially with decreasing capillary number. Above this critical value, negligible entrapment of voids is observed. Similar experiments carried out on surface treated nonwoven mats spanning a range of equilibrium contact angles from 20 deg to 78 deg showed that there is a critical contact angle above which negligible entrapment is observed. Below this value, there is no apparent effect of contact angle on the void fraction - capillary number relationship described earlier. Studies on the effect of filament wettability, and fluid velocity and viscosity on the size of the entrapment (voids) were also carried out. These indicate that larger sized entrapments which envelop more than one pore are favored by a low capillary number in comparison to smaller, pore level bubbles. Experiments were carried out on deformed mats - imposing high permeability spots at regular intervals on a background of low permeability. The effect of these spatial fluctuations in heterogeneity of the mat on entrapment is currently being studied.

  8. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  9. Improvement of critical current density in thallium-based (Tl,Bi)Sr(1.6)Ba(0.4)Ca2Cu3O(x) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Z. F.; Wang, C. A.; Wang, J. H.; Miller, D. J.; Goretta, K. C.

    1995-01-01

    Epitaxial (Tl,Bi)Sr(1.6)Ba(0.4)Ca2Cu3O(x) ((Tl,Bi)-1223) thin films on (100) single crystal LaAlO3 substrates were synthesized by a two-step procedure. Phase development, microstructure, and relationships between film and substrate were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Resistance versus temperature, zero-field-cooled and field cooled magnetization, and transport critical current density (J(sub c)) were measured. The zero-resistance temperature was 105-111 K. J(sub c) at 77 K and zero field was greater than 2 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm. The films exhibited good flux pinning properties.

  10. Burst Oscillation Periods from 4U 1636-53: A Constraint on the Binary Doppler Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, A. B.; Hill, K. M.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Cummings, N.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The burst oscillations seen during Type 1 X-ray bursts from low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) typically evolve in period towards an asymptotic limit that likely reflects the spin of the underlying neutron star. If the underlying period is stable enough, measurement of it at different orbital phases may allow a detection of the Doppler modulation caused by the motion of the neutron star with respect to the center of mass of the binary system. Testing this hypothesis requires enough X-ray bursts and an accurate optical ephemeris to determine the binary phases at which they occurred. We present here a study of the distribution of asymptotic burst oscillation periods for a sample of 26 bursts from 4U 1636-53 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The burst sample includes both archival and proprietary data and spans more than 4.5 years. We also present new optical light curves of V801 Arae, the optical counterpart of 4U 1636-53, obtained during 1998-2001. We use these optical data to refine the binary period measured by Augusteijn et al. to 3.7931206(152) hours. We show that a subset of approx. 70% of the bursts form a tightly clustered distribution of asymptotic periods consistent with a period stability of approx. 1 x 10(exp -4). The tightness of this distribution, made up of bursts spanning more than 4 years in time, suggests that the underlying period is highly stable, with a time to change the period of approx. 3 x 10(exp 4) yr. This is comparable to similar numbers derived for X-ray pulsars. We investigate the period and orbital phase data for our burst sample and show that it is consistent with binary motion of the neutron star with v(sub ns) sin i < 38 and 50 km/s at 90 and 99% confidence, respectively. We use this limit as well as previous radial velocity data to constrain the binary geometry and component masses in 4U 1636-53. Our results suggest that unless the neutron star is significantly more massive than 1.4 solar masses the secondary is

  11. A preliminary characterization of applied-field MPD thruster plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Wehrle, David; Vernyi, Mark; Biaglow, James; Reese, Shawn

    1991-01-01

    Electric probes, quantitative imaging, and emission spectroscopy were used to study the plume characteristics of applied field magnetohydrodynamic thrusters. The measurements showed that the applied magnetic field plays the dominant role in establishing the plume structure, followed in importance by the cathode geometry and propellant. The anode radius had no measurable impact on the plume characteristics. For all cases studied the plume was highly ionized, though spectral lines of neutral species were always present. Centerline electron densities and temperatures ranged from 2 times 10 (exp 18) to 8 times 10 (exp 18) m(exp -3) and from 7500 to 20,000 K, respectively. The plume was strongly confined by the magnetic field, with radial density gradients increasing monotonically with applied field strength. Plasma potential measurements show a strong effect of the magnetic field on the electrical conductivity and indicate the presence of radial current conduction in the plume.

  12. Preliminary Heat-Transfer Measurements on a Hypersonic Glide Configuration Having 79.5 degree Sweepback and 45 degree Dihedral at a Mach Number of 4.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, Calvin

    1960-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the heat-transfer characteristics of a hypersonic glide configuration having 79.5 deg of sweepback (measured in the plane of the leading edges) and 45 of dihedral. The tests were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 4.95 and a stagnation temperature of 400 F. The test-section unit Reynolds number was varied from 1.95 x 10(exp 6) to 12.24 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The results indicated that the laminar-flow heat-transfer rate to the lower surface of the model decreased as the distance from the ridge line increased except for thermocouples located near the semispan at an angle of attack of 00 with respect to the plane of the leading edges. The heat-transfer distribution (local heating rate relative to the ridge-line heating rate) was similar to the theoretical heat-transfer distribution for a two-dimensional blunt body, if the ridge line was assumed to be the stagnation line, and could be predicted by this theory provided a modified Newtonian pressure distribution was used. Except in the vicinity of the apex, the ridge-line heat-transfer rate could also be predicted from two-dimensional blunt-body heat-transfer theory provided it was assumed that the stagnation-line heat-transfer rate varied as the cosine of the effective sweep (sine of the angle of attack of the ridge line). The heat-transfer level on the lower surface and the nondimensional heat-transfer distribution around the body on the lower surface were in qualitative agreement with the results of a geometric study of highly swept delta wings with large positive dihedrals made in reference 1.

  13. A Remarkable Three Hour Thermonuclear Burst from 4U 1820-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Brown, Edward F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed observational and theoretical study of an approximately three hour long X-ray burst (the "super burst") observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1820-30. This is the longest X-ray burst ever observed from this source, and perhaps one of the longest ever observed in great detail from any source. We show that the super burst is thermonuclear in origin. Its peak luminosity of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 38) ergs s(exp -1) is consistent with the helium Eddington limit for a neutron star at approximately 7 kpc, as well as the peak luminosity of other, shorter, thermonuclear bursts from the same source. The super burst begins in the decaying tail of a more typical (approximately equal to 20 s duration) thermonuclear burst. These shorter, more frequent bursts are well known helium flashes from this source. The level of the accretion driven flux as well as the observed energy release of upwards of 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs indicate that helium could not be the energy source for the super burst. We outline the physics relevant to carbon production and burning on helium accreting neutron stars and present calculations of the thermal evolution and stability of a carbon layer and show that this process is the most likely explanation for the super burst. Ignition at the temperatures in the deep carbon "ocean" requires greater than 30 times the mass of carbon inferred from the observed burst energetics unless the He flash is able to trigger a deflagration from a much smaller mass of carbon. We show, however, that for large columns of accreted carbon fuel, a substantial fraction of the energy released in the carbon burning layer is radiated away as neutrinos, and the heat that is conducted from the burning layer in large part flows inward, only to be released on timescales longer than the observed burst. Thus the energy released during the event possibly exceeds that observed in X-rays by more than a factor of

  14. Absolute intensities and foreign gas broadening coefficients of the 11(sub 1,10) from 11(sub 2,10) and 18(sub 0,18) from 18(sub 1,18) lines in the nu(sub 7) band of C2H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1993-01-01

    Absolute intensities and foreign gas broadening coefficients of the 18(sub 0,18) from 18(sub 1,18) and 11(sub 1,10) from 11(sub 2,10) transitions in the nu(sub 7) band of C2H4 near 948/cm have been measured at a spectral resolution of approximately 5 x 10(exp -4)/cm using tunable diode laser spectrometry. Ar, He, N2, O2 were used as the broadening gases. In order to determine the temperature dependence of the broadening coefficient, data were obtained at temperatures ranging from 150 to 296 K. The absolute intensity of the 5(sub 0,5) from 5(sub 1,5) transition was also found at 296 K. A band strength of 330 +/- 10/sq cm/atm was obtained from weighted averages of the individual line intensities and a rigid asymmetric top calculation.

  15. Dating of vein specularite using internal (U+Th)/He-4 isochrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernicke, Rolf S.; Lippolt, Hans J.

    1994-03-01

    Hematite, an ubiquitous iron oxide, is commonly found enriched with uranium and other elements supplied by the ore solution from which it had formed. The decay of the incorporated uranium to stable lead produces alpha particles which become He-4 atoms via electron capture. In hematite this helium production may provide a convenient 'clock' which records the time elapsed since the iron oxide became closed enough to prevent quantitative helium escape (Wernicke and Lippolt, 1993a; 1993b). Recently, Lippolt et al. (1993) reported high retention qualities of specular hematite for He-4 over geologic periods of time (activation energies above 116 (KJ/mol) and diffusion coefficients smaller than 10(exp -30) sq m/s) at room temperature, and closure temperatures above 200 C). Here the concentrations of U and Th have been measured together with radiogenic He-4 at four different locations inside two specularites. The U-He concentrations co-varied sufficiently among the locations for an internal helium isochron of Late Jurassic age to be obtained from each specularite. The study suggests that specularite is a prolific chronometer and might allow a routine approach of the helium (isochron) method to obtain crystallization/cooling ages.

  16. Further ROSAT measurements of the period of 4U 1820-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klis, M. Van Der; Hasinger, G.; Verbunt, F.; Paradijs, J. Van; Belloni, T.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1993-01-01

    We have made two new observations of 4U 1820-30 with the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC). The measurements do not provide further evidence for a secular period decrease of this source. Instead, after inclusion of our new arrival time measurements the significance of the orbital period derivative drops (from 5.5 to 4.6 sigma), its best-fit value decreases (to P-dot/P =(-5.3 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -8)/yr) and the formal probability that statistical fluctuations have caused the observed P-dot increases to 0.5% (from 0.003%). We detect light curve changes that are large enough to be the cause of some (or all) of the period changes seen in 4U 1820-30, but not large enough to explain the discrepancy of the observed period derivative with that theoretically predicted. We explore the possibility that the secular period change observed during 1976-1991 could have been dominated by random or systematic changes in the position and shape of an occulting bulge on the disk rim and conclude that phase shifts caused by this mechanism could in principle explain the discrepancy entirely.

  17. Torque Reversal and Spin-Down of the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto L.; Bildsten, L.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Koh, D. T.; Prince, T. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Finger, M. H.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Over 5 yr of hard X-ray (20-60 keV) monitoring of the 7.66 s accretion-powered pulsar 4U 1626-67 with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE large-area detectors has revealed that the neutron star is now steadily spinning down, in marked contrast to the steady spin-up and spin-down torques differ by only 15% with the neutron star spin changing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 5000 yr in both states. The current spin-down rate is itself decreasing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 26 yr. The long-term timing history shows small-amplitude variations on a 4000 day timescale, which are probably due to variations in the mass transfer rate. The pulsed 20-60 keV emission from 4U 1626-67 is well-fitted by a power-law spectrum with photon index gamma = 4.9 and a typical pulsed intensity of 1.5 x 10(exp -10) ergs cm (exp -2)s(exp -1). The low count rates with BATSE prohibited us from constraining the reported 42 minute binary orbit, but we can rule out long-period orbits in the range 2 days < or = P(orb) < or = 900 days. We compare the long-term torque behavior of 4U 1626-67 to other disk-fed accreting pulsars and discuss the implications of our results for the various theories of magnetic accretion torques. The abrupt change in the sign of the torque is difficult to reconcile with the extremely smooth spin-down now observed. The strength of the torque noise in 4U 1626-67, approximately 10(exp -22) Hz(exp 2)s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1), is the smallest ever measured for an accreting X-ray pulsar, and it is comparable to the timing noise seen in young radio pulsars. We close by pointing out that the core temperature and external torque (the two parameters potentially relevant to internal sources of timing noise) of an accreting neutron star are also comparable to those of young radio pulsars.

  18. Observations of 4U 1700-37 with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, B. C.; Finger, M. H.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Wilson, C. A.; Brock, M. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Cominsky, L. R.; Roberts, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    The eclipsing binary X-ray source 4U 1700-37 has been continually monitored by the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory since the spring of 1991. Using source measurements at times of Earth occultation, we observe an average (uneclipsed) flux of 0.23 crab in the 20-120 keV band. The flux is highly variable, with occasional flaring behavior on timescales from hundreds of seconds to several hours and intensities as bright as 1 crab. The uneclipsed spectrum is well represented by an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung model with a temperature of 25 keV independent of source intensity or orbital phase. An upper limit of 4% on the pulse fraction has been obtained for pulse periods between 2 and 700 s. Average orbital light curves from almost 1000 days of occultation measurements have been constructed. These profiles are used to measure: (1) the eclipse semiangle, Theta(sub E) = 28.6 deg +/- 2.1 deg in the 20-120 keV band, and (2) the decrease in orbital period, P(dot)/P = -(3.3 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -7) 1/ yr. Estimates of system physical parameters are obtained using Monte Carlo simulations to propagate errors in measured and assumed parameters. For the X-ray source mass we find M(sub x) = 2.6(sub -1.4)(sup +2.3) solar mass, and for the mass and radius of the optical companion, M(sub 0) = 30(sub -7)(sup +11) solar mass and R(sub 0) = 18(sub -2)(sup +2) solar radius.

  19. Energy Spectra and High Frequency Oscillations in 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E. C.; Kaaret, P.; Chen, K.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U 0614+091, combining timing and spectral analysis of RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) observations. The energy spectrum of the source can be described by a power law plus a blackbody component. The blackbody has a variable temperature (kT approximately 0.8 to 1.4 keV) and accounts for 10 to 25% of the total energy flux. The power law flux and photon index also vary (F approximately 0.8 to 1.6 x 10(exp -9) erg/sq cm.s and alpha approximately 2.0 to 2.8 respectively). We find a robust correlation of the frequency of the higher frequency QPO with the flux of the blackbody. The source follows the same relation even in observations separated by several months. The QPO frequency does not have a similarly unique correlation with the total flux or the flux of the power law component. The RMS amplitudes of the higher frequency QPO rise with energy but are consistent with a constant for the lower frequency QPO. These results may be interpreted in terms of a beat frequency model for the production of the high frequency QPOs.

  20. H2SO4 photolysis: A souce of sulfur dioxide in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, D. W.; Zander, R.; Abrams, M. C.; Goldman, A.; Sze, N. D.; Yue, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous absoption lines of stratospheric sulfer dioxide (SO2) were identified in solar occulation spectra recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer during the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS)-1 shuttle mission (March 24-April 2, 1992). based on their analysis, a volume mixing ratio profile of SO2 increasing from (13 +/- 4) p.p.t.v. (parts per 10(exp -12) by volume) at 16 mbar (approximately 28 km) to 455 +/- 90 p.p.t.v. at 0.63 mbar (approximately 52 km) was measured with no significant profile differences between 20 deg N and 60 deg S latitude. The increase in the SO2 mixing ratios with altitude indicates the presence of a source of SO2 in the upper stratosphere. Profiles retrieved from ATMOS spectra recorded during shuttle flights in April-May 1985 and April 1993 show similar vertical distributions but lower concentrations. Two-dimensional model calculations with SO2 assumed as the end product of H2SO4 photolysis produce SO2 profiles consistent with the ATMOS measuremnts to within about a factor 2.

  1. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 10(exp 3), 2 x 10(exp 4), and 1 x 10(exp 3). The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.

  2. Radio Detections During Two State Transitions of the Intermediate-Mass Black Hole HLX-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Natalie; Cseh, David; Lenc, Emil; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Corbel, Stephane; Farrell, Sean; Fender, Robert; Gehrels, Neil; Heywood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Relativistic jets are streams of plasma moving at appreciable fractions of the speed of light. They have been observed from stellar-mass black holes (approx. 3 to 20 solar masses) as well as supermassive black holes (approx.. 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) found in the centers of most galaxies. Jets should also be produced by intermediate-mass black holes (approx. 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) Solar Mass), although evidence for this third class of black hole has, until recently, been weak. We report the detection of transient radio emission at the location of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which is consistent with a discrete jet ejection event. These observations also allow us to refine the mass estimate of the black hole to be between approx. 9 × 10(exp 3) Solar Mass and approx. 9 × 10(exp 4) Solar Mass.

  3. An XMM-Newton Observation of 4U1755-33 in Quiescence: Evidence for a Fossil X-Ray Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; White, Nicholas E.

    2003-01-01

    We report an XMM-Newton observation of the Low mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) and black hole candidate 4U1755-33. This source had been a bright persistent source for at least 25 yrs, but in 1995 entered an extended quiescent phase. 4U1755-33 was not detected with an upper limit to the 2-10 keV luminosity of 5 x 10(exp 31) d(sup 2) (sub 4kpc) ergs per second (where d(sub 4kpc) is the distance in units of 4 kpc) - consistent with the luminosity of other black hole candidates in a quiescent state. An unexpected result is the discovery of a narrow 7 arc min long X-ray jet centered on the position of 4Ul755-33. The spectrum of the jet is similar to that of jets observed from other galactic and extragalactic sources, and may have been ejected from 4Ul755-33 when it was bright. Jets are a feature of accreting black holes, and the detection of a fossil jet provides additional evidence supporting the black hole candidacy of 4U1755-33. The spectral properties of three bright serendipitous sources in the field are reported and it is suggested these are background active galactic nuclei sources.

  4. Meridional Distribution of CH3C2H and C4H2 in Saturn's Stratosphere from CIRS/Cassini Limb and Nadir Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Bezard, Bruno; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Limb and nadir spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) are analyzed in order to derive, for the first time, the meridional variations of diacetylene (C4H2) and methylacetylene (CH3C2H) mixing ratios in Saturn's stratosphere, from 5 hPa up to 0.05 hPa and 80 deg S to 45 deg N. We find that the C4H2 and CH3C2H meridional distributions mimic that of acetylene (C2H2), exhibiting small-scale variations that are not present in photochemical model predictions. The most striking feature of the meridional distribution of both molecules is an asymmetry between mid-southern and mid-northern latitudes. The mid-southern latitudes are found depleted in hydrocarbons relative to their northern counterparts. In contrast, photochemical models predict similar abundances at north and south mid-latitudes. We favor a dynamical explanation for this asymmetry, with upwelling in the south and downwelling in the north, the latter coinciding with the region undergoing ring shadowing. The depletion in hydrocarbons at mid-southern latitudes could also result from chemical reactions with oxygen-bearing molecules. Poleward of 60 deg S, at 0.1 and 0.05 hPa, we find that the CH3C2H and C4H2 abundances increase dramatically. This behavior is in sharp contradiction with photochemical model predictions, which exhibit a strong decrease towards the south pole. Several processes could explain our observations, such as subsidence, a large vertical eddy diffusion coefficient at high altitudes, auroral chemistry that enhances CH3C2H and C4H2 production, or shielding from photolysis by aerosols or molecules produced from auroral chemistry. However, problems remain with all these hypotheses, including the lack of similar behavior at lower altitudes. Our derived mean mixing ratios at 0.5 hPa of (2.4 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -10) for C4H2 and of (1.1 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -9) for CH3C2H are compatible with the analysis of global-average ISO observations performed by Moses et al. Finally, we provide

  5. The 2017 Meteor Shower Activity Forecast for Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, Althea; Cooke, Bill; Moser, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Most meteor showers will display typical activity levels in 2017. Perseid activity is expected to be higher than normal but less than in 2016; rates may reach 80% of the peak ZHR in 2016. Despite this enhancement, the Perseids rank 4th in flux for 0.04-cm-equivalent meteoroids: the Geminids (GEM), Daytime Arietids (ARI), and Southern delta Aquariids (SDA) all produce higher fluxes. Aside from heightened Perseid activity, the 2017 forecast includes a number of changes. In 2016, the Meteoroid Environment Office used 14 years of shower flux data to revisit the activity profiles of meteor showers included in the annual forecast. Both the list of showers and the shape of certain major showers have been revised. The names and three-letter shower codes were updated to match those in the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Meteor Data Center, and a number of defunct or insignificant showers were removed. The most significant of these changes are the increased durations of the Daytime Arietid (ARI) and Geminid (GEM) meteor showers. This document is designed to supplement spacecraft risk assessments that incorporate an annual averaged meteor shower flux (as is the case with all NASA meteor models). Results are presented relative to this baseline and are weighted to a constant kinetic energy. Two showers - the Daytime Arietids (ARI) and the Geminids (GEM) - attain flux levels approaching that of the baseline meteoroid environment for 0.1-cm-equivalent meteoroids. This size is the threshold for structural damage. These two showers, along with the Quadrantids (QUA) and Perseids (PER), exceed the baseline flux for 0.3-cm-equivalent particles, which is near the limit for pressure vessel penetration. Please note, however, that meteor shower fluxes drop dramatically with increasing particle size. As an example, the Arietids contribute a flux of about 5x10(exp -6) meteoroids m(exp -2) hr-1 in the 0.04-cm-equivalent range, but only 1x10(exp -8) meteoroids m(sub -2) hr-1 for the 0

  6. 1,2-Dichlorohexafluoro-Cyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) a Potent Ozone Depleting Substance and Greenhouse Gas: Atmospheric Loss Processes, Lifetimes, and Ozone Depletion and Global Warming Potentials for the (E) and (Z) stereoisomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Smith, Shona C.; Jubb, Aaron M.; Portmann, Robert W.; Hall, Bradley D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric processing of (E)- and (Z)-1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) was examined in this work as the ozone depleting (ODP) and global warming (GWP) potentials of this proposed replacement compound are presently unknown. The predominant atmospheric loss processes and infrared absorption spectra of the R-316c isomers were measured to provide a basis to evaluate their atmospheric lifetimes and, thus, ODPs and GWPs. UV absorption spectra were measured between 184.95 to 230 nm at temperatures between 214 and 296 K and a parametrization for use in atmospheric modeling is presented. The Cl atom quantum yield in the 193 nm photolysis of R- 316c was measured to be 1.90 +/- 0.27. Hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) was determined to be a photolysis co-product with molar yields of 0.7 and 1.0 (+/-10%) for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c, respectively. The 296 K total rate coefficient for the O(1D) + R-316c reaction, i.e., O(1D) loss, was measured to be (1.56 +/- 0.11) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/ molecule/s and the reactive rate coefficient, i.e., R-316c loss, was measured to be (1.36 +/- 0.20) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/molecule/s corresponding to a approx. 88% reactive yield. Rate coefficient upper-limits for the OH and O3 reaction with R-316c were determined to be <2.3 × 10(exp -17) and <2.0 × 10(exp -22)cu cm/molecule/s, respectively, at 296 K. The quoted uncertainty limits are 2(sigma) and include estimated systematic errors. Local and global annually averaged lifetimes for the (E)- and (Z)-R-316c isomers were calculated using a 2-D atmospheric model to be 74.6 +/- 3 and 114.1 +/-10 years, respectively, where the estimated uncertainties are due solely to the uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra. Stratospheric photolysis is the predominant atmospheric loss process for both isomers with the O(1D) reaction making a minor, approx. 2% for the (E) isomer and 7% for the (Z) isomer, contribution to the total atmospheric loss. Ozone depletion potentials for (E)- and (Z

  7. Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle in Perfect-Gas Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel s Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1x10(exp 6)/ft to 49x10(exp 6)/ft (1.3x10(exp 7)/m to 16x10(exp 7)/m) and 1.2x10(exp 6)/ft to 19x10(exp 6)/ft (0.39x10(exp 7)/m to 62x10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1x10(exp 6)/ft to 7x10(exp 6)/ft (0.36x10(exp 7)/m to 2.2x10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for all wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 10% of the experimental data

  8. Turbulent Aeroheating Testing of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent aeroheating on the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle heat shield has been conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter MSL model in pure N2 gas in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers of 4.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 49 x 10(exp 6)/ft (1.3 x 10(exp 7)/m to 19 x 10(exp 6/ft) and 1.2 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 19 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.39 x 10(exp 7)/m to 62 x 10(exp 7)/m), respectively. These conditions were sufficient to span the regime of boundary-layer flow from completely laminar to fully-developed turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A supporting aeroheating test was also conducted in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel at free stream Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7 x 10(exp 6)/ft (0.36 x 10(exp 7)/m to 2.2 x 10(exp 7)/m) in order to help corroborate the Tunnel 9 results. A complementary computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in parallel to the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent predictions were generated for the wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons were performed with the data for the purpose of helping to define uncertainty margins on predictions for aeroheating environments during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Data from both wind tunnel tests and comparisons with the predictions are presented herein. It was concluded from these comparisons that for perfect-gas conditions, the computational tools could predict fully-laminar or fully-turbulent heating conditions to within 12% or better of the experimental data.

  9. Constructing the Coronal Magnetic Field by Correlating Parameterized Magnetic Field Lines with Observed Coronal Plasma Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gary G.; Alexander, David

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing the coronal magnetic field from photospheric magnetograms and observed coronal loops. A set of magnetic field lines generated from magnetogram data is parameterized and then deformed by varying the parameterized values. The coronal flux tubes associated with this field are adjusted until the correlation between the field lines and the observed coronal loops is maximized. A mathematical formulation is described which ensures that (1) the normal component of the photospheric field remains unchanged, (2) the field is given in the entire corona over an active region, (3) the field remains divergence-free, and 4electric currents are introduced into the field. It is demonstrated that a parameterization of a potential field, comprising a radial stretching of the field, can provide a match for a simple bipolar active region, AR 7999, which crossed the central meridian on 1996 November 26. The result is a non-force-free magnetic field with the Lorentz force being of the order of 10(exp -5.5) g per s(exp 2) resulting from an electric current density of 0.79 micro A per m(exp 2). Calculations show that the plasma beta becomes larger than unity at a strong non-radial currents requires low height of about 0.25 solar radii supporting the non-force-free conclusion. The presence of such strong non-radial currents requires large transverse pressure gradients fo maintain a magnetostatic atmosphere, required by the relatively persistent nature of the coronal structures observed in AR 7999. This scheme is an important tool in generating a magnetic field solution consistent with the coronal flux tube observations and the observed photospheric magnetic field.

  10. Ionospheric Convection in the Postnoon Auroral Oval: SuperDARN and Polar UVI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, A.; Koustov, A.; Lyatsky, W.; Kangas, J.; Parks, G.; Chua, D.

    2002-01-01

    Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) observations, ultraviolet imaging from the Polar satellite (UVI), and particle precipitation data from DMSP satellites have been used to investigate the electrodynamics of the postnoon auroral oval in the Northern hemisphere. We show that: (1) For negative IMF By, the convection reversal (CR) was co-located with the maximum of auroral luminosity, but during positive IMF By the convection reversal was poleward of the auroral oval up to several degrees in latitude; (2) Postnoon auroral oval was associated with a large-scale upward field-aligned current (FAC) of the order of 6x10(exp -7). A m(exp -2) in magnitude (the FAC was inferred from the SuperDARN and UVI data). For negative IMF By, maximum of the auroral intensity coincides in latitude with the maximum of the upward field-aligned current. However, for positive IMF By. the maximum of the upward FAC was shifted to the poleward edge of the auroral oval; (3) In response to the IMF By turning from positive to negative, the maximum of the auroral luminosity did not change its position noticeably, but the position of the convection reversal changed considerably from 80-81 degs to about 76 degs MLAT, and the maximum of FAC moved from 77-78 degs to about 76 degs MLAT. Thus, after IMF By turns negative, both the FAC maximum and CR tend to coincide with the auroral maximum; (4) The IMF Bz positive deflection was followed by a decrease in both field-aligned current intensity and auroral luminosity. However, the decrease in the auroral luminosity lags behind the FAC decrease by about 12 min. Firstly, these observations allow us to suggest that the IMF By-related electric field can penetrate into the closed magnetosphere and produce convection and FAC changes in the region of the postnoon auroral oval. Secondly, we suggest that the interchange instability is a promising mechanism for the postnoon auroras.

  11. Performance of Soviet and US hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uljanov, Adolph A.; Demidov, Nikolai A.; Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.; Allan, David W.; Winkler, Gernot M. R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequencies of Soviet- and U.S.-built hydrogen masers located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and at the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) were compared with each other and, via Global Positioning System (GPS) common-view measurements, with three primary frequency-reference scales. The best masers were found to have fractional frequency stabilities as low as 6 times 10(exp -16) for averaging times of approximately 10(exp 4) s. Members of the USNO maser ensemble provided frequency prediction better than 1 times 10(exp 14) for periods up to a few weeks. The frequency residuals of these masers, after removal of frequency drift and rate of change of drift, had stabilities of a few parts in 10(exp -15), with serveral masers achieving residual stabilities well below 1 times 10(exp -15) for intervals from 10(exp 5)s to 2 times 10(exp 6)s. The fractional frequency drifts of the 13 masers studied, relative to the primary reference standards, ranged from -0.2 times 10(exp -15)/day to +9.6 times 10(exp -15)/day.

  12. Fourier transform-infrared studies of thin H2SO4/H2O films: Formation, water uptake, and solid-liquid phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Iraci, Laura T.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Saastad, Ole W.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Hanson, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to examine films representative of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols. Thin films of sulfuric acid were formed in situ by the condensed phase reaction of SO3 with H2O. FTIR spectra show that the sulfuric acid films absorb water while cooling in the presence of water vapor. Using stratospheric water pressures, the most dilute solutions observed were greater than 40 wt % before simultaneous ice formation and sulfuric acid freezing occurred. FTIR spectra also revealed that the sulfuric acid films crystallized mainly as sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Crystallization occurred either when the composition was about 60 wt% H2SO4 or after ice formed on the films at temperatures 1-4 K below the ice frost point. Finally, we determined that the melting point for SAT depended on the background water pressure and was 216-219 K in the presence of 4 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O. Our results suggest that once frozen, sulfuric acid aerosols in the stratosphere are likely to melt at these temperatures, 30 K colder than previously thought.

  13. WISE Discovery of Hyper Luminous Galaxies at z=2-4 and Their Implications for Galaxy and AGN Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Chao Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Bridge, Carrie; Assef, Roberto; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Robert L.; Jarrett, Thomas; Lonsdale, Carol; Petty, Sara; Sayers, Jack; Stanford, Adam; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    On behalf of the WISE Science team, we present the discovery of a class of distant dust-enshrouded galaxies with extremely high luminosity. These galaxies are selected to have extreme red colors in the mid-IR using NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). They are faint in the optical and near-IR, predominantly at zeta = 2-4, and with IR luminosity > 10(exp 13) Solar Luminosity, making them Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyLIRGs). SEDs incorporating the WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry indicate hot dust dominates the bolometric luminosity, presumably powered by AGN. Preliminary multi-wavelength follow-up suggests that they are different from normal populations in the local M-sigma relation. Their low source density implies that these objects are either intrinsically rare, or a short-lived phase in a more numerous population. If the latter is the case, these hot, dust-enshrouded galaxies may be an early stage in the interplay between AGN and galaxies.

  14. A calibration of the production rate ratio P-21/P-26 by low energy secondry neutrons: Identification of Ne spallation components at the 10(exp 6) atoms/g level in terrestrial samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, TH.; Niedermann, S.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The spallation ratio (Ne-22/Ne-21)(sub c) from Si was determined as 1.243 plus or minus 0.022 in a terrestrial quartz sample. We carried out a calibration of the in-situ production rate ratio P-21/P-26 in quartz samples for which Be-10 and Al-26 production rates were previously measured. A ratio P-21/P-26 of 0.67 plus or minus 0.12 is obtained.

  15. Flight Test of a 30-Foot Nominal-Diameter Disk-Gap-Band Parachute Deployed at Mach 1.56 and Dynamic Pressure of 11.4 Pounds per Square Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Preisser, John S.

    1967-01-01

    A 30-foot (9.1 meter) nominal-diameter disk-gap-band parachute (reference area 707 sq ft (65.7 m(exp 2)) was flight tested with a 200-pound (90.7 kg) instrumented payload as part of the NASA Planetary Entry Parachute Program. A deployment mortar ejected the test parachute when the payload was at a Mach number of 1.56 and a dynamic pressure of 11.4 lb/sq ft (546 newtons per m 2 ) at an altitude of 127,500 feet (38.86 km). The parachute reached suspension line stretch in 0.37 second resulting in a snatch force loading of 1270 pounds (5650 N). Canopy inflation began 0.10 second after line stretch. A delay in the opening process occurred and was apparently due to a momentary interference of the glass-fiber shroud used in packing the parachute bag in the mortar. Continuous canopy inflation began 0.73 second after initiation of deployment and 0.21 second later full inflation was attained for a total elapsed time from mortar fire of 0.94 second. The maximum opening load of 3915 pounds (17,400 newtons) occurred at the time the canopy was first fully opened. The parachute exhibited an average drag coefficient of 0.52 during the deceleration period and pitch-yaw oscillations of the canopy were less than 5 degrees. During the steady-state descent portion of the test period, the average effective drag coefficient was about 0.47 (based on vertical descent velocity and total system weight).

  16. Dynamical timescales in the Jupiter family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindgren, Mats

    1992-01-01

    Numerically integrated fictitious comets starting in orbits perihelion tangent to Jupiter have been used to estimate the duration of a typical visit to the observable Jupiter family of comets. The results show values of 3 to 6 thousand years, narrowing the previously estimated interval of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) years.

  17. The Complex Spin State of 103P-Hartley 2: Kinematics and Orientation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Thomas, Peter; Li, Jian-Yang; Williams, Jade; Carcich, Brian; A'Hearn, Michael F.; McLaughlin, Stephanie; Farnham, Tony; McFadden, Lucy; Lisse, Carey M.; Collins, Steven; Besse, Sebastien; Klaasen, Kenneth; Sunshine, Jessica; Meech, Karen J.; Lindler, Don

    2013-01-01

    long axis changed by approx. -4.4 min/d at perihelion. M decreased at a rate of 0.038 (sq m/s) per day in a roughly linear fashion. Assuming a bulk density between 230-300 kg/m3 and a total volume for the nucleus of 8.09 X 10(exp 8) cubic m, the net torque acting on the nucleus was in the range 0.8-1.1 X 10(exp 5) kg m(exp 2) /s(exp 2). In order to bring the spacecraft photometric and imaging data into alignment on the direction of M, the directions of the intermediate and short principal axes of inertia had to be adjusted by 33 deg (on the sky) from the values indicated by the shape model with an assumed homogeneous interior. The adjusted direction of the intermediate axis is RA, Dec = 302 deg., -16.5 deg.. The morning and evening terminators in the images are identified, and the variation of the insolation at three regions on the nucleus associated with active areas calculated. The plume of water vapor observed in the inner coma is found to be directed close to the direction of local gravity over the sub-solar region for a range of reasonable bulk densities. The plume does not follow the projected normal to the surface at the sub-solar point.

  18. Coronal electron stream and Langmuir wave detection inside a propagation channel at 4.3 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttighoffer, A.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Hoang, S.; Mangeney, A.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Observations of an energetic interplanetary electron event associated with the production of Langmuir waves, both of which are identified at 4.3 AU by instruments on the Ulysses spacecraft, are presented in this paper. This electron event propagates inside a well-defined magnetic structure. The existence of this structure is firmly established by joint particle and plasma observations made by Ulysses instruments. Its local estimated radial width is of the order of 2.3 x 10(exp 7) km (0.15 AU). The electron beam is associated with a type III burst observed from Earth at high frequencies and at low frequencies from Ulysses in association with Langmuir waves detected inside the structure. The consistency of local (Ulysses) and remote (Earth) observations in terms of temporal and geometrical considerations establishes that the structure is anchored in the solar corona near the solar active region responisble for the observed type III emission and gives an accurate determination of the injection time for the observed electron beam. Propagation analysis of the electron event is presented. In order to quantify the magnetic field properties, a variance analysis has been performed and is presented in this paper. The analysis establishes that inside the structure the amount of magnetic energy involved in the fluctuations is less than 4% of the total magnetic energy; the minimal variance direction is well defined and in coincidence with the direction of the mean magnetic field. This configuration may produce conditions favorable for scatter free streaming of energetic electrons and/or Langmuir wave production. The results presented show that the magnetic field might play a role in stabilizing the coronal-origin plasma structures and then preserving them to large, approximately 4 AU, distances in the heliosphere.

  19. Eddy correlation measurements of methane fluxes using a tunable diode laser at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, G. C.; Neumann, H. H.; Den Hartog, G.; Thurtell, G. W.; Kidd, G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) measurements of methane flux were made at the Kinosheo Lake tower site for a 1-month period during the 1990 summer intensive. The measurements were made with a diode-laser-based methane sensor using the eddy correlation technique. Measurements of the methane fluxes were made at two levels, 5 or 18 m. Approximately 900 half-hour average methane flux measurements were obtained. Weak temporal and diurnal trends were observed in the data. Fluxes averaged over the study period showed an overall methane emission of 16 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d with a daytime average of 20 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d and a nighttime average of 9 mg CH4 m(exp -2)/d. The effect of emission footprint was evident in the data. A strong relationship between the daily average methane flux and wet bog temperature at 20-cm depth was observed.

  20. A Comprehensive Spectral Analysis of the X-Ray Pulsar 4U 1907+09 from Two Observations with the Suzaku X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Pottschmidt, Katja; Roth, Stefanie; Barragan, Laura; Furst, Felix; Suchy, Slawomir; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Jorn; Rothschild, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We present results from two observations of the wind-accreting X-ray pulsar 4U 1907+09 using the Suzaku observatory, The broadband time-averaged spectrum allows us to examine the continuum emission of the source and the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at approx. 19 keV. Additionally, using the narrow CCD response of Suzaku near 6 ke V allows us to study in detail the Fe K bandpass and to quantify the Fe Kp line for this source for the first time. The source is absorbed by fully-covering material along the line of sight with a column density of N(sub H) approx. 2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, consistent with a wind accreting geometry, and a high Fe abundance (approx. 3 - 4 x solar). Time and phase-resolved analyses allow us to study variations in the source spectrum. In particular, dips found in the 2006 observation which are consistent with earlier observations occur in the hard X-ray bandpass, implying a variation of the whole continuum rather than occultation by intervening material, while a dip near the end of the 2007 observation occurs mainly in the lower energies implying an increase in NH along the line of sight, perhaps indicating clumpiness in the stellar wind

  1. Fall-Back Disks in Long and Short GRBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizo, John K.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical time-dependent calculations for fall-back disks relevant for GRBs in which the disk of material surrounding the black hole (BH) powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the strength of the jet. Given the initial existence of a small mass appr oximately less than 10(exp -4) M(solar) near the progenitor with a circularization radius approximately 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) cm, an una voidable consequence will be the formation of an "external disk" whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. For long GRBs, if the mass distribution in the initial fall-back disk traces the progenitor envelope, then a radius approximates 10(exp 11) cm gives a time scale app roximately 10(exp 4) s for the X-ray plateau. For late times t > 10(exp 7) s a steepening due to a cooling front in the disk may have obser vational support in GRB 060729. For short GRBs, one expects most of t he mass initially to lie at small radii < 10(exp 8) cm; however the presence of even a trace amount approximately 10(exp -9) M(solar) of hi gh angular material can give a brief plateau in the light curve.

  2. 2.4 Micrometer Cutoff Wavelength AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb Phototransistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulima, O. V.; Swaminathan, K.; Refaat, T. F.; Faleev, N. N.; Semenov, A. N.; Solov'ev, V. A.; Ivanov, S. V.; Abedin, M. N.; Singh, U. N.; Prather, D.

    2006-01-01

    We report the first AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistors with a cutoff wavelength (50% of peak responsivity) of 2.4 micrometers operating in a broad range of temperatures. These devices are also the first AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb heterojunction phototransistors (HPT) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). This work is a continuation of a preceding study, which was carried out using LPE (liquid phase epitaxy)-grown AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb/GaSb heterostructures. Although the LPE-related work resulted in the fabrication of an HPT with excellent parameters [1-4], the room temperature cutoff wavelength of these devices (approximately 2.15 micrometers) was determined by fundamental limitations implied by the close-to-equilibrium growth from Al-In-Ga-As-Sb melts. As the MBE technique is free from the above limitations, AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb/GaSb heterostructures for HPT with a narrower bandgap of the InGaAsSb base and collector - and hence sensitivity at longer wavelengths (lambda) - were grown in this work. Moreover, MBE - compared to LPE - provides better control over doping levels, composition and width of the AlGaAsSb and InGaAsSb layers, compositional and doping profiles, especially with regard to abrupt heterojunctions. The new MBE-grown HPT exhibited both high responsivity R (up to 2334 A/W for lambda=2.05 micrometers at -20 deg C.) and specific detectivity D* (up to 2.1 x 10(exp 11) cmHz(exp 1/2)/W for lambda=2.05 micrometers at -20 deg C).

  3. Evidence for Live Cl-36 in Ca-Al-rich Inclusions from the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.; Ouyang, Z.; Wang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The short-lived radionuclide Cl-36 decays to either Ar-36 (98.1%, beta(sup -)) or S-36 (1.9%, epsilon and beta(sup +)), with a half life of 3.01 x 10(exp 5) yr. Both the nucleosynthetic and spallation models suggest high initial Cl-36/Cl-35 ratios ((Cl-36/Cl-35)o up to approximately 10(exp -4)) in the early solar system. Previous observed excess Ar-36 in Efremovka matrix has been interpreted to represent a much lower (Cl-36/Cl-35)o ratio of approximately 1 x 10(exp -6). From the observed S-36 excesses in sodalite in calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), we report in this study the first direct evidence of the presence of Cl-36 in primitive meteorites. The inferred (Cl-36/Cl-35)o ratios range from approximately 5 x 10(exp -6) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5).

  4. A search for massive compact halo objects in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Cook, K.; Park, H.; Griest, K.; Stubbs, C.; Freeman, K.; Peterson, B.; Quinn, P.; Rogers, A.

    1991-04-01

    Massive compact halo objects such as brown dwarfs, Jupiters, and black holes are prime candidates to comprise the dark halo of our galaxy. Our group is currently involved in constructing a dedicated observing system at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia. We will use a refurbished 1.27 meter telescope and an innovative two-color CCD camera with 3.4 x 10 exp 7 pixels to monitor 10 exp 6 - 10 exp 7 stars in the Magellanic Clouds. During the first year of operation (1991-1992), we hope to detect (or rule out) objects in the mass range between 0.001 and 0.1 solar mass, and after five years, we hope to have covered the range 10 exp -6 solar mass - 10 exp 2 solar masses.

  5. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 3: Medium-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6), 60 x 10(exp 6), and 120 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  6. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Wilczek, Frank

    1990-01-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from the false-vacuum phase to a radiation-dominated Universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation and percolation, bubble collisions supply a potent-and potentially detectable-source of gravitational waves. The present energy density in relic gravity waves from bubble collisions is expected to be about 10(exp -5) of closure density-many orders of magnitude greater than that of the gravity waves produced by quantum fluctuations. Their characteristic wavelength depends upon the reheating temperature T(sub RH): lambda is approximately 10(exp 4) cm (10(exp 14) GeV/T(sub RH)). If large numbers of black holes are produced, a not implausible outcome, they will evaporate producing comparable amounts of shorter wavelength waves, lambda is approximately 10(exp -6) cm (T(sub RH)/10(exp 14) GeV).

  7. Direct detection optical intersatellite link at 220 Mbps using AlGaAs laser diode and silicon APD with 4-ary PPM signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed 220 Mbps free-space 4-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) direct detection optical communication system is described. High speed GaAs integrated circuits were used to construct the PPM encoder and receiver electronic circuits. Both PPM slot and word timing recovery were provided in the PPM receiver. The optical transmitter consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (Mitsubishi ML5702A, lambda=821nm) and a high speed driver unit. The photodetector consisted of a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) (RCA30902S) preceded by an optical interference filter (delta lambda=10nm). Preliminary tests showed that the self-synchronized PPM receiver could achieve a receiver bit error rate of less than 10(exp -6) at 25 nW average received optical signal power or 360 photons per transmitted information bit. The relatively poor receiver sensitivity was believed to be caused by the insufficient electronic bandwidth of the APD preamplifier and the poor linearity of the preamplifier high frequency response.

  8. High-temperature photochemistry and BAC-MP4 studies of the reaction between ground-state H atoms and N/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, P.; Fontijn, A.; Melius, C.F.

    1987-05-15

    The H+N/sub 2/O reaction has been investigated using the high-temperature photochemistry (HTP) technique. H(1 /sup 2/S) atoms were generated by flash photolysis of NH/sub 3/ and monitored by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence with pulse counting. The bimolecular rate coefficient for H-atom consumption, leading essentially to N/sub 2/+OH, from 390 to 1310 K is found to be given by k/sub 1/(T) = 5.5 x 10/sup -14/ exp(-2380 K/T)+7.3 x 10/sup -10/ exp(-9690 K/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/; the accuracy is assessed as approximately 25% at the 2sigma confidence level. Above 750 K, k/sub 1/ closely follows the Arrhenius behavior of the second term alone. Distinct curvature is evident below 750 K. k/sub 1/ is compared to theoretical BAC-MP4 predictions and good agreement is found for a model involving rearrangement of an HNNO intermediate coupled with tunneling through an Eckart potential barrier, which dominates at the lower temperatures. The branching ratio for the channel leading to NH+NO is discussed in the context of recent thermochemical information and a maximum rate coefficient of <1 x 10/sup -9/ exp(-15800 K/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ is set for temperatures up to 2000 K.

  9. Development of a Method for Local Electron Temperature and Density Measurements in the Divertor of the JET Tokamak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupen, C.; Meigs, A.; Bhatia, A. K.; Brezinsek, S.; OMullane, M.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma volume recombination in the divertor, a process in which charged particles recombine to neutral atoms, contributes to plasma detachment and hence cooling at the divertor target region. Detachment has been observed at JET and other tokamaks and is known to occur at low electron temperatures (T(sub e)<1 eV) and at high electron density (n(sub e)>10(exp 20)/m(exp 3)). The ability to measure such low temperatures is therefore of interest for modelling the divertor. In present work we report development of a new spectroscopic technique for investigation of local electron density (n(sub e)) and temperature (T,) in the outer divertor at JET.

  10. Assimilation by Lunar Mare Basalts: Melting of Crustal Material and Dissolution of Anorthite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnila, A. B.; Hess, P. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss techniques for calculating the amount of crustal assimilation possible in lunar magma chambers and dikes based on thermal energy balances, kinetic rates, and simple fluid mechanical constraints. Assuming parent magmas of picritic compositions, we demonstrate the limits on the capacity of such magmas to melt and dissolve wall rock of anorthitic, troctolitic, noritic, and KREEP (quartz monzodiorite) compositions. Significant melting of the plagioclase-rich crustal lithologies requires turbulent convection in the assimilating magma and an efficient method of mixing in the relatively buoyant and viscous new melt. Even when this occurs, the major element chemistry of the picritic magmas will change by less than 1-2 wt %. Diffusion coefficients measured for Al2O3 from an iron-free basalt and an orange glass composition are 10(exp -12) m(exp 2) s(exp -1) at 1340 C and 10(exp -11) m(exp 2) s(exp -1) at 1390 C. These rates are too slow to allow dissolution of plagioclase to significantly affect magma compositions. Picritic magmas can melt significant quantities of KREEP, which suggests that their trace element chemistry may still be affected by assimilation processes; however, mixing viscous melts of KREEP composition with the fluid picritic magmas could be prohibitively difficult. We conclude that only a small part of the total major element chemical variation in the mare basalt and volcanic glass collection is due to assimilation/fractional crystallization processes near the lunar surface. Instead, most of the chemical variation in the lunar basalts and volcanic glasses must result from assimilation at deeper levels or from having distinct source regions in a heterogeneous lunar mantle.

  11. Relationship Between Ecosystem Productivity and Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Northern Peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolking, S. E.; Bubier, J. L.; Moore, T. R.; Ball, T.; Bellisario, L. M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Carroll, P.; Crill, P. M.; Lafleur, P. M.; McCaughey, J. H.; Roulet, N. T.; Suyker, A. E.; Verma, S. B.; Waddington, J. M.; Whiting, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) and irradiance (as photosynthetic photon flux density or PPFD), using published and unpublished data that have been collected during midgrowing season for carbon balance studies at seven peatlands in North America and Europe, NEE measurements included both eddy-correlation tower and clear, static chamber methods, which gave very similar results. Data were analyzed by site, as aggregated data sets by peatland type (bog, poor fen, rich fen, and all fens) and as a single aggregated data set for all peatlands. In all cases, a fit with a rectangular hyperbola (NEE = alpha PPFD P(sub max)/(alpha PPFD + P(sub max) + R) better described the NEE-PPFD relationship than did a linear fit (NEE = beta PPFD + R). Poor and rich fens generally had similar NEE-PPFD relationships, while bogs had lower respiration rates (R = -2.0 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for bogs and -2.7 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) for fens) and lower NEE at moderate and high light levels (P(sub max)= 5.2 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for bogs and 10.8 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for fens). As a single class, northern peatlands had much smaller ecosystem respiration (R = -2.4 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) and NEE rates (alpha = 0.020 and P(sub max)= 9.2 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) than the upland ecosystems (closed canopy forest, grassland, and cropland). Despite this low productivity, northern peatland soil carbon pools are generally 5-50 times larger than upland ecosystems because of slow rates of decomposition caused by litter quality and anaerobic, cold soils.

  12. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  13. The Composition of Titan's Lower Atmosphere and Simple Surface Volatiles as Measured by the Cassini-Huygens Probe Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Demick, J. E.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Lunine, J. I.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Probe Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) determined the composition of the Titan atmosphere from 140km altitude to the surface. After landing, it returned composition data of gases evaporated from the surface. Height profiles of molecular nitrogen (N2), methane (CH4) and molecular hydrogen (H2) were determined. Traces were detected on the surface of evaporating methane, ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), cyanogen (C2N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The methane data showed evidence that methane precipitation occurred recently. The methane mole fraction was (1.48+/-0.09) x 10(exp -2) in the lower stratosphere (139.8 km to 75.5 km) and (5.65+/-0.18) x 10(exp -2) near the surface (6.7 km to the surface). The molecular hydrogen mole fraction was (1.01+/-0.16) x 10(exp -3) in the atmosphere and (9.90+/-0.17) x 10(exp -4) on the surface. Isotope ratios were 167.7+/-0.6 for N-14/N-15 in molecular nitrogen, 91.1+/-1.4 for C-12/C-13 in methane and (1.35+/-0.30) x 10(exp -4) for D/H in molecular hydrogen. The mole fractions of Ar-36 and radiogenic Ar-40 are (2.1+/-0.8) x 10(exp -7) and (3.39 +/-0.12) x 10(exp -5) respectively. Ne-22 has been tentatively identified at a mole fraction of (2.8+/-2.1) x 10(exp -7) Krypton and xenon were below the detection threshold of 1 x 10(exp -8) mole fraction. Science data were not retrieved from the gas chromatograph subsystem as the abundance of the organic trace gases in the atmosphere and on the ground did not reach the detection threshold. Results previously published from the GCMS experiment are superseded by this publication.

  14. Environmental Perturbations Caused by the Impacts of Comets and Asteroids on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The extinction mechanisms proposed at the Cretaceous-Tertiary geological boundary are reviewed and related to the impact of asteroids or comets in general. For impact energies below 10(exp 4) Megatons (less than 6 x 10(exp 4) years; asteroid diameter less than 650 m), blast, earthquake, and fire may destroy local areas up to 10(exp 5) square m. Tidal waves could flood a kilometer inland over entire ocean basins. The energy range from 105 to 106 Megatons (less than 2 x 10(exp 6) years; asteroid diameter less than 3 km) is transitional. Dust lifted, sulfur released from within impacting asteroids, and soot from fires started by comets can produce climatologically significant optical depths of 10. At energies beyond 10(exp 7) Megatons, blast and earthquake damage is regional (10(exp 6) square cm). Tsunami cresting to 100 m and flooding 20 km inland will sweep the coastal zones of the world's oceans. Fires will be set globally. Light levels may drop so low from the smoke, dust and sulfate that vision is not possible. At energies approaching 10(exp 9) Megatons the ocean surface waters may be acidified by sulfur. The combination of these effects would be devastating.

  15. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  16. Evidence for a Millisecond Pulsar in 4U 1636-53 During a Superburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the Proportional Counter Array on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of highly coherent 582 Hz pulsations during the February 22, 2001 (UT) 'superburst' from 4U 1636-53. The pulsations are detected during an 800 s interval spanning the flux maximum of the burst. Within this interval the barycentric oscillation frequency increases in a monotonic fashion from 581.89 to 581.93 Hz. The predicted orbital motion of the neutron star during this interval is consistent with such an increase as long as optical maximum corresponds roughly with superior conjunction of V801 Arae, the optical companion to the neutron star in 4U 1636-53. We show that a range of circular orbits with 90 < v(sub ns) sin i < 175 km/s and 0.336 > phi(sub 0) > 0.277 for the neutron star can provide an excellent description of the frequency and phase evolution. The brevity of the observed pulse train with respect to the 3.8 hour orbital period unfortunately does not allow more precise constraints. The average pulse profile is sinusoidal and the time averaged pulsation amplitude, as inferred from the half amplitude of the sinusoid is 1%, smaller than typical for burst oscillations observed in normal thermonuclear bursts. We do not detect any higher harmonics nor the putative subharmonic near 290 Hz. The 90% upper limits on signal amplitude at the subharmonic and first harmonic are 0.1 and 0.06%, respectively. The highly coherent pulsation, with a Q = v(sub 0)/delta-v > 4.5 x 10(exp 5) provides compelling evidence for a rapidly rotating neutron star in 4U 1636-53, and further supports the connection of burst oscillation frequencies with the spin frequencies of neutron stars. Our results provide further evidence that some millisecond pulsars are spun up via accretion in LMXBs. We also discuss the implications of our orbital velocity constraint for the masses of the components of 4U 1636-53.

  17. TID and SEE Response of an Advanced Samsung 4G NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Friendlich, M.; Howard, J. W.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Irwin, T. L.; LaBel, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    Initial total ionizing dose (TID) and single event heavy ion test results are presented for an unhardened commercial flash memory, fabricated with 63 nm technology. Results are that the parts survive to a TID of nearly 200 krad (SiO2), with a tractable soft error rate of about 10(exp -l2) errors/bit-day, for the Adams Ten Percent Worst Case Environment.

  18. Pulsed high-energy gamma-radiation from Geminga (1E0630 + 178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The detection of pulsed gamma rays with energy above 50 MeV from the soft X-ray source 1E0630 + 178 is reported, confirming the identification of Geminga with this X-ray source. The period derivative (11.4 +/- 1.7) x 10 exp -15 s/s suggests that Geminga is a nearby isolated rotating neutron star with a magnetic field of 1.6 x 10 exp 12 gauss, a characteristic age of 300,000 yr, and a spin-down energy loss rate of 3.5 x 10 exp 34 erg/s.

  19. Thermal Decomposition of Some Linear Perfluoroalkanes in an Inconel Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, W. L.

    1961-01-01

    The products of the pyrolysis reactions of perfluoropropane, perfluoroethane, and carbon tetrafluoride in an Inconel bomb are described. The values for the energy of activation and frequency factor for the first-order pyrolysis reactions are respectively: (1) 80 kcal. per mole and 2x10(exp14) sec.(exp-1) for perfluoropropane; (2) 53 kcal. per mole and 3x10(exp7) sec.(exp-1) for perfluoroethane; and (3) 96 kcal. per mole and 4x10(exp13) sec.(exp-1) for carbon tetrafluoride.

  20. Limits on the UV Photodecomposition of Carbonates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Richard; Zent, Aaron P.; McKay, Christopher P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of UV (ultraviolet) light on the stability of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere was experimentally investigated. Sample cells containing C-13 labeled calcite were irradiated with a Xe arc lamp in 10 mbar of simulated martian atmosphere and a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to monitor the headspace gases for the production of (13)CO2. We found no experimental evidence of the UV photodecomposition of calcium carbonate in a simulated martian atmosphere. Extrapolating the lower limit of detection of our experimental system to an upper limit of carbonate decomposition on Mars yields a quantum efficiency of 3.5 x 10(exp -8) molecules/photon over the wavelength interval of 190-390 nm and a maximum UV photodecomposition rate of 1.2 x 10(exp -13) kg m(exp -2) s(exp -1) from a calcite surface. The maximum loss of bulk calcite due to this process would be 2.5 nm yr(exp -1). However, calcite is expected to be thermodynamically stable on the surface of Mars and potential UV photodecomposition reaction mechanisms indicate that while calcium carbonate may decompose under vacuum, it would be stable in a CO2 atmosphere. Given the expected stability of carbonate on Mars and our inability to detect carbonate decomposition, we conclude that it is unlikely that the apparent absence of carbonate on the martian surface is due to UV photo decomposition of calcite in the current environment.

  1. Micron-Sized Particles Detected in the Vicinity of Jupiter by the Voyager Plasma Wave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsintikidis, D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Granroth, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Wideband waveform data obtained by the plasma wave instruments onboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been used to study micron-sized dust particles in the vicinity of Jupiter. The technique used was developed during the flybys of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, and makes use of the fact that a particle striking the spacecraft at 10-20 km/s causes a voltage pulse in the plasma wave receiver. The waveform of the voltage pulse is much different than the waveform of plasma waves and provides a highly reliable method of detecting micron-sized dust particles. Although the dust impact rate observed in the vicinity of Jupiter is much lower than the rates at Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, the particles are easily detectable. Approximately 1200 48-second frames of wideband waveform data were examined in the vicinity of Jupiter. Dust impact signatures were found in approximately 20% of these frames. The peak impact rates are about 1 impact per second, and the peak number densities are about 10(exp -5) m(exp -3). Most of the impacts occurred near the equatorial plane at radial distances less than about 35 R(sub j) from Jupiter. Analysis of the detection threshold indicates that the particles have masses greater than 10(exp -11) g, which corresponds to particles with diameters of a few micrometers or larger.

  2. A performance comparison of two small rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.; Rivera, Angel, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on two small rockets (110 N thrust class) to directly compare a standard conical nozzle with a bell nozzle optimized for maximum thrust using the Rao method. In large rockets, with throat Reynolds numbers of greater than 1 x 10(exp 5), bell nozzles outperform conical nozzles. In rockets with throat Reynolds numbers below 1 x 10(exp 5), however, test results have been ambiguous. An experimental program was conducted to test two small nozzles at two different fuel film cooling percentages and three different chamber pressures. Test results showed that for the throat Reynolds number range from 2 x 10(exp 4) to 4 x 10(exp 4), the bell nozzle outperformed the conical nozzle. Thrust coefficients for the bell nozzle were approximately 4 to 12 percent higher than those obtained with the conical nozzle. As expected, testing showed that lowering the fuel film cooling increased performance for both nozzle types.

  3. Thermal studies of Martian channels and valleys using Termoskan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bruce H.; Murray, Bruce C.

    1994-01-01

    The Termoskan instrument on board the Phobos '88 spacecraft acquired the highest spatial resolution thermal infrared emission data ever obtained for Mars. Included in the thermal images 2 km/pixel, midday observations of several major channel and valley systems including significant portions of Shalbatana, Ravi, Al-Qahira, and Ma'adim Valles, the channel connecting Valles Marineris with Hydraotes Chaos, and channel material in Eos Chasma. Termoskan also observed small portions of the southern beginnings of Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles and some channel material in Gangis Chasma. Simultaneous broadband visible reflectance data were obtained for all but Ma'adim Vallis. We find that most of the channels and valleys have higher thermal inertias than their surroundings, consistent with previous thermal studies. We show for the first time that the thermal inertia boundaries closely match flat channel floor boundaries. Also, buttes within channels have inertias similiar to the plains surrounding the channels, suggesting the buttes are remnants of a contiguous plains surface. Lower bounds on typical channel thermal inertias range from 8.4 to 12.5 (10(exp -3) cal cm(exp -2) s(exp -1/2)/K) (352 to 523 in SI units of J m(exp -2) s(exp -1/2)/K). Lower bounds on inertia differences with the surrounding heavily cratered plains range from 1.1 to 3.5 (46 to 147 SI). Atmospheric and geometric effects are not sufficient to cause the observed channel inertia enhancements. We favor nonaeolian explanations of the overall channel inertia enhancements based primarily upon the channel floors' thermal homogeneity and the strong correlation of thermal boundaries with floor boundaries. However, localized, dark regions within some channels are likely aeolian in nature as reported previously. Most channels with increased inertias have fretted morphologies such as flat floors with steep walls. Eastern Ravi and southern Ares Valles, the only major channel sections observed that have obvious

  4. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE): Initial Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Hine, B.; Delory, G. T.; Salute, J. S.; Noble, S.; Colaprete, A.; Horanyi, M.; Mahaffy, P.

    2014-01-01

    between 0.7 and sev-eral micrometers in size, present over the pre-dawn and morning sector of the Moon. This tenuous dust exosphere, with densities of approximately 10(exp -5) m(exp -3), appears to be sustained by the ejecta of micrometeoroid impacts.

  5. Removing cosmic-ray hits from multiorbit HST Wide Field Camera images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.

    1994-01-01

    We present an optimized algorithm that removes cosmic rays ('CRs') from multiorbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field/Planetary Camera ('WF/PC') images. It computes the image noise in every iteration from the WF/PC CCD equation. This includes all known sources of random and systematic calibration errors. We test this algorithm on WF/PC stacks of 2-12 orbits as a function of the number of available orbits and the formal Poissonian sigma-clipping level. We find that the algorithm needs greater than or equal 4 WF/PC exposures to locate the minimal sky signal (which is noticeably affected by CRs), with an optimal clipping level at 2-2.5 x sigma(sub Poisson). We analyze the CR flux detected on multiorbit 'CR stacks,' which are constructed by subtracting the best CR filtered images from the unfiltered 8-12 orbit average. We use an automated object finder to determine the surface density of CRS as a function of the apparent magnitude (or ADU flux) they would have generated in the images had they not been removed. The power law slope of the CR 'counts' (gamma approximately = 0.6 for N(m) m(exp gamma)) is steeper than that of the faint galaxy counts down to V approximately = 28 mag. The CR counts show a drop off between 28 less than or approximately V less than or approximately 30 mag (the latter is our formal 2 sigma point source sensitivity without spherical aberration). This prevents the CR sky integral from diverging, and is likely due to a real cutoff in the CR energy distribution below approximately 11 ADU per orbit. The integral CR surface density is less than or approximately 10(exp 8)/sq. deg, and their sky signal is V approximately = 25.5-27.0 mag/sq. arcsec, or 3%-13% of our NEP sky background (V = 23.3 mag/sq. arcsec), and well above the EBL integral of the deepest galaxy counts (B(sub J) approximately = 28.0 mag/sq. arcsec). We conclude that faint CRs will always contribute to the sky signal in the deepest WF/PC images. Since WFPC2 has approximately 2.7x

  6. A Study of Saturn's E-Ring Particles Using the Voyager 1 Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsintikidis, D.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Barbosa, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    The flyby of Voyager 1 at Saturn resulted in the detection of a large variety of plasma waves, e.g., chorus, hiss, and electron cyclotron harmonics. Just before the outbound equator crossing, at about 6.1 R(sub s), the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument detected a strong, well-defined low-frequency enhancement. Initially it was suggested that plasma waves might be responsible for the spectral feature but more recently dust was suggested as at least a partial contributor to the enhancement. In this report we present evidence which supports the conclusion that dust contributes to the low-frequency enhancement. A new method has been used to derive the dust impact rate. The method relies mainly on the 16-channel spectrum analyzer data. The few wide band waveform observations available (which have been used to study dust impacts during the Voyager 2 ring plane crossing) were useful for calibrating the impact rate from the spectrum analyzer data. The mass and, hence, the size of the dust particles were also obtained by analyzing the response of the plasma wave spectrum analyzer. The results show that the region sampled by Voyager 1 is populated by dust particles that have rms masses of up to few times 10(exp -11) g and sizes of up to a few microns. The dust particle number density is on the order of 10(exp -3) m(exp 3). The optical depth of the region sampled by the spacecraft is 1.04 x 10(exp -6). The particle population is centered about 2500 km south of the equatorial plane and has a north-south thickness of about 4000 km. Possible sources of these particles are the moons Enceladus and Tethys whose orbits lie within the E-ring radial extent. These results are in reasonable agreement with photometric studies and numerical simulations.

  7. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  8. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  9. Numerical Modeling of Solidification in Space With MEPHISTO-4. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James E.; Yoa, Minwu; deGroh, Henry C., III; Garimella, V. Suresh

    1998-01-01

    A pre-flight analysis of the directional solidification of BiSn with MEPHISTO-4 is presented. Simplified Bridgman growth under microgravity conditions is simulated using a two dimensional finite element model. This numerical model is a single domain, pseudo-steady state model, and includes the effects of both thermal and solutal convection. The results show that for all orientations of the applied steady state gravity vector, of magnitude 1 micro-g, the directional solidification process remains diffusion controlled. The maximum convective velocity was found to be 4.424 x 10(exp -5) cm/s for the horizontal Bridgman growth configuration. This value is an order of magnitude lower than the growth velocity. The maximum and minimum values or solute concentration in the liquid at the crystal-melt interface were 13.867 at.% and 13.722 at.%, respectively. This gives a radial segregation value of xi = 1.046% at the interface. A secondary objective of this work was to compare the results obtained to those that consider thermal convection only (no solutal convection). It was found that the convective flow patterns in simulations which included solutal convection were significantly different from those which ignored solutal convection. The level of radial segregation predicted by the current simulations is an order of magnitude lower than that found in simulations which ignore solutal convection. The final aim was to investigate the effect of g-jitter on the crystal growth process. A simulation was performed to calculate the system response to a 1 second, 100 micro-g gravity impulse acting normal to the direction of growth. This pulse is consistent with that induced by Orbiter thruster firings. The results obtained indicate that such a gravity pulse causes an increase in the level of radial solute segregation at the interface from the steady state values. The maximum value of solute concentration in the liquid was found to be 13.888 at.%, the minimum value calculated was 13

  10. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  11. Heterogeneous Reaction of ClONO2(g) + NaCl(s) to Cl2(g) + NaNO3(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of ClON02 + NaCl yields Cl2 + NaNO3 (eq 1) was investigated over a temperature range 220-300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer. Partial pressures of ClON02 in the range 10(exp -8) - 10(exp -5) Torr were used. Granule sizes and surface roughness of the NaCl substrates were determined by using a scanning electron microscope, and in separate experiments, surface areas of the substrates were measured by using BET analysis of gas-adsorption isotherms. For dry NaCl substrates, both the decay rates of ClON02 and the growth rates Of C12 were used to obtain reaction probabilities, gamma(sub l) = (4.6 +/- 3.0) x 10(exp -3) at 296 K and (6.7 +/- 3.2) x 10(exp -1) at 225 K, after considering the internal surface area, The error bars represent 1 standard deviation. The Cl2 yield based on the ClONO2 reacted was measured to be 1.0 +/- 0.2. In order to mimic the conditions encountered in the lower stratosphere, the effect of water vapor pressures between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 3 x 10(exp -4) Torr on reaction 1 was also studied. With added H20, reaction probabilities, gamma = (4.1 +/- 2.1) x 10(exp -3) at 296 K and (4.7 +/- 2.9) x 10(exp -3) at 225 K, were obtained. A trace of HOCl, the reaction product from the ClON02 + H20 yield HOCl + HN03 reaction, was observed in addition to the C12 product from reaction 1. The implications of this result for the enhancement of hydrogen chloride in the stratosphere after the El Chichon volcanic eruption and for the marine troposphere are discussed.

  12. The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, Alan; Bruner, M.; Jurcevich, B.; Lemen, J.; Strong, K.; Tarbell, Ted; Wolfson, C. Jacob; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Fisher, R.

    1995-01-01

    The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE) NASA small explorer mission and instrument are presented. The TRACE scientific investigation explores the relationships between fine-scale magnetic fields and the associated solar plasma structures. The instrument collects images of solar plasmas at temperatures from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 7) K with one arcsec spatial resolution. The design specifications of the trace instrument are presented.

  13. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  14. Discovery of X-ray emission associated with the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Nousek, J.; Garmire, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Gum Nebula was observed by the A-2 LED proportional counters on the HEAO-1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. The first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Gum Nebula is reported. Soft X-ray spectra were constructed from the A-2 LED PHA data. Single temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra to yield temperature, column density and emission measure. The temperature is 6 x 10 exp 5 K, the column density 4 x 10 exp 20/sq cm, and the emission measure 5 cm exp-6 pc. The X-ray and optical properties of the Gum Nebula are consistent with a supernova remnant in the shell stage of evolution, which was the product of an energetic (3 x 10 exp 51 ergs) supernova explosion which occurred about 2 x 10 exp 6 yr ago.

  15. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer that 10(exp 4) seconds is limited at present by systematic processes. Researchers discuss the physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors. Based upon estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, they find that the primary internal mechanisms currently limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level parts in 10(exp 15) per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10(exp 16) to parts in 10(exp 15) per day. They discuss strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations.

  16. Observations of X-ray jets with the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Ishido, Yoshinori; Acton, Loren W.; Strong, Keith T.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Uchida, Yutaka; Mcallister, Alan H.; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Tsuneta, Saku; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The features of the multiple X-ray jets in the solar corona, revealed by the time series of the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope images are described. The typical size of a jet was from 5 x 10 exp 3 to 4 x 10 exp 5 km, the translational velocity was 30-300 km/s, and the corresponding kinetic energy was estimated to be from 10 exp 25 to 10 exp 28 erg. Many of the jets were found to be associated with flares in X-ray bright points, emerging flux regions, or active regions, and they sometimes occurred several times from the same X-ray feature. One of the jets associated with a flaring bright point was identified as being an H-alpha surge.

  17. Stratospheric OClO and NO2 measured by groundbased UV/Vis-spectroscopy in Greenland in January and February 1990 and 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, A.; Perner, D.

    1994-01-01

    Groundbased UV/Vis-spectroscopy of zenith scattered sunlight was performed at Sondre Stromfjord (Greenland) during Jan/Feb 1990 and Jan/Feb 1991. Considerable amounts of OClO were observed during both campaigns. Maximum OClO vertical column densities at 92 deg solar zenith angle (SZA) were 7.4 x 10(exp 13) molec/sq cm in 1990 and 5.7 x 10(exp 13) molec/sq cm in 1991 (chemical enhancement is included in the calculation of the air mass factor (AMF)). A threshold seems to exist for OClO detection: OClO was detected on every day when the potential vorticity at the 475 K level of potential temperature was higher than 35 x 10(exp -6)Km(exp 2)kg(exp -1)s(exp -1). NO2 vertical columns lower than 1 x 10(exp 15) molec/sq cm were frequently observed in both winters.

  18. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  19. Microbiological characterization of a regenerative life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. W.; Bruce, R. J.; Mishra, S. K.; Barta, D. J.; Pierson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    A Variable Pressure Plant Growth Chamber (VPGC), at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) ground based Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) test bed, was used to produce crops of soil-grown lettuce. The crops and chamber were analyzed for microbiological diversity during lettuce growth and after harvest. Bacterial counts for the rhizosphere, spent nutrient medium, heat exchanger condensate, and atmosphere were approximately 10(exp 11) Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g, 10(exp 5) CFU/ml, 10(exp 5)CFU/ml, and 600 CFU/m sq, repectively. Pseudomonas was the predominant bacterial genus. Numbers of fungi were about 10(exp 5) CFU/g in the rhizosphere, 4-200 CFU/ml in the spent nutient medium, 110 CFU/ml in the heat exchanger condensate, and 3 CFU/cu m in the atmosphere. Fusarium and Trichoderma were the predominant fungal genera.

  20. Rosat Observations of Nine Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Dewey, D.; Levine, A.; Macri, L.

    1994-01-01

    The ROSAT HRI was used to image fields around nine Galactic globular clusters that have central densities in the range of 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) solar mass pc(exp -3) and that had not previously been observed with the Einstein Observatory. We detected X-ray sources associated with Pal 2 and NGC 6304 with luminosities of 1.1 x 10(exp 34) ergs/s and 1.2 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, respectively. No X-ray emission was detected from the source in Ter 6, thus confirming its transient nature. In all, there were 23 serendipitous sources found in the nine fields; none was apparently associated with any of the other seven clusters. The results are discussed in the context of low-luminosity cluster X-ray sources, in general.

  1. Physical properties and evolutionary time scales of disks around solar-type and intermediate mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen E.; Edwards, Suzan

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations of circumstellar disks and their evolutionary timescales are reviewed. It is concluded that disks appear to be a natural outcome of the star-formation process. The disks surrounding young stars initially are massive, with optically thick structures comprised of gas and micron-sized grains. Disk masses are found to range from 0.01 to 0.2 solar masses for solar-type PMS stars, and from 0.01 to 6 solar masses for young, intermediate mass stars. Massive, optically thick accretion disks have accretion rates between 10 exp -8 and 10 exp -6 solar masses/yr for solar type PMS stars and between 10 exp -6 and 10 exp -4 solar masses/yr for intermediate stars. The results suggest that a significant fraction of the mass comprising the star may have passed through a circumstellar accretion disk.

  2. Line strength and self-broadening coefficient of the pure rotational S(1) quadrupole line in H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The absolute intensity, S(sub 1), and self-broadening coefficient, gamma(sub L), for H2 S(sub zero)(1) pure rotational line at 17.0348 micrometers (587.032 cm(exp -1)) have been measured for the first time using a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a resolution of approximately 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1). By fitting a Galatry line shape convolved with a 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) Gaussian instrument profile to absorption profiles, for H2 pressures ranging from 0.34 to 1.30 atm, values of s(sub 1) = (7.0 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp -8) cm(exp -2) atm(exp -1) and gamma(sub L) = (1.73 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) were obtained.

  3. Boeing F4B-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The Boeing F4B-4 was seen to differ from earlier F4Bs in having a vertical fin with slightly more area. The Boeing model 235 was not fitted with a NACA cowling, but rather the less efficient 'Townend' ring around the Pratt & Whitney Wasp radials cylinders. This aircraft was much used by both the Navy and the Army Air Corps in the late 1920's and early 1930's. The Army variation was known as the P-12E. The engine cowling was a British development known as the 'Townend' ring. It differed from the NACA cowling and was less effective in reducing the drag.

  4. Modelling Temporal Variability in the Carbon Balance of a Spruce/Moss Boreal Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolking, S.; Goulden, M. L.; Wofsy, S. C.; Fan, S.-M.; Sutton, D. J.; Munger, J. W.; Bazzaz, A. M.; Daube, B. C.; Crill, P. M.; Aber, J. D.; Band, L. E.; Wang, X.; Savages, K.; Moore, T.; Harriss, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A model of the daily carbon balance of a black spruce/feathermoss boreal forest ecosystem was developed and results compared to preliminary data from the 1994 BOREAS field campaign in northern Manitoba, Canada. The model, driven by daily weather conditions, simulated daily soil climate status (temperature and moisture profiles), spruce photosynthesis and respiration, moss photosynthesis and respiration, and litter decomposition. Model agreement with preliminary field data was good for net ecosystem exchange (NEE), capturing both the asymmetrical seasonality and short-term variability. During the growing season simulated daily NEE ranged from -4 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) (carbon uptake by ecosystem) to + 2 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) (carbon flux to atmosphere), with fluctuations from day to day. In the early winter simulated NEE values were + 0.5 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1), dropping to + 0.2 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1) in mid-winter. Simulated soil respiration during the growing season (+ 1 to + 5 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1)) was dominated by metabolic respiration of the live moss, with litter decomposition usually contributing less than 30% and live spruce root respiration less than 10% of the total. Both spruce and moss net primary productivity (NPP) rates were higher in early summer than late summer. Simulated annual NEE for 1994 was -51 g C m(exp -2) y(exp -1), with 83% going into tree growth and 17% into the soil carbon accumulation. Moss NPP (58 g C m(exp -2) d(exp -1)) was considered to be litter (i.e. soil carbon input; no net increase in live moss biomass). Ecosystem respiration during the snow-covered season (84 g Cm(exp -2)) was 58% of the growing season net carbon uptake. A simulation of the same site for 1968-1989 showed about 10-20% year-to-year variability in heterotrophic respiration (mean of + 113 g C m-2 y@1). Moss NPP ranged from 19 to 114 g C m(exp -2) y(exp -1); spruce NPP from 81 to 150 g C nt-2 y,@l; spruce growth (NPP minus litterfall) from 34 to 103 g C m(exp

  5. The fate of atmospheric phosgene and the stratospheric chlorine loadings of its parent compounds: CCl4, C2Cl4, C2HCL3, CH3CCl3, and CHCl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, T. P.; Chameides, W. L.; Wine, P. H.; Cunnold, D. M.; Alyea, F. N.; Franklin, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    of reaction of phosgene with sulfate aerosols. However, on the basis of the observed vertical distribution of COCl2, we estimate that the reaction of COCl2 with sulfate aerosol most likely has a gamma less than 5 x 10(exp -5) and, as a result, has a negligible impact on the stratospheric chlorine loadings of the phosgene parent compounds.

  6. A Hot-electron Direct Detector for Radioastronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McGrath, William R.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Gershenson, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    A hot-electron transition-edge superconducting bolometer with adjustable thermal relaxation speed is proposed. The bolometer contacts are made from a superconductor with high critical temperature which blocks the thermal diffusion of hot carriers into the contacts. Thus electron-phonon interaction is the only mechanism for heat removal. The speed of thermal relaxation for hot electrons in a nanometer-size superconducting bolometer with T(sub c) = 100-300 mK is controlled by the elastic electron mean free path l. The relaxation rate behaves as T(sup 4)l at subkelvin temperatures and can be reduced by a factor of 10-100 by decreasing 1. Then an antenna- or wave guide-coupled bolometer with a time constant approx. = 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) s will exhibit photon-noise limited performance at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The bolometer will have a figure-of-merit NEPtau = 10(exp -22) - 10(exp -21) W/Hz at 100 mK which is 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) times better (ie: smaller) than that of a state-of-the-art bolometer. A tremendous increase in speed and sensitivity will have a significant impact for observational mapping applications.

  7. 4-Aminopyridine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - Aminopyridine ; CASRN 504 - 24 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  8. 4-Methylphenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - Methylphenol ; CASRN 106 - 44 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  9. Formation, early evolution, and gravitational stability of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamoto, Taishi; Nakagawa, Yoshitsugo

    1994-01-01

    The formation, viscous evolution, and gravitational stability of protoplanetary disks are investigated. The formation process is parameterized by the angular velocity of the molecular cloud core omega, while the viscous evolution is parameterized by the viscosity parameter alpha in the disk; in this study we consider a range of (0.4-6) x 10(exp -14)/s for omega and from 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -1) for alpha. The axisymmetric gravitational stabilities of the disks are checked using Toomre's criterion. The resulting disk surface temperature distribution, (d log T(sub s)/d log R) approximately = -0.6 (R is the cylindrical radius), can be attributed to two heating sources: the viscous heating dominant in the inner disk region, and the accretion shock heating dominant in the outer disk region. This surface temperature distribution matches that observed in many disks around young stellar objects. During the infall stage, disks with alpha less than 10(exp -1.5) become gravitationally unstable independent of omega. The gravitational instabilities occur at radii ranging from 5 to 40 AU. The ratio of the disk mass to the central star mass ranges from 0.2 to 0.5 at the times of instability, about 4 x 10(exp -5) x (omega/10(exp -14)/s)(exp -0.67) yr. Most disks with low alpha and high omega become gravitationally unstable during their formation phase.

  10. Charge Transfer Between Ground-State N(2+) and H2, N2, and CO at Electron-Volt Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The charge-transfer rate coefficients for reactions of N(2+)(2 S(sup 2)2p(sup 2)P(sup 0)) with H2, N2, and CO are measured using ion storage. A cylindrical rf ion trap was used to store N(2+) ions produced by laser ablation of a solid titanium nitride target. The rate coefficients were derived from the decay rate of the ion signal. The rate coefficients for the above three reactions are 3.38(0.35) x 10(exp -11)sq sm/s at T(sub equiv.)=2.9 x 10(exp 3) K, 2.10(0.18) x 10(exp -9)sq sm/s at T(sub equiv.) = 1.3 x 10(exp 4) K, and 3.37(0.29) x 10(exp -9)sq cm/s at T(sub equiv.) = 1.3 x 10(exp 4) K, respectively. No theoretical or other experimental values are available at this energy range.

  11. 17 CFR 4.2-4.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 4.2-4.4 Section 4.2-4.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions and Exemptions §§ 4.2-4.4...

  12. 17 CFR 4.2-4.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 4.2-4.4 Section 4.2-4.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions and Exemptions §§ 4.2-4.4...

  13. 17 CFR 4.2-4.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 4.2-4.4 Section 4.2-4.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions and Exemptions §§ 4.2-4.4...

  14. 17 CFR 4.2-4.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false 4.2-4.4 Section 4.2-4.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions and Exemptions §§ 4.2-4.4...

  15. 17 CFR 4.2-4.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 4.2-4.4 Section 4.2-4.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS General Provisions, Definitions and Exemptions §§ 4.2-4.4...

  16. Stability Characteristics of Two Missiles of Fineness Ratios 12 and 18 with Six Rectangular Fins of Very Low Aspect Ratio Over a Mach Number Range of 1.4 to 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, Allen B.

    1959-01-01

    Two rocket-propelled missiles have been test flown by the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division in order to study the stability characteristics of a body with six rectangular fins of very low aspect ratio. The fins, which had exposed aspect ratios of approximately o.o4 and 0.02 per fin, were mounted on bodies of fineness ratios of 12 and 18, respectively. Each body had a nose with a fineness ratio of 3.5 and a cylindrical afterbody. The body and the fin chord of the model having a fineness ratio of 12 were extended the length of 6 body diameters to produce the model with a fineness ratio of 18. The missiles were disturbed in flight by pulse rockets in order to obtain the stability data. The tests were performed over a Mach number range of 1.4 to 3.2 and a Reynolds number range of 2 x 10(exp 6) to 21 x l0(exp 6). The results of these tests indicate that these configurations with the long rectangular fins of very low aspect ratio showed little induced roll" with the missile of highest fineness ratio and longest fin chord exhibiting the least amount. Extending the body and fin chord of the shorter missile six body diameters and thereby increasing the fin area approximately 115 percent increased the lift-curve slope based on body cross-sectional area approximately 40 to 55 percent, increased the dynamic stability by a substantial amount, and increased the drag from 14 to 33 percent throughout the comparable Mach number range. The center-of-pressure location of both missiles remained constant over the Mach number range.

  17. Evaluation of Several Space Lubricants using a Vacuum Four-Ball Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Poslowski, Agnieszka K.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of seven space lubricants was investigated under boundary lubrication conditions using a vacuum four-ball tribometer. Three of the lubricants were perfluoropolyethers (143AC, S-200, and Z-25). Three were synthetic hydrocarbons (a multiply alkylated cyclopentane, 2001a), and a formulated version with an antiwear and an antioxidant additive (2001). The third hydrocarbon was an unformulated polyalphaolefin (PAO-100). An unformulated silahydrocarbon (SiHC) was also evaluated. Test conditions included: a pressure less than 6.7 x 10(exp 4) Pa, a 200 N load, a sliding velocity of 28.8 mm/sec (100 RPM), and room temperature (approx. 23 C). The wear rate for each lubricant was determined from the slope of wear volume as a function of sliding distance. The lowest wear rate (0.033 x 10(exp-9) cu mm/mm) was obtained with the silahydrocarbon. The formulated synthetic hydrocarbon had a wear rate off O.037 x 10(exp -9)cu mm/mm, which was a 36% reduction compared to the unformulated fluid. The polyalphaolefin had the highest wear rate of the non-PFPE fluids. Of the perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs), wear rates decreased by about 50% from Z-25 (1.7 x 10(exp -9)cu mm/mm) to S-200 (0.70 x 10(exp -9)cu mm/mm) to 143AC (0.21 x 10(exp -9)cu mm/mm).

  18. Pyridine-4-carbaldehyde 4-phenylsemicarbazone

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Meroño, Rafael; Menéndez-Taboada, Laura; Fernández-Zapico, Eva; García-Granda, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C13H12N4O, the semicarbazone fragment links a benzene and a pyridine ring in the structure. The crystal packing is stabilized by strong inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which connect two mol­ecules to form a synthon unit, and by N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯π inter­actions. The mol­ecular conformation is stabil­ized by intra­molecular N—H⋯N and C—H⋯O inter­actions. PMID:21754444

  19. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3) sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp 11)/cc cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A)) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, O, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/ s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24)/ s, respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Iono- spheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show

  20. Environmental Perturbations Caused by the Impacts of Asteroids and Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Zahnle, Kevin; Morrison, David; Turco, Richard; Covey, Curt

    1997-01-01

    We review the major mechanisms proposed to cause extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary geological boundary following an asteroid impact. We then discuss how the proposed extinction may relate to the impact of asteroids or comets in general. We discuss the limitations of these mechanisms in terms of the spatial scale that may be affected, and the time scale over which the effects may last. Our goal is to provide relatively simple prescriptions for evaluating the importance of colliding objects having a range of energies and compositions. We also identify the many uncertainties concerning the environmental effects of impacts. We conclude that, for impact energies below about 10(exp 4) Mts (megatons of TNT equivalent) - i.e., impact frequencies less than in 6 x 10(exp 4) yr, corresponding to comets and asteroids with diameters smaller than about 400 m and 650 m, respectively - blast damage, earthquakes, and fires should be important on a scale of 10(exp 4) or 10(exp 5) km (exp 2), which corresponds to the area damaged in many natural disasters of recent history. However, tsunami could be more damaging, flooding a kilometer of coastal plane over entire ocean basins. In the energy range of 10(exp 4) to 10 (exp 5) Mts (intervals up to 3 x 10(exp 5) yr; comets and asteroids with sizes up to 800 m and 1.5 km, respectively) water vapor injections and ozone loss become significant on the global scale. In the submicrometer dust injection fraction from the pulverized target material is much higher than is presently thought to be most likely, then dust injection could be important in this energy range.

  1. Electrical characterization of 6H crystalline silicon carbide. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempner, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    Crystalline silicon carbide (SiC) substrates and epilayers, undoped as well as n- and p-doped, have been electrically characterized by performing Hall effect and resistivity measurements (van der Pauw) over the temperature range of approximately 85 K to 650 K (200 K to 500 K for p-type sample). By fitting the measured temperature dependent carrier concentration data to the single activation energy theoretical model: (1) the activation energy for the nitrogen donor ranged from 0.078 eV to 0.101 eV for a doping concentration range of 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3) to 10(exp 18) cm(exp -3) and (2) the activation energy for the aluminum acceptor was 0.252 eV for a doping concentration of 4.6 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -3). By fitting the measured temperature dependent carrier concentration data to the double activation energy level theoretical model for the nitrogen donor: (1) the activation energy for the hexagonal site was 0.056 eV and 0.093 eV corresponding to doping concentrations of 3.33 x 10 (exp 17) cm(exp -3) and 1.6 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -3) and (2) the activation energy for the cubic site was 0.113 and 0.126 eV corresponding to doping concentrations of 4.2 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3) and 5.4 x 10(exp 18) cm(exp -3).

  2. An Investigation of Wing and Aileron Loads Due to Deflected Inboard and Outboard Ailerons on a 4-Percent-Thick 30 deg Sweptback Wing at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, Charles F.; Critzos, Chris C.; Brown, Philippa F.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the changes in wing loading characteristics due to deflections of a plain faired flap-type inboard aileron, a plain faired flap-type outboard aileron, and a slab-sided thickened trailing edge outboard aileron. The test wing was 4 percent thick and had 30 sweep of the quarter chord, an aspect ratio of 3.0, a taper ratio of 0.2, and NACA 65A004 airfoil sections. The loading characteristics of the deflected ailerons were also investigated. The model was a sting-mounted wing-body combination, and pressure measurements over one wing panel (exposed area) and the ailerons were obtained for angles of attack from 0 to 20 at deflections up to +/- 15 deg for Mach numbers between 0.80 and 1.03. The test Reynolds number based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord was about 7.4 x 10(exp 6). The results of the investigation indicated that positive deflection of the plain faired flap-type inboard aileron caused significant added loading over the wing sections outboard of the aileron at all Mach numbers for model angles of attack from 0 deg or 4 deg up to 12 deg. Positive deflection of the two outboard ailerons (plain faired and slab sided with thickened trailing edge) caused significant added loading over the wing sections inboard of the ailerons for different model angle-of-attack ranges at the several test Mach numbers. The loading shapes over the ailerons were irregular and would be difficult to predict from theoretical considerations in the transonic speed range. The longitudinal and lateral center-of-pressure locations for the ailerons varied only slightly with increasing angle of attack and/or Mach number. Generally, the negative slopes of the variations of aileron hinge-moment coefficient with aileron deflection for all three ailerons varied similarly with Mach number at the test angles of attack.

  3. Microwave Conductivity of Laser Ablated YBa2Cu3O7-delta Superconducting Films and Its Relation to Microstrip Transmission Line Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Chorey, C. M.; Ebihara, B. T.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.

    1990-01-01

    We report on the values of the microwave conductivity in the normal (sigma(subN)) and superconducting (sigma*=sigma(sub1)-j sigma(sub2)) states of two laser ablated YBa2CU3O7(sigma) thin films at 35 GHz, in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The films 0.7 and 0.4 micrometers) were deposited on LaA10(sub3) by laser ablation. The conductivity was obtained from the microwave power transmitted through the films and assuming a two-fluid model. Values of sigma(subN) approximately 2.3 X 10(exp5) S/m at room temperature for both films, and of sigma(sub1) approximately 6.3 X 10(exp5) and 4.6 X 10(exp5) S/m at temperatures around 80 K were obtained for the 0.7 and 0.4 micrometer films respectively. For sigma(sub2) values of 4.9 X 10(exp6) and 5.4 X 10(exp6) S/m were obtained for the 0.7 and 0.4 micrometer films at 80 K. The expected conductor losses and Q-factor of a superconducting ring resonator were calculated using these conductivity values. The theoretical values were then compared with the experimental results obtained for a resonator fabricated from one of these films.

  4. Is HL Tauri and FU Orionis system in quiescence?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Hayashi, M.; Bell, K. R.; Ohashi, N.

    1994-01-01

    A recent Nobeyama map of HL Tau reveals that gas is infalling in a flattened region approximately 1400 AU around the central star. The apparent motion of the gas provides the necessary condition for the formation of a Keplerian disk with a radius comparable to the size of the primordial solar nebula. The inferred mass infall rate onto the disk is approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr, which greatly exceeds the maximum estimate of the accretion rate onto the central star (approximately 7 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr). Consequently, mass must currently be accumulating in the disk. The estimated age and disk mass of HL Tau suggest that the accumulated matter has been flushed repeatedly on a timescale less than 10(exp 4) yr. Based on the similarites between their evolution patterns, we propose that HL Tau is an FU Orionis system in quiescence. In addition to HL Tau, 14 out of 86 pre-main-sequence stars in the Taurus-Auriga dark clouds have infrared luminosities much greater than their otherwise normal extinction-corrected stellar luminosities. These sources also tend to have flat spectra which may be due to the reprocessing of radiation by dusty, flattened, collapsing envelopes with infall rates a few 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr. Such rates are much larger than estimated central accretion rates for these systems, which suggests that mass must also be accumulating in these disks. If these sources are FU Orionis stars in quiescence, similar to HL Tau, their age and relative abundance imply that the FU Orionis phase occurs over a timescale of approixmately 10(exp 5) yr, and the quiescent phase between each outburst lasts approximately 10(exp 3) =10(exp 4) yr. These inferred properties are compatible with the scenario that FU Orionis outbursts are regulated by a thermal instability in the inner region of the disk.

  5. Measurements of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a 15 deg. Cone in Free Flight at Supersonic Mach Numbers up to 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Charles B.; Lee, Dorothy B.

    1961-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made at several stations on the 15 deg total-angle conical nose of a rocket-propelled model in free flight at Mach numbers up to 5.2. Data are presented for a range of local Mach number just outside the boundary layer from 1.40 to 4.65 and a range of local Reynolds number from 3.8 x 10(exp 6) to 46.5 x 10(exp 6), based on length from the nose tip to a measurement station. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were measured. The laminar data were in agreement with laminar theory for cones, and the turbulent data agreed well with turbulent theory for cones using Reynolds number based on length from the nose tip. At a nearly constant ratio of wall to local static temperature of 1.2 the Reynolds number of transition increased from 14 x 10(exp 6) to 30 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased from 1.4 to 2.9 and then decreased to 17 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased to 3.7. At Mach numbers near 3.5, transition Reynolds numbers appeared to be independent of skin temperature at skin temperatures very cold with respect to adiabatic wall temperature. The transition Reynolds number was 17.7 x 10(exp 6) at a condition of Mach number and ratio of wall to local static temperature near that for which three-dimensional disturbance theory has been evaluated and has predicted laminar boundary-layer stability to very high Reynolds numbers (approximately 10(exp 12)).

  6. X-ray-emitting gas surrounding the spiral galaxy NGC 891

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Pidis, Rachel A.

    1994-01-01

    We observed the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891 with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) to search for how extraplanar gas expected in the galactic fountain model. Diffuse X-ray emission surrounds the disk with a Half Width at Half Maximum (HWHM) for the surface brightness perpendicular to the disk of 50 sec (2.4 kpc) and a radial extent of approximately 6.5 kpc, both of which are similar in extent to the extended H(alpha) and radio halo component; the implied density scale height for the hot gas is 7 kpc. The spectrum is best fitted with a hard stellar component and a soft diffuse gas component of temperature 3.6 x 10(exp 6) K. The density of this gas is 2 x 10(exp -3)/cu cm, the luminosity is 4.4 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, the mass is 1 x 10(exp 8) solar mass, and the pressure (P/k) is 1.4 10(exp 4) K/cu cm. These data are consistent with this gas participating in a galactic fountain, where the material approaches hydrostatic equilibrium before cooling at a rate of 0.12 solar mass/yr. The cooled material may be responsible for some of the H(alpha) emission.

  7. Absorption of water and lubricating oils into porous nylon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Oil and water absorption from air into sintered porous nylon can be described by infiltration into the pores of the material. This process can be modeled by a diffusion-like mechanism. For water absorption, we find a formal diffusion coefficient of 1.5 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min when the nylon is initially dry. The diffusion coefficient is 4 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min when the nylon is oil-impregnated prior to air exposure. In a 52% RH atmosphere, dry nylon absorbs 3% w/w water, and oil-impregnated nylon absorbs 0.6% w/w water. For oil absorption there are three steps: (1) surface absorption and infiltration into (2) larger and (3) smaller pores. Surface absorption is too fast to be measured in these experiments. The diffusion coefficient for the second step is 6 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for SRG-60 oil into dry nylon and 4 x 10(exp -4)sq cm/min for air-equilibrated nylon. The diffusion coefficient for the third step is about 1 x 10(exp -6)sq cm/min for both cases. The total amount of oil absorbed is 31% w/w. The interaction between water and nylon is not as strong as that between water and cotton-phenolic: oil can replace water, and only a small amount of water can enter previously oil-impregnated nylon.

  8. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3)sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8)x IO(exp 11)/cu cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, 0, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24), respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Ionospheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show that there

  9. Comparative Studies for the Sodium and Potassium Atmospheres of the Moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A summary discussion of recent sodium and potassium observations for the atmospheres of the Moon and Mercury is presented with primary emphasis on new full-disk images that have become available for sodium. For the sodium atmosphere, image observations for both the Moon and Mercury are fitted with model calculations (1) that have the same source speed distribution, one recently measured for electron-stimulated desorption and thought to apply equally well to photon-stimulated desorption, (2) that have similar average surface sodium fluxes, about 2.8 x 10(exp 5) to 8.9 x 10(exp 5) atoms cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) for the Moon and approximately 3.5 x 10(exp 5) to 1.4 x 10(exp 6) atoms cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) for Mercury, but (3) that have very different distributions for the source surface area. For the Moon, a sunlit hemispherical surface source of between approximately 5.3 x 10(exp 22) to 1.2 x 10(exp 23) atoms/s is required with a spatial dependence at least as sharp as the square of the cosine of the solar zenith angle. For Mercury, a time dependent source that varies from 1.5 x 10(exp 22) to 5.8 x l0(exp 22) atoms/s is required which is confined to a small surface area located at, but asymmetrically distributed about, the subsolar point. The nature of the Mercury source suggest that the planetary magnetopause near the subsolar point acts as a time varying and partially protective shield through which charged particles may pass to interact with and liberate gas from the planetary surface. Suggested directions for future research activities are discussed.

  10. Microorganisms, Organic Carbon, and Their Relationship with Oxidant Activity in Hyper-Arid Mars-Like Soils: Implications for Soil Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Karouia, Fathi; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Soil samples from the hyper-arid region in the Atacama 23 Desert in Southern Peru (La Joya Desert) were analyzed for total and labile organic carbon (TOC & LOC), phospholipid fatty acids analysis (PLFA), quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 4',6- diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-fluorescent microscopy, culturable microorganisms, and oxidant activity, in order to understand the relationship between the presence of organic matter and microorganisms in these types of soils. TOC content levels were similar to the labile pool of carbon suggesting the absence of recalcitrant carbon in these soils. The range of LOC was from 2 to 60 micro-g/g of soil. PLFA analysis indicated a maximum of 2.3 x 10(exp 5) cell equivalents/g. Culturing of soil extracts yielded 1.1 x 10(exp 2)-3.7 x 10(exp 3) CFU/g. qRT-PCR showed between 1.0 x 10(exp 2) and 8 x 10(exp 3) cells/g; and DAPI fluorescent staining indicated bacteria counts up to 5 x 104 cells/g. Arid and semiarid samples (controls) showed values between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 11) cells/g with all of the methods used. Importantly, the concentration of microorganisms in hyper-arid soils did not show any correlation with the organic carbon content; however, there was a significant dependence on the oxidant activity present in these soil samples evaluated as the capacity to decompose sodium formate in 10 hours. We suggest that the analysis of oxidant activity could be a useful indicator of the microbial habitability in hyper-arid soils, obviating the need to measure water activity over time. This approach could be useful in astrobiological studies on other worlds.

  11. Infrared Measurements of Atmospheric Gases Above Mauna Loa, Hawaii, in February 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.02/ cm resolution from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) program station at Mauna Loa, Hawaii (latitude 19.5 deg N, longitude 155.6 deg W, elevation 3.40 km), in February 1997 have been analyzed to determine simultaneous total vertical column amounts for 13 atmospheric gases. Average tropospheric concentrations of CO2, N2O, CH4, and CHCIF2 and the daytime diurnal variations or the total columns of NO and NO2 have also been inferred. The retrieved total columns (in molecules /sq cm) of the nondiurnally varying gases are 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 15) for HCl, 5.9 +/- 1.2 x 10(exp 15) for HNO3, 2.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 21) for H2O16, 4.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(exp 18) for H2O18, 2.7 +/- 0.1 x 10(exp 17) for HDO, 2.3 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 19) for CH4, 5.0 +/- 0.5 x 10(exp 21) for CO2, 6.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(exp 18) for O3, 4.3 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp 18) for N2O, 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp 16) for C2H6, and 9.7 +/- 2.5 x 10(exp 14) for CHClF2. We compare the total column measurements of HCl and HNO3 with previously reported ground-based, aircraft, and satellite measurements. The results for HCl are or particular interest because of the expected temporal increase in the concentration of this gas in the stratosphere. However, systematic differences among stratospheric HCl total column measurements from 1978 to 1980 and the absence of observations of free tropospheric HCl above Mauna Loa make it impossible to obtain a reliable estimate of the trend in the total burden of HCl. The measured HNO3 total column is consistent with aircraft measurements from approx. 12 km altitude. The O3 total column deduced from the IR spectra agrees with correlative Mauna Loa Umkehr measurements within the estimated error limits. The column-averaged D/H ratio of water vapor is (68 +/- 9) x- 10(exp -6), which is 0.44 +/- 0.06 times the reference value of 155.76 x 10(exp -6) for standard mean ocean water (SMOW). This

  12. X-ray Characterization of Detached-Grown Germanium Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Szoke, J.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2005-01-01

    Germanium (111)-oriented crystals have been grown by the vertical Bridgman technique, in both detached and attached configurations. Microstructural characterization of these crystals has been performed using synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) and double axis x-ray diffraction. Dislocation densities were measured from x-ray topographs obtained using the reflection geometry. For detached-grown crystals, the dislocation density is 4-6 x 10(exp 4) per square centimeter in the seed region, and decreases in the direction of growth to less than 10(exp 3) per square centimeter, and in some crystals reaches less than 10(exp 2) per square centimeter. For crystals grown in the attached configuration, dislocation densities were on the order of 10(exp 4) per square centimeter in the middle of the crystals, increasing to greater than 10(exp 5) per square centimeter near the edge. The measured dislocation densities are in excellent agreement with etch pit density results. The rocking curve linewidths were relatively insensitive to the dislocation densities. However, broadening and splitting of the rocking curves were observed in the vicinity of subgrain boundaries identified by x-ray topography in some of the attached-grown crystals.

  13. Long-term survival of bacterial spores in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horneck, G.; Bucker, H.; Reitz, G.

    1994-01-01

    On board of the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), spores of Bacillus subtilis in monolayers (10(exp 6)/sample) or multilayers (10(exp 8)/sample) were exposed to the space environment for nearly six years and their survival was analyzed after retrieval. The response to space parameters, such as vacuum (10(exp -6) Pa), solar electromagnetic radiation up to the highly energetic vacuum-ultraviolet range 10(exp 9) J/sq m) and/or cosmic radiation (4.8 Gy), was studied and compared to the results of a simultaneously running ground control experiment. If shielded against solar ultraviolet (UV)-radiation, up to 80% of spores in multilayers survive in space. Solar UV-radiation, being the most deleterious parameter of space, reduces survival by 4 orders of magnitude or more. However, up to 10(exp 4) viable spores were still recovered, even in completely unprotected samples. Substances, such as glucose or buffer salts serve as chemical protectants. With this 6 year study in space, experimental data are provided to the discussion on the likelihood of 'Panspermia'.

  14. 4. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 4 OF 4 PART PANORAMA WITH ...

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    4. SITE OVERVIEW. PART 4 OF 4 PART PANORAMA WITH NOS. CA-265-1 TO CA-265-3. INTERCHANGE OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY, INTERSTATE 1-5, AND FIGUEROA STREET AT CROSSINGS OF THE LOS ANGELES RIVER AS SEEN FROM GRAND VIEW POINT IN ELYSIAN PARK. VIEW 4 SHOWS LOS ANGELES RIVER. LOOKING 140° SE. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Los Angeles to Pasadena, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance appraisal. 4.2 Section 4.2 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE AND UTILIZATION § 4.2 Performance appraisal. (a) The GAO shall develop one or more performance appraisal systems which provide for...

  16. 10 CFR 4.4 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 4.4 Section 4.4 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... eligibility for Federal financial assistance; “application” means such an application, request, or plan....

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training. 4.1 Section 4.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE AND UTILIZATION § 4.1 Training. The provisions of chapter 41, of title 5, United States Code, and Office of Personnel Management implementing...

  18. Material properties and device evaluations of ECR-deposited a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Essick, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Device-quality a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films have been deposited using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasmas of SiH4, CH4, and H2 mixtures. Typical material properties of ECR-deposited, photosensitive a-Si:H films are: (1) high photosensitivity up to 2 x 106 with a photoconductivity of 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -4/(Ohm-cm), (2) a Tauc gap of 1.75 to 1.85 eV, (3) an Urbach slope of 50-60 meV determined by the constant photocurrent method, and (4) an integrated defect density of 1-2 x 10 exp 16/cu cm determined by junction capacitance measurements. Highly conductive, p-type a-SiC:H films have been produced by ECR plasmas with a conductivity of 0.2/(Ohm-cm).

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics and pressure distributions for an executive-jet baseline airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1993-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an executive-jet baseline airfoil model was conducted in the adaptive-wall test section of the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The primary goal of the test was to measure airfoil aerodynamic characteristics over a wide range of flow conditions that encompass two design points. The two design Mach numbers were 0.654 and 0.735 with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 4.5 x 10(exp 6) and 8.9 x 10(exp 6) based on chord, respectively, and normal-force coefficients of 0.98 and 0.51, respectively. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.250 to 0.780 and a chord Reynolds number range from 3 x 10(exp 6) to 18 x 10(exp 6). The angle of attack was varied from -2 deg to a maximum below 10 deg with one exception in which the maximum was 14 deg for a Mach number of 0.250 at a chord Reynolds number of 4.5 x 10(exp 6). Boundary-layer transition was fixed at 5 percent of chord on both the upper and lower surfaces of the model for most of the test. The adaptive-wall test section had flexible top and bottom walls and rigid sidewalls. Wall interference was minimized by the movement of the adaptive walls, and the airfoil aerodynamic characteristics were corrected for any residual top and bottom wall interference.

  20. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  1. A search for gamma-ray lines from the decay of Fe-59 in Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, M. J.; Leising, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched spectra of Supernova (SN) 1987A, accumulated during several 35-day intervals after the explosion by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), for gamma-ray lines at 1.099 and 1.292 MeV from the decay of Fe-59 which may have been produced in the progenitor's helium shell. We find no evidence for these lines, down to 3-sigma upper limits approximately = 7 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.099 MeV line, or approximately = 4.5 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.292 MeV line, in any 35-day interval. We derive a conservative 3-sigma upper limit on the mass fraction of Fe-59 in the helium shell of 2.9 x 10(exp -3).

  2. Electron Field Emission Properties of Textured Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.

    2002-01-01

    During ground tests of electric microthrusters and space tests of electrodynamic tethers the electron emitters must successfully operate at environmental pressures possibly as high as 1x10(exp -4) Pa. High partial pressures of oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor are expected in such environments. A textured platinum surface was used in this work for field emission cathode assessments because platinum does not form oxide films at low temperatures. Although a reproducible cathode conditioning process did not evolve from this work, some short term tests for periods of 1 to 4 hours showed no degradation of emission current at an electric field of 8 V/mm and background pressures of about 1x10(exp -6) Pa. Increases of background pressure by air flow to about 3x10(exp -4) Pa yield a hostile environment for the textured platinum field emission cathode.

  3. Micromechanical and Electrical Properties of Monolithic Aluminum Nitride at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    Micromechanical spectroscopy of aluminum nitride reveals it to possess extremely low background internal friction at less than 1 x 10 (exp -4) logarithmic decrement (log dec.) from 20 to 1200 C. Two mechanical loss peaks were observed, the first at 350 C approximating a single Debye peak with a peak height of 60 x 10 (exp -4) log dec. The second peak was seen at 950 C with a peak height of 20 x 10 (exp -4) log dec. and extended from 200 to over 1200 C. These micromechanical observations manifested themselves in the electrical behavior of these materials. Electrical conduction processes were predominately intrinsic. Both mechanical and electrical relaxations appear to be thermally activated processes, with activation energies of 0.78 and 1.32 eV respectively.

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  5. Rosat observations of FK comae berenices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    We obtained ROSAT PSPC observations of FK Com over a period of 24.4 h, or 0.42 rotation. During the observations the x-ray flux increased by a factor of at least 5 before declining toward its previous level. A single temperature Raymond-Smith model is adequate to model the low signal-to-noise ratio spectrum from each observation interval. Initially the spectrum was that of a 8.5 x 10(exp 6) K plasma, with L9sub x)=0.66 x 10(exp 31) erg s(exp -1). When the x-ray flux was greatest, the model plasma temperature rose to 2.5 x 10(exp 7) K, and L(sub x)=3.46 x 10(exp 31) ergs(exp -1). During the post-maximum decline in luminosity the plasma temperature was approximately 12 x 10(exp 6) K. We conclude that the increase of x-ray flux recorded by ROSAT was due to an x-ray flare with a 1.5 h decline time scale.

  6. Optimal and Local Connectivity Between Neuron and Synapse Array in the Quantum Dot/Silicon Brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Assad, Christopher; Thakoor, Anikumar P.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is used to connect between synapse and neuron arrays using nanowire in quantum dot and metal in CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology to enable the density of a brain-like connection in hardware. The hardware implementation combines three technologies: 1. Quantum dot and nanowire-based compact synaptic cell (50x50 sq nm) with inherently low parasitic capacitance (hence, low dynamic power approx.l0(exp -11) watts/synapse), 2. Neuron and learning circuits implemented in 50-nm CMOS technology, to be integrated with quantum dot and nanowire synapse, and 3. 3D stacking approach to achieve the overall numbers of high density O(10(exp 12)) synapses and O(10(exp 8)) neurons in the overall system. In a 1-sq cm of quantum dot layer sitting on a 50-nm CMOS layer, innovators were able to pack a 10(exp 6)-neuron and 10(exp 10)-synapse array; however, the constraint for the connection scheme is that each neuron will receive a non-identical 10(exp 4)-synapse set, including itself, via its efficacy of the connection. This is not a fully connected system where the 100x100 synapse array only has a 100-input data bus and 100-output data bus. Due to the data bus sharing, it poses a great challenge to have a complete connected system, and its constraint within the quantum dot and silicon wafer layer. For an effective connection scheme, there are three conditions to be met: 1. Local connection. 2. The nanowire should be connected locally, not globally from which it helps to maximize the data flow by sharing the same wire space location. 3. Each synapse can have an alternate summation line if needed (this option is doable based on the simple mask creation). The 10(exp 3)x10(exp 3)-neuron array was partitioned into a 10-block, 10(exp 2)x10(exp 3)-neuron array. This building block can be completely mapped within itself (10,000 synapses to a neuron).

  7. Can Asian Dust Trigger Phytoplankton Blooms in the Oligotrophic Northern South China Sea?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng Hsiang; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Huang, Shih-Jen; Lau, William K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite data estimate a high dust deposition flux (approximately 18 g m(exp-2 a(exp-1) into the northern South China Sea (SCS). However, observational evidence concerning any biological response to dust fertilization is sparse. In this study, we combined long-term aerosol and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) measurements from satellite sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) with a 16-year record of dust events from surface PM10 observations to investigate dust transport, flux, and the changes in Chl-a concentration over the northern SCS. Our result revealed that readily identifiable strong dust events over this region, although relatively rare (6 cases since 1994) and accounting for only a small proportion of the total dust deposition (approximately 0.28 g m(exp-2 a(exp-1), do occur and could significantly enhance phytoplankton blooms. Following such events, the Chl-a concentration increased up to 4-fold, and generally doubled the springtime background value (0.15 mg m(exp-3). We suggest these heavy dust events contain readily bioavailable iron and enhance the phytoplankton growth in the oligotrophic northern SCS.

  8. Precision Mass Property Measurements Using a Five-Wire Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring the moment of inertia of an object using a five-wire torsion pendulum design is described here. Typical moment of inertia measurement devices are capable of 1 part in 10(exp 3) accuracy and current state of the art techniques have capabilities of about one part in 10(exp 4). The five-wire apparatus design shows the prospect of improving on current state of the art. Current measurements using a laboratory prototype indicate a moment of inertia measurement precision better than a part in 10(exp 4). In addition, the apparatus is shown to be capable of measuring the mass center offset from the geometric center. Typical mass center measurement devices exhibit a measurement precision up to approximately 1 micrometer. Although the five-wire pendulum was not originally designed for mass center measurements, preliminary results indicate an apparatus with a similar design may have the potential of achieving state of the art precision.

  9. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, V. E.; Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Rogers, F. J.; Iglesias, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results from the simulation of convective photospheres of neutron stars are presented. It is shown that in photospheres composed of light elements, convection arises at relatively low effective temperatures of between 3 x 10(exp 4) and 5 x 10(exp 4) K, whereas, in the case of iron composition, it arises at temperatures of less than or equal to 3 x 10(exp 5) K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. It is concluded that depth should be taken into account for the correct interpretation of extreme ultraviolet/soft X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  10. The effect of fluctuations on the electrical transport behavior in YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish; Alterovitz, S. A.; Stan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The excess conductivity behavior of highly oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films prepared by both coevaporation and laser ablation was studied in detail in the reduced-temperature range 9 x 10(exp -4) is less than t is less than 1. The excess conductivity in all the films studied was found to diverge sharply near T(sub c), in agreement with the conventional mean-field theory. However, the detailed temperature dependence could not be fitted to either the power-law or the logarithmic functional forms as predicted by the theory. The excess conductivity of all the films was found to be exponentially dependent on the temperature over nearly three decades for 9 x 10(exp -4) is less than t is less than 10(exp -1), in contradiction to the mean-field theory.

  11. Lunar Laser Ranging Science: Gravitational Physics and Lunar Interior and Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava G.; Boggs, Dale H.; Ratcliff, J. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Laser pulses fired at retroreflectors on the Moon provide very accurate ranges. Analysis yields information on Earth, Moon, and orbit. The highly accurate retroreflector positions have uncertainties less than a meter. Tides on the Moon show strong dissipation, with Q=33+/-4 at a month and a weak dependence on period. Lunar rotation depends on interior properties; a fluid core is indicated with radius approx.20% that of the Moon. Tests of relativistic gravity verify the equivalence principle to +/-1.4x10(exp -13), limit deviations from Einstein's general relativity, and show no rate for the gravitational constant G/G with uncertainty 9x10(exp -13)/yr.

  12. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  13. Intumescent coatings containing 4,4'-dinitrosulfanilide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating which is stable to the environment and to exposure to water, and which intumesces at a favorable temperature was developed. The composition comprises a mixture of 4, 4 prime dinitrousulfanilide as the intumescent agent in a polymer binder mixture of a chlorinated polyolefin, a bisphenol A epoxy resin, and a rubber-like amine hardener.

  14. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and is responsible for the direct supervision of certain national banks, including the largest... Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS, AVAILABILITY... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office. The Washington office of the OCC is the...

  15. Electron beam induced damage in PECVD Si3N4 and SiO2 films on InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantic, Dragan M.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Young, Paul G.; Williams, Wallace D.; Dickman, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphorus rich plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride and silicon dioxide films on n-type indium phosphide (InP) substrates were exposed to electron beam irradiation in the 5 to 40 keV range for the purpose of characterizing the damage induced in the dielectic. The electron beam exposure was on the range of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -3) C/sq cm. The damage to the devices was characterized by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of the metal insulator semiconductor (MIS) capacitors. These results were compared to results obtained for radiation damage of thermal silicon dioxide on silicon (Si) MOS capacitors with similar exposures. The radiation induced damage in the PECVD silicon nitride films on InP was successfully annealed out in an hydrogen/nitrogen (H2/N2) ambient at 400 C for 15 min. The PECVD silicon dioxide films on InP had the least radiation damage, while the thermal silicon dioxide films on Si had the most radiation damage.

  16. State of the art and future directions for the atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The present status of technology development for atomic hydrogen masers (H-masers) is reviewed. The limitations to frequency stability and accuracy are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with cavity resonator instability and the lack of reproducibility and stability of the storage volume wall coating frequency shift. New types of coating developed in the Soviet Union and better, cavity resonator materials, are expected to make possible frequency at the 10(exp -16) level at 10(exp 4) sec. Better control of systematic effects should extend the long-term stability to levels better than 10(exp -15) for intervals beyond one day. Present use of H-masers as flywheel oscillators in timekeeping systems is discussed as is the outlook for the future cryogenic and room temperature H-masers as flywheel oscillators to operate very high resolution frequency discriminators based on the newly evolving technology of trapped and cooled ions and atoms.

  17. The Deep Space Network stability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Greenhall, Charles A.; Hamell, Robert L.; Kuhnle, Paul F.

    1995-01-01

    A stability analyzer for testing NASA Deep Space Network installations during flight radio science experiments is described. The stability analyzer provides realtime measurements of signal properties of general experimental interest: power, phase, and amplitude spectra; Allan deviation; and time series of amplitude, phase shift, and differential phase shift. Input ports are provided for up to four 100 MHz frequency standards and eight baseband analog (greater than 100 kHz bandwidth) signals. Test results indicate the following upper bounds to noise floors when operating on 100 MHz signals: -145 dBc/Hz for phase noise spectrum further than 200 Hz from carrier, 2.5 x 10(exp -15) (tau =1 second) and 1.5 x 10(exp -17) (tau =1000 seconds) for Allan deviation, and 1 x 10(exp -4) degrees for 1-second averages of phase deviation. Four copies of the stability analyzer have been produced, plus one transportable unit for use at non-NASA observatories.

  18. A Numerical Method for Solving the Equations of Compressible Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCormack, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Although much progress has already been made In solving problems in aerodynamic design, many new developments are still needed before the equations for unsteady compressible viscous flow can be solved routinely. This paper describes one such development. A new method for solving these equations has been devised that 1) is second-order accurate in space and time, 2) is unconditionally stable, 3) preserves conservation form, 4) requires no block or scalar tridiagonal inversions, 5) is simple and straightforward to program (estimated 10% modification for the update of many existing programs), 6) is more efficient than present methods, and 7) should easily adapt to current and future computer architectures. Computational results for laminar and turbulent flows at Reynolds numbers from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 7) and at CFL numbers as high as 10(exp 3) are compared with theory and experiment.

  19. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-06-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  20. A Noachian/Hesperian Hiatus and Erosive Reactivation of Martian Valley Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. P., III.; Maxwell, T. A.; Howard, A. D.; Craddock, R. A.; Moore, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite new evidence for persistent flow and sedimentation on early Mars, it remains unclear whether valley networks were active over long geologic timescales (10(exp 5)-10(exp 8) yr), or if flows were persistent only during multiple discrete episodes of moderate (approx. 10(exp 4) yr) to short (<10 yr) duration. Understanding the long-term stability/variability of valley network hydrology would provide an important control on paleoclimate and groundwater models. Here we describe geologic evidence for a hiatus in highland valley network activity while the fretted terrain formed, followed by a discrete reactivation of persistent (but possibly variable) erosive flows. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. High-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of an Equivalent Width-Selected Sample of Starbursting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maseda, Michael V.; VanDerWeL, Arjen; DaChuna, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacafichi, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; VanDokkum, Pieter; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Harry C.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (approx. 50 km/s) for a sample of 14 Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs) at redshifts 1.4 < zeta < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low ( 3 × 10(exp 9) M). Their large [O III]5007 equivalent widths (500 - 1100 A) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) M, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase thus represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  2. Terrestrial Applications of a Nano-g Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-sensitive accelerometer, developed for NASA to monitor the microgravity environments of Space Shuttle, five orbiters and Space Station, needed to measure accelerations up to 10 mg with an absolute accuracy of 10 nano-g (10(exp -8)g) for at least two orbits (10(exp 4) seconds) to resolve accelerations associated with orbital drag. Also, the accelerometers needed to have less than 10(exp -9) F.S. off-axis sensitivity; to be thermally and magnetically inert; to be immune to quiescent shock, and to have an in-situ calibration capability. Multi-axis compact seismometers, designs that have twelve decades of dynamic range will be described. Density profilometers, precision gradiometers, gyros and vibration isolation designs and applications will be discussed. Finally, examples of transformations of the accelerometer into sensitive anemometers and imaging spectrometers will be presented.

  3. Gamma-Ray, Cosmic Ray and Neutrino Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd

    2011-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10(exp -35) m. I will discuss here the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) from observations of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) to the amount of LIV of at a proton Lorentz factor of approximately 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future.

  4. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-01-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  5. g-modes and the solar neutrino problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Kumar, Pawan

    1993-01-01

    We show that low-order g-modes with large enough amplitudes to affect significantly the solar neutrino fluxes would produce surface velocities that are 10 exp 4 times larger than the observed upper limits and hence are ruled out by existing data. We also demonstrate that any large-amplitude, short-period oscillations that grow on a Kelvin-Helmholtz time scale will require, to affect solar neutrino fluxes, a large amount of energy (for g-modes, 10 exp 9 times the energy in the observed p-mode oscillations) and a tiny amount of dissipation (for g modes, 10 exp -8 the fractional dissipation rate of the p-modes).

  6. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer than 10 exp 4 s is currently limited by systematic processes. The physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors are discussed. From estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, it is found that the primary internal mechanisms limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level of parts in 1015 per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10 exp 16 to parts in 10 exp 15 per day. Strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations are discussed.

  7. Doppler experiments with Cassini radio system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comoretto, G.; Bertotti, B.; Iess, L.; Ambrosini, R.

    1992-01-01

    The radio system of the Cassini orbiter will include a K-alpha band downlink channel, mainly intended for telemetry. A K-alpha uplink has also been proposed to allow for a highly accurate gravitational wave experiment. The fourfold increase in frequency will reduce the plasma noise by a factor of 12 and will allow a Doppler accuracy better than 10 exp -15 for time scales of 10 exp 3 - 10 exp 4 s. Extensive Doppler measurements of the gravitational field of Saturn and its satellites can be performed, exploiting the induced change in the velocity of the spacecraft. Possible sources of low-frequency gravitational waves and errors in the Doppler link are discussed.

  8. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  9. A Preliminary Model for Spacecraft Propulsion Performance Analysis Based on Nuclear Gain and Subsystem Mass-Power Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidt, G. R.; Thio, Y. C.; Hurst, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid transportation of human crews to destinations throughout the solar system will require propulsion systems having not only very high exhaust velocities (i.e., I(sub sp) >= 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 5) sec) but also extremely low mass-power ratios (i.e., alpha <= 10(exp -2) kg/kW). These criteria are difficult to meet with electric propulsion and other power-limited systems, but may be achievable with propulsion concepts that use onboard power to produce a net gain in energy via fusion or some other nuclear process. This paper compares the fundamental performance of these gain-limited systems with that of power-limited systems, and determines from a generic power balance the gains required for ambitious planetary missions ranging up to 100 AU. Results show that energy gain reduces the required effective mass-power ratio of the system, thus enabling shorter trip times than those of power-limited concepts.

  10. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 1; Sharp Leading Edge; [conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 36 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at a Reynolds number of 6 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  11. Tests of the Rockwell Si:As Back-Illuminated Blocked-Impurity Band (BIBIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, J.; Groezinger, U.; Burgdorf, M.; Salama, A.

    1989-01-01

    Two arrays of Rockwell's Si:As back-illuminated blocked-impurity-band detectors were tested at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) at low background and low temperature for possible use in the astronomical space experiment ISOPHOT. For these measurements special test equipment was put together. A cryostat was mechanically modified to accommodate the arrays and special peripheral electronics was added to a microprocessor system to drive the cold multiplexer and to acquire the output data. The first device, a 16x50 element array on a fan-out board was used to test individual pixels with a trans-impedance-amplifier at a photon background of 10(exp 8) Ph s(-1)cm(-2) and at temperatures of 2.7 to 4.4 K. The noise-equivalent-power NEP is in the range 5 - 7 x 10(exp -18) WHz(exp -1/2), the responsivity is less than or equal to 100 AW(exp -1)(f = 10 Hz). The second device was a 10x50 array including a cold readout electronics of switched FETs (SWIFET). Measurements of this array were done in a background range of 5 x 10(exp 5) to 5 x 10(exp 11) Ph s(exp-1)cm(exp-2) and at operating temperatures between 3.0 and 4.8 K. The NEP ranges from less than 10(exp -18) at the lowest background to 2 x 10(exp -16) WHz(exp -1/2) at the highest flux.

  12. N-[4-(Dimethyl-amino)-benzyl-idene]-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-amine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2012-05-01

    The title compound, C(11)H(13)N(5), is a Schiff base synthesized by the reaction of 4-amino-4H-1,2,4-triazole and 4-(dimethyl-amino)-benzaldehyde. The dihedral angle between the benzene and triazole rings is 43.09 (11)°. The crystal structure displays weak C-H⋯N inter-actions.

  13. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mabasher, Bahram; Brudgesm Terrry J.; Hudson, Michael J.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Smith, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the radio luminosity function and radio source population for two fields within the Coma cluster of galaxies, with the fields centered on the cluster core and southwest infall region and each covering about half a square degree. Using VLA data with a typical rms sensitivity of 28 (mu)Jy per 4.4" beam, we identify 249 radio sources with optical counterparts brighter than r = 22 (equivalent to M(sub r) = -13 for cluster member galaxies). Comprehensive optical spectroscopy identifies 38 of these as members of the Coma cluster, evenly split between sources powered by an active nucleus and sources powered by active star formation. The radio-detected star-forming galaxies are restricted to radio luminosities between about 10(exp 21) and 10(exp 22) W/Hz, an interesting result given that star formation dominates field radio luminosity functions below about 10(exp 23) W/Hz. The majority of the radio-detected star-forming galaxies have characteristics of starbursts, including high specific star formation rates and optical spectra with strong emission lines. In conjunction with prior studies on post-starburst galaxies within the Coma cluster, this is consistent with a picture in which late-type galaxies entering Coma undergo a starburst prior to a rapid cessation of star formation. Optically bright elliptical galaxies (Mr less than or equals -20.5) make the largest contribution to the radio luminosity function at both the high (> approx. 3x10(exp 22) W/Hz) and low (< approx. 10(exp 21) W/Hz) ends. Through a stacking analysis of these optically-bright ellipticals we find that they continue to harbor radio sources down to luminosities as faint as 3x10(exp 19) W/Hz. However, contrary to published results for the Virgo cluster we find no evidence for the existence of a population of optically faint (M(sub r) approx. equals -14) dwarf ellipticals hosting strong radio AGN.

  14. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  15. Basic features of the STS/Spacelab vibration environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, Charles R.; Ramachandran, N.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle acceleration environment is characterized. The acceleration environment is composed of a residual or quasi-steady component and higher frequency components induced by vehicle structural modes and the operation of onboard machinery. Quasi-steady accelerations are generally due to atmospheric drag, gravity gradient effects, and rotational forces. These accelerations tend to vary with the orbital frequency (approx. 10(exp -4) Hz) and have magnitudes less than or equal to 10(exp -6) g(sub 0) (where 1 g(sub 0) is terrestrial gravity). Higher frequency g-jitter is characterized by oscillatory disturbances in the 1-100 Hz range and transient components. Oscillatory accelerations are related to the response of large flexible structures like antennae, the Spacelab module, and the Orbiter itself, and to the operation of rotating machinery. The Orbiter structural modes in the 1-10 Hz range, are excited by oscillatory and transient disturbances and tend to dominate the energy spectrum of the acceleration environment. A comparison of the acceleration measurements from different Space Shuttle missions reveals the characteristic signature of the structural modes of the Orbiter overlaid with mission specific hardware induced disturbances and their harmonics. Transient accelerations are usually attributed to crew activity and Orbiter thruster operations. During crew sleep periods, the acceleration levels are typically on the order of 10(exp -6) g(sub 0) (1 micro-g). Crew work and exercise tend to raise the accelerations to the 10(exp -3) g(sub 0) (1 milli-g) level. Vernier reaction control system firings tend to cause accelerations of 10(exp -4) g(sub 0), while primary reaction control system and Orbiter maneuvering system firings cause accelerations as large as 10(exp -2) g(sub 0). Vibration isolation techniques (both active and passive systems) used during crew exercise have been shown to significantly reduce the acceleration magnitudes.

  16. Hard X-ray Observation of Cygnus X-1 By the Marshall Imaging X-ray Experiment (MIXE2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minamitani, Takahisa; Apple, J. A.; Austin, R. A.; Dietz, K. L.; Koloziejczak, J. J.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The second generation of the Marshall Imaging X-ray Experiment (MIXE2) was flown from Fort Sumner, New Mexico on May 7-8, 1997. The experiment consists of coded-aperture telescope with a field of view of 1.8 degrees (FWHM) and an angular resolution of 6.9 arcminutes. The detector is a large (7.84x10(exp 4) sq cm) effective area microstrip proportional counter filled with 2.0x10(exp5) Pascals of xenon with 2% isobutylene. We present MIXE2 observation of the 20-80keV spectrum and timing variability of Cygnus X-1 made during balloon flight.

  17. Quantum Cohesion Oscillation of Electron Ground State in Low Temperature Laser Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Qingxun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Kaixi

    1996-01-01

    The development of radically new technological and economically efficient methods for obtaining chemical products and for producing new materials with specific properties requires the study of physical and chemical processes proceeding at temperature of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) K, temperature range of low temperature plasma. In our paper, by means of Wigner matrix of quantum statistical theory, a formula is derived for the energy of quantum coherent oscillation of electron ground state in laser plasma at low temperature. The collective behavior would be important in ion and ion-molecule reactions.

  18. Infrared photodetectors with tailorable response due to resonant plasmon absorption in epitaxial silicide particles embedded in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Dejewski, S. M.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Krabach, T. N.; Ksendzov, A.

    1993-01-01

    Tailorable infrared photoresponse in the 1-2 micron range are demonstrated in a device incorporating electrically floating metal silicide particles. Photons absorbed by excitation of the metallic-particle surface plasmon are shown to contribute to the photoresponse. Quantum efficiencies of roughly 0.2 percent are measured at 77 K, with dark currents of less than 2 nA/sq cm at a reverse bias of 1 V and detectivities of 4 x 10 exp 9 - 8 x 10 exp 9 cm sq rt Hz/W are obtained.

  19. The Prolate Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auchere, F.; Boulade, S.; Koutchmy, S.; Smartt, R. N.; Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Georgakilas, A.; Gurman, J. B.; Artzner, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the chromospheric solar limb prolateness, using strictly simultaneous H-alpha, ground-based observations and HeII space-based observations. The typical prolateness is found to be DeltaD/D = 5.5 x 10(exp -3) in HeII and 1.2 x 10(exp -3) in H-alpha. The first measurements in the 30.4 nm HeII line over a period of two years. as well as coronal data, are discussed to explore further the origin of the prolateness and its possible consequences.

  20. Fractionation of hydrogen and deuterium on Venus due to collisional ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, M. A.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-02-01

    The collisional ejection process for hydrogen on Venus is reanalyzed. Improved values for the efficiency of H and D escape as a function of the ionospheric temperature are reported. It is proposed that the reduction of the hydrogen flux for collisional ejection be reduced from 8 to 3.5 x 10 exp 6/sq cm/s, and a revised D/H fractional factor of 0.47 due to collisional ejection is suggested. The resulting deuterium flux is 3.1 x 10 exp 4/sq cm/s, roughly six times the flux due to charge exchange, making collisional ejection the dominant escape mechanism for deuterium on Venus.

  1. The Swift Discovery of X-ray Afterglows Accompanying Short Bursts from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Palmer, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of X-ray afterglows accompanying two short bursts from SGR1900+14 is presented. The afterglow luminosities at the end of each observation are lower by 30-50% than their initial luminosities, and decay with power law indices p approx. 0.2-0.4. Their initial bolometric luminosities are L approx. 10(exp 34)- 10(exp 35) erg/s. We discuss analogies and differences between the X-ray afterglows of SGR short bursts and short gamma-ray bursts.

  2. A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer ASTRE (Accelerometre Spatial Triaxial Electrostatique) is a simplified version of the GRADIO accelerometer designed for the ARISTOTELES mission, which operates by measuring the force provided by a three-axis electrostatic suspension of the proof-mass. It covers the g-spectrum from 10 exp -8 to 10 exp -4 in the frequency range dc to 5 Hz. A dedicated test bench was developed in order to preserve the accelerometer from the seismic noise. The paper presents the performance parameters of the ASTRE accelerometer and some of the design schemes.

  3. Exoplanet Direct Imaging: Coronagraph Probe Mission Study EXO-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2013-01-01

    Flagship mission for spectroscopy of ExoEarths is a long-term priority for space astrophysics (Astro2010). Requires 10(exp 10) contrast at 3 lambda/D separation, ( (is) greater than 10,000 times beyond HST performance) and large telescope (is) greater than 4m aperture. Big step. Mission for spectroscopy of giant planets and imaging of disks requires 10(exp 9) contrast at 3 lambda/D (already demonstrated in lab) and (is) approximately 1.5m telescope. Should be much more affordable, good intermediate step.Various PIs have proposed many versions of the latter mission 17 times since 1999; no unified approach.

  4. Luminosities of H alpha emitting regions in a pair of interacting galaxies in the Bootes void

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.; Hintzen, P.; Kennicutt, R.; Liu, C.; Lowenthal, J.; Cheng, K.-P.; Oliversen, R.; Woodgate, B.

    1993-01-01

    Luminosities of H alpha emission from a pair of interacting galaxies in the low density environment of the Bootes void are presented. CG 692 (IRAS 1519+5050) has an H alpha luminosity of 2 x 10(exp 42) ergs s(exp -1), indicating a star formation rate of 18.4 solar mass yr(exp -1). Individual extranuclear H alpha regions have luminosities of approximately 10(exp 40) ergs s(exp -1). These luminosities are similar to those found for H II regions in bright, late-type galaxies in more densely populated parts of the Universe.

  5. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from Space Shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S.A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from studies designed to identify deposition patterns and quantify the ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents (which are primarily Al2O3 and HCl) from the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors in the area of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad. Results of measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, as much as 7.1 x 10 exp 3 kg of particulates and 3.4 x 10 exp 3 kg HCL can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence during one STS launch.

  6. Tables of square-law signal detection statistics for Hann spectra with 50 percent overlap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Stanley R.; Cullers, D. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, currently being planned by NASA, will require that an enormous amount of data be analyzed in real time by special purpose hardware. It is expected that overlapped Hann data windows will play an important role in this analysis. In order to understand the statistical implication of this approach, it has been necessary to compute detection statistics for overlapped Hann spectra. Tables of signal detection statistics are given for false alarm rates from 10(exp -14) to 10(exp -1) and signal detection probabilities from 0.50 to 0.99; the number of computed spectra ranges from 4 to 2000.

  7. LISA Instrument Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2008-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is designed to observe gravitational waves in the frequency band from 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -4) Hz where a rich spectrum of sources is expected. The measurements must be made from space to avoid the large motions of the earth that prevent the current generations (eg. LIGO) from operating at these freq8uencies. The technology and expected performance behind this measurement capability will be reviewed with an emphasis on the interferometric measurement system., including recent laboratory results showing a novel tunable frequency stabilized laser.

  8. X-Ray Emission from the Sun in Its Youth and Old Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorren, J. D.; Gudel, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained ROSAT PSPC (Roentgen Satellite Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) pointed observations of two nearby G stars of ages 70 Myr and 9.5 Gyr that are of unique importance as proxies for the Sun at the two extremes of its main-sequence evolutionary lifetime. The younger star, HD 129333 (EK Dra; G0 V), a rapid rotator with a 2.7 day period, is a strong source with an X-ray luminosity L(x)(0.2-2.4 keV) = (7.5-11.5) x 10(exp 29) erg/s. Modeling suggests a two-temperature corona with T(1) = (2.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 6) K and T(2) = (9.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 6) K (formal uncertainties). A continuous emission measure distribution, increasing to higher temperatures and with a cutoff at (20-30) x 10(exp 6) K, yields even better fits to the data. The old star, beta Hyi (HR 98; G2 IV), represents the Sun in the future, near the end of its hydrogen-core burning stage, when it should be rotating more slowly (present P(rot) = 25.4 day) and should have lower levels of activity. The ROSAT measurements yield L(x) = (0.9-3.0) x 10(exp 27) ergs/s and a rather cool, single coronal temperature of T = (1.7 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 6) K. For comparison, the Sun has L(x) approx. equal to 2 x 10(exp 27) ergs/s and a coronal temperature of about T = 2 x 10(exp 6) K. These stars provide information on the decline of the stellar (and specifically solar) magnetic activity from extreme youth to old age. HD 129333 is also important in that it yields an estimate of the solar soft X-ray flux in the early solar system at the epoch of the terminal stages of planetary accretion.

  9. IC 751: A New Changing Look AGN Discovered by NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Arevalo, P.; Boggs, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Ghandi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Stern, D.; Treister, E.; Zhang, W. W.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of five Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the type 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in IC 751, three of which were performed simultaneously with XMM-Newton or Swift/ X-Ray Telescope. We find that the nuclear X-ray source underwent a clear transition from a Compton-thick (NH approx. = 2 x10(exp 24)/sq cm) to a Compton-thin ( N(sub H) approx. = 4 x10(exp 23)/sq cm) state on timescales of < or approx.3 months, which makes IC 751 the first changing look AGN discovered by NuSTAR. Changes of the line of sight column density at the approx.2 (sigma) level are also found on a timescale of approx. 48 hr (delta N(sub H approx. 10(exp 23)/sq cm). From the lack of spectral variability on timescales of approx.100 ks, we infer that the varying absorber is located beyond the emission-weighted average radius of the broad-line region (BLR), and could therefore be related either to the external part of the BLR or a clumpy molecular torus. By adopting a physical torus X-ray spectral model, we are able to disentangle the column density of the non-varying absorber (N(sub H) approx. 3.8 x10(exp 23)/sq cm) from that of the varying clouds [N(sub H) approx. (1- 150) x 10(exp 22)/sq cm], and to constrain that of the material responsible for the reprocessed X-ray radiation (N(sub H approx. 6 x 10(exp 24)/sq cm).24 -2). We find evidence of significant intrinsic X-ray variability, with the flux varying by a factor of five on timescales of a few months in the 2-10 and 10-50 keV band.

  10. G4beamline

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-24

    G4beamline is a single-particle-tracking simulation code based on the Geant4 toolkit. It is specifically optimized for the realistic evaluation of beam lines. It is especially useful for evaluating future muon facilities.

  11. Photochemical Modeling of CH3 Abundances in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Anthony Y. T.; Yung, Yuk L.; Moses, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Recent measurements of methyl radicals (CH3) in the upper atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) provide new constraints to photochemical models of hydrocarbon chemistry in the outer solar system. The derived column abundances of CH3 on Saturn above 10 mbar and Neptune above the 0.2 mbar pressure level are (2.5 - 6.0) x 10(exp 13) / sq cm and (0.7 - 2.8) x 10(exp 13) / sq cm, respectively. We use the updated Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory photochemical model, which incorporates hydrocarbon photochemistry, vertical molecular and bulk atmospheric eddy diffusion, and realistic radiative transfer modeling, to study the CH3 abundances in the upper atmosphere of the giant planets and Titan. We identify the key reactions that control the concentrations of CH3 in the model, such as the three-body recombination reaction, CH3 + CH3 + M yields C2H6 + M. We evaluate and extrapolate the three-body rate constant of this reaction to the low-temperature limit (1.8 x 10(exp -16) T(sup -3.75) e(sup -300/T), T < 300 K) and compare methyl radical abundances in five atmospheres: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Titan. The sensitivity of our models to the rate coefficients for the reactions H + CH3 + M yields CH4 + M, H + C2H3 yields C2H2 + H2, (sup 1)CH2 + H2 yields CH3 + H, and H + C2H5 yields 2CH3, the branching ratios of CH4 photolysis, vertical mixing in the five atmospheres, and Lyman alpha photon enhancement at the orbit of Neptune have all been tested. The results of our model CH3 abundances for both Saturn (5.1 x 10(exp 13) / sq cm) and Neptune (2.2 x 10(exp 13) / sq cm) show good agreement with ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer measurements. Using the same chemical reaction set, our calculations also successfully generate vertical profiles of stable hydrocarbons consistent with Voyager and ground-based measurements in these outer solar system atmospheres. Predictions of CH3 column concentrations (for p <= 0.2 mbar) in the atmospheres

  12. 4-[4-(Diethyl-amino)benzyl-ideneamino]-4H-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian Xin; Zhang, Ju Zhou; Chen, Qian Wang

    2008-05-03

    The title compound, C(13)H(17)N(5), is a Schiff base synthesized by the reaction of 4-amino-4H-1,2,4-triazole and 4-(diethyl-amino)benzaldehyde. The triazole ring forms a dihedral angle of 5.77 (16)° with the benzene ring. The crystal structure is stabilized by an inter-molecular C-H⋯N hydrogen bond.

  13. 4-H and Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Deborah, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue focuses on Iowa's role in the historical development of the 4-H youth program. "Roots in Iowa" and "Jessie Field Shambaugh: The Mother of 4-H" (J. Friedel) describes the rural Iowan roots of the 4-H program, which today is located in 80 different countries, and give the story of its founder. Jessie Shambaugh, a rural…

  14. 2-(4-Methoxyphenylazo)-4-phenylphenol

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Cruz; Perez-Caballero; Hernandez-Ortega; Rubio-Arroyo

    2000-08-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, C(19)H(16)N(2)O(2), displays a trans configuration of the azo moiety, which forms an intramolecular O-H.N=N hydrogen bond. The H.N and O.N distances are 1.81 (3) and 2.581 (4) A, respectively. The azobenzene moiety is approximately planar, and has a dihedral angle of ca 23 degrees with the substituted phenyl group.

  15. LiYbCl4(THF)4

    PubMed Central

    Richtera, Lukas; Jancik, Vojtech; Hermanova, Sona; Krpoun, Karel; Thompson-Montero, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, di-μ-chlorido-dichlorido-1κ2 Cl-tetra­kis­(tetra­hydro­furan)-1κ2 O,2κ2 O-lithiumytterbium(III), [LiYbCl4(C4H8O)4], was prepared by the reaction of YbCl3(THF)3 with LiCl in THF (THF is tetra­hydro­furan). The central motif of the structure is a Yb(μ-Cl)2Li ring. The Yb atom is hexa­coordinated to four Cl atoms and two THF mol­ecules oriented in a trans fashion. The Li atom has a tetra­hedral environment and is coordinated to two Cl atoms and two THF mol­ecules. No inter­molecular inter­actions other than van der Waals forces were observed. Two of the THF mol­ecules are disordered over two positions. PMID:21754604

  16. In vitro Catecholamine Exposure Produces Variable Effects on the B7 Costimulatory Pathway in Human Monocytic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B.; Sams, Clarence; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Catecholamines have been associated with immunomodulation of the adaptive immune system towards a Th2 response in vitro. We therefore examined the role of in vitro epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) exposure on the B7 costimulatory expression of antigen presenting cells (APC) from human monocytic cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). THP1 monocytic cells and CD14+ cells from normal human PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and incubated with physiologic stress levels (10(exp -6) - 10(exp -8)M) of EPI or NE for 24 hours. Cells were subsequently stained with CD80 FITC, CD86 PE, and CD14 PC5 antibodies and analyzed by flow cytometry for changes in fluorescence and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Exposure of THP1 to EPI in vitro at concentrations of 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8)M significantly decreased mean CD80 from 42 plus or minus 0.7% to 11 plus or minus 0.44%, 19.1 plus or minus 2.0%, and 30.7 plus or minus 2.1% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). In addition, CD86 expression increased with EPI at 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8) M from 9.2 plus or minus 0.52% to 41 plus or minus 3.8%, 26.4 plus or minus 1.9%, and 15.74 plus or minus 1.8% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). Similar results for mean CD80 and CD86 percent expression were observed for CD14+ cells from PBMC with a sample size of N = 6 and for NE when substituted for EPI. The data show that in vitro exposure to catecholamines significantly decreases %CD86 expression and significantly increases %CD86 expression in THP1 cells and human CD14+ APC. Previous studies have suggested an association between increased CD86 expression and TH2 activity. Thus, these data suggest that immunomodulation by catecholamines results in part by the variable effects of the B7 costimulatory pathway in APC.

  17. Time-Dependent Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Natta, Antonella

    1995-01-01

    We present theoretical models of the time-dependent thermal and chemical structure of molecular gas suddenly exposed to far-ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) radiation fields and the consequent time- dependent infrared emission of the gas. We focus on the response of molecular hydrogen for cloud densities ranging from n = 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 6)/cu cm and FUV fluxes G(sub 0) = 10(exp 3)-10(exp 6) times the local FUV interstellar flux. For G(sub 0)/n greater than 10(exp -2) cu cm, the emergent H(sub 2) vibrational line intensities are initially larger than the final equilibrium values. The H(sub 2) lines are excited by FUV fluorescence and by collisional excitation in warm gas. Most of the H(sub 2) intensity is generated at a characteristic hydrogen column density of N approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, which corresponds to an FUV optical depth of unity caused by dust opacity. The time dependence of the H(sub 2) intensities arises because the initial abundances of H(sub 2) at these depths is much higher than the equilibrium values, so that H(sub 2) initially competes more effectively with dust in absorbing FUV photons. Considerable column densities of warm (T approximately 1000) K H(sub 2) gas can be produced by the FUV pumping of H(sub 2) vibrational levels followed by collisional de-excitation, which transfers the energy to heat. In dense (n greater than or approximately 10(exp 5)/cu cm) gas exposed to high (G(sub 0) greater than or approximately 10(exp 4)) fluxes, this warm gas produces a 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(l) H(sub 2) line ratio of approximately 0.1, which mimics the ratio found in shocked gas. In lower density regions, the FUV pumping produces a pure-fluorescent ratio of approximately 0.5. We also present calculations of the time dependence of the atomic hydrogen column densities and of the intensities of 0 I 6300 A, S II 6730 A, Fe II 1.64 microns, and rotational OH and H20 emission. Potential applications include star-forming regions, clouds

  18. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  19. MOBILE4 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies the MOB1LE4 input variables that can have significant impacts on highway vehicle emissions inventories and gives priorities for the development of improved guidance for specifying MOB1LE4 inputs. wo major factors are considered: (1) the likelihood and potent...

  20. Rank 4 Premodular Categories

    SciTech Connect

    Bruillard, Paul J.; Galindo, Cesar; Ng, Siu Hung; Plavnik, Julia; Rowell, Eric; Wang, Zhenghan

    2016-09-01

    We consider the classification problem for rank 4 premodular categories. We uncover a formula for the 2nd Frobenius-Schur indicator of a premodular category is determined and the classification of rank 4 premodular categories (up to Grothendieck equivalence) is completed. In the appendix we show rank finiteness for premodular categories.

  1. Experimental investigation of the Marangoni effect on the stability of a double-diffusive layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanny, Josef; Chen, Chuan F.

    1994-01-01

    Stability experiments were carried out in 4-cm-thick, salt-stratified fluid layer by heating from below and cooling from above. The bottom boundary was rigid while the top was either free or rigid. The initial solute Rayleigh number varied from 2.5 x 10(exp 6) to 4.6 x 10(exp 7). For the rigid-free case, at initial solute Rayleigh numbers R(sub s) greater than 5.4 x 10(exp 6), thermal Marangoni instabilities were observed to onset along the free surface at a relatively low thermal Rayleigh number, R(sub t). The convection was very weak, and it had almost no effect on the concentration and temperature distributions. Double-diffusive instabilities along the top free surface were observed to onset at a higher R(sub t), with much stronger convection causing changes in the concentration and temperature distributions near the top. At a yet higher R(sub t), double-diffusive convection was observed to onset along the bottom boundary. Fluid motion in the layer then evolved into fully developed thermal convection of a homogeneous fluid without any further increase in the imposed Delta T. For layers with R(sub s) less than 5.4 x 10(exp 6), Marangoni and double-diffusive instabilities onset simultaneously along the free surface first, while double-diffusive instabilities along the bottom wall onset at a higher R(sub t).

  2. New Molecular Species In Comet C/1995 (Hale-Bopp) Observed with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Mehringer, D. M.; Benford, D.; Gardner, M.; Phillips, T. G.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Colom, P.; Crovisier, J.; Despois, D.; Rauer, H.

    1998-01-01

    We present millimeter-wave observations of HNCO, HC3N, SO, NH2CHO, H(13)CN, and H3O(+) in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) obtained in February-April, 1997 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). HNCO, first detected at the CSO in comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake), is securely confirmed in comet Hale-Bopp via observations of three rotational transitions. The derived abundance with respect to H2O is (4-13) x 10(exp -4). HC3N, SO, and NH2CHO are detected for the first time in a comet. The fractional abundance of HC3N based on observations of three rotational lines is (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -4). Four transitions of SO are detected and the derived fractional abundance, (2-8) x 10(exp -3), is higher than the upper limits derived from UV observations of previous comets. Observations of NH2CHO imply a fractional abundance of (1-8) x 10(exp -4). H3O(+) is detected for the first time from the ground. The H(13)CN (3-2) transition is also detected and the derived HCN/H(13)CN abundance ratio is 90 +/- 15, consistent with the terrestrial C-13/C-12 ratio. in addition, a number of other molecular species are detected, including HNC, OCS, HCO(+), CO(+), and CN (the last two are first detections in a comet at radio wavelengths).

  3. The G4 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Nancy; Gray, Lucas T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments provide fascinating examples of how G4 DNA and G4 RNA structures—aka quadruplexes—may contribute to normal biology and to genomic pathologies. Quadruplexes are transient and therefore difficult to identify directly in living cells, which initially caused skepticism regarding not only their biological relevance but even their existence. There is now compelling evidence for functions of some G4 motifs and the corresponding quadruplexes in essential processes, including initiation of DNA replication, telomere maintenance, regulated recombination in immune evasion and the immune response, control of gene expression, and genetic and epigenetic instability. Recognition and resolution of quadruplex structures is therefore an essential component of genome biology. We propose that G4 motifs and structures that participate in key processes compose the G4 genome, analogous to the transcriptome, proteome, or metabolome. This is a new view of the genome, which sees DNA as not only a simple alphabet but also a more complex geography. The challenge for the future is to systematically identify the G4 motifs that form quadruplexes in living cells and the features that confer on specific G4 motifs the ability to function as structural elements. PMID:23637633

  4. Bacteriophage T4 genome.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric S; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the "cell-puncturing device," combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the complex

  5. Bacteriophage T4 Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the “cell-puncturing device,” combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the

  6. Dengue 4 Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    CopU~1C FftE 0~AD( ) DENGUE 4 VACCINE DEVELOPMENT Lf 0, to ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT0 by 0Nyven J. Marchette, Ph.D. September 1, 1987 (For the period 1... Dengue 4 Vaccine Development 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Nyven Marchette. Ph.D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT T COVERED 114. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGE...necessary and identi’fy by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Key words: Virus, arbovirus, dengue , dengue -4, vaccinej attenuation, immunity, RAI

  7. Accretion Disks Around Binary Black Holes of Unequal Mass: GRMHD Simulations Near Decoupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Pfeiffer, Harald, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simulations in general relativity of magnetized disks onto black hole binaries. We vary the binary mass ratio from 1:1 to 1:10 and evolve the systems when they orbit near the binary disk decoupling radius. We compare (surface) density profiles, accretion rates (relative to a single, non-spinning black hole), variability, effective alpha-stress levels and luminosities as functions of the mass ratio. We treat the disks in two limiting regimes: rapid radiative cooling and no radiative cooling. The magnetic field lines clearly reveal jets emerging from both black hole horizons and merging into one common jet at large distances. The magnetic fields give rise to much stronger shock heating than the pure hydrodynamic flows, completely alter the disk structure, and boost accretion rates and luminosities. Accretion streams near the horizons are among the densest structures; in fact, the 1:10 no-cooling evolution results in a refilling of the cavity. The typical effective temperature in the bulk of the disk is approx. 10(exp5) (M / 10(exp 8)M solar mass (exp -1/4(L/L(sub edd) (exp 1/4K) yielding characteristic thermal frequencies approx. 10 (exp 15) (M /10(exp 8)M solar mass) (exp -1/4(L/L (sub edd) (1+z) (exp -1)Hz. These systems are thus promising targets for many extragalactic optical surveys, such as LSST, WFIRST, and PanSTARRS.

  8. Uptake and Dissolution of Gaseous Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Staton, Sarah J. R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of gas-phase ethanol (ethyl alcohol, CH3CH2OH, EtOH) in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was measured in a Knudsen cell reactor over ranges of temperature (209-237 K) and acid composition (39-76 wt % H2SO4). Ethanol is very soluble under these conditions: effective Henry's law coefficients, H*, range from 4 x 10(exp 4) M/atm in the 227 K, 39 wt % acid to greater than 10(exp 7) M/atm in the 76 wt % acid. In 76 wt % sulfuric acid, ethanol solubility exceeds that which can be precisely determined using the Knudsen cell technique but falls in the range of 10(exp 7)-10(exp 10) M/atm. The equilibrium concentration of ethanol in upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UT/LS) sulfate particles is calculated from these measurements and compared to other small oxygenated organic compounds. Even if ethanol is a minor component in the gas phase, it may be a major constituent of the organic fraction in the particle phase. No evidence for the formation of ethyl hydrogen sulfate was found under our experimental conditions. While the protonation of ethanol does augment solubility at higher acidity, the primary reason H* increases with acidity is an increase in the solubility of molecular (i.e., neutral) ethanol.

  9. CN and HCN in the infrared spectrum of IRC + 10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, G. R.; Deming, D.; Jennings, D. E.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Keady, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The abundance of HCN in the inner circumstellar shell of IRC + 10216 has been remeasured using the 12-micron nu2 band. The 12-micron lines are less saturated than HCN 3-micron lines previously detected in the spectrum of IRC + 10216. The observed 12-micron HCN line is formed in the circumstellar shell from about 4 to 12 R sub * in accord with a photospheric origin for HCN. The derived HCN abundance in the 4 to 12 R sub* region is 4 x 10 exp-5 and the column density is 7 x 10 exp 18/sq cm. The 5-micron CN vibration-rotation fundamental band was detected for the first time in an astronomical source. Using four CN lines, the CN column density was determined to be 2.6 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and the rotational temperature to be 8 +/-2 K. The peal radial abundance is 1 x 10 exp -5. The values for the temperature and abundance are in good agreement with microwave results and with the formation of CN from the photolysis of HCN.

  10. CN and HCN in the infrared spectrum of IRC + 10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, G. R.; Deming, D.; Jennings, D. E.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Keady, John J.

    1991-11-01

    The abundance of HCN in the inner circumstellar shell of IRC + 10216 has been remeasured using the 12-micron nu2 band. The 12-micron lines are less saturated than HCN 3-micron lines previously detected in the spectrum of IRC + 10216. The observed 12-micron HCN line is formed in the circumstellar shell from about 4 to 12 R* in accord with a photospheric origin for HCN. The derived HCN abundance in the 4 to 12 R sub* region is 4 x 10 exp-5 and the column density is 7 x 10 exp 18/sq cm. The 5-micron CN vibration-rotation fundamental band was detected for the first time in an astronomical source. Using four CN lines, the CN column density was determined to be 2.6 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and the rotational temperature to be 8 +/-2 K. The peal radial abundance is 1 x 10 exp -5. The values for the temperature and abundance are in good agreement with microwave results and with the formation of CN from the photolysis of HCN.

  11. Preliminary DMR measurements of the CMB isotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; De Amici, G.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.; Rokke, L.

    1991-01-01

    The COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument has produced preliminary full-sky maps at frequencies 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz. The redundant channels and matched beams at three frequencies distinguish the DMR from previous large-scale surveys. Galactic emission is seen unambiguously at all three frequencies. The only large-scale anisotropy detected in the cosmic microwave background is the dipole anisotropy. There is no clear evidence for any other large-angular-scale feature in the maps. Without correcting for any systematic effects, we are able to place limits DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 3 x 10 exp -5 for the rms quadrupole amplitude, DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for monochromatic fluctuations, and DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for Gaussian fluctuations (all limits are 95 percent C.L. with TO = 2.735 K). The data limit DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 10 exp -4 for any feature larger than 7 deg. We briefly review the DMR and discuss some implications of these results in cosmology.

  12. T4 test

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal level of T4 may be due to: Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto disease and other disorders involving an ... disease) Goiter - simple Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Hypothalamus Hypothyroidism Kwashiorkor T3 test Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Review Date ...

  13. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  14. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  15. Trajectory Optimization: OTIS 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riehl, John P.; Sjauw, Waldy K.; Falck, Robert D.; Paris, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    The latest release of the Optimal Trajectories by Implicit Simulation (OTIS4) allows users to simulate and optimize aerospace vehicle trajectories. With OTIS4, one can seamlessly generate optimal trajectories and parametric vehicle designs simultaneously. New features also allow OTIS4 to solve non-aerospace continuous time optimal control problems. The inputs and outputs of OTIS4 have been updated extensively from previous versions. Inputs now make use of objectoriented constructs, including one called a metastring. Metastrings use a greatly improved calculator and common nomenclature to reduce the user s workload. They allow for more flexibility in specifying vehicle physical models, boundary conditions, and path constraints. The OTIS4 calculator supports common mathematical functions, Boolean operations, and conditional statements. This allows users to define their own variables for use as outputs, constraints, or objective functions. The user-defined outputs can directly interface with other programs, such as spreadsheets, plotting packages, and visualization programs. Internally, OTIS4 has more explicit and implicit integration procedures, including high-order collocation methods, the pseudo-spectral method, and several variations of multiple shooting. Users may switch easily between the various methods. Several unique numerical techniques such as automated variable scaling and implicit integration grid refinement, support the integration methods. OTIS4 is also significantly more user friendly than previous versions. The installation process is nearly identical on various platforms, including Microsoft Windows, Apple OS X, and Linux operating systems. Cross-platform scripts also help make the execution of OTIS and post-processing of data easier. OTIS4 is supplied free by NASA and is subject to ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) restrictions. Users must have a Fortran compiler, and a Python interpreter is highly recommended.

  16. Coronal heating by the resonant absorption of Alfven waves: The effect of viscous stress tensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The time-dependent linearized magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations for a fully compressible, low-beta, viscoresistive plasma are solved numerically using an implicit integration scheme. The full viscosity stress tensor (Braginskii 1965) is included with the five parameters eta(sub i) i = 0 to 4. In agreement with previous studies, the numerical simulations demonstrate that the dissipation on inhomogeneities in the background Alfven speed occurs in a narrow resonant layer. For an active region in the solar corona the values of eta(sub i) are eta(sub o) = 0.65 g/cm/s, eta(sub 1) = 3.7 x 10(exp -12) g/cm/s, eta(sub 2) = 4 eta(sub 1), eta(sub 3) = 1.4 x 10(exp -6) g/cm/s, eta(sub 4) = 2 eta(sub 3), with n = 10(exp 10)/cu cm, T = 2 x 10(exp 6) K, and B = 100 G. When the Lundquist number S = 10(exp 4) and R(sub 1) much greater than S (where R(sub 1) is the dimensionless shear viscous number) the width of the resistive dissipation layer d(sub r) is 0.22a (where a is the density gradient length scale) and d(sub r) approximately S(exp -1/3). When S much greater than R(sub 1) the shear viscous dissipation layer width d(sub r) scales as R(sub 1)(exp -1/3). The shear viscous and the resistive dissipation occurs in an overlapping narrow region, and the total heating rate is independent of the value of the dissipation parameters in agreement with previous studies. Consequently, the maximum values of the perpendicular velocity and perpendicular magnetic field scale as R(sub 1)(exp -1/3). It is evident from the simulations that for solar parameters the heating due to the compressive viscosity (R(sub 0) = 560) is negligible compared to the resistive and the shear viscous (R(sub 1)) dissipation and it occurs in a broad layer of order a in width. In the solar corona with S approximately equals 10(exp 4) and R(sub 1) approximately equals 10(exp 14) (as calculated from the Braginskii expressions), the shear viscous resonant heating is of comparable magnitude to the resistive resonant

  17. [C4 type photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Drozak, Anna; Wasilewska, Wioleta; Buczyńska, Alicja; Romanowska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis includes several anatomical and biochemical modifications that allow plants to concentrate CO2 at the site of Rubisco. The photorespiratory pathway is repressed in C4 plants, since the rates of photosynthesis and biomass production are increased. This is an adaptation to high light intensities, high temperatures and dryness. C4 plants contain two distinct types of photosynthetic cells, mesophyll and bundle sheath. The processes of assimilation and reduction of CO2 are separated spatiality and catayzed by two different enzymes. Only the bundle sheath chloroplasts perform the reactions of the Calvin-Benson cycle with the help of the Rubisco enzyme present exclusively in this cell type. The primary CO2 fixation occurs in mesophyll cells through the action of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The light-dependent reactions of the photosynthesis occur exclusively in the latter cell type. These differences in photochemistry lead to distinct redox profiles in both types of cells. C4 plants are divided into three biochemical subtypes on the basis of differences in the mechanisms of decarboxylation of the C4 acids. C4 plants will provide the main source of food for humans and animals in the nearest decade.

  18. A Versatile Low Temperature Synthetic Route to Zintl Phase Precursors: Na4Si4, Na4Ge4 and K4Ge4 as Examples

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuchu; Xu, Fen; Atkins, Tonya; Goforth, Andrea M.; Neiner, Doinita; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Na4Si4 and Na4Ge4 are ideal chemical precursors for inorganic clathrate structures, clusters, and nanocrystals. The monoclinic Zintl phases, Na4Si4 and Na4Ge4, contain isolated homo-tetrahedranide [Si4]4− and [Ge4]4− clusters surrounded by alkali metal cations. In this study, a simple scalable route has been applied to prepare Zintl phases of composition Na4Si4 and Na4Ge4 using the reaction between NaH and Si or Ge at low temperature (420 °C for Na4Si4 and 270 °C for Na4Ge4). The method was also applied to K4Ge4, using KH and Ge as raw materials, to show the versatility of this approach. The influence of specific reaction conditions on the purity of these Zintl phases has been studied by controlling five factors: the method of reagent mixing (manual or ball milled), the stoichiometry between raw materials, the reaction temperature, the heating time and the gas flow rate. Moderate ball-milling and excess NaH or KH facilitate the formation of pure Na4Si4, Na4Ge4 or K4Ge4 at 420 °C (Na4Si4) or 270 °C (both M4Ge4 compounds, M = Na, K). TG/DSC analysis of the reaction of NaH and Ge indicates that ball milling reduces the temperature for reaction and confirms the formation temperature. This method provides large quantities of high quality Na4Si4 and Na4Ge4 without the need for specialized laboratory equipment, such as Schlenk lines, niobium/tantalum containers, or an arc welder, thereby expanding the accessibility and chemical utility of these phases by making them more convenient to prepare. This new synthetic method may also be extended to lithium-containing Zintl phases (LiH is commercially available) as well as to alkali metal-tetrel Zintl compounds of other compositions, e.g. K4Ge9. PMID:19921060

  19. Processing and testing of high toughness silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Sanders, William A.; Choi, Sung R.

    1993-01-01

    High toughness silicon nitride ceramics were processed with the addition of small quantities of beta-Si3N4 whiskers in a commercially available alpha-Si3N4 powder. These whiskers grew preferentially during sintering resulting in large, elongated beta-grains, which acted to toughen the matrix by crack deflection and grain pullout. The fracture toughness of these samples seeded with beta-Si3N4 whiskers ranged from 8.7 to 9.5 MPa m(exp 0.5) depending on the sintering additives.

  20. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene by Pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Spain, J C

    1993-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas spp. was isolated from nitrobenzene-contaminated soil on 4-nitrotoluene as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The organism also grew on 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, and 4-nitrobenzoate. 4-Nitrobenzoate and ammonia were detected in the culture fluid of glucose-grown cells after induction with 4-nitrotoluene. Washed suspensions of 4-nitrotoluene- or 4-nitrobenzoate-grown cells oxidized 4-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol, and protocatechuate. Extracts from induced cells contained 4-nitrobenzaldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase activities. Under anaerobic conditions, cell extracts converted 4-nitrobenzoate or 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to protocatechuate. Conversion of 4-nitrobenzoate to protocatechuate required NADPH. These results indicate that 4-nitrotoluene was degraded by an initial oxidation of the methyl group to form 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol, which was converted to 4-nitrobenzoate via 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. The 4-nitrobenzoate was reduced to 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate, which was converted to protocatechuate. A protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase catalyzed meta-ring fission of the protocatechuate. The detection of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and 4-nitrotoluene oxygenase activities in 4-nitrobenzoate-grown cells suggests that 4-nitrobenzoate is an inducer of the 4-nitrotoluene degradative pathway. PMID:8357257

  1. Search for Antihelium with the BESS-Polar Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, M.; Mitchell, J. W.; Hams, T.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Myers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Seo, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    In two long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica, the BESS-Polar collaboration has searched for antihelium in the cosmic radiation with higher sensitivity than any reported investigation. BESSPolar I flew in 2004, observing for 8.5 days. BESS-Polar II flew in 2007-2008, observing for 24.5 days. No antihelium candidate was found in BESS-Polar I data among 8.4 x 10(exp 6) [Z] = 2 nuclei from 1.0 to 20 GV or in BESS-Polar II data among 4.0 x 10(exp 7) [Z] = 2 nuclei from 1.0 to 14 GV. Assuming antihelium to have the same spectral shape as helium, a 95% confidence upper limit of 6.9 x 10(exp -8) was determined by combining all the BESS data, including the two BESS-Polar flights. With no assumed antihelium spectrum and a weighted average of the lowest antihelium efficiencies from 1.6 to 14 GV, an upper limit of 1.0 x 10(exp -7) was determined for the combined BESS-Polar data. These are the most stringent limits obtained to date.

  2. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Ferguson, H. C.; Scarlata, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Newman, J. A.; Dickinson, M.; Jahnke, K.; Salmon, B. W.; deMello, D. F.; Kkocevski, D. D.; Lai, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Rodney, S. A.; Guo, Yicheng

    2012-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z approx. 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines . with rest-frame equivalent widths approx. 1000A in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with approx.10(exp 8) Solar Mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M*/M* of only approx. 15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10(exp -4) Mpc(sup -3) can produce in approx.4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) Solar Mass dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  3. Ultra-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensors for the Background Limited Infrared/Sub-mm Spectrograph (BLISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, A. D.; Kenyon, M. E.; Echternach, P. M.; Chui, T.; Eom, B.-H.; Day, P. K.; Bock, J. J.; Holmes, W.A.; Bradford, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report progress in fabricating ultra-sensitive superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) for BLISS. BLISS is a suite of grating spectrometers covering 35-433 micron with R approx. 700 cooled to 50 mK that is proposed to fly on the Japanese space telescope SPICA. The detector arrays for BLISS are TES bolometers readout with a time domain SQUID multiplexer. The required noise equivalent power (NEP) for BLISS is NEP = 10(exp -19) W/Hz(exp 1/2) with an ultimate goal of NEP= 5 x 10(exp -20) W/Hz(exp 1/2) to achieve background limited noise performance. The required and goal response times are tau = 150 ms and tau = 50ms respectively to achieve the NEP at the required and goal optical chop frequency 1-5 Hz. We measured prototype BLISS arrays and have achieved NEP = 6 x 10(exp -18) W/Hz(exp 1/2) and tau = 1.4 ms with a Ti TES (T(sub C) = 565 mK) and NEP approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -19) W/Hz(exp 1/2) and tau approximates 4.5 ms with an Ir TES (T(sub C) = 130 mK). Dark power for these tests is estimated at 1-5 fW.

  4. Spherically symmetric, expanding, non-LTE model atmospheres for novae during their early stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.; Wehrse, R.; Starrfield, S.; Shaviv, G.

    1992-01-01

    In the continuum and line-blanketed models presented here, nova atmospheres are characterized by a very slow decrease of density with increasing radius. This feature leads to very large geometrical extensions so that there are large temperature differences between the inner and outer parts of the line-forming regions. The theoretical spectra show a large IR excess and a small Balmer jump which may be either in absorption or in emission. For the parameters considered (effective temperature of about 10 exp 4 K, L = 2 x 10 exp 4 solar luminosities, outer boundary density of about 3 x 10 exp -15 g cm exp -3, mass-loss rate of 10 exp -5 solar masses/yr), most lines are in absorption. The effects of changes in the abundances of the heavy elements on the emergent spectra are discussed. The strong unidentified features observed in ultraviolet spectra of novae are found in actuality to be regions of transparency within the Fe 'forest'. Ultraviolet spectra obtained from the IUE archives are displayed, and spectral synthesis of these spectra is done using the theoretical atmospheres.

  5. Observations of the Minor Species Al, Fe and Ca(+) in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bida, Thomas A.; Killen, Rosemary M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first detections of Al and Fe, and strict upper limits for Ca(+) in the exosphere of Mercury, using the HIRES spectrometer at the Keck I telescope. We report observed 4-sigma tangent columns of 1.5x10(exp 7) Al atoms per square centimeter at an altitude of 1220 km (1.5 Mercury radii (R(sub M)) from planet center), and that for Fe of 1.6 x 10 per square centimeter at an altitude of 950 km (1.4 R(sub M)). The observed 3-sigma Ca(+) column was 3.9x10(exp 6) ions per square centimeter at an altitude of 1630 km (1.67 R(sub M). A simple model for zenith column abundances of the neutral species were 9.5 x 10(exp 7) Al per square centimeter, and 3.0 x 10(exp 8) Fe per square centimeter. The observations appear to be consistent with production of these species by impact vaporization with a large fraction of the ejecta in molecular form. The scale height of the Al gas is consistent with a kinetic temperature of 3000 - 9000 K while that of Fe is 10500 K. The apparent high temperature of the Fe gas would suggest that it may be produced by dissociation of molecules. A large traction of both Al and Fe appear to condense in a vapor cloud at low altitudes.

  6. Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro da Silva, Ana Luísa; Vaz da Silva, Manuel Joaquim

    2016-11-01

    The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative consensus conference proposed a classification of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), aiming for a better delineation of each subtype. Although the exact pathophysiology of type 4 CRS is not completely understood, the mechanisms involved are probably multifactorial. There is growing evidence that oxidative stress is a major connector in the development and progression of type 4 CRS. Giving its complexity, poor prognosis and increasing incidence, type 4 CRS is becoming a significant public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly predisposed to cardiac dysfunction, due to the high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this population, but the contribution of risk factors specific to chronic kidney disease should also be taken into account. Much remains to be elucidated about type 4 CRS: despite progress over the last decade, there are still significant questions regarding its pathophysiology and there is as yet no specific therapy. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved may provide potential targets for intervention. The present review will provide a brief description of the definition, epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, biomarkers and management strategies of type 4 CRS, and the pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors presumably involved in its development will be particularly highlighted.

  7. SLC4A Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyeong

    2016-01-01

    SLC4A gene family proteins include bicarbonate transporters that move HCO3− across the plasma membrane and regulate intracellular pH and transepithelial movement of acid–base equivalents. These transporters are Cl/HCO3 exchangers, electrogenic Na/HCO3 cotransporters, electroneutral Na/HCO3 cotransporters, and Na+-driven Cl/HCO3 exchanger. Studies of the bicarbonate transporters in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated their physiological importance for acid–base homeostasis at the cellular and systemic levels. Recent advances in structure/function analysis have also provided valuable information on domains or motifs critical for regulation, ion translocation, and protein topology. This chapter focuses on the molecular mechanisms of ion transport along with associated structural aspects from mutagenesis of particular residues and from chimeric constructs. Structure/function studies have helped to understand the mechanism by which ion substrates are moved via the transporters. This chapter also describes some insights into the structure of SLC4A1 (AE1) and SLC4A4 (NBCe1) transporters. Finally, as some SLC4A transporters exist in concert with other proteins in the cells, the structural features associated with protein–protein interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:23177984

  8. Triply Threaded [4]Rotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Danon, Jonathan J; Leigh, David A; McGonigal, Paul R; Ward, John W; Wu, Jhenyi

    2016-09-28

    [4]Rotaxanes featuring three axles threaded through a single ring have been prepared through active metal template synthesis. Nickel-catalyzed sp(3)-sp(3) homocouplings of alkyl bromide "half-threads" through 37- and 38-membered 2,2':6',2″-terpyridyl macrocycles generate triply threaded [4]rotaxanes in up to 11% yield. An analogous 39-membered macrocycle produced no rotaxane products under similar conditions. The constitutions of the [4]rotaxanes were determined by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Doubly threaded [3]rotaxanes were also obtained from the reactions but no [2]rotaxanes were isolated, suggesting that upon demetalation the axle of a singly threaded rotaxane can slip through a macrocycle that is sufficiently large to accommodate three threads.

  9. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  10. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  11. X-4 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    In the early days of transonic flight research, many aerodynamicists believed that eliminating conventional tail surfaces could reduce the problems created by shock wave interaction with the tail's lifting surfaces. To address this issue, the Army Air Forces's Air Technical Service awarded a contract to Northrop Aircraft Corporation on 5 April 1946 to build a piloted 'flying laboratory.' Northrop already had experience with tailless flying wing designs such as the N-1M, N-9M, XB-35, and YB-49. Subsequently, the manufacturer built two semi-tailless X-4 research aircraft, the first of which flew half a century ago. The X-4 was designed to investigate transonic compressibility effects at speeds near Mach 0.85 to 0.88, slightly below the speed of sound. Northrop project engineer Arthur Lusk designed the aircraft with swept wings and a conventional fuselage that housed two turbojet engines. It had a vertical stabilizer, but no horizontal tail surfaces. It was one of the smallest X-planes ever built, and every bit of internal space was used for systems and instrumentation. The first X-4 arrived at Muroc Air Force Base by truck on 15 November 1948. Over the course of several weeks, engineers conducted static tests, and Northrop test pilot Charles Tucker made initial taxi runs. Although small of stature, he barely fit into the diminutive craft. Tucker, a veteran Northrop test pilot, had previously flown the XB-35 and YB-49 flying wing bomber prototypes. Prior to flying for Northrop, he had logged 400 hours in jet airplanes as a test pilot for Lockheed and the Air Force. He would now be responsible for completing the contractor phase of the X-4 flight test program. Finally, all was ready. Tucker climbed into the cockpit, and made the first flight on 15 December 1948. It only lasted 18 minutes, allowing just enough time for the pilot to become familiar with the basic handling qualities of the craft. The X-4 handled well, but Tucker noted some longitudinal instability at all

  12. Reader. Grade 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA.

    This textbook is the fourth in the official reading series developed by the Ministry of Education in Saigon and used in all public schools in Vietnam. The books in this series have been reprinted in their entirety from the original editions for use in elementary schools in the United States which have Vietnamese students. This grade 4 reader…

  13. Rescue Manual. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fourth of 10 modules contains 8 chapters: (1) construction and characteristics of rescue rope; (2) knots, bends, and hitches; (3) critical angles; (4) raising systems; (5) rigging; (6) using the brake-bar rack for rope rescue; (7) rope…

  14. 1,4-Dibromobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,4 - Dibromobenzene ; CASRN 106 - 37 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  15. 2,4-Diaminotoluene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Diaminotoluene ; CASRN 95 - 80 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  16. 2,4-Dinitrophenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dinitrophenol ; CASRN 51 - 28 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  17. 2,4-Dichlorophenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dichlorophenol ; CASRN 120 - 83 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  18. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,4 - Dichlorobenzene ; CASRN 106 - 46 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  19. 1,4-Dioxane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 005 - F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF 1,4 - Dioxane ( CAS No . 123 - 91 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been rev

  20. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  1. A-4 scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of galactic sources, extragalactic sources and gamma bursts with the A-4 instrument at energy 1 energies of between 0.1 to 10 MeV are discussed. Aximuthal scans are presented. The Crab Nebula and its spectrum and the spectrum of Cygnus Z-1 are described.

  2. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dinitrotoluene ; CASRN 121 - 14 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  3. 1,4-Dithiane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,4 - Dithiane ; CASRN 505 - 29 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. 2,4-Dimethylphenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dimethylphenol ; CASRN 105 - 67 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. 3,4-Dimethylphenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    3,4 - Dimethylphenol ; CASRN 95 - 65 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  6. SVX4 User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Kreiger, B.; Rapidis, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Utes, M.; Weber, M.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    We present and describe the operation of the SVX4 chip. The SVX4 is a custom 128-channel analog to digital converter chip used by D0 and CDF in Run IIb to read out their respective silicon strip detectors. Each channel consists of an integrator (Front-End device, or FE) and a digitize/readout section (Back-End device, or BE). The input to each channel is sampled and temporarily stored in its own storage capacitor. Upon receiving a trigger signal, the relevant pipeline cell is reserved. Subsequent signals cause reserved cells to be digitized by a 128 parallel channel Wilkinson type 8-bit ADC, and then readout in byte-serial mode with optional zero suppression (sparsification). Salient features include (1) operation in either D0 mode or CDF mode (CDF mode features ''dead timeless operation'' or continued acquisition during digitization and readout) with an additional mixed mode of operation, (2) adjustable, loadable control parameters, including the integrator bandwidth and ADC polarity (only one input charge polarity will be used for Run IIb, but this feature remains for diagnostic purposes), (3) sparsified readout with nearest neighbor logic, (4) built-in charge injection with the ability for external voltage overriding for testing and calibration, and (5) a channel mask that is used for either charge injection or for masking of channels with excessive DC current input during chip operation. This document is meant to familiarize the user with the functionality of the SVX4 and goes on to include specifications, pin outs, timings and electrical information. Additional information on the SVX4 can be found in Ref [1].

  7. 27 CFR 4.4 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delegations of the Administrator. 4.4 Section 4.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.4 Delegations of...

  8. 10 CFR 4.552-4.559 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.552-4.559 Section 4.552-4.559 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.552-4.559...

  9. 10 CFR 4.561-4.569 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.561-4.569 Section 4.561-4.569 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.561-4.569...

  10. 10 CFR 4.512-4.529 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.512-4.529 Section 4.512-4.529 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.512-4.529...

  11. 10 CFR 4.531-4.539 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.531-4.539 Section 4.531-4.539 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.531-4.539...

  12. 10 CFR 4.571-4.999 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.571-4.999 Section 4.571-4.999 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.571-4.999...

  13. 10 CFR 4.541-4.548 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.541-4.548 Section 4.541-4.548 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.541-4.548...

  14. 10 CFR 4.504-4.509 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 4.504-4.509 Section 4.504-4.509 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL... Activities Conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission §§ 4.504-4.509...

  15. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accident. 4.4 Section 4.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property damage, personal injury or death shall report...

  16. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... accident. 4.4 Section 4.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property damage, personal injury or death shall report...

  17. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accident. 4.4 Section 4.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor vehicle involved in an accident resulting in property damage, personal injury or death shall report...

  18. 38 CFR 4.80-4.84 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4.80-4.84 Section 4.80-4.84 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense §§ 4.80-4.84 Impairment of Auditory Acuity...

  19. 45 CFR 4.4 - Acknowledgement of mailed process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acknowledgement of mailed process. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION SERVICE OF PROCESS § 4.4 Acknowledgement of mailed process. The Department will not provide a receipt or other acknowledgement of process received, except for a...

  20. 29 CFR 4.124-4.129 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 4.124-4.129 Section 4.124-4.129 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Specific Exclusions §§ 4.124-4.129 Particular Application of Contract Coverage Principles...

  1. 29 CFR 4.157-4.158 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 4.157-4.158 Section 4.157-4.158 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Employees Covered by the Act §§ 4.157-4.158...

  2. 29 CFR 4.147-4.149 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 4.147-4.149 Section 4.147-4.149 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Period of Coverage §§ 4.147-4.149 Employees Covered by the Act...

  3. 29 CFR 4.135-4.139 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 4.135-4.139 Section 4.135-4.139 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Application of the McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Particular Application of Contract Coverage Principles §§ 4.135-4.139 Determining Amount...

  4. 27 CFR 4.4 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delegations of the Administrator. 4.4 Section 4.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.4 Delegations of...

  5. 27 CFR 4.4 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delegations of the Administrator. 4.4 Section 4.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.4 Delegations of...

  6. 27 CFR 4.4 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delegations of the Administrator. 4.4 Section 4.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.4 Delegations of...

  7. 27 CFR 4.4 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delegations of the Administrator. 4.4 Section 4.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.4 Delegations of...

  8. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  9. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  10. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  11. The heating of nova ejecta by radioactive decays of the beta-unstable nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistinner, Shlomi; Shaviv, Giora; Starrfield, Sumner

    1994-01-01

    Recent nucleosynthesis and hydrodynamic calculations of the consequences of accretion onto massive ONeMg white dwarf stars show that under certain circumstances significant amounts of the beta-unstable nuclei can be produced and ejected by the resulting explosion. We use these calculations as a guide in order to obtain the conditions under which the heating of the ejected material by the nonthermal electrons and positrons produced by the decays of the beta-unstable nuclei is sufficient to overcome the cooling from adiabatic expansion and lead to the production of X-ray-emitting coronal gas. These conditions are as follows: (1) a mass fraction for Na-22 of the order of 10(exp -3) or greater, (2) an expansion velocity in the range approximately 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 3) km/s, (3) a photospheric radius of approximately 10(exp 14) cm, (4) if the density distribution in the atmosphere satisfies a power law, then the exponent must be less than 3 for heating to overcome adiabatic cooling. Both the simulations of the outburst and the model atmosphere fits to the observed energy distributions, however, imply that the exponent is greater than or = 3 during the early phases of the outburst. Nevertheless, for a value of the exponent of 2, we predict the time when hot coronal gas can form during the expansion phases of the envelope.

  12. Test Status for Proposed Coupling of a Gravitational Force to Extreme Type II YBCO Ceramic Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Li, Ning; Robertson, Tony; Koczor, Ron; Brantley, Whitt

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair electron density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (about 10-6 g/cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with the percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 10(exp 4) was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In the present experiments reported using a sensitive gravimeter (resolution <10(exp -9) unit gravity or variation of 10(exp -6) cm/sq s in accelerations), bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field (0.6 Tesla) subject to lateral AC fields (60 Gauss at 60 Hz) and rotation. With magnetic shielding, thermal control and buoyancy compensation, changes in acceleration were measured to be less than 2 parts in 10(exp 8) of the normal gravitational acceleration. This result puts new limits on the strength and range of the proposed coupling between high-Tc superconductors and gravity. Latest test results will be reported, along with status for future improvements and prospects.

  13. Activation energy and capture cross section of majority carrier traps in Zn doped InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    Schottky barrier diodes were fabricated on Zn doped InP Wafers. The diodes were radiation damaged with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 2 x 10(exp 12)cm(sup -2). The damage was analyzed by DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) using the double correlation technique. Capture cross sections were measured directly. Two major defects were observed in the DLTS spectra. The first defect, was H4 at Ev + 0.29 eV, with capture cross section 1.1 x 10(exp -17)cm(sup 2). The second defect, was H5 at Ev + 0.53 eV. Its capture cross section varied with temperature as described by the relationship sigma = sigma(sub 0) exp(delta(E)/kT) where sigma(sub 0) = 1.3 x 10(exp -19)cm(sup 2) and delta(E) = .08 eV. This relationship yields a sigma of 5.9 x 10(exp -21)cm(sup 2) at room temperature. The surprisingly small capture cross section of H5 and its temperature dependence are discussed in terms of the multiphonon emission process for carrier capture at the defect. The advantages of the improved experimental techniques used are also discussed.

  14. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  15. Electric Propulsion Options for 10 kW Class Earth-Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, M. J.; Curran, Francis M.

    1989-01-01

    Five and 10 kW ion and arcjet propulsion system options for a near-term space demonstration experiment were evaluated. Analyses were conducted to determine first-order propulsion system performance and system component mass estimates. Overall mission performance of the electric propulsion systems was quantified in terms of the maximum thrusting time, total impulse, and velocity increment capability available when integrated onto a generic spacecraft under fixed mission model assumptions. Maximum available thrusting times for the ion-propelled spacecraft options, launched on a DELTA 2 6920 vehicle, range from approximately 8,600 hours for a 4-engine 10 kW system to more than 29,600 hours for a single-engine 5 kW system. Maximum total impulse values and maximum delta-v's range from 1.2x10 (exp 7) to 2.1x10 (exp 7) N-s, and 3550 to 6200 m/s, respectively. Maximum available thrusting times for the arcjet propelled spacecraft launched on the DELTA 2 6920 vehicle range from approximately 528 hours for the 6-engine 10 kW hydrazine system to 2328 hours for the single-engine 5 kW system. Maximum total impulse values and maximum delta-v's range from 2.2x10 (exp 6) to 3.6x10 (exp 6) N-s, and approximately 662 to 1072 m/s, respectively.

  16. Microgravity monitoring instrument development and application to vernier guidance, navigation, and vehicle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joseph J.

    1992-01-01

    The fact that a spacecraft traveling through the 'vacuum' of space conforms to the classical Keplerian ellipse has recently been disproven. It is now well known that such a vehicle is acted on by many external forces such as drag in the rarefied particle atmosphere, solar wind and particle impact. This paper discusses the development of sensors and sensor systems to measure these minute forces of acceleration/deceleration. Four systems will be discussed: a 10 exp -4 g system, a 10 exp -6 g system, a 10 exp -(6-8) g system and a 10 exp -9 g system. The design of each system will be explained along with the advantages/disadvantages of each. Various applications unique to each system will be discussed. Configurations, design schemes, test plans and calibration procedures, both in the ground laboratory and inflight, will be presented. The current design/development/operational status of each system will be examined and future plans discussed. Application to aerodynamic studies and vernier guidance, navigation, and vehicle control will also be examined.

  17. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  18. Space Weathering Rates in Lunar and Itokawa Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering alters the chemistry, microstructure, and spectral proper-ties of grains on the surfaces of airless bodies by two major processes: micrometeorite impacts and solar wind interactions. Investigating the nature of space weathering processes both in returned samples and in remote sensing observations provides information fundamental to understanding the evolution of airless body regoliths, improving our ability to determine the surface composition of asteroids, and linking meteorites to specific asteroidal parent bodies. Despite decades of research into space weathering processes and their effects, we still know very little about weathering rates. For example, what is the timescale to alter the reflectance spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope from an S-type asteroid? One approach to answering this question has been to determine ages of asteroid families by dynamical modeling and determine the spectral proper-ties of the daughter fragments. However, large differences exist between inferred space weathering rates and timescales derived from laboratory experiments, analysis of asteroid family spectra and the space weathering styles; estimated timescales range from 5000 years up to 108 years. Vernazza et al. concluded that solar wind interactions dominate asteroid space weathering on rapid timescales of 10(exp 4)-10(exp 6) years. Shestopalov et al. suggested that impact-gardening of regolith particles and asteroid resurfacing counteract the rapid progress of solar wind optical maturation of asteroid surfaces and proposed a space weathering timescale of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) years.

  19. Evolution of Intrinsic Scatter in the SFR-Stellar Mass Correlation at 0.5 less than z Less Than 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Acquaviva, Viviana; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; De Mello, Duilia F.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2016-01-01

    We present estimates of intrinsic scatter in the star formation rate (SFR)--stellar mass (M*) correlation in the redshift range 0.5 less than z less than 3.0 and in the mass range 10(exp 7) less than M* less than 10(exp 11) solar mass. We utilize photometry in the Hubble Ultradeep Field (HUDF12) and Ultraviolet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) campaigns and CANDELS/GOODS-S and estimate SFR, M* from broadband spectral energy distributions and the best-available redshifts. The maximum depth of the UDF photometry (F160W 29.9 AB, 5 sigma depth) probes the SFR--M* correlation down to M* approximately 10(exp 7) solar mass, a factor of 10-100 x lower in M* than previous studies, and comparable to dwarf galaxies in the local universe. We find the slope of the SFR-M* relationship to be near unity at all redshifts and the normalization to decrease with cosmic time. We find a moderate increase in intrinsic scatter with cosmic time from 0.2 to 0.4 dex across the epoch of peak cosmic star formation. None of our redshift bins show a statistically significant increase in intrinsic scatter approximately 100 Myr. Our results are consistent with a picture of gradual and self-similar assembly of galaxies across more than three orders of magnitude in stellar mass from as low as 10(exp 7) solar mass.

  20. Record Low NEP in the Hot-Electron Titanium Nanobolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Olaya, David; Wei, Jian; Pereverzev, Sergey; Gershenson, Michael E.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; McGrath, William R.; Sergeev, Andrei V.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing hot-electron superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) capable of counting THz photons and operating at T = 0.3K. We fabricated superconducting Ti nanosensors with Nb contacts with a volume of approx. 3x10(exp -3) cu microns on planar Si substrate and have measured the thermal conductance due to the weak electron-phonon coupling in the material G = 4x10(exp -14) W/K at 0.3 K. The corresponding phonon-noise NEP = 3x10(exp -19) W/Hz(sup 1/2). Detection of single optical photons (1550nm and 670nm wavelength) has been demonstrated for larger devices and yielded the thermal time constants of 30 microsec at 145 mK and of 25 microsec at 190 mK. This Hot-Electron Direct Detector (HEDD) is expected to have a sufficient energy resolution for detecting individual photons with (nu) > 1 THz where NEP approx. 3x10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 1/2) is needed for spectroscopy in space.

  1. Observed temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, M. K.; Eanes, R. L.; Shum, C. K.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging data to Starlette, collected during the period from 1975 to 1990, are analyzed to determine yearly values of the second degree annual (Sa) and semiannual (Ssa) tides, simultaneously with average values of other low degree and order tide parameters. The yearly fluctuations in the values for Sa and Ssa are associated with changes in the Earth's second degree zonal harmonic caused by meteorological excitation. The Starlette-determined mean values for the amplitude of the annual and semiannual variations in J2 are 32.3 x 10 exp -11 and 19.5 x 10 exp -11, respectively; while the rms about the mean values are 4.1 x 10 exp -11 and 6.3 x 10 exp -11, respectively. The annual delta-J2 is in good agreement with the value obtained from the combined effects of air mass redistribution without the oceanic inverted-barometer effects (non-IB) and hydrological change. Approximately 90 percent of the observed annual variation from Starlette is attributed to the meteorological mass redistribution occurring on the Earth's surface.

  2. Two-dimensional velocity, optical risetime, and peak current estimates for natural positive lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    Velocities, optical risetimes, and transmission line model peak currents for seven natural positive return strokes are reported. The average 2D positive return stroke velocity for channel segments of less than 500 m in length starting near the base of the channel is 0.8 +/- 0.3 x 10 exp 8 m/s, which is slower than the present corresponding average velocity for natural negative first return strokes of 1.7 +/- 0.7 x 10 exp 8/s. It is inferred that positive stroke peak currents in the literature, which assume the same velocity as negative strokes, are low by a factor of 2. The average 2D positive return stroke velocity for channel segments of greater than 500 m starting near the base of the channel is 0.9 +/- 0.4 x 10 exp 8 m/s. The corresponding average velocity for the present natural negative first strokes is 1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10 exp 8 m/s. No significant velocity change with height is found for positive return strokes.

  3. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with the August 2006 Timing Glitch of the Vela Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A.

    2011-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasinormal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational-wave emission, In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two colocated Hanford gravitational-wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational-wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational-wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6,3 x 10(exp -21) to 1.4 x 10(exp -20) on the peak: intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational-wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0 x 10(exp 44) to 1.3 x 10(exp 45) erg.

  4. Fourier transform infrared studies of the interaction of HCl with model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1993-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions involving hydrochloric acid adsorbed on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are postulated to contribute to polar ozone loss. Using FTIR spectroscopy to probe the condensed phase, we have examined the interaction of HCl with ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) films representative of types II and I PSCs, respectively. For HCl pressures in the range of 10 exp -7 to 10 exp -5 Torr, our FTIR studies show that a small amount of crystalline HCl-6H2O formed on or in ice at 155 K. However, for higher HCl pressures, we observed that the entire film of ice rapidly converted into an amorphous 4:1 H2O:HCl mixture. From HCl-uptake experiments with P(HCl) = 8 x 10 exp -7 Torr, we estimate roughly that the diffusion coefficient of HCl in ice is around 2 x 10 exp -12 sq cm/s at 158 K. For higher temperatures more closely approximating those found in the stratosphere, we were unable to detect bulk HCl uptake by ice. Indirect evidence suggests that HCl adsorption onto the surface of model PSC films inhibited the evaporation of both ice and NAT by 3-5 K.

  5. Boundary Layer Transition Correlations and Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Smart Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2002-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent perfect-gas air, Navier-Stokes computations have been performed for a proposed Mars Smart Lander entry vehicle at Mach 6 over a free stream Reynolds number range of 6.9 x 10(exp 6)/m to 2.4 x 10(exp 7)/m (2.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.3 x 10(exp 6)/ft) for angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 11-deg, 16-deg, and 20-deg, and comparisons were made to wind tunnel heating data obtained a t the same conditions. Boundary layer edge properties were extracted from the solutions and used to correlate experimental data on the effects of heat-shield penetrations (bolt-holes where the entry vehicle would be attached to the propulsion module during transit to Mars) on boundary-layer transition. A non-equilibrium Martian-atmosphere computation was performed for the peak heating point on the entry trajectory in order to determine if the penetrations would produce boundary-layer transition by using this correlation.

  6. Boundary Layer Transition Correlations and Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Smart Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2002-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent perfect-gas air, Navier-Stokes computations have been performed for a proposed Mars Smart Lander entry vehicle at Mach 6 over a free stream Reynolds number range of 6.9 x 10(exp 6/m to 2.4 x 10(exp 7)m(2.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.3 x 10(exp 6)ft) for angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 11-deg, 16-deg, and 20-deg, and comparisons were made to wind tunnel heating data obtained at the same conditions. Boundary layer edge properties were extracted from the solutions and used to correlate experimental data on the effects of heat-shield penetrations (bolt-holes where the entry vehicle would be attached to the propulsion module during transit to Mars) on boundary-layer transition. A non-equilibrium Martian-atmosphere computation was performed for the peak heating point on the entry trajectory in order to determine if the penetrations would produce boundary-layer transition by using this correlation.

  7. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micron [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous ( L(sub IR) approximates 10(exp 13) L (sub solar)) starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L(sub [Cu II] L(sub Fir) approximates 2 x 10(exp -3) of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approximates 10(exp 4.2) /cm(exp 3) , and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approximately 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) ratio is higher than observed in local ultralummous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.

  8. ARCHIMEDESV4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, Terri L.; Brown, Russell G.; Peters, Ralph R.; Mitchell, Emily A.; Trinkle, Jeff C.

    2002-04-22

    The Archimedes 4.0 system is a constraint-based interactive assembly planning software tool used to plan, optimize, simulate, visualize, and document sequences of assembly. given a CAD model of the product, the program automatically finds part-to-part contacts, generates collision-free insertion motions, and chooses assembly order. The engineer specifies a quality metric in tems of application-specific costs for standard assembly process steps, such as part insertion, fastening, and subassembly inversion. Combined with an engineer's knowledge of application-specific assembly process requirements, Archimedes 4.0 allows systematic exploration of the space of possible assembly sequences. The engineer uses a simple graphical interface to place constraints on the valid assembly sequences, such as defining subassemblies, requiring that certain parts be placed consecutively with or before other parts, declaring preferred directions, etc. The user interface is critical to effectiveness and user acceptance of an interactive planning system.

  9. (0,4) dualities

    DOE PAGES

    Putrov, Pavel; Song, Jaewon; Yan, Wenbin

    2016-03-29

    We study a class of two-dimensional N = (0; 4) quiver gauge theories that flow to superconformal field theories. We find dualities for the superconformal field theories similar to the 4d N = 2 theories of class S, labelled by a Riemann surface C. The dual descriptions arise from various pair-of-pants decompositions, that involve an analog of the TN theory. Especially, we find the superconformal indices of such theories can be written in terms of a topological field theory on C. In conclusion, we interpret this class of SCFTs as the ones coming from compactifying 6d N = (2; 0)more » theory on CP1 x C. Moreover, some new dualities of (0; 2) and (2; 2) theories are also discussed.« less

  10. (0,4) dualities

    SciTech Connect

    Putrov, Pavel; Song, Jaewon; Yan, Wenbin

    2016-03-29

    We study a class of two-dimensional N = (0; 4) quiver gauge theories that flow to superconformal field theories. We find dualities for the superconformal field theories similar to the 4d N = 2 theories of class S, labelled by a Riemann surface C. The dual descriptions arise from various pair-of-pants decompositions, that involve an analog of the TN theory. Especially, we find the superconformal indices of such theories can be written in terms of a topological field theory on C. In conclusion, we interpret this class of SCFTs as the ones coming from compactifying 6d N = (2; 0) theory on CP1 x C. Moreover, some new dualities of (0; 2) and (2; 2) theories are also discussed.

  11. Nimbus 4 michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R A; Schlachman, B; Rogers, D; Vanous, D

    1971-06-01

    The Michelson interferometer, IRIS-D, flown on Nimbus 4 in April 1970 is an improved version of the interferometer, IRIS-B, flown on Nimbus 3 a year earlier. Thermal emission spectra of the earth are being recorded between 400 cm(-1) and 1600 cm(-1) with a nominal spectral resolution of 2.8 cm(-1) and a noise equivalent radiance between approximately 0.5 and 1 erg sec(-1) cm(-2) ster(-1) cm. This paper describes the design and performance of the IRIS-D and concentrates on the design differences that exist between the interferometers flown on Nimbus 3 and 4. The performance is demonstrated by examples of spectra obtained while in earth orbit.

  12. A comparison of low-gravity measurements on-board Columbia during STS-40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Baugher, C. R.; Blanchard, R. C.; Delombard, R.; Durgin, W. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Neupert, W.; Roussel, P.

    1993-01-01

    The first NASA Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1) flew 5 Jun. to 14 Jun. 1991 on the orbiter Columbia (STS-40). The purpose of the mission was to investigate the human body's adaptation to the low-gravity conditions of space flight and the body's readjustment after the mission to the 1 g environment of earth. In addition to the life sciences experiments manifested for the Spacelab module, a variety of experiments in other scientific disciplines flew in the Spacelab and in Get Away Special (GAS) Canisters on the GAS Bridge Assembly. Several principal investigators designed and flew specialized accelerometer systems to better assess the results of their experiments by means of a low-gravity environment characterization. This was also the first flight of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) and the first flight of the NASA Orbiter Experiments Office (OEX) sponsored Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment accelerometer (OARE). A brief introduction to seven STS-40 accelerometer systems are presented and the resulting data are discussed and compared. During crew sleep periods, acceleration magnitudes in the 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -5) g range were recorded in the Spacelab module and on the GAS Bridge Assembly. Magnitudes increased to the 10(exp -4) g level during periods of nominal crew activity. Vernier thruster firings caused acceleration shifts on the order of 10(exp -4) g and primary thruster firings caused accelerations as great as 10(exp -2) g. Frequency domain analysis revealed typical excitation of Orbiter and Spacelab structural modes at 3.5, 4.7, 5.2, 6.2, 7, and 17 Hz.

  13. Developmental milestones record - 4 months

    MedlinePlus

    Normal childhood growth milestones - 4 months; Childhood growth milestones - 4 months; Growth milestones for children - 4 months ... provider. PHYSICAL AND MOTOR SKILLS The typical 4-month-old baby should: Slow in weight gain to ...

  14. G4 Advanced Education.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    Advanced Finance and Economy Edu- cation/Zhao Dongya// Finance and Economy Science(Journal of Sichuan Finance and Economy College)(Chengdu), 1986. 2. 63...67 Preliminary Thoughts on the Reform of Industrial, Enterprising Finance Management Curriculums/Gu Xingsu//Journal of Beijing Foreign Trade College...1985. 4. 71-76 Humble Opinions on Offering Classes in "Construction of Chinese Social- ism"/Zhao Luxin//Theory and Implementation of Finance and

  15. Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Régent, Alexis; Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Cheynier, Rémi; Terrier, Benjamin; Charmeteau-De Muylder, Bénédicte; Krivitzky, Alain; Oksenhendler, Eric; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hubert, Pascale; Lortholary, Olivier; Dupin, Nicolas; Debré, Patrice; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic CD4 T lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare and severe condition with limited available data. We conducted a French multicenter study to analyze the clinical and immunologic characteristics of a cohort of patients with ICL according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. We recruited 40 patients (24 female) of mean age 44.2 ± 12.2 (19–70) years. Patients underwent T-lymphocyte phenotyping and lymphoproliferation assay at diagnosis, and experiments related to thymic function and interferon (IFN)-γ release by natural killer (NK) cell were performed. Mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 6.7 (0.14–24.3) years. Infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic events were recorded, as were outcomes of interleukin 2 therapy. In all, 25 patients had opportunistic infections (12 with human papillomavirus infection), 14 had autoimmune symptoms, 5 had malignancies, and 8 had mild or no symptoms. At the time of diagnosis, the mean cell counts were as follows: mean CD4 cell count: 127/mm3 (range, 4–294); mean CD8: 236/mm3 (range, 1–1293); mean CD19: 113/mm3 (range, 3–547); and mean NK cell count: 122/mm3 (range, 5–416). Most patients had deficiency in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Cytotoxic function of NK cells was normal, and patients with infections had a significantly lower NK cell count than those without (p = 0.01). Patients with autoimmune manifestations had increased CD8 T-cell count. Proliferation of thymic precursors, as assessed by T-cell rearrangement excision circles, was increased. Six patients died (15%). CD4 T-cell count <150/mm3 and NK cell count <100/mm3 were predictors of death. In conclusion, ICL is a heterogeneous disorder often associated with deficiencies in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Long-term prognosis may be related to initial CD4 and NK cell deficiency. PMID:24646462

  16. Flat microwave spectra seen at X-class flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    We report peculiar spectral activity of four large microwave bursts as obtained from the Solar Arrays at the Owens Valey Radio Observatory during observations of X-class flares on 24 May 1990 and 7, 8, 22 March 1991. Main observational points that we newly uncovered are: (1) flat flux spectra over 1-18 GHz in large amounts of flux ranging from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) s.f.u. at the maximum phase, (2) a common evolutionary pattern in which the spectral region of dominant flux shifts from high frequencies at the initial rise to low frequencies at the decaying phase, and (3) unusual time profiles that are impulsive at high frequencies but more extended at lower frequencies. We carry out the model calculations of microwave spectra under assumptions of gyrosynchrotron mechanism and a dipole field configuration to reproduce the observational characteristics. Our results are summarized as follows. First, a flat microwave spectrum reaching up to 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 4) s.f.u. may occur in a case where a magnetic loop is extended to an angular size of approximately (0.7-7.0) x 10(exp -7) sterad and contains a huge number (N(E greater than 10 keV) approx. 10(exp 36) - 10(exp 38)) of nonthermal electrons with power-law index approx. 3-3.5 over the entire volume. Second, the observed spectral activity could adequately be accounted for by the shrinking of the region of nonthermal electrons to the loop top and by the softening of the power-law spectrum of electrons in a time scale ranging 3-45 min depending on the event. Third, the extended microwave activity at lower frequencies is probably due to electrons trapped in the loop top where magnetic fields are low. Finally, we clarify the physical distinction between these large, extended microwave bursts and the gradual/post-microwave bursts often seen in weak events, both of which are characterized by long-period activity and broadband spectra.

  17. Imagine the Universe. 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains compilations of three NASA Website pages from the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The three sites on the CD-ROM are: (1) the Imagine the Universe!, (for ages 14 on up), which is dedicated to discussion of the Universe, what we know, how it is evolving and the kinds of objects and phenomena it contains; (2) StarChild: A learning center for young astronomers, (for ages 4-14), contains information about the Solar System, the Universe and space explorations; and (3) the Astronomy picture of the day, which offers a new astronomical image and caption for each calendar day.

  18. 1,4-Bis(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)benzene dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu-Guang; Li, Jian-Hui; Ding, Bin; Du, Gui-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C10H8N6·2H2O, comprises half the organic species, the mol­ecule being completed by inversion symmetry, and one water mol­ecule. The dihedral angle between the 1,2,4-triazole ring and the central benzene ring is 32.2 (2)°. The water mol­ecules form O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds with N-atom acceptors of the triazole rings. C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds are also observed, giving a three-dimensional framework. PMID:22904851

  19. SWIFT BAT Survey of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Winter, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results1 of the analysis of the first 9 months of data of the Swift BAT survey of AGN in the 14-195 keV band. Using archival X-ray data or follow-up Swift XRT observations, we have identified 129 (103 AGN) of 130 objects detected at [b] > 15deg and with significance > 4.8-delta. One source remains unidentified. These same X-ray data have allowed measurement of the X-ray properties of the objects. We fit a power law to the logN - log S distribution, and find the slope to be 1.42+/-0.14. Characterizing the differential luminosity function data as a broken power law, we find a break luminosity logL*(ergs/s)= 43.85+/-0.26. We obtain a mean photon index 1.98 in the 14-195 keV band, with an rms spread of 0.27. Integration of our luminosity function gives a local volume density of AGN above 10(exp 41) erg/s of 2.4x10(exp -3) Mpc(sup -3), which is about 10% of the total luminous local galaxy density above M* = -19.75. We have obtained X-ray spectra from the literature and from Swift XRT follow-up observations. These show that the distribution of log nH is essentially flat from nH = 10(exp 20)/sq cm to 10(exp 24)/sq cm, with 50% of the objects having column densities of less than 10(exp 22)/sq cm. BAT Seyfert galaxies have a median redshift of 0.03, a maximum log luminosity of 45.1, and approximately half have log nH > 22.

  20. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model. 2; New Insights into Modeling the Pre-Industrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, J. Lee; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D.; Rind, D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the chemical (hydroxyl and ozone) and dynamical response to changing from present day to pre-industrial conditions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS GMC). We identify three main improvements not included by many other works. Firstly, our model includes interactive cloud calculations. Secondly we reduce sulfate aerosol which impacts NOx partitioning hence Ox distributions. Thirdly we reduce sea surface temperatures and increase ocean ice coverage which impact water vapor and ground albedo respectively. Changing the ocean data (hence water vapor and ozone) produces a potentially important feedback between the Hadley circulation and convective cloud cover. Our present day run (run 1, control run) global mean OH value was 9.8 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. For our best estimate of pre-industrial conditions run (run 2) which featured modified chemical emissions, sulfate aerosol and sea surface temperatures/ocean ice, this value changed to 10.2 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing only the chemical emissions to pre-industrial levels in run 1 (run 3) resulted in this value increasing to 10.6 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing the sulfate in run 3 to pre-industrial levels (run 4) resulted in a small increase in global mean OH (10.7 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc). Changing the ocean data in run 4 to pre-industrial levels (run 5) led to a reduction in this value to 10.3 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Mean tropospheric ozone burdens were 262, 181, 180, 180, and 182 Tg for runs 1-5 respectively.

  1. An Ultrasensitive Hot-Electron Bolometer for Low-Background SMM Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olayaa, David; Wei, Jian; Pereverzev, Sergei; Karasik, Boris S.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; McGrath, William R.; Sergeev, Andrei V.; Gershenson, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a hot-electron superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) that is capable of counting THz photons and operates at T = 0.3K. The main driver for this work is moderate resolution spectroscopy (R approx. 1000) on the future space telescopes with cryogenically cooled (approx. 4 K) mirrors. The detectors for these telescopes must be background-limited with a noise equivalent power (NEP) approx. 10(exp -19)-10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 1/2) over the range v = 0.3-10 THz. Above about 1 THz, the background photon arrival rate is expected to be approx. 10-100/s), and photon counting detectors may be preferable to an integrating type. We fabricated superconducting Ti nanosensors with a volume of approx. 3x10(exp -3) cubic microns on planar substrate and have measured the thermal conductance G to the thermal bath. A very low G = 4x10(exp -14) W/K, measured at 0.3 K, is due to the weak electron-phonon coupling in the material and the thermal isolation provided by superconducting Nb contacts. This low G corresponds to NEP(0.3K) = 3x10(exp -19) W/Hz(sup 1/2). This Hot-Electron Direct Detector (HEDD) is expected to have a sufficient energy resolution for detecting individual photons with v > 0.3 THz at 0.3 K. With the sensor time constant of a few microseconds, the dynamic range is approx. 50 dB.

  2. A potential cyclotron line signature in low-luminosity X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Wang, John C. L.; Salpeter, E. E.; Wasserman, Ira

    1995-01-01

    Estimates indicate there may be greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 3) low-luminosity X-ray pulsars (L less than or approximately equal to 10(exp 34) ergs/s) in the Galaxy undergoing 'low-state' wind accretion in Be/X-ray binary systems, and approximately 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) isolated neutron stars which may be accreting directly from the interstellar medium. Despite their low effective temperatures (kT(sub e) less than or approximately equal to 300 eV), low-luminosity accreting neutron stars with magnetic fields B approximately (0.7-7) x 10(exp 12) G could emit a substantial fraction (0.5%-5%) of their total luminosity in a moderately broadened (Epsilon/delta Epsilon approximately 2-4) cyclotron emission line which peaks in the energy range approximately 5-20 keV. The bulk of the thermal emission from these stars will be in the extreme ultraviolet/soft X-ray regime. In sharp contrast, the nonthermal cyclotron component predicted here will not be strongly absorbed, and consequently it may be the only distinguishing signature for the bulk of these low-luminosity sources. We propose a search for this cyclotron emission feature in long pointed observations of the newly discovered candidate isolated neutron star MS 0317.7-6477, and the Be/X-ray transient pulsar 4U 0115+63 in its quiescent state. We note that an emission-like feature similar to the one we predict here has been reported in the energy spectrum of the unusual X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586.

  3. MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CALCIUM 4snf→4s(n+1)d, 4sng, 4snh, 4sni, AND 4snk TRANSITIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunkaew, Jirakan; Gallagher, Tom

    2015-06-01

    We use a delayed field ionization technique to observe the microwave transitions of calcium Rydberg states, from the 4snf states to the 4s(n+1)d, 4sng, 4snh, 4sni, and 4snk states for 18≤ n≤23. We analyze the observed intervals between the ℓ and (ℓ+1), ℓ≥5, states of the same n to determine the Ca^+ 4s dipole and quadrupole polarizabilities. We show that the adiabatic core polarization model is not adequate to extract the Ca^+ 4s dipole and quadrupole polarizabilities and a non adiabatic treatment is required. We use the non adiabatic core polarization model to determine the ionic dipole and quadrupole polarizabilities to be α_d=76.9(3);a_0^3 and α_q=206(9);a_0^5, respectively.

  4. 4. DRY DOCK NO. 4, LOOKING NORTH FROM WEST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DRY DOCK NO. 4, LOOKING NORTH FROM WEST END OF CAISSON. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 4, Broad Street south of Government Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Capability 9.4 Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Rud

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on capability structure 9.4 servicing. The topics include: 1) Servicing Description; 2) Benefits of Servicing; 3) Drivers & Assumptions for Servicing; 4) Capability Breakdown Structure 9.4 Servicing; 5) Roadmap for Servicing; 6) 9.4 Servicing Critical Gaps; 7) Capability 9.4 Servicing; 8) Capability 9.4.1 Inspection; 9) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.1 Inspection; 10) Capability 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 11) State-of-the-Art/Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 12) Capability 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 13) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 14) Capability 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 15) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 16) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 17) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 18) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 19) Capability 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, Training; and 20) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, & Training;

  6. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 4. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 4; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4)…

  7. Arizona Academic Standards: Grade 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 4. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 4; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4)…

  8. Black Holes in Bulgeless Galaxies: An XMM-Newton Investigation of NGC 3367 AND NGC 4536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlpine, W.; Satyapal, S.; Gliozzi, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Sambruna, R. M.; Eracleous, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of optically identified active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the local Universe reside in host galaxies with prominent bulges, supporting the hypothesis that black hole formation and growth is fundamentally connected to the build-up of galaxy bulges. However, recent mid-infrared spectroscopic studies with Spitzer of a sample of optically "normal" late-type galaxies reveal remarkably the presence of high-ionization [NeV] lines in several sources, providing strong evidence for AGNs in these galaxies. We present follow-up X-ray observations recently obtained with XMM-Newton of two such sources, the late-type optically normal galaxies NGC 3367 and NGC 4536. Both sources are detected in our observations. Detailed spectral analysis reveals that for both galaxies, the 2-10 keV emission is dominated by a power law with an X-ray luminosity in the L(sub 2- 10 keV) approximates 10(exp 39) - 10(exp 40) ergs/s range, consistent with low luminosity AGNs. While there is a possibility that X-ray binaries account for some fraction of the observed X-ray luminosity, we argue that this fraction is negligible. These observations therefore add to the growing evidence that the fraction of late-type galaxies hosting AGNs is significantly underestimated using optical observations alone. A comparison of the midinfrared [NeV] luminosity and the X-ray luminosities suggests the presence of an additional highly absorbed X-ray source in both galaxies, and that the black hole masses are in the range of 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) solar M for NGC 3367 and 10(exp 4) - (exp 10) solar M for NGC 4536

  9. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  10. Global Evolution of Solid Matter in Turbulent Protoplanetry Disks. Part 1; Aerodynamics of Solid Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Valageas, P.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of planetary system formation and its subsequent character can only be addressed by studying the global evolution of solid material entrained in gaseous protoplanetary disks. We start to investigate this problem by considering the space-time development of aerodynamic forces that cause solid particles to decouple from the gas. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that only the smallest particles are attached to the gas, or that the radial distribution of the solid matter has no momentary relation to the radial distribution of the gas. We present the illustrative example wherein a gaseous disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52) g/sq cm/s is allowed to evolve due to turbulent viscosity characterized by either alpha = 10(exp -2) or alpha = 10(exp -3). The motion of solid particles suspended in a viscously evolving gaseous disk is calculated numerically for particles of different sizes. In addition we calculate the global evolution of single-sized, noncoagulating particles. We find that particles smaller than 0.1 cm move with the gas; larger particles have significant radial velocities relative to the gas. Particles larger than 0.1 cm but smaller than 10(exp 3) cm have inward radial velocities much larger than the gas, whereas particles larger than 10(exp 4) cm have inward velocities much smaller than the gas. A significant difference in the form of the radial distribution of solids and the gas develops with time. It is the radial distribution of solids, rather than the gas, that determines the character of an emerging planetary system.

  11. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  12. Source Parameter Inversion for Recent Great Earthquakes from a Decade-long Observation of Global Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Shin-Chan; Riva, Ricccardo; Sauber, Jeanne; Okal, Emile

    2013-01-01

    We quantify gravity changes after great earthquakes present within the 10 year long time series of monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity fields. Using spherical harmonic normal-mode formulation, the respective source parameters of moment tensor and double-couple were estimated. For the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the gravity data indicate a composite moment of 1.2x10(exp 23)Nm with a dip of 10deg, in agreement with the estimate obtained at ultralong seismic periods. For the 2010 Maule earthquake, the GRACE solutions range from 2.0 to 2.7x10(exp 22)Nm for dips of 12deg-24deg and centroid depths within the lower crust. For the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the estimated scalar moments range from 4.1 to 6.1x10(exp 22)Nm, with dips of 9deg-19deg and centroid depths within the lower crust. For the 2012 Indian Ocean strike-slip earthquakes, the gravity data delineate a composite moment of 1.9x10(exp 22)Nm regardless of the centroid depth, comparing favorably with the total moment of the main ruptures and aftershocks. The smallest event we successfully analyzed with GRACE was the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake with M(sub 0) approx. 5.0x10(exp 21)Nm. We found that the gravity data constrain the focal mechanism with the centroid only within the upper and lower crustal layers for thrust events. Deeper sources (i.e., in the upper mantle) could not reproduce the gravity observation as the larger rigidity and bulk modulus at mantle depths inhibit the interior from changing its volume, thus reducing the negative gravity component. Focal mechanisms and seismic moments obtained in this study represent the behavior of the sources on temporal and spatial scales exceeding the seismic and geodetic spectrum.

  13. On a Solar Origin for the Cosmogenic Nuclide Event of 775 A.D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a greater than 1 GV spectrum approximately 45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a greater than 30 MeV proton fluence (F(sub 30)) of approximately 8 × 10(exp 10) proton cm(exp -2), approximately 10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F(sub 30) value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for greater than 30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is approximately X230 (approximately 9 × 10(exp 33) erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of approximately X35 (approximately 10(exp 33) erg) and approximately X45 (approximately 2 × 10(exp 33) erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a approximately 10(exp 34) erg flare is approximately 2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The approximately 1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last approximately 2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  14. FUSE Observations of O VI Absorption in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, W. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Shelton, R. L.; Bowen, D. V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of an initial Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) survey of O VI Lambda 1032 absorption along the lines of sight to eleven nearby white dwarfs, ten of which are within the Local Bubble (LB; d < or approximately equal 100 pc). A goal of this survey is to investigate the possible formation of O VI in the conductive interfaces between cool (about 10(exp 4) K) clouds immersed in the presumably hot (10(exp 6) K) gas within the LB. This mechanism is often invoked to explain the widespread presence of 0 VI throughout the Galactic disk. We find no 0 VI absorption toward two stars, and the column densities along three additional sight lines are quite low; N(O VI) about 5 x 10(exp 13)/sq cm. In several directions, we observe rather broad, shallow absorption with N(O VI) about 1 - 2 x 10(exp 13)/sq cm. Models of conductive interfaces predict narrow profiles with N(OVI) > or about equal to 10(exp 13)/sq cm per interface, in the absence of a significant transverse magnetic field. Hence, our observations of weak 0 VI absorption indicate that conduction is being quenched, possibly by non-radial magnetic fields. Alternatively, the gas within the LB may not be hot. Breitschwerdt & Schmutzler have proposed a model for the LB in which an explosive event within a dense cloud created rapid expansion and adiabatic cooling, resulting in a cavity containing gas with a kinetic temperature of T about 50,000 K, but with an ionization state characteristic of much hotter gas. This model has a number of attractive features, but appears to predict significantly more O VI than we observe.

  15. FUSE Observations of Warm Gas in the Cooling Flow Clusters A1795 and A2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, W. R.; Cowie, L.; Davidsen, A.; Hu, E.; Hutchings, J.; Murphy, E.; Sembach, K.; Woodgate, B.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of the cores of the massive cooling flow clusters Abell 1795 and 2597 obtained with FUSE. As the intracluster gas cools through 3 x 10(exp 5)K, it should emit strongly in the O VI lambda(lambda)1032,1038 resonance lines. We report the detection of O VI (lambda)1032 emission in A2597, with a line flux of 1.35 +/- 0.35 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, as well as detection of emission from C III (lambda)977. A marginal detection of C III (lambda)977 emission is also reported for A1795. These observations provide evidence for a direct link between the hot (10(exp 7) K) cooling flow gas and the cool (10(exp 4) K) gas in the optical emission line filaments. Assuming simple cooling flow models, the O VI line flux in A2597 corresponds to a mass deposition rate of approx. 40 solar mass /yr within the central 36 kpc. Emission from O VI (lambda)1032 was not detected in A1795, with an upper limit of 1.5 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, corresponding to a limit on the mass cooling flow rate of M(28 kpc) less than 28M solar mass/ yr. We have considered several explanations for the lack of detection of O VI emission in A1795 and the weaker than expected flux in A2597, including extinction by dust in the outer cluster, and quenching of thermal conduction by magnetic fields. We conclude that a turbulent mixing model, with some dust extinction, could explain our O VI results while also accounting for the puzzling lack of emission by Fe(sub XVII) in cluster cooling flows.

  16. Modeling of pickup ion distributions in the Halley cometosheath: Empirical limits on rates of ionization, diffusion, loss and creation of fast neutral atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distribution of water group ions observed by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer on its approach to comet Halley is modeled to derive empirical values for the rates of ionization, energy diffusion, and loss in the midcometosheath. The model includes the effect of rapid pitch angle scattering into a bispherical shell distribution as well as the effect of the magnetization of the plasma on the charge exchange loss rate. It is found that the average rate of ionization of cometary neutrals in this region of the cometosheath appears to be of the order of a factor 3 faster than the `standard' rates approx. 1 x 10(exp -6)/s that are generally assumed to model the observations in most regions of the comet environment. For the region of the coma studied in the present work (approx. 1 - 2 x 10(exp 5) km from the nucleus), the inferred energy diffusion coefficient is D(sub 0) approx. equals 0.0002 to 0.0005 sq km/cu s, which is generally lower than values used in other models. The empirically obtained loss rate appears to be about an order of magnitude greater than can be explained by charge exchange with the `standard' cross section of approx. 2 x 10(exp -15)sq cm. However such cross sections are not well known and for water group ion/water group neutral interactions, rates as high as 8 x 10(exp -15) sq cm have previously been suggested in the literature. Assuming the entire loss rate is due to charge exchange yields a rate of creation of fast neutral atoms of the order of approx. 10(exp -4)/s or higher, depending on the level of velocity diffusion. The fast neutrals may, in turn, be partly responsible for the higher-than-expected ionization rate.

  17. Transonic-Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.15-Scale Model of the North American Aviation 255-Inch Fin-Stabilized External Store, Coord No. AF-AM-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischetti, Thomas L.

    1958-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnels on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.15-scale model of the North American Aviation 255-inch fin-stabilized external store over a maximum Mach number range of 0.60 to 1.2 and on the effects of mounting lugs, of fin orientation, of fin aspect ratio, and of fixed-transition. The Reynolds number (based on a body length of 37.50 inches) varied from 9.8 x 10(exp 6) to 13.1 x 10(exp 6). The results indicate that the static margin of the finned store at low lift coefficients was only 9 percent of body length at subsonic Mach numbers and was reduced to zero at a Mach number of 1.0, Increasing the fin aspect ratio from 1.82 to 2.41 increased the subsonic static margin to 18 percent and provided a minimum margin of 9 percent near a Mach number of l.O. Store mounting lugs or fin orientation had only small effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of the basic store.

  18. 4X source

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Sherman, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our Penning surface-plasma source (SPS) discharge chamber was enlarged 4X in two dimensions. To date, three pulsed discharge modes have been studied: two with noisy arc (greater than or equal to 20% H/sup -/ current fluctuations) and one with quiescent arc (less than or equal to 1% H/sup -/ current fluctuations). Lower arc magnetic field and higher H/sub 2/ gas flow allow switching from the noisy to the quiescent mode. The noisy modes yield up to 120 mA of 29-keV H/sup -/ beam; for 110 mA at 29 keV, the two-dimensional normalized rms emittance is 0.017 x 0.018 ..pi...cm.mrad. The quiescent mode yields 75 mA of 29-keV H/sup -/beam; for 67 mA at 24 keV, the emittance is 0.011 x 0.012 ..pi...cm.mrad.

  19. National parks: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.; Allen, Craig D.; Fleishman, Erica; Gunderson, Lance; McKenzie, Don; Meyerson, Laura A.; Oropeza, Jill; Stephenson, Nathan L.

    2008-01-01

    Covering about 4% of the United States, the 338,000 km² of protected areas in the National Park System contain representative landscapes of all of the nation’s biomes and ecosystems. The U.S. National Park Service Organic Act established the National Park System in 1916 “to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”1 Approximately 270 national park system areas contain significant natural resources. Current National Park Service policy for natural resource parks calls for management to preserve fundamental physical and biological processes, as well as individual species, features, and plant and animal communities. Parks with managed natural resources range from large intact (or nearly intact) ecosystems with a full complement of native species— including top predators—to those diminished by disturbances such as within-park or surrounding-area legacies of land use, invasive species, pollution, or regional manipulation of resources. The significance of national parks as representatives of naturally functioning ecosystems and as refugia for natural processes and biodiversity increases as surrounding landscapes become increasingly altered by human activities.

  20. [4+2[sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.; Javahery, G.; Petrie, S.; Bohme, D.K. )

    1994-06-02

    Results of an experimental study using the selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) technique are reported for ion-molecule reactions of C[sub 60][sup [center dot]+] with a variety of cycloalkenes and acyclic and cyclic dienes at 294 [+-] 2 K in helium gas at a pressure of 0.35 [+-] 0.01 Torr. Addition is observed only with 1,3-cyclopentadiene and 1,3-cyclohexadiene. Rate coefficients were measured to be 1.0 and 1.5 x 10[sup [minus]11] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1], respectively. No reactions, k < 3 x 10[sup [minus]12] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1], were observed with 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, 1,3-pentadiene, cyclopentene, cyclohexene, furan, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene. These results provide indirect evidence for the occurrence of a Diels - Alder cycloaddition with 1,3-cyclopentadiene and 1,3-cyclohexadine. The addition reactions of these two molecules with C[sub 60][sup +] were found to be 5 [+-] 1 and 6 [+-] 2, respectively, faster than the addition reactions with C[sub 70][sup [center dot]+] for which rate coefficients of 2.0 and 2.5 x 10[sup [minus]12] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup [minus]1], respectively, were measured. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. 43 CFR 3802.4-4 - Fire prevention and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire prevention and control. 3802.4-4... Exploration and Mining, Wilderness Review Program § 3802.4-4 Fire prevention and control. The operator shall comply with all applicable Federal and State fire laws and regulations, and shall take all...

  2. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY... most effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to protect the collections...

  3. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY... most effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to protect the collections...

  4. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY... most effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to protect the collections...

  5. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY... most effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to protect the collections...

  6. 42 CFR 4.4 - Use of Library facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of Library facilities. 4.4 Section 4.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS NATIONAL LIBRARY... most effective use of facilities by health-sciences professionals and to protect the collections...

  7. 37 CFR 4.4 - Invention promoter reply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Invention promoter reply. 4.4... COMMERCE GENERAL COMPLAINTS REGARDING INVENTION PROMOTERS § 4.4 Invention promoter reply. (a) If a submission appears to meet the requirements of a complaint, the invention promoter named in the...

  8. 4 CFR 200.4 - Privacy Act inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Privacy Act inquiries. 200.4 Section 200.4 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.4 Privacy Act inquiries. (a... Avenue, NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20006. Inquiries should be marked “Privacy Act Inquiry” on...

  9. 4 CFR 200.4 - Privacy Act inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Privacy Act inquiries. 200.4 Section 200.4 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.4 Privacy Act inquiries. (a... Avenue, NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20006. Inquiries should be marked “Privacy Act Inquiry” on...

  10. 4 CFR 200.4 - Privacy Act inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Privacy Act inquiries. 200.4 Section 200.4 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.4 Privacy Act inquiries. (a... Avenue, NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20006. Inquiries should be marked “Privacy Act Inquiry” on...

  11. 4 CFR 200.4 - Privacy Act inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Privacy Act inquiries. 200.4 Section 200.4 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.4 Privacy Act inquiries. (a... Avenue, NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20006. Inquiries should be marked “Privacy Act Inquiry” on...

  12. 4 CFR 4.3 - Removal for unacceptable performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by an attorney or other representative. (3) A reasonable time to answer orally and in writing. (4) A... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Removal for unacceptable performance. 4.3 Section 4.3 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE AND UTILIZATION §...

  13. 4 CFR 4.3 - Removal for unacceptable performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by an attorney or other representative. (3) A reasonable time to answer orally and in writing. (4) A... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Removal for unacceptable performance. 4.3 Section 4.3 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE AND UTILIZATION §...

  14. 4 CFR 200.4 - Privacy Act inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Privacy Act inquiries. 200.4 Section 200.4 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.4 Privacy Act inquiries. (a...) Inquiries by mail may be sent to: Privacy Act Officer, Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board,...

  15. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-4 - Exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 915.404-4-70-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 915.404-4-70-4 Exceptions. (a) For contracts not... used— (1) Commercialization and demonstration type contracts; (2) Management and operating...

  16. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-4 - Exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 915.404-4-70-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 915.404-4-70-4 Exceptions. (a) For contracts not... used— (1) Commercialization and demonstration type contracts; (2) Management and operating...

  17. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-4 - Exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 915.404-4-70-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 915.404-4-70-4 Exceptions. (a) For contracts not... used— (1) Commercialization and demonstration type contracts; (2) Management and operating...

  18. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-4 - Exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 915.404-4-70-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 915.404-4-70-4 Exceptions. (a) For contracts not... demonstration type contracts; (2) Management and operating contracts; (3) Construction contracts;...

  19. 48 CFR 915.404-4-70-4 - Exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 915.404-4-70-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Contract Pricing 915.404-4-70-4 Exceptions. (a) For contracts not... used— (1) Commercialization and demonstration type contracts; (2) Management and operating...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Selected 4,4'-Diaminoalkoxyazobenzenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of the -N(CH2CH20H)2 group in producing a mutagenic response from 4-«3-(2h) Uroxyethoxy)4-amino)phenylazo)-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-aniline has been investigated. To accomplish this goal, a group ofsubstituted 4,4'-diaminoazobenzene dyes was synthesized, and their struct...

  1. 43 CFR 4750.4-4 - Replacement animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Replacement animals. 4750.4-4 Section 4750... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.4-4 Replacement animals. The authorized officer shall replace an animal, upon request by the adopter, if (a) within 6 months of the execution...

  2. 43 CFR 4750.4-4 - Replacement animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Replacement animals. 4750.4-4 Section 4750... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.4-4 Replacement animals. The authorized officer shall replace an animal, upon request by the adopter, if (a) within 6 months of the execution...

  3. 43 CFR 4750.4-4 - Replacement animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Replacement animals. 4750.4-4 Section 4750... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.4-4 Replacement animals. The authorized officer shall replace an animal, upon request by the adopter, if (a) within 6 months of the execution...

  4. 43 CFR 4750.4-4 - Replacement animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Replacement animals. 4750.4-4 Section 4750... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.4-4 Replacement animals. The authorized officer shall replace an animal, upon request by the adopter, if (a) within 6 months of the execution...

  5. 29 CFR 4.4 - Obtaining a wage determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., contracting agencies may select and obtain a wage determination using WDOL. (See § 4.4(c).) Although the WDOL... subsequent issuance of wage determinations for one or more composite localities. (4) In no event may a... thereon pursuant to section 4(c) of the Act is warranted, shall file its request for such hearing...

  6. 43 CFR 3802.4-4 - Fire prevention and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire prevention and control. 3802.4-4... Exploration and Mining, Wilderness Review Program § 3802.4-4 Fire prevention and control. The operator shall... measures to prevent and suppress fires on the area of mining operations....

  7. US EPA's SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, volatile o...

  8. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  9. A season of heat, water vapor, total hydrocarbon, and ozone fluxes at a subarctic fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Daube, Bruce C.; Munger, J. William; Bakwin, Peter S.; Crill, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    High-latitude environments are thought to play several critical roles in the global balance of radiatively active trace gases. Adequate documentation of the source and sink strengths for trace gases requires long time series of detailed measurements, including heat and moisture budgets. A fen near Schefferville, Quebec, was instrumented during the summer of 1990 for the measurement of the surface energy, radiation, and moisture balances as well as for eddy correlation estimates of ozone and methane flux. Despite the limited fetch at this site, analysis of the tower flux 'footprint' indicates that at least 80% of the flux observed originates from sources within the fen. Sensible heat fluxes averaged 25% of the daytime net radiation at the site, while the latent heat flux, determined from the energy balance, was 63%; the Bowen ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.8 from day to day, without a seasonal trend to the variation. The competing effects of rooted macrophyte development (with concomitant effects on roughness and transpiration) and the normal shift in synoptic pattern around day 200 to warm, dry conditions results in a lack of net seasonal effect on the energy partitioning. Over the period from days 170 to 230, the evaporation (167 mm) was double the rainfall, while the decline in water level was 107 mm, leaving a net runoff of 0.44 mm/d. The total hydrocarbon flux was 75-120 mg m(exp -2)/d, following a diurnal pattern similar to heat or moisture flux, while the daytime ozone flux was about -1.11 x 10(exp 11) molecules cm(exp -2)/s. A period near the end of the experiment, during week 30, produced the strongest total hydrocarbon flux, associated with warmer deep (1 m) soil temperatures, lower fen water levels, and the late summer shift in wind direction at that time. An early summer 'flush' of total hydrocarbon was not observed.

  10. A high level computational study of the CH4/CF4 dimer: how does it compare with the CH4/CH4 and CF4/CF4 dimers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Matthew J.; Mecozzi, Sandro

    2012-04-01

    The interaction within the methane-methane (CH4/CH4), perfluoromethane-perfluoromethane (CF4/CF4) methane-perfluoromethane dimers (CH4/CF4) was calculated using the Hartree-Fock (HF) method, multiple orders of Møller-Plesset perturbation theory [MP2, MP3, MP4(DQ), MP4(SDQ), MP4(SDTQ)], and coupled cluster theory [CCSD, CCSD(T)], as well as the PW91, B97D, and M06-2X density functional theory (DFT) functionals. The basis sets of Dunning and coworkers (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T, Q), Krishnan and coworkers [6-311++G(d,p), 6-311++G(2d,2p)], and Tsuzuki and coworkers [aug(df, pd)-6-311G(d,p)] were used. Basis set superposition error (BSSE) was corrected via the counterpoise method in all cases. Interaction energies obtained with the MP2 method do not fit with the experimental finding that the methane-perfluoromethane system phase separates at 94.5 K. It was not until the CCSD(T) method was considered that the interaction energy of the methane-perfluoromethane dimer (-0.69 kcal mol-1) was found to be intermediate between the methane (-0.51 kcal mol-1) and perfluoromethane (-0.78 kcal mol-1) dimers. This suggests that a perfluoromethane molecule interacts preferentially with another perfluoromethane (by about 0.09 kcal mol-1) than with a methane molecule. At temperatures much lower than the CH4/CF4 critical solution temperature of 94.5 K, this energy difference becomes significant and leads perfluoromethane molecules to associate with themselves, forming a phase separation. The DFT functionals yielded erratic results for the three dimers. Further development of DFT is needed in order to model dispersion interactions in hydrocarbon/perfluorocarbon systems.

  11. ATP-dependent transport of leukotrienes B4 and C4 by the multidrug resistance protein ABCC4 (MRP4).

    PubMed

    Rius, Maria; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Keppler, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    The proinflammatory mediators leukotriene (LT) B(4) and LTC(4) must be transported out of cells before they can interact with LT receptors. Previously, we identified the multidrug resistance protein ABCC1 (MRP1) as an efflux pump for LTC(4). However, the molecular basis for the efflux of LTB(4) was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human ABCC4 mediates the ATP-dependent efflux of LTB(4) in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH), whereby the latter can be replaced by S-methyl GSH. Transport studies were performed with inside-out membrane vesicles from V79 fibroblasts and Sf9 insect cells that contained recombinant ABCC4, with vesicles from human platelets and myelomonocytic U937 cells, which were rich in endogenous ABCC4, but ABCC1 was below detectability. Moreover, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes contained ABCC4. K(m) values for LTB(4) were 5.2 muM with vesicles from fibroblasts and 5.6 muM with vesicles from platelets. ABCC4, with its broad substrate specificity, also functioned as an ATP-dependent efflux pump for LTC(4) with a K(m) of 0.13 muM in vesicles from fibroblasts and 0.32 muM in vesicles from platelets. However, GSH was not required for the transport of this glutathionylated leukotriene. The transport of LTC(4) by ABCC4 explains its release from platelets during transcellular synthesis. ATP-dependent transport of LTB(4) and LTC(4) by ABCC4 was inhibited by several organic anions, including S-decyl GSH, sulindac sulfide, and by the LTD(4) receptor antagonists montelukast and 3-(((3-(2-(7-chloro-2-quinolinyl)ethenyl)phenyl)-((3-dimethyl-amino-3-oxopropyl)-thio)-methyl)thio)propanoic acid (MK571). Thus, as an efflux pump for the proinflammatory mediators LTB(4) and LTC(4), ABCC4 may represent a novel target for anti-inflammatory therapies.

  12. Biotransformation of 4-halophenols to 4-halocatechols using Escherichia coli expressing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Lydie; Nolan, Louise C; Nikodinovic, Jasmina; Doyle, Evelyn M; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2011-03-01

    Escherichia coli cells, expressing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase, fully transformed 4-halogenated phenols to their equivalent catechols as single products in shaken flasks. 4-Fluorophenol was transformed at a rate 1.6, 1.8, and 3.4-fold higher than the biotransformation of 4-chloro-, 4-bromo-, and 4-iodo-phenol, respectively. A scale-up from shaken flask to a 5 L stirred tank bioreactor was undertaken to develop a bioprocess for the production of 4-substituted halocatechols at higher concentrations and scale. In a stirred tank reactor, the optimized conditions for induction of 4-HPA hydroxylase expression were at 37 °C for 3 h. The rate of biotransformation of 4-fluorophenol to 4-fluorocatechol by stirred tank bioreactor grown cells was the same at 1 and 4.8 mM (5.13 μmol/min/g CDW) once the ratio of biocatalyst (E. coli CDW) to substrate concentration (mM) was maintained at 2:1. At 10.8 mM 4-fluorophenol, the rate of 4-fluorocatechol formation decreased by 4.7-fold. However, the complete transformation of 1.3 g of 4-fluorophenol (10.8 mM) to 4-fluorocatechol was achieved within 7 h in a 1 L reaction volume. Similar to 4-fluorophenol, other 4-substituted halophenols were completely transformed to 4-halocatechols at 2 mM within a 1-2 h period. An increase in 4-halophenol concentration to 4.8 mM resulted in a 2.5-20-fold decrease in biotransformation efficiency depending on the substrate tested. Organic solvent extraction of the 4-halocatechol products followed by column chromatography resulted in the production of purified products with a final yield of between 33% and 38%.

  13. 4,4′-Bipyridinium bis(perchlorate)–4-aminobenzoic acid–4,4′-bipyridine–water (1/4/2/2)

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qun-Hui; Han, Lu; Hou, Jian-Dong; Luo, Yi-Fan; Zeng, Rong-Hua

    2009-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, C10H10N2 2+·2ClO4 −·4C7H7NO2·2C10H8N2·2H2O, the 4,4′-bipyridinium cation has a crystallographically imposed centre of symmetry. The cation is linked by N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds to adjacent 4,4′-bipyridine mol­ecules, which in turn inter­act via O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds with 4-amino­benzoic acid mol­ecules, forming chains running parallel to [30]. The chains are further connected into a three-dimensional network by N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the perchlorate anion, the water mol­ecules and the 4-amino­benzoic acid mol­ecules. In addition, π–π stacking inter­actions with centroid–centroid distances ranging from 3.663 (6) to 3.695 (6) Å are present. The O atoms of the perchlorate anion are disordered over two sets of positions, with refined site occupancies of 0.724 (9) and 0.276 (9). PMID:21581593

  14. The ternary system K2SO4MgSO4CaSO4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.; Morey, G.W.; Silber, C.C.

    1967-01-01

    Melting and subsolidus relations in the system K2SO4MgSO4CaSO4 were studied using heating-cooling curves, differential thermal analysis, optics, X-ray diffraction at room and high temperatures and by quenching techniques. Previous investigators were unable to study the binary MgSO4CaSO4 system and the adjacent area in the ternary system because of the decomposition of MgSO4 and CaSO4 at high temperatures. This problem was partly overcome by a novel sealed-tube quenching method, by hydrothermal synthesis, and by long-time heating in the solidus. As a result of this study, we found: (1) a new compound, CaSO4??3MgSO4 (m.p. 1201??C) with a field extending into the ternary system; (2) a high temperature form of MgSO4 with a sluggishly reversible inversion. An X-ray diffraction pattern for this polymorphic form is given; (3) the inversion of ??-CaSO4 (anhydrite) to ??-CaSO4 at 1195??C, in agreement with grahmann; (1) (4) the melting point of MgSO4 is 1136??C and that of CaSO4 is 1462??C (using sealed tube methods to prevent decomposition of the sulphates); (5) calcium langbeinite (K2SO4??2CaSO4) is the only compound in the K2SO4CaSO4 binary system. This resolved discrepancies in the results of previous investigators; (6) a continuous solid solution series between congruently melting K2SOP4??2MgSO4 (langbeinite) and incongruently melting K2SO4??2CaSO4 (calcium langbeinite); (7) the liquidus in the ternary system consists of primary phase fields of K2SO4, MgSO4, CaSO4, langbeinite-calcium langbeinite solid solution, and CaSO4??3MgSO4. The CaSO4 field extends over a large portion of the system. Previously reported fields for the compounds (K2SO4??MgSO4??nCaSO4), K2SO4??3CaSO4 and K2SO4??CaSO4 were not found; (8) a minimum in the ternary system at: 740??C, 25% MgSO4, 6% CaSO4, 69% K2SO4; and ternary eutectics at 882??C, 49% MgSO4, 19% CaSO4, 32% K2SO4; and 880??, 67??5% MgSO4, 5% CaSO4, 27??5% K2SO4. ?? 1967.

  15. Magnetic structures and physical properties of Tm3Cu4Ge4 and Tm3Cu4Sn4.

    PubMed

    Baran, S; Kaczorowski, D; Szytuła, A; Gil, A; Hoser, A

    2013-02-13

    Tm(3)Cu(4)Ge(4) crystallizes in the orthorhombic Gd(3)Cu(4)Ge(4)-type crystal structure (space group Immm) whereas Tm(3)Cu(4)Sn(4) crystallizes in a distorted variant of this structure (monoclinic space group C2/m). The compounds were studied by means of neutron diffraction, specific heat, electrical resistivity and magnetic measurements. Analysis of experimental data revealed the presence of an antiferromagnetic order below 2.8 K in both compounds. In Tm(3)Cu(4)Ge(4) the magnetic unit cell is doubled in respect to the crystal unit cell and the magnetic structure can be described by a propagation vector k = [0, 1/2, 0]. A larger magnetic unit cell was found in Tm(3)Cu(4)Sn(4), given by a propagation vector k = [1/2, 1/2, 0] (for simplicity the orthorhombic description is used for both the germanide and the stannide). Close to 2 K, in each compound an incommensurate antiferromagnetic order develops. This low-temperature magnetic phase is characterized by a propagation vector k = [1/4, 0, k(z)], where k(z) is close to 0.49 and 0.47 in Tm(3)Cu(4)Ge(4) and Tm(3)Cu(4)Sn(4), respectively. The antiferromagnetic phase transitions are clearly seen in the bulk magnetic and specific heat data of both compounds.

  16. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rate, and Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We present total conduction (Wilson) currents for more than 1000 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds acquired over nearly two decades. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16. kV/m, with mean (median) of 0.9 kV/m (0.29 kV/m). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS/m to 3.6 pS/m, with mean and median of 2.2 pS/m. Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(exp -2) to 33.0 nA m(exp -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(exp -2) (0.6 nA m(exp -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.7 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.41 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min-1, respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  17. Rapid, Microwave Accelerated Synthesis of [1,2,4]Triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles from 4-Acylamino-1,2,4-Triazoles.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Stesphanie L; Olson, Margaret E; Harki, Daniel A

    2016-09-07

    1,2,4-Triazoles and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles are prevalent moieties in pharmaceutical agents, yet fused [1,2,4]-triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles are surprisingly under-represented for both synthesis and biological application. We report a rapid, two-step synthesis of [1,2,4]-triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]oxadiazoles from commercial 4-amino-1,2,4-triazoles that is highlighted by a microwave accelerated intramolecular cyclization to generate the fused ring system. Our efforts to optimize reaction conditions and elucidate reaction mechanism are also described.

  18. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  19. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2016-03-22

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate involves reacting a dialkyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding an alkyl cyano acetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate. The 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate may be acidified into 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  20. Extraterrestrial Helium Trapped in Fullerenes in the Sudbury Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    Fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Sudbury impact structure contain trapped helium with a He-3/He-4 ratio of 5.5 x 10(exp -4) to 5.9 x 10(exp -4). The He-3/He-4 ratio exceeds the accepted solar wind value by 20 to 30 percent and is higher by an order of magnitude than the maximum reported mantle value. Terrestrial nuclear reactions or cosmic-ray bombardment are not sufficient to generate such a high ratio. The He-3/He-4 ratios in the Sudbury fullerenes are similar to those found in meteorites and in some interplanetary dust particles. The implication is that the helium within the C60 molecules at Sudbury is of extraterrestrial origin.

  1. 4 CFR 81.4 - Requests for identifiable records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requests for identifiable records. 81.4 Section 81.4 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE RECORDS PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE... Accountability Office, 441 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20548. Requests may also be made via a link from...

  2. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  3. 32 CFR 1645.4 - Exclusion from Class 4-D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.4 Exclusion from Class 4-D. A registrant is excluded from Class 4-D when his... duly ordained minister of religion in accordance with the ceremonial rite or discipline of a church... principles of religion and administer the ordinances of public worship, as embodied in the creed...

  4. Specific interactions among transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) proteins and phosphoinositide 4-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yauch, R L; Hemler, M E

    2000-01-01

    In earlier work we established that phosphoinositide 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase) may associate with transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF, tetraspanin) proteins, but critical specificity issues were not addressed. Here we demonstrate that at least five different TM4SF proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD151 and A15/TALLA1) can associate with a similar or identical 55 kDa type II PI 4-kinase. These associations were specific, since we found no evidence for other phosphoinositide kinases (e.g. phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphoinositide-4-phosphate 5-kinase) associating with TM4SF proteins, and many other TM4SF proteins (including CD82 and CD53) did not associate with PI 4-kinase. CD63-PI 4-kinase complexes were almost entirely intracellular, and thus are distinct from other TM4SF-PI 4-kinase complexes (e.g. involving CD9), which are largely located in the plasma membrane. These results suggest that a specific subset of TM4SF proteins may recruit PI 4-kinase to specific membrane locations, and thereby influence phosphoinositide-dependent signalling. PMID:11042117

  5. Growth, optical, thermal and laser damage threshold studies of 4-aminopyridinium 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadesan, A.; Peramaiyan, G.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Arjunan, S.

    2015-05-01

    Organic nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals of 4-aminopyridinium 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol (4AP4NP) were grown by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. The unit cell parameters and space group of 4AP4NP crystal were found out by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. From the UV-vis-NIR spectral studies, the lower cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal was found to be 474 nm. The laser damage threshold study shows that 4AP4NP crystal withstands the laser radiation up to 3.67 GW cm-2. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses revealed that 4AP4ANP is thermally stable up to 175 °C. The specific heat capacity of 4AP4NP was measured to be 3.9135 J g-1 K-1 at 33 °C. Kurtz and Perry powder study reveals that 4AP4NP is a phase-matchable NLO material. The four independent tensor coefficients of dielectric permittivity were found to be ε11=25.09, ε22=25.84, ε33=26.69 and ε13=0.8 from the dielectric measurement.

  6. MOLECULAR RESURFACING OF CARTILAGE WITH PROTEOGLYCAN 4 (PRG4)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Ham, Hyun Ok; Nguyen, Trung; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    Early loss of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a lubricating glycoprotein implicated in boundary lubrication, from the cartilage surface has been associated with degeneration of cartilage and early onset of osteoarthritis. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid and other macromolecules has been proposed as a treatment of osteoarthritis, however efficacy of viscosupplementation is variable and may be influenced by the short residence time of lubricant in the knee joint after injection. Recent studies have demonstrated the use of aldehyde (CHO) modified extracellular matrix proteins for targeted adherence to a biological tissue surface. We hypothesized that CHO could be exploited to enhance binding of lubricating proteoglycans to the surface of PRG4 depleted cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of molecular resurfacing of cartilage with aldehyde modified PRG4. PRG4 was chemically functionalized with aldehyde (PRG4-CHO), and aldehyde plus Oregon Green (OG) fluorophore (PRG4-OG-CHO) to allow for differentiation of endogenous and exogenous PRG4. Cartilage disks depleted of native PRG4 were then treated with solutions of PRG4, PRG4-CHO, or PRG4-OG-CHO and then assayed for the presence of PRG4 by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and fluorescence imaging. Repletion of cartilage surfaces was significantly enhanced with the inclusion of CHO compared to repletion with unmodified PRG4. These findings suggest a generalized approach that may be used for molecular resurfacing of tissue surfaces with PRG4 and other lubricating biomolecules, perhaps leading in the future to a convenient method for overcoming loss of lubrication during the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:20338268

  7. Bis (4-(3,4-dimethylene-pyrrolidyl)-phenyl) methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenbrite, Raphael M. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective is to prepare high temperature polymeric materials, especially linear aromatic polyimides, which maintain their integrity and toughness during long exposure times at elevated temperatures. The attained benefits are obtained by first providing the bis (exocyclodiene) bis (4-(3,4-dimethylene-pyrrolidyl)-phenyl) methane, which is a novel material formed from the monomer N-phenyl-3,4-dimethylene-pyrrolidine. This compound undergoes Diels-Alder reaction with a bismaleimide, without the evolution of gaseous by-products, to form the aromatic polyimide bis (4-(3,4-dimethylene-pyrrolidyl)-phenyl) methane.

  8. Soft x-ray properties of the binary millisecond pulsar J0437-4715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.

    1995-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0. 27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2-1.5, intervening column density NH = (5-8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1-2. 4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.3 deg from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = lES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, NH less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50-600 m and temperature (1.0-3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4-12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma-ray pulsars may have.

  9. Soft X-Ray Properties of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J0437-4715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman, L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0.27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2 - 1.5, intervening column density N(sub H) = (5 - 8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1 - 2.4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.2 min. from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = IES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, N(sub H) less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50 - 600 m and temperature (1.0 - 3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4 - 12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma

  10. Giovanni-4: The Next Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, C.; Hegde, M.; Smit, C.; Da Silva, D.; Bryant, K.; Zhao, P.; Liu, Z.; Shen, S.; Savtchenko, A.; Teng, W.; Wei, J.; Acker, J.

    2014-01-01

    This talk discusses the new aspects of Giovanni-4. Covered in the talk are new features in Giovanni-4, including shape fileservices, seasonal analysis services, the Omnibus Portal, navigation among variables, and comparison services.

  11. The GEANT4 Visualisation System

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.; Asai, M.; Barrand, G.; Donszelmann, M.; Minamimoto, K.; Tanaka, S.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tinslay, J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The Geant4 Visualization System is a multi-driver graphics system designed to serve the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit. It is aimed at the visualization of Geant4 data, primarily detector descriptions and simulated particle trajectories and hits. It can handle a variety of graphical technologies simultaneously and interchangeably, allowing the user to choose the visual representation most appropriate to requirements. It conforms to the low-level Geant4 abstract graphical user interfaces and introduces new abstract classes from which the various drivers are derived and that can be straightforwardly extended, for example, by the addition of a new driver. It makes use of an extendable class library of models and filters for data representation and selection. The Geant4 Visualization System supports a rich set of interactive commands based on the Geant4 command system. It is included in the Geant4 code distribution and maintained and documented like other components of Geant4.

  12. Polymorphisms in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes associated with keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Štabuc-Šilih, Mirna; Ravnik-Glavač, Metka; Glavač, Damjan; Hawlina, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Alterations in collagen type IV, alpha-3 (COL4A3) and collagen type IV, alpha-4 (COL4A4) genes may be responsible for a decrease in collagen types I and III, a feature often detected in keratoconus (KC). To evaluate the significance of alterations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes in KC patients, we screened both genes and estimated the significance of polymorphisms in Slovenian patients with KC. Methods The study included 104 unrelated patients with KC and 157 healthy blood donors. Diagnosis was established by clinical examination, electronic refractometry, and keratometry. DNA was extracted from blood, and gene exons were amplified by PCR. Non-isotopic high-resolution single-stranded conformation analysis (SSCA) was used to screen COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, and migration shifts detected by SSCA were subsequently sequenced. For statistical evaluation, control blood donors were chosen according to age, sex, and not having blood relationship. Neither patients nor control blood donors chosen for statistical analysis were in blood relationship. We used Fisher’s exact test for statistical evaluation, with p<0.05 considered significant. Results We detected eight polymorphisms in the COL4A3 gene and six in the COL4A4 gene. Allele differences in D326Y in COL4A3 and M1237V and F1644F in COL4A4 are significantly distinctive of KC patients (Fisher’s exact test, p<0.05). When analyzing different genotypes under three models (dominant, recessive, and additive), we established that P141L, D326Y, and G895G in COL4A3 and P482S, M1327V, V1516V, and F1644F in COL4A4 have significant differences in genotype distribution between KC patients and the control group. Conclusions This is the first mutational screening of COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes in KC patients to establish the status of these genes and compare them to a control population. Analysis of COL4A3 and COL4A4 revealed no mutations related to KC patients, but specific genotypes of seven previously described polymorphisms are

  13. Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Busso, M.; Gallino, R.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out a theoretical evaluation of the contribution of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to some short-lived (10(exp 6) less than or equal to Tau-bar less than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 7) yr) isotopes in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in the early solar system using stellar model calculations for thermally pulsing evolutionary phases of low-mass stars. The yields of s-process nuclei in the convective He-shell for different neutron exposures tau(sub 0) were obtained, and AGB stars were shown to produce several radioactive nuclei (especially Pd-107, Pb-205, Fe-60, Zr-93, Tc-99, Cs-135, and Hf-182) in diferent amounts. Assuming either contamination of the solar nebula from a single AGB star or models for continuous injection and mixing from many stars into the ISM, we calculate the ratios of radioactive to stable nuclei at the epoch of the Sun's formation. The dilution factor between the AGB ejecta and the early solar system matter is obtained by matching the observed Pd-107/Pd-108 and depends on the value of tau(sub 0). It is found that small masses M(sub He) of He-shell material (10(exp -4)-10(exp -7) solar mass) enriched in s-process nuclei are sufficient to contaminate 1 solar mass of the ISM to produce the Pd-107 found in the early solar system. Predictions are made for all of the other radioactive isotopes. The optimal model to explain several observed radioactive species at different states of the proto-solar nebula involves a single AGB star with a low neutron exposure (tau(sub 0) = 0.03 mbarn(sup -1)) which contaminated the cloud with a dilution factor of M(sub He)/solar mass approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4). This will also contribute newly synthesized stable s-process nuclei in the amount of approximately 10(exp -4) of their abundances already present in the proto-solar cloud. Variations in the degree of homogenization (approximately 30%) of the injected material may account for some of the small general isotopic anomalies found in meteorites. It is

  14. A multi-scale approach to characterize pure CH4, CF4, and CH4/CF4 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Risthaus, Tobias; Rubner, Oliver; Heuer, Andreas; Grimme, Stefan

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we develop three intermolecular potentials for methane (CH4), tetrafluoromethane (CF4), and CH4/CF4 dimers using a novel ab initio method. The ultimate goal is to understand microscopically the phase-separation in CH4/CF4 systems, which takes place in the liquid states near their freezing points. Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations of the pure CH4 system are performed using the ab initio energies to verify the potential. The simulations reproduce quite well the experimentally known liquid densities, the internal energies, the second virial coefficients, and the radial distribution function. The essentially six-dimensional (6D) ab initio potential is then reduced to a one-dimensional (1D) effective potential using the inverse Monte-Carlo technique. This potential, too, successfully reproduces the experimental results. Interestingly, the MC study cannot be extended to the pure CF4 system and the CH4/CF4 mixed system because the two respective ab initio potentials present very rough potential landscapes. This renders the interpolation of energies for the MC simulations and thus the multi-scale approach unreliable. It suggests, however, a possible driving force for the experimentally observed phase separation of the CH4/CF4 system at low temperatures. Furthermore, we carefully study the determination of 1D effective potentials via inverse MC techniques. We argue that to a good approximation the temperature dependence of the 1D potentials can be estimated via reweighting techniques for a fixed temperature.

  15. A multi-scale approach to characterize pure CH4, CF4, and CH4/CF4 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Risthaus, Tobias; Rubner, Oliver; Heuer, Andreas; Grimme, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we develop three intermolecular potentials for methane (CH4), tetrafluoromethane (CF4), and CH4/CF4 dimers using a novel ab initio method. The ultimate goal is to understand microscopically the phase-separation in CH4/CF4 systems, which takes place in the liquid states near their freezing points. Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations of the pure CH4 system are performed using the ab initio energies to verify the potential. The simulations reproduce quite well the experimentally known liquid densities, the internal energies, the second virial coefficients, and the radial distribution function. The essentially six-dimensional (6D) ab initio potential is then reduced to a one-dimensional (1D) effective potential using the inverse Monte-Carlo technique. This potential, too, successfully reproduces the experimental results. Interestingly, the MC study cannot be extended to the pure CF4 system and the CH4/CF4 mixed system because the two respective ab initio potentials present very rough potential landscapes. This renders the interpolation of energies for the MC simulations and thus the multi-scale approach unreliable. It suggests, however, a possible driving force for the experimentally observed phase separation of the CH4/CF4 system at low temperatures. Furthermore, we carefully study the determination of 1D effective potentials via inverse MC techniques. We argue that to a good approximation the temperature dependence of the 1D potentials can be estimated via reweighting techniques for a fixed temperature.

  16. Bacterial metabolism of 4-chlorophenoxyacetate

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W. C.; Smith, B. S. W.; Moss, P.; Fernley, H. N.

    1971-01-01

    1. A pseudomonad capable of utilizing 4-chlorophenoxyacetate (CPA) as sole source of organic carbon was isolated from soil. 2. The organism was grown in liquid culture and the following compounds were isolated and identified in culture extracts: 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate, 4-chlorocatechol, β-chloromuconate probably the cis–trans isomer and γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide. 3. Cells grown on 4-chlorophenoxyacetate were able to metabolize 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate, 4-chlorocatechol and γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide without a lag period. They were not adapted to 4-chlorophenol, or to either culture isolated or synthetic β-chloromuconate, possibly because of stereospecificity towards the cis–cis isomer. 4. On the basis of isolation and induction evidence, the following metabolic pathway is proposed for the breakdown of 4-chlorophenoxyacetate by this organism: 4-chlorophenoxyacetate → 4-chloro-2-hydroxyphenoxyacetate → 4-chlorocatechol → cis–cis-β-chloromuconate → γ-carboxymethylene-Δαβ-butenolide → maleylacetate and fumarylacetate → fumarate and acetate. PMID:5123884

  17. Douglas OA-4A Dolphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Douglas OA-4A Dolphin: This twin-engine Douglas OA-4A Dolphin was unusual in comparison with other OA-4s in that it employed a nose wheel instead of a tail wheel during its NACA testing at Langley. Here is is seen in the NACA hangar in September 1938.

  18. WFPC2 observations of the double cluster NGC 1850 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmozzi, R.; Kinney, E. K.; Ewald, S. P.; Panagia, N.; Romaniello, M.

    1994-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope-Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (HST-WFPC2) optical and ultraviolet imaging observations of the young double cluster NGC 1850 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are presented. The main cluster, NGC 1850A, is a globular-like cluster and has an age of 50 +/- 10 Myr, while the subcluster, NGC 1850B, which is more loosely distributed, is very young at 4.3 +/- 0.9 Myr. Its young age is confirmed by the detection of a pre-main-sequence population of stars associated to it. The two clusters have considerably different IMF slopes, with the main cluster having a flat slope (f(m) proportional to m(exp -1.4 +/- 0.2)) and the young cluster a much steeper one (f(m) proportional to m(exp -2.6 +/- -0.1)). The LMC field star population displays a broad range of ages, from approximately 0.5 Gyr up to more than 4 Gyr.

  19. Crystal structure of 4,4′-(disulfanediyl)dibutanoic acid–4,4′-bipyridine (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Atria, Ana María; Garland, Maria Teresa; Baggio, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    4,4′-(Disulfanediyl)dibutanoic acid (dtba) and 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bpy) crystallize in an 1:1 ratio, leading to the title co-crystal with composition C8H14O4S2·C10H8N2. A distinctive feature of the crystal structure is the geometry of the dtba moiety, which appears to be stretched [with a 9.98 (1) Å span between outermost carbons] and acts as an hydrogen-bonding connector, forming linear chains along [-211] with the 4,4′-bpy moiety by way of O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds and C—H⋯O interactions. The influence of the mol­ecular shape on the hydrogen-bonding pattern is analysed by comparing the title compound and two other 4,4′-bpy co-crystals with closely related mol­ecules of similar formulation but different geometry, showing the way in which this correlates with the packing arrangement. PMID:25309167

  20. Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust at 4.4 to 4.5 ga.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T M; Blichert-Toft, J; Müller, W; Albarede, F; Holden, P; Mojzsis, S J

    2005-12-23

    The long-favored paradigm for the development of continental crust is one of progressive growth beginning at approximately 4 billion years ago (Ga). To test this hypothesis, we measured initial 176Hf/177Hf values of 4.01- to 4.37-Ga detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia. epsilonHf (deviations of 176Hf/177Hf from bulk Earth in parts per 10(4)) values show large positive and negative deviations from those of the bulk Earth. Negative values indicate the development of a Lu/Hf reservoir that is consistent with the formation of continental crust (Lu/Hf approximately 0.01), perhaps as early as 4.5 Ga. Positive epsilon(Hf) deviations require early and likely widespread depletion of the upper mantle. These results support the view that continental crust had formed by 4.4 to 4.5 Ga and was rapidly recycled into the mantle.

  1. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey: A First Sensitive Look at the High-Energy Cosmic X-Ray Background Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; DelMoro, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Assef, R. J.; Aird, J.; Ajello, M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Civano, F.; Cosmastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Alexander, D. M.; Zhang, W. W.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first 10 identifications of sources serendipitously detected by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to provide the first sensitive census of the cosmic X-ray background source population at approximately greater than 10 keV. We find that these NuSTAR-detected sources are approximately 100 times fainter than those previously detected at approximately greater than 10 keV and have a broad range in redshift and luminosity (z = 0.020-2.923 and L(sub 10-40 keV) approximately equals 4 × 10(exp 41) - 5 × 10(exp 45) erg per second; the median redshift and luminosity are z approximately equal to 0.7 and L(sub 10-40 keV) approximately equal to 3 × 10(exp 44) erg per second, respectively. We characterize these sources on the basis of broad-band approximately equal to 0.5 - 32 keV spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and broad-band ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution analyses. We find that the dominant source population is quasars with L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 44) erg per second, of which approximately 50% are obscured with N(sub H) approximately greater than 10(exp 22) per square centimeters. However, none of the 10 NuSTAR sources are Compton thick (N(sub H) approximately greater than 10(exp 24) per square centimeters) and we place a 90% confidence upper limit on the fraction of Compton-thick quasars (L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 44) erg per second) selected at approximately greater than 10 keV of approximately less than 33% over the redshift range z = 0.5 - 1.1. We jointly fitted the rest-frame approximately equal to 10-40 keV data for all of the non-beamed sources with L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 43) erg per second to constrain the average strength of reflection; we find R less than 1.4 for gamma = 1.8, broadly consistent with that found for local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed at approximately greater than 10 keV. We also constrain the host-galaxy masses and find a median stellar

  2. Detection of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Sabbatino, Francesco; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano

    2014-01-01

    The tumor antigen chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) appears to be a useful biomarker to identify melanoma cells and an attractive target to apply antibody-based immunotherapy for the treatment of melanoma. Here we described the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method and the immunohistochemical (IHC) staining method to detect the expression of CSPG4 in melanoma cells and tissues.

  3. Metaphoric Perceptions of Teachers and Pre-Service Teachers about 4+4+4 Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aykac, Necdet; Bilgin, Hilal; Kabaran, Hasret

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the perceptions of teachers and pre-service teachers about 4+4+4 education system via the metaphors they have developed. In this study, the opinions of teachers and pre-service teachers are described with qualitative approach. The participants of the study are 137 primary school 1st grade teachers, working in Mugla in…

  4. Window type: 4x4 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x4 multipaned ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: 4x4 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x4 multipaned steel, casements. Concrete stoop, entry overhang and pipe rail detail also illustrated. Building 36, facing northwest - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. The Ethylene Ketal Protecting Group Revisited: The Synthesis of 4-Hydroxy-4, 4-Diphenyl-2-Butanone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Russell, Charles E.; Wusthoiz, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment to demonstrate the use of ethylene ketal as a protecting group, one that can be completed in four lab periods, is described. The hydroxy ketone like 4-hydroxy-4, 4-diphenyl-2-butanone formed during the reaction can be identified by its melting point, IR, and (super 1)H NMR.

  6. 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid (2,4-DB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2,4 - Dichlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( 2,4 - DB ) ; CASRN 94 - 82 - 6 Health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of chronic toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several Program Offices and the Office of Research and

  7. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2016-03-22

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  8. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2015-06-02

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with sodium ethoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxybutenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with aqueous sodium hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  9. Peptidomimetics as protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trabocchi, Andrea; Pala, Nicolino; Krimmelbein, Ilga; Menchi, Gloria; Guarna, Antonio; Sechi, Mario; Dreker, Tobias; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carta, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    The protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a calcium-dependent enzyme, which catalyses the irreversible conversion of peptidyl-arginines into peptidyl-citrullines and plays an important role in several diseases such as in the rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease and cancer. In this study, we report the inhibition profiles and computational docking toward the PAD4 enzyme of a series of 1,2,3-triazole peptidomimetic-based derivatives incorporating the β-phenylalanine and guanidine scaffolds. Several effective, low micromolar PAD4 inhibitors are reported in this study.

  10. Initial Sulfate Solubility Study for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)

    SciTech Connect

    Lorier, T

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this task is to provide the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) with an assessment of the viability of using the current 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit (in glass) and/or the possibility of increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility limit to account for anticipated sulfur concentrations in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit was implemented for processing of Frit 418-Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) to avoid the formation of sulfate inclusions in the glass and/or the formation of a molten sulfate-rich phase on the melt pool in the DWPF melter. The presence of such a phase on the surface of the melt pool increases corrosion rates of melter components, enhances the potential for steam excursions in a slurry-fed waste glass melter, and creates the potential for undesirable current paths that could deplete energy delivered to the melter due to the electrical conductivity of the molten salt layer. This suite of sulfate-solubility tests began by testing the 1200-canister, 2nd transfer case for SB4 (as defined by Lilliston and Shah, 2004)--based on this being the most conservative (having the highest predicted viscosity when coupled with specific frits, it could potentially have the greatest impact on SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility) blending scenario of SB4 with the heel of SB3 for SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility. Frits 320 and 418 were tested with SB4 and the tests indicated that at the current SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit (in glass) and the tested waste loadings (30% and 40%), neither Frit 320 nor Frit 418 could be utilized with SB4 (for the 1200-canister, 2nd transfer case composition originally provided). More specifically, SO{sub 4}{sup =} was observed on the surface with the SB4 composition and Frit 320 at 40% waste loading (WL) and 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =}, and with Frit 418 at 30% and 40% WL and 0.5 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =}. As alternative frits were being developed--Frits 447, 448, and 449, that contained CaO and/or V

  11. Our Sun IV: The Standard Model and Helioseismology: Consequences of Uncertainties in Input Physics and in Observed Solar Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, Arnold I.; Sackmann, I.-Juliana

    2001-01-01

    Helioseismic frequency observations provide an extremely accurate window into the solar interior; frequencies from the Michaelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, enable the adiabatic sound speed and adiabatic index to be inferred with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 4) and the density with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 3). This has become a Serious challenge to theoretical models of the Sun. Therefore, we have undertaken a self-consistent, systematic study of the sources of uncertainties in the standard solar models. We found that the largest effect on the interior structure arises from the observational uncertainties in the photospheric abundances of the elements, which affect the sound speed profile at the level of 3 parts in 10(exp 3). The estimated 4% uncertainty in the OPAL opacities could lead to effects of 1 part in 10(exp 3); the approximately 5%, uncertainty in the basic pp nuclear reaction rate would have a similar effect, as would uncertainties of approximately 15% in the diffusion constants for the gravitational settling of helium. The approximately 50% uncertainties in diffusion constants for the heavier elements would have nearly as large an effect. Different observational methods for determining the solar radius yield results differing by as much as 7 parts in 10(exp 4); we found that this leads to uncertainties of a few parts in 10(exp 3) in the sound speed int the solar convective envelope, but has negligible effect on the interior. Our reference standard solar model yielded a convective envelope position of 0.7135 solar radius, in excellent agreement with the observed value of 0.713 +/- 0.001 solar radius and was significantly affected only by Z/X, the pp rate, and the uncertainties in helium diffusion constants. Our reference model also yielded envelope helium abundance of 0.2424, in good agreement with the approximate range of 0.24 to 0.25 inferred from helioseismic observations; only

  12. Dynamical Model for the Zodiacal Cloud and Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvorny, David; Janches, Diego; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving to the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer (approx. > 10(exp 5) yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models (approx 10(exp 4) yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) 10(exp 11) sq km and approx. 4 10(exp 19) g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the Zodiacal Cloud (ZC) in a steady state is estimated to be approx. 10(exp 4)-10(exp 5) kg/s. The input is up to approx 10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes, and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 micron and 1 cm is found to be approx 15,000 tons/yr (factor of 2 uncertainty), which is

  13. Static Stability Characteristics of a Series of Hypersonic Boost-Glide Configurations at Mach Numbers of 1.41 and 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Gerald V.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of the static stability characteristics of several hypersonic boost-glide configurations has been conducted in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41 and 2.01 (with Reynolds numbers per foot of 2.90 x 10(exp 6) and 2.41 x 10(exp 6) respectively). This series of configurations consisted of a cone, with and without cruciform fins, a trihedron, two low-aspect-ratio delta wings that differed primarily in cross-sectional shape, and two wing-body configurations. All configurations indicated reasonably linear pitching-, yawing-, and rolling-moment characteristics for angles of attack to at least 12 deg. The maximum lift-drag ratio for the zero-thrust condition (base drag included) was about 3 for the delta-wing configurations and about 4 for the wing-body configurations.

  14. Na7Cr4(P2O7)4PO4

    PubMed Central

    Bourguiba Fakhar, Noura; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, hepta­sodium tetra­chromium(III) tetra­kis­(diphosphate) orthophosphate, was synthesized by solid-state reaction. Its structure is isotypic with that of Na7 M 4(P2O7)4PO4 (M = In, Al) compounds and is made up from a three-dimensional [(CrP2O7)4PO4]7− framework with channels running along [001]. The three Na+ cations are located in the voids of the framework. One of the cations is situated on a general position, one is equally disordered around a twofold rotation axis and one is on a fourfold rotoinversion axis. The isolated PO4 tetra­hedron of the anionic framework is also situated on the -4 axis. Structural relationships between the title compound and different diphosphates containing MP2O11 units (M = Mo, V) are discussed. PMID:23723751

  15. Bacterial Nitration of 4-Chlorobiphenyl

    PubMed Central

    Sylvestre, Michel; Massé, Robert; Messier, François; Fauteux, Johanne; Bisaillon, Jean-Guy; Beaudet, Réjean

    1982-01-01

    In the course of a study dealing with the biodegradation of 4-chlorobiphenyl by strain B-206, we noticed that the gram-negative bacterium accumulated different metabolic intermediates depending on the nitrogen source of the medium. Hence, in the presence of nitrate, strain B-206 produced four compounds which were identified as 2- and 4-hydroxy-4′-chlorobiphenyl and 2- and 4-hydroxy-mononitro-4′-chlorobiphenyl. The accumulation of these compounds in the culture medium indicated the presence of a monooxygenase in strain B-206 leading to the production of arene oxide intermediates. The possible transformation of 4-chlorobiphenyl to an arene oxide by this bacterial strain is a matter of concern because of the high reactivity of these arene oxides with biological material. PMID:16346111

  16. 43 CFR 3802.4-4 - Fire prevention and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Exploration and Mining, Wilderness Review Program § 3802.4-4 Fire prevention and control. The operator shall... measures to prevent and suppress fires on the area of mining operations....

  17. West wall, display area (room 101), view 4 of 4: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, display area (room 101), view 4 of 4: northwest corner, with D.M. logistics office below (room 137), and D.O./D.D.O. offices above. Lower stairs lead to entry shown in view 13 - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  18. 11 CFR 4.4 - Availability of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... materials available for public inspection and copying: (1) Statements of policy and interpretation which... Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS AND THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 4.4... affect a member of the public; (3) Opinions of Commissioners rendered in enforcement cases,...

  19. EPAs SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of source category-specific particulate matter (PM), volatile organic gas, and other gas speciation profiles of air pollutant emissions. Abt Associates, Inc. developed SPECIATE 4.4 through a collaborat...

  20. 4. Engine room, east end looking east toward engine #4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Engine room, east end looking east toward engine #4 (Enterprise Diesel; reduction gear in foreground; in left rear, two D.C. generators with Ames Ironworks horizontal engine and sturtevant vertical engine - East Boston Pumping Station, Chelsea Street at Chelsea Creek, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 43 CFR 3862.4-4 - Charges for publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.4-4 Charges for publication. (a) The charge for the publication of notice of application for patent in a mining case in all districts shall not exceed the legal...

  2. 43 CFR 3862.4-4 - Charges for publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Lode Mining Claim Patent Applications § 3862.4-4 Charges for publication. (a) The charge for the publication of notice of application for patent in a mining case in all districts shall not exceed the legal...

  3. 2,2\\',4,4\\',5-Pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 07 / 006F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF 2,2 ' , 4,4 ' , 5 - PENTABROMODIPHENYL ETHER ( BDE - 99 ) ( CAS No . 60348 - 60 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2008 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington ,

  4. 2,2\\',4,4\\'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 07 / 005F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF 2,2 ' , 4,4 ' - TETRABROMODIPHENYL ETHER ( BDE - 47 ) ( CAS No . 5436 - 43 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2008 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC D

  5. 4,4\\'-Methylene bis(N,N\\'-dimethyl)aniline

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4,4 ' - Methylene bis ( N , N ' - dimethyl ) aniline ; CASRN 101 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Haz

  6. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Report of motor vehicle... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor... section do not relieve the operator and occupants of a motor vehicle involved in an accident of...

  7. 36 CFR 4.4 - Report of motor vehicle accident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Report of motor vehicle... INTERIOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.4 Report of motor vehicle accident. (a) The operator of a motor... section do not relieve the operator and occupants of a motor vehicle involved in an accident of...

  8. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid ( 2,4 - D ) ; CASRN 94 - 75 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asses

  9. 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid (MCPB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( MCPB ) ; CASRN 94 - 81 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  10. Discover 4-H Clubs: The Essential Resource for 4-H

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, Stacey; Nelson, Cindy; Brower, Naomi; Memmott, Margie; Peterson, Gaelynn

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles facing new 4-H volunteers include time constraints and difficulty finding project-specific information, resources, and opportunities available for club members. As a solution to these obstacles and an aid for assisting volunteers in becoming confident in delivering information to youth, content experts produced Discover 4-H Clubs, a…

  11. CARE 3, Version 4 enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, L. A.; Stiffler, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The enhancements and error corrections to CARE III Version 4 are listed. All changes to Version 4 with the exception of the internal redundancy model were implemented in Version 5. Version 4 is the first public release version for execution on the CDC Cyber 170 series computers. Version 5 is the second release version and it is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 for execution on the DEC VAX 11/700 series computers and many others.

  12. On phase transitions in NH_{4HSeO4} and ND{4}DSeO{4}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, V.; Quilichini, M.; Le Calvé, N.; Pasquier, B.; Heger, G.; Schweiss, P.

    1991-10-01

    We propose a hypothetical prototype phase (space group Imm) from which all observed phases in NH{4}HSeO{4} and ND{4}DSeO{4} can be deduced by introducing order parameters of definite symmetries. Following this hypothesis the symmetry of the superionic phase should be P2/n in disagreement with recent experimental results. Free energies of Landau type are derived by means of which particular phase transitions could be described. The large dielectric anomaly near 252 K in NH{4}HSeO{4} is discussed in some detail. The first order phase transition in ND{4}DSeO{4} from the room temperature phase P2{1}2121 into commensurate lock-in phase (with the wave-vector k {z}(0,0, frac{π}{c})) has been investigated by neutron elastic scattering and the symmetry of the latter has been found to be P112{1} in agreement with our theoretical prediction. Nous proposons une phase prototype hypothétique (de groupe d'espace Immm) à partir de laquelle on peut déduire toutes les phases observées dans NH{4}HSeO{4} et ND{4}DSeO{4} par l'introduction de paramètres d'ordre ayant une symétrie définie. D'après cette hypothèse le groupe d'espace de la phase superionique doit être P2/n ce qui est en désaccord avec des résultats expérimentaux récents. Pour chaque transition de phase on écrit l'énergie libre de type Landau à partir de laquelle elle peut être décrite. La grande anomalie diélectrique au voisinage de 252 K dans le composé NH{4}HSeO{4} est discutée de façon détaillée. Dans le composé ND{4}DSeO{4}, nous avons étudié par diffusion élastique de neutrons la transition de phase du premier ordre qui transforme le cristal de la structure P2{1}2121 dans la phase commensurable d'accrochage (de vecteur d'onde k {z}(0,0, frac{π}{c})). Nous avons montré que la symétrie de cette phase est P112{1}, ce qui en accord avec nos prévisions théoriques.

  13. Disrupting sensitization of TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Mack, Konrad; Fischer, Michael J M

    2017-04-01

    TRPV4 ion channels have a broad expression profile and were shown to contribute to enhanced pain sensation in inflammation. Directly blocking TRPV4 might run the risk of interfering with normal physiology, and has prompted to explore the interaction with the scaffolding protein AKAP79, an approach successfully used for TRPV1 channels. HEK293t cells express AKAP79, additional transfection did not sensitize human TRPV4. Application of trypsin facilitated responses to TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A. Using a specific protease-activated receptor 2 agonist, involvement of an A-kinase-anchoring protein in TRPV4 activation was demonstrated by inhibition with AKAP inhibitor peptide Ht31. TRPV4 has substantial sequence similarity to TRPV1 in the range interacting with AKAP79. A synthetic peptide resembling these amino acids and extended by a positive region for transmembrane uptake was tested. Sensitization of TRPV4 responses could be reduced after exposure to this 771-781::TAT peptide but not by a scrambled control peptide. This validates the concept of targeting the interaction between TRPV4 and AKAP79 and controlling increased TRPV4 activity.

  14. Regulation of CXCR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Busillo, John M.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 belongs to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, and is directly involved in a number of biological processes including organogenesis, hematopoeisis, and immune response. Recent evidence has highlighted the role of CXCR4 in a variety of diseases including HIV, cancer, and WHIM syndrome. Importantly, the involvement of CXCR4 in cancer metastasis and WHIM syndrome appears to be due to dysregulation of the receptor leading to enhanced signaling. Herein we review what is currently known regarding the regulation of CXCR4 and how dysregulation contributes to disease progression. PMID:17169327

  15. Aquaporin-4 and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Heling; Huang, Chuyi; Ding, Hongyan; Dong, Jing; Gao, Zidan; Yang, Xiaobo; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are conditions caused by problems with brain vasculature, which have a high morbidity and mortality. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most abundant water channel in the brain and crucial for the formation and resolution of brain edema. Considering brain edema is an important pathophysiological change after stoke, AQP4 is destined to have close relation with cerebrovascular diseases. However, this relation is not limited to brain edema due to other biological effects elicited by AQP4. Till now, multiple studies have investigated roles of AQP4 in cerebrovascular diseases. This review focuses on expression of AQP4 and the effects of AQP4 on brain edema and neural cells injuries in cerebrovascular diseases including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current review, we pay more attention to the studies of recent years directly from cerebrovascular diseases animal models or patients, especially those using AQP4 gene knockout mice. This review also elucidates the potential of AQP4as an excellent therapeutic target. PMID:27529222

  16. CF.sub.4 laser

    DOEpatents

    Wittig, Curt; Tiee, Joe J.

    1979-01-01

    A CF.sub.4 laser for producing near 16 .mu.m radiation utilizing a line tunable CO.sub.2 laser as an optical pumping source. The device uses a cryogenically cooled optically pumped cell containing molecular CF.sub.4 gas. An optical resonant cavity formed around the optically pumped cell induces oscillations of near 16 .mu.m radiation from the .nu..sub.2 +.nu..sub.4 .fwdarw..nu..sub.2 transition in the molecular CF.sub.4 gas.

  17. Shale JP-4 Additive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    8217. •% . , ’ ,,,r ,% . -- - ,.-. ’ ’ 4,w% %’. " - ,’ . . . * ’, .* . TABLE OF CONTENTS .4q ,4 . * SECTION PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TEST PARAMETERS 2 1...42 PRECEDING PAGE BLANK TABLE OF CONTENTS (CON’T) SECT ION PAGE V. CONCLUSIONS 44 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A Drum to Test Sample Relationship 47 APPENDIX...B.O.C.L.E. Results 40 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 Antioxidants 3 2 Raw Shale/Petroleum Fuel Properties 10 3 Drum Sample Additive Content 13 4

  18. A Suzaku X-ray Observation of One Orbit of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16479-4514

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Sguera, V.; Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Ramano, P.; Wilms, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 250 ks long X-ray observation of the supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT) IGR J16479-4514 performed with Suzaku in 2012 February. During this observation, about 80% of the short orbital period (P(sub orb) approximates 3.32 days) was covered as continuously as possible for the first time. The source light curve displays variability of more than two orders of magnitude, starting with a very low emission state (10(exp -13) erg / sq cm/s; 1-10 keV) lasting the first 46 ks, consistent with being due to the X-ray eclipse by the supergiant companion. The transition to the uneclipsed X-ray emission is energy dependent. Outside the eclipse, the source spends most of the time at a level of 6-7X10)(exp-12) erg/sq. cm/s) punctuated by two structured faint flares with a duration of about 10 and 15 ks, respectively, reaching a peak flux of 3-4X10(exp -11) erg/sq. cm./S, separated by about 0.2 in orbital phase. Remarkably, the first faint flare occurs at a similar orbital phase of the bright flares previously observed in the system. This indicates the presence of a phase-locked large scale structure in the supergiant wind, driving a higher accretion rate onto the compact object. The average X-ray spectrum is hard and highly absorbed, with a column density, NH, of 10*exp 23)/sq cm, clearly in excess of the interstellar absorption. There is no evidence for variability of the absorbing column density, except that during the eclipse, where a less absorbed X-ray spectrum is observed. A narrow Fe K-alpha emission line at 6.4 keV is viewed along the whole orbit, with an intensity which correlates with the continuum emission above 7 keV. The scattered component visible during the X-ray eclipse allowed us to directly probe the wind density at the orbital separation, resulting in rho(sub w)=7X10(exp -14) g/cubic cm. Assuming a spherical geometry for the supergiant wind, the derived wind density translates into a ratio M(sub w)/v(sub infinity) = 7X10(exp -17) Solar M

  19. 3,4-Dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, its 4-methylphenyl analogue, and a potassium salt of 2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Nye, Luke; Turnbull, Mark M; Wikaira, Jan L

    2013-11-01

    Reaction of 4-methoxyacetophenone with diethyl oxalate under basic conditions produced 3,4-dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, C20H18O6, (1). The molecules lie across a crystallographic inversion centre and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, similar to acetylacetone, is observed, confirming that the molecule is in the di-enol-dione tautomeric form. Additional O-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into chains parallel to the b axis. The structure is compared with that of redetermined 4-methylphenyl compound 3,4-dihydroxy-1,6-bis(4-methylphenyl)hexa-2,4-diene-1,6-dione, C20H18O4, (2), which crystallizes in a similar fashion. The salt, catena-poly[[μ2-2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoato-κ(3)O(1),O(2):O(4)][μ2-2-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid-κ(2)O(1):O(4)]potassium], [K(C11H9O5)(C11H10O5)]n, (3), was isolated as a by-product of the synthesis of (1). The two organic species are linked by a strong hydrogen bond between the carboxylic acid and carboxylate groups. They are further stabilized and linked into a double-chain structure via the seven-coordinate potassium ion.

  20. Comparative magnetic and thermoanalytical study of two enstatite chondrites: Adhi Kot and Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Elizabeth; Lang, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    With allowance for the discussion of classification of enstatite chondrites and their relation to aubrites, the obtained magnetic and thermoanalytical data is submitted to be considered as additive arguments. Our study covered the Adhi Kot (EH4) and Atlanta (EL6). meteorites belonging to two distinct groups of enstatite chondrites. Applying AF demagnetization the intensity of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured and the mean magnetic susceptibility of the samples was determined. The differential thermal (DTA) and thermogravimetric (TG) curves were obtained for meteorites under study. For measurements of the intensity of NRM, a superconducting cryomagnetometer SQUID (2 G Enterprise, USA), while magnetic susceptibility Kappabridge KLY-2 (Czechoslovakia) were used. The abbreviated magnetic data sheets are given. The values 786 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg and 196.1 x 10(exp -4)A/mkg were obtained as NRM intensities for Atlanta and Adhi Kot respectively, while 17.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg and 43.4 x 10(exp -6) SIu/kg for their susceptibilities. Both meteorites proved to be strongly magnetized. The demagnetization down to 3.2 percent of NMR was received for Atlanta at AF field intensity of 250 Oe. For Adhi Kot at this level rested 13.2 percent of NRM intensity, this sample being demagnetized without change of direction till 750 Oe field. The demagnetization curves are similar to those obtained for Abee (EL4) chondrite by Sugiura and Strangway. Against Abee the Adhi Kot exhibited a little bit steeper downfall, and in both cases dominate one component of magnetization. The DTA and TG curves were obtained with Rigaku-Denki thermoanalytical instrument. The DTA curves exhibit striking similarity in their shape and relatively close temperature values for various features. The same is valid for TG curves. The higher values for TG for Adhi Kot express its higher content of oxydable (Fe, Ni) whose oxidation in air is reached at 1000-1200 C.

  1. AgCo3PO4(HPO4)2.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Driss, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the hydrothermally synthesized compound AgCo3PO4(HPO4)2, silver tricobalt phosphate bis(hydrogen phosphate), consists of edge-sharing CoO6 chains linked together by the phosphate groups and hydrogen bonds. The three-dimensional framework delimits two types of tunnels which accommodate Ag+ cations and OH groups. The title compound is isostructural with the compounds AM3H2(XO4)3 (A = Na or Ag, M = Co or Mn, and X = P or As) of the alluaudite structure type.

  2. Bis(4-(3,4-dimethylenepyrrolidyl)-phenyl) methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenbrite, Raphael M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    It is the primary object of the present invention to prepare high temperature polymeric materials, especially linear aromatic polyimides, which maintain their integrity and toughness during long exposure times at elevated temperatures. According to the present invention, this object is achieved, and the attending benefits are obtained, by first providing the bis(exocyclodiene) bis(4-(3,4-dinethylene pyrrolidyl) phenyl) methane, which is formed from the monomer N-phenyl 3,4-dimethylene pyrrolidine. This bis-(exocyclodiene) undergoes Diels-Alder reaction with a bismaleimide without the evolution of gaseous by-products, to form the aromatic polyimide.

  3. Intumescent coatings based on 4,4 prime-dinitrosulfanilide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Nitroaromatic amine-based intumescent coatings which offer improved thermal protection to a substrate by reducing the backface temperature rise have been developed. The intumescent monomer agent is 4,4 prime-dinitrosulfanilide. This agent has an intumescent temperature of 220 deg C, compared with 300 deg C for the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid and offers a twelve-fold reduction in water solubility over this compound. On the basis of differential thermal analysis and screening tests, a chlorinated polyolifin epoxy-reactive butadiene acrylonitrile rubber blend was selected as a flame quenching binder.

  4. Vought XO4U-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Vought XO4U-2: A biplane scout, the Vought XO4U-2 was 'flown' in the NACA's 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in early spring 1933. Part of these tests were to study the cooling of the Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp radial engine. Other tests involved the relation of the slipstream to stability and control.

  5. 50 CFR Table 4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 4 Table 4 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Critical habitat for the Cook Inlet beluga whale...

  6. ULO_2.4W

    SciTech Connect

    Pitarka, A.

    2012-03-02

    ULO_2.4W is a computer program that can be used to model elastic wave propagation in heterogeneous media from earthquake (souble couple) point sources. The program is a modified version of the orginal program ULO_2.4 developed by Arben Pitarka. The modifications allow for treatment of solid liquid boundary conditions.

  7. 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4,5 - Trichlorophenol ; CASRN 95 - 95 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  8. 50 CFR Table 4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 4 Table 4 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Critical habitat for the Southern Distinct Population Segment of...

  9. 50 CFR Table 4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 4 Table 4 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Critical habitat for the southern Distinct Population Segment...

  10. 50 CFR Table 4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 4 Table 4 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Critical habitat for the southern Distinct Population Segment...

  11. Vibronic Spectroscopy of 4-ISOCYANOBENZONITRILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Joseph A.; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-06-01

    This talk will discuss the jet-cooled vibronic spectroscopy of 4-isocyanobenzonitrile (4IBN, CN-C_6H_4-CN) via resonant two-photon ionization, laser induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence, and UV-UV hole burning methods. Much of the vibronic spectroscopy of the molecule shows strong similarities with the symmetric structural isomers dicyano and di-isocyanobenzene. However, in 4IBN, we have identified a series of weak transitions extending well red of the ππ* origin. UV holeburning spectroscopy has been used to confirm that these transitions arise from the same ground state as the others, pointing to the presence of another electronic state. Based on comparison with other nitrilebenzenes, we postulate that the large dipole moment of 4IBN opens the possibility of a charge transfer (CT) state, much as occurs in para-amino substituted benzonitriles. The rich vibronic spectroscopy of this molecule will be explored using dispersed fluorescence.

  12. Geant4 Applications in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, M.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Use of Geant4 is rapidly expanding in space application domain. I try to overview three major application areas of Geant4 in space, which are apparatus simulation for pre-launch design and post-launch analysis, planetary scale simulation for radiation spectra and surface and sub-surface explorations, and micro-dosimetry simulation for single event study and radiation-hardening of semiconductor devices. Recently, not only the mission dependent applications but also various multi-purpose or common tools built on top of Geant4 are also widely available. I overview some of such tools as well. The Geant4 Collaboration identifies that the space applications are now one of the major driving forces of the further developments and refinements of Geant4 toolkit. Highlights of such developments are introduced.

  13. DHHC7 Palmitoylates Glucose Transporter 4 (Glut4) and Regulates Glut4 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Du, Keyong; Murakami, Shoko; Sun, Yingmin; Kilpatrick, Casey L; Luscher, Bernhard

    2017-02-17

    Insulin-dependent translocation of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) to the plasma membrane plays a key role in the dynamic regulation of glucose homeostasis. We recently showed that this process is critically dependent on palmitoylation of Glut4 at Cys-223. To gain further insights into the regulation of Glut4 palmitoylation, we set out to identify the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) involved. Here we report that among 23 mammalian DHHC proteins, DHHC7 is the major Glut4 PAT, based on evidence that ectopic expression of DHHC7 increased Glut4 palmitoylation, whereas DHHC7 knockdown in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and DHHC7 KO in adipose tissue and muscle decreased Glut4 palmitoylation. Moreover, inactivation of DHHC7 suppressed insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary adipocytes. Finally, DHHC7 KO mice developed hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, thereby confirming that DHHC7 represents the principal PAT for Glut4 and that this mechanism is essential for insulin-regulated glucose homeostasis.

  14. Mutation testing in melanoma families: INK4A, CDK4 and INK4D

    PubMed Central

    Newton Bishop, J A; Harland, M; Bennett, D C; Bataille, V; Goldstein, A M; Tucker, M A; Ponder, B A J; Cuzick, J; Selby, P; Bishop, D T

    1999-01-01

    The INK4A gene which codes for the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor INK4A or p16 underlies susceptibility to melanoma in some families. Germline mutations in the gene that codes for the target protein of p16, CDK4, underlie susceptibility in very rare families. We report mutation screening of the INK4A and CDK4 genes in 42 UK families. A total of nine families were identified with INK4A mutations and none with CDK4 exon 2 mutations. These mutations were in 8/22 (35%) families with three or more cases of melanoma and 1/20 (5%) families with only two cases. In one of these nine families a novel single base pair substitution was identified, Gly67Arg. In an attempt to identify another melanoma susceptibility gene, a member of the INK4 family, the p19 INK4D gene has been studied. The p19 gene was sequenced in DNA from the 42 UK families and six additional US families. No mutations were identified. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10390011

  15. Decision document for function 4.2.4 dispose waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mcconville, C.M.

    1996-09-23

    This report formally documents the planning assumptions for Function 4.2.4, {ital Dispose Waste} to provide a basis for lower level Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Disposal Program decisions and analyses. The TWRS Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS 1996) and a supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for closure of operable units will provide the ultimate Records of Decision for the TWRS strategy at this level. However, in the interim, this decision document provides a formal basis for the TWRS Dispose Waste planning assumptions. Function 4.2.4 addresses the disposition of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW), the disposition of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and closure of the tank farm operable units.

  16. RADTRAN 4: Volume 4, Programmer`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, F L; Neuhauser, K S

    1992-07-01

    The RADTRAN 4 computer code is designed to analyze radiological consequences and accident risks of transporting radioactive material. This manual provides information useful for interpreting, troubleshooting, or debugging components of the code during development or revision of the program.

  17. 4MOST: 4m Multi Object Spectroscopic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depagne, Éric

    4MOST (4m Multi Object Spectroscopic Telescope) is a spectroscopic facility that will be installed on ESO's VISTA around 2020. The science rationale of this facility are to be found in the ASTRONET Science Vision for European Astronomy (de Zeeuw & Molster, (eds) A Science Vision for European Astronomy, Astronet 2007. ISBN 978-3-923524-62-4). Specifically fundamental contribution can be made to the Extreme Universe (Dark Energy & Dark Matter, Black holes), Galaxy Formation & Evolution, and the Origin of Stars science cases in the ASTRONET Science Vision. The unique capabilities of the 4MOST facility are due to by its large field-of-view, high multiplex, its broad optical spectral wavelength coverage

  18. Triton's atmosphere - A source of N and H for Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Michael E.; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    Mass loading of the Neptunian magnetosphere occurs primarily by thermal escape of H, H2, and N from Triton's upper atmosphere. The global escape rate of hydrogen is about 7 x 10 exp 25/s, determined by the global average methane photolysis rate, whereas the escape rate of nitrogen for the present preferred model is about 3.4 x 10 exp 25/s, and is controlled by the global and orbital average energy deposition rate due to precipitating magnetospheric electrons. The escape rate of H(+) and N(+) is less than 4 percent of the neutral escape rate and implies that mass loading of the Neptunian magnetosphere is not localized to Triton's corona. The ratio of hydrogen to nitrogen escape rates for the present preferred model is about 2:1, comparable to the H(+)/N(+) abundance ratio inferred for Neptune's magnetosphere.

  19. Electrospun Polyaniline/Polyethylene Oxide Nanofiber Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, N. J.; Johnson, A. T.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Mueller, C. H.; Theofylaktos, N.; Robinson, D. C.; Miranda, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the observation of field effect transistor (FET) behavior in electrospun camphorsulfonic acid doped polyaniline(PANi)/polyethylene oxide(PE0) nanofibers. Saturation channel currents are observed at surprisingly low source/drain voltages. The hole mobility in the depletion regime is 1.4 x 10(exp -4) sq cm/V s while the 1-D charge density (at zero gate bias) is calculated to be approximately 1 hole per 50 two-ring repeat units of polyaniline, consistent with the rather high channel conductivity (approx. 10(exp -3) S/cm). Reducing or eliminating the PEO content in the fiber is expected to enhance device parameters. Electrospinning is thus proposed as a simple method of fabricating 1-D polymer FET's.

  20. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  1. Exploring the fine structure at the limb in coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Magarita; Blundell, Solon F.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1994-01-01

    The fine structure of the solar limb in coronal holes is explored at temperatures ranging from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 6) K. An image enhancement algorithm orignally developed for solar eclipse observations is applied to a number of simultaneous multiwavelength observations made with the Harvard Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer experiment on Skylab. The enhanced images reveal the presence of filamentary structures above the limb with a characteristic separation of approximately 10 to 15 sec . Some of the structures extend from the solar limb into the corona to at least 4 min above the solar limb. The brightness of these structures changes as a function of height above the limb. The brightest emission is associated with spiculelike structures in the proximity of the limb. The emission characteristic of high-temperature plasma is not cospatial with the emission at lower temperatures, indicating the presence of different temperature plasmas in the field of view.

  2. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  3. The solid state photomultiplier: Status of photon counting beyond the near-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, K. M.; Laviolette, R. A.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Petroff, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Rockwell International's Solid State Photomultiplier (SSPM) is an impurity-band avalanche device which can count individual photons with wavelengths between 0.4 and 28 micrometers. Its response to a photon is a pulse of between 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 5) conduction electrons, making it an important device for use in phenomenology. The characteristics of the SSPM make it a potentially important device for use in astronomical applications. Contract NAS2-12400 was initiated in June 1986 to conduct modeling and characterization studies of the SSPM to provide a basis for assessing its use in astronomical systems. Some SSPM models and results of measurements which characterize the group of SSPMs recently fabricated on this contract are discussed.

  4. Effect of Growth Rate on Elevated Temperature Plastic Flow and Room Temperature Fracture Toughness of Directionally Solidified NiAl-31Cr-3Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.; Salem, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The eutectic system Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo was directionally solidified at rates ranging from 7.6 to 508 mm/h. Samples were examined for microstructure and alloy chemistry, compression tested at 1200 and 1300 K, and subjected to room temperature fracture toughness measurements. Lamellar eutectic grains were formed at 12.7 mm/h; however cellular structures with a radial eutectic pattern developed at faster growth rates. Elevated temperature compression testing between 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -7)/s did not reveal an optimum growth condition, nor did any single growth condition result in a significant fracture toughness advantage. The mechanical behavior, taken together, suggests that Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo grown at rates from 25.4 to 254 mm/h will have nominally equivalent properties.

  5. Micromechanical and Electrical Properties of Monolithic Aluminum Nitride at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2000-01-01

    Micromechanical spectroscopy of aluminum nitride reveals it to possess extremely low background internal friction at less than 1x10(exp-4) logarithmic decrement (log dec) from 20 to 1200 T. Two mechanical loss peaks were observed, the first at 350 C approximating a single Debye peak with a peak height of 60x10(exp-4) log dec. The second peak was seen at 950 'C with a peak height of 20x 10' log dec and extended from 200 to over 1200 C. These micromechanical observations manifested themselves in the electrical behavior of these materials. Electrical conduction processes were predominately intrinsic. Both mechanical and electrical relaxations appear to be thermally activated processes, with activation energies of 0.78 and 1.32 eV respectively.

  6. Temperature and Strain-Rate Effects on Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Schiffers, H.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of strain rate (4 x 10(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -3)/s) and temperature on the Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H have been evaluated in the range 750 C to 950 C. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted in air at a strain amplitude of +/- 0.30 pct. LCF life decreased with decreasing strain rate and increasing temperature. The cyclic stress response behavior showed a marked variation with temperature and strain rate. The time- and temperature- dependent processes which influence the cyclic stress response and life have been identified and their relative importance assessed. Dynamic strain aging, time-dependent deformation, precipitation of parallel platelets of M(23)C6 on grain boundaries and incoherent ledges of twins, and oxidation were found to operate depending on the test conditions. The largest effect on life was shown by oxidation processes.

  7. Expectations for X-ray cluster observations by the Rosat satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evrard, A. E.; Henry, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions for characteristics of the X-ray cluster population expected to be observed by the Rosat satellite are presented via theoretical models for the evolution of X-ray cluster abundances. With a square detect cell of side 4.8 arcmin employed to search for extended cluster sources, roughly 200 clusters per steradian above the all-sky survey limiting flux of 7 x 10 exp -13 ergs/s sq cm are expected. For the north ecliptic pole region of the Rosat survey, which is to cover a 10-deg radius field to a limiting flux of roughly 9 x 10 exp -14 ergs/s sq cm, about 330 cluster X-ray sources are predicted. The clusters should have a median redshift of 0.2, and 10 percent of them should have z greater than 0.4.

  8. Observations of 13.5 micron rotation-vibration lines of SiS in IRC +10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Keady, J. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Hirsch, K. L.; Wiedemann, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the first observations of the 13.5 micron fundamental band of SiS in the spectrum of the heavily obscured carbon star IRC +10216. The lines are formed in the inner region of the circumstellar envelope where the gas is accerlerating and where the temperature ranges from 800-500 K. We have carried out a detailed model of the observed line profiles. Our observations are best fit by a gradient in the abundance of SiS. We derive an abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(exp -6) at a distance of twelve stellar radii from the central star rising to x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(exp -5) at a few stellar radii from the surface of the star.

  9. An aircraft instrument design for in situ tropospheric OH measurements by laser induced fluorescence at low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Stevens, Philip S.; Mather, James H.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is important for many processes involved in tropospheric chemistry. For instance, it initiates the photochemical degradation of gases that cause global climate change, such as methane and the chlorofluorocarbon substitutes (HCFCs). Because of its reactivity, its abundances are less than 0.1 pptv. Thus, OH has been very difficult to measure accurately, despite its importance. Techniques have evolved, however, so that good measurements of tropospheric OH abundances are now possible. One of these techniques that is adaptable to aircraft measurements is the laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH radical in a detection chamber at low pressures. The current ground-based instrument, which can be readily adapted to aircraft, can detect OH abundances of 1.4 x 10 exp 5 OH molecules/cu cm with S/N = 2 in 30 sec, and 5 x 10 exp 4/cu cm in 5 min.

  10. On the Extended Emission of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar IE 1547.0-5408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C. -Y.; Zhu, W. W.; Gavriil, F. P.; Woods, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the extended emission around the anomalous X-ray pulsar IE 1547.0-5408 using four XMM-Newton observations taken with the source in varying states of outburst as well as in quiescence. We find that the extended emission flux is highly variable and strongly correlated with the flux of the magnetar. Based on this result, as well as on spectral and energetic considerations, we conclude that the extended emission is dominated by a dust-scattering halo and not a pulsar wind nebula (P-VVN), as has been previously argued. We obtain an upper limit on the 2-10 keV flux of a possible PWN of 4.7 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm, three times less than the previously claimed value, implying an efficiency for conversion of spin-down energy into nebular luminosity of <9 x 10(exp -4) .

  11. On the massive star-forming capacity of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Shore, Steven N.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Assuming that photoionization is the self-limiting process for continued star formation, we estimate the maximum number of massive (OB) stars that can form within a molecular cloud. The most efficient cloud destruction mechanism in the early stages of H II region evolution is the evaporation of the cloud by stars located near the cloud boundary. The maximum number of OB stars is of order 1 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of average molecular gas, or 10 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of dense molecular gas. The resulting star-forming efficiencies within cloud complexes range from 2% to 16% depending on both the location of the stars in the cloud and the details of the initial mass function, with an overall value of about 5% for average molecular gas.

  12. Description of a subset of single events from the BATSE gamma ray burst data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    About 15 percent of the gamma ray bursts in the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) data exhibit a simple light curve consisting mainly of a single pulse without fine substructures. In 12 of the burst profiles, the pulse shapes show a linear rise and decay. Three events have a distinct sharp rise followed by a long, almost exponential decay. Searches based on only a sharp rise selection criterion resulted in five more grbs with different profile complexities. In one case, we identify an envelope of fast oscillations with a long, softer tail lasting about 100 seconds. The majority of events were detectable at energies above 300 keV, with tentative estimates for fluences that vary between 4.0 x 10(exp -8) and 5.4 x 10(exp -6) ergs/sq cm. We describe here their general characteristics (durations, rise-decay times) and their hardness ratios.

  13. Time resolved simulation of lightning by LIP. [laser-induced plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jebens, D. S.; Lakkaraju, H. S.; Mckay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of time-resolved spectra of lightning simulation in air by laser-induced plasma (LIP) are reported. The measured electron temperatures varied from 17,000 +/-1000 K at 600 ns to 12,000 +/-1000 K at 4 microsec after the ignition of the plasma. Electron densities in the plasma varied from (7.0 +/-1.4) x 10 exp 17/cu cm to (9.0 +/-1.8) x 10 exp 16/cu cm for the above times. A comparison of state variables for LIP and natural lightning is presented. Immediately following the ignition, both natural lightning and LIP are found to reach temperatures in excess of 16,000 K and relax to ambient pressure with different rates. They are expected to approach the 2000-4000-K temperature range, which is important to chemical synthesis, in an asymptotically similar fashion.

  14. 4MOST - 4-meter Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Consortium, 4MOST

    2015-08-01

    4MOST is a wide-field, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility under development for the 4m VISTA telescope of the European Southern Observatory. 4MOST will provide the spectroscopic complement to the large area surveys coming from space missions like Gaia, eROSITA, Euclid, and PLATO and from ground-based facilities like VISTA, VST, DES, LSST and SKA.The 4MOST baseline concept features a 2.5 degree diameter field-of-view with ~2400 fibers in the focal surface that are configured by a fiber positioner based on the tilting spine principle. The fibers feed two types of spectrographs: ~1600 fibers go to two spectrographs with resolution R>5000 (λ~390-930 nm) and ~800 fibers to a spectrograph with R>18,000 (λ~392-437 nm & 515-572 nm & 605-675 nm).4MOST will have a unique operations concept in which 5 year public surveys from both the consortium and the ESO community will be combined and observed in parallel during each exposure, resulting in more than 25 million spectra of targets spread over a large fraction of the southern sky. The 4MOST Facility Simulator (4FS) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of this observing concept. 4MOST has been accepted for implementation by ESO with operations expected to start by the end of 2020.Gaia’s spectroscopic limits mean that radial velocity information starts to peter out at about 10 kpc, even for the most luminous stars. With 4MOST we will be able to obtain metallicities and [α/Fe] ratios of horizontal branch (HB) and red giant branch (RGB) stars out to ≈50 kpc and accurate radial velocities (σV ≈ 2 km/s) to 100 kpc. This will answer many open questions about the structure and formation of the Milky Way.Beginning in 2016 eROSITA will carry out a full sky X-ray survey that will probe to approximately 50 times fainter fluxes than the very successful ROSAT all sky survey but with dramatically better angular resolution of FWHM˜25ʺ and much better energy resolution.eROSITA will discover 3 million X

  15. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  16. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4): From development to cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Divya; Morton, Derrick J; Carey, Jason; Havrda, Mathew C; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Highly conserved Inhibitors of DNA-Binding (ID1-ID4) genes encode multi-functional proteins whose transcriptional activity is based on dominant negative inhibition of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. Initial animal models indicated a degree of compensatory overlap between ID genes such that deletion of multiple ID genes was required to generate easily recognizable phenotypes. More recently, new model systems have revealed alterations in mice harboring deletions in single ID genes suggesting complex gene and tissue specific functions for members of the ID gene family. Because ID genes are highly expressed during development and their function is associated with a primitive, proliferative cellular phenotype there has been significant interest in understanding their potential roles in neoplasia. Indeed, numerous studies indicate an oncogenic function for ID1, ID2 and ID3. In contrast, the inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) presents a paradigm shift in context of well-established role of ID1, ID2 and ID3 in development and cancer. Apart from some degree of functional redundancy such as HLH dependent interactions with bHLH protein E2A, many of the functions of ID4 are distinct from ID1, ID2 and ID3: ID4 proteins a) regulate distinct developmental processes and tissue expression in the adult, b) promote stem cell survival, differentiation and/or timing of differentiation, c) epigenetic inactivation/loss of expression in several advanced stage cancers and d) increased expression in some cancers such as those arising in the breast and ovary. Thus, in spite of sharing the conserved HLH domain, ID4 defies the established model of ID protein function and expression. The underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the unique role of ID4 as compared to other ID proteins still remains largely un-explored. This review will focus on the current understanding of ID4 in context of development and cancer.

  17. Vitamin D4 in mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine M; Horst, Ronald L; Koszewski, Nicholas J; Simon, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D(2) as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D(4) (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D(4) was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [(3)H] itamin D(3) as an internal standard. White button, crimini, portabella, enoki, shiitake, maitake, oyster, morel, chanterelle, and UV-treated portabella mushrooms were analyzed, as four composites each of a total of 71 samples from U.S. retail suppliers and producers. Vitamin D(4) was present (>0.1 µg/100 g) in a total of 18 composites and in at least one composite of each mushroom type except white button. The level was highest in samples with known UV exposure: vitamin D enhanced portabella, and maitake mushrooms from one supplier (0.2-7.0 and 22.5-35.4 µg/100 g, respectively). Other mushrooms had detectable vitamin D(4) in some but not all samples. In one composite of oyster mushrooms the vitamin D(4) content was more than twice that of D(2) (6.29 vs. 2.59 µg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) exceeded 2 µg/100 g in the morel and chanterelle mushroom samples that contained D(4), but was undetectable in two morel samples. The vitamin D(4) precursor 22,23-dihydroergosterol was found in all composites (4.49-16.5 mg/100 g). Vitamin D(4) should be expected to occur in mushrooms exposed to UV light, such as commercially produced vitamin D enhanced products, wild grown mushrooms or other mushrooms receiving incidental exposure. Because vitamin D(4) coeluted with D(3) in the routine HPLC analysis of vitamin D(2) and an alternate mobile phase was necessary for resolution, researchers analyzing vitamin D(2) in mushrooms and using D(3) as an internal standard should verify that the system will resolve vitamins D(3) and D(4).

  18. Vitamin D4 in Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katherine M.; Horst, Ronald L.; Koszewski, Nicholas J.; Simon, Ryan R.

    2012-01-01

    An unknown vitamin D compound was observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of edible mushrooms in the course of analyzing vitamin D2 as part of a food composition study and confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be vitamin D4 (22-dihydroergocalciferol). Vitamin D4 was quantified by HPLC with UV detection, with vitamin [3H] itamin D3 as an internal standard. White button, crimini, portabella, enoki, shiitake, maitake, oyster, morel, chanterelle, and UV-treated portabella mushrooms were analyzed, as four composites each of a total of 71 samples from U.S. retail suppliers and producers. Vitamin D4 was present (>0.1 µg/100 g) in a total of 18 composites and in at least one composite of each mushroom type except white button. The level was highest in samples with known UV exposure: vitamin D enhanced portabella, and maitake mushrooms from one supplier (0.2–7.0 and 22.5–35.4 µg/100 g, respectively). Other mushrooms had detectable vitamin D4 in some but not all samples. In one composite of oyster mushrooms the vitamin D4 content was more than twice that of D2 (6.29 vs. 2.59 µg/100 g). Vitamin D4 exceeded 2 µg/100 g in the morel and chanterelle mushroom samples that contained D4, but was undetectable in two morel samples. The vitamin D4 precursor 22,23-dihydroergosterol was found in all composites (4.49–16.5 mg/100 g). Vitamin D4 should be expected to occur in mushrooms exposed to UV light, such as commercially produced vitamin D enhanced products, wild grown mushrooms or other mushrooms receiving incidental exposure. Because vitamin D4 coeluted with D3 in the routine HPLC analysis of vitamin D2 and an alternate mobile phase was necessary for resolution, researchers analyzing vitamin D2 in mushrooms and using D3 as an internal standard should verify that the system will resolve vitamins D3 and D4. PMID:22870201

  19. Exact ∇44 couplings and helicity supertraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Pioline, Boris

    2017-01-01

    In type II string theory compactified on a d-dimensional torus T d down to D = 10- ddimensions,the ℛ4 and ∇44 four-gravitoncouplingsareknownexactly,forall values of the moduli, in terms of certain Eisenstein series of the U-duality group E d ( ℤ). In the limit where one circle in the torus becomes large, these couplings are expected to reduce to their counterpart in dimension D +1, plus threshold effects and exponentially suppressed corrections corresponding to BPS black holes in dimension D + 1 whose worldline winds around the circle. By combining the weak coupling and large radius limits, we determine these exponentially suppressed corrections exactly, and demonstrate that the contributions of 1/4-BPS black holes to the ∇44 coupling are proportional to the appropriate helicity supertrace. Mathematically, our results provide the complete Fourier expansion of the next-to-minimal theta series of E d + 1( ℤ) with respect to the maximal parabolic subgroup with Levi component E d for d ≤ 6, and the complete Abelian part of the Fourier expansion of the same for d = 7.

  20. OSSE observations of galactic 511 keV annihilation radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has performed several observations of the galactic plane and galactic center region to measure the distribution of galactic 511 keV positron annihilation radiation. Preliminary analysis of data collected during the observation of the galactic center region over the period 13-24 Jun. 1991, indicates the presence of a 511 keV line and positronium continuum superimposed on a power-law continuum. The line of flux was found to be (2.7 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec, with a positronium fraction of (0.9 +/- 0.2). The 3(sigma) upper limit to daily variations in the 511 keV line flux from the mean during the observation interval is 3 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. If all of the observed annihilation radiation is assumed to originate from the x-ray source 1E 1740.7-2942, the corresponding 511 keV line flux would be (3.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. The 3(sigma) upper limit for 511 keV line emission from the x-ray binary GX1+4 is 6 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm sec. Results from the galactic plane observations at galactic longitudes of 25 degrees (16-21 Aug. 1991) and 339 degrees (6-11 Sep. 1991) suggest that the emission is concentrated near the galactic center. The observations and the preliminary results are described.