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Sample records for 10exp 5 solar

  1. The study of pressure measurement techniques and devices in the range of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure range was studied in a region where conventional pressure sensing devices do not provide meaningful measurements. However, a hot filament gauge was developed and miniaturized which will measure the pressure in the 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -5) torr (2 millipsi to 0.2 micropsi) region, hence the name Micropsi gauge. Laboratory studies were made comparing the currently available devices with the newly developed miniature low power 'Micropsi' pressure sensor.

  2. Laboratory Demonstration of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph with Better than 10(exp -9) Contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert; Martinache, Frantz; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    We present coronagraphic images from the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph on NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab, showing contrasts of 5x10(exp -1) averaged from 2-4 lambda/D, in monochromatic light at 808 nm. In parallel with the coronagraph and its deformable mirror and coronagraphic wavefront control, we also demonstrate a low-order wavefront control system, giving 100 x rms suppression of introduced tip/tilt disturbances down to residual levels of 10(exp -3) lambda/D. Current limitations, as well as broadband (10% fractional bandpass) preliminary results are discussed.

  3. A geodetic laser radar rangefinder with 10(exp -7) resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, Y.; Takeichi, M.; Warashima, Y.; Takeshima, A.; Ogawa, I.; Ichie, K.; Schiller, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel geodetic laser radar rangefinder (GLRR) unit utilizing a pair of synchronized 10-psec streak camera systems was developed for displacement measurements of the earth's plates. In order to achieve minimum computing error and assure extremely high spatial resolution, an optical pulse registration clock was developed and used to register a fiducial mark on the time scale of the system. Conventional optical rangefinders have been limited to a relative resolution of 10(exp -6) even for short distances. The system to be reported on today has the capability of measuring a 50km range with an accuracy of 4mm corresponding to a relative resolution of 10(exp -7). With a gain of greater than 3 x 10(exp 3), the system has the capability of detecting extremely weak signals on the order of photon counting. This combined with temporal gating makes daytime measurements comparable in signal-to-noise ratio to nighttime viewing. This is useful for measuring faint signals returning over a range of several tens of kilometers. The present ranging system was designed to observe the mutual displacement of geodetic plates and was employed to measure the boundary between the Philippine and Asian geodetic plates that pass beneath the Suruga Bay near Hamamatsu City, Japan. The system has been in operation for over 3 years. In addition, the system has the ability of producing and detecting optical ranging pulses of several wavelengths simultaneously, making this a complete multicolor system. The basic GLRR system consists of a frequency stabilizing crystal, optical clock, YAG laser, KDP doubling crystal, DK*P tripling crystal, two matched streak cameras (A and B), a control computer, and an output/input periscope system.

  4. Heat-Transfer and Pressure Measurements from a Flight Test of the Third 1/18-Scale Model of the Titan Intercontinental Ballistic Missile up to a Mach Number of 3.86 and Reynolds Number per Foot of 23.5 x 10(exp 6) and a Comparison with Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, John B., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure measurements were obtained from a flight test of a 1/18-scale model of the Titan intercontinental ballistic missile up to a Mach number of 3.86 and Reynolds number per foot of 23.5 x 10(exp 6) and are compared with the data of two previously tested 1/18-scale models. Boundary-layer transition was observed on the nose of the model. Van Driest's theory predicted heat-transfer coefficients reasonably well for the fully laminar flow but predictions made by Van Driest's theory for turbulent flow were considerably higher than the measurements when the skin was being heated. Comparison with the flight test of two similar models shows fair repeatability of the measurements for fully laminar or turbulent flow.

  5. A vacuum (10(exp -9) Torr) friction apparatus for determining friction and endurance life of MoSx films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip B.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Spalvins, Talivaldis; Wheeler, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    The first part of this paper describes an ultrahigh vacuum friction apparatus (tribometer). The tribometer can be used in a ball-on-disk configuration and is specifically designed to measure the friction and endurance life of solid lubricating films such as MoS(x) in vacuum at a pressure of 10 exp -7 Pa. The sliding mode is typically unidirectional at a constant rotating speed. The second part of this paper presents some representative friction and endurance life data for magnetron sputtered MoS(x) films (110 nm thick) deposited on sputter-cleaned 440 C stainless-steel disk substrates, which were slid against a 6-mm-diameter 440 C stainless-steel bearing ball. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.49 to 3.6 N (average Hertzian contact pressure, 0.33 to 0.69 GPa), at a constant rotating speed of 120 rpm (sliding velocity ranging from 31 to 107 mm/s due to the range of wear track radii involved in the experiments), in a vacuum of 7 x 10 exp -7 Pa and at room temperature. The results indicate that there are similarities in friction behavior of MoS(x) films overs their life cycles regardless of load applied. The coefficient of friction (mu) decreases as load W increases according to mu = kW exp -1/3. The endurance life E of MoS(x) films decreases as the load W increases according to E = KW exp -1.4 for the load range. The load- (or contract-pressure-) dependent endurance life allows us to reduce the time for wear experiments and to accelerate endurance life testing of MoS(x) films. For the magnetron-sputtered MoS(x) films deposited on 440 C stainless-steel disks: the specific wear rate normalized to the load and the number of revolutions was 3 x 10 exp -8 mm exp 3/N-revolution; the specific wear rate normalized to the load and the total sliding distance was 8 x 10 exp -7 mm exp 3/N-m; and the nondimensional wear coefficient of was approximately 5 x 10 exp -6. The values are almost independent of load in the range 0.49 to 3.6 N (average Hertzian contact

  6. Reconstruction of 10(exp 20)ev Showers in EUSO and JEM EUSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V.; Adams, J.; Cline, D.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the procedure to reconstruct 10(exp 20) ev showers in Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO). We show the angular and energy resolution is excellent. We now apply this to the newly proposed Japanese JEM-EUSO and will present results at the meeting.

  7. The measurement of elemental abundances above 10 exp 15 eV at a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swordy, S. P.

    1990-03-01

    At about 10 exp 15 eV the slope of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays becomes significantly steeper than at lower energies. The measurement of relative elemental abundances at these energies is expected to provide a means to resolve the origin of this feature and greatly contribute to the understanding of the sources of cosmic rays. A moon-based detector for making well-resolved elemental measurements at these energies is described using hadronic calorimetry. This detector is particularly well suited for a site on the lunar surface because there is no overlying layer of atmosphere and the large mass required can be provided by the lunar regolith.

  8. Magnetic ropes in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Shukurov, A.; Sokolov, D. IZMIRAN, Troitsk Moscow State Univ. )

    1992-10-01

    The generation of magnetic fluctuations by MHD turbulence in the solar wind is discussed. An estimate of the effective magnetic Reynolds number in the solar wind based on a width of the inertial range of the turbulence is proposed. Dynamo activity is predicted to lead to generation of magnetic ropes whose length is of the order of the energy range scale, 2.5 x 10 exp 11 cm, and whose thickness can be as low as 5 x 10 exp 8 cm. Experimental detection of the ropes would require determination of two-point and higher correlation functions for the magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind. 21 refs.

  9. The Prolate Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auchere, F.; Boulade, S.; Koutchmy, S.; Smartt, R. N.; Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Georgakilas, A.; Gurman, J. B.; Artzner, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the chromospheric solar limb prolateness, using strictly simultaneous H-alpha, ground-based observations and HeII space-based observations. The typical prolateness is found to be DeltaD/D = 5.5 x 10(exp -3) in HeII and 1.2 x 10(exp -3) in H-alpha. The first measurements in the 30.4 nm HeII line over a period of two years. as well as coronal data, are discussed to explore further the origin of the prolateness and its possible consequences.

  10. An Instrument to Measure Elemental Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei Up to 10(exp 16) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov,S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    A longstanding goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays up to and through the "knee" (approx. equal to 3 x 10 (exp 15) eV. It is not currently feasible to achieve this goal with an ionization calorimeter because the mass required to be deployed in Earth orbit is very large (at least 50 tonnes). An alternative method will be presented. This is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer using silicon microstrip detector technology. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11)- 10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a design for a new lightweight instrument with a large aperture (KLEM) will be described.

  11. A vacuum (10 exp -9 torr) friction apparatus for determining friction and endurance life of MoS(x) films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Honecy, Frank S.; Abel, Phillip B.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Spalvins, Talivaldis; Wheeler, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrahigh-vacuum tribometer for use in a ball-on-disk configuration was specially designed for measuring the friction and endurance life of magnetron-sputtered solid lubricating MoS(x) films deposited on sputter-cleaned 400 C stainless-steel disks, when slid against a 6-mm-diameter 440 C stainless-steel ball. The results of tests showed that the tribometer performs satisfactorily in unidirectional rotation in vacuum at a pressure of 10 exp -7 Pa, 10 exp -9 torr. Similarities are observed in the life cycle friction behavior and the coefficient of friction as a function of the number of disk revolutions, for MoS(x) films at average Hertzian contact from 0.33 to 0.69 GPa.

  12. On possible Mn-53 heterogeneity in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, A. K.; Ustinova, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of influence of shock wave propagation on the energy spectrum of accelerated particles that lead to different production rates of radionuclides, in particular, Mn-53, on small scales in the early solar system are shown. Search for evidence for extinct Mn-53 has stimulated investigations of Cr isotope anomalies in meteorites. The linear correlation between the magnitude of the Cr-53* excesses and the Mn/Cr ratio that unambiguously proves the in situ decay of Mn-53 was detected, really, in different mineral phases of some carbonaceous and enstatite chondrites, primitive achondrites, pallasites and iron meteorites. However, the data on the Cr-53* excess rarely defines a single linear array on a Mn-53-Cr-52 evolution diagram even for meteorites of the same chemical group. A clear isochron with Mn-53/Mn-55 = 4.4 plus or minus 1.0 x 10(exp -5) (in range of approximately 2.4 to approximately 9 x 10(exp -5)) is observed for CAI of the Allende C3-chondrite while the data for the Murchison C2- and Orgueil C1-chondrites fall much lower corresponding rather to Mn-53/Mn-55 less than 2 x 10(exp -5). In the case of iron meteorites it ranges from less than 5 x 10(exp -8) to less than 5 x 10(exp -5).

  13. 39 photons/bit direct detection receiver at 810 nm, BER = 1 x 10 exp -6, 60 Mb/s QPPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Andrew; Dion, Bruno; Noeldeke, Christoph; Duchmann, Olivier

    1991-06-01

    39 photons/bit direct detection receiver sensitivity is reported, at a BER of 1 x 10 exp -6, for a 2-percent extinction ratio, 810 nm, 60 Mb/s QPPM signal. The sensitivity is 68 photons/bit at a BER of 1 x 10 exp -9. These figures represent a record sensitivity for a direct detection receiver. They are achieved by a combination of a novel silicon avalanche photodiode, an optimized preamplifier and a maximum likelihood demodulator. The work was a part of Phase B Breadboarding activities for the European Space Agency (ESA) SILEX (Semiconductor Intersatellite Link EXperiment) program on Intersatellite Optical Links.

  14. On a Solar Origin for the Cosmogenic Nuclide Event of 775 A.D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Dietrich, W. F.; Ling, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We explore requirements for a solar particle event (SPE) and flare capable of producing the cosmogenic nuclide event of 775 A.D., and review solar circumstances at that time. A solar source for 775 would require a greater than 1 GV spectrum approximately 45 times stronger than that of the intense high-energy SPE of 1956 February 23. This implies a greater than 30 MeV proton fluence (F(sub 30)) of approximately 8 × 10(exp 10) proton cm(exp -2), approximately 10 times larger than that of the strongest 3 month interval of SPE activity in the modern era. This inferred F(sub 30) value for the 775 SPE is inconsistent with the occurrence probability distribution for greater than 30 MeV solar proton events. The best guess value for the soft X-ray classification (total energy) of an associated flare is approximately X230 (approximately 9 × 10(exp 33) erg). For comparison, the flares on 2003 November 4 and 1859 September 1 had observed/inferred values of approximately X35 (approximately 10(exp 33) erg) and approximately X45 (approximately 2 × 10(exp 33) erg), respectively. The estimated size of the source active region for a approximately 10(exp 34) erg flare is approximately 2.5 times that of the largest region yet recorded. The 775 event occurred during a period of relatively low solar activity, with a peak smoothed amplitude about half that of the second half of the 20th century. The approximately 1945-1995 interval, the most active of the last approximately 2000 yr, failed to witness a SPE comparable to that required for the proposed solar event in 775. These considerations challenge a recent suggestion that the 775 event is likely of solar origin.

  15. The effects of electron and proton radiation on GaSb infrared solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruenbaum, P. E.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) infrared solar cells were exposed to 1 MeV electrons and protons up to fluences of 1 times 10(exp 15) cm (-2) and 1 times 10(exp 12) cm (-2) respectively. In between exposures, current voltage and spectral response curves were taken. The GaSb cells were found to degrade slightly less than typical GaAs cells under electron irradiation, and calculations from spectral response curves showed that the damage coefficient for the minority carrier diffusion length was 3.5 times 10(exp 8). The cells degraded faster than GaAs cells under proton irradiation. However, researchers expect the top cell and coverglass to protect the GaSb cell from most damaging protons. Some annealing of proton damage was observed at low temperatures (80 to 160 C).

  16. Preliminary results of a balloon flight of the solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, E.; Twigg, L.; Sofia, S.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results of a balloon flight on October 11, 1991, of the solar disk sextant (SDS) experiment are reported. The SDS is an instrument which measures the solar diameter at different orientations with respect to the solar polar axis. Fitting straight lines through two fixed-angle data sets with time as the independent variable yields slopes of (7.1 +/ - 1.5) x 10 exp -3 and (6.7 +/- 1.6) x 10 exp -3/mas s, consistent with the value of 6.47 x 10 exp -3/mas s expected from the earth's approach to the sun due to the orbital motion toward perihelion. Upon the instrument's rotation on its axis a sinusoidal component of the diameter measurement was observed in each rotation cycle, with a variable amplitude of about 150 mas. The present result is epsilon of (5.6 +/- 6.3) x 10 exp -6, about 30 deg offset from the polar-equator position. The absolute diameter obtained by means of the FFT definition is found to be 1919.269 +/- 0.240 arcsec or 1919.131 +/- 0.240 arcsec, depending on the orientation mode of the measurement.

  17. Preliminary results of a balloon flight of the solar disk sextant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, E.; Twigg, L.; Sofia, S.

    1992-04-01

    Preliminary results of a balloon flight on October 11, 1991, of the solar disk sextant (SDS) experiment are reported. The SDS is an instrument which measures the solar diameter at different orientations with respect to the solar polar axis. Fitting straight lines through two fixed-angle data sets with time as the independent variable yields slopes of (7.1 +/ - 1.5) x 10 exp -3 and (6.7 +/- 1.6) x 10 exp -3/mas s, consistent with the value of 6.47 x 10 exp -3/mas s expected from the earth's approach to the sun due to the orbital motion toward perihelion. Upon the instrument's rotation on its axis a sinusoidal component of the diameter measurement was observed in each rotation cycle, with a variable amplitude of about 150 mas. The present result is epsilon of (5.6 +/- 6.3) x 10 exp -6, about 30 deg offset from the polar-equator position. The absolute diameter obtained by means of the FFT definition is found to be 1919.269 +/- 0.240 arcsec or 1919.131 +/- 0.240 arcsec, depending on the orientation mode of the measurement.

  18. The origin and evolution of short-period Miras in the solar neighborhood: Constraints on the life cycle of old stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the short-period (P less than 300 days) oxygen-rich Miras in the solar neighborhood can be fitted with an exponential scale height above the Galactic plane of about 600 pc. Using the Gliese catalog of local main-sequence stars, we estimate that the density of suitable G-type progenitor dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun for these short-period Miras is 6 x 10(exp -4)/cu pc. The portion of the H-R diagram near the main-sequence turnoff of these velocity-selected Gliese stars is intermediate between that of the old open cluster NGC 188 and that of the metal-rich globular cluster, 47 Tuc. We infer that the main-sequence progenitors of the short-period Miras have masses near 1.0 solar mass, and we estimate that these Miras have ages approximately 9 x 10(exp 9). We also identify a few old disk red giants in the neighborhood of the Sun. On the basis of very limited information, we estimate that the total amount of mass lost from these stars during their first ascent up the red giant branch is less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass. We derive a duration of the short-period Mira phase of close to 5 x 10(exp 5) yr. This estimate for the duration of the short period Mira phase is longer than our estimate of 2 x 10(exp 5) yr for the duration of the Mira phase for stars with periods longer than 300 days. From their infrared colors, we estimate a typical mass-loss rate from the short-period Miras of approximately 1 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr.

  19. Our Sun IV: The Standard Model and Helioseismology: Consequences of Uncertainties in Input Physics and in Observed Solar Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothroyd, Arnold I.; Sackmann, I.-Juliana

    2001-01-01

    Helioseismic frequency observations provide an extremely accurate window into the solar interior; frequencies from the Michaelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, enable the adiabatic sound speed and adiabatic index to be inferred with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 4) and the density with an accuracy of a few parts in 10(exp 3). This has become a Serious challenge to theoretical models of the Sun. Therefore, we have undertaken a self-consistent, systematic study of the sources of uncertainties in the standard solar models. We found that the largest effect on the interior structure arises from the observational uncertainties in the photospheric abundances of the elements, which affect the sound speed profile at the level of 3 parts in 10(exp 3). The estimated 4% uncertainty in the OPAL opacities could lead to effects of 1 part in 10(exp 3); the approximately 5%, uncertainty in the basic pp nuclear reaction rate would have a similar effect, as would uncertainties of approximately 15% in the diffusion constants for the gravitational settling of helium. The approximately 50% uncertainties in diffusion constants for the heavier elements would have nearly as large an effect. Different observational methods for determining the solar radius yield results differing by as much as 7 parts in 10(exp 4); we found that this leads to uncertainties of a few parts in 10(exp 3) in the sound speed int the solar convective envelope, but has negligible effect on the interior. Our reference standard solar model yielded a convective envelope position of 0.7135 solar radius, in excellent agreement with the observed value of 0.713 +/- 0.001 solar radius and was significantly affected only by Z/X, the pp rate, and the uncertainties in helium diffusion constants. Our reference model also yielded envelope helium abundance of 0.2424, in good agreement with the approximate range of 0.24 to 0.25 inferred from helioseismic observations; only

  20. Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Busso, M.; Gallino, R.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out a theoretical evaluation of the contribution of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to some short-lived (10(exp 6) less than or equal to Tau-bar less than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 7) yr) isotopes in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in the early solar system using stellar model calculations for thermally pulsing evolutionary phases of low-mass stars. The yields of s-process nuclei in the convective He-shell for different neutron exposures tau(sub 0) were obtained, and AGB stars were shown to produce several radioactive nuclei (especially Pd-107, Pb-205, Fe-60, Zr-93, Tc-99, Cs-135, and Hf-182) in diferent amounts. Assuming either contamination of the solar nebula from a single AGB star or models for continuous injection and mixing from many stars into the ISM, we calculate the ratios of radioactive to stable nuclei at the epoch of the Sun's formation. The dilution factor between the AGB ejecta and the early solar system matter is obtained by matching the observed Pd-107/Pd-108 and depends on the value of tau(sub 0). It is found that small masses M(sub He) of He-shell material (10(exp -4)-10(exp -7) solar mass) enriched in s-process nuclei are sufficient to contaminate 1 solar mass of the ISM to produce the Pd-107 found in the early solar system. Predictions are made for all of the other radioactive isotopes. The optimal model to explain several observed radioactive species at different states of the proto-solar nebula involves a single AGB star with a low neutron exposure (tau(sub 0) = 0.03 mbarn(sup -1)) which contaminated the cloud with a dilution factor of M(sub He)/solar mass approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4). This will also contribute newly synthesized stable s-process nuclei in the amount of approximately 10(exp -4) of their abundances already present in the proto-solar cloud. Variations in the degree of homogenization (approximately 30%) of the injected material may account for some of the small general isotopic anomalies found in meteorites. It is

  1. Observations of Environmental Quenching in Groups in the 11 GYR Since z = 2.5: Different Quenching For Central and Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tal, Tomer; Dekel, Avishai; Marchesini, Danilo; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Oesch, Pascal; Muzzin, Adam; Brammer, Gabriel B.; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Leja, Joel; Magee, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 less than z less than 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z approximately 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M=6.5x10(exp 10) M/solar mass) to nearby massive ellipticals (M=1.5x10(exp 11) M/solar mass). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M=6.5x10(exp 9) M/solar mass). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10(exp 12) and 10(exp 13) M/solar mass, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  2. Radiation hardness of Ga0.5In0.5 P/GaAs tandem solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Sarah R.; Olson, J. M.; Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kibbler, A.; Cavicchi, B. T.; Krut, D. D.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation hardness of a two-junction monolithic Ga sub 0.5 In sub 0.5 P/GaAs cell with tunnel junction interconnect was investigated. Related single junction cells were also studied to identify the origins of the radiation losses. The optimal design of the cell is discussed. The air mass efficiency of an optimized tandem cell after irradiation with 10(exp 15) cm (-2) 1 MeV electrons is estimated to be 20 percent using currently available technology.

  3. Simultaneous observations of solar plage with the solar extreme ultraviolet rocket telescope and spectrograph (SERTS), the VLA, and the Kitt Peak magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, William T.; Thomas, Roger J.; Holman, Gordon D.; Gopalswamy, N.; White, Stephen M.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Jones, Harrison P.

    1993-01-01

    We obtained simultaneous images of solar plage on 1991, May 7 with SERTS, the VLA,4 and the NASA/National Solar Observatory spectromagnetograph at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope. Using intensity ratios of Fe XVI to Fe XV emission lines, we find that the coronal plasma temperature is (2.3-2.9) x 10 exp 6 K throughout the region. The column emission measure ranges from 2.5 x 10 exp 27 to l.3 x 10 exp 28 cm exp -5. The calculated structure and intensity of the 20 cm wavelength thermal bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma observed by SERTS is quite similar to the observed structure and intensity of the 20 cm microwave emission observed by the VLA. Using the Meyer (1991, 1992) revised coronal iron abundance, we find no evidence either for cool absorbing plasma or for contributions from thermal gyroemission. Using the observed microwave polarization and the SERTS plasma parameters, we calculate a map of the coronal longitudinal magnetic field. The resulting values, about 30-60 G, are comparable to extrapolated values of the potential field at heights of 5000 and 10,000 km.

  4. UV testing of solar cells: Effects of antireflective coating, prior irradiation, and UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1993-01-01

    Short-circuit current degradation of electron irradiated double-layer antireflective-coated cells after 3000 hours ultraviolet (UV) exposure exceeds 3 percent; extrapolation of the data to 10(exp 5) hours (11.4 yrs.) gives a degradation that exceeds 10 percent. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences in degradation were observed in cells with double- and single-layer antireflective coatings. The effects of UV-source age were observed and corrections were made to the data. An additional degradation mechanism was identified that occurs only in previously electron-irradiated solar cells since identical unirradiated cells degrade to only 6 +/- 3 percent when extrapolated 10(exp 5) hours of UV illumination.

  5. UV testing of solar cells: Effects of antireflective coating, prior irradiation, and UV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1993-05-01

    Short-circuit current degradation of electron irradiated double-layer antireflective-coated cells after 3000 hours ultraviolet (UV) exposure exceeds 3 percent; extrapolation of the data to 10(exp 5) hours (11.4 yrs.) gives a degradation that exceeds 10 percent. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences in degradation were observed in cells with double- and single-layer antireflective coatings. The effects of UV-source age were observed and corrections were made to the data. An additional degradation mechanism was identified that occurs only in previously electron-irradiated solar cells since identical unirradiated cells degrade to only 6 +/- 3 percent when extrapolated 10(exp 5) hours of UV illumination.

  6. On the deficit problem of mass and energy of solar coronal mass ejections connected with interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanchuk, V. I.; Pishkalo, N. I.

    1995-01-01

    Mean values of a number of parameters of the most powerful coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and interplanetary shocks generated by these ejections are estimated using an analysis of data obtained by the cosmic coronagraphs and spacecrafts, and geomagnetic storm measurements. It was payed attention that the shock mass and mechanical energy, averaging 5 x 10(exp 16) grm and 2 x 10(exp 32) erg respectively, are nearly 10 times larger than corresponding parameters of the ejections. So, the CME energy deficit problem seems to exist really. To solve this problem one can make an assumption that the process of the mass and energy growth of CMEs during their propagation out of the Sun observed in the solar corona is continued in supercorona too up to distances of 10-30 solar radii. This assumption is confirmed by the data analysis of five events observed using zodiacal light photometers of the HELIOS- I and HELIOS-2 spacecrafts. The mass growth rate is estimated to be equal to (1-7) x 10(exp 11) grm/sec. It is concluded that the CME contribution to mass and energy flows in the solar winds probably, is larger enough than the value of 3-5% adopted usually.

  7. Solar Flare Abundances of Potassium, Argon, and Sulphur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Landi, E.

    2003-01-01

    The absolute coronal abundances of potassium has been determined for the first time from X-ray solar flare line and continuous spectra together with absolute and relative abundances of Ar and S. Potassium is of importance in the continuing debate concerning the nature of the coronal/photospheric element abundance ratios which are widely considered to depend on first ionization potential since it has the lowest FIP of any common element in the Sun. The measurements were obtained with the RESIK crystal spectrometer on the Coronas-F spacecraft. A differential emission measure DEM = const. x exp (-(beta)T(sub e) was found to be the most consistent with the data out of three models considered. We find that the coronal ratio [K/H] = 3.7 x 10(exp - 7), a factor 3 times photospheric, in agreement with other observations using line-to-line ratios. Our measured value for the coronal ratio [Ar/H] = 1.5 x 10(exp -6) is significantly less than photospheric, indicating that there is a slight depletion of this high-FIP element in the corona. For S (an intermediate-FIP element) we obtained [S/H] = 2.2 x 10(exp - 5), approximately the same as in previous work.

  8. SDO's View of May 5, 2010 Solar Flare - With Timeline

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a composite view of the solar flare on May 5, 2010, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) cameras in multiple wavelengths (211, 193, 17...

  9. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  10. Thermodynamics of the Solar Corona and Evolution of the Solar Magnetic Field as Inferred from the Total Solar Eclipse Observations of 11 July 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Morgan, Huw; Ding, Adalbert; Johnson, Judd; Druckmuellerova, Hana; Daw, Adrian; Arndt, Martina B.; Dietzel, Martin; Saken, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We report on multi-wavelength observations of the corona taken simultaneously in broadband white light, and in seven spectral lines, H-alpha 656.3 nm, Fe IX 435.9 nm, Fe X 637.4 nm, Fe XI 789.2 nm, Fe XIII 1074.7 nm, Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Ni XV 670.2 nm. The observations were made during the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010 from the atoll of Tatakoto in French Polynesia. Simultaneous imaging with narrow bandpass filters in each of these spectral lines and in their corresponding underlying continua maximized the observing time during less than ideal observing conditions and yielded outstanding quality data. The application of two complementary image processing techniques revealed the finest details of coronal structures at 1" resolution in white light, and 6.5" in each of the spectral lines. This comprehensive wavelength coverage confirmed earlier eclipse findings that the solar corona has a clear two-temperature structure: The open field lines, expanding outwards from the solar surface, are characterized by electron temperatures near 1 X 10(exp 6) K, while the hottest plasma around 2X 10(exp 6) K resides in loop-like structures forming the bulges of streamers. The first images of the corona in the forbidden lines of Fe IX and Ni XV, showed that there was very little coronal plasma at temperatures below 5 X 10(exp 5) K and above 2.5X 10(exp 6) K. The data also enabled temperature differentiations as low as 0:2 X 10(exp 6) K in different density structures. These observations showed how the passage of CMEs through the corona, prior to totality, produced large scale ripples and very sharp streaks, which could be identified with distinct temperatures for the first time. The ripples were most prominent in emission from spectral lines associated with temperatures around 10(exp 6) K. The most prominent streak was associated with a conical-shaped void in the emission from the coolest line of Fe IX and from the hottest line of Ni XV. A prominence, which erupted prior to

  11. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  12. The 5 MW for solar-chemistry development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. T.

    1981-11-01

    The US-DOE, 5MW solar Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operates to develop and proof-test high efficiency solar receivers and collectors (heliostats) for applications such as electricity generation and process heating. The capabilities of CRTF for solar chemical process development studies are described and related to chemical reactant heating rates. A Sun Fuels program is planned to demonstrate a process for upgrading both nonrenewable and renewable feedstocks into conventional fuels. To additionally benefit from the high intensity light source, studies on the direct solar pyrolysis of metal halides and carbonyls to produce high purity, high value metals are recommended.

  13. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  14. Longitudinal-stability Investigation of High-lift and Stall-control Devices on a 52 Degree Sweptback Wing with and Without Fuselage and Horizontal Tail at a Reynolds Number of 6.8 x 10(exp 6).

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Gerald V; Fitzpatrick, James E

    1948-01-01

    Contains low-speed longitudinal stability characteristics of a 52 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 2.88, taper ratio 0.625, and NACA 64 (sub 1)-112 airfoil sections normal to the 0.282-chord line, in combination with split flaps, leading-edge flaps, and upper-surface fences. Low-wing and midwing-fuselage aerodynamic characteristics are presented with and without a horizontal tail at various vertical locations. Tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 6.8 x 10(exp 6).

  15. Search for Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescence in LIGO and Virgo Data from S5 and VSR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Ceron, E. Amador; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of the first search for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence using data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. Five months of data were collected during the concurrent S5 (UGO) and VSRI (Virgo) science runs. The search focused on signals from binary mergers with a total mass between 2 and 35 Solar Mass. No gravitational waves are identified. The cumulative 90%-confidence upper limits on the rate of compact binary coalescence are calculated for non-spinning binary neutron stars, black hole-neutron star systems, and binary black holes to be 8.7 x 10(exp -3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) 2.2 x 10-3 yr-1L101, and 4.4 x 10(exp -4)3) / yr-1/L(sub 10) respectively, where L (sub 10) is 10(exp 10) times the blue solar luminosity. These upper limits are compared with astrophysical expectations.

  16. A very low resistance, non-sintered contact system for use on indium phosphide concentrator/shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is made into the possibility of providing low resistance contacts to shallow junction InP solar cells which do not require sintering and which do not cause device degradation even when subjected to extended annealing at elevated temperatures. We show that the addition of In to Au contacts in amounts that exceed the solid solubility limit lowers the as-fabricated (unsintered) contact resistivity (R sub c) to the 10(exp -5) ohm cm(exp 2) range. We next consider the contact system Au/Au2P3 which has been shown to exhibit as-fabricated R sub c values in the 10(exp -6) ohm cm(exp 2) range, but which fails quickly when heated. We show that the substitution of a refractory metal (W, Ta) for Au preserves the low R sub c values while preventing the destructive reactions that would normally take place in this system at high temperatures. We show, finally, that R sub c values in the 10(exp -7) ohm cm(exp 2) range can be achieved without sintering by combining the effects of In or Ga additions to Au contacts with the effects of introducing a thin Au2P3 layer at the metal-InP interface.

  17. A very low resistance, non-sintered contact system for use on indium phosphide concentrator/shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is made into the possibility of providing low resistance contacts to shallow junction InP solar cells which do not require sintering and which do not cause device degradation even when subjected to extended annealing at elevated temperatures. We show that the addition of In to Au contacts in amounts that exceed the solid solubility limit lowers the as-fabricated (unsintered) contact resistivity (R sub c) to the 10(exp -5) ohm cm(exp 2) range. We next consider the contact system Au/Au2P3, which has been shown to exhibit as-fabricated R sub c values in the 10(exp -6) ohm cm(exp 2) range, but which fails quickly when heated. We show that the substitution of a refractory metal (W, Ta) for Au preserves the low R sub c values while preventing the destructive reactions that would normally take place in this system at high temperatures. We show, finally, that R sub c values in the 10(exp -7) ohm cm(exp 2) range can be achieved without sintering by combining the effects of In or Ga additions to Au contacts with the effects of introducing a thin Au2P3 layer at the metal-InP interface.

  18. The intrinsic magnetic field and solar-wind interaction of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    1992-01-01

    The Venus-like interaction between the solar wind and the atmosphere of Mars is examined. The bow shock and magnetosheath of Mars indicate the presence of an obstacle to the solar wind that is somewhat larger than the size of the planet and its observed ionosphere, and also relatively larger than the Venus obstacle under comparable conditions. The intrinsic magnetic field of Mars must be no greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 12 T/cu m, or about 0.0001 times as strong as that of the earth to produce an obstacle of such small size. At least for solar minimum conditions, like those prevailing at the time of the Viking Landers, the ionospheric plasma (thermal) pressure is insufficient to balance the incident solar-wind pressure by itself. The ion and electron temperatures in the Martian ionosphere indicate the presence of local horizontal magnetic fields and heat sources in excess of solar radiation alone.

  19. Search for Cm-248 in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavielle, B.; Marti, K.; Pellas, P.; Perron, C.

    1992-01-01

    Possible evidence for the presence of Cm-248 in the early solar system was reported from fission gas studies (Rao and Gopalan, 1973) and recently from studies of very high nuclear track densities (not less than 5 x 10 exp 8/sq cm) in the merrillite of the H4 chondrite Forest Vale (F.V.) (Pellas et al., 1987). We report here an analysis of the isotopic abundances of xenon in F.V. phosphates and results of track studies in phosphate/pyroxene contacts. The fission xenon isotopic signature clearly identifies Pu-244 as the extinct progenitor. We calculate an upper limit Cm-248/Pu-244 to be less than 0.0015 at the beginning of Xe retention in F.V. phosphates. This corresponds to an upper limit of the ratio Cm-248/U-235 of not greater than 5 x 10 exp -5 further constraining the evidence for any late addition of freshly synthesized actinide elements just prior to solar system formation. The fission track density observed after annealing the phosphates at 290C (1 hr, which essentially erases spallation recoil tracks) is also in agreement with the Pu-244 abundance inferred from fission Xe. The spallation recoil tracks produced during the 76 Ma cosmic-ray exposure account for the very high track density in merrillites.

  20. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  1. New Horizons Solar Wind Around Pluto Solar Wind (SWAP) Measurements from 5 to 23 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Delamere, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    This year the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons (NH) spacecraft collected 79 days of solar wind measurements during hibernation, about 30 days of data during annual checkout operations, and has begun recording another 168 days of data in hibernation which will be played back next year. The currently available NH-SWAP solar wind observations now span from about 5.1 to 23.4 AU. We examine how the peak solar wind speed in the New Horizons measurements vary with distance, report on progress toward automating the fitting of the SWAP solar wind count rate distributions, and take an initial look at the solar wind temperature-speed relationship beyond 11 AU. Since most of the SWAP solar wind observations were collected while spinning, and ions from the entire field-of-view (10 by 276 degrees) are focused onto one pair of coincidence Channel Electron Multiplier, we need to evaluate the effect of spinning on the measured rates. By comparing the 3-axis stabilized, to the rolling and spinning measurements, we strive to assess spin variations in the observed SWAP count rates and develop techniques to account for them. To test our analysis, we fit simulated count rate distributions to quantify how well our technique recovers the input solar wind conditions.

  2. Solar measurements from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of the solar spectral irradiance from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite is the focus for this research grant. A pre-print copy of the paper describing the calibrations of and results from the San Marco ASSI is attached to this report. The calibration of the ASSI included (1) transfer of photometric calibration from a rocket experiment and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME), (2) use of the on-board radioactive calibration sources, (3) validation of the ASSI sensitivity over its field of view, and (4) determining the degradation of the spectrometers. We have determined that the absolute values for the solar irradiance needs adjustment in the current proxy models of the solar UV irradiance, and the amount of solar variability from the proxy models are in reasonable agreement with the ASSI measurements. This research grant also has supported the development of a new solar EUV irradiance proxy model. We expected that the magnetic flux is responsible for most of the heating, via Alfen waves, in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. From examining time series of solar irradiance data and magnetic fields at different levels, we did indeed find that the chromospheric emissions correlate best with the large magnetic field levels.

  3. Effect of Solar Exposure on the Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Hubble Space Telescope Aluminized-Teflon Thermal Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Aobo; Ashmead, Claire C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to low Earth orbital (LEO) environment, external spacecraft materials degrade due to radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and atomic oxygen (AO) interaction. Collisions between AO and spacecraft can result in oxidation of external spacecraft surface materials, which can lead to erosion and severe structural and/or optical property deterioration. It is therefore essential to understand the AO erosion yield (Ey), the volume loss per incident oxygen atom (cu cm/atom), of polymers to assure durability of spacecraft materials. The objective of this study was to determine whether solar radiation exposure can increase the rate of AO erosion of polymers in LEO. The material studied was a section of aluminized-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) thermal shield exposed to space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for 8.25 years. Retrieved samples were sectioned from the circular thermal shield and exposed to ground laboratory thermal energy AO. The results indicate that the average Ey of the solar facing HST Al-FEP was 1.9 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom, while the average Ey of the anti-solar HST Al-FEP was 1.5 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. The Ey of the pristine samples was 1.6- 1.7 10(exp -24)cu cm/atom. These results indicate that solar exposure affects the post-flight erosion rate of FEP in a plasma asher. Therefore, it likely affects the erosion rate while in LEO.

  4. Measurements of Local Heat Transfer and Pressure on Six 2-Inch-Diameter Blunt Bodies at a Mach Number of 4.95 and at Reynolds Numbers Per Foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Morton; Mayo, Edward E.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the local heat transfer and pressure distribution have been made on six 2-inch-diameter, blunt, axially symmetric bodies in the Langley gas dynamics laboratory at a Mach number of 4.95 and at Reynolds numbers per foot up to 81 x 10(exp 6). During the investigation laminar flow was observed over a hemispherical-nosed body having a surface finish from 10 to 20 microinches at the highest test Reynolds number per foot (for this configuration) of 77.4 x 10(exp 6). Though it was repeatedly possible to measure completely laminar flow at this Reynolds number for the hemisphere, it was not possible to observe completely laminar flow on the flat-nosed body for similar conditions. The significance of this phenomenon is obscured by the observation that the effects of particle impacts on the surface in causing roughness were more pronounced on the flat-nosed body. For engineering purposes, a method developed by M. Richard Dennison while employed by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation appears to be a reasonable procedure for estimating turbulent heat transfer provided transition occurs at a forward location on the body. For rearward-transition locations, the method is much poorer for the hemispherical nose than for the flat nose. The pressures measured on the hemisphere agreed very well with those of the modified Newtonian theory, whereas the pressures on all other bodies, except on the flat-nosed body, were bracketed by modified Newtonian theory both with and without centrifugal forces. For the hemisphere, the stagnation-point velocity gradient agreed very well with Newtonian theory. The stagnation-point velocity gradient for the flat- nosed model was 0.31 of the value for the hemispherical-nosed model. If a Newtonian type of flow is assumed, the ratio 0.31 will be independent of Much number and real-gas effects.

  5. Solar Signals in CMIP-5 Simulations: The Stratospheric Pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.M.; Misios, S.; Gray, L. J.; Tourpali, K.; Matthes, K.; Hood, L.; Schmidt, H.; Chiodo, G.; Thieblemont, R.; Rozanov, E.; Shindell, D.; Krivolutsky, A.

    2015-01-01

    The 11 year solar-cycle component of climate variability is assessed in historical simulations of models taken from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP-5). Multiple linear regression is applied to estimate the zonal temperature, wind and annular mode responses to a typical solar cycle, with a focus on both the stratosphere and the stratospheric influence on the surface over the period approximately 1850-2005. The analysis is performed on all CMIP-5 models but focuses on the 13 CMIP-5 models that resolve the stratosphere (high-top models) and compares the simulated solar cycle signature with reanalysis data. The 11 year solar cycle component of climate variability is found to be weaker in terms of magnitude and latitudinal gradient around the stratopause in the models than in the reanalysis. The peak in temperature in the lower equatorial stratosphere (approximately 70 hPa) reported in some studies is found in the models to depend on the length of the analysis period, with the last 30 years yielding the strongest response. A modification of the Polar Jet Oscillation (PJO) in response to the 11 year solar cycle is not robust across all models, but is more apparent in models with high spectral resolution in the short-wave region. The PJO evolution is slower in these models, leading to a stronger response during February, whereas observations indicate it to be weaker. In early winter, the magnitude of the modeled response is more consistent with observations when only data from 1979-2005 are considered. The observed North Pacific high-pressure surface response during the solar maximum is only simulated in some models, for which there are no distinguishing model characteristics. The lagged North Atlantic surface response is reproduced in both high- and low-top models, but is more prevalent in the former. In both cases, the magnitude of the response is generally lower than in observations.

  6. The Corona of the Young Solar Analog EK Draconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudel, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Benz, A. O.; Elias, N. M., II

    1995-01-01

    First coronal microwave and new soft X-ray observations of the very active, near-Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS) dGOe star EK Dra = HD 129333 show that this analog of the young Sun is more luminous in both emissions than most single M-dwarf flare stars. Variations in the 8.4 GHz flux include modulation with the optically determined rotation period of 2.7 days. This result points to a non-uniform filling of the corona with energetic electrons due to an incomplete coverage of the surface with active regions and a source volume that is not concentric with the star. The radio luminosity varying between log L(sub R) = 13.6 and 14.6 (L(sub R) in erg/s/Hz) shows evidence for unpolarized gyrosynchrotron flares, while strongly polarized flares were absent during the observations. This star is the first young, truly solar-like main sequence G star discovered in microwaves. Having just arrived on the main sequence, it conclusively proves that young, solar-like G stars can maintain very high levels of radio emission after their T Tau phase. The X-ray observations were obtained from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). The average X-ray luminosity amounts to log L(sub x) = 29.9 (L(sub x) in erg/s). A Raymond-Smith type plasma model fit yields two plasma components at temperatures of 1.9 and 10 MK, with volume emission measures of 1.2 and 2.5 x 10 (exp 52)/cu cm, respectively. The X-ray light curve is significantly variable, with the photon count rate from the cooler plasma being strongly modulated by the rotation period; the emission from the hotter plasma is only weakly variable. Modeling of the source distribution in the stellar corona yields electron densities of the order of 4 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm or higher for the cool plasma component. It indicates that a considerable portion of EK Dra's high X-ray luminosity is due to high-density plasma rather than large emission volume. Parameters for an X-ray flare indicate an electron density of 1.75 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm and a source height of

  7. High voltage thermally diffused p(+)n solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, M.; Faur, M.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Weinberg, I.; Goradia, C.; Fatemi, N.; Goradia, M.; Thesling, W.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of fabricating thermally diffused p(+)n InP solar-cells with high open-circuit voltage without sacrificing the short circuit current is discussed. The p(+)n InP junctions were formed by Cd and Zn diffusion through a 3-5-nm-thick anodic or chemical phosphorus-rich oxide cap layer grown on n:InP:S (with ND-NA = 3.5 x 10 exp 16 and 4.5 x 10 exp 17/cu cm) Czochralski LEC-grown substrates. After thinning the emitter from its initial thickness of 1 to 2.5 micron down to 0.06-0.15 micron, the maximum efficiency was found when the emitter was 0.2 to 0.3 micron thick. Typical AM0, 25 C values of 854-860 mV were achieved for Voc, Jsc values were from 25.9 to 29.1 mA/sq cm using only the P-rich passivating layer left after the thinning process as an antireflection coating.

  8. Multiple-etalon systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Multiple etalon systems are discussed that meet the science requirements for a narrow-passband imaging system for the 4-meter National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer that works in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations are described that provide a spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5 micron and reduce parasitic light levels to 10(exp -4) as required for precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like (Telecentric Etalon SOlar Spectrometer) triple etalon system provides a spectral purity of 10(exp -5). The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon; allow the use of more stable blocking filters, and have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass (Cavallini-like) system can provide a competing configuration. Such a dual-etalon design can provide high contrast. The selection of the final focal plane instrument will depend on a trade-off between an ideal instrument and practical reality. The trade study will include the number of etalons, their aperture sizes, complexities of the optical train, number of blocking filters, configuration of the electronic control system, computer interfaces, temperature controllers, etalon controllers, and their associated feedback electronics. The heritage of single and multiple etalon systems comes from their use in several observatories, including the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer-Institut fur Sonnenphysik (KIS, Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will benefit from the experience gained at these

  9. Qualification test results for blue-red reflecting solar covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    Recent market forces and design innovations have spurred the development of solar cell covers that significantly reduce the solar absorptance for a cell array. GaAs cells, using Ge as the substrate host material, can have a significantly higher output if the solar absorptance of the cell array is reduced. New optical coating design techniques have allowed the construction of covers that reflect the ultraviolet energy (below 350 nm) and the near infrared energy (above 900 nm) resulting in the beneficial reduction in absorptance. Recent modeling suggests three or more present output increase due to the lowered temperature with such a device. Within the last several months we have completed the testing of production samples of these new covers in a qualification series that included the usual environmental effects associated with the routine testing of solar cell covers and the combined effects of protons, electrons and solar UV as would be encountered in space. For the combined effects testing the samples were exposed to 300 sun days equivalent UV, 5 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm of 0.5 MeV protons and 10(exp 15)/sq cm of 1.0 MeV electrons. Measurements of the reflectance, transmission, emittance and other appropriate parameters were made before and after the testing. As measured by the averaged transmission over the cell operating band, the change in transmission for the samples was less than or about equal to 1 percent. The details of the testing and the results in terms of transmission, reflectance and emittance are discussed in the paper.

  10. Future L5 Missions for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Gopalswamy, Nat

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIR) are the sources of intense space weather in the heliosphere. Most of the current knowledge on CMEs accumulated over the past few decades has been derived from observations made from the Sun-Earth line, which is not the ideal vantage point to observe Earth-affecting CMEs (Gopalswamy et al., 2011a,b). In this paper, the advantages of remote-sensing and in-situ observations from the Sun-Earth L5 point are discussed. Locating a mission at Sun-Earth L5 has several key benefits for solar physics and space weather: (1) off the Sun-Earth line view is critical in observing Earth-arriving parts of CMEs, (2) L5 coronagraphic observations can also provide near-Sun space speed of CMEs, which is an important input to models that forecast Earth-arrival time of CMEs, (3) backside and frontside CMEs can be readily distinguished even without inner coronal imagers, (4) preceding CMEs in the path of Earth-affecting CMEs can be identified for a better estimate of the travel time, (5) CIRs reach the L5 point a few days before they arrive at Earth, and hence provide significant lead time before CIR arrival, (6) L5 observations can provide advance knowledge of CME and CIR source regions (coronal holes) rotating to Earth view, and (7) magnetograms obtained from L5 can improve the surface magnetic field distribution used as input to MHD models that predict the background solar wind. The paper also discusses L5 mission concepts that can be achieved in the near future. References Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., St. Cyr, O. C., Sittler, E. C., Auchère, F., Duvall, T. L., Hoeksema, J. T., Maksimovic, M., MacDowall, R. J., Szabo, A., Collier, M. R. (2011a), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5 JASTP 73, 658-663, DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.013 Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., Auchère, F., Schou, J., Korendyke, C. M. Shih, A., Johnston, J. C

  11. Design and Development of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, John; Fatemi, Navid; Gamica, Robert; Sharma, Surya; Senft, Donna; Maybery, Clay

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Space Technology 5 (ST5) is designed to flight-test the concept of miniaturized 'small size" satellites and innovative technologies in Earth's magnetosphere. Three satellites will map the intensity and direction of the magnetic fields within the inner magnetosphere. Due to the small area available for the solar arrays, and to meet the mission power requirements, very high-efficiency multijunction solar cells were selected to power the spacecraft built by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This was done in partnership with the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) through the Dual-Use Science and Technology (DUS&T) program. Emcore's InGaP/lnGaAs/Ge Advanced triple-junction (ATJ) solar cells, exhibiting an average air mass zero (AMO) efficiency of 28.0% (one-sun, 28 C), were used to populate the arrays. Each spacecraft employs 8 identical solar panels (total area of about 0.3 square meters), with 15 large-area solar cells per panel. The requirement for power is to support on-orbit average load of 13.5 W at 8.4 V, with plus or minus 5% off pointing. The details of the solar array design, development and qualification considerations, as well as ground electrical performance & shadowing analysis results are presented.

  12. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  13. Catalysis by Dust Grains in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, we have applied our time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10(exp -5) to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650 K. Under these physical conditions, the reaction 3H2 + CO yields CH4 + H2O is readily catalyzed by an iron or nickel surface, whereas the same reaction is kinetically inhibited in the gas phase. Our model results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  14. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  15. Video 5 of 7: Introduction to Solar Storms -- for Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visualization of solar activity. The nature of solar storms, how they can affect Earth and astronauts in space, and how NASA scientists monitor solar activity so they can protect astronauts are pre...

  16. Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

  17. Variability of surface solar radiation in unforced CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We examine the natural variability of surface solar radiation (SSR) under pre-industrial conditions with time-invariant forcing in control runs in global climate simulations of the latest coupled model intercomparison project, CMIP5. We consider global and regional scales, as well as annual and seasonal data. Special emphasis is given to the likelihood of spurious SSR trends. To address this question, we determine for each model the range of linear SSR trends as function of the number of years over which the trend is taken. We discuss our findings with regard to potential aerosol induced dimming and its detectability in the second half of the 20th century.

  18. Low-Speed Longitudinal Stability and Lateral-Control Characteristics of a 0.3-Scale Model of the Republic RF-84F Airplane at a Reynolds Number of 9x10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollech, Thomas V.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel on a 0.3-scale model of the Republic RF-84F airplane to determine modifications which would eliminate the pitch-up that occurred near maximum lift during flight tests of the airplane. The effects of high-lift and stall-control devices, horizontal tail locations, external stores, and various inlets on the longitudinal characteristics of the model were investigated. For the most part, these tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 9.0 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.19. The results indicated that from the standpoint of stability the inlets should possess blunted side bodies. The horizontal tail located at either the highest or lowest position investigated improved the stability of the model. Three configurations were found for the model equipped with the production tail which eliminated the pitch-up through the lift range up to the maximum lift and provided a stable static margin which did not vary more than 15% of the mean aerodynamic chord through the lift range up to 85% of maximum lift. The three configurations are as follows: the production wing-fuselage-tail combination with an inlet similar to the production inlet but smaller in plan form in conjunction with either (1) a wing fence located at 65% of the win semispan or (2) an 11.7% chord leading-edge extension extending from 65.8 to 95.8% of the wing semispan and (3) the production wing-fuselage-tail combination with the production inlet and an 11.7% chord leading-edge extension extending from 70.8 to 95.8% of the wing semispan.

  19. The solar thermal report. Volume 3, Number 5

    SciTech Connect

    1982-09-01

    This report is published by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the DOE Solar Thermal Technology Division to provide an account of work sponsored by the Division and to aid the community of people interested in solar thermal technology in gaining access to technical information. Contents include articles entitled the following: Solar system supplies thermal energy for producing chemicals at USS plant; Solar thermal power module designed for small community market; Roof-mounted trough system supplies process heat for Caterpillar plant; Solar thermal update -- 10 MW(e) pilot plant and 3-MW(t) total energy system; Solar steam processes crude oil; New York investigates solar ponds as a source of thermal energy; On-farm solar -- Finding new uses for the sun; and Topical index of solar thermal report articles.

  20. Plasma Interactions with High Voltage Solar Arrays for a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T.; Horvater, M. A.; Vaughn, J.; Carruth, M. R.; Jongeward, G. A.; Mikellides, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Environmental Effects Group of NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting research into the effects of plasma interaction with high voltage solar arrays. These high voltage solar arrays are being developed for a direct drive Hall Effect Thruster propulsion system. A direct drive system configuration will reduce power system mass by eliminating a conventional power-processing unit. The Environmental Effects Group has configured two large vacuum chambers to test different high-voltage array concepts in a plasma environment. Three types of solar arrays have so far been tested, an International Space Station (ISS) planar array, a Tecstar planar array, and a Tecstar solar concentrator array. The plasma environment was generated using a hollow cathode plasma source, which yielded densities between 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) per cubic centimeter and electron temperatures of 0.5-1 eV. Each array was positioned in this plasma and biased in the -500 to + 500 volt range. The current collection was monitored continuously. In addition, the characteristics of arcing, snap over, and other features, were recorded. Analysis of the array performance indicates a time dependence associated with the current collection as well as a tendency for "conditioning" over a large number of runs. Mitigation strategies, to reduce parasitic current collection, as well as arcing, include changing cover-glass geometry and layout as well as shielding the solar cell edges. High voltage performance data for each of the solar array types tested will be presented. In addition, data will be provided to indicate the effectiveness of the mitigation techniques.

  1. Ozone Correction for AM0 Calibrated Solar Cells for the Aircraft Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The aircraft solar cell calibration method has provided cells calibrated to space conditions for 37 years. However, it is susceptible to systematic errors due to ozone concentration in the stratosphere. The present correction procedure applies a 1% increase to the measured Isc values. High band-gap cells are more sensitive to ozone adsorbed wavelengths so it has become important to reassess the correction technique. This paper evaluates the ozone correction to be 1+{O3}sup Fo, where Fo is 29.5x10(exp-6)/d.u. for a Silicon solar cell and 42.2xl0(exp -6)/d.u. for a GaAs cell. Results will be presented for high band-gap cells. A comparison with flight data indicates that this method of correcting for the ozone density improves the uncertainty of AM0 Isc to 0.5%.

  2. The possible role of high-frequency waves in heating solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Lisa J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Sturrock, Peter A.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the role of high-frequency waves in the heating of solar active region coronal loops. We assume a uniform background magnetic field, and we introduce a density stratification in a direction perpendicular to this field. We focus on ion compressive viscosity as the damping mechanism of the waves. We incorporate viscosity self-consistently into the equations, and we derive a dispersion relation by adopting a slab model, where the density inside the slab is greater than that outside. Such a configuration supports two types of modes: surface waves and trapped body waves. In order to determine under what conditions these waves may contribute to the heating of active regions, we solve our dispersion relation for a range of densities, temperatures, magnetic field strengths, density ratios, wavevector magnitudes, wavevector ratios, and slab widths. We find that surface waves exhibit very small damping, but body waves can potentially damp at rates needed to balance radiative losses. However, the required frequencies of these body waves are very high. For example, the wave frequency must be at least 5.0/s for a slab density of 10(exp 9,5)/cc, a slab temperature of 10(exp 6,5) K, a field strength of 100 G, and a density ratio of 5. For a slab density of 10(exp 10)/cc, this frequency increases to 8.8/s. Although these frequencies are very high, there in no observational evidence to rule out their existence, and they may be generated both below the corona and at magnetic reconnection sites in the corona. However, we do find that, for slab densities of 10(exp 10)/cc or less, the dissipation of high-frequency waves will be insufficient to balance the radiative losses if the magnetic field strength exceeds roughly 200 G. Because the magnetic field is known to exceed 200 G in many active region loops, particularly low-lying loops and loops emanating from sunspots, it is unlikely that high-frequency waves can provide sufficient heating in these regions.

  3. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  4. Dependence of the amplitude of Pc5-band magnetic field variations on the solar wind and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Yumoto, Kiyohumi; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Sanchez, Ennio R.; Troshichev, Oleg A.; Janzhura, Alexander S.

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the dependence of the amplitude of magnetic field variations in the Pc5 band (1.6-6.7 mHz) on the solar wind and solar activity. Solar wind parameters considered are the bulk velocity Vsw and the variation of the solar wind dynamic pressure δPsw. The solar activity dependence is examined by contrasting observations made in 2001 (solar activity maximum) and 2006 (solar activity declining phase). We calculated hourly Pc5 amplitude using data from geostationary satellites at L = 6.8 and ground stations covering 1 < L < 9. The amplitude is positively correlated with both Vsw and δPsw, but the degree of correlation varies with L and magnetic local time. As measured by the correlation coefficient, the amplitude dependence on both Vsw and δPsw is stronger on the dayside than on the nightside, and the dependence on Vsw (δPsw) tends to be stronger at higher (lower) L, with the relative importance of the two solar wind parameters switching at L ˜ 5. We attribute the Vsw control to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the magnetopause, occurring both at high and low latitudes, and the δPsw control to buffeting of the magnetosphere by variation of solar wind dynamic pressure. The GOES amplitude is higher at the solar maximum at all local times and the same feature is seen on the ground in the dawn sector at L > 6. A radial shift of the fast mode wave turning point, associated with the solar cycle variation of magnetosphere mass density, is a possible cause of this solar activity dependence.

  5. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  6. The Generation of Lighting in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey; Desch, S. J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The process that melted and formed the chondrules, mm-sized glassy beads within meteorites, has not been conclusively identified. Origin by lightning in the solar nebula is consistent with many features of chondrules, but no viable model of lightning has yet been advanced. We present a model demonstrating how lightning could be generated in the solar nebula which differs from previous models in three important aspects. First, we identify a new', powerful charging mechanism that is based on the differences in contact potentials between particles of different composition, a form of triboelectric charging. In the presence of fine silicate grains and fine iron metal grains, large silicate particles (the chondrules) can acquire charges of +10(exp 5) e. Second, we assume that the chondrule precursor particles are selectively concentrated in clumps 1 - 100 km in size by the turbulent concentration mechanism described by Cuzzi et al. (1996). The concentration of these highly charged particles into clumps, in a background of negatively charged metal grains, is what generates the strong electric fields. Third, we make refinements in the estimates of the breakdown electric field and the ionization rate. We calculate that electric fields large enough to trigger breakdown easily could have existed over regions large enough (approx. 100km) to generate very large discharges of electrical energy (approx. 10(exp 16)erg). The discharges would have been sufficiently energetic and frequent to have formed the chondrules. We place constraints on the generation of lightning and conclude that it could not be generated if the abundance of Al-26 in chondrules was as high as the level in the CAls. This conclusion is consistent with isotopic analyses of chondrules. This possibly implies that Al-26 was non-uniformly distributed in the solar nebula or that the chondrules formed several Myr after the CAIs.

  7. Total solar irradiance variability - 5 years of ERBE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Woerner, Mary A.; Gibson, M. A.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Data obtained by the ERBS solar monitors measuring total solar irradiance variability are discussed. The ERBS and NOAA-99 monitors derived 1365 W/sq m as the magnitude of the solar irradiance, normalized to 1 astronomical unit. The NOAA-10 monitor yielded 1363 W/m as the magnitude of the irradiance. The long-term precision of the monitors was demonstrated by the detection of the decreasing and increasing trends in the irradiance at levels of the order of 0.03 to 0.05 percent per year. The ERBS and NOAA-9 measurements demonstrated that solar variability exists in a systematic mode which is directly correlated with the solar magnetic activity, indicated by sunspot activity. It is argued that during the decline of sunspot cycle 22, the solar irradiance variability may be entirely different from that which was observed during the decline of cycle 21.

  8. Ions with low charges in the solar wind as measured by SWICS on board Ulysses. [Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Von Steiger, R.; Mall, U.; Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F.; Wilken, B.; Gliem, F.

    1992-01-01

    We present new data on rare ions in the solar wind. Using the Ulysses-SWICS instrument with its very low background we have searched for low-charge ions during a 6-d period of low-speed solar wind and established sensitive upper limits for many species. In the solar wind, we found He(1+)/He(2+) of less than 5 x 10 exp -4. This result and the charge state distributions of heavier elements indicate that all components of the investigated ion population went through a regular coronal expansion and experienced the typical electron temperatures of 1 to 2 million Kelvin. We argue that the virtual absence of low-charge ions demonstrates a very low level of nonsolar contamination in the source region of the solar wind sample we studied. Since this sample showed the FlP effect typical for low-speed solar wind, i.e., an enhancement in the abundances of elements with low first ionization potential, we conclude that this enhancement was caused by an ion-atom separation mechanism operating near the solar surface and not by foreign material in the corona.

  9. Science and Instrument Design of 1.5-m Aperture Solar Optical Telescope for the SOLAR-C Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We present science cases and a design of one of major instruments for SOLAR-C mission; 1.5-m-class aperture solar ultra-violet visible and near IR observing Telescope (SUVIT). The SOLAR-C mission aims at fully understanding dynamism and magnetic nature of the solar atmosphere by observing small-scale plasma processes and structures. The SUVIT is designed to provide high-angular-resolution investigation of lower atmosphere from the photosphere to the uppermost chromosphere with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability covering a wide wavelength region from 280 nm (Mg II h&k) to 1100 nm (He I 1083 nm), using focal plane instruments: wide-band and narrow-band filtergraphs and a spectrograph for high-precision spectro-polarimetry in the solar photospheric and chromospheric lines. We will discuss about instrument design to realize the science cases.

  10. Modeling of the Dust and Gas Outflows from OH 26.5+0.6: The Superwind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justtanont, K.; Skinner, C. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, M.; Baas, F.

    1996-01-01

    We have observed the extreme OH/IR star, OH 26.5+0.6, in the infrared dust continuum and in the sub- millimeter rotational lines of CO. Mid-infrared images reveal the compact nature of the circumstellar shell (less than 0.5 sec). A deep 9.7 microns absorption feature and an absorption at 18 microns show that the dust mass-loss rate is very high. However, the low antenna temperatures of CO J = 1-0 and 2-1 lines suggest that the outer part of the circumstellar shell is much more tenuous. In order to resolve this discrepancy, we have observed the J = 3-2 and 4-3 CO rotational transitions. We have developed a model for the circumstellar shell for OH 26.5 + 0.6 which is consistent with the infrared and submillimeter observations. The dust and gas data are well fitted by a two-shell model, consisting of a dense shell surrounded by a more tenuous shell. The former we identify with the superwind (M = 5.5 x 10(exp -4) solar mass/ yr), and the latter we identify with mass loss on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) (M = 10(exp -6) solar mass/ yr). The transition between the two mass-loss phases is shown to be rather abrupt ((Delta)t less than 150 yr). Depending on the mass of the progenitor, this superwind phase may be the last thermal pulse (for M(sub *) less than 1.5 solar mass), or the first of a series of the superwind phases (for up to 8 solar mass), punctuated by a period of low mass-loss rates, before the star evolves off the AGB.

  11. NEW OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR 0.55 KEV SOFT X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-20

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ∼0.2 and ∼4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ∼0.5 to ∼5 keV, with ∼0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5–10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ∼6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ∼1.6, below the usually observed value of ∼4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  12. Short telescope design of 1.5-m aperture solar UV visible and IR telescope aboard Solar-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Horiuchi, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2011-10-01

    We present an optical and thermal design of one of major instrumental payload planned for SOLAR-C mission/Plan-B (high resolution spectroscopic option): the telescope assembly of Solar Ultra-violet Visible and near IR observing Telescope (SUVIT). To accommodate a launcher's nosecone size, a wide observing wavelength coverage from UV (down to 280 nm) through near IR (up to 1100 nm), and an 0.1 arcsec resolution in the field of 200 arcsec diameter, a short telescope design was made for a 1.5 m aperture solar Gregorian telescope with the compact design of three-mirror collimator unit.

  13. Material Interactions with Solar Wind Ion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; McWilliams, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Solar wind composition is dominated by hydrogen (approx.96%) and helium (approx.3 to 4%) with a minor fraction (less than or equal to 1%) of heavy ions. Hydrogen (helium) ions impact spacecraft surfaces with energies from 0.5 to 5 keV (1.8 to 21 keV) due to variations in solar wind velocity from 300 km/s to 1000 km/sec with extremes of a few 10 s keV during periods of extremely high solar wind velocity exceeding 1000 km/sec. Mean impact energies are typically on the order of approximately 1 keV and 4 keV for hydrogen ions and helium ions, respectively. These energies are typically of the peak of the energy dependent light ion sputter yields for hydrogen and helium on many metals. In addition, light ions with kilovolt energies have been shown to produce blister (or exfoliation) damage to metal surfaces due to formation of high pressure gas bubbles within the materials when exposed to ion fluences on the order of 10(exp 16 to (10(exp 17 ions/sq cm. A number of spacecraft designs for current and future missions include gossamer polymer structures with thin metallic reflection coatings to shield instruments from the Sun or solar sail propulsion systems for use in a variety of locations in the inner solar system from 0.5 to 1 AU. In addition, there is interest in designing spacecraft for solar physics missions requiring operations as close to the Sun as 0.16 to 0.2 AU. Integrity of the metallic coatings is critical in many of these applications since degradation will result in modification of material thermal properties or exposure of polymers to solar UV photons which can compromise mission requirements. This paper will evaluate the relative contributions of sputtering and blister formation to material degradation in solar wind environments over a range of radial distances from the Sun to demonstrate where solar wind environments become important for materials selection. We will first review the physics and results from laboratory measurements of light ion sputtering

  14. Temperature Measurements in the Solar Transition Region Using N III Line Intensity Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doron, R.; Doschek, G. A.; Laming, J. M.; Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    UV emission from B-like N and O ions a rather rare opportunity for recording spectral lines in a narrow wavelength range that can potentially be used to derive temperatures relevant to the solar transition region. In these ions, the line intensity ratios of the type (2s2p(sup 2) - 2p(sup 3)) / (2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2)) are very sensitive to the electron temperature. Additionally, the lines involving the ratios fall within a range of only - 12 A; in N III the lines fall in the 980 - 992 A range and in O IV in the 780 - 791 A range. In this work, we explore the use of these atomic systems, primarily in N III, for temperature diagnostics of the transition region by analyzing UV spectra obtained by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer flown on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The N III temperature-sensitive line ratios are measured in more than 60 observations. Most of the measured ratios correspond to temperatures in the range 5.7x10(exp 4) - 6.7x10(exp 4) K. This range is considerably lower than the calculated temperature of maximum abundance of N III, which is approx. 7.6x10(exp 4) K. Detailed analysis of the spectra further indicates that the measured ratios are probably somewhat overestimated due to resonant scattering effects in the 2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2) lines and small blends in the 2s2p(sup 2) - 2p3 lines. Actual lower ratios would only increase the disagreement between the ionization balance calculations and present temperature measurements based on a collisional excitation model. In the case of the O IV spectra, we determined that due to the close proximity in wavelength of the weak line (2s2p(sup 2)-2p3 transitions) to a strong Ne VIII line, sufficiently accurate ratio measurements cannot be obtained. Subject headings: atomic data --- atomic processes --- Sun: transition region --- Sun: U V radiation --- techniques: spectroscopic

  15. Progress in p(+)n InP solar cells fabricated by thermal diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Weinberg, I.; Vargas, C.; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.; Fatemi, N. S.

    1993-01-01

    The performance results of our most recently thermally diffused InP solar cells using the p(+)n (Cd,S) structures are presented. We have succeeded in fabricating cells with measured AMO, 25 C V(sub oc) exceeding 880 mV (bare cells) which to the best of our knowledge is higher than previously reported V(sub oc) values for any InP homojunction solar cells. The cells were fabricated by thinning the emitter, after Au-Zn front contacting, from its initial thickness of about 4.5 microns to about 0.6 microns. After thinning, the exposed surface of the emitter was passivated by a thin (approximately 50A) P-rich oxide. Based on the measured EQY and J(sub sc)-V(sub oc) characteristics of our experimental high V(sub oc) p(+)n InP solar cells, we project that reducing the emitter thickness to 0.3 microns, using an optimized AR coating, maintaining the surface hole concentration of 3 x 10(exp 18)cm(sup -3), reducing the grid shadowing from actual 10.55 percent to 6 percent and reducing the contact resistance will increase the actual measured 12.57 percent AMO 25 C efficiency to about 20.1 percent. By using our state-of-the-art p(+)n structures which have a surface hole concentration of 4 x 10(exp 18)cm(sup -3) and slightly improving the front surface passivation, an even higher practically achievable AMO, 25 C efficiency of 21.3 percent is projected.

  16. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  17. Testing the DC-electric field model in a solar flare observed by Yohkoh and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.; Mariska, J. T.; Dennis, B. R.

    1995-01-01

    We apply a DC-electric field model to the analysis of soft and hard X-ray observations of a solar flare observed by Yohkoh and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) on 6 September 1992. The flare was observed simultaneously in the soft X-ray Ca XIX line by the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and in hard X-rays (greater than 50 keV) by the CGRO Burst and Transient Spectrometer Experiment (BATSE). A strong stationary component of Ca XIX emission was present at the start of impulsive hard X-ray emission indicating an extended phase of heating prior to the production of energetic nonthermal electrons. We interpret the preflare Ca XIX emission as a signature of Joule heating by field-aligned currents. We relate the temporal variation of impulsive hard X-ray emission to the rate of runaway electron acceleration by the DC-electric field associated with the current. We find that the initial rise in hard X-ray emission is consistent with electron acceleration by a DC-electric field that increased from a preflare value of less than approximately 10(exp -5) V/cm to approximately (9 +/- 1) x 10(exp -5) V/cm at the time of the first hard X-ray peak and then remained constant during the rest of the impulsive phase. We attribute the increase in electric field strength to the formation of a current sheet at the reconnection point of two loop structures. The decrease in hard X-ray emission after flare maximum is consistent with a reduction in the number of runaway electrons due to an increase in coronal density produced by chromospheric evaporation. The increased density quenches the runaway process by enhancing collisional thermalization of electrons. To avoid the generation of an unrealistically large magnetic field, the flaring region must be highly filamented into greater than approximately 10(exp 6) oppositely directed current channels of approximately 30 cm width with an initial preflare current of approximately 3 x 10(exp 10) A per channel.

  18. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 5: Process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B.; Alexander, P.; Burger, D.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the Process Development Area, as part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, was to develop and demonstrate solar cell fabrication and module assembly process technologies required to meet the cost, lifetime, production capacity, and performance goals of the FSA Project. R&D efforts expended by Government, Industry, and Universities in developing processes capable of meeting the projects goals during volume production conditions are summarized. The cost goals allocated for processing were demonstrated by small volume quantities that were extrapolated by cost analysis to large volume production. To provide proper focus and coverage of the process development effort, four separate technology sections are discussed: surface preparation, junction formation, metallization, and module assembly.

  19. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(++) to proton density ratio increased until about 1 hour before closest approach after which time it decreased. Abrupt increases in this ratio were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region (8.6 - 5.5(10)(exp 5) km from the comet along the spacecraft trajectory). These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(++) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(++). In general agreement with the solar wind proton and He(++) observations, solar wind oxygen and carbon ions were observed to charge exchange from higher to lower charge states with decreasing distance to the comet. The more abrupt increases in the He(++) to proton and the He(++) to O(6+) density ratios in the mystery region require a change in the solar wind ion composition in this region while the correlation with energetic electrons indicates processes associated with the comet.

  20. Results of the 1996 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign was completed with the first flight on June 30, 1996 and a second flight on August 8, 1996. All objectives of the flight program were met. Sixty-four modules were carried to an altitude of 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full 1-5 curves were measured on 22 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 42 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  1. Results of the 2000 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 27, 2000, and July 5, 2000. All objectives of the flight program were met. Sixty-two modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on sixteen of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on thirty-seven modules (forty-six cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. Nine modules were flown for temperature measurement only. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496x10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  2. Heat flux dropouts in the solar wind and Coulomb scattering effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1992-01-01

    Data on solar wind electrons at the ISEE 3 spacecraft located 0.01 AU upstream from the earth (McComas et al., 1989) showed periods of time when the flux of antisunward suprathermal electrons would decrease suddenly, leading to heat flux dropouts (HFDs). This paper examines data from ISEE 1 at the 1.5 x 10 exp 6 km downstream location to determine whether HFDs identified at ISEE 3 by McComas et al. can be detected at this location and whether the ISEE 1 observations can provide information to one or the other possible interpretations of HFDs: that HFDs are due to enhanced Coulomb scattering, or to disconnection from the sun of the magnetic flux tube. The results of the examination identified the presence of HFD events in the ISEE 1 data, and the findings indicate that Coulomb scattering plays a substantial role in at least some HFD events.

  3. Solar Drivers of 11-yr and Long-Term Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Richardson, I. G.; Ling, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    In the current paradigm for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), diffusion is taken to be the dominant process during solar maxima while drift dominates at minima. Observations during the recent solar minimum challenge the pre-eminence of drift: at such times. In 2009, the approx.2 GV GCR intensity measured by the Newark neutron monitor increased by approx.5% relative to its maximum value two cycles earlier even though the average tilt angle in 2009 was slightly larger than that in 1986 (approx.20deg vs. approx.14deg), while solar wind B was significantly lower (approx.3.9 nT vs. approx.5.4 nT). A decomposition of the solar wind into high-speed streams, slow solar wind, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs; including postshock flows) reveals that the Sun transmits its message of changing magnetic field (diffusion coefficient) to the heliosphere primarily through CMEs at solar maximum and high-speed streams at solar minimum. Long-term reconstructions of solar wind B are in general agreement for the approx. 1900-present interval and can be used to reliably estimate GCR intensity over this period. For earlier epochs, however, a recent Be-10-based reconstruction covering the past approx. 10(exp 4) years shows nine abrupt and relatively short-lived drops of B to < or approx.= 0 nT, with the first of these corresponding to the Sporer minimum. Such dips are at variance with the recent suggestion that B has a minimum or floor value of approx.2.8 nT. A floor in solar wind B implies a ceiling in the GCR intensity (a permanent modulation of the local interstellar spectrum) at a given energy/rigidity. The 30-40% increase in the intensity of 2.5 GV electrons observed by Ulysses during the recent solar minimum raises an interesting paradox that will need to be resolved.

  4. Solar flare accelerated isotopes of hydrogen and helium. [observed by IMP-4 and IMP-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, J. D.; Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of solar flare hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium-3, and helium-4 in the energy range approximately 10 to 50 MeV per nucleon obtained with instrumentation on the IMP-4 and IMP-5 satellites are reported and studies based on these results which place several constraints on theories of solar flare particle acceleration are discussed. A brief review of previous work and the difficulties in studying the rare isotopes of hydrogen and helium is also included. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that the information to be obtained from the solar flare products of high energy interactions is not available through either solar wind observations where both the acceleration mechanism and the coronal source of the nuclear species are different, or optical measurements of solar active regions.

  5. Solar Wind ~0.1-1.5 keV Electrons at Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Wang, L.; Zong, Q. G.; Li, G.; He, J.; Tu, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Salem, C. S.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind halo/strahl electrons carry important information on the formation of suprathermal electrons in the solar wind. Here we present a statistical survey on the energy spectrum of 0.1-1.5 keV electrons observed by WIND/3DP in the solar wind during quiet times at solar minimum and maximum of solar cycle 23 and 24. First, we separate strahl electrons from halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV to a kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature Teff. We also integrate the electron measurements to obtain the number density n of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both halo and strahl electrons. For strahl electrons, the index κ (number density n) appears to decrease (increase) with increasing solar activity. For halo electrons, the index κ also decreases with increasing solar activity, while the number density n shows no clear solar-cycle variation. Based on a simple model, we find that the escape of thermal electrons from the coronal region with a higher temperature T could lead to a larger κ for the 0.1-1.5 keV electrons measured in the solar wind, if T > ~0.73×106 K. These results suggest that strahl electrons are likely related to the escaping thermal electrons from different regions in the hot corona, while halo electrons are probably formed due to the scatter/acceleration of strahl electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  6. Operational Solar Forecasting System for DNI and GHI for Horizons Covering 5 Minutes to 72 Hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbra, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    I will describe the methodology used to develop and deploy operationally a comprehensive solar forecasting system for both concentrated and non-concentrated solar technologies. This operational forecasting system ingests data from local telemetry, remote sensing and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, processes all the diferent types of data (time series, sky images, satellite images, gridded data, etc.) to produce concatenated solar forecasts from 5 minutes out to 72 hours into the future. Each forecast is optimized with stochastic learning techniques that include input selection, model topology optimization, model output statistics, metric fitness optimization and machine learning. These forecasts are used by solar generators (plant managers), utilities and independent system operators for operations, scheduling, dispatching and market participation.

  7. Energy-conserving passive solar multi-family retrofit projects. Cycle 5, category 1: HUD Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    A total of 14 passive solar retrofit buildings are described. The concept of passive solar energy and the various types of passive systems found in the Cycle 5 projects are discussed. Each of the 14 solar designs is described, and some of the key points raised in the discussion of passive concepts are illustrated. Each project description cites the location of the passive solar home and presents the following information: grantee/builder, designer, solar designer, price, number of units, net heated area, heat load, degree days, solar fraction of the total heat load, and auxiliary heat required. Project descriptions also include data on recognition factors (the five passive elements necessary for a complete passive system), the type of auxiliary heating system used in the building, the solar water heating system (if any), and the passive cooling techniques used (if any).

  8. Sloshing Gas in the Core of the Most Luminous Galaxy Cluster RXJ1347.5-1145

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Ryan E.; Zuhone, John; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Markevitvh, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    We present new constraints on the merger history of the most X-ray luminous cluster of galaxies, RXJ1347.5-1145, based on its unique multiwavelength morphology. Our X-ray analysis confirms the core gas is undergoing "sloshing" resulting from a prior, large scale, gravitational perturbation. In combination with extensive multiwavelength observations, the sloshing gas points to the primary and secondary clusters having had at least two prior strong gravitational interactions. The evidence supports a model in which the secondary subcluster with mass M=4.8+/-2.4x10(exp 14) solar Mass has previously (> or approx.0.6 Gyr ago) passed by the primary cluster, and has now returned for a subsequent crossing where the subcluster's gas has been completely stripped from its dark matter halo. RXJ1347 is a prime example of how core gas sloshing may be used to constrain the merger histories of galaxy clusters through multiwavelength analyses.

  9. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or = 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modelling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronologically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differentiated meteorites (eucrites and angrites) - appear to have experience potentially dateable nebular events. In both case, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate nebular events spanning several Ma. We

  10. Turbulence in the solar wind: spectra from Voyager 2 data at 5 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternale, F.; Gallana, L.; Iovieno, M.; Opher, M.; Richardson, J. D.; Tordella, D.

    2016-02-01

    Fluctuations in the flow velocity and magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Solar System. These fluctuations are turbulent, in the sense that they are disordered and span a broad range of scales in both space and time. The study of solar wind turbulence is motivated by a number of factors all keys to the understanding of the Solar Wind origin and thermodynamics. The solar wind spectral properties are far from uniformity and evolve with the increasing distance from the sun. Most of the available spectra of solar wind turbulence were computed at 1 astronomical unit, while accurate spectra on wide frequency ranges at larger distances are still few. In this paper we consider solar wind spectra derived from the data recorded by the Voyager 2 mission during 1979 at about 5 AU from the sun. Voyager 2 data are an incomplete time series with a voids/signal ratio that typically increases as the spacecraft moves away from the sun (45% missing data in 1979), making the analysis challenging. In order to estimate the uncertainty of the spectral slopes, different methods are tested on synthetic turbulence signals with the same gap distribution as V2 data. Spectra of all variables show a power law scaling with exponents between -2.1 and -1.1, depending on frequency subranges. Probability density functions (PDFs) and correlations indicate that the flow has a significant intermittency.

  11. Central solar eclipses of 1992. Annual solar eclipse of 4-5 January 1992, total solar eclipse of 30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bangert, J.A.; Fiala, A.D.; Harris, W.T.

    1991-02-01

    By coincidence, the two central solar eclipses of 1992 share a similar characteristic: both central paths will pass almost entirely over water, except for a very small portion at one end which will pass over land and include a major city. The first of the eclipses, an annular eclipse of the Sun, will occur on Saturday, 4 January 1992 and Sunday, 5 January 1992. It will preceded by an associated partial lunar eclipse on 21 December 1991. The central path of this annular eclipse will include a number of small islands in the Pacific Ocean and end over the Los Angeles, California metropolitan area. At maximum over the central Pacific Ocean, approximately 84.4% of the Sun's disk will be obscured. The maximum duration of annularity will be about 11m 36s. Because the track will cross the Internation Date Line, by local times the eclips will occur on the morning of 5 January at the beginning of the path and occur on the evening of 4 January at the end of the path. This eclipse belongs to saros series number 141. The last preceding eclipse in this series was the annular solar eclipse of 24 December 1973; the next eclipse in series will be the annular solar eclips of 15 January 2010.

  12. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the <5 MeV particles were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  13. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  14. Voyager observations of O(+6) and other minor ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villanueva, Louis; Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Steinberg, John T.

    1994-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) experiments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft began making measurements of the solar wind shortly after the two launches in the fall of 1977. In reviewing the data obtained prior to the Jupiter encounters in 1979, we have found that the large dynamic range of the PLS instrument generally allows a clean separation of signatures of minor ions (about 2.5% of the time) during a single instrument scan in energy per charge. The minor ions, most notably O(+6), are well separated from the protons and alpha particles during times when the solar wind Mach number (ratio of streaming speed to thermal speed) is greater than approximately 15. During the Earth to Jupiter cruise we find that the average ratio of alpha particle number density to that of oxygen is 66 +/- 7 (Voyager 1) and 71 +/- 17 (Voyager 2). These values are consistent with the value 75 +/- 20 inferred from the Ion Composition Instrument on ISEE 3 during the period spanning 1978 and 1982. We have inferred an average coronal temperature of (1.7 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp 6) K based on the ratio of O(+7) to O(+6) number densities. Our observations cover a period of increasing solar activity. During this time we have found that the alpha particle to proton number density ratio is increasing with the solar cycle, the oxygen to proton ratio increases, and the alpha particle to oxygen ratio remains relatively constant in time.

  15. InP tunnel junction for InGaAs/InP tandem solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilela, M. F.; Freundlich, A.; Bensaoula, A.; Medelci, N.; Renaud, P.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) has been shown to allow the growth of high quality materials with reproducible complex compositional and doping profiles. The main advantage of CBE compared to metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the most popular technique for InP-based photovoltaic device fabrication, is the ability to grow high purity epilayers at much lower temperatures (450-530 C). We have previously shown that CBE is perfectly suited toward the fabrication of complex photovoltaic devices such as InP/InGaAs monolithically integrated tandem solar cells, because its low process temperature preserves the electrical characteristics of the InGaAs tunnel junction commonly used as an ohmic interconnect. In this work using CBE for the fabrication of optically transparent (with respect to the bottom cell) InP tunnel diodes is demonstrated. Epitaxial growth were performed in a Riber CBE 32 system using PH3 and TMIn as III and V precursors. Solid Be (p-type) and Si (n-type) have been used as doping sources, allowing doping levels up to 2 x 10(exp -19)/cu cm and 1 x 10(exp -19)/cu cm for n and p type respectively. The InP tunnel junction characteristics and the influence of the growth's conditions (temperature, growth rate) over its performance have been carefully investigated. InP p(++)/n(++) tunnel junction with peak current densities up to 1600 A/sq cm and maximum specific resistivities (V(sub p)/I(sub p) - peak voltage to peak current ratio) in the range of 10(exp -4) Omega-sq cm were obtained. The obtained peak current densities exceed the highest results previously reported for their lattice matched counterparts, In(0.53)Ga( 0.47)As and should allow the realization of improved minimal absorption losses in the interconnect InP/InGaAs tandem devices for Space applications. Owing to the low process temperature required for the top cell, these devices exhibit almost no degradation of its characteristics after the growth of subsequent thick InP layer suggesting

  16. The formation of protostellar disks. I - 1 M(solar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamical calculations of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating one solar mass protostellar cloud, including the effects of radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but without magnetic fields, are presented. The results include calculations of infrared protostellar spectra as a function of time and viewing angle. A numerical algorithm involving explicit nested grids is used to resolve the region of initial disk formation and at the same time to include the outer regions in the calculation. The central part of the protostar is modeled approximately. Initial conditions are systematically varied to investigate their influence on the evolution and final configuration of central star plus circumstellar disk. The initial state for the standard case is a centrally condensed molecular cloud core of one solar mass with a mean density of 8 x 10 exp -18 g/cu cm and a specific angular momentum at the outer edge of 7 x 10 exp 20 sq cm/s. The collapse is followed for 8 x 10 exp 4 yr, at which point 0.45 solar mass is contained in a rapidly rotating central object and most of the remainder in a surrounding equilibrium disk. The stability of this final structure is qualitatively analyzed.

  17. Embedding Analogical Reasoning into 5E Learning Model: A Study of the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devecioglu-Kaymakci, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the 5E learning model affects learning about the Solar System when an analogical model is utilized in teaching. The data were gathered in an urban middle school 7th grade science course while teaching relevant astronomy topics. The analogical model developed by the researchers was administered to 20…

  18. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events <5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  19. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    SciTech Connect

    Geissbühler, Jonas Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  20. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbühler, Jonas; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Barraud, Loris; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  1. V2O5 thin film deposition for application in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Elhadi A. A.; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-04-01

    Vanadium pentoxide V2O5 films were fabricated by way of electrochemical deposition technique for application as hole transport buffer layer in organic solar cell. A thin and uniform V2O5 films were successfully deposited on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrate. The characterization of surface morphology and optical properties of the deposition suggest that the films are suitable for photovoltaic application. Organic solar cell fabricated using V2O5 as hole transport buffer layer showed better devices performance and environmental stability than those devices fabricated with PEDOT:PSS. In an ambient device preparation condition, the power conversion efficiency increases by nearly 80 % compared with PEDOT:PSS-based devices. The devices lifetime using V2O5 buffer layer has improved by a factor of 10 over those devices with PEDOT:PSS.

  2. Analysis of type 3 solar radio bursts observed at kilometric wavelengths from the OGO-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.

    1971-01-01

    Research was conducted to analyze the data on solar radio bursts obtained by the OGO-5 satellite. Since the wavelengths corresponding to the three lowest frequencies of observations exceeded one kilometer, the bursts detected in those channels were designated as kilometer-waves. The data search covered approximately 9200 hours between March 1968 and February 1970, and included the maximum of solar cycle No. 20. The study concentrated on 64 Type 3 solar radio events reaching frequencies equal or lower than 0.35 MHz. This selection criteria led to the choice of the most intense radio events. Measurements included: times of start, times of decay, and amplitudes of the 64 events. The consistency of the results, within the accuracy of the measurements, lends support to some of the assumptions made for the analysis, notably, the validity of the local plasma hypothesis, the constancy of the exciter particles velocity, and spiral shape of their trajectory.

  3. The Discovery of the Solar 5-minute Oscillations and the Supergranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    2014-06-01

    The summer of 1960 marked the discovery, from the Mt. Wilson 60-foot solar tower telescope, of both the solar 5-minute oscillation and the supergranulation. We review the history of how, starting in 1955, Robert Leighton at Caltech carried out studies of the sun at high resolution from the Mt. Wilson 60-foot solar tower telescope. In 1958 he developed a method to map the spatial distribution of solar magnetic fields by photographically subtracting pairs of spectroheliograph images differing only in the sign of their Zeeman-effect sensitivity to longitudinal magnetic fields, and showed for the first time that photospheric magnetic fields trace out the heating of the overlying chromosphere as revealed by the pattern of the Ca II emission network. Leighton then developed a variation of the technique to measure velocity fields and their spatial and temporal variation, and in the summer of 1960 he and his students made a series of discoveries that changed the face of solar physics. One of these was the discovery that the velocity field of the sun exhibits a very strong quasi-periodic vertical oscillation with a period of about 5 minutes; this discovery represents the dawn of helioseismology, which over the past 50 years has grown to embrace research lines in solar and stellar astrophysics that were unimaginable at the time. A parallel discovery made by Leighton and his students during that same summer was the "large cells", later to be termed the supergranulation, which show a complex pattern of flow fields, evidently produced bylarge-scale convective motions that are still not well-understood, but which create the magnetic network and hence the pattern of heating in the overlying chromosphere.

  4. The climate response to the 11-yr solar cycle in the CMIP5 historical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misios, Stergios; Mitchell, Daniel; Tourpali, Kleareti; Gray, Lesley; Matthes, Katja

    2014-05-01

    The variation of the incoming solar irradiance over the course of the 11-yr solar cycle is a significant source of stratospheric variability. Dynamical mechanisms could amplify and transfer solar signals from the stratosphere to the troposphere and even the surface in a "top-down" pathway. In the opposite direction, "bottom-up" mechanisms could mediate solar signals from the surface to the troposphere via air-sea coupling. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the climate response to the 11-yr solar cycle, as brought about from both "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms, because for the first time different coupled models are driven by spectral solar irradiance and ozone changes. We here analyse archived "historical" simulations (1850-2005) with a lead/lag multiple linear regression model, focusing onto the troposphere and oceans. Our analysis identifies a delayed warming in the troposphere and surface, which is explained by the delayed response of the oceans. In fact, the delayed warming penetrates down to ~150 m from the ocean surface. A significant warming is identified over the western Pacific and Indian oceans whereas an anomalous cooling is simulated in the eastern Pacific. This meridional temperature dipole introduces changes in the Walker circulation, precipitation, convective activity with concomitant effects on the Northern Pacific. We further categorize models in "low- and high-top, depending on the inclusion or not of detailed stratospheric dynamics. This classification is found educative when the relative role of the "top-down" versus "bottom-up" forcing is investigated.

  5. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin F.

    1998-01-01

    Brosche and Seiler recently suggested that direct lunar and solar tidal torques on the oceanic tides play a significant role in the earth's short-period angular momentum balance ("short-period" here meaning daily and sub-daily). We reexamine that suggestion here, concentrating on axial torques and hence on variations in rotation rate. Only those spherical harmonic components of the ocean tide having the same degree and order as the tidal potential induce nonzero torques. Prograde components (those moving in the same direction as the tide-generating body) produce the familiar secular braking of the earth's rotation. Retrograde components, however, produce rapid variations in UTI at twice the tidal frequency. There also exist interaction torques between tidal constituents, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides. They generate UTI variations at frequencies equal to the sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. We give estimates of the torques and angular momentum variations for each of the important regimes, secular to quarter-diurnal. For the M(sub 2) potential acting on the M(sub 2) ocean tide, we find an associated angular momentum variation of amplitude 3 x 10(exp 19) N m. This is 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the angular momentum variations associated with tidal currents. We conclude that these torques do not play a significant role in the short-period angular momentum balance.

  6. Power Spectra, Power Law Exponents, and Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence at Small Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, J. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    The Wind spacecraft provides simultaneous solar wind velocity and magnetic field measurements with 3- second time resolution, roughly an order of magnitude faster than previous measurements, enabling the small scale features of solar wind turbulence to be studied in unprecedented detail. Almost the entire inertial range can now be explored (the inertial range extends from approximately 1 to 10(exp 3) seconds in the spacecraft frame) although the dissipation range of the velocity fluctuations is still out of reach. Improved measurements of solar wind turbulence spectra at 1 AU in the ecliptic plane are presented including spectra of the energy and cross-helicity, the magnetic and kinetic energies, the Alfven ratio, the normalized cross-helicity, and the Elsasser ratio. Some recent observations and theoretical challenges are discussed including the observation that the velocity and magnetic field spectra often show different power law exponents with values close to 3/2 and 5/3, respectively; the energy (kinetic plus magnetic) and cross-helicity often have approximately equal power law exponents with values intermediate between 3/2 and 5/3; and the Alfven ratio, the ratio of the kinetic to magnetic energy spectra, is often a slowly increasing function of frequency increasing from around 0.4 to 1 for frequencies in the inertial range. Differences between high- and low-speed wind are also discussed. Comparisons with phenomenological turbulence theories show that important aspects of the physics are yet unexplained.

  7. Impact of an L5 Magnetograph on Nonpotential Solar Global Magnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Duncan H.; Yeates, Anthony R.; Bocquet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present the first theoretical study to consider what improvement could be obtained in global nonpotential modeling of the solar corona if magnetograph data were available from the L5 Lagrange point, in addition to from the direction of Earth. To consider this, we first carry out a “reference Sun” simulation over two solar cycles. An important property of this simulation is that random bipole emergences are allowed across the entire solar surface at any given time (such as can occur on the Sun). Next, we construct two “limited data” simulations, where bipoles are only included when they could be seen from (i) an Earth-based magnetograph and (ii) either Earth- or L5-based magnetographs. The improvement in reproducing the reference Sun simulation when an L5 view is available is quantified through considering global quantities in the limited data simulations. These include surface and polar flux, total magnetic energy, volume electric current, open flux, and the number of flux ropes. Results show that when an L5 observational viewpoint is included, the accuracy of the global quantities in the limited data simulations can increase by 26%-40%. This clearly shows that a magnetograph at the L5 point could significantly increase the accuracy of global nonpotential modeling and with this the accuracy of future space weather forecasts.

  8. Solar Wind Excitation of Pc5 Fluctuations in the Magnetosphere and on the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Ramona L.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to show the strong link between solar wind compressional fluctuations in the 1-8 mHz frequency range and Pc5 fluctuations in the magnetosphere near the magnetopause, at geosynchronous orbit, over the poles, and on the ground. We focus on a time interval in March and April 2002 when there was a favorable alignment of satellites combined with ten high speed solar wind streams. We used the S3C Great Observatory: specifically, ACE and Wind in the solar wind, Geotail near the magnetopause, GOES 8 and 10 at geosynchronous orbit, Cluster over the poles, and CANOPUS/CARISMA ground stations near the footpoints of magnetic field lines connected to either the magnetopause or the GOES satellites. Using four examples and a statistical survey we show that magnetospheric Pc5 fluctuations exist regardless of IMF orientation and for a wide range of speeds and dynamic pressures; the amplitude and power of magnetospheric fluctuations depends primarily on the amplitude and power of solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations. The driving and response frequency of these geoeffective fluctuations is in the range 0.5 - 4 mHz. The most striking magnetospheric response occurs when the solar wind speed, dynamic pressure, and dynamic pressure fluctuations all increase at approximately the same time, as frequently occurs near the leading edge of high speed streams. We show evidence of oscillating Poynting Flux at the magnetopause determined using Geotail data that both excites a FLR and propagates evanescently inward. These observations suggest that, at least for this time interval at spring equinox, the entry path is from the dayside equatorial magnetopause inward; multiple field line resonances may be excited from the magnetopause to geosynchronous orbit by propagating compressional waves, with the power decreasing inward away from the magnetopause.

  9. Simulations of Solar Wind Plasma Flow Around a Simple Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Wang, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a number of solar sail missions of various designs and sizes have been proposed (e.g., Geostorm). Of importance to these missions is the interaction between the ambient solar wind plasma environment and the sail. Assuming a typical 1 AU solar wind environment of 400 km/s velocity, 3.5 cu cm density, ion temperature of approx.10 eV, electron temperature of 40 eV, and an ambient magnetic field strength of 10(exp -4) G, a first order estimate of the plasma interaction with square solar sails on the order of the sizes being considered for a Geostorm mission (50 m x 50 m and 75 m x 75 m corresponding to approx.2 and approx.3 times the Debye length in the plasma) is carried out. First, a crude current balance for the sail surface immersed in the plasma environment and in sunlight was used to estimate the surface potential of the model sails. This gave surface potentials of approx.10 V positive relative to the solar wind plasma. A 3-D, Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code was then used to simulate the solar wind flowing around the solar sail. It is assumed in the code that the solar wind protons can be treated as particles while the electrons follow a Boltzmann distribution. Next, the electric field and particle trajectories are solved self-consistently to give the proton flow field, the electrostatic field around the sail, and the plasma density in 3-D. The model sail was found to be surrounded by a plasma sheath within which the potential is positive compared to the ambient plasma and followed by a separate plasma wake which is negative relative to the plasma. This structure departs dramatically from a negatively charged plate such as might be found in the Earth s ionosphere on the night side where both the plate and its negative wake are contiguous. The implications of these findings are discussed as they apply to the proposed Geostorm solar sail mission.

  10. Chondrule formation by clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Graham, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chondrule textures and compositions appear to require rapid heating of precursor grain aggregates to temperatures in the range 1500 K to 2100 K, cooling times on the order of hours, and episodic and variable intensity events in order to produce chondrule rims and chemically distinct groups. Nebula shock waves have been proposed by Hood and Horanyi as a physical mechanism that may be capable of meeting the meteoritical constraints. Motivated by astronomical observations of the close environments of young stars, we suggest that the source of the nebula shock waves may be clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula - that is, episodic impacts onto the nebula by discrete cloud clumps with masses of at least 10(exp 22) g. If the cloud clumps are massive enough (10(exp 26) g), the resulting shockwave may be able to propagate to the midplane and process precursor aggregates residing in a dust sub-disk.

  11. Ground-based Pc5 ULF wave power: Solar wind speed and MLT dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahud, D. M.; Rae, I. J.; Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Amalraj, V.

    2009-07-01

    Using over 20 years of ground-based magnetometer data from the CANOPUS/CARISMA magnetometer array, we present a statistical characterisation of Pc5 ultra-low frequency (ULF) power in the 2-10 mHz band as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), L-shell, and solar wind speed. We examine the power across L-shells between 4.2 and 7.9, using data from the PINA, ISLL, GILL and FCHU stations, and demonstrate that there is a significant MLT dependence in both the H- and D-component median 2-10 mHz power during both fast (>500 km/s) and slow (<500 km/s) solar wind speeds. The H-component power consistently dominates over D-component power at all MLTs and during both fast and slow solar wind. At the higher-L stations (L>5.4), there are strong MLT power peaks in the morning and midnight local time sectors; the morning sector dominating midnight during fast solar wind events. At lower L-shells, there is no evidence of the midnight peak and the 2-10 mHz power is more symmetric with respect to MLT except during the fastest solar wind speeds. There is little evidence in the ground-based power of a localised MLT peak in ULF power at dusk, except at the lowest L-shell station, predominantly in the H-component. The median 2-10 mHz power increases with an approximate power law dependence on solar wind speed, at all local times across the L-shell domain studied in both components. The H-component power peaks at the latitude of the GILL station, with significantly lower power at both higher and lower L-shells. Conversely, the D-component power increases monotonically. We believe that this is evidence for 2-10 mHz power accumulating at auroral latitudes in field line resonances. Finally, we discuss how such ULF wave power characterisation might be used to derive empirical radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients based on, and driven by, the solar wind speed dependence of ULF wave power.

  12. Computation of solar wind parameters from the OGO-5 plasma spectrometer data using Hermite polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1971-01-01

    The method used to calculate the velocity, temperature, and density of the solar wind plasma is presented from spectra obtained by attitude-stabilized plasma detectors on the earth satellite OGO 5. The method, which used expansions in terms of Hermite polynomials, is very inexpensive to implement on an electronic computer compared to the least-squares and other iterative methods often used for similar problems.

  13. Radio Detections During Two State Transitions of the Intermediate-Mass Black Hole HLX-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Natalie; Cseh, David; Lenc, Emil; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Corbel, Stephane; Farrell, Sean; Fender, Robert; Gehrels, Neil; Heywood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Relativistic jets are streams of plasma moving at appreciable fractions of the speed of light. They have been observed from stellar-mass black holes (approx. 3 to 20 solar masses) as well as supermassive black holes (approx.. 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) found in the centers of most galaxies. Jets should also be produced by intermediate-mass black holes (approx. 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) Solar Mass), although evidence for this third class of black hole has, until recently, been weak. We report the detection of transient radio emission at the location of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which is consistent with a discrete jet ejection event. These observations also allow us to refine the mass estimate of the black hole to be between approx. 9 × 10(exp 3) Solar Mass and approx. 9 × 10(exp 4) Solar Mass.

  14. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Luo, Zhangai

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Our solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of about 5000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of about 5.6 x 10 exp 8 N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated.

  15. X-ray line and continuum spectra of solar flares from 0.5 to 8.5 angstroms.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J F; Kreplin, R W; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1968-11-22

    Two crystal spectrometers aboard the orbiting solar observatory OSO-4 cover the wavelength ranges 0.5 to 3.9 angstroms and 1.0 to 8.5 angstroms. Within this range, there appear emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like states of calcium, sulfur, silicon, magnesium, and aluminum. The Mg XII Lyman-alpha is present strongly in all x-ray flares. The most intense flares (such as class 3) produce strong Si XIV Lyman-alpha and often S XVI Lyman-alpha. Emission, in the form of Ka lines of highly ionized states of calcium, iron, aluminum, and silicon is usually present. The continuum from 1 to 10 angstroms always dominates the line emission by more than an order of magnitude. Electron temperatures derived from the slope of the continuum spectrum are in the range of 10(7) to 10(8) degrees K, considerably higher than theoretical ionization equilibrium temperatures.

  16. MuSICa image slicer prototype at 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcines, A.; López, R. L.; Collados, M.; Vega Reyes, N.

    2014-07-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy is an innovative technique that is being implemented in the state-of-the-art instruments of the largest night-time telescopes, however, it is still a novelty for solar instrumentation. A new concept of image slicer, called MuSICa (Multi-Slit Image slicer based on collimator-Camera), has been designed for the integral field spectrograph of the 4-m European Solar Telescope. This communication presents an image slicer prototype of MuSICa for GRIS, the spectrograph of the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope located at the Observatory of El Teide. MuSICa at GRIS reorganizes a 2-D field of view of 24.5 arcsec into a slit of 0.367 arcsec width by 66.76 arcsec length distributed horizontally. It will operate together with the TIP-II polarimeter to offer high resolution integral field spectropolarimetry. It will also have a bidimensional field of view scanning system to cover a field of view up to 1 by 1 arcmin.

  17. Solar Cycle Dependence of the Solar Wind Dynamics: Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    Significant differences between Pioneer and Voyager observations were found in solar wind structure between 1 to 6 AU. These disagreements were attributed to temporal effects related to the solar cycle, but no unifying study of Pioneer-Voyager observations was performed.

  18. The Solar Wind as a Laboratory for the Study of Magnetofluid Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind is the Sun's exosphere. As the solar atmosphere expands into interplanetary space, it is accelerated and heated. Data from spacecraft located throughout the heliosphere have revealed that this exosphere has velocities of several hundred kilometers/sec, densities at Earth orbit of about 5 particles/cm(exp 3), and an entrained magnetic field that at Earth orbit that is about 5 X 10(exp 5) Gauss. A fascinating feature of this magnetized plasma, which is a gas containing both charged particles and magnetic field, is that the magnetic field fluctuates in a way that is highly reminiscent of "Alfven waves", first defined by Hannes Alfven in 1942. Such waves have the defining property that the fluctuating magnetic fields are aligned with fluctuations in the velocity of the plasma and that, when properly normalized, the fluctuations have equal magnitudes. The observed alignment is not perfect and the resulting mismatch leads to a variety of complex interactions. In many respects, the flow patterns appear to be an example of fully developed magnetofluid turbulence. Recently, the dissipation range of this turbulence has been revealed by Search Coil magnetometer data from the four Cluster spacecraft. This tutorial will describe some of the properties of the large-scale and small-scale turbulence.

  19. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-A (Solid-Earth Geophysics, Solar Terrestrial Physics, and Glaciology). (a) Geophysical and solar... geological data, including data on heat flow, cores, samples, and sediments. (2) Solar-Terrestrial...

  20. 6.5% efficient perovskite quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Sang-Won; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2011-10-01

    Highly efficient quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell is fabricated using ca. 2-3 nm sized perovskite (CH3NH3)PbI3 nanocrystal. Spin-coating of the equimolar mixture of CH3NH3I and PbI2 in γ-butyrolactone solution (perovskite precursor solution) leads to (CH3NH3)PbI3 quantum dots (QDs) on nanocrystalline TiO2 surface. By electrochemical junction with iodide/iodine based redox electrolyte, perovskite QD-sensitized 3.6 μm-thick TiO2 film shows maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 78.6% at 530 nm and solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 6.54% at AM 1.5G 1 sun intensity (100 mW cm-2), which is by far the highest efficiency among the reported inorganic quantum dot sensitizers.Highly efficient quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell is fabricated using ca. 2-3 nm sized perovskite (CH3NH3)PbI3 nanocrystal. Spin-coating of the equimolar mixture of CH3NH3I and PbI2 in γ-butyrolactone solution (perovskite precursor solution) leads to (CH3NH3)PbI3 quantum dots (QDs) on nanocrystalline TiO2 surface. By electrochemical junction with iodide/iodine based redox electrolyte, perovskite QD-sensitized 3.6 μm-thick TiO2 film shows maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 78.6% at 530 nm and solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 6.54% at AM 1.5G 1 sun intensity (100 mW cm-2), which is by far the highest efficiency among the reported inorganic quantum dot sensitizers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10867k

  1. Speeding up the solar water disinfection process (SODIS) against Cryptosporidium parvum by using 2.5l static solar reactors fitted with compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, H; Fontán-Sainz, M; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Ares-Mazás, E

    2012-12-01

    Water samples of 0, 5, and 100 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) spiked with Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to natural sunlight in 2.5l static borosilicate solar reactors fitted with two different compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), CPC1 and CPC1.89, with concentration factors of the solar radiation of 1 and 1.89, respectively. The global oocyst viability was calculated by the evaluation of the inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide and the spontaneous excystation. Thus, the initial global oocyst viability of the C. parvum isolate used was 95.3 ± 1.6%. Using the solar reactors fitted with CPC1, the global viability of oocysts after 12h of exposure was zero in the most turbid water samples (100 NTU) and almost zero in the other water samples (0.3 ± 0.0% for 0 NTU and 0.5 ± 0.2% for 5 NTU). Employing the solar reactors fitted with CPC1.89, after 10h exposure, the global oocyst viability was zero in the non-turbid water samples (0 NTU), and it was almost zero in the 5 NTU water samples after 8h of exposure (0.5 ± 0.5%). In the most turbid water samples (100 NTU), the global viability was 1.9 ± 0.6% after 10 and 12h of exposure. In conclusion, the use of these 2.5l static solar reactors fitted with CPCs significantly improved the efficacy of the SODIS technique as these systems shorten the exposure times to solar radiation, and also minimize the negative effects of turbidity. This technology therefore represents a good alternative method for improving the microbiological quality of household drinking water in developing countries. PMID:22944729

  2. Speeding up the solar water disinfection process (SODIS) against Cryptosporidium parvum by using 2.5l static solar reactors fitted with compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, H; Fontán-Sainz, M; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Ares-Mazás, E

    2012-12-01

    Water samples of 0, 5, and 100 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) spiked with Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to natural sunlight in 2.5l static borosilicate solar reactors fitted with two different compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), CPC1 and CPC1.89, with concentration factors of the solar radiation of 1 and 1.89, respectively. The global oocyst viability was calculated by the evaluation of the inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide and the spontaneous excystation. Thus, the initial global oocyst viability of the C. parvum isolate used was 95.3 ± 1.6%. Using the solar reactors fitted with CPC1, the global viability of oocysts after 12h of exposure was zero in the most turbid water samples (100 NTU) and almost zero in the other water samples (0.3 ± 0.0% for 0 NTU and 0.5 ± 0.2% for 5 NTU). Employing the solar reactors fitted with CPC1.89, after 10h exposure, the global oocyst viability was zero in the non-turbid water samples (0 NTU), and it was almost zero in the 5 NTU water samples after 8h of exposure (0.5 ± 0.5%). In the most turbid water samples (100 NTU), the global viability was 1.9 ± 0.6% after 10 and 12h of exposure. In conclusion, the use of these 2.5l static solar reactors fitted with CPCs significantly improved the efficacy of the SODIS technique as these systems shorten the exposure times to solar radiation, and also minimize the negative effects of turbidity. This technology therefore represents a good alternative method for improving the microbiological quality of household drinking water in developing countries.

  3. Conceptual design study of a 5 kilowatt solar dynamic Brayton power system using a dome Fresnel lens solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Mark J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Spears, Don H.

    1989-01-01

    The primary project objective was to generate a conceptual design for a nominal 5 kW solar dynamic space power system, which uses a unique, patented, transmittance-optimized, dome-shaped, point-focus Fresnel lens as the optical concentrator. Compared to reflective concentrators, the dome lens allows 200 times larger slope errors for the same image displacement. Additionally, the dome lens allows the energy receiver, the power conversion unit (PCU), and the heat rejection radiator to be independently optimized in configuration and orientation, since none of these elements causes any aperture blockage. Based on optical and thermal trade studies, a 6.6 m diameter lens with a focal length of 7.2 m was selected. This lens should provide 87 percent net optical efficienty at 800X geometric concentration ratio. The large lens is comprised of 24 gores, which compactly stow together during launch, and automatically deploy on orbit. The total mass of the microglass lens panels, the graphite/epoxy support structure, and miscellaneous hardware is about 1.2 kg per square meter of aperture. The key problem for the dome lens approach relates to the selection of a space-durable lens material. For the first time, all-glass Fresnel lens samples were successfully made by a sol-gel casting process.

  4. A large-scale view of Space Technology 5 magnetometer response to solar wind drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Gjerloev, J.; Redmon, R. J.; Slavin, J.; Le, G.

    2015-04-01

    In this data report we discuss reprocessing of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) magnetometer database for inclusion in NASA's Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) virtual observatory. The mission consisted of three spacecraft flying in elliptical orbits, from 27 March to 27 June 2006. Reprocessing includes (1) transforming the data into the Modified Apex Coordinate System for projection to a common reference altitude of 110km, (2) correcting gain jumps, and (3) validating the results. We display the averaged magnetic perturbations as a keogram, which allows direct comparison of the full-mission data with the solar wind values and geomagnetic indices.With the data referenced to a common altitude, we find the following: (1) Magnetic perturbations that track the passage of corotating interaction regions and high-speed solar wind; (2) unexpectedly strong dayside perturbations during a solstice magnetospheric sawtooth oscillation interval characterized by a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component that may have enhanced the accompanying modest southward IMF; and (3) intervals of reduced magnetic perturbations or "calms," associated with periods of slow solar wind, interspersed among variable-length episodic enhancements. These calms aremost evidentwhen the IMF is northward or projectswith a northward component onto the geomagnetic dipole. The reprocessed ST5 data are in very good agreement with magnetic perturbations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, which we also map to 110km. We briefly discuss the methods used to remap the ST5 data and the means of validating the results against DMSP. Our methods form the basis for future intermission comparisons of space-based magnetometer data.

  5. Heteroepitaxial InP, and ultrathin, directly glassed, GaAs 3-5 solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardingham, C. M.; Cross, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    The commercial application of Indium Phosphide solar cells in practical space missions is crucially dependent upon achieving a major cost reduction which could be offered by heteroepitaxy on cheaper, more rugged substrates. Furthermore, significant mass reduction, compatibility with mechanically stacked multijunction cells, and elimination of the current loss through glue discoloration, is possible in III-V solar cells by the development of ultrathin, directly glassed cells. The progress of a UK collaborative program to develop high efficiency, homojunction InP solar cells, grown by MOCVD on Si substrates, is described. Results of homoepitaxial cells (is greater than 17 percent 1 Sun AM0) are presented, together with progress in achieving low dislocation density heteroepitaxy. Also, progress in a UK program to develop ultrathin directly-glassed GaAs cells is described. Ultrathin (5 micron) GaAs cells, with 1 Sun AM0 efficiencies up to 19.1 percent, are presented, together with progress in achieving a direct (adhesive-less) bond between the cell and coverglass. Consequential development to, for example, cell grids, are also discussed.

  6. Observations and Interpretations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. f.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. c.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss recently reported observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from an X9 solar flare/coronal mass ejection event on 5 December 2006, located at E79. The observations were made by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. Taking into account ENA losses, we find that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances > or equal to 2 solar radii. Although there are no CME images from this event, it is shown that CME-shock-accelerated protons can, in principle, produce a time-history consistent with the observations.

  7. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  8. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  9. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  10. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National Geophysical and Solar... National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC). The National Geophysical and Solar... geophysical data as well as ionospheric, solar, and other space environment data; develops...

  11. Calibration of NOAA-7 AVHRR, GOES-5 and GOES-6 VISSR/VAS solar channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, R.; Gautier, C.

    1986-01-01

    The NOAA-7, GOES-5 and GOES-6 Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer/Vertical Atmospheric Sounder (VISSR/VAS) solar channels were calibrated. The White Sands Monument area in New Mexico, whose reflectance properties are well known, and space are used as calibration targets. The shortwave reflected terrestrial irradiance that is measured at satellite altitude is computed using a fairly accurate radiative transfer model which accounts for multiple scattering and bidirectional effects. The ground target reflectance and relevant characteristics of the overlying atmosphere are estimated from climatological data and observation at the nearest meteorological sites. The approach is believed to produce accuracies of 8 to 13% depending on the channel considered.

  12. Quiet-time Suprathermal (~0.1-1.5 keV) Electrons in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3DP instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. After separating (beaming) strahl electrons from (isotropic) halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature Teff. We also calculate the number density n and average energy Eavg of strahl and halo electrons by integrating the electron measurements between ˜0.1 and 1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both strahl and halo electrons, and a strong positive correlation between the strahl n and halo n, likely reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. In both solar cycles, κ is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum for both strahl and halo electrons. The halo κ is generally smaller than the strahl κ (except during the solar minimum of cycle 23). The strahl n is larger at solar maximum, but the halo n shows no difference between solar minimum and maximum. Both the strahl n and halo n have no clear association with the solar wind core population, but the density ratio between the strahl and halo roughly anti-correlates (correlates) with the solar wind density (velocity).

  13. Large Solar-Rejection Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William; Sheikh, David; Patrick, Brian

    2007-01-01

    times solar, and sulfur is 20 times solar. From its previously observed optical emission lines, P831-57 (WD 0334 6400 or Ret 1 in A Catalog and Atlas of Cataclysmic Variables: Living Edition) has been suspected to contain an accretion disk associated with a companion star in orbit around a subdwarf star with a temperature T is greater than 21,000K. P831-57 has therefore been classified as a nova-like. However, our present observations show it to be a DA + dMe binary. The analysis of its Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum (continuum and lines) reveal an average mass white dwarf (Log(g) approximately equals 7.8 plus or minus 0.1)with a temperature T approximately equals 37,000 plus or minus 500K, an extremely low projected rotational velocity, and a distance of about 115 plus or minus 5pc. The photosphere contains C, N, Si, and S (at about 1% of solar abundances). The dMe star is seen as a flux excess in near-infrared photometry and appears to show occasional flaring of about one magnitude as seen in the Harvard plates. There is no evidence of periodic variability in the spectroscopic or photometric data. We find no evidence of a an accretion disk, instead we find evidence of wind accretion as the stellar carbon abundance (N(C)/N(H) = 2.5 x 10 (exp -6) is about ten times larger than predicted by radiative levitation for such a gravity and temperature. The power needs and solutions for the space exploration and lunar mobility program are discussed. Long term missions in space and on the lunar surface require high energy batteries. Rechargeable batteries for mobility systems and portable utility pallet are needed for successful exploration missions. Nanomaterial usage increases the energy density of the cells apart from increasing the power density. The symptoms and threats from acute mountain sickness (AMS) are discussed. The underlying assumptions concerning spacecraft atmosphere mean there is a potential risk to astronauts. The baseline worst case

  14. Solar wind ˜0.1-1.5 keV electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3-D Plasma & Energetic Particle (3DP) instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. Firstly, we separate strahl (beaming) electrons and halo (isotropic) electrons based on their features in pitch angle distributions. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both the strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ, effective temperature Teff and density n0. We also integrate the the measurements over ˜0.1-1.5 keV to obtain the average electron energy Eavg of the strahl and halo. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both the strahl and halo, possibly reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. Among the 245 selected samples, ˜68% have the halo κ smaller than the strahl κ, while ˜50% have the halo Eh larger than the strahl Es.

  15. The Possible Impact of L5 Magnetograms on Non-potential Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Marion; Mackay, Duncan H.; Yeates, Anthony R.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed Carrington-L5 mission would bring instruments to the L5 Lagrange point to provide us with crucial data for space weather prediction. To assess the importance of including a magnetograph, we consider the possible differences in non-potential solar coronal magnetic field simulations when magnetograph observations are available from the L5 point, compared with an L1-based field of view (FOV). A timeseries of synoptic radial magnetic field maps is constructed to capture the emergence of two active regions from the L5 FOV. These regions are initially absent in the L1 magnetic field maps, but are included once they rotate into the L1 FOV. Non-potential simulations for these two sets of input data are compared in detail. Within the bipolar active regions themselves, differences in the magnetic field structure can exist between the two simulations once the active regions are included in both. These differences tend to reduce within 5 days of the active region being included in L1. The delayed emergence in L1 can, however, lead to significant persistent differences in long-range connectivity between the active regions and the surrounding fields, and also in the global magnetic energy. In particular, the open magnetic flux and the location of open magnetic footpoints, are sensitive to capturing the real-time of emergence. These results suggest that a magnetograph at L5 could significantly improve predictions of the non-potential corona, the interplanetary magnetic field, and of solar wind source regions on the Sun.

  16. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 2: The Study for the Distance 9.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our paper is a 2.5D and 3D numerical plasma models of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC). These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model for which the derived SW interaction with spacecraft (SC) could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board SC in the inner heliosphere. We observe an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of the electromagnetic field oscillation about of (0.015-0.06) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements, which were planned in future Solar Probe Plus mission.

  17. Evaluating local correlation tracking using CO5BOLD simulations of solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Steffen, M.; Denker, C.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Flows on the solar surface are intimately linked to solar activity, and local correlation tracking (LCT) is one of the standard techniques for capturing the dynamics of these processes by cross-correlating solar images. However, the link between contrast variations in successive images to the underlying plasma motions has to be quantitatively confirmed. Aims: Radiation hydrodynamics simulations of solar granulation (e.g., CO5BOLD) provide access to both the wavelength-integrated, emergent continuum intensity and the three-dimensional velocity field at various heights in the solar atmosphere. Thus, applying LCT to continuum images yields horizontal proper motions, which are then compared to the velocity field of the simulated (non-magnetic) granulation. In this study, we evaluate the performance of an LCT algorithm previously developed for bulk-processing Hinode G-band images, establish it as a quantitative tool for measuring horizontal proper motions, and clearly work out the limitations of LCT or similar techniques designed to track optical flows. Methods: Horizontal flow maps and frequency distributions of the flow speed were computed for a variety of LCT input parameters including the spatial resolution, the width of the sampling window, the time cadence of successive images, and the averaging time used to determine persistent flow properties. Smoothed velocity fields from the hydrodynamics simulation at three atmospheric layers (log τ = -1, 0, and +1) served as a point of reference for the LCT results. Results: LCT recovers many of the granulation properties, e.g., the shape of the flow speed distributions, the relationship between mean flow speed and averaging time, and also - with significant smoothing of the simulated velocity field - morphological features of the flow and divergence maps. However, the horizontal proper motions are grossly underestimated by as much as a factor of three. The LCT flows match best the flows deeper in the atmosphere at

  18. Regulation of the solar wind electron heat fluxfrom 1 to 5 AU: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scime, Earl E.; Bame, Samuel J.; Feldman, William C.; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, John L.; Balogh, Andre

    1994-01-01

    In this study we use observations from the three-dimensional electron spectrometer and magnetometer aboard the Ulysses spacecraft to examine the solar wind electron heat flux from 1.2 to 5.4 AU in the ecliptic plane. Throughout Ulusses' transit to 5.4 AU, the electron heat flux decreases more rapidly (approximately R(exp -30)) than simple collisionless expansion along the local magnetic field and is smaller than expected for a thermal gradient heat flux, q(sub parallel e) (r) = - Kappa(sub parallel) del(sub parallel) T(sub e)(r). The radial gradients and magnitudes expected for a number of electron heat flux regulatory mechanisms are examined and compared to the observations. The best agreement is found for heat flux regulation by the whistler heat flux instability. The upper bound and radial scaling for the electron heat flux predicted for the whistler heat flux instability are consistent with the observations.

  19. The Variation of Solar Fe 14 and Fe 10 Flux over 1.5 Solar Activity Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altrock, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A new source of data on the solar output, namely limb flux from the one- and two-million degree corona is presented. This parameter is derived from data obtained at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak with the 40 cm coronagraph of the John W. Evans Solar Facility and the Emission Line Coronal Photometer. The limb flux is defined to be the latitude-averaged intensity in millionths of the brightness of disk center from an annulus of width 1.1 minutes centered at a height of 0.15 solar constant above the limb of emission from lines at 6374A (Fe X) or 5303A (Fe XIV). Fe XIV data have been obtained since 1973 and Fe X since 1984. Examination of the Fe XIV data shows that there is ambiguity in the definition of the last two solar activity minima, which can affect the determination of cycle rise times and lengths. There is an indication that a constant minimum or basal corona may exist at solar minimum. Cycle 22 has had a much faster onset than Cycle 21 and has now overtaken Cycle 21. The rise characteristics of the two cycles were very similar up until Jul. to Aug. 1989, at which time a long-term maximum occurred in Fe X and Fe XIV, which could possibly be the solar maximum. Another maximum is developing at the current time. Cycle 21 was characterized in Fe XIV by at least 4 major thrusts or bursts of activity, each lasting on the order of a year and all having similar maximum limb fluxes which indicates that coronal energy output is sustained over periods in which the sunspot number declines significantly. Dramatic increases in the limb fluxes occur from minimum to maximum, ranging from factors of 14 to 21 in the two lines. Two different techniques to predict the epoch of solar maximum have been applied to the Fe XIV data, resulting in estimates of April 1989 (plus or minus 1 mo) and May 1990 (plus or minus 2 mos).

  20. Neutron and electromagnetic emissions during the 1990 May 24 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, L. G.; Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Zirin, H.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we are primarily concerened with the solar neutron emission during the 1990 May 24 flare, utilizing the counting rate of the Climax neutron monitor and the time profiles of hard X-rays and gamma-rays obtained with the GRANAT satellite (Pelaez et al., 1992; Talon et al., 1993; Terekhov et al., 1993). We compare the derived neutron injection function with macroscopic parameters of the flare region as obtained from the H-alpha and microwave observations made at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) respectively. Our results are summarized as folows: (1) to explain the neutron monitor counting rate and 57.5-110 MeV and 2.2 MeV gamma-ray time profiles, we consider a two-component neutron injection function, Q(E, t). (2) From the H-alpha observations, we find a relatively small loop of length approximattely equal to 2 x 10(exp 4) km, which may be regarded as the source for the fast-decaying component of gamma-rays (57.5-110 MeV) and for the first component of neutron emission. From microwave visibility and the microwave total power spectrum we postulate the presence of a rather big loop (approximately equal to 2 x 10(exp 5) km), which we regard as being responsible for the slow-decaying component of the high-energy emission. We show how the neutron and gamma-ray emission data can be explained in terms of the macroscopic parameters derived from the H-alpha and microwave observations. (3) The H-alpha observations also reveal the presence of a fast mode MHD shock (the Moreton wave) which precedes the microwave peak by 20-30 s and the peak of gamma-ray intensity by 40-50 s. From this relative timing and the single-pulsed time profiles of both radiations, we can attribute the whole event as due to a prompt acceleration of both electrons and protons by the shock and subsequent deceleration of the trapped particles while they propagate inside the magnetic loops.

  1. Signal-to-noise enhancement in ground-based intensity observations of solar p modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensity observations of solar p modes are needed to form a complete picture of wave propagation in the photosphere. Ground-based intensity observations are severely hampered by terrestrial atmospheric noise. Partial cancellation of the noise power can be achieved if two spectra having disparate signal-to- noise ratios, and based on time series acquired simultaneously at the same site, are combined. A method of combining the spectra is suggested in which one amplitude is scaled and subtracted from the other. The result is squared yielding a positive-definite power density. To test the method, the intensity of light scattered by the Earth's atmnosphere was recorded at fifteen- second intervals in two narrow bands centered on 0.5 microns and 1.6 microns. When the two resulting spectra were combined, the noise power was attenuated by a factor of 2.7. The scale factor was varied about its optimum value, revealing that noise peaks have a different siganture than signal peaks, and opening up the possibility of a new tool in discrimination against noise peaks. Maxima at symmetry-allowed frequencies and minima at symmetry- forbidden frequencies indicate that the possibility that these results are obtained by chance is only 6.1 x 10(exp -4). The positions of these maxima and minima also support the solar-cycle dependent frequency shifts found by Palle, Regulo, and Roca Cortes.

  2. Hinode Observations of the Onset Stage of a Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Berger, Thomas E.; Bobra, Monica; Davis, John M.; Jibben, Patricia; Kano, R.; Lundquist, Loraine; Myers, D.; Narukage, N.; Sakao, T.; Shibasaki, K.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Weber, Mark

    2007-01-01

    We use Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) filtergraph (FG) Stokes-V magnetogram observations, to study the early onset of a solar eruption that includes an erupting filament that we observe in TRACE EUV images. The filament undergoes a slow rise for at least 20 min prior to its fast eruption and strong soft X-ray flaring; such slow rises have been previously reported, and the new Hinode data elucidate the physical processes occurring during this period. XRT images show that during the slow-rise phase, a soft X-ray (SXR) sigmoid forms from apparent reconnection low in the sheared core field traced by the filament, and there is a low-level intensity peak in both EUV and SXRs during the slow rise. MDI and SOT FG/V magnetograms show that the pre-eruption filament is along a neutral line between opposing-polarity enhanced network cells, and the SOT magnetograms show that these opposing fields are flowing together and canceling for at least six hours prior to eruption. From the MDI data we measure the canceling network fields to be approx. 40 G, and we estimate that approx. 10(exp 19) Mx of flux canceled during the five hours prior to eruption; this is only approx. 5% of the total flux spanned by the eruption and flare, but apparently its tether-cutting cancellation was enough to destabilize the sigmoid field holding the filament and resulted in that field's eruption.

  3. Hinode Observations of the Onset Stage of a Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Berger, Thomas E.; Bobra, Monica; Davis, John M.; Jibben, Patricia; Kano, Ryohei; Lundquist, Loraine L.; Myers, D.; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Weber, Mark

    2007-01-01

    We used Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) filtergraph (FG) Stokes-V magnetogram observations, to study the early onset of a solar eruption that includes an erupting filament that we observe in TRACE EUV images. The filament undergoes a slow rise for at least 20min prior to its fast eruption and strong soft X-ray (SXR) flaring; such slow rises have been previously reported, and the new Hinode data elucidate the physical processes occurring during this period. XRT images show that during the slow-rise phase, an SXR sigmoid forms from apparent reconnection low in the sheared core field traced by the filament, and there is a low-level intensity peak in both EUV and SXRs during the slow rise. MDI and SOT FG Stokes-V magnetograms show that the pre-emption filament is along a neutral line between opposing-polarity enhanced network cells, and the SOT magnetograms show that these opposing fields are flowing together and canceling for at least six hours prior to eruption. From the MDI data we measured the canceling network fields to be approx. 40 G, and we estimated that approx. 10(exp 19)Mx of flux canceled during the five hours prior to eruption; this is only approx.5% of the total flux spanned by the eruption and flare, but apparently its tether-cutting cancellation was enough to destabilize the sigmoid field holding the filament and resulted in that field's eruption.

  4. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  5. Monitoring of solar far ultraviolet radiation from the OSO-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rense, W. A.; Parker, R.

    1972-01-01

    A spectrophotometer for monitoring the solar EUV in three broad wavelength bands is described. The kind of data obtained, along with sources of error, are presented. The content of the tape library which contains the data is outlined. The scientific results are discussed. These include the following: solar flares in the EUV, solar eclipse observations in the EUV, SFD's and relationship to solar flares, and the application of satellite sunrise and sunset data for the study of model upper atmospheres for the earth.

  6. The Solar-Stellar Connection (NAG5-6124: SOHO Guest Investigator Program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    that much of the chromospheric "action" must be occurring on fine spatial scales and short times; particularly in the cell interior transient brightenings, but also in the longer-lived network fragments. That regime of investigation is far removed from what one usually associates with "synoptic" measurements. Nevertheless, synoptic observations of chromospheric indices, filtergrams, and globally-averaged profile parameters not only can provide important insight concerning the crucial role of the cycle-variable part of the solar magnetic field; but they also can forge a key link with analogous measurements of the stars, where often the phenomena can be significantly exaggerated from the solar case, but high spatial resolution reconnaissance is not even a remote possibility. In addition to discussing the synoptic aspects of chromospheric structure and dynamics, I summarized new insights into the general problem of the solar chromosphere that have been obtained recently with the SUMER far-ultraviolet spectrometer on SOHO. (2) CO and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Atmosphere -- The surface layers of the Sun provide a crucial boundary condition for many of the processes that occur in the deep interior. The stratification of the outer solar atmosphere once was thought to be well understood. However, studies of thermally sensitive molecular absorptions in the infrared revealed puzzling anomalies. Strong lines of the CO fundamental vibration-rotation bands near 5 microns showed very cool temperatures at the extreme limb, and remarkable off-limb emissions extending well into the supposedly hot chromosphere. The conflicting pictures of the photosphere/chromosphere interface, from the widely separated wavelength regimes, has raised suspicions that those "layers" of the atmosphere are much more inhomogeneous than previously suspected. One proposal is that the low chromosphere is dominated by cool gas, the "COmosphere," which is threaded by a network of persistent small

  7. 18.5% efficient AlOx/SiNy rear passivated industrial multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Qi; Lu, Hongyan; Ge, Jian; Xi, Xi; Chen, Rulong; Yang, Jian; Zhu, Jingbing; Shi, Zhengrong; Chu, Junhao

    2014-06-01

    Due to the trend toward thinner and higher efficient crystalline silicon solar cells, excellent rear surface passivation and internal optical reflectance have become more and more important. Aluminum oxide (AlOx) capped with silicon nitride (SiNy), which is considered as one of the most promising candidates to achieve superior rear passivation and internal reflectance, has to date been mostly used for the rear side of p-type monocrystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. In this paper, we have optimized rear AlOx/SiNy stacks deposited by industrial plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) passivated emitter and rear cells (PERC). Sufficient passivation activation effect from industrial fast-firing process and SiNy deposition process have been demonstrated, so the samples were not subjected to additional thermal treatment process in the cell fabrication flow. For rear AlOx/SiNy stack, it is shown that when PECVD AlOx is thicker than 40 nm, apparent blisters in fired AlOx deteriorate the cell performance, and the appropriate SiNy capping is N-rich SiNy with thickness of at least 180 nm. After process optimization with the least additional process steps, independently confirmed efficiency of 18.5% for Pluto-PERC with PECVD AlOx/SiNy rear passivation on standard 156 mm × 156 mm p-type mc-Si wafers has been achieved.

  8. A comparison of solar wind and estimated solar system xenon abundances - A test for solid/gas fractionation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, D. S.; Neugebauer, M.; Pepin, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The solar Xe elemental abundance is determined here using solar wind measurements from lunar ilmenites which are normalized to Si by spacecraft data. The results are compared with estimated abundances assuming no fractionation. When corrected for solar wind/photospheric fractionation, the Xe-130 abundance given by surface layer oxidation of ilmenite from solid 71501 exposed within the last 200 m.y. is 0.24 +/- 0.09 normalized to Si = 10 exp 6. This is indistinguishable from estimates made assuming no solid/gas fractionation. Results from breccia 79035 ilmenite exposed at least 1 Gyr ago indicate that the solar wind Xe flux may have been significantly higher relative to other noble gases, perhaps due to more efficient Xe ionization. If this is true, fluxes of C and S, which have first ionization potentials similar to Xe, should also be higher in the ancient solar wind from the same time period.

  9. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 5: Solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Solar Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The areas to be investigated by the solar physics experiments are: (1) the production of mechanical energy in the subphotospheric layers and its transport and dissipation in the upper layers of the atmosphere, (2) the mass flux from the subphotospheric layers into the chromosphere and corona and beyond the solar wind, (3) solar activity and its relationship to magnetic fields, and (4) the production of solar flares. The approach to be followed in conducting the experiments and the equipment required are defined.

  10. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or equal to 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modeling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molcular clouds in the interstellar clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly, on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronoloically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differential meteorites (eucrites and augrites) -- appear to have experienced potentially dateable nebular events. In both cases, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate

  11. High and low energy proton radiation damage in p/n InP MOCVD solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irving; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)nn(+) MOCVD solar cells were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The degradation of power output, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 meV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a DLTS study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(v) + 0.33 and E(v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and E10 at E(c)- 0.39 and E(c)-0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect E10, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  12. A New 0.5m Telescope (MAST) for Solar Imaging and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S. K.

    2009-06-01

    In this article we discuss the design of a new 0.5 m telescope which will be installed at the lake site of Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO), India in the first quarter of 2009. The telescope has an off-axis alt-azimuth design, which will provide a low scattered-light performance. The complete telescope including the control system will be made by AMOS, Belgium. The prototype adaptive-optics system for seeing correction is being developed at USO. The design of two back-end instruments, an echelle-scanning spectrograph capable of observing simultaneously in at least two spectral lines, and an imaging spectrometer based on double Fabry-Pérot etalon, and a polarimeter common for both the instruments is in progress. The scientific objectives, design aspects and the current status of the above instruments is discussed in this paper.

  13. Performance of the MIR Cooperative Solar Array After 2.5 Years in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hoffman, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) was developed jointly by the United States and Russia to produce 6 kW of power for the Russian space station Mir. Four, multi-orbit test sequences were executed between June 1996 and December 1998 to measure MCSA electrical performance. A dedicated Fortran computer code was developed to analyze the detailed thermal-electrical performance of the MCSA. The computational performance results compared very favorably with the measured flight data in most cases. Minor performance degradation was detected in one current generating section of the MCSA. Yet overall, the flight data indicated the MCSA was meeting and exceeding performance expectations. There was no precipitous performance loss due to contamination or other causes after 2.5 years of operation. In this paper, we review the MCSA flight electrical performance tests, data and computational modeling and discuss findings from data comparisons with the computational results.

  14. Solar flare line emission between 6 A and 25 A. [using crystal spectrometer onboard OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.; Swartz, M.; Kastner, S. O.

    1973-01-01

    A list of emission lines in the spectra of solar flares between 6 and 25 A has been compiled using data obtained with a KAP crystal spectrometer on the OSO-5 satellite. The emission lines have been classified according to their sensitivity to flare activity. This classification provides a method for discriminating between iron in high stages of ionization (Fe XX-Fe XXV) and lower stages (Fe XVII-Fe XIX), the lines of which are both present in the same spectral region during flares. Identifications consistent with these classifications are proposed. Anomalous intensities in the spectra of Fe XVII and Fe XX are pointed out, and implications of the observations for models of the X-ray emitting regions are discussed.

  15. Shocks in the solar wind between 1 and 8.5 AU: Voyager 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was made of all interplanetary shocks detected by the plasma science experiment aboard the Voyager 1 spacecraft between 1.2 and 8.5 AU. Shock normals and shock velocities are determined. The variation of shock frequency and various shock parameters with heliocentric distance is discussed. The results indicate that beyond 1.2 AU, the vast majority of shocks were associated with interaction regions between high and low speed streams; of 95 events, only 1 was clearly associated with a transient event. Forward shocks were more numerous and seemed to form closer to the sun than reverse shocks. Forward shocks were stronger than reverse shocks. The energy balance of three shocks is examined. A close agreement is found between the measured and the predicted pressure ratios across these shocks. The contribution of shocks to the global energy balance is discussed. Shocks are found to have a significant effect in heating the solar wind.

  16. All-weather ultraviolet solar spectra retrieved at a 0.5-Hz sampling rate.

    PubMed

    Thorseth, T M; Kjeldstad, B

    1999-10-20

    A measurement scheme and an algorithm have been developed to retrieve global irradiance ultraviolet solar spectra (290-400 nm) at a sampling rate of 0.5 Hz. The algorithm combines spectral irradiance measurements performed with a slow (a few minutes) scanning spectroradiometer (Optronic Model OL752) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer (Biospherical ground-based ultraviolet radiometer Model 541). The filter radiometer instrument allows for continuous observations of global UV radiation at five channels (approximately 10-nm bandwidth), performed simultaneously with spectral measurements. Information about changing cloud conditions during a spectral scan was retrieved from filter measurements and applied to spectral data, hence estimated spectra without cloud variations could be constructed. The quality of the estimated spectra depends on data quality from both instruments. The method works well in all kinds of weather conditions, as long as the Sun is above the horizon and none of the instruments are hampered by measurement errors. PMID:18324148

  17. Ozone Correction for AM0 Calibrated Solar Cells for the Aircraft Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Rieke, William J.; Blankenship, Kurt S.

    2002-01-01

    The aircraft solar cell calibration method has provided cells calibrated to space conditions for 37 years. However, it is susceptible to systematic errors due to ozone concentrations in the stratosphere. The present correction procedure applies a 1 percent increase to the measured I(sub SC) values. High band-gap cells are more sensitive to ozone absorbed wavelengths (0.4 to 0.8 microns) so it becomes important to reassess the correction technique. This paper evaluates the ozone correction to be 1+O3xFo, where O3 is the total ozone along the optical path, and Fo is 29.8 x 10(exp -6)/du for a Silicon solar cell, 42.6 x 10(exp -6)/du for a GaAs cell and 57.2 x 10(exp -6)/du for an InGaP cell. These correction factors work best to correct data points obtained during the flight rather than as a correction to the final result.

  18. The rate of planet formation and the solar system's small bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safronov, Viktor S.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of random velocities and the mass distribution of preplanetary body at the early stage of accumulation are currently under review. Arguments were presented for and against the view of an extremely rapid, runaway growth of the largest bodies at this stage with parameter values of Theta approximately greater than 10(exp 3). Difficulties are encountered assuming such a large Theta: (1) bodies of the Jovian zone penetrate the asteroid zone too late and do not have time to hinder the formation of a normal-sized planet in the asteroidal zone and thereby remove a significant portion of the mass of solid matter and (2) Uranus and Neptune cannot eject bodies from the solar system into the cometary cloud. Therefore, the values Theta less than 10(exp 2) appear to be preferable.

  19. 5.5 W continuous-wave TEM00-mode Nd:YAG solar laser by a light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, J.; Liang, D.; Vistas, C. R.; Bouadjemine, R.; Guillot, E.

    2015-12-01

    A significant progress in TEM00-mode solar laser power and efficiency with heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. A double-stage light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity is used to efficiently couple and redistribute the concentrated pump light from a 2-m-diameter parabolic mirror to a 4-mm-diameter, 30-mm-length, 1.1 at.% Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. The light guide with large rectangular cross section enables a stable uniform pumping profile along the laser rod, resulting also in an enhanced tracking error compensation capacity. 5.5 W cw TEM00-mode solar laser power was measured at the output of a thermally near unstable asymmetric resonator. 150 and 157 % improvement in TEM00-mode solar laser collection efficiency and slope efficiency were obtained, respectively.

  20. Lightweight, Flexible Solar Cells on Stainless Steel Foil and Polymer for Space and Stratospheric Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beernink, Kevin; Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Jeff; Banerjee, Arindam; Lord, Ken; DeMaggio, Greg; Liu, Frank; Pietka, Ginger; Johnson, Todd; Reinhout, Melanie; Younan, Kais; Wolf, David

    2007-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, lightweight and reliable photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important component in reducing the cost of satellites and spacecraft. In addition, future high-power spacecraft will require lightweight PV arrays with reduced stowage volume. In terms of the requirements for low mass, reduced stowage volume, and the harsh space environment, thin film amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells have several advantages over other material technologies (1). The deposition process is relatively simple, inexpensive, and applicable to large area, lightweight, flexible substrates. The temperature coefficient has been found to be between -0.2 and -0.3 %/degC for high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy cells, which is superior for high temperature operation compared to crystalline Si and triple-junction GaAs/InGaP/Ge devices at 0.53 %/degC and 0.45 %/degC, respectively (2). As a result, the reduction in efficiency at high temperature typical in space conditions is less for a-Si alloy cells than for their crystalline counterparts. Additionally, the a-Si alloy cells are relatively insensitive to electron and proton bombardment. We have shown that defects that are created by electrons with energies between 0.2 to 2 MeV with fluence up to 1x10(exp 15) e/sq cm and by protons with energy in the range 0.3 MeV to 5 MeV with fluence up to 1x10(exp 13) p/sq cm can be annealed out at 70 C in less than 50 hours (1). Further, modules incorporating United Solar s a-Si alloy cells have been tested on the MIR space station for 19 months with only minimal degradation (3). For stratospheric applications, such as the high altitude airship, the required PV arrays are typically of considerably higher power than current space arrays. Airships typically have a large area available for the PV, but weight is of critical importance. As a result, low cost and high specific power (W/kg) are key factors for airship PV arrays. Again, thin-film a-Si alloy solar cell technology is well

  1. Field-Aligned Current Dynamics and Its Correlation with Solar Wind Conditions and Geomagnetic Activities From Space Technology 5 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongli; Boardsen, Scott; Le, Guan; Slavin, James; Strangeway, Robert J.

    Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the currents flowing into and out of the ionosphere which connect to the magnetosphere. They provide an essential linkage between the solar wind - magnetosphere system and the ionosphere, and the understanding of these currents is important for global magnetosphere dynamics and space weather prediction. The three spacecraft ST-5 constellation provides an unprecedented opportunity to study in situ FAC dynamics in time scales (10 sec to 10 min) that can not be achieved previously with single spacecraft studies or large-spaced conjugate spacecraft studies. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations during the whole ST-5 mission to study the dependence of FAC current sheet motion and intensity on solar wind conditions. FAC peak current densities show very good correlations with some solar wind parameters, including IMF Bz, dynamic pressure, Ey, and some IMF angles, but not with other parameters. Instant FAC speeds show generally much weaker dependence on solar wind conditions comparing to FAC peak current densities. This obvious uncorrelation between FAC peak current densities and speeds implies that FAC peak current densities are more consistently controlled by solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities, while FAC speeds are more oscillatory, sometimes with higher speeds during quieter times and lower speeds during more turbulent times. Detailed examination of FAC current sheet speed during two major storms in the ST-5 mission will also be given to illustrate the temporal evolution of the FAC dynamics with geomagnetic storm.

  2. Regulation of the solar wind electron heat flux from 1 to 5 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gary, S.P.; Phillips, J.L.; Balogh, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this study the authors use observations from the three-dimensional electron spectrometer and magnetometer aboard the Ulysses spacecraft to examine the solar wind electron heat flux from 1.2 to 5.4 AU in the ecliptic plane. Throughout Ulysses` transit to 5.4 AU, the electron heat flux decreases more rapidly ({approximately}R{sup {minus}3.0}) than simple collisionless expansion along the local magnetic field and is smaller than expected for a thermal gradient heat flux, q{sub {parallel}}e(r)={minus}k{sub {parallel}}{del}{sub {parallel}}T{sub e}(r). The radial gradients and magnitudes expected for a number of electron heat flux regulatory mechanisms are examined and compared to the observations. The best agreement is found for heat flux regulation by the whistler heat flux instability. The upper bound and radial scaling for the electron heat flux predicted for the whistler heat flux instability are consistent with observations.

  3. HST Observations of Star Formation in Interacting Galaxies: NGC 4194, the "Medusa"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.; Eggers, D.; Nelson, C. H.; Kaiser, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Ultraviolet and visible imaging of the blue compact galaxy NGC4194 was obtained to survey the star-forming knots in the center of this galaxy. Photometry and image analysis were performed on these regions. Comparison with evolutionary tracks indicates many of the knots are reddened with a typical E(B-V)approx.0.3. The knot ages range from 10(exp 6-10(exp 8)years. Some of the knots may have masses 3-5x10(exp 5) solar mass. The FUV fluxes correspond to the flux from 60-3.8x10(exp 3) O5V stars.

  4. Thermal Considerations of Space Solar Power Concepts with 3.5 GW RF Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the thermal challenge of the Space Solar Power (SSP) design concepts with a 3.5 GW radio-frequency (RF) output. High efficiency klystrons are thermally more favored than solid state (butterstick) to convert direct current (DC) electricity to radio-frequency (RF) energy at the transmitters in these concepts. Using klystrons, the heat dissipation is 0.72 GW. Using solid state, the heat dissipation is 2.33 GW. The heat dissipation of the klystrons is 85% at 500C, 10% at 300C, and 5% at 125C. All the heat dissipation of the solid state is at 100C. Using klystrons, the radiator area is 74,500 square m Using solid state, the radiator area is 2,362,200 square m Space constructable heat pipe radiators are assumed in the thermal analysis. Also, to make the SSP concepts feasible, the mass of the heat transport system must be minimized. The heat transport distance from the transmitters to the radiators must be minimized. It can be accomplished by dividing the radiator into a cluster of small radiators, so that the heat transport distances between the klystrons and radiators can be minimized. The area of each small radiator is on the order of 1 square m. Two concepts for accommodating a cluster of small radiators are presented. If the distance between the transmitters and radiators is 1.5 m or less, constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) are acceptable for heat transport. If the distance exceeds 1.5 m, loop heat pipes (LHPs) are needed.

  5. Evidence for Langmuir Envelope Solitons in Solar Type III Burst Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; Goldstein, M. L.; MacDowall, R. J.; Papadopoulos, K.; Stone, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    We present observational evidence for the generation of Langmuir envelope solitons in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts. The solitons appear to be formed by electron beams which excite either the modulational instability or oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). Millisecond data from the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) show that Langmuir waves associated with type III bursts occur as broad intense peaks with time scales ranging from 15 to 90 milliseconds (6 - 27 km). These broad field structures have the properties expected of Langmuir envelope solitons, viz.: the normalized peak energy densities, W(sub L)/n(sub e)T(sub e) approximately 10(exp -5), are well above the modulational instability threshold; the spatial scales, L, which range from 1 - 5 Langmuir wavelengths, show a high degree of inverse correlation with (W(sub L)/n(sub e)T(sub e))(sup 1/2); and the observed widths of these broad peaks agree well with the predicted widths of envelope solitons. We show that the orientation of the Langmuir field structures is random with respect to the ambient magnetic field, indicating that they are probably isotropic structures that have evolved from initially pancake-like solitons. These observations suggest that strong turbulence processes, such as the modulational instability or the OTSI, stabilize the electron beams that produce type III bursts.

  6. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Imaging of Macs Galaxy Clusters at =>0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRoque, Samuel; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Ebeling, Harald; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Dawson, Kyle S.; Edge, Alastair; Holzapfel, William L.; Miller, Amber D.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2003-01-01

    We present 30 GHz interferometric Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) measurements of a redshift-limited, X-ray-selected cluster sample from the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS). All eight of the high-redshift (z > 0.5, delta > -15 deg) galaxy clusters were detected. Additional observations were made at 4.8 GHz with the Very Large Array to help constrain the amount of point source contamination to the SZE decrements. From SZE data alone, we derive electron temperatures in the range 5.5-18.5 keV and total masses between 1.5 and 2.6 x 10(exp 14)/h solar masses within a 65 minute radius (0.28/h Mpc at z = 0.5) for the eight clusters. Six of the clusters are MACS discoveries, while two (C10016+1609 and MS 0451.6-0305) were detected by previous X-ray observations and have been recently observed with the Chandra observatory. The X-ray-derived temperatures and masses for C10016+1609 and MS 0451.6-0305 are in good agreement with the SZE derived values. Strong detections of the SZE signal in this sample of MACS objects confirm that they are hot, massive clusters.

  7. Post-Flight Analysis of Selected Fluorocarbon and Other Thin Film Polymer Specimens Flown on MISSE-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeGroh, Kim; Finckenor, Miria; Minton, Tim; Brunsvold, Amy; Pippin, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Twenty thin film specimens were flown on M1SSE-5 as a cooperative effort between several organizations. This presentation will report results of initial inspections and post-flight measurements of the optical properties and recession of these materials due to the approx.13 month exposure period on the exterior of the International Space Station. These specimens were located on the "anti-solar" side of the MISSE-5 container and received a low number of Equivalent Sun Hours of solar UV exposure. Profilometry and/or ATF measurements will be conducted to determine thickness changes and atomic oxygen-induced recession rates Six of the specimens were covered with thin Kapton films, 0.1 and 0.3 mil in thickness. The 0.1 mil Kapton was almost completely eroded, suggesting that the atomic oxygen fluence is <8 x 10(exp 19) atoms/sq cm, similar to levels experienced during Space Shuttle materials experiments in the 1980's and 1990's. A comparison of results from MISSE-5 and Space Shuttle experiments will be included for those materials common to both the short and long-term exposures.

  8. Specific Volumes of the Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) Alloy in the Liquid, Glass, and Crystalline States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Chung, S. K.; Rhim, W. K.; Johnson, W. L.; Peker, A.; Scruggs, D.

    1997-01-01

    The specific volumes of the Zr(41.2)Ti(3.8)Cu(2.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) alloy as a function of temperature, T, are determined by employing an image digitizing technique and numerical calculation methods applied to the electrostatically levitated spherical alloy. The linear fitting of the volumes of the alloy in the liquid, V(sub l), glass, V(sub g) and crystalline V(sub c), states in the temperature ranges shown in parentheses are V(sub l)(T) = 0.1583 + 8.877 x 10(exp -6) T(cu cm/g) (700-1300 K);V(sub g)(T) = 0.1603 + 5.528 x 10(exp -6) T (400-550 K);V(sub c)(T) = 0.1583 + 6.21 x 10(exp -6)T(400-850 K). The average volume thermal expansion coefficients within the temperature ranges are determined to be 5.32, 3.39. and 3.83 x 10(exp -5) (1/K) for the liquid, glass, and crystalline states, respectively.

  9. High band gap 2-6 and 3-5 tunneling junctions for silicon multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, Taher (Inventor); Kachare, Akaram H. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A multijunction silicon solar cell of high efficiency is provided by providing a tunnel junction between the solar cell junctions to connect them in series. The tunnel junction is comprised of p+ and n+ layers of high band gap 3-5 or 2-6 semiconductor materials that match the lattice structure of silicon, such as GaP (band gap 2.24 eV) or ZnS (band gap 3.6 eV). Each of which has a perfect lattice match with silicon to avoid defects normally associated with lattice mismatch.

  10. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  11. A 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhijian; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    Zee-type models with Majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, a particularly simple solution is found to the solar neutrino problem, which besides nu(sub 17) predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino nu(sub light) = nu(sub e) + nu(sub mu)(sup c) with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10(exp -11)(mu)(sub B) through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  12. CAB-DWTM for 5 μm trace-width deposition of solar cell metallization top-contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Justin Hoey; Drew Thompson; Matt Robinson; Zakaria Mahmud; Orven F. Swenson; Iskander S. Akhatov; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    This paper reviews methods for creating solar cell grid contacts and explores how cell efficiency can be increased using CAB-DW{trademark}. Specifically, the efficiency of p-i-n structure solar cells built in-house with 90 {micro}m sputtered lines and 5 {micro}m CAB-DW lines were compared. Preliminary results of the comparison show a marked improvement in solar cell efficiency using CAB-DW. In addition to this, a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of particle impaction on a substrate (i.e. whether particle stick or bounce) will be discussed including how this analysis may lead to further improvement of CAB-DW.

  13. The solar diameter and oblateness measured by the solar disk sextant on the 1992 September 30 balloon flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Heaps, W.; Twigg, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a balloon flight of the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) on 1992 September 30. This was the first flight in which the SDS used a wedge assembly fabricated by molecular contact in order to eliminate the wedge angle variations observed in previous flights. The instrument performed as designed. The main results obtained are values of the solar diameter for a number of discrete heliocentric latitudes, and the solar oblateness. The accuracy of the diameter values is better than 0.2 sec whereas the precision is approximately 1-2 mas. The equatorial solar diameter, at 1 AU, was 1919.06 sec +/- 0.12 sec, and the oblateness epsilon = 8.63 +/- 0.88 x 10(exp -6).

  14. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  15. 8.5 percent efficient screen-printed CdS/CdTe solar cell produced on a 5-cm x 10-cm glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Nakano, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Uda, H.; Kuribayashi, K.; Ikegami, S.

    1983-02-01

    The preparation conditions of CdS sintered film for 5-cm x 10-cm screen-printed CsS/CdTe solar cells were investigated. Increasing the belt speed of the belt furnace increased the residual amount of Cl ions in the CdS sintered film and lowered the efficiency of the cell. The optimum belt speed was 2 cm/min, corresponding to a sintering time of 90 min. The thickness of the CdS film was changed by changing the screen thickness. Increasing the thickness of the CdS film lowered its surface resistivity and improved the fill factor of a cell. A solar cell of 8.5 percent intrinsic efficiency was obtained from CdS film printed by an 80 mesh screen and sintered at 690 C at a belt speed of 2 cm/min.

  16. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  17. Energy Transport in the Thermosphere During the Solar Storms of April 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Crowley, Geoff; Funke, Bernd; Lu, Gang; Russell, III, James M.; Kozyra, Janet; Sharma, Ramesh; Gordley, Larry; Paxton, Larry

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic solar storm events of April 2002 deposited a large amount of energy into the Earth's upper atmosphere, substantially altering the thermal structure, the chemical composition, the dynamics, and the radiative environment. We examine the flow of energy within the thermosphere during this storm period from the perspective of infrared radiation transport and heat conduction. Observations from the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite are coupled with computations based on the ASPEN thermospheric general circulation model to assess the energy flow. The dominant radiative response is associated with dramatically enhanced infrared emission from nitric oxide at 5.3 microns from which a total of approx. 7.7 x 10(exp 23) ergs of energy are radiated during the storm. Energy loss rates due to NO emission exceed 2200 Kelvin per day. In contrast, energy loss from carbon dioxide emission at 15 microns is only approx. 2.3% that of nitric oxide. Atomic oxygen emission at 63 microns is essentially constant during the storm. Energy loss from molecular heat conduction may be as large as 3.8% of the NO emission. These results confirm the "natural thermostat" effect of nitric oxide emission as the primary mechanism by which storm energy is lost from the thermosphere below 210 km.

  18. Investigation of Solar about 5-Month Cycle in Human Circulating Melatonin: Signature of Weather in Extraterrestrial Space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornélissen, G.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Otsuka, K.; Gigolashvili, M.; Halberg, F.

    2009-12-01

    Melatonin, produced mainly in the pineal and the gut, is often thought of as the "dark hormone" as its concentration in the circulation is high during darkness and low during light in diurnally- and nocturnally-active mammals in health. About-daily and about-yearly periodicities can thus be anticipated to characterize melatonin, matching the two major photic environmental cycles. Non-photic solar influences have also been observed, melatonin being depressed in association with magnetic storms. While less stable than the daily and yearly changes, non-photic solar dynamics also undergo various periodicities. Among them is an about 0.42-year (about 5-month or 154-day) cycle, reported by several physicists in relation to Zürich relative sunspot numbers and to solar flares. This putative signature of solar activity was found in the incidence pattern of sudden cardiac death in Minnesota, USA, among other geographic locations. A cycle with a period of about 0.42 year is here reported in data on circulating melatonin of 172 patients studied between Oct 1992 and Dec 1995 in Florence, Italy. Melatonin may mediate some of the Sun's effects upon the biosphere in certain frequency-windows such as a cis-half-year of about 5 months.

  19. Optimization of hybrid organic/inorganic poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Martin; Sanders, Simon; Stümmler, Dominik; Pfeiffer, Pascal; Vescan, Andrei; Kalisch, Holger

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, hybrid organic/silicon solar cells have attracted great interest in photovoltaic research due to their potential to become a low-cost alternative for the conventionally used silicon pn-junction solar cells. This work is focused on hybrid solar cells based on the polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), which was deposited on n-doped crystalline silicon via spin-coating under ambient conditions. By employing an anisotropic etching step with potassium hydroxide (KOH), the reflection losses at the silicon surface were reduced. Hereby, the short-circuit current density of the hybrid devices was increased by 31%, leading to a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 13.1% compared to a PCE of 10.7% for the devices without KOH etching. In addition, the contacts were improved by replacing gold with the more conductive silver as top grid material to reduce the contact resistance and by introducing a thin (˜0.5 nm) lithium fluoride layer between the silicon and the aluminum backside contact to improve electron collection and hole blocking. Hereby, the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor of the hybrid solar cells were further improved and devices with very high PCE up to 14.2% have been realized.

  20. OBSERVATION OF KINK INSTABILITY DURING SMALL B5.0 SOLAR FLARE ON 2007 JUNE 4

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, Pankaj; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M. L. E-mail: pkumar@aries.res.i E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.a

    2010-05-20

    Using multi-wavelength observations of SOHO/MDI, SOT-Hinode/blue-continuum (4504 A), G band (4305 A), Ca II H (3968 A), and TRACE 171 A, we present the observational signature of a highly twisted magnetic loop in AR 10960 during the period 04:43 UT-04:52 UT on 2007 June 4. SOT-Hinode/blue-continuum (4504 A) observations show that penumbral filaments of positive polarity sunspot have counterclockwise twist, which may be caused by the clockwise rotation of the spot umbrae. The coronal loop, whose one footpoint is anchored in this sunspot, shows strong right-handed twist in chromospheric SOT-Hinode/Ca II H (3968 A) and coronal TRACE 171 A images. The length and the radius of the loop are L {approx} 80 Mm and a {approx} 4.0 Mm, respectively. The distance between neighboring turns of magnetic field lines (i.e., pitch) is estimated as {approx}10 Mm. The total twist angle, {Phi} {approx} 12{pi} (estimated for the homogeneous distribution of the twist along the loop), is much larger than the Kruskal-Shafranov instability criterion. We detected clear double structure of the loop top during 04:47 UT-04:51 UT on TRACE 171 A images, which is consistent with simulated kink instability in curved coronal loops. We suggest that the kink instability of this twisted magnetic loop triggered a B5.0 class solar flare, which occurred between 04:40 UT and 04:51 UT in this active region.

  1. Compound biomimetic structures for efficiency enhancement of Ga(0.5)In(0.5)P/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Mu-Min; Han, Hau-Vei; Hong, Chung-Yu; Hong, Kuo-Hsuan; Yang, Tung-Ting; Yu, Peichen; Wu, Yu-Rue; Yeh, Hong-Yih; Huang, Hong-Cheng

    2014-03-10

    Biomimetic nanostructures have shown to enhance the optical absorption of Ga(0.5)In(0.5)P/GaAs/Ge triple junction solar cells due to excellent antireflective (AR) properties that, however, are highly dependent on their geometric dimensions. In practice, it is challenging to control fabrication conditions which produce nanostructures in ideal periodic arrangements and with tapered side-wall profiles, leading to sacrificed AR properties and solar cell performance. In this work, we introduce compound biomimetic nanostructures created by depositing a layer of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) on top of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanostructures for triple junction solar cells. The device exhibits photogenerated current and power conversion efficiency that are enhanced by ~8.9% and ~6.4%, respectively, after deposition due to their improved antireflection characteristics. We further investigate and verify the optical properties of compound structures via a rigorous coupled wave analysis model. The additional SiO(2) layer not only improves the geometric profile, but also serves as a double-layer dielectric coating. It is concluded that the compound biomimetic nanostructures exhibit superior AR properties that are relatively insensitive to fabrication constraints. Therefore, the compound approach can be widely adopted for versatile optoelectronic devices and applications.

  2. Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE) for MISSE-5 Verified and Readied for Flight on STS-114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip P.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Greer, Lawrence C.; Flatico, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE) is a space solar cell experiment built as part of the Fifth Materials on the International Space Station Experiment (MISSE-5): Data Acquisition and Control Hardware and Software. It represents a collaborative effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the U.S. Naval Academy. The purpose of this experiment is to place current and future solar cell technologies on orbit where they will be characterized and validated. This is in response to recent on-orbit and ground test results that raised concerns about the in-space survivability of new solar cell technologies and about current ground test methodology. The various components of the FTSCE are assembled into a passive experiment container--a 2- by 2- by 4-in. folding metal container that will be attached by an astronaut to the outer structure of the International Space Station. Data collected by the FTSCE will be relayed to the ground through a transmitter assembled by the U.S. Naval Academy. Data-acquisition electronics and software were designed to be tolerant of the thermal and radiation effects expected on orbit. The experiment has been verified and readied for flight on STS-114.

  3. Nobeyama Radio Heliograph and RHESSI Observations of the X 1.5 Flare of April 21, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.; Garaimov, V. I.; White, S. M.; Krucker, S.

    2004-01-01

    We present an overview of the microwave (17 and 34 GHz) observations of the X1.5 flare of April 21,2002, along with RHESSI hard X-ray observations. The event lasted more than 2 hours and features a beautiful arcade of rising loops on the limb visible at X-ray, EUV and radio wavelengths. The main flare was preceded by a small event 90 minutes earlier showing a long loop ,connecting well-separated radio and hard X-ray sources. The main flare itself starts with a compact radio and hard X-ray source well inside the solar limb. As the flare proceeds a large set of loops is seen to rise well above the solar limb. Distinct regions of radio emission with very different time behavior can be identified in the radio images, and in particular a peculiar nonthermal source seen in radio and hard X-rays low in the corona at the base of the arcade is seen to turn on 30 minutes after the start of the impulsive phase. At about the same time an extremely intense burst of coherent radio emission is seen from 500 to 2000 MHz: we speculate that this lower-frequency burst is produced by electrons that are accelerated in the nonthermal source at the base of the arcade and injected into the loop system where they radiate plasma emission in the 10(exp 10)/cm(exp 3) density plasma at the top of the arcade of loops.

  4. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 5, phase 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the solar power satellite system is presented. Performance, cost, and operational characteristics are assessed. The photovoltaic system is described and investigated. Alternative construction concepts are discussed. The structural bay configuration is presented along with the antenna structure options.

  5. Innovative point focus solar concentrator: Volume 5, Electronic controls and electrical interface; Phase 1 topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-07

    This report discusses the following electronic equipment for the solar collector: LEC-1700 electrical control system; LEC-1700 controller; hand-held remote control unit; communications interface controller; RS-232C to CIC interface card; audio interface card; communications interface controller backplane; wiring harness; and ac power controller.

  6. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on P25/Ta2O5 composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingsong; Gao, Jian; Yi, Lin; Hu, Guang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, novel titanium dioxide/tantalum pentoxide (P25/Ta2O5) composite films have been successfully fabricated and applied to dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Ta2O5 nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple low-temperature solvothermal method. The influence of Ta2O5 nanoparticles on photovoltaic performance of DSSCs is systematically investigated. As a result, the DSSC based on 10 wt% Ta2O5 incorporated P25 film exhibits excellent photovoltaic performance with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 5.85 %. Compared to a reference DSSC based on the pure P25 film (4.93 %), the PCE of DSSCs has been remarkably enhanced by 19 %. Such enhancement can be mainly attributed to the higher electron collection efficiency in P25/Ta2O5 composite films, which result from the suppression of the electron recombination at the photoanode/electrolyte interface.

  7. The Evolution of the Spectrum of Solar Wind Velocity Fluctuations from 0.3 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that at 1 AU from the Sun the power spectrum of the solar wind magnetic field has the -5/3 spectral slope expected for Kolmogorov turbulence, but that the velocity has closer to a -3/2 spectrum. This paper traces the changes in solar wind velocity spectra from 0.3 to 5 AU using data from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft to show that this is a transient stage in solar-wind evolution. The spectrum of the velocity is found to be flatter than that of the magnetic field for the higher frequencies examined for all cases until the slopes become equal (at -5/3) well past 1 AU when the wind is relatively nonAlfvenic. In some respects, in particular in the evolution of the frequency at which the spectrum changes from flatter at larger scales to a "turbulent" spectrum at smaller scales, the velocity field evolves more rapidly than the magnetic, and this is associated with the dominance of the magnetic energy over the kinetic at "inertial range" scales. The speed of the flow is argued to be largely unrelated to the spectral slopes, consistent with previous work, whereas high Alfvenicity appears to slow the spectral evolution, as expected from theory. This study shows that, for the solar wind, the idea of a simple "inertial range" with uniform spectral properties is not realistic, and new phenomenologies will be needed to capture the true situation. It is also noted that a flattening of the velocity spectrum often occurs at small scales.

  8. Solar Energy and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  9. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The SPP model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  10. The northern edge of the band of solar wind variability: Ulysses at {approximately}4.5AU

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; McComas, D.J.; Riley, P.; Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Ulysses observations reveal that the northern edge of the low-latitude band of solar wind variability at {approximately}4.5AU was located at N30{degree} in the latter part of 1996 when solar activity was at a minimum. This edge latitude is intermediate between edge latitudes found during previous encounters with the band edge along different portions of Ulysses{close_quote} polar orbit about the Sun. Corotating interaction regions, CIRs, near the northern edge of the band were tilted in such a manner that the forward and reverse shocks bounding the CIRs were propagating equatorward and poleward, respectively, providing definite confirmation that CIRs have opposed tilts in the opposite solar hemispheres. No shocks or coronal mass ejections, CMEs, were detected during the {approximately}1.5y traverse of the northern, high-latitude northern hemisphere; however, at the northern edge of the band of variability an expanding CME was observed that was driving a shock into the high-speed wind.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  11. Coronal temperature, density, and magnetic field maps of a solar acitve region using the Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first results of solar active region observations with the recently completed five-element Owens Valley Solar Array. On 1991 October 24, maps of Active Region AR 6891 were obtained at 22 frequencies from 1.2-7.0 GHz to provide brightness temperature spectra at each point. This is the first time that both high spatial and frequency-resolution brightness temperature spectra have been available over such a broad radio-frequency range. We find that over most of the region the spectra fall into one of the two well-defined categories: thermal free-free or thermal gyroresonance. In these cases, we use the spectra to deduce the spatial variation of physical parameters-electron temperature, column emission measure (intergral n(sup 2)(sub e) dl), and the coronal magnetic field strength-in and around the active region. Over a limited area of the region, the spectra resemble neither of the simple types, and alternative interpretations are required. The possibilties include the presence of fine structure that is unresolved at low frequencies; the presence of a small number of nonthermal electrons; or the presence of overlying, cooler 10(exp 6) K material which at low frequencies absorbs the hot (3 x 10(exp 6) K) thermal emission generated below.

  12. Artificial layered perovskite oxides A(B{sub 0.5}B′{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} as potential solar energy conversion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hungru; Umezawa, Naoto

    2015-02-07

    Perovskite oxides with a d{sup 0} electronic configuration are promising photocatalysts and exhibit high electron mobilities. However, their band gaps are too large for efficient solar energy conversion. On the other hand, transition metal cations with partially filled d{sup n} electronic configurations give rise to visible light absorption. In this study, by using hybrid density functional theory calculations, it is demonstrated that the virtues of the two categories of materials can be combined in perovskite oxide A(B{sub 0.5}B′{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} with a layered B-site ordering along the [001] direction. The electronic structures of the four selected perovskite oxide compounds, La(Ti{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, La(Ti{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, Sr(Nb{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}, and Sr(Nb{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} are calculated and discussed.

  13. Cobalt phosphate-modified barium-doped tantalum nitride nanorod photoanode with 1.5% solar energy conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbo; Zhang, Li; Torres-Pardo, Almudena; González-Calbet, Jose M; Ma, Yanhang; Oleynikov, Peter; Terasaki, Osamu; Asahina, Shunsuke; Shima, Masahide; Cha, Dongkyu; Zhao, Lan; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    Spurred by the decreased availability of fossil fuels and global warming, the idea of converting solar energy into clean fuels has been widely recognized. Hydrogen produced by photoelectrochemical water splitting using sunlight could provide a carbon dioxide lean fuel as an alternative to fossil fuels. A major challenge in photoelectrochemical water splitting is to develop an efficient photoanode that can stably oxidize water into oxygen. Here we report an efficient and stable photoanode that couples an active barium-doped tantalum nitride nanostructure with a stable cobalt phosphate co-catalyst. The effect of barium doping on the photoelectrochemical activity of the photoanode is investigated. The photoanode yields a maximum solar energy conversion efficiency of 1.5%, which is more than three times higher than that of state-of-the-art single-photon photoanodes. Further, stoichiometric oxygen and hydrogen are stably produced on the photoanode and the counter electrode with Faraday efficiency of almost unity for 100 min.

  14. Fluence Uniformity Measurements in an Electron Accelerator Used for Irradiation of Extended Area Solar Cells and Electronic Circuits for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, Roberto M.; Filppi, Ed; Zhang, Shubo

    2007-01-01

    It is common to have liquid crystal displays and electronic circuit boards with area sizes of the order of 20x20 sq cm on board of satellites and space vehicles. Usually irradiating them at different fluence values assesses the radiation damage in these types of devices. As a result, there is a need for a radiation source with large spatial fluence uniformity for the study of the damage by radiation from space in those devices. Kent State University s Program on Electron Beam Technology has access to an electron accelerator used for both research and industrial applications. The electron accelerator produces electrons with energies in the interval from 1 to 5 MeV and a maximum beam power of 150 kW. At such high power levels, the electron beam is continuously scanned back and forth in one dimension in order to provide uniform irradiation and to prevent damage to the sample. This allows for the uniform irradiation of samples with an area of up to 1.32 sq m. This accelerator has been used in the past for the study of radiation damage in solar cells (1). However in order to irradiate extended area solar cells there was a need to measure the uniformity of the irradiation zone in terms of fluence. In this paper the methodology to measure the fluence uniformity on a sample handling system (linear motion system), used for the irradiation of research samples, along the irradiation zone of the above-mentioned facility is described and the results presented. We also illustrate the use of the electron accelerator for the irradiation of large area solar cells (of the order of 156 sq cm) and include in this paper the electrical characterization of these types of solar cells irradiated with 5 MeV electrons to a total fluence of 2.6 x 10(exp 15) e/sq cm.

  15. Formation of solar cells based on Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric thick film

    SciTech Connect

    Irzaman, Syafutra, H. Arif, A. Alatas, H.; Hilaluddin, M. N.; Kurniawan, A.; Iskandar, J.; Dahrul, M.; Ismangil, A.; Yosman, D.; Aminullah; Prasetyo, L. B.; Yusuf, A.; Kadri, T. M.

    2014-02-24

    Growth of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (BST) 1 M thick films are conducted with variation of annealing hold time of 8 hours, 15 hours, 22 hours, and 29 hours at a constant temperature of 850 °C on p-type Si (100) substrate using sol-gel method then followed by spin coating process at 3000 rpm for 30 seconds. The BST thick film electrical conductivity is obtained to be 10{sup −5} to 10{sup −4} S/cm indicate that the BST thick film is classified as semiconductor material. The semiconductor energy band gap value of BST thick film based on annealing hold time of 8 hours, 15 hours, 22 hours, and 29 hours are 2.58 eV, 3.15 eV, 3.2 eV and 2.62 eV, respectively. The I-V photovoltaic characterization shows that the BST thick film is potentially solar cell device, and in accordance to annealing hold time of 8 hours, 15 hours, 22 hours and 29 hours have respective solar cell energy conversion efficiencies of 0.343%, 0.399%, 0.469% and 0.374%, respectively. Optical spectroscopy shows that BST thick film solar cells with annealing hold time of 8 hours, 15 hours, and 22 hours absorb effectively light energy at wavelength of ≥ 700 nm. BST film samples with annealing hold time of 29 hours absorb effectively light energy at wavelength of ≤ 700 nm. The BST thick film refraction index is between 1.1 to 1.8 at light wavelength between ±370 to 870 nm.

  16. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 5: Conclusions and recomendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Air pollution resulting from the use of fossil fuels is discussed. Phenomena relating to the emission of CO2 such as the greenhouse effect and multiplier effect are explored. Particulate release is also discussed. The following recommendations are made for the elimination of fossil fuel combustion products in the United States: development of nuclear breeder reactors, use of solar energy systems, exploration of energy alternatives such as geothermal and fusion, and the substitution of coal for gas and oil use.

  17. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 5: Space transportation analysis, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A small Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) for the Solar Power Satellites (SPS) System was analyzed. It is recommended that the small HLLV with a payload of 120 metric tons be adopted as the SPS launch vehicle. The reference HLLV, a shuttle-derived option with a payload of 400 metric tons, should serve as a backup and be examined further after initial flight experience. The electric orbit transfer vehicle should be retained as the reference orbit-to-orbit cargo system.

  18. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 5: Space transportation analysis, phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A small Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) for the Solar Power Satellites (SPS) System was analyzed. It is recommended that the small HLLV with a payload of 120 metric tons be adopted as the SPS launch vehicle. The reference HLLV, a shuttle-derived option with a payload of 400 metric tons, should serve as a backup and be examined further after initial flight experience. The electric orbit transfer vehicle should be retained as the reference orbit-to-orbit cargo system.

  19. Multiradionuclide evidence for the solar origin of the cosmic-ray events of ᴀᴅ 774/5 and 993/4.

    PubMed

    Mekhaldi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Aldahan, Ala; Beer, Jürg; McConnell, Joseph R; Possnert, Göran; Sigl, Michael; Svensson, Anders; Synal, Hans-Arno; Welten, Kees C; Woodruff, Thomas E

    2015-10-26

    The origin of two large peaks in the atmospheric radiocarbon ((14)C) concentration at AD 774/5 and 993/4 is still debated. There is consensus, however, that these features can only be explained by an increase in the atmospheric (14)C production rate due to an extraterrestrial event. Here we provide evidence that these peaks were most likely produced by extreme solar events, based on several new annually resolved (10)Be measurements from both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores. Using ice core (36)Cl data in pair with (10)Be, we further show that these solar events were characterized by a very hard energy spectrum with high fluxes of solar protons with energy above 100 MeV. These results imply that the larger of the two events (AD 774/5) was at least five times stronger than any instrumentally recorded solar event. Our findings highlight the importance of studying the possibility of severe solar energetic particle events.

  20. 4,4',5,5'-Tetracarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine Ru(II) sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chun-Cheng; Hu, Fa-Chun; Wu, Kuan-Lin; Duan, Tainan; Chi, Yun; Liu, Shih-Hung; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2014-08-18

    Two Ru(II) sensitizers TCR-1 and TCR-2 bearing four carboxy anchoring groups were prepared using 4,4',5,5'-tetraethoxycarbonyl-2,2'-bipyridine chelate and 4-(5-hexylthien-2-yl)-2-(3-trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine and 6-t-butyl-1-(3-trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)isoquinoline, respectively. Dissolution of these sensitizers in DMF solution afforded a light green solution up to 10(-5) M, for which their color gradually turned red upon further dilution and deposition on the surface of a TiO2 photoanode due to the spontaneous deprotonation of carboxylic acid groups. These sensitizers were characterized using electrochemical means and structural analysis time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulation and were also subjected to actual device fabrication. The as-fabricated DSC devices showed overall efficiencies η = 6.16% and 6.23% versus their 4,4'-dicarboxy counterparts TFRS-2 and TFRS-52 with higher efficiencies of 7.57% and 8.09%, using electrolyte with 0.2 M LiI additive. Their inferior efficiencies are possibly caused by the combination of blue-shifted absorption on TiO2, inadequate dye loading, and the perpendicularly oriented central carboxy groups.

  1. Mid-Term Quasi-Periodicities and Solar Cycle Variation of the White-Light Corona from 18.5 Years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of LASCO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlyaeva, T.; Lamy, P.; Llebaria, A.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the analysis of the temporal evolution of the solar corona based on 18.5 years (1996.0 - 2014.5) of white-light observations with the SOHO/LASCO-C2 coronagraph. This evolution is quantified by generating spatially integrated values of the K-corona radiance, first globally, then in latitudinal sectors. The analysis considers time series of monthly values and 13-month running means of the radiance as well as several indices and proxies of solar activity. We study correlation, wavelet time-frequency spectra, and cross-coherence and phase spectra between these quantities. Our results give a detailed insight on how the corona responds to solar activity over timescales ranging from mid-term quasi-periodicities (also known as quasi-biennial oscillations or QBOs) to the long-term 11 year solar cycle. The amplitude of the variation between successive solar maxima and minima (modulation factor) very much depends upon the strength of the cycle and upon the heliographic latitude. An asymmetry is observed during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24, prominently in the royal and polar sectors, with north leading. Most prominent QBOs are a quasi-annual period during the maximum phase of Solar Cycle 23 and a shorter period, seven to eight months, in the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24. They share the same properties as the solar QBOs: variable periodicity, intermittency, asymmetric development in the northern and southern solar hemispheres, and largest amplitudes during the maximum phase of solar cycles. The strongest correlation of the temporal variations of the coronal radiance - and consequently the coronal electron density - is found with the total magnetic flux. Considering that the morphology of the solar corona is also directly controlled by the topology of the magnetic field, this correlation reinforces the view that they are intimately connected, including their variability at all timescales.

  2. Overview of the Development of the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission 12.5-kW Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Chang, Li; Clayman, Lauren; Herman, Daniel; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Verhey, Timothy; Griffith, Christopher; Myers, James; Williams, George; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard; Polk, James; Goebel, Dan

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing mission concepts for a solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission. A number of mission concepts are being evaluated including ambitious missions to near Earth objects. The demonstration of a high-power solar electric propulsion capability is one of the objectives of the candidate missions under consideration. In support of NASA's exploration goals, a number of projects are developing extensible technologies to support NASA's near and long term mission needs. Specifically, the Space Technology Mission Directorate Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission project is funding the development of a 12.5-kilowatt magnetically shielded Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. This paper presents the design attributes of the thruster that was collaboratively developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The paper provides an overview of the magnetic, plasma, thermal, and structural modeling activities that were carried out in support of the thruster design. The paper also summarizes the results of the functional tests that have been carried out to date. The planned thruster performance, plasma diagnostics (internal and in the plume), thermal, wear, and mechanical tests are outlined.

  3. Overview of the Development of the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission 12.5-kW Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Chang, Li; Clayman, Lauren; Herman, Daniel; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Verhey, Timothy; Griffith, Christopher; Myers, James; Williams, George; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard; Polk, James; Goebel, Dan

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing mission concepts for a solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission. A number of mission concepts are being evaluated including ambitious missions to near Earth objects. The demonstration of a high-power solar electric propulsion capability is one of the objectives of the candidate missions under consideration. In support of NASAs exploration goals, a number of projects are developing extensible technologies to support NASAs near and long term mission needs. Specifically, the Space Technology Mission Directorate Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission project is funding the development of a 12.5-kW magnetically shielded Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. This paper presents the design attributes of the thruster that was collaboratively developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The paper provides an overview of the magnetic, plasma, thermal, and structural modeling activities that were carried out in support of the thruster design. The paper also summarizes the results of the functional tests that have been carried out to date. The planned thruster performance, plasma diagnostics (internal and in the plume), thermal, wear, and mechanical tests are outlined.

  4. Determination of optimum sunlight concentration level in space for 3-5 cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The optimum range of concentration levels in space for III-V cascade cells was calculated using a realistic solar cell diode equation. Temperature was varied with concentration using several models and ranged from 55 C at 1 sun to between 80 and 200 C at 100 suns. A variety of series resistance and internal resistances were used. Coefficients of the diffusion and recombination terms are strongly temperature dependent. The study indicates that the maximum efficiency of 30 percent occurs in the 50 to 100 sun concentration range provided series resistance is below 0.015 ohm-sq cm and cell temperature is about 80 C at 100 suns.

  5. Hydrogen passivation of n+p and p+n heteroepitaxial InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Ringel, S. A.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    High-efficiency, heteroepitaxial (HE) InP solar cells, grown on GaAs, Si or Ge substrates, are desirable for their mechanically strong, light-weight and radiation-hard properties. However, dislocations, caused by lattice mismatch, currently limit the performance of the HE cells. This occurs through shunting paths across the active photovoltaic junction and by the formation of deep levels. In previous work we have demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of dislocations in specially designed HE InP test structures. In this work, we present the first report of successful hydrogen passivation in actual InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in HE n+n InP cell structures from as-grown values of approximately 10(exp 15)/cm(exp -3), down to 1-2 x 10(exp 13)/cm(exp -3). The deep levels in the p-type base region of the cell structure match those of our earlier p-type test structures, which were attributed to dislocations or related point defect complexes. All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal with no detectable activation of deep levels. I-V analysis indicated a subsequent approximately 10 fold decrease in reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and no change in the forward biased series resistance of the cell structure which indicates complete reactivation of the n+ emitter. Furthermore, electrochemical C-V profiling indicates greatly enhanced passivation depth, and hence hydrogen diffusion, for heteroepitaxial structures when compared with identically processed homoepitaxial n+p InP structures. An analysis of hydrogen diffusion in dislocated InP will be discussed, along with comparisons of passivation effectiveness for n+p versus p+n heteroepitaxial cell configurations. Preliminary hydrogen

  6. Electrostatic bonding of thin (approximately 3 mil) 7070 cover glass to Ta2O5 AR-coated thin (approximately 2 mil) silicon wafers and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egelkrout, D. W.; Horne, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding (ESB) of thin (3 mil) Corning 7070 cover glasses to Ta2O5 AR-coated thin (2 mil) silicon wafers and solar cells is investigated. An experimental program was conducted to establish the effects of variations in pressure, voltage, temperature, time, Ta2O5 thickness, and various prebond glass treatments. Flat wafers without contact grids were used to study the basic effects for bonding to semiconductor surfaces typical of solar cells. Solar cells with three different grid patterns were used to determine additional requirements caused by the raised metallic contacts.

  7. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 5: Economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems are studied along with a variety of economic and programmatic issues relevant to their development and deployment. The costs, uncertainties and risks associated with the current photovoltaic Satellite Solar Power System (SSPS) configuration, and issues affecting the development of an economically viable SSPS development program are addressed. In particular, the desirability of low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous (GEO) test satellites is examined and critical technology areas are identified. The development of SSPS unit production (nth item), and operation and maintenance cost models suitable for incorporation into a risk assessment (Monte Carlo) model (RAM) are reported. The RAM was then used to evaluate the current SSPS configuration expected costs and cost-risk associated with this configuration. By examining differential costs and cost-risk as a function of postulated technology developments, the critical technologies, that is, those which drive costs and/or cost-risk, are identified. It is shown that the key technology area deals with productivity in space, that is, the ability to fabricate and assemble large structures in space, not, as might be expected, with some hardware component technology.

  8. National Passive Solar Conference, 4th, Kansas City, MO, October 3-5, 1979, Proceedings. Volume 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, G.

    1981-10-01

    Papers concern recent experience in the research, development and application of passive solar technology. Specific topics include the legislative barriers and incentives to passive solar systems, coupled thermal and lighting simulations for evaluating daylighting design effectiveness, passive solar applications in inner city housing, radiative cooling in a desert climate, salinity gradient solar ponds, the retrofit of a masonry home for passive space heating, the performances of active and passive solar domestic hot water systems, builder experience with passive solar home construction, the use of solar energy installations on farm buildings, and a method of determining the thermal performance of passive storage walls.

  9. Results of the 1998 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of one flight, which occurred on August 15, 1998. All objectives of the flight program were met. Thirty-one modules were carried to an altitude of = 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on 4 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 27 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  10. A novel counter electrode material of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yongfeng; Qin, Tianze; Yang, Bo; Zuo, Xueqin; Li, Guang; Wu, Mingzai; Ma, Yongqing; Jin, Shaowei; Zhu, Kerong

    2016-11-01

    In this work, La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (LSCO) perovskite oxide with perfect crystallinity was successfully synthesized via a sol-gel method and then used as counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The DSSCs with LSCO CEs exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for the triiodide reduction and yielded a power conversion efficiency of 7.17%, which is greater than that of the Pt electrode (7.06%). Compared with the hydrothermal method and solvothermal method, sol-gel method is more suitable for large scale preparation. This work should open up a new class of CE materials for low-cost and high-efficiency DSSCs.

  11. A 2000 Solar Mass Rotating Molecular Disk Around NGC 6334A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.; Paglione, A. D.; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    1997-01-01

    We present millimeter and centimeter wave spectroscopic observations of the H II region NGC 6334A. We have mapped the source in several transitions of CO, CS, and NH3. The molecular emission shows a distinct flattened structure in the east-west direction. This structure is probably a thick molecular disk or torus (2.2 x 0.9 pc) responsible for the bipolarity of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio continuum emission which extends in two "lobes" to the north and south of the shell-like H II region. The molecular disk is rotating from west to east (omega approximately equals 2.4 km/s.pc) about an axis approximately parallel to the radio and NIR emission lobes. By assuming virial equilibrium, we find that the molecular disk contains approximately 2000 solar mass. Single-component gas excitation model calculations show that the molecular gas in the disk is warmer and denser (T(sub k) approximately equals 60 K, n approximately equals 3000/cc) than the gas to the north and south (T(sub k) approximately equals 50 K, n approximately equals 400/cc). High resolution (approximately 5 sec) NH3 (3, 3) images of NGC 6334A reveal several small (approximately 0.1 pc) clumps, one of which lies southwest of the radio continuum shell, and is spatially coincident with a near-infrared source, IRS 20. A second NH3 clump is coincident with an H2O maser and the center of a molecular outflow. The dense gas tracers, CS J = 5 approaches 4 and 7 approaches 6, peak near IRS 20 and the H2O maser, not at NGC 6334A. IRS 20 has a substantial far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L(sub FIR) approximately 10(exp 5) solar luminosity, which indicates the presence of an O 7.5 star but has no detected radio continuum (F(sub 6 cm) < 0.02 Jy). The combination of dense gas, a large FIR luminosity and a lack of radio continuum can best be explained if IRS 20 is a protostar. A third clump of NH3 emission lies to the west of IRS 20 but is not associated with any other molecular or continuum features. The star formation

  12. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  13. Projections of long-term changes in solar radiation based on CMIP5 climate models and their influence on energy yields of photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris; Henschel, Florian; Müller, Björn

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, for the planning and assessment of solar energy systems, the amount of solar radiation (sunlight) incident on the Earth's surface is assumed to be constant over the years. However, with changing climate and air pollution levels, solar resources may no longer be stable over time and undergo substantial decadal changes. Observational records covering the past decades confirm long-term changes in this quantity. Here we examine, how the latest generation of climate models used for the 5th IPCC report projects potential changes in surface solar radiation over the coming decades, and how this may affect, in combination with the expected greenhouse warming, solar power output from photovoltaic (PV) systems. For this purpose, projections up to the mid 21th century from 39 state of the art climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) are analysed globally and for selected key regions with major solar power production capacity. The large model ensemble allows to assess the degree of consistency of their projections. Models are largely consistent in the sign of the projected changes in solar radiation under cloud-free conditions as well as in surface temperatures over most of the globe, while still reasonably consistent over a considerable part of the globe in the sign of changes in cloudiness and associated changes in solar radiation. A first order estimate of the impact of solar radiation and temperature changes on energy yields of PV systems under the RPC8.5 scenario indicates statistically significant decreases in PV outputs in large parts of the world, but notable exceptions with positive trends in parts of Europe and the South-East of China. Projected changes between 2006 and 2049 under the RCP8.5 scenario overall are on the order of 1 % per decade for horizontal planes, but may be larger for tilted or tracked planes as well as on shorter (decadal) timescales. Related References: Wild, M., Folini, D., Henschel, F., and M

  14. Stellar Laboratories: 3. New Ba 5, Ba 6, and Ba 7 Oscillator Strengths and the Barium Abundance in the Hot White Dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, Jeffrey Walter

    2014-01-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. Aims. Reliable Ba 5-7 oscillator strengths are used to identify Ba lines in the spectra of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289 and to determine their photospheric Ba abundances. Methods. We newly calculated Ba v-vii oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of Ba lines exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N UV observations of G191-B2B and RE 0503-289. Results. For the first time, we identified highly ionized Ba in the spectra of hot white dwarfs. We detected Ba vi and Ba vii lines in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of RE 0503-289. The Ba vi/Ba vii ionization equilibrium is well reproduced with the previously determined effective temperature of 70 000 K and surface gravity of log g=7.5. The Ba abundance is 3.5 +/- 0.5 × 10(exp-4) (mass fraction, about 23 000 times the solar value). In the FUSE spectrum of G191-B2B, we identified the strongest Ba vii line (at 993.41 Å) only, and determined a Ba abundance of 4.0 +/- 0.5 × 10(exp-6) (about 265 times solar). Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a pre-requisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Ba vi-vii line profiles in two white dwarfs' (G191-B2B and RE 0503-289) far-ultraviolet spectra were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. This allowed to determine the photospheric Ba abundance of these two stars precisely.

  15. Nanoforest Nb2O5 Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Rudresh; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Uher, Tim; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Samulski, Edward T.; McNeil, L. E.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Lopez, Rene

    2011-10-26

    Vertically aligned bundles of Nb₂O₅ nanocrystals were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and tested as a photoanode material in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). They were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies, optical absorption spectroscopy (UV–vis), and incident-photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) experiments. The background gas composition and the thickness of the films were varied to determine the influence of those parameters in the photoanode behavior. An optimal background pressure of oxygen during deposition was found to produce a photoanode structure that both achieves high dye loading and enhanced photoelectrochemical performance. For optimal structures, IPCE values up to 40% and APCE values around 90% were obtained with the N₃ dye and I₃{sup –}/I{sup –} couple in acetonitrile with open circuit voltage of 0.71 V and 2.41% power conversion efficiency.

  16. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

  17. Determination of optimum sunlight concentration level in space for 3-5 cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Current-voltage curves were calculated for each cell in a cascade structure using a solar cell diode equation and superposition. Terms for the light generated current, diffusion current, space charge recombination current and series and shunt resistance are included. Individual current voltage curves are added in series with ohmic resistance losses for the cell interconnects to obtain the cascade cell performance. Temperature was varied with concentration, using several models, and ranged from 55 C at one Sun to between 80 and 200 C at 100 Suns. A variety of series resistance and internal resistances were used. Coefficients of the diffusion and recombination terms are strongly temperature dependent. The study indicates that maximum efficiency (30%) occurs in the 50 to 100X Sun concentration range, provided series resistance is below 0.015 ohm-sq cm and cell temperature is 80 C at 100 Suns.

  18. Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Data Release 5.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set contains over 200 parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems.The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=1 degree].

  19. HNO3, N2O5 and CIONO2 Enhancements after the October-November 2003 Solar Proton Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Gil-Lopez, S.; Tsidu, G. Mengistu; Fischer, H.; Jackman, C. H.

    2005-01-01

    The large solar storm in October-November 2003 produced enormous amounts of high-energy protons which reached the Earth and penetrated into the middle atmosphere in the polar regions. At this time, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on board the Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) was observing the atmosphere in the 6-68 km altitude range. MIPAS observed significant enhancements of the NO(y) components HNO3, N2O5 and CIONO2 in the Northern polar stratosphere after the intense solar proton events. Two distinct HNO3 enhancements were observed. An instantaneous increase of 1-2 ppbv was observed immediately after the SPEs and is attributed to gas-phase chemistry: NO2 + OH + M yields HNO3 + M, accelerated by SPE-produced excess OH. A very large second increase of 1- 5 ppbv started around 10 November and lasted until the end of December. It is attributed to NO(x) (NO+NO2) produced in the mesosphere during the major SPEs in late October/early November and then transported downwards during November and December, partially converted to N2O5 in the upper stratosphere, which finally formed HNO3 via ion cluster reactions. N2O5 was observed to increase by 0.1-0.4 ppbv 1-3 days after the major SPEs and reached down to 30 km altitude. A second, more pronounced N2O5 enhancement of up to 1.2 ppbv at 40 km appeared about 12-13 days after the major SPEs. With a delay of 1-2 days after the major SPEs CIONO2 increased by up to 0.4 ppbv (40%) at 32 km altitude. NO(y) enhancements in the Southern hemisphere were generally less pronounced.

  20. Sinterless contacts to shallow junction InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Fatemi, N. S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    In the past, the achievement of good electrical contact to InP has inevitably been accompanied by mechanical degradation of the InP itself. Most contact systems require heat treatment after metal deposition that results in the dissolution of substantial amounts of InP into the metallization. Devices such as the solar cell, where shallow junctions are the rule, can be severely degraded if the damage to the semiconductor substrate is not precisely controlled. Two contact systems are described that provide low contact resistance to InP solar cells that do not require subjecting the current carrying metallization to a post deposition sintering process. It is shown that these two systems, one nickel based and the other silver based, provide contact resistivity values in the low 10(exp -6) ohm sq cm range, as fabricated, without the need for sintering.

  1. Project 5S: A Safe Stepping Stone into the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John; Culick, Fred; Dimotakis, Paul; Friedman, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The human exploration program, at least in NASA, has been directed to move beyond the Moon and travel on a flexible path into the solar system. Reaching a Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) is a major human space flight goal but such missions have tight times and life-support requirements that require huge steps from current capabilities. An objective between the Moon and a NEA is needed. Example interim objectives are the Lagrangian points in either the Sun-Earth or Earth-Moon (EM) system. The nearest of these points beyond the Moon is E-M L2. The Lagrangian points are empty (as far as we know). As objectives for human flight,it has been argued that they suffer from a lack of public interest and of meaningful objectives for astronaut operations. To provide a physical target, a robotic spacecraft could retrieve a small NEA and bring it to a Lagrangian or other nearer-Earth point to be accessed and utilized for human-mission objectives. This paper reports on the results of a recently completed study of an asteroid retrieval mission sponsored by the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) at the California Institute of Technology. The study included an evaluation of potential targets, mission objectives, mission and system design, and potential capture mechanisms. The study concluded that, while challenging, there are no fundamental show stoppers and that such a mission would be possible with technology expected to be available in this decade. The final destination selected (for safety and mission operations) was high lunar orbit. Two options for target selection are considered: (i) retrieving a small (7 meter) NEA with a mass of order 500,000 kg, and (ii) taking a similar size boulder of a large known carbonaceous NEA. Several areas of technology and program requirements were identified, but the most important conclusion was that this approach enables meeting a goal of humans going to a NEA by the mid-2020s. The advantages and benefits for human exploration are considerable

  2. Solar flares observed by AVS-F instrument onboard CORONAS-F satellite during 2,5 year of it's operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelsky, Andrew; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Kotov, Yu. D.; Glyaneneko, A. S.; Kuznetsov, S. N.

    AVS-F instrument (Amplitude-Time Spectrometry of the Sun) is the system of an electronics engineering for onboard data gathering from two detectors: scintillation (CsI (Tl)) detector SONG-D (SOlar Neutrons and Gamma quantums) of complex of detectors SKL (in low and high gamma-band) and from semiconducting detector (X-ray semiconducting spectrometer) XSS-1 (in X-ray band). The experiment is carried out on the satellite CORONAS-F launched on July 31 2001. During more than 2,5 year of apparatus operation more than 30 of solar flares were detected. Characteristics of observed solar flares are presented in this article.

  3. Influence of Solar and Thermal Radiation on Future Heat Stress Using CMIP5 Archive Driving the Community Land Model Version 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2015-12-01

    The summer of 2015 has experienced major heat waves on 4 continents, and heat stress left ~4000 people dead in India and Pakistan. Heat stress is caused by a combination of meteorological factors: temperature, humidity, and radiation. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) uses Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT)—an empirical metric this is calibrated with temperature, humidity, and radiation—for determining labor capacity during heat stress. Unfortunately, most literature studying global heat stress focuses on extreme temperature events, and a limited number of studies use the combination of temperature and humidity. Recent global assessments use WBGT, yet omit the radiation component without recalibrating the metric.Here we explicitly calculate future WBGT within a land surface model, including radiative fluxes as produced by a modeled globe thermometer. We use the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), which is a component model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), and is maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). To drive our CLM4.5 simulations, we use greenhouse gasses Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (business as usual), and atmospheric output from the CMIP5 Archive. Humans work in a variety of environments, and we place the modeled globe thermometer in a variety of environments. We modify CLM4.5 code to calculate solar and thermal radiation fluxes below and above canopy vegetation, and in bare ground. To calculate wet bulb temperature, we implemented the HumanIndexMod into CLM4.5. The temperature, wet bulb temperature, and radiation fields are calculated at every model time step and are outputted 4x Daily. We use these fields to calculate WBGT and labor capacity for two time slices: 2026-2045 and 2081-2100.

  4. 3D-Stereoscopic Analysis of Solar Active Region Loops. 2; SoHo/EIT Observations at Temperatures of 1.5-2.5 MK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Alexander, David; Hurlburt, Neal; Newmark, Jeffrey S.; Neupert, Werner M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Gary, G. Allen

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study the three-dimensional (3D) structure of hot (T(sub e) approximately equals 1.5 - 2.5 MK) loops in solar active region NOAA 7986, observed on 1996 August 30 with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO). This complements a first study on cooler (T(sub e) approximately equals 1.0 - 1.5 MK) loops of the same active region, using the same method of Dynamic Stereoscopy to reconstruct the 3D geometry. We reconstruct the 3D-coordinates x(s), y(s), z(s), the density n(sub e)(s), and temperature profile T(sub e)(s) of 35 individual loop segments (as function of the loop coordinate s) using EIT 195 A and 284 A images. The major findings are: (1) All loops are found to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, in the entire temperature regime of T(sub e) = 1.0 - 2.5 MK; (2) The analyzed loops have a height of 2-3 scale heights, and thus only segments extending over about one vertical scale height have sufficient emission measure contrast for detection; (3) The temperature gradient over the lowest scale height is of order dT/ds is approximately 1 - 4 K/km; (4) The radiative loss rate is found to exceed the conductive loss rate by about two orders or magnitude, making thermal conduction negligible to explain the temperature structure of the loops; (5) A steady-state can only be achieved when the heating rate E(sub H) matches the radiative loss rate in hydrostatic equilibrium, requiring a heat deposition length lambda(sub H) of the half density scale height lambda, predicting a scaling law with the loop base pressure, EH varies as p(sub 0 exp 2). This favors coronal heating mechanisms that operate near the loop footpoints; (6) We find a reciprocal correlation between the loop pressure p(sub 0) and loop length L, i.e. p(sub 0) varies as 1/L, implying a scaling law of the steady-state requirement with loop length, i.e. E(sub H ) varies as 1/L(exp 2). The heating rate shows no correlation with the loop

  5. Evidence for Live Cl-36 in Ca-Al-rich Inclusions from the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y.; Guan, Y.; Leshin, L. A.; Ouyang, Z.; Wang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The short-lived radionuclide Cl-36 decays to either Ar-36 (98.1%, beta(sup -)) or S-36 (1.9%, epsilon and beta(sup +)), with a half life of 3.01 x 10(exp 5) yr. Both the nucleosynthetic and spallation models suggest high initial Cl-36/Cl-35 ratios ((Cl-36/Cl-35)o up to approximately 10(exp -4)) in the early solar system. Previous observed excess Ar-36 in Efremovka matrix has been interpreted to represent a much lower (Cl-36/Cl-35)o ratio of approximately 1 x 10(exp -6). From the observed S-36 excesses in sodalite in calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), we report in this study the first direct evidence of the presence of Cl-36 in primitive meteorites. The inferred (Cl-36/Cl-35)o ratios range from approximately 5 x 10(exp -6) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5).

  6. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A Potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.; Sittler, E. C.; Auchere, F.; Duvall, Jr. T. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Maksimovic, M.; MacDowall, R. J.; Szabo, A.; Collier, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific rationale for an L5 mission and a partial list of key scientific instruments the mission should carry. The L5 vantage point provides an unprecedented view of the solar disturbances and their solar sources that can greatly advance the science behind space weather. A coronagraph and a heliospheric imager at L5 will be able to view CMEs broadsided, so space speed of the Earth-directed CMEs can be measured accurately and their radial structure discerned. In addition, an inner coronal imager and a magnetograph from L5 can give advance information on active regions and coronal holes that will soon rotate on to the solar disk. Radio remote sensing at low frequencies can provide information on shock-driving CMEs, the most dangerous of all CMEs. Coordinated helioseismic measurements from the Sun Earth line and L5 provide information on the physical conditions at the base of the convection zone, where solar magnetism originates. Finally, in situ measurements at L5 can provide information on the large-scale solar wind structures (corotating interaction regions (CIRs)) heading towards Earth that potentially result in adverse space weather.

  7. In-Vacuum Photogrammetry of a Ten-Meter Square Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Meyer, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    Solar sailing is a promising, future in-space propulsion method that uses the small force of reflecting sunlight to accelerate a large, reflective membrane without expendable propellants. One of two solar sail configurations under development by NASA is a striped net approach by L'Garde, Inc. This design uses four inflatably deployed, lightweight booms supporting a network of thin strings onto which four quadrants of ultrathin aluminized membranes are attached. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provided both experimental and analytical support to L'Garde for validating the structural characteristics of this unique, ultralightweight spacecraft concept. One of LaRC's responsibilities was to develop and apply photogrammetric methods to measure sail shape. The deployed shape provides important information for validating the accuracy of finite-element modeling techniques. Photogrammetry is the science and art of calculating 3D coordinates of targets or other distinguishing features on structures using images. A minimum of two camera views of each target is required for 3D determination, but having four or more camera views is preferable for improved reliability and accuracy. Using retroreflective circular targets typically provides the highest measurement accuracy and automation. References 3 and 4 provide details of photogrammetry technology, and reference 5 discusses previous experiences with photogrammetry for measuring gossamer spacecraft structures such as solar sails. This paper discusses the experimental techniques used to measure a L Garde 10-m solar sail test in vacuum with photogrammetry. The test was conducted at the NASA-Glenn Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest vacuum chamber in the United States, measuring 30 m in diameter by 37 m in height. High vacuum levels (10(exp -6) torr) can be maintained inside the chamber, and cold environments (-195 C) are possible using variable

  8. Solar photocatalytic degradation of RB5 by ferrite bismuth nanoparticles synthesized via ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Soltani, T; Entezari, M H

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated with ferrite bismuth synthesized via ultrasound under direct sunlight irradiation. The intensity of absorption peaks of RB5 gradually decreased by increasing the irradiation time and finally vanished in 50 min in acidic medium. The formation of new intermediate was observed in basic medium. The relative concentration of RB5 in solution and on the surface of ferrite bismuth (BiFeO3) nanoparticles was considered during the experiment in acidic and basic media. The effects of various parameters such as amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH of the solution have been studied on the dye degradation. The adsorption isotherm and the kinetic of photocatalytic degradation of RB5 were investigated. The adsorption constants in the dark and in the presence of sunlight irradiation were compared. The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of RB5 has been evaluated through the addition of some scavengers to the solution. In addition, the stability and reusability of the catalyst were examined in this work.

  9. Solar photocatalytic degradation of RB5 by ferrite bismuth nanoparticles synthesized via ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Soltani, T; Entezari, M H

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated with ferrite bismuth synthesized via ultrasound under direct sunlight irradiation. The intensity of absorption peaks of RB5 gradually decreased by increasing the irradiation time and finally vanished in 50 min in acidic medium. The formation of new intermediate was observed in basic medium. The relative concentration of RB5 in solution and on the surface of ferrite bismuth (BiFeO3) nanoparticles was considered during the experiment in acidic and basic media. The effects of various parameters such as amount of catalyst, concentration of dye, and pH of the solution have been studied on the dye degradation. The adsorption isotherm and the kinetic of photocatalytic degradation of RB5 were investigated. The adsorption constants in the dark and in the presence of sunlight irradiation were compared. The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of RB5 has been evaluated through the addition of some scavengers to the solution. In addition, the stability and reusability of the catalyst were examined in this work. PMID:23466007

  10. Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael; Evans, James; Ellis, Jordan; Schimmels, John; Roberts, Timothy; Rios-Reyes, Leonel; Scheeres, Daniel; Bladt, Jeff; Lawrence, Dale; Piggott, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (S5) toolkit provides solar-sail designers with an integrated environment for designing optimal solar-sail trajectories, and then studying the attitude dynamics/control, navigation, and trajectory control/correction of sails during realistic mission simulations. Unique features include a high-fidelity solar radiation pressure model suitable for arbitrarily-shaped solar sails, a solar-sail trajectory optimizer, capability to develop solar-sail navigation filter simulations, solar-sail attitude control models, and solar-sail high-fidelity force models.

  11. Observations of subterahertz radiation of solar flares with an RT-7.5 radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V. V.; Nagnibeda, V. G.; Ryzhov, V. S.; Zhil'tsov, A. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed unique observations of two flare events at frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz. The observations were carried out with an RT-7.5 radiotelescope at the Bauman State Technical University (Moscow) using the method of continuous active region tracking with spatial resolutions of 2.5 (at a frequency of 93 GHz) and 1.5 arc-minutes (at 140 GHz). The light curves of the bursts were analyzed and compared with the time profiles of soft and hard X-ray emission obtained by the GOES and RHESSI spacecraft. The radio delete this word flux density spectra were plotted. It was found that the radiation flux at a frequency of 140 GHz exceeded the flux at 93 GHz. This constitutes a new independent confirmation of the presence of a subterahertz flare component, the appearance of which may be associated with the thermal radiation of the hot plasma at the base of flare loops.

  12. Solar-to-hydrogen efficiency exceeding 2.5% achieved for overall water splitting with an all earth-abundant dual-photoelectrode.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunmei; Qin, Wei; Wang, Nan; Liu, Guiji; Wang, Zhiliang; Yan, Pengli; Shi, Jingying; Li, Can

    2014-08-01

    The solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency of a traditional mono-photoelectrode photoelectrochemical water splitting system has long been limited as large external bias is required. Herein, overall water splitting with STH efficiency exceeding 2.5% was achieved using a self-biased photoelectrochemical-photovoltaic coupled system consisting of an all earth-abundant photoanode and a Si-solar-cell-based photocathode connected in series under parallel illumination. We found that parallel irradiation mode shows higher efficiency than tandem illumination especially for photoanodes with a wide light absorption range, probably as the driving force for water splitting reaction is larger and the photovoltage loss is smaller in the former. This work essentially takes advantage of a tandem solar cell which can enhance the solar-to-electricity efficiency from another point of view.

  13. Solar-to-hydrogen efficiency exceeding 2.5% achieved for overall water splitting with an all earth-abundant dual-photoelectrode.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunmei; Qin, Wei; Wang, Nan; Liu, Guiji; Wang, Zhiliang; Yan, Pengli; Shi, Jingying; Li, Can

    2014-08-01

    The solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency of a traditional mono-photoelectrode photoelectrochemical water splitting system has long been limited as large external bias is required. Herein, overall water splitting with STH efficiency exceeding 2.5% was achieved using a self-biased photoelectrochemical-photovoltaic coupled system consisting of an all earth-abundant photoanode and a Si-solar-cell-based photocathode connected in series under parallel illumination. We found that parallel irradiation mode shows higher efficiency than tandem illumination especially for photoanodes with a wide light absorption range, probably as the driving force for water splitting reaction is larger and the photovoltage loss is smaller in the former. This work essentially takes advantage of a tandem solar cell which can enhance the solar-to-electricity efficiency from another point of view. PMID:24956231

  14. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  15. A catalogue of solar cosmic ray events: IMPS 4 and 5, May 1967 - December 1972. [analysis of data acquired during operation of Explorer 34 and 41 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhollebeke, M. A.; Wang, J. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    This catalogue of solar cosmic ray events has been prepared for the use of solar physicists and other interested scientists. It contains some 185 solar particle events detected by the Goddard Space Flight Center Cosmic Ray Experiments on IMP's IV and V (Explorer 34 and 41) for the period May 1967 - December 1972. The data is presented in the form of hourly averages for three proton energy intervals - 0.9 - 1.6 MeV; 6 - 20 MeV and 20 - 80 MeV. In addition the time histories of .5 - 1.1 MeV electrons are shown on a separate scale. To assist in the identification of related solar events, the onset time of the electron event is indicated. The details of the instrumentation and detector techniques are described. Further descriptions of data reduction procedure and on the time-history plots are given.

  16. High and Low Energy Proton Radiation Damage in p/n InP MOCVD Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irv; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Uribe, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)/n/n(+) solar cells, fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, (MOCVD) were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The power output degradation, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 MeV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(sub v) + 0.33 and E(sub v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and El0 at E(sub c) - 0.39 and E(sub c) - 0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect El0, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  17. Single Junction InGaP/GaAs Solar Cells Grown on Si Substrates using SiGe Buffer Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringel, S. A.; Carlin, J. A.; Andre, C. L.; Hudait, M. K.; Gonzalez, M.; Wilt, D. M.; Clark, E. B.; Jenkins, P.; Scheiman, D.; Allerman, A.

    2002-01-01

    Single junction InGaP/GaAs solar cells displaying high efficiency and record high open circuit voltage values have been grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on Ge/graded SiGe/Si substrates. Open circuit voltages as high as 980 mV under AM0 conditions have been verified to result from a single GaAs junction, with no evidence of Ge-related sub-cell photoresponse. Current AM0 efficiencies of close to 16% have been measured for a large number of small area cells, whose performance is limited by non-fundamental current losses due to significant surface reflection resulting from greater than 10% front surface metal coverage and wafer handling during the growth sequence for these prototype cells. It is shown that at the material quality currently achieved for GaAs grown on Ge/SiGe/Si substrates, namely a 10 nanosecond minority carrier lifetime that results from complete elimination of anti-phase domains and maintaining a threading dislocation density of approximately 8 x 10(exp 5) per square centimeter, 19-20% AM0 single junction GaAs cells are imminent. Experiments show that the high performance is not degraded for larger area cells, with identical open circuit voltages and higher short circuit current (due to reduced front metal coverage) values being demonstrated, indicating that large area scaling is possible in the near term. Comparison to a simple model indicates that the voltage output of these GaAs on Si cells follows ideal behavior expected for lattice mismatched devices, demonstrating that unaccounted for defects and issues that have plagued other methods to epitaxially integrate III-V cells with Si are resolved using SiGe buffers and proper GaAs nucleation methods. These early results already show the enormous and realistic potential of the virtual SiGe substrate approach for generating high efficiency, lightweight and strong III-V solar cells.

  18. High Excitation Rydberg Levels of Fe I from the ATMOS Solar Spectrum at 2.5 and 7 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, W. G.; Chang, E. S.; Geller, M.; Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.

    1995-01-01

    The quadrupole-polarization theory has been applied to the 3d(sup 6)4S(D-6)4f and 5g subconfigurations of Fe I by a parametric fit, and the fitted parameters are used to predict levels in the 6g and 6h subconfigurations. Using the predicted values, we have computed the 4f-6g and 5g-6h transition arrays and made identifications in the ATMOS infrared solar spectrum. The newly identified 6g and 6h levels, based on ATMOS wavenumbers, are combined with the 5g levels and found to agree with the theoretical values with a root mean-squared-deviation of 0.042/ cm. Our approach yields a polarizability of 28.07 a(sub o, sup 2) and a quadrupole moment of 0.4360 +/- 0.0010 ea(sup 2, sub o) for Fe II, as well as an improved ionization potential of 63737.700 +/- 0.010/ cm for Fe I.

  19. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as astrophysical and cosmological stochastic backgrounds. Since the relative strength and angular distribution of the many possible sources of GWs are not well constrained, searches for GW signals must be performed in a model-independent way. To that end we perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. The latter result is the first of its kind. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (CL) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2 - 20 X 10 (exp -50) strain2Hz(exp -1) and 5 - 35 X 10 (exp -49) strain2Hz(exp -1)/sr for pointlike and extended sources respectively. The limits on pointlike sources constitute a factor of 30 improvement over the previous best limits. We also set 90% CL limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN1987A and the Galactic Center as low as approximately equal 7 X 10(exp -25) in the most sensitive frequency range near 160Hz. These limits are the most constraining to date and constitute a factor of 5 improvement over the previous best limits.

  20. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Metallorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greater than 16 percent AMO) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AMO efficiency at 25 C.

  1. Effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical-vapor-deposited heteroepitaxial indium phosphide (InP) solar cell experimental results were simulated by using a PC-1D computer model. The effect of emitter parameter variation on the performance of n(+)/p/p(+) heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs solar cell was presented. The thinner and lighter doped emitters were observed to offer higher cell efficiencies. The influence of emitter thickness and minority carrier diffusion length on the cell efficiency with respect to dislocation density was studied. Heteroepitaxial cells with efficiencies similar to present day homojunction InP efficiencies (greaater than 16 percent AM0) were shown to be attainable if a dislocation density lower than 10(exp 6)/sq cm could be achieved. A realistic optimized design study yielded InP solar cells of over 22 percent AM0 efficiency at 25 C.

  2. External and Internal Reconnection in Two Filament-Carrying Magnetic-Cavity Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We observe two near-limb solar filament eruptions, one of 2000 February 26 and the other of 2002 January 4. For both we use 195 A Fe XII images from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) and magnetograms from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), both of which are on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). For the earlier event we also use soft X-ray telescope (SXT), hard X-ray telescope (HXT), and Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) data from the Yohkoh satellite, and hard X-ray data from the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ra.v Observatory (CGRO). Both events occur in quadrupolar magnetic regions, and both have coronal features that we infer belong to the same magnetic cavity structures as the filaments. In both cases, the cavity and filament first rise slowly at approx.10 km/s prior to eruption and then accelerate to approx.100 km/s during the eruption, although the slow-rise movement for the higher altitude cavity elements is clearer in the later event. We estimate that both filaments and both cavities contain masses of approx.10(exp 14)-10(exp 15) and approx.10(exp 15)-10(exp 16) g, respectively. We consider whether two specific magnetic reconnection-based models for eruption onset, the "tether cutting" and the "breakout" models, are consistent with our observations. In the earlier event, soft X-rays from SXT show an intensity increase during the 12 minute interval over which fast eruption begins, which is consistent with tether- cutting-model predictions. Substantial hard X-rays, however, do not occur until after fast eruption is underway, and so this is a constraint the tether-cutting model must satisfy. During the same 12 minute interval over which fast eruption begins, there are brightenings and topological changes in the corona indicative of high-altitude reconnection early in the eruption, and this is consistent with breakout predictions. In both eruptions, the state of the overlying loops at the time of onset of the fast-rise phase of

  3. External and Internal Reconnection in Two Filament-Carrying Magnetic-Cavity Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We observe two near-limb solar filament eruptions, one of 2000 February 26 and the other of 2002 January 4. For both we use 195 Angstroms, Fe XII images from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) and magnetograms from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), both of which are on the Solar arid Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). For the earlier event we also use soft X-ray telescope (SXT), hard X-ray telescope (HXT), and Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) data from the Yohkoh satellite, and hard X-ray data from the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observation, (CGRO). Both events occur in quadrupolar magnetic regions, and both have coronal features that we infer belong to the same magnetic cavity structures as the filaments. In both cases, the cavity and filament first rise slowly at approximately 10 kilometers per second prior to eruption and then accelerate to approximately 100 kilometers per second during the eruption, although the slow-rise movement for the higher altitude cavity elements is clearer in the later event. We estimate that both filaments and both cavities contain masses of approximately 10(exp 14)-10(exp 15) and approximately 10(exp 15)-10(exp 16)g, respectively. We consider whether two specific magnetic reconnection-based models for eruption onset, the tether cutting and the breakout models, are consistent with our observations. In the earlier event, soft X-rays from SXT show an intensity increase during the 12 minute interval over which fast eruption begins, which is consistent with tether-cutting-model predictions. Substantial hard X-rays, however, do not occur until after fast eruption is underway, and so this is a constraint the tether-cutting model must satisfy. During the same 12 minute interval over which fast eruption begins, there are brightenings and topological changes in the corona indicative of high-altitude reconnection early in the eruption, and this is consistent with breakout predictions. In both eruptions, the state of

  4. Aggregation and morphology control enables polymer solar cells with efficiencies near 11.5% (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, He

    2015-10-01

    Current high-efficiency (>9.0%) PSCs are restricted to materials combinations that are based on limited donor polymers and only one specific fullerene acceptor, PC71BM. Furthermore, best-efficiency PSCs are mostly based on relatively thin (100 nm) active layers. Here we first report multiple cases of high-performance thick-film (300 nm) PSCs (efficiencies up to 10.8%, fill factors up to 77%) based on conventional PCBM and many non-PCBM fullerenes. Our simple aggregation control and materials design rules allowed us to develop, within a short time, three new donor polymer, six fullerenes (including C60-based fullerenes), and over ten polymer:fullerene combinations, all of which yielded higher efficiency than previous state of art devices (~9.5%). The common structural feature of the three new donor polymers, the 2-octyldodecyl (2OD) alkyl chains sitting on quaterthiophene, causes a temperature-dependent aggregation behavior that allows for the processing of the polymer solutions at moderately elevated temperature, and more importantly, controlled aggregation and strong crystallization of the polymer during the film cooling and drying process. This results in a well-controlled and near-ideal polymer:fullerene morphology (containing highly crystalline, preferentially orientated, yet small polymer domains) that is controlled by polymer aggregation during warm casting and thus insensitive to the choice of fullerenes. The 2OD structural motif is then further applied to several other polymer backbones and produces three additional polymers with efficiencies between 10-11.5%. Our best efficiency (11.5%) is achieved via the combination of new structural designs, interface and optical engineering and optimizations on the solvents and additives of the polymer:fullerene solution.

  5. Tether-Cutting Energetics of a Solar Quiet Region Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We study the morphology and energetics of a slowly-evolving quiet region solar prominence eruption occurring on 1999 February 8-9 in the solar north polar crown region, using soft X-ray data from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh and Fe xv EUV 284 A data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO. After rising at approx. 1 km/s for about six hours, the prominence accelerates to a velocity of approx. 10 km/s, leaving behind EUV and soft X-ray loop arcades of a weak flare in its source region. Intensity dimmings occur in the eruption region cospatially in EUV and soft X-rays, indicating that the dimmings result from a depletion of material. Over the first two hours of the prominence s rapid rise, flare-like brightenings occur beneath the rising prominence which may correspond to "tether cutting" magnetic reconnection. These brightenings have heating requirements of up to approx. 10(exp 28)-10(exp 29) ergs, and this is comparable to the mechanical energy required for the rising prominence over the same time period. If the ratio of mechanical energy to heating energy remains constant through the early phase of the eruption, then we infer that coronal signatures for the tether cutting may not be apparent at or shortly after the start of the fast phase in this or similar low-energy eruptions, since the plasma-heating energy levels would not exceed that of the background corona.

  6. Solar coronal temperature diagnostics using emission line from multiple stages of ionization of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Thompson, William T.

    1994-01-01

    We obtained spatially resolved extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of AR 6615 on 1991 May 7 with NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS). Included are emission lines from four different stages of ionization of iron: Fe(+15) lambda 335 A, Fe(+14) lambda 327 A, Fe(+13) lambda 334 A, and Fe(+12) lambda 348 A. Using intensity ratios from among these lines, we have calculated the active region coronal temperature along the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) slit. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate adjacent stages of ionization are most sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield the largest scatter. Temperatures derived from line ratios which incorporate nonadjacent stages of ionization are less sensitive to measurement uncertainties and yield little scatter. The active region temperature derived from these latter ratios has an average value of 2.54 x 10(exp 6) K, with a standard deviation approximately 0.12 x 10(exp 6) K, and shows no significant variation with position along the slit.

  7. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

  8. Theory and case studies on solar induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Gerald; Freund, Friedemann; Kosovichev, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Huge electric current vortices are continuously generated in the Earth's lithosphere through electromagnetic induction from powerful ionospheric electric vortex currents that arise from ionization on the sun-lit side of the Earth (Chapman S. and Bartels J., 1940). The circular telluric currents in the Earth's lithosphere interact with the Earth's main magnetic field (H), building up a magnetic moment (M). According to T = [M x H] a mechanic torque (T) results from this interaction that can reach values as high as 5x10exp13 Nm (Duma G. and Ruzhin Y., 2003). We present evidence that this ionospherically induced telluric torque, which reaches deep into the lithosphere, influences the diurnal seismicity patterns in major earthquake zones as documented by earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.0. Our results confirm observations of distinct time-of-day patterns of seismic activity reported for over a century (Omori F., 1902; Conrad V., 1932 ; Shimshoni M., 1971; Duma G. and Vilardo G., 1998; Schekotov A.Yu., Molchanov O.A. and Hayakawa M., 2005) and even much earlier by Pliny the Elder, 79 A.D. A solar influence on earthquake frequency is apparent not only in diurnal patterns, but also in seasonal (e.g. Lipovics T., 2005) and decadal patterns. The effect can be validated by data recorded continuously at geomagnetic observatories, the INTERMAGNET stations (http://www.intermagnet.org), operating on all continents. The observatories continuously record magnetic variations which arise from the telluric currents in the Earth's lithosphere. Theory and model are presented, starting from the primary source for the effect, which is the varying solar wind speed as measured by satellites. The data are provided by the OMNI 2 directory (NASA, http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov). We offer 7 case studies that deal with seismic activity patterns in the diurnal, seasonal and long term time domains for seismic zones in Asia (Japan, Taiwan, Sumatra), N-America (California), the Mid Atlantic Ridge

  9. The Molecular Clouds Fueling A 1/5 Solar Metallicity Starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam K.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Sandstrom, Karin; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2016-09-01

    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have made the first high spatial and spectral resolution observations of the molecular gas and dust in the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. The {}12{CO}(2-1) and {}12{CO}(3-2) emission is clumpy and distributed throughout the central star-forming region. Only one of eight molecular clouds has associated star formation. The continuum spectral energy distribution is dominated by free-free and synchrotron; at 870 μm, only 50% of the emission is from dust. We derive a CO-to-H2 conversion factor using several methods, including a new method that uses simple photodissocation models and resolved CO line intensity measurements to derive a relationship that uniquely predicts {α }{co} for a given metallicity. We find that the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is 4-35 times that of the Milky Way (18.1-150.5 {M}⊙ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1). The star formation efficiency of the molecular gas is at least 10 times higher than that found in normal spiral galaxies, which is likely due to the burst-dominated star formation history of II Zw 40 rather than an intrinsically higher efficiency. The molecular clouds within II Zw 40 resemble those in other strongly interacting systems like the Antennae: overall they have high size-linewidth coefficients and molecular gas surface densities. These properties appear to be due to the high molecular gas surface densities produced in this merging system rather than to increased external pressure. Overall, these results paint a picture of II Zw 40 as a complex, rapidly evolving system whose molecular gas properties are dominated by the large-scale gas shocks from its ongoing merger.

  10. The Molecular Clouds Fueling A 1/5 Solar Metallicity Starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Leroy, Adam K.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Sandstrom, Karin; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2016-09-01

    Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have made the first high spatial and spectral resolution observations of the molecular gas and dust in the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. The {}12{CO}(2-1) and {}12{CO}(3-2) emission is clumpy and distributed throughout the central star-forming region. Only one of eight molecular clouds has associated star formation. The continuum spectral energy distribution is dominated by free–free and synchrotron; at 870 μm, only 50% of the emission is from dust. We derive a CO-to-H2 conversion factor using several methods, including a new method that uses simple photodissocation models and resolved CO line intensity measurements to derive a relationship that uniquely predicts {α }{co} for a given metallicity. We find that the CO-to-H2 conversion factor is 4–35 times that of the Milky Way (18.1–150.5 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1). The star formation efficiency of the molecular gas is at least 10 times higher than that found in normal spiral galaxies, which is likely due to the burst-dominated star formation history of II Zw 40 rather than an intrinsically higher efficiency. The molecular clouds within II Zw 40 resemble those in other strongly interacting systems like the Antennae: overall they have high size–linewidth coefficients and molecular gas surface densities. These properties appear to be due to the high molecular gas surface densities produced in this merging system rather than to increased external pressure. Overall, these results paint a picture of II Zw 40 as a complex, rapidly evolving system whose molecular gas properties are dominated by the large-scale gas shocks from its ongoing merger.

  11. Low-Altitude Reconnection Inflow-Outflow Observations During a 2010 November 3 Solar Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina L.a; Holman, Gordon; Reeves, Katharine K.; Seaton, Daniel B.; McKenzie, David E.; Su, Yang

    2012-01-01

    For a solar flare occurring on 2010 November 3, we present observations us- ing several SDO/AIA extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) passbands of an erupting flux rope followed by inflows sweeping into a current sheet region. The inflows are soon followed by outflows appearing to originate from near the termination point of the inflowing motion an observation in line with standard magnetic reconnection models. We measure average inflow plane-of-sky speeds to range from approximately 150 - 690 km s-1 with the initial, high-temperature inflows being the fastest. Using the inflow speeds and a range of Alfven speeds, we estimate the Alfvenic Mach number which appears to decrease with time. We also provide inflow and outflow times with respect to RHESSI count rates and find that the fast, high- temperature inflows occur simultaneously with a peak in the RHESSI thermal light curve. Five candidate inflow-outflow pairs are identified with no more than a minute delay between detections. The inflow speeds of these pairs are measured to be approximately 10(exp 2) km s-1 with outflow speeds ranging from approximately 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 33 km s-1 indicating acceleration during the reconnection process. The fastest of these outflows are in the form of apparently traveling density enhancements along the legs of the loops rather than the loop apexes themselves. These flows could possibly either be accelerated plasma, shocks, or waves prompted by reconnection. The measurements presented here show an order of magnitude difference between the retraction speeds of the loops and the speed of the density enhancements within the loops presumably exiting the reconnection site.

  12. Multiradionuclide evidence for the solar origin of the cosmic-ray events of ᴀᴅ 774/5 and 993/4

    PubMed Central

    Mekhaldi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Aldahan, Ala; Beer, Jürg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Possnert, Göran; Sigl, Michael; Svensson, Anders; Synal, Hans-Arno; Welten, Kees C.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of two large peaks in the atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) concentration at AD 774/5 and 993/4 is still debated. There is consensus, however, that these features can only be explained by an increase in the atmospheric 14C production rate due to an extraterrestrial event. Here we provide evidence that these peaks were most likely produced by extreme solar events, based on several new annually resolved 10Be measurements from both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores. Using ice core 36Cl data in pair with 10Be, we further show that these solar events were characterized by a very hard energy spectrum with high fluxes of solar protons with energy above 100 MeV. These results imply that the larger of the two events (AD 774/5) was at least five times stronger than any instrumentally recorded solar event. Our findings highlight the importance of studying the possibility of severe solar energetic particle events. PMID:26497389

  13. Multiradionuclide evidence for the solar origin of the cosmic-ray events of ᴀᴅ 774/5 and 993/4.

    PubMed

    Mekhaldi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Adolphi, Florian; Aldahan, Ala; Beer, Jürg; McConnell, Joseph R; Possnert, Göran; Sigl, Michael; Svensson, Anders; Synal, Hans-Arno; Welten, Kees C; Woodruff, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    The origin of two large peaks in the atmospheric radiocarbon ((14)C) concentration at AD 774/5 and 993/4 is still debated. There is consensus, however, that these features can only be explained by an increase in the atmospheric (14)C production rate due to an extraterrestrial event. Here we provide evidence that these peaks were most likely produced by extreme solar events, based on several new annually resolved (10)Be measurements from both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores. Using ice core (36)Cl data in pair with (10)Be, we further show that these solar events were characterized by a very hard energy spectrum with high fluxes of solar protons with energy above 100 MeV. These results imply that the larger of the two events (AD 774/5) was at least five times stronger than any instrumentally recorded solar event. Our findings highlight the importance of studying the possibility of severe solar energetic particle events. PMID:26497389

  14. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  15. First measurement of helium on Mars: Implications for the problem of radiogenic gases on the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Mcdonald, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    The 108 photons of the Martian He 584 A airglow detected by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite during a two-day exposure (22-23 Jan. 1993) correspond to the effective disk average intensity of 43 (+/-) 10 Rayleigh. Radiative transfer calculations, using a model atmosphere appropriate to the conditions of the observation and having an exospheric temperature of 210 (+/-) 20 K, result in an He mixing ratio of 1.1 (+/-) 0.4 ppm in the lower atmosphere. Nonthermal escape of helium is due to the following: electron impact ionization and pickup of He(+) by the solar wind; collisions with hot oxygen atoms; and charge exchange with molecular species with corresponding column loss rates of 1.4 x 10(exp 5), 3 x 10(exp 4), and 7 x 10(exp 3) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1), respectively. The lifetime of helium on Mars is 5 x 10(exp 4) yr. The He outgassing rate, coupled with the Ar-40 atmospheric abundance and with the K:U:Th ratio measured in the surface rocks, is used as input to a simple two-reservoir degassing model which presumes the loss of all argon accumulated in the atmosphere during the first Byr by large-scale impacts. The model results in total planet mass ratios of 10(exp -5) g/g for K, 2.3 x 10(exp -9) g/g for U, 8.5 x 10(exp -9) g/g for Th, 4 x 10(exp -10) g/g for He, and 1.5 x 10(exp -9) g/g for Ar-40. The predicted radiogenic heat flux is 2 erg cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Similar modeling for Venus results in total plant mass ratios of 4.7 x 10(exp -5) g/g for K, 6.7 x 10(exp -9) g/g for U, 2.2 x 10(exp -8) g/g for Th, 1.3 x 10(exp -9) for He, 6.7 x 10(exp -9) g/g for Ar-40, and a radiogenic heat flux of 15 erg cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The implications of these results are discussed. The modeling shows that the radioactive elements were not distributed uniformly in the protoplanetary nebula, and their relative abundances differ very much in the terrestrial planets.

  16. Live Iron-60 in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukolyukov, A.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of nickel in samples from the differentiated meteorite Chervony Kut revealed the presence of relative excesses of Ni-60 ranging from 2.4 up to 50 parts per 10 exp 4. These isotopic excesses are from the decay of the now extinct short-lived nuclide Fe-60 and provide clear evidence for the existence of Fe-60 over large scales in the early solar system. Not only was Fe-60 present at the time of melting and differentiation (that is, Fe-Ni fractionation) of the parent body of Chervony Kut but also later at the time when basaltic magma solidified at or near the surface of the planetesimal. The inferred abundance of Fe-60 suggests that its decay alone could have provided sufficient heat to melt small (diameters of several hundred kilometers) planetary bodies shortly after their accretion.

  17. Space Environmental Testing of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jerry D.; Anglin, Emily J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Scheiman, David A.; Castro, Stephenie L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells has lead NASA to investigate the potential of these devices for space power generation, Reported here is the first space environment characterization of these type of photovoltaic devices. Cells containing liquid electrolytes were exposed to simulated low-earth orbit conditions and their performance evaluated. All cells were characterized under simulated air mass zero (AMO) illumination. Complete cells were exposed to pressures less than 1 x 10(exp -7) torr for over a month, with no sign of sealant failure or electrolyte leakage. Cells from Solaronix SA were rapid thermal cycled under simulated low-earth orbit conditions. The cells were cycled 100 times from -80 C to 80 C, which is equivalent to 6 days in orbit. The best cell had a 4.6% loss in efficiency as a result of the thermal cycling,

  18. A Solar System Survey of Forced Librations in Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornstock, Robert L.; Bills, Bruce G.

    2003-01-01

    Forced librations are periodic rotational rate variations due to gravitational interactions with an orbital partner. We have developed an analytic theory capable of calculating expected amplitudes of forced librations for nonresonant rotators as well as for bodies existing in a spin-orbit resonance. The theory has been applied to 34 solar system bodies, including terrestrial planets, planetary satellites, and the asteroid Eros. Parameters governing libration amplitude are the body s orbital eccentricity, moment difference, and the ratio of its spin rate to its orbital rate. In each case the largest libration amplitude is associated with the forcing frequency 2 (p - 1) n, where n is the orbital mean motion and p is the spin/orbit rate ratio. This dominant frequency is simply semidiurnal as seen from the position of the torquing body. The maximum libration angular amplitude is 1.3 x 10(exp -2) radians for Thebe, and the maximum mean equatorial displacement is 1.4 km for Mimas.

  19. A Solar Energy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, David L.; Riley, Robert A.

    This document contains 5,000 references to literature through 1976 dealing with various aspects of solar energy. Categories are established according to area of solar research. These categories include: (1) overview; (2) measurement; (3) low-range solar energy collection (below 120 degrees C); (4) intermediate-range solar energy collection (120…

  20. Observations of solar X-ray bursts in the energy range 5-15 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.; Hudson, H. S.; Peterson, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Bursts of solar X-rays in the energy range 5-15 keV are associated with flares and are due to thermal emission from a hot coronal plasma. The results of the first study of a large sample of separate bursts, 197 events associated with subflares, and of a few events of importance 1 are presented. The observations were made by a proportional counter on the satellite OSO-7 from October, 1971 to June, 1972. In most cases, the temperature characterizing the X-ray spectrum rises impulsively at the onset of the burst and then declines slowly throughout the remainder of the burst. The emission measure rises exponentially with a time scale of 30-100 sec and then declines slowly on a time scale of the order of 1,000 sec. It is shown that the growth of the thermal energy in the flare plasma throughout the burst can be due to the heating of new cool material.

  1. INSTANT: a Small Mission Concept to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 Point for Innovative Solar, Heliospheric and Space Weather Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, B.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We present a small mission concept to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather sciences. The proposed INvestigation of Solar-Terrestrial Activity aNd Transients (INSTANT) mission concept is designed to identify how solar coronal magnetic fields drive eruptions, mass transport and particle acceleration that impact the Earth and the heliosphere. The INSTANT concept would be the first to (1) obtain measurements of coronal magnetic fields from space, and (2) determine coronal mass ejection (CME) kinematics with unparalleled accuracy. Thanks to innovative instrumentation at a vantage point that provides the most suitable perspective view of the Sun-Earth system, INSTANT would, in addition, uniquely track the whole chain of fundamental processes driving space weather. We present the science requirements, payload and mission profile which fulfill ambitious science objectives within small mission programmatic boundary conditions.

  2. A small mission concept to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, B.; Liu, Y.; Segura, K.; He, J.; Qin, G.; Temmer, M.; Vial, J.-C.; Xiong, M.; Davies, J. A.; Rouillard, A. P.; Pinto, R.; Auchère, F.; Harrison, R. A.; Eyles, C.; Gan, W.; Lamy, P.; Xia, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kong, L.; Wang, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zhang, S.; Zong, Q.; Soucek, J.; An, J.; Prech, L.; Zhang, A.; Rochus, P.; Bothmer, V.; Janvier, M.; Maksimovic, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Tappin, J.; Vainio, R.; Poedts, S.; Dunlop, M. W.; Savani, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Bale, S. D.; Li, G.; Howard, T.; DeForest, C.; Webb, D.; Lugaz, N.; Fuselier, S. A.; Dalmasse, K.; Tallineau, J.; Vranken, D.; Fernández, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present a concept for a small mission to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L5 point for innovative solar, heliospheric and space weather science. The proposed INvestigation of Solar-Terrestrial Activity aNd Transients (INSTANT) mission is designed to identify how solar coronal magnetic fields drive eruptions, mass transport and particle acceleration that impact the Earth and the heliosphere. INSTANT is the first mission designed to (1) obtain measurements of coronal magnetic fields from space and (2) determine coronal mass ejection (CME) kinematics with unparalleled accuracy. Thanks to innovative instrumentation at a vantage point that provides the most suitable perspective view of the Sun-Earth system, INSTANT would uniquely track the whole chain of fundamental processes driving space weather at Earth. We present the science requirements, payload and mission profile that fulfill ambitious science objectives within small mission programmatic boundary conditions.

  3. Toward 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Texas Center for Space Research research efforts under NASA Grant No. NAG-1936 from 1 Jan. 1992 - 31 Dec. 1992 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis of global GPS data collected during the first three months of the IGS campaign, and analysis of regional data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented in the following.

  4. Towards 10(exp 9) GPS geodesy: Vector baselines, Earth rotation and reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.

    1994-01-01

    Effort during the period form January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993 were in the following areas: GPS orbit accuracy assessments and efforts to improve the accuracy; analysis and effects of GPS receiver antenna phase center variation; analysis of global GPS data being collected for the IGS campaign; and analysis of regional (south west Pacific) campaign data. A brief summary of each of the above activities is presented.

  5. Friction, Wear, and Evaporation Rates of Various Materials in Vacuum to 10(exp -7) mm Hg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max; Johnson, Robert L.

    1961-01-01

    The requirements for bearings and seals to operate in the environment of space dictate a new area for lubrication research. The low ambient pressures encountered in space can be expected to influence the behavior of oil, grease, and solid-film lubricants. The property of these materials most significantly affected by low ambient pressures is the evaporation rate. Various investigators have therefore measured the evaporation rates of oils and greases in vacuum as one method of establishing their relative merit for space applications (1-3). The results of this work have given some indication as to the oils and greases with the greatest stability at reduced ambient pressures. Only limited experimental work, however, has been reported in the literature for inorganic solids and soft metals which have potential use as solid lubricant films or coatings for hard alloy substrates [e.g. Reference ( 4 )]. In general, the evaporation rates of these materials would be lower than those of oils and greases. These films might therefore be very attractive as lubricants for high vacuum service.

  6. Ag2O/TiO2/V2O5 one-dimensional nanoheterostructures for superior solar light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Lixin; Xu, Liang; Cao, Xiuxia; Li, Xuhai; Huang, Yuanjie; Meng, Chuanmin; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2014-06-21

    Titanium dioxide has attracted considerable interest as a prototypical semiconductor photocatalyst. However, because of the relative large bandgap energy, further application of TiO2 photocatalyst is limited by its inefficient solar energy conversion. Various attempts have been made to broaden the light absorption window of the TiO2, such as growth of TiO2-based heterostructures. Herein, a novel three-component system, Ag2O/TiO2/V2O5 one-dimensional nanoheterostructures with enhanced solar light absorption, is prepared by depositing Ag2O nanoparticles onto the surface of TiO2/V2O5 nanofibers through a two-step synthetic process. This three-component system exhibits excellent solar-driven photocatalytic activity, far exceeding those of the single- and two-component systems, as a result of extended solar light absorption and efficient electron-hole separation. Furthermore, the photocatalytic performance of Ag2O/TiO2/V2O5 one-dimensional nanoheterostructures is very stable for recycling use.

  7. The Three-Dimensional Nature of Interaction Regions: Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses fro 1 to 5 AU: Solar Cycle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esperanza, J. A. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated diverse aspects of the interaction regions detected by four spacecraft that travelled from Earth to Jupiter at different phases of the solar cycle: Pioneer 11 (declining phase of cycle 20); voyagers 1 and 2 (ascending phase of cycle 21); and Ulysses (just after solar maximum 22). From the analysis of 38 stream interfaces we found that the interaction regions detected by the three missions have different geometries.

  8. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  9. Novel thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole-based organic dyes for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyi; Feng, Quanyou; Wang, Zhong-Sheng; Zhou, Gang

    2013-05-01

    A series of novel metal-free organic dyes containing the thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole moiety were designed and synthesized for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Different alkoxy chains were introduced into the electron donor part of the dye molecules for comparison. The optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties for all sensitizers were systematically investigated. It was found that the sensitizers with the different alkoxy groups have similar photophysical and electrochemical properties, such as absorbance and energy levels, owing to their close chemical structures. However, the quasi-solid-state DSSCs based on the resulting sensitizers exhibit different performance parameters. The quasi-solid-state DSSC based on sensitizer FNE74 with two octyloxy chains possessed the highest solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.10 % under standard AM 1.5G sunlight illumination without the use of coadsorbant agents.

  10. Electron-irradiated two-terminal, monolithic InP/Ga0.47In0.53As tandem solar cells and annealing of radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotal, H. L.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Messenger, Scott R.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation damage results from two-terminal monolithic InP/Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As tandem solar cells subject to 1 MeV electron irradiation are presented. Efficiencies greater than 22 percent have been measured by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory from 2x2 sq cm cells at 1 sun, AMO (25 C). The short circuit current density, open circuit voltage and fill factor are found to tolerate the same amount of radiation at low fluences. At high fluence levels, slight differences are observed. Decreasing the base amount of radiation at the Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As bottomcell improved the radiation resistance of J(sub sc) dramatically. This is turn, extended the series current flow through the subcell substantially up to a fluence of 3x10(exp 15) cm(exp -2) compared to 3x10(exp 14) cm(exp -2), as observed previously. The degradation of the maximum power output form tandem device is comparable to that from shallow homojunction (SHJ) InP solar cells, and the mechanism responsible for such degradation is explained in terms of the radiation response of the component cells. Annealing studies revealed that the recovery of the tandem cell response is dictated by the annealing characteristics exhibited by SHJ InP solar cells.

  11. Lanthanide and actinide chemistry at high C/O ratios in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to study the condensation chemistry of the REE and actinides under the highly reducing conditions which are necessary for the formation of the enstatite chondrites. Our calculations confirm that the REE and actinides condensed into oldhamite (CaS), the major REE and actinide host phase in enstatite chondrites, at a carbon-oxygen (C/O) ratio not less than 1 in an otherwise solar gas. Five basic types of REE abundance patterns, several of which are analogous to REE abundance patterns observed in the Ca, Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, are predicted to occur in meteoritic oldhamites. All of the reported REE patterns in oldhamites in enstatite chondrites can be interpreted in terms of our condensation calculations. The observed patterns fall into three of the five predicted categories. The reported Th and U enrichments and ratios in meteoritic oldhamites are also consistent with predictions of the condensation calculations. Pure REE sulfides are predicted to condense in the 10 exp -6 to 10 exp -9 bar range and may be found in enstatite chondrites if they formed in this pressure range.

  12. A Coronal Hole Jet Observed with Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Peter H.; Muglach, Karin

    2014-01-01

    A small blowout jet was observed at the boundary of the south coronal hole on 2011 February 8 at around 21:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) revealed an expanding loop rising from one footpoint of a compact, bipolar bright point. Magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO showed that the jet was triggered by the cancelation of a parasitic positive polarity feature near the negative pole of the bright point. The jet emission was present for 25 mins and it extended 30 Mm from the bright point. Spectra from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode yielded a temperature and density of 1.6 MK and 0.9-1.7 × 10( exp 8) cu cm for the ejected plasma. Line-of-sight velocities reached up to 250 km/s. The density of the bright point was 7.6 × 10(exp 8) cu cm, and the peak of the bright point's emission measure occurred at 1.3 MK, with no plasma above 3 MK.

  13. Asymmetries of solar oscillation line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jefferies, S. M.; Harvey, J. W.; Osaki, Y.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Asymmetries of the power spectral line profiles of solar global p-modes are detected in full-disk intensity observations of the Ca II K Fraunhofer line. The asymmetry is a strong function of temporal frequency being strongest at the lowest frequencies observed and vanishing near the peak of the power distribution. The variation with spherical harmonic degree is small. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of a model in which the solar oscillation cavity is compared to a Fabry-Perot interferometer with the source slightly outside the cavity. A phase difference between an outward direct wave and a corresponding inward wave that passes through the cavity gives rise to the asymmetry. The asymmetry is different in velocity and intensity observations. Neglecting the asymmetry when modeling the power spectrum can lead to systematic errors in the measurement of mode frequencies of as much as 10 exp -4 of the mode frequency. The present observations and interpretation locate the source of the oscillations to be approximately 60 km beneath the photosphere, the shallowest position suggested to date.

  14. Electric conductivity of plasma in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important parameters in MHD description of the solar wind is the electric conductivity of plasma. There exist now two quite different approaches to the evaluation of this parameter. In the first one a value of conductivity taken from the most elaborated current theory of plasma should be used in calculations. The second one deals with the empirical, phenomenological value of conductivity. E.g.: configuration of interplanetary magnetic field, stretched by the expanding corona, depends on the magnitude of electrical conductivity of plasma in the solar wind. Knowing the main empirical features of the field configuration, one may estimate the apparent phenomenological value of resistance. The estimations show that the electrical conductivity should be approximately 10(exp 13) times smaller than that calculated by Spitzer. It must be noted that the empirical value should be treated with caution. Due to the method of its obtaining it may be used only for 'large-scale' description of slow processes like coronal expansion. It cannot be valid for 'quick' processes, changing the state of plasma, like collisions with obstacles, e.g., planets and vehicles. The second approach is well known in large-scale planetary hydrodynamics, stemming from the ideas of phenomenological thermodynamics. It could formulate real problems which should be solved by modern plasma physics, oriented to be adequate for complicated processes in space.

  15. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  16. The role of radiation hard solar cells in minimizing the costs of global satellite communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.; Walters, Robert J.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis embodied in a PC computer program is presented, which quantitatively demonstrates how the availability of radiation hard solar cells can help minimize the cost of a global satellite communications system. An important distinction between the currently proposed systems, such as Iridium, Odyssey and Ellipsat, is the number of satellites employed and their operating altitudes. Analysis of the major costs associated with implementing these systems shows that operation at orbital altitudes within the earth's radiation belts (10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4)km) can reduce the total cost of a system by several hundred percent, so long as radiation hard components including solar cells can be used. A detailed evaluation of the predicted performance of photovoltaic arrays using several different planar solar cell technologies is given, including commercially available Si and GaAs/Ge, and InP/Si which is currently under development. Several examples of applying the program are given, which show that the end of life (EOL) power density of different technologies can vary by a factor of ten for certain missions. Therefore, although a relatively radiation-soft technology can usually provide the required EOL power by simply increasing the size of the array, the impact upon the total system budget could be unacceptable, due to increased launch and hardware costs. In aggregate, these factors can account for more than a 10% increase in the total system cost. Since the estimated total costs of proposed global-coverage systems range from $1B to $9B, the availability of radiation-hard solar cells could make a decisive difference in the selection of a particular constellation architecture.

  17. Flexible ITO-free organic solar cells applying aqueous solution-processed V2O5 hole transport layer: An outdoor stability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. Anderson S.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Roth, Bérenger; Andersen, Thomas R.; Bortoti, Andressa; Reyna, Yegraf; Castro, Eryza; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Lira-Cantu, Mónica

    2016-02-01

    Solution processable semiconductor oxides have opened a new paradigm for the enhancement of the lifetime of thin film solar cells. Their fabrication by low-cost and environmentally friendly solution-processable methods makes them ideal barrier (hole and electron) transport layers. In this work, we fabricate flexible ITO-free organic solar cells (OPV) by printing methods applying an aqueous solution-processed V2O5 as the hole transport layer (HTL) and compared them to devices applying PEDOT:PSS. The transparent conducting electrode was PET/Ag/PEDOT/ZnO, and the OPV configuration was PET/Ag/PEDOT/ZnO/P3HT:PC60BM/HTL/Ag. Outdoor stability analyses carried out for more than 900 h revealed higher stability for devices fabricated with the aqueous solution-processed V2O5.

  18. Differential energy spectra of low energy (less than 8.5 MeV per nucleon) heavy cosmic rays during solar quiet times. [from Explorer 47 satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Vollmer, O.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Explorer 47 satellite observations of carbon, oxygen, and heavier nuclei differential energy spectra below 8.5 MeV/nucleon are presented for solar quiet time periods. A dE/dx vs E method for particle identification and energy determination was used. The instrumentation telescope included an isobutane proportional counter, a surface barrier Si detector, and a cylindrical plastic scintillator anticoincidence shield. The observations were performed outside the bow-shock and in the ecliptic plane. Results show an anisotropy of about 25% at 22 degrees west of the sun with a C/O ratio of 0.5 supporting a solar origin. The low energy portions of the C and O spectra have steep negative slopes, and the corresponding power law is given. Peculiarities in the O spectrum are discussed.

  19. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    This report first describes the different types of solar ponds including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. It then discusses the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds, and compares the economics of salty and saltless ponds as a function of salt cost. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirements is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  20. Solar ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T.S.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The different types of solar ponds are described, including the nonconvecting salt gradient pond and various saltless pond designs. Then the availability and cost of salts for salt gradient ponds are discussed and costs are compared. A simple computational model is developed to approximate solar pond performance. This model is later used to size solar ponds for district heating and industrial process heat applications. For district heating, ponds are sized to provide space conditioning for a group of homes, in different regions of the United States. Size requirement is on the order of one acre for a group of 25 to 50 homes. An economic analysis is performed of solar ponds used in two industrial process heat applications. The analysis finds that solar ponds are competitive when conventional heat sources are priced at $5 per million Btu and expected to rise in price at a rate of 10% per year. The application of solar ponds to the generation of electricity is also discussed. Total solar pond potential for displacing conventional energy sources is estimated in the range of from one to six quadrillion Btu per year in the near and intermediate future.

  1. The solar wind interaction with Mars: Mariner 4, Mars 2, Mars 3, Mars 5, and Phobos 2 observations of bow shock position and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, J.A. ); Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. )

    1991-07-01

    Observations taken by Mariner 4, Mars 2, Mars 3, Mars 5, and Phobos 2 are used to model the shape, position, and variability of the Martian bow shock for the purpose of better understanding the interaction of this planet with the solar wind. Emphasis is placed upon comparisons with the results of similar analyses at Venus, the only planet known to have no significant intrinsic magnetic field. Excellent agreement is found between Mars bow shock models derived from the earlier Mariner-Mars data set (24 crossings in 1964-1974) and the far more extensive observations recently returned by Phobos 2 (94 crossings in 1989). The best fit model to the aggregate data set locates the subsolar bow shock at a planetocentric distance of 1.56 {plus minus} 0.04 R{sub M}. Mapped into the terminator plane, the average distance to the Martian bow shock is 2.66 {plus minus} 0.05 R{sub M}. Compared with Venus, the bow wave at Mars is significantly more distant in the terminator plane, 2.7 R{sub M} versus 2.4 R{sub V}, and over twice as variable in location with a standard deviation of 0.49 R{sub M} versus 0.21 R{sub V} at Venus. The Mars 2, 3, and 5 and Phobos 2 data also contain a small number of very distant dayside shock crossings with inferred subsolar obstacle radii derived from gasdynamic modeling of 2,000 to 4,000 km. Such distant bow shock occurrences do not appear to take place at Venus and may be associated with the expansion of a small Martian magnetosphere under the influence of unusually low wind pressure. Finally, the altitude of the Venus bow shock has a strong solar cycle dependence believed to be due to the effect of solar EUV on the neutral atmosphere and mass loading. Comparison of the Phobos 2 shock observations near solar maximum (R{sub z} = 141) with the Mariner-Mars measurements taken much farther from solar maximum (R{sub z} = 59) indicates that the Martian bow shock location is independent of solar cycle phase and, hence, solar EUV flux.

  2. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  3. 19.5% Efficient Screen Printed Crystalline Silicon Metal Wrap Through (mwt) Solar Cells for Concentrator (2-25x) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellmeth, Tobias; Fritz, Susanne; Menkoe, Michael; Clement, Florian; Biro, Daniel; Preu, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    One of the main barriers on the way to mass production of concentrator silicon solar cells is the lack of industrially feasible process sequences. Therefore, a concentrator silicon based Metal Wrap Through (C-MWT) solar cell completely processed at the Fraunhofer ISE Photo Voltaic Technology Evaluation Center (PV-TEC) is introduced. This means no clean room or photolithographic steps have been used. Under one-sun conditions, a conversion efficiency of 18.6% could be reached which is so far the highest efficiency reported for a MWT silicon solar cell. The highest efficiency achieved was 19.5% at 6 suns and even 18.1% at 23 suns. The series resistance as major loss mechanism concentrator solar cells are suffering from is the main focus in this work. Concerning this matter an investigation of the Light Induced Plating (LIP) step is presented. A simulation tool containing an analytical series resistance model has been developed and the 2-diode-model was added providing the calculation of the efficiency and the fill factor in dependency of the concentration at given parameters.

  4. Short Wavelength Electromagnetic Perturbations Excited Near the Solar Probe Plus Spacecraft in the Inner Heliosphere: 2.5D Hybrid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    A 2.5D numerical plasma model of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC) is presented. These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model derived from the SW-interaction with the spacecraft (SC), which could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board the SC in the inner heliosphere. Compression waves and electric field jumps with amplitudes of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. A strong polarization electric field was also observed in the wing of the plasma wake. However, 2.5D hybrid modeling did not show excitation of whistler/Alfven waves in the upstream connected with the bidirectional current closure that was observed in short-time 3D modeling SPPSC and near a tether in the ionosphere. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements planned for the future Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission. The results of modeling electromagnetic field perturbations in the SW due to shot noise in absence of SPPSC are also discussed.

  5. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) probe at Mars characterizes the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) input into the Martian atmosphere. EUVM measures solar irradiance at 0-7 nm, 17-22 nm and 121.6 nm at a nominal 1 second cadence. These bands were selected to capture variability originating at different heights in the solar atmosphere; and are used to drive the Flare Irradiance Solar Model at Mars (FISM-M) that is a model of the solar spectrum from 0.1-190 nm with 1 nm resolution and produced routinely as the EUVM Level 3 data product. The 0-5 nm range of the solar spectrum is of particular aeronomic interest because the primary species of the Mars upper atmosphere have Auger transitions in this range. When an Auger transition is excited by incident SXR radiation, secondary electrons are emitted with sufficient energy to further ionize the atmosphere. Because these transitions are highly structured, sub-nm resolution of the solar spectrum is needed in the 0-5 nm range to fully constrain the solar input and more accurately characterize the energetics of the upper atmosphere. At Earth, .1 nm resolution estimates of the solar 0-5 nm range are produced by the X-ray Photometer System (XPS) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite by combining broad-band SXR measurements with solar flare temperature measurements to drive an atomic physics based forward model of solar coronal emissions. This spectrum has been validated with other models as well as with photo-electron and day glow measurements at Earth. Similar to XPS, the EUVM 0-7 nm and 17-22 nm bands can be used to produce an XPS-like model at Mars, but with reduced precision due to differences in the available bands. We present first results of this technique applied to a set of solar flares observed by MAVEN EUVM and Earth assets. In addition to comparing EUVM and Earth-asset derived 0-5 nm solar spectra to

  6. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 5; The SeaWiFS Solar Radiation-Based Calibration and the Transfer-to-Orbit Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Slater, Philip N.; Holmes, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was performed on 1 November 1993. Measurements were made outdoors in the courtyard of the instrument manufacturer. SeaWiFS viewed the solar irradiance reflected from the sensor's diffuser in the same manner as viewed on orbit. The calibration included measurements using a solar radiometer designed to determine the transmittances of principal atmospheric constituents. The primary uncertainties in the outdoor measurements are the transmission of the atmosphere and the reflectance of the diffuser. Their combined uncertainty is about 5 or 6%. The SRBC also requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum. Four solar models are used. When averaged over the responses of the SeaWiFS bands, the irradiance models agree at the 3.6% level, with the greatest difference for SeaWiFS band 8. The calibration coefficients from the SRBC are lower than those from the laboratory calibration of the instrument in 1997. For a representative solar model, the ratios of the SRBC coefficients to laboratory values average 0.962 with a standard deviation of 0.012. The greatest relative difference is 0.946 for band 8. These values are within the estimated uncertainties of the calibration measurements. For the transfer-to-orbit experiment, the measurements in the manufacturer's courtyard are used to predict the digital counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit (August 1, 1997). This experiment requires an estimate of the relative change in the diffuser response for the period between the launch of the instrument and its first solar measurements on orbit (September 9, 1997). In relative terms, the counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit averaged 1.3% higher than predicted, with a standard deviation of 1.2% and a greatest difference of 2.4% or band 7. The estimated uncertainty for the transfer-to-orbit experiment is about 3 or 4%.

  7. The University of Iowa Helios solar wind plasma wave experiment /E 5a/. [using spectrum analyzer-electric field antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Odem, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    This document describes the University of Iowa solar wind plasma wave experiment for the Helios missions (Experiment 5a). The objective of this experiment is the investigation of naturally occurring plasma instabilities and electromagnetic waves in the solar wind. To carry out this investigation, the experiment consists primarily of a 16-channel spectrum analyzer connected to the electric field antennas. The spectrum analyzer covers the frequency range from 20 Hz to 200 kHz and has an amplitude dynamic range which extends from .3 microvolts/m to 30 mV/m per channel. This spectrum analyzer, the antenna potential measurements, the shock alarm system and the supporting electronics are discussed in detail.

  8. Time-dependent 2.2-MeV and 0.5-MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2- and 0.51-MeV gamma-ray lines from solar flares are calculated, and the results are compared with observations of the 1972 August 4 and 7 flares. The time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines is caused by capture of the neutrons and subsequent deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Our main results are that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2-MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and high-energy electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma-ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  9. GaAs and 3-5 compound solar cells status and prospects for use in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Gallium arsenide solar cells equal or supass the best silicon solar cells in efficiency, radiation resistance, annealability, and in the capability to produce usable power output at elevated temperatures. NASA has been involved in a long range research and development program to capitalize on these manifold advantages, and to explore alternative III-V compounds for additional potential improvements. The current status and future prospects for research and development in this area are reviewed and the progress being made toward development of GaAs cells suitable for variety of space missions is discussed. Cell types under various stages of development include n(+)/p shallow homojunction thin film GaAs cells, x100 concentration ratio p/n and n/p GaAs small area concentrator cells, mechanically-stacked, two-junction tandem cells, and three-junction monolithic cascade cells, among various other cell types.

  10. Two-fluid 2.5D MHD model of the fast solar wind and the effective proton temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    1999-06-01

    Recent SOHO/UVCS observations indicate that the perpendicular proton and ion temperatures are much larger than electron temperatures (Kohl et al. 1997). In the present study we simulate numerically the solar wind flow in a coronal hole with the two-fluid approach. For simplicity, we neglect electron inertia. We investigate the effects of electron and proton temperatures on the solar wind acceleration by nonlinear waves. In the model the nonlinear waves are generated by Alfvén waves with frequencies in the 10-3 Hz range, driven at the base of the coronal hole. The resulting electron and proton flow profile exhibits density and velocity fluctuations. The fluctuations may steepen into shocks as they propagate away from the sun. We construct the proton velocity distribution and a synthetic Ly-α line profile by including the combined effects of temperature and velocity fluctuations in the model, and compare them to the UVCS observations.

  11. Time-dependent 2.2 MeV and 0.5 MeV lines from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.; Ramaty, R.

    1975-01-01

    The time dependences of the 2.2 MeV and 0.51 MeV gamma ray lines from solar flares are calculated and the results are compared with observations of the 1972, August 4 and 7 flares. Time lag between the nuclear reactions and the formation of these two lines are caused, respectively, by capture of the neutrons, and by deceleration of the positrons and decay of the radioactive nuclei. Results show that the calculation is consistent with the observed rise of the 2.2 MeV line on August 4, and it does not require different time dependences for the accelerated protons and electrons in the flare region. The above lags can explain the delayed gamma ray emission observed on August 7. Positrons of energies greater than about 10 MeV could be detected in interplanetary space following large solar flares.

  12. A burst from a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S.; Politano, M.; Truran, J. W.; Sparks, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Studies which examine the consequences of accretion, at rates of 10(exp -9) solar mass/yr and 10(exp -10) solar mass/yr, onto an ONeMg white dwarf with a mass of 1.35 solar masses are performed. In these studies, a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic, one-dimensional computer code was used. The code now includes a network with 89 nuclei up to Ca-40, elemental diffusion, new opacities, and new equation of state. The initial abundance distribution corresponded to a mixture that was enriched to either 25, 50, or 75 percent in products of carbon burning. The remaining material in each case is assumed to have a solar composition. The evolution of the thermonuclear runaway in the 1.35 solar mass white dwarf, with M = 10(exp -9) solar mass, produced peak temperatures in the shell source exceeding 300 million degrees. The sequence produced significant amounts of Na-22 from proton captures onto Ne-20 and significant amounts of Al-26 from proton captures on Mg-24. This sequence ejected 5.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass moving with speeds from approximately 100 km/s to 2300 km/s. When the mass accretion rate was decreased to 10(exp -10) solar mass, the resulting thermonuclear runaway produced a shock that moved through the outer envelope of the white dwarf and raised the surface luminosity to L greater than 10(exp 7) solar luminosity and the effective temperature to values exceeding 10(exp 7) K. The interaction of the material expanding from off of the white dwarf with the accretion disk should produce a burst of gamma-rays.

  13. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  14. Development and characterization of high-efficiency Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge dual- and triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, N.H.; King, R.R.; Cavicchi, B.T.

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the characterization, analysis, and development of high-efficiency, radiation-resistant Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge dual-junction (DJ) and triple-junction (TJ) solar cells. DJ cells have rapidly transitioned from the laboratory to full-scale (325 kW/year) production at Spectrolab. Performance data for over 470,000 large-area (26.94 cm{sup 2}), thin (140 {micro}m) DJ solar cells grown on low-cost, high-strength Ge substrates are shown. Advances in next-generation triple-junction Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge cells with an active Ge component cell are discussed, giving efficiencies up to 26.7% (21.65-cm{sup 2} area), AM0, at 28 C. Final-to-final power ratios P/P{sub 0} of 0.83 were measured for these n-on-p DJ and TJ cells after irradiation with 10{sup 15} 1-MeV electrons/cm{sup 2}. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements are applied to double heterostructures grown with semiconductor layers and interfaces relevant to these multifunction solar cells, to characterize surface and bulk recombination and guide further device improvements. Dual-and triple-junction Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P/GaAs/Ge cells are compared to competing space photovoltaic technologies, and found to offer 60--75% more end-of-life power than high-efficiency Si cells at a nominal array temperature of 60 C.

  15. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  16. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  17. Tether-Cutting Energetics of a Solar Quiet Region Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We study the morphology and energetics of a slowly evolving quiet-region solar prominence eruption occurring on 1999 February 8-9 in the solar north polar crown region, using soft X-ray data from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh and Fexv EUV 284 Angstrom data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). After rising at approximately equal to l kilometer per second for about six hours, the prominence accelerates to a velocity of approximately equal to 10 kilometers per second, leaving behind EUV and soft X-ray loop arcades of a weak flare in its source region. Intensity dimmings occur in the eruption region cospatially in EUV and soft X-rays, indicating that the dimmings result from a depletion of material. Over the first two hours of the prominences rapid rise, flare-like brightenings occur beneath the rising prominence that might correspond to tether-cutting magnetic reconnection. These brightenings have heating requirements of up to approximately 10(exp 28)-10(exp 29) ergs, and this is comparable to the mechanical energy required for the rising prominence over the same time period. If the ratio of mechanical energy to heating energy remains constant through the early phase of the eruption, then we infer that coronal signatures for the tether cutting may not be apparent at or shortly after the start of the fast phase in this or similar low-energy eruptions, since the plasma-heating energy levels would not exceed that of the background corona.

  18. An Unusual Coronal Mass Ejection: First Solar Wind Electron, Proton, Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) Results from the Advanced Composition Explorer. Appendix 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, D. J.; Bame, S. J.; Barker, P. L.; Delapp, D. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Tokar, R. L.; Riley, P.; Feldman, W. C.; Santiago, E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the first scientific results from the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) instrument on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. We analyzed a coronal mass ejection (CME) observed in the solar wind using data from early February, 1998. This event displayed several of the common signatures of CMEs, such as counterstreaming halo electrons and depressed ion and electron temperatures, as well as some unusual features. During a portion of the CME traversal, SWEPAM measured a very large helium to proton abundance ratio. Other heavy ions, with a set of ionization states consistent with normal (1 to 2x10(exp 6) K) coronal temperatures, were proportionately enhanced at this time. These observations suggest a source for at least some of the CME material, where heavy ions are initially concentrated relative to hydrogen and then accelerated up into the solar wind, independent of their mass and first ionization potential.

  19. The improvement of solar photocatalytic activity of ZnO by doping with Er3+:Y3Al5O12 during dye degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L. N.; Li, Y.; Wang, J.; Kong, Y. M.; Zhai, Y.; Wang, B. X.; Li, K.; Zhang, X. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Er3+:Y3Al5O12, an upconversion luminescence agent, which is able to transform the visible light to ultraviolet light, was synthesized by nitrate-citric acid method. And then, a novel photocatalyst, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO composites, was prepared by ultrasonic dispersing and liquid boil method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structural morphology and surface properties of the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO. Azo Fuchsine dye was selected as target organic pollutant to inspect the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO. The key parameters affecting the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO, such as Er3+:Y3Al5O12 content, heat-treatment temperature and heat-treatment time, were studied. In addition, the effects of dye initial concentration, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO amount and solar light irradiation time were also reviewed, as well as the photocatalytic activity in degradation of other organic dyes were compared. It was found that the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO was much superior to pure ZnO under the same conditions. Thus, the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO is a useful photocatalyst for the wastewater treatment because it can efficiently utilize solar light by converting visible light into ultraviolet light.

  20. Lead antimony sulfide (Pb5Sb8S17) solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with an efficiency of over 4%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete Asefa; Shi, Jen-Bin; Chen, Peter; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-04-01

    Lead antimony sulfides are rare in nature and relatively unexplored ternary semiconductors. This work investigates the photovoltaic performance of Pb-Sb-S quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles are grown on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes using the successive ionic layer adsorption reaction process. The synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles exhibit two attractive features for a good solar absorber material: a high optical absorption coefficient and a near optimal energy gap. Solid-state QDSCs are fabricated from the synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles using Spiro-OMeTAD as the hole-transporting material. The best cell yields a short-circuit current density Jsc of 11.92 mA cm-2, an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.48 V, a fill factor FF of 30.7% and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.76% under 1sun. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectrum covers a spectral range of 350-800 nm with a maximal EQE = 65% at λ = 450 nm. At the reduced light intensity of 10% sun, the PCE increases to 4.14% with Jsc = 2.0 mA cm-2 (which could be normalized to 20 mA cm-2 under 1 sun). This PCE is 65% higher than the best previous result. The respectable PCE and Jsc indicate that Pb5Sb8S17 could be a potential candidate for a solar absorber material.

  1. Solution-processed inverted organic solar cell using V2O5 hole transport layer and vacuum free EGaIn anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongul, Fatih

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the sol-gel V2O5 derived by a hydrothermal method to replace the PEDOT:PSS which is a hole transport layer between organic active layer and two different anodes in inverted organic solar cells with TiO2 as an electron transport layer was investigated. The power conversion efficiencies of inverted organic photovoltaic cells increased approximately twofold with using V2O5 instead of PEDOT:PSS on top of the photoactive layer. It was demonstrated that the power conversion efficiencies of inverted organic solar cells prepared with V2O5 solution which was diluted with isopropanol in certain proportions by volume were decreased by increasing ratio of isopropanol in total volume. It was reported for the first time that the inverted organic photovoltaic cells prepared using V2O5 interlayer and Eutectic Gallium-Indium alloy which was prepared using vacuum free simple brush-painted method and can be used as anode electrode as Ag electrode.

  2. Vanadium oxides (V2O5) prepared with different methods for application as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kezhong; Sun, Xiaolong; Duan, Chongyuan; Gao, Jing; Wu, Mingxing

    2016-09-01

    V2O5 was synthesized by four different procedures employing thermal decomposition, sol-gel, and hydrothermal methods which were subsequently introduced into dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as counter electrode (CE) catalysts for the regeneration of traditional iodide/triiodide (I-/I3 -) redox couple. The catalytic activities of as-prepared V2O5 were significantly affected by the synthetic routes as evidenced by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Tafel polarization curve. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the DSCs employing V2O5 CE, fabricated by thermal decomposition method, was observed to be 3.80 % by using citric acid as an additive, while the PCE of the DSCs using V2O5 CE prepared by hydrothermal and thermal decomposition methods without additive, as well as by a sol-gel procedure, was determined to be 2.13, 2.08, and 2.04 %, respectively.

  3. UV testing of INTELSAT-7, 7A, and 8 solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    A 4000 hour experiment, conducted in late 1992 through mid 1993, confirmed earlier results on the ultraviolet damage effects in covered solar cells of various types being used, or proposed for use, in INTELSAT programs. Two different UV test systems were used to identify systematic errors and to study the effects of UV source-bulb age on degradation rate. After correction for contamination and UV source-bulb aging, the extrapolated degradation rates for irradiated and unirradiated INTELSAT-5, -6 single AR(SAR) coated cells and INTELSAT-7, -7A, -8 double layer AR(DAR) coated cells in both the 1993 tests confirm the following hypotheses resulting from the 1992 experiment. (a) Irradiated cells display significantly more UV degradation than do the unirradiated cells for tests exceeding 2000 hours. The new data indicates that degradation effects from electron irradiation are proportional to t(exp 2) (the square of the UV hours), at least for times less than or equal to 3000 hours. (b) This difference does not depend upon entire reflective coating, cell resistivity, or manufacturer within the sensitivity and reproducibility of the experiment. (c) There is a clear difference in degradation rate between single AR coated cells (TiO(x)) and double layer AR coated cells (SiO(x) and Al2O3?). At 100,000 hours (11.4 years) the DAR coated cells display more degradation than do the SAR coated cells, even though at 1,000 hours the DAR cells display less degradation. (d) UV degradation rates, to modern covered silicon solar cells, at the beginning of bulb life drop from approximately 2 times the average rate to near zero after 2000 hours (average end-of-life for the xenon short-arc lamps used in the tests). The effects of 1 MeV electron irradiation (10(exp 15) e(-)/sq cm) prior to UV exposure are clearly indicated in the plot of percent change in cell open circuit voltage (Voc) versus percent change in short circuit current (Isc) during the UV test and post-test cleanup of the cells

  4. Galactic cosmic ray variations in the inner heliosphere from solar distances less than 0.5 AU: Measurements from the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Feldman, William C.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2016-08-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on board NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft is sensitive to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons greater than 125 MeV. During the MESSENGER orbital mission of Mercury, which lasted from March 2011 to April 2015, the NS made continual measurements of GCR variations, which represent the first long-term GCR measurements for solar distances less than 0.5 AU. These relative GCR variations are compared to GCR variations measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for Environmental Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The two data sets are highly correlated, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.91 to 0.98 for time integrations ranging from 1 to 25 days. The MESSENGER NS and CRaTER measurements of GCR variations are used to investigate the GCR radial gradient within the inner solar system. We find that the GCR radial gradient is less than 10% per AU, which is consistent with GCR radial gradients measured for solar distances greater than 1 AU.

  5. Discovery of a Similar to 5 Day Characteristic Timescale in the Kepler Power Spectrum of Zw 229-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Malkan, M.; Kelly, B. C.; Smith, K. L.; Boyd, P. T.; Mushotzky, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present time series analyses of the full Kepler dataset of Zw 229- 15. This Kepler light curve- with a baseline greater than three years, composed of virtually continuous, evenly sampled 30-minute measurements - is unprecedented in its quality and precision. We utilize two methods of power spectral analysis to investigate the optical variability and search for evidence of a bend frequency associated with a characteristic optical variability timescale. Each method yields similar results. The first interpolates across data gaps to use the standard Fourier periodogram. The second, using the CARMA-based time-domain modeling technique of Kelly et al., does not need evenly-sampled data. Both methods find excess power at high frequencies that may be due to Kepler instrumental effects. More importantly both also show strong bends (delta alpha is approx. 2) at timescales of approx. 5 days, a feature similar to those seen in the X-ray PSDs of AGN but never before in the optical. This observed approx. 5 day timescale may be associated with one of several physical processes potentially responsible for the variability. A plausible association could be made with light -crossing, dynamical or thermal timescales, depending on the assumed value of the accretion disk size and on unobserved disk parameters such as alpha and H¬R. This timescale is not consistent with the viscous timescale, which would be years in a approx. 10(exp7) solar mass AGN such as Zw 229- 15. However there must be a second bend on long (& 1 year) timescales, and that feature could be associated with the viscous timescale.

  6. RT-2 DETECTION OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN THE 2009 JULY 5 SOLAR HARD X-RAY FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A. R.; Malkar, J. P.; Hingar, M. K.; Agrawal, V. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Nandi, A.; Debnath, D.; Kotoch, T. B.; Chidambaram, T. R.; Vinod, P.; Sreekumar, S.; Kotov, Y. D.; Buslov, A. S.; Yurov, V. N.; Tyshkevich, V. G.; Arkhangelskij, A. I.; Zyatkov, R. A.; Begum, S. Shaheda; Manoharan, P. K.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of an analysis of hard X-ray observations of the C2.7 solar flare detected by the RT-2 experiment on board the Coronas-Photon satellite. We detect hard X-ray pulsations at periods of {approx}12 s and {approx}15 s. We find a marginal evidence for a decrease in period with time. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the RHESSI satellite. We present a spectral analysis and measure the spectral parameters.

  7. Micron-Sized Dust Particles Detected in the Outer Solar System by the Voyager 1 and 2 Plasma Wave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Ansher, J. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Granroth, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of the outer planets it has been demonstrated that the plasma wave instrument can detect small dust particles striking the spacecraft. In this paper, we examine the Voyager plasma wave data for dust impacts in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 6 to 60 astronomical units (AU). The results show that a small but persistent level of dust impacts exists out to at least 30 to 50 AU. The average number density of these particles is about 2 x 10(exp -8)/cu m, and the average mass of the impacting particles is believed to be a few times 10(exp -11) g, which corresponds to particle diameters in the micron range. Possible sources of these particles are planets, moons, asteroids, comets, and the interstellar medium. Of these, comets appear to be the most likely source. The number densities are only weakly dependent on ecliptic latitude, which indicates that the particles probably do not originate from planets, moons, or asteroids. Comparisons with interstellar dust fluxes measured in the inner regions of the solar system by the Ulysses spacecraft indicate that the particles are not of interstellar origin.

  8. Micron-Sized Dust Particles Detected in the Outer Solar System by the Voyager 1 and 2 Plasma Wave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Ansher, J. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Granroth, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of the outer planets it has been demonstrated that the plasma wave instrument can detect small dust particles striking the spacecraft. In this paper, we examine the Voyager plasma wave data for dust impacts in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 6 to 60 astronomical units (AU). The results show that a small but persistent level of dust impacts exists out to at least 30 to 50 AU. The average number density of these particles is about 2 x 10(exp -8)/cu m, and the average mass of the impacting particles is believed to be a few times 10(exp -11) g, which corresponds to particle diameters in the micron range. Possible sources of these particles are planets, moons, asteroids, comets, and the interstellar medium. Of these, comets appear to be the most likely source. ne number densities are only weakly dependent on ecliptic latitude, which indicates that the particles probably do not originate from planets, moons, or asteroids. Comparisons with interstellar dust fluxes measured in the inner regions of the solar system by the Ulysses spacecraft indicate that the particles are not of interstellar origin.

  9. DETERMINATION OF LOW-ENERGY CUTOFFS AND TOTAL ENERGY OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to the spectrum of accelerated electrons is decisive for the estimation of the total nonthermal energy in solar flares. Because thermal bremsstrahlung dominates the low-energy part of flare X-ray spectra, this cutoff energy is difficult to determine with spectral fitting alone. We have used anew method that combines spatial, spectral, and temporal analysis to determine the cutoff energy for the M1.2 flare observed with RHESSI on 2002 April 15. A low-energy cutoff of 24 +/- 2 keV is required to ensure that the assumed thermal emissions always dominate over nonthermal emissions at low energies (<20 keV) and that the spectral fitting results are consistent with the RHESSI light curves and images. With this cutoff energy, we obtain a total nonthermal energy in electrons of (1.6 +/- 1) x 10(exp 30) ergs that is comparable to the peak energy in the thermal plasma, estimated from RHESSI observations to be (6 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp 29) ergs assuming a filling factor of 1.

  10. Predicting interplanetary shock arrivals at Earth, Mars, and Venus: A real-time modeling experiment following the solar flares of 5-14 December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Dryer, M.; Fry, C. D.; Smith, Z. K.; Intriligator, D. S.; Courtney, W. R.; Deehr, C. S.; Sun, W.; Kecskemety, K.; Kudela, K.; Balaz, J.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.

    2008-06-01

    A 3-D, kinematic, solar wind model (Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry version 2 (HAFv.2)) is used to predict interplanetary shock arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars during a sequence of significant solar events that occurred in the interval 5-14 December 2006. Mars and Venus were on the opposite side of the Sun from Earth during this period. The shocks from the first two east limb events (5 and 6 December) were predicted to interact to form a single disturbance before reaching Earth and Venus. A single shock was indeed recorded at Earth only about 3 h earlier than had been predicted. The composite shock was predicted by HAFv.2 to arrive at Venus on 8 December at ˜0500 UT. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) were detected in Venus Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms-4 data for some 3 d (from <0530 UT on 6 December), and an energetic storm particle (ESP) event signaled the arrival of a single shock wave at 0900 UT on 7 December. SEPs were correspondingly recorded at Mars. However, the eastern flank of the composite shock was predicted to decay to an MHD wave prior to reaching this location, and no shock signature was observed in the available data. The shocks generated in association with two flare events that occurred closer to the West Limb on 13 and 14 December were predicted by HAFv.2 to remain separate when they arrived at Earth but to combine thereafter before reaching Mars. Each was expected to decay to MHD waves before reaching Venus, which was at that time located behind the Sun. Separated shocks were observed to arrive at L1 (ACE) only 8 min earlier than and 5.3 h later than their predicted times. The western flank of the combined shocks was predicted to arrive at Mars early on 20 December 2006. An indication of the passage of this shock was provided by a signature of ion heating in Mars Express IMA (ion mass-resolving analyzer) data from <0424 UT on 20 December. The predictions of the HAFv.2 model for Earth were each well within the ±11 h. RMS error

  11. Development of a Wide Bandgap Cell for Thin Film Tandem Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 6 November 2003 - 5 January 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Shafarman, W.; McCandless, B.

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop approaches for a transparent wide-bandgap cell to be used in a thin-film tandem polycrystalline solar cell that can ultimately attain 25% efficiency. Specific goals included the research and development of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 and Cd1-xZnxTe alloys with a bandgap from 1.5 to 1.8 eV, demonstrating the potential of a 15% cell efficiency with a transparent contact, and supporting the High Performance PV Program. This Final Report presents results that emphasize the 3rd phase of the program.

  12. Solar dynamic heat pipe development and endurance test. Monthly technical progress report number 5, 30 September--28 October, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, M.B.

    1987-10-28

    The Space Station requires a high level of reliable electric power. The baseline approach is to utilize a hybrid system in which power is provided by photovoltaic arrays and by solar dynamic power conversion modules. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is one approach to solar dynamic conversion. The ORC provides the attributes of high efficiency at low temperature and compact simple designs utilizing conventional techniques and materials. The heat receiver is one area which must be addressed in applying the proven ORC to long life applications such as the Space Station. Heat pipes with integral thermal energy storage (TES) canisters and a toluene heater tube are the prime components of the heat receiver from the Phase B preliminary design. This contract is a task order type addressing the design, fabrication and testing of a full scale heat pipe. The contract was initiated on April 16, 1987. Sundstrand has specific responsibilities in each task. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in turn has the prime contract responsibility to NASA-LeRC.

  13. The energy-down-shift effect of Cd(0.5)Zn(0.5)S-ZnS core-shell quantum dots on power-conversion-efficiency enhancement in silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Wook; Shim, Jae-Hyoung; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-09-14

    We found that Cd0.5Zn0.5S-ZnS core (4.2 nm in diameter)-shell (1.2 nm in thickness) quantum dots (QDs) demonstrated a typical energy-down-shift (2.76-4.96 → 2.81 eV), which absorb ultra-violet (UV) light (250-450 nm in wavelength) and emit blue visible light (∼442 nm in wavelength). They showed the quantum yield of ∼80% and their coating on the SiNX film textured p-type silicon solar-cells enhanced the external-quantum-efficiency (EQE) of ∼30% at 300-450 nm in wavelength, thereby enhancing the short-circuit-current-density (JSC) of ∼2.23 mA cm(-2) and the power-conversion-efficiency (PCE) of ∼1.08% (relatively ∼6.04% increase compared with the reference without QDs for p-type silicon solar-cells). In particular, the PCE peaked at a specific coating thickness of the Cd0.5Zn0.5S-ZnS core-shell QD layer; i.e., the 1.08% PCE enhancement at the 8.8 nm thick QD layer.

  14. Solar '80s: A Teacher's Handbook for Solar Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaHart, David E.

    This guide is intended to assist the teacher in exploring energy issues and the technology of solar energy conversion and associated technologies. Sections of the guide include: (1) Rationale; (2) Technology Overview; (3) Sun Day Suggestions for School; (4) Backyard Solar Water Heater; (5) Solar Tea; (6) Biogas; (7) Solar Cells; (8) Economics; (9)…

  15. Synthesis and characterization of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-based copolymers for polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sora; Shin, Won Suk; Lee, Jong-Cheol; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Taek

    2015-09-01

    Two benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT)-based copolymers, poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl) thiophene-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-alt-5,8-(2,3-bis(4-octyloxy)phenyl)quinoxaline] (P1) and poly[4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophene-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-alt-5,7-(2,3-bis(4- octyloxy)phenyl)thieno[3,4-b]pyrazine] (P2), are synthesized and used as donor materials in polymer solar cells (PSCs). To obtain a low band gap polymer, we use a copolymerized donor-acceptor structure. The optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties of the copolymers are investigated. The results indicate that the acceptor units in the copolymers influenced the band gap, electronic energy levels, and photovoltaic properties of the copolymers significantly. The band gaps of the copolymers are in the range 1.34 - 1.75 eV. Under optimized conditions, the BDT-based polymers showed power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) for the PSCs in the range 1.46 - 2.05% under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW/cm2).

  16. Solar Pumped Solid State Lasers for Space Solar Power: Experimental Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Carrington, Connie K.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Green, Jason J. A.; Laycock, Rustin L.

    2003-01-01

    We outline an experimentally based strategy designed to lead to solar pumped solid state laser oscillators useful for space solar power. Our method involves solar pumping a novel solid state gain element specifically designed to provide efficient conversion of sunlight in space to coherent laser light. Kilowatt and higher average power is sought from each gain element. Multiple such modular gain elements can be used to accumulate total average power of interest for power beaming in space, e.g., 100 kilowatts and more. Where desirable the high average power can also be produced as a train of pulses having high peak power (e.g., greater than 10(exp 10 watts). The modular nature of the basic gain element supports an experimental strategy in which the core technology can be validated by experiments on a single gain element. We propose to do this experimental validation both in terrestrial locations and also on a smaller scale in space. We describe a terrestrial experiment that includes diagnostics and the option of locating the laser beam path in vacuum environment. We describe a space based experiment designed to be compatible with the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We anticipate the gain elements will be based on low temperature (approx. 100 degrees Kelvin) operation of high thermal conductivity (k approx. 100 W/cm-K) diamond and sapphire (k approx. 4 W/cm-K). The basic gain element will be formed by sequences of thin alternating layers of diamond and Ti:sapphire with special attention given to the material interfaces. We anticipate this strategy will lead to a particularly simple, robust, and easily maintained low mass modelocked multi-element laser oscillator useful for space solar power.

  17. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerty, J.J.

    1980-01-31

    Construction of an automated solar cell layup and interconnect system is now complete. This system incorporates a Unimate 2000 B industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a vacuum pick up and induction heating coil. The robot interfaces with a smart cell preparation station which correctly orients the cell, applies solder paste and forms and positions the correct lengths of interconnect lead. The system is controlled and monitored by a TRS-80 micro computer. The first operational tests of the fully integrated station have been run. These tests proved the soundness of the basic design concept but also pointed to areas in which modifications are necessary. These modifications are nearly complete and the improved parts are being integrated. Development of the controlling computer program is progressing to both reflect these changes and reduce operating time.

  18. Results of the 1997 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of three flights, the first flight on June 11, 1997, the second flight on August 2, 1997, and the third flight on August 24, 1997. One flight, flown on August 14, 1997, was terminated early because of a telemetry transmitter failure, and its payload was reflown on the August 24 flight. All objectives of the flight program were met. Ninety-eight modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on 32 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 66 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  19. Results of the 1999 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 14, 1999, and July 6, 1999. All objectives of the flight program were met. Fifty-seven modules were carried to an altitude of approximately equal to 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on five of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on forty-three modules (forty-five cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10 (exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  20. Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Loferski, J.J.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

  1. Enhancement of solar light photocatalytic activity of TiO2-CeO2 composite by Er3+:Y3Al5O12 in organic dye degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Li, S. G.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Ma, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Er3+:Y3Al5O12, as an upconversion luminescence agent which is able to transform the visible part of the solar light to ultraviolet light, was prepared by nitrate-citrate sol-gel method. A novel solar light photocatalyst, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite was synthesized using ultrasonic treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning election microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structural morphology of the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite. In order to evaluate the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite, the Azo Fuchsine dye was used as a model organic pollutant. The progress of the degradation reaction was monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy and ion chromatography. The key influences on the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 were studied, such as Ti/Ce molar ratio, heat-treatment temperature and heat-treatment time. Otherwise, the effects of initial dye concentration, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 amount, solar light irradiation time and the nature of the dye on the solar light photocatalytic degradation process were investigated. It was found that the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite was superior to Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2 and Er3+:Y3Al5O12/CeO2 powder in the similar conditions.

  2. Solar Power System Design for the Solar Probe+ Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Kinnison, James; Fraeman, Martin; Roufberg, Lew; Vernon, Steve; Wirzburger, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Solar Probe+ is an ambitious mission proposed to the solar corona, designed to make a perihelion approach of 9 solar radii from the surface of the sun. The high temperature, high solar flux environment makes this mission a significant challenge for power system design. This paper summarizes the power system conceptual design for the solar probe mission. Power supplies considered included nuclear, solar thermoelectric generation, solar dynamic generation using Stirling engines, and solar photovoltaic generation. The solar probe mission ranges from a starting distance from the sun of 1 AU, to a minimum distance of about 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU, from the center of the sun. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 510 times AM0. This requires power systems that can operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  3. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 10(exp 4) more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  4. The Rate Constant for the Reaction H + C2H5 at T = 295 - 150K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pimentel, Andre S.; Payne, Walter A.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Cody, Regina J.; Stief, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction between the hydrogen atom and the ethyl (C2H3) radical is predicted by photochemical modeling to be the most important loss process for C2H5 radicals in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. This reaction is also one of the major sources for the methyl radicals in these atmospheres. These two simplest hydrocarbon radicals are the initial species for the synthesis of larger hydrocarbons. Previous measurements of the rate constant for the H + C2H5 reaction varied by a factor of five at room temperature, and some studies showed a dependence upon temperature while others showed no such dependence. In addition, the previous studies were at higher temperatures and generally higher pressures than that needed for use in planetary atmospheric models. The rate constant for the reaction H + C2H5 has been measured directly at T = 150, 202 and 295 K and at P = 1.0 Torr He for all temperatures and additionally at P = 0.5 and 2.0 Torr He at T = 202 K. The measurements were performed in a discharge - fast flow system. The decay of the C2H5 radical in the presence of excess hydrogen was monitored by low-energy electron impact mass spectrometry under pseudo-first order conditions. H atoms and C2H5 radicals were generated rapidly and simultaneously by the reaction of fluorine atoms with H2 and C2H6, respectively. The total rate constant was found to be temperature and pressure independent. The measured total rate constant at each temperature are: k(sub 1)(295K) = (1.02+/-0.24)x10(exp -10), k(sub 1)(202K) = (1.02+/-0.22)x10(exp -10) and k(sub 1)(150K) = (0.93+/-0.21)x10(exp -10), all in units of cu cm/molecule/s. The total rate constant derived from all the combined measurements is k(sub 1) = (l.03+/-0.17)x10(exp -10) cu cm/molecule/s. At room temperature our results are about a factor of two higher than the recommended rate constant and a factor of three lower than the most recently published study.

  5. Excitation of Low-frequency Waves in the Solar Wind by Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions H+ and He+ as Seen by Voyager at 4.5 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Colin J.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Murphy, Neil; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of a spectral enhancement in the magnetic field fluctuations measured by the MAG instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft during 4.5 hr on DOY 7, 1979 at a heliocentric radial position of 4.5 AU. This time period is contained within a solar wind rarefaction when the large-scale interplanetary magnetic field was nearly radial. The frequency range and polarization of the enhanced fluctuations are consistent with waves generated by newly ionized interstellar H+ and He+. We show sunward propagation of the waves via a cross-helicity analysis. We compare the observation with a theoretical model and find reasonable agreement given the model assumptions. This event is the first indication of pickup ion-generated waves seen at Voyager. It is also the first identification of pickup He+ waves by any spacecraft.

  6. On reflection of Alfven waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogulec, M.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; Moore, R. L.; Nerney, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of propagation of toroidal and linear Alfven waves formulated by Heinemann and Olbert (1980) to compare WKB and non-WKB waves and their effects on the solar wind. They considered two solar wind models and showed that reflection is important for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one day and longer, and that non-WKB Alfven waves are no more effective in accelerating the solar wind than WKB waves. There are several recently published papers which seem to indicate that Alfven waves with periods of the order of several minutes should be treated as non-WKB waves and that these non-WKB waves exert a stronger acceleration force than WKB waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the origin of these discrepancies by performing parametric studies of the behavior of the waves under a variety of different conditions. In addition, we want to investigate two problems that have not been addressed by Heinemann and Olbert, namely, calculate the efficiency of Alfven wave reflection by using the reflection coefficient and identify the region of strongest wave reflection in different wind models. To achieve these goals, we investigated the influence of temperature, electron density distribution, wind velocity and magnetic field strength on the waves. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that Alfven wave reflection is strongly model dependent and that the strongest reflection can be expected in models with the base temperatures higher than 10(exp 6) K and with the base densities lower than 7 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3). In these models as well as in the models with lower temperatures and higher densities, Alfven waves with periods as short as several minutes have negligible reflection so that they can be treated as WKB waves; however, for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one hour or longer reflection is significant, requiring a non-WKB treatment. We also show that non-WKB, linear Alfven waves are always less effective in accelerating the

  7. Reflection of Alfven waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogulec, M.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.; Moore, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of propagation of toroidal and linear Alfven waves formulated by Heinemann and Olbert (1980) to compare Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) and non-WKB waves and their effects on the solar wind. They considered two solar wind models and showed that reflection is important for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one day and longer and that non-WKB Alfven waves are no more effective in accelerating the solar wind than in WKB waves. There are several recently published papers that seem to indicate that Alfven waves with periods of the order of several minutes should be treated as non-WKB waves and that these non-WKB waves exert a stronger acceleration force than WKB waves. The purposse of this paper is to study the origin of these discrepancies by performing parametric studies of the behavior of the waves under a variety of different conditions. In addition, we want to investigate two problems that have not been addressed by Heinimann and Olbert, namely, calculate the efficieny of Alfven wave reflection by using the reflection coefficient and identfy the region of strongest wave reflection in different wind models. To achieve these goals, we investigate the influence of temperature, electron desity distribution, wind velocity, and magnetic field strength on te waves. The obtained results clearly demonstrate that Alfven wave reflection is strongly model dependent and that the strongest reflection can be expected in models with the base temperatures higher than 10(exp 6) K and with the base densities lower than 7 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. In these models as well as in the models with lower temperatures and higher densities Alfven waves with periods as short as several minutes have negligible reflection so that they can be treated as WKB waves; however, for Alfven waves with periods of the order of one hour or longer reflection is significant, requiring a non-WKB treatment. We also show that non-WKB, linear Alfven waves are always less effective

  8. Extinction coefficient (1 micrometer) properties of high-altitude clouds from solar occultation measurements (1985-1990): Evidence of volcanic aerosol effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Minnis, Patrick; Yue, Glenn K.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of the 1-micrometer volume extinction coefficient of two geographically different high-altitude cloud systems have been examined for the posteruption period (1985-1990) of the April 1982 El Chichon volcanic event with emphasis on the effect of volcanic aerosols on clouds. These two high-altitude cloud systems are the tropical clouds in the tropopause region observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 and the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) sighted by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) 2. The results indicate that volcanic aerosols alter the frequency distributions of these high-altitude clouds in such a manner that the occurrence of clouds having high extinction coefficients (6 x 10(exp -3) - 2 x 10(exp -2)/km) is suppressed, while that of clouds having low extinction coefficients (2 x 10(exp -3) - 6 x 10(exp -2)/km) is enhanced. This influence of the volcanic aerosols appears to be opposite to the increase in the extinction coefficient of optically thick clouds observed by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) during the initial posteruption period of the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption. A plausible explanation of this difference, based on the Mie theory, is presented. As a consequence of the Mie theory, the effective radius of most, if not all, of the high-altitude clouds, measured by the SAGE series of satellite instruments must be less than about 0.8 micrometers. This mean cloud particle size implied by the satellite extinction-coefficient data at a single wavelength (1 micrometer) is further substantiated by the particle size analysis based on cloud extinction coefficient at two wavelengths (0.525 and 1.02 micrometers) obtained by the SAGE 2 observations. Most of the radiation measured by ERBE is reflected by cloud systems comprised of particles having effective radii much greater than 1 micrometer. A reduction in the effective radius of these clouds due to volcanic aerosols is expected to increase their

  9. Solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in South African children aged under 5 years: the role of participant motivation.

    PubMed

    Du Preez, Martella; Mcguigan, Kevin G; Conroy, Ronan M

    2010-11-15

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) effectively improves the microbial quality of drinking water for preventing diarrhea; however, the effect of participant motivation has not been studied. This 1-year randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of SODIS of drinking water and motivation on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in periurban communities in South Africa.We compared 383 children in 297 households using SODIS with 335 children in 267 households with no intervention. At baseline 62.4% of the study households had stored water which met World Health Organization guidelines for zero thermotolerant coliforms per 100 mL. Dysentery was recorded using a pictorial diary. Incidence of dysentery was significantly associated with higher motivation, defined as 75% or better completion of diarrhea data. Incidence rates were lower in those drinking solar disinfected water (incidence rate ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.39 - 1.0, P = 0.071) but not statistically significant. Compared with the control, participants with higher motivation achieved a significant reduction in dysentery (incidence rate ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.16 - 0.81, P = 0.014). However, there was no significant reduction in risk at lower levels of motivation. Solar disinfection was not significantly associated with nondysentery diarrhea risk overall (P = 0.419). A statistically significant reduction in dysentery was achieved only in households with higher motivation, showing that motivation is a significant determinant for measurable health gains. Failure of three-quarters of participants to achieve a significant reduction in dysentery suggests that research into effective implementation is required.

  10. Analysis of the 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f-5g supermultiplet of Fe I in laboratory and solar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Geller, M.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.; Schoenfeld, W. G.; Change, E. S.; Farmer, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The combined laboratory and solar analysis of the highly excited subconfigurations 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f and 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)5g of Fe I has allowed us to classify 87 lines of the 4f-5g supermultiplet in the spectral region 2545-2585 per cm. The level structure of these JK-coupled configurations is predicted by semiempirical calculations and the quardrupolic approximation. Semiempirical gf-values have been calculated and are compared to gf-values derived from the solar spectrum. The solar analysis has shown that these lines, which should be much less sensitive than lower excitation lines to departures from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) and to temperature uncertanties, lead to a solar abundance of iron which is consistent with the meteoritic value (A(sub Fe) = 7.51).

  11. EPIC Study of Two Enigmatic Sources: The Mouse and SNR 359.1-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, George

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the original proposal was to observe the Mouse pulsar wind nebula (associated with PSR J1744-2958) and the nearby supernova remnant G359.1-0.5, where the pulsar was probably born, with the XMM-Newton observatory to study the properties of these objects. SNR G359.1-0.5 was accepted as a Category C target and has not been observed. The Mouse was observed on April 27,2003 for 52 ks. The image analysis has shown that the Mouse is extended in the East-West direction, possibly along the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum of this pulsar wind nebula can be described as an absorbed power law with the photon index GAMMA = 1.9 plus or minus 0.1, effective hydrogen column density n(sub H) = (2.6 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, and flux F = 1.8 x 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter per second in the 1-10 keV energy range. Based on the n(sub H) value, the distance to the source is about 5 kpc, which results in the luminosity 3.7 x 10(exp 34) erg per second. We conclude that PSR J1744-2958 and the Mouse are not physically associated with G359.1-0.5, which lies at a larger distance. In addition to the Mouse, we also detected two Low-Mass X-ray Binaries, SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300, in the EPIC MOS and PN fields of view. The latter of these objects showed a Type I X-ray burst during our observation, with a rise time of 5 s and decay time of 60 s. A very strong pileup during the burst made the analysis of the burst properties unreliable. The spectral analysis of the persistent radiation from SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300 yields the hydrogen column densities of 3.2 plus or minus 0.1 and (3.6 plus or minus 0.2) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, respectively, which suggests that the sources are close to the Galactic center (d = 8-9 kpc). The spectra can be reasonably well fitted with a blackbody plus thin disk model, with the blackbody temperatures of 1.7 plus or minus 0.2 and 1.8 plus or minus 0.2 keV, respectively.

  12. Comprehensive silicon solar cell computer modeling. Quarterly progress report No. 1, January 5, 1984-April 4, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lamorte, M.F.

    1984-06-01

    The general method to solve the transport equations for a solar cell is discussed. To obtain an accurate representation of a physical system, the system geometry is divided into a number of segments (mesh points). In a one-dimensional geometry, the segments are defined by a series of parallel planes. The separation of the planes defining the segments determines the simulation accuracy. The segments may be taken as thin as required to obtain the accuracy desired. The transport equations, governing the behavior of the physical system, are applied to each segment, and a closed-form solution is obtained in each of the segments. A brief discussion is presented of some of the phenomena submodels in the model and the representations used in the simulation program. The submodels cover such phenomena as mobility, diffusivities, boundary conditions at depletion region edges and those imposed at the mesh points, bandgap narrowing and intrinsic concentration, carrier lifetime, induced surface electric field, and built-in fields. (LEW)

  13. Mg-Zr Cosubstituted Ta3N5 Photoanode for Lower-Onset-Potential Solar-Driven Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Nakabayashi, Mamiko; Hisatomi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-10-14

    In p/n photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell systems, a low onset potential for the photoanode, as well as a high photocurrent, are critical for efficient water splitting. Here, we report a Mg-Zr cosubstituted Ta3N5 (Ta3N5:Mg+Zr) photoanode, designed to provide a more negative onset potential for PEC water splitting. The anodic photocurrent onset on Ta3N5:Mg+Zr was 0.55 V(RHE) under AM 1.5G-simulated sunlight, which represented a negative shift from the ca. 0.8 V(RHE) for pure Ta3N5. This negative shift in the onset potential of PEC water splitting was attributed to the change in the bandgap potential due to partial substitution by the foreign ions Mg(2+) and/or Zr(4+). PMID:26426439

  14. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  15. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  16. Study of a Solar X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The highly structured nature of the outer solar atmosphere seems to be intimately linked to the presence, at the solar surface, of magnetic fields that have been generated inside the Sun and have emerged to the surface. The corona is brightest (and also hottest) at just those locations where the magnetic field has emerged from inside the Sun. Dynamo theory predicts that strong magnetic fields will be generated deep in the solar interior and that bundles or 'ropes' of magnetic flux will float to the surface. When this happens, a magnetically bipolar region will become visible, extending above the surface in a three-dimensional structure. The field lines penetrate through the surface, showing two magnetic poles, and also exhibit a three-dimensional structure above the surface. The structure created by the field emergence is rooted in the (relatively) cool photosphere and extends through the chromosphere and transition region to the corona. Thus, the magnetic field creates a region, called an active region, which contains portions at temperatures from less than 10(exp 4) K to greater than 10(exp 6) K, and is therefore visible at wavelengths from the infrared through x-rays. The locations where the magnetic field leaves and reenters the visible surface are called the 'footpoints' of the coronal structures associated with the magnetic field. The magnetic fields themselves are not directly visible. However, the hot coronal plasma is, for the most part, constrained to follow the direction of the magnetic field lines in the atmosphere. Now, 100 years after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1896, we can routinely make observations of the solar corona from outside the Earth's atmosphere in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As shown by comparing x-ray images with magnetograms, the bright corona over these bipolar magnetic regions consists of closed structures that seem to follow the orientation of the magnetic field. Although we can see down to the

  17. Solar cell arcing: The role of outgassing and contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Green, B. D.; Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G.; Hastings, D.; Aifer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of outgassing, venting, and thruster firing events on spacecraft system performance has been a long standing issue. Recent laboratory measurements on negatively biased high voltage solar cells at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) suggest that some currently designed and certainly future space power systems must address/re-evaluate this issue. Our observations show that exposing these cells to moderate levels (10 exp -3 torr-min) of H2O vapor enhances the arcing frequency, while heating to 85 C to remove water vapor significantly reduces the arc frequency. The interaction of the adhesive used to attach the cover glass to the solar cell with ambient water vapor is the key factor in determining arcing rates. Elimination of adhesive exposed to the environmental plasma reduces the arc frequency more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminates any sensitivity to H2O exposure. The adhesive may also become a source of spacecraft contamination. Macroscopic amounts were observed to blow off some arc events, and (we assume) electrostatically precipitate at other negatively biased locations. Data, analysis, and potential impact for future space platforms are discussed.

  18. Solar Spicules near and at The Limb, Observed from Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Solar spicules appear as narrow jets emanating from the chromosphere and extending into the corona. They have been observed for over a hundred years,mainly in chromospheric spectral lines such as H-alpha. Because they are at the limit of visibility of ground-based instruments, their nature has long been a puzzle. In recent years however, vast progress has been made in understanding them both theoretically and observationally. Most recently, spicule studies have undergone revolution because of the superior resolution, time cadence, and atmosphere-free observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) instrument on the Hinode spacecraft. Here we present observations of spicules from {\\sl Hinode} SOT, and consider how the observations from Hinode compare with historical observations. We include data taken in the blue and red wings of Halpha, where the spicules have widths of a few approx.100 kms, and the longest ones reach about 10(exp 4) km in extent,similar to sizes long reported from ground-based instruments. Their dynamics are not easy to generalize, with many showing the upward movement followed by falling or fading, as traditionally reported, but with others showing more dynamic or even ejective aspects. There is a strong transverse component to their motion, as extensively reported previously from the Hinode data as evidence for Alfven waves.

  19. An Ultra-luminous Quasar at z = 5.363 with a Ten Billion Solar Mass Black Hole and a Metal-rich DLA at z ∼ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Cai, Zheng; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian D.; Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin; Yang, Qian; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar J030642.51+185315.8 (hereafter J0306+1853) at redshift 5.363, which hosts a supermassive black hole with {M}{BH}=(1.07+/- 0.27)× {10}10 {M}ȯ . With an absolute magnitude {M}1450=-28.92 and a bolometric luminosity {L}{bol}∼ 3.4× {10}14{L}ȯ , J0306+1853 is one of the most luminous objects in the early universe. It is not likely to be a beamed source based on its small flux variability, low radio loudness, and normal broad emission lines. In addition, a z=4.986 damped Lyα system (DLA) with [{{M}}/{{H}}]=-1.3+/- 0.1, among the most metal-rich DLAs at z≳ 5, is detected in the absorption spectrum of this quasar. This ultra-luminous quasar puts strong constraints on the bright end of the quasar luminosity function and massive end of the black hole mass function. It will provide a unique laboratory for the study of BH growth and the co-evolution between a BH and the host galaxy with multi-wavelength follow-up observations. The future high-resolution spectra will give more insight into the DLA and other absorption systems along the line of sight of J0306+1853.

  20. Side-chain Engineering of Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene Core-structured Small Molecules for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xinxing; An, Qiaoshi; Yu, Jiangsheng; Guo, Fengning; Geng, Yongliang; Bian, Linyi; Xu, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Baojing; Xie, Linghai; Zhang, Fujun; Tang, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Three novel small molecules have been developed by side-chain engineering on benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene (BDT) core. The typical acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure is adopted with 4,8-functionalized BDT moieties as core, dioctylterthiophene as π bridge and 3-ethylrhodanine as electron-withdrawing end group. Side-chain engineering on BDT core exhibits small but measurable effect on the optoelectronic properties of small molecules. Theoretical simulation and X-ray diffraction study reveal the subtle tuning of interchain distance between conjugated backbones has large effect on the charge transport and thus the photovoltaic performance of these molecules. Bulk-heterojunction solar cells fabricated with a configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/SM:PC71BM/PFN/Al exhibit a highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.99% after solvent vapor annealing. PMID:27140224

  1. Draft genome sequence of Halorubrum tropicale strain V5, a novel halophilic archaeon isolated from the solar salterns of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Nieves, Rubén; Facciotti, Marc T.; Saavedra-Collado, Sofía; Dávila-Santiago, Lizbeth; Rodríguez-Carrero, Roy; Montalvo-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The genus Halorubrum is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae which currently has the highest number of described species (31) of all the haloarchaea. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain V5, a new species within this genus that was isolated from the solar salterns of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico. Assembly was performed and rendered the genome into 17 contigs (N50 = 515,834 bp), the largest of which contains 1,031,026 bp. The genome consists of 3.57 MB in length with G + C content of 67.6%. In general, the genome includes 4 rRNAs, 52 tRNAs, and 3246 protein-coding sequences. The NCBI accession number for this genome is LIST00000000 and the strain deposit number is CECT9000. PMID:26981427

  2. Side-chain Engineering of Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene Core-structured Small Molecules for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xinxing; An, Qiaoshi; Yu, Jiangsheng; Guo, Fengning; Geng, Yongliang; Bian, Linyi; Xu, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Baojing; Xie, Linghai; Zhang, Fujun; Tang, Weihua

    2016-05-01

    Three novel small molecules have been developed by side-chain engineering on benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene (BDT) core. The typical acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure is adopted with 4,8-functionalized BDT moieties as core, dioctylterthiophene as π bridge and 3-ethylrhodanine as electron-withdrawing end group. Side-chain engineering on BDT core exhibits small but measurable effect on the optoelectronic properties of small molecules. Theoretical simulation and X-ray diffraction study reveal the subtle tuning of interchain distance between conjugated backbones has large effect on the charge transport and thus the photovoltaic performance of these molecules. Bulk-heterojunction solar cells fabricated with a configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/SM:PC71BM/PFN/Al exhibit a highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.99% after solvent vapor annealing.

  3. Optical properties of thermal control coating contaminated by MMH/N2O4 5-pound thruster in a vacuum environment with solar simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommers, R. D.; Raquet, C. A.; Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Cat-a-lac Black, and S13G thermal control coatings were exposed to the exhaust of a thruster in a simulated space environment. Vacuum was maintained at less than 10 to the minus 5th power torr during thruster firing in the liquid helium cooled facility. The thruster was fired in a 50-millisecond pulse mode and the accumulated firing time was 224 seconds. Solar absorptance (alpha sub s) and thermal emittance (sigma) of the coatings were measured in-situ at intervals of 300 pulses. A calorimetric technique was used to measure alpha sub s and sigma. The tests, technique, and test results are presented. The Cat-a-lac Black coatings showed no change in alpha sub s or sigma. The S13G showed up to 25 percent increase in alpha sub s but no change in sigma.

  4. Simple Experiments on the Use of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, G. J.; Goldsmid, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes 5 solar energy experiments that can be used in secondary school: flat-plate collector, solar thermoelectric generator, simple concentrators, solar cell, and natural storage of solar energy. (MLH)

  5. Efficient all polymer solar cells employing donor polymer based on benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guanqun; Yuan, Jianyu; Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Zeke; Shi, Guozheng; Shi, Shaohua; Ding, Jiexiong; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Ma, Wanli

    2015-11-01

    We reported all polymer solar cells (all-PSCs) employing BDT-based donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers composed of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) and thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine (PyTZ) (PBPT-8 and PBPT-12) as donor and NDI-based n-type polymer Poly{[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)} (P(NDI2OD-T2)) (N2200) as acceptor. The influence of thermal annealing on the performance of all-PSCs was systematically investigated and discussed. It was found that the pre-annealing of the active blend films could significantly improve the all-PSCs performance. Both PBPT-8/PBPT-12:N2200 systems can deliver promising PCEs (4.12% and 4.25%) at the optimal annealing temperature of 160 oC due to the promoted film quality and charge transport properties. Morphology investigation and carrier mobility measurements have been carried out to analyze the effect of thermal annealing. This study suggests that BDT-based polymer:N2200 systems can be promising candidates for all-PSCs, with thermal annealing as an effective approach to promote the device performance.

  6. New benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-based small molecules containing alkoxyphenyl side chains for high efficiency solution-processed organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengkun; Chen, Weichao; Wen, Shuguang; Qiao, Shanlin; Liu, Qian; Ouyang, Dan; Wang, Ning; Bao, Xichang; Yang, Renqiang

    2014-12-01

    A new acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) small molecule, namely, BDT-PO-DPP, based on the alkoxyphenyl (PO)-substituted benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) derivative and the diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) unit was synthesized as an electron donor for solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells (SMOSCs). BDT-PO-DPP exhibited good thermal stability, with a 5 % weight-lost temperature at 401 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. BDT-PO-DPP exhibited a lower HOMO energy level of -5.25 eV and a weaker aggregation ability than alkoxy-substituted BDT-O-DPP. A bulk heterojunction SMOSC device based on BDT-PO-DPP and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 -butyric acid methyl ester was prepared, and it showed a power conversion efficiency up to 5.63% with a high open-circuit voltage of 0.83 V, a short circuit current density of 11.23 mA cm(-2) , and a fill factor of 60.37% by using 1,2-dichlorobenzene as the co-solvent after thermal annealing at 110 °C. The results indicate that the alkoxyphenyl-substituted BDT derivative is a promising electron-donor building block for constructing highly efficient solution-processed SMOSCs.

  7. New benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-based small molecules containing alkoxyphenyl side chains for high efficiency solution-processed organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengkun; Chen, Weichao; Wen, Shuguang; Qiao, Shanlin; Liu, Qian; Ouyang, Dan; Wang, Ning; Bao, Xichang; Yang, Renqiang

    2014-12-01

    A new acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) small molecule, namely, BDT-PO-DPP, based on the alkoxyphenyl (PO)-substituted benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) derivative and the diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) unit was synthesized as an electron donor for solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells (SMOSCs). BDT-PO-DPP exhibited good thermal stability, with a 5 % weight-lost temperature at 401 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. BDT-PO-DPP exhibited a lower HOMO energy level of -5.25 eV and a weaker aggregation ability than alkoxy-substituted BDT-O-DPP. A bulk heterojunction SMOSC device based on BDT-PO-DPP and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 -butyric acid methyl ester was prepared, and it showed a power conversion efficiency up to 5.63% with a high open-circuit voltage of 0.83 V, a short circuit current density of 11.23 mA cm(-2) , and a fill factor of 60.37% by using 1,2-dichlorobenzene as the co-solvent after thermal annealing at 110 °C. The results indicate that the alkoxyphenyl-substituted BDT derivative is a promising electron-donor building block for constructing highly efficient solution-processed SMOSCs. PMID:25346491

  8. Polarized-thermoreflectance study of the band-edge transitions in Cu(Al 0.5 In 0.5)S2 solar-energy related crystal.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ching-Hwa; Huang, Guan-Tzu

    2010-02-15

    Polarization dependence of band-edge excitonic transitions in Cu(Al(0.5)In(0.5))S(2) [denoted as Cu(AlIn)S(2)] has been characterized using polarized-thermoreflectance (PTR) measurements with E || <111 > and E perpendicular <111 > polarizations in the temperature range between 30 and 320 K. The measurements were done on as-grown {112} surface of the chalcopyrite crystal. The polarization dependence of the band-edge transitions of Cu(AlIn)S(2) clearly showed that the E(A) exciton is present prominently with E || <111 > polarization while the E(B) exciton appears significantly only in the E perpendicular <111 > polarized spectra. For the unpolarized spectra, both E(A) and E(B) features were combined. The E(A) feature is closely related to the E(0) transition, while the E(B) feature is that of E(0) + Delta(0) transition in the chalcopyrite. The crystal-field splitting energy of Delta(0) of Cu(AlIn)S(2) at the valence-band top is determined accurately by PTR experiments. Temperature dependences of transition energies of E(A) and E(B) transitions were analyzed. The band-edge excitons reveal an anomalous temperature-energy shift with increasing the temperatures from 30 to 320 K due to the variation of Cu d electrons' contribution to valence band that affected by the native defects inside Cu(AlIn)S(2). The PTR technique is more effective in studying the band-edge structure of the chalcopyrite crystal.

  9. Forbidden transition probabilities for ground terms of ions with p or p5 configurations. [for solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.

    1976-01-01

    Forbidden transition probabilities are given for ground term transitions of ions in the isoelectronic sequences with outer configurations 2s2 2p (B I), 2p5 (F I), 3s2 3p (Al I), and 3p5 (Cl I). Tables give, for each ion, the ground term interval, the associated wavelength, the quadrupole radial integral, the electric quadrupole transition probability, and the magnetic dipole transition probability. Coronal lines due to some of these ions have been observed, while others are yet to be observed. The tales for the Al I and Cl I sequences include elements up to germanium.

  10. Infrared Solar Spectroscopic Measurements of Free Tropospheric CO, C2H6, and HCN above Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Seasonal Variations and Evidence for Enhanced Emissions from the Southeast Asian Tropical Fires of 1997-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Stephen, T. M.; Pougatchev, N. S.; Fishman, J.; David, S. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Novelli, P. C.; Jones, N. B.

    1999-01-01

    High spectral resolution (0.003 per cm) infrared solar absorption measurements of CO, C2H6, and HCN have been recorded at the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change station on Mauna Loa, Hawaii, (19.5N, 155.6W, altitude 3.4 km). The observations were obtained on over 250 days between August 1995 and February 1998. Column measurements are reported for the 3.4-16 km altitude region, which corresponds approximately to the free troposphere above the station. Average CO mixing ratios computed for this layer have been compared with flask sampling CO measurements obtained in situ at the station during the same time period. Both show asymmetrical seasonal cycles superimposed on significant variability. The first 2 years of observations exhibit a broad January-April maximum and a sharper CO minimum during late summer. The C2H6 and CO 3.4-16 km columns were highly correlated throughout the observing period with the C2H6/CO slope intermediate between higher and lower values derived from similar infrared spectroscopic measurements at 32'N and 45'S latitude, respectively. Variable enhancements in CO, C2H6, and particularly HCN were observed beginning in about September 1997. The maximum HCN free tropospheric monthly mean column observed in November 1997 corresponds to an average 3.4-16 km mixing ratio of 0.7 ppbv (1 ppbv = 10(exp -9) per unit volume), more than a factor of 3 above the background level. The HCN enhancements continued through the end of the observational series. Back-trajectory calculations suggest that the emissions originated at low northern latitudes in southeast Asia. Surface CO mixing ratios and the C2H6 tropospheric columns measured during the same time also showed anomalous autumn 1997 maxima. The intense and widespread tropical wild fires that burned during the strong El Nino warm phase of 1997- 1998 are the likely source of the elevated emission products.

  11. Heating of the solar middle chromosphere by large-scale electric currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global resistive, two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to introduce and support the hypothesis that the quiet solar middle chromosphere is heated by resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents which fill most of its volume. The scale height and maximum magnitude of the current density are 400 km and 31.3 m/sq m, respectively. The associated magnetic field is almost horizontal, has the same scale height as the current density, and has a maximum magnitude of 153 G. The current is carried by electrons flowing across magnetic field lines at 1 m/s. The resistivity is the electron contribution to the Pedersen resitivity for a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized, hydrogen gas. The model does not include a driving mechanism. Most of the physical quantities in the model decrease exponentially with time on a resistive timescale of 41.3 minutes. However, the initial values and spatial; dependence of these quantities are expected to be essentially the same as they would be if the correct driving mechanism were included in a more general model. The heating rate per unit mass is found to be 4.5 x 10(exp 9) ergs/g/s, independent of height and latitude. The electron density scale height is found to be 800 km. The model predicts that 90% of the thermal energy required to heat the middle chromosphere is deposited in the height range 300-760 km above the temperature minimum. It is shown to be consistent to assume that the radiation rate per unit volume is proportional to the magnetic energy density, and then it follows that the heating rate per unit volume is also proportional to the energy from the photosphere into the overlying chromosphere are briefly discussed as possible driving mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the current system. The case in which part of or all of the current is carried by protons and metal ions, and the contribution of electron-proton scattering to the current are also considered, with the conclusion

  12. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of fully flexible dye-sensitized solar cells based on the Nb2O5 coated hierarchical TiO2 nanowire-nanosheet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenwu; Hong, Chengxun; Wang, Hui-gang; Zhang, Mei; Guo, Min

    2016-02-01

    Nb2O5 coated hierarchical TiO2 nanowire-sheet arrays photoanode was synthesized on flexible Ti-mesh substrate by using a hydrothermal approach. The effect of TiO2 morphology and Nb2O5 coating layer on the photovoltaic performance of the flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on Ti-mesh supported nanostructures were systematically investigated. Compared to the TiO2 nanowire arrays (NWAs), hierarchical TiO2 nanowire arrays (HNWAs) with enlarged internal surface area and strong light scattering properties exhibited higher overall conversion efficiency. The introduction of thin Nb2O5 coating layers on the surface of the TiO2 HNWAs played a key role in improving the photovoltaic performance of the flexible DSSC. By separating the TiO2 and electrolyte (I-/I3-), the Nb2O5 energy barrier decreased the electron recombination rate and increased electron collection efficiency and injection efficiency, resulting in improved Jsc and Voc. Furthermore, the influence of Nb2O5 coating amounts on the power conversion efficiency were discussed in detail. The fully flexible DSSC based on Nb2O5 coated TiO2 HNWAs films with a thickness of 14 μm displayed a well photovoltaic property of 4.55% (Jsc = 10.50 mA cm-2, Voc = 0.75 V, FF = 0.58). The performance enhancement of the flexible DSSC is largely attributed to the reduced electron recombination, enlarged internal surface area and superior light scattering ability of the formed hierarchical nanostructures.

  14. 4-Alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl-Substituted Benzodithiophene-Based Wide Band Gap Polymers for High-Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangwu; Gong, Xue; Zhang, Jicheng; Liu, Yahui; Feng, Shiyu; Li, Cuihong; Bo, Zhishan

    2016-02-17

    Two novel polymers PTFBDT-BZS and PTFBDT-BZO with 4-alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl substituted benzodithiophene as the donor unit, benzothiadiazole or benzooxadiazole as the acceptor unit, and thiophene as the spacer have been synthesized and used as donor materials for polymer solar cells (PSCs). These two polymers exhibited wide optical band gaps of about 1.8 eV. PSCs with the blend of PTFBDT-BZS:PC71BM (1:2, by weight) as the active layer fabricated without using any processing additive and any postannealing treatment showed power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.24% with an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.89 V, a short circuit current (Jsc) of 12.67 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.73 under AM 1.5G illumination, indicating that PTFBDT-BZS is a very promising donor polymer for PSCs. The blend of PTFBDT-BZO:PC71BM showed a lower PCE of 5.67% with a Voc of 0.96 V, a Jsc of 9.24 mA/cm(2), and an FF of 0.64. One reason for the lower PCE is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a smaller LUMO offset with PC71BM, which cannot provide enough driving force for charge separation. And another reason is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a lower hole mobility in comparison with PTFBDT-BZS.

  15. 4-Alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl-Substituted Benzodithiophene-Based Wide Band Gap Polymers for High-Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangwu; Gong, Xue; Zhang, Jicheng; Liu, Yahui; Feng, Shiyu; Li, Cuihong; Bo, Zhishan

    2016-02-17

    Two novel polymers PTFBDT-BZS and PTFBDT-BZO with 4-alkyl-3,5-difluorophenyl substituted benzodithiophene as the donor unit, benzothiadiazole or benzooxadiazole as the acceptor unit, and thiophene as the spacer have been synthesized and used as donor materials for polymer solar cells (PSCs). These two polymers exhibited wide optical band gaps of about 1.8 eV. PSCs with the blend of PTFBDT-BZS:PC71BM (1:2, by weight) as the active layer fabricated without using any processing additive and any postannealing treatment showed power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.24% with an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.89 V, a short circuit current (Jsc) of 12.67 mA/cm(2), and a fill factor (FF) of 0.73 under AM 1.5G illumination, indicating that PTFBDT-BZS is a very promising donor polymer for PSCs. The blend of PTFBDT-BZO:PC71BM showed a lower PCE of 5.67% with a Voc of 0.96 V, a Jsc of 9.24 mA/cm(2), and an FF of 0.64. One reason for the lower PCE is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a smaller LUMO offset with PC71BM, which cannot provide enough driving force for charge separation. And another reason is probably due to that PTFBDT-BZO has a lower hole mobility in comparison with PTFBDT-BZS. PMID:26646056

  16. Detection of ℓ = 4 and ℓ = 5 modes in 12 years of solar VIRGO-SPM data—tests on Kepler observations of 16 Cyg A and B

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Mikkel Nørup; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Handberg, Rasmus; Aguirre, Victor Silva

    2014-02-10

    We present the detection of ℓ = 4 and ℓ = 5 modes in power spectra of the Sun, constructed from 12 yr full-disk VIRGO-SPM data sets. A method for enhancing the detectability of these modes in asteroseismic targets is presented and applied to Kepler data of the two solar analogues 16 Cyg A and B. For these targets, we see indications of a signal from ℓ = 4 modes, while nothing is yet seen for ℓ = 5 modes. We further simulate the power spectra of these stars and from this we estimate that it should indeed be possible to see such indications of ℓ = 4 modes at the present length of the data sets. In the simulation process, we briefly look into the apparent misfit between observed and calculated mode visibilities. We predict that firm detections of at least ℓ = 4 should be possible in any case at the end of the Kepler mission. For ℓ = 5, we do not predict any firm detections from Kepler data.

  17. Stellar coronal abundances. 3: The solar first ionization potential effect determined from full-disk observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laming, J. Martin; Drake, J. J.; Widing, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we reanalayze the full-disk quiet-sun spectrum of Mallinovsky & Heroux (1973) with modern atomic data. The purposes of this are to check our atomic data and methods in other investigations using data from nearby stars obtained with the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite, and to confirm that the solar first ionization potential (FIP) effect investigated by previous authors studying discrete solar regions is the same as that found in full-disk spectra. We recover the usual solar FIP effect of a coronal abundance enhancement of elements with a low FIP of a factor approximately 3-4 for lines formed at temperatures greater than approximately 10(exp 6) K. For lower temperatures, the FIP effect seems to be substantially smaller, in qualitative agreement with other data. Comparing our full-disk result with those from discrete solar structures suggest that the FIP effect is a function of altitude, with the lower temperature full-disk emission being dominated by the super-granulation network. We also compare the recent ionization balance of Arnaud & Raymond (1992) with that of Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  18. Evidence for mass outflow in the low solar corona over a large sunspot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, Werner M.; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Thomas, Roger J.; Thompson, William T.

    1992-01-01

    Spatially resolved EUV coronal emission-line profiles have been obtained in a solar active region, including a large sunspot, using an EUV imaging spectrograph. Relative Doppler velocities were measured in the lines of Mg IX, Fe XV, and Fe XVI with a sensitivity of 2-3 km/s at 350 A. The only significant Doppler shift occurred over the umbra of the large sunspot, in the emission line of Mg IX (at Te of about 1.1 x 10 exp 6 K). The maximum shift corresponded to a peak velocity toward the observer of 14 +/- 3 km/s relative to the mean of measurements in this emission line made elsewhere over the active region. The magnetic field in the low corona was aligned to within 10 deg of the line of sight at the location of maximum Doppler shift. Depending on the closure of the field, such a mass flow could either contribute to the solar wind or reappear as a downflow of material in distant regions on the solar surface. The site of the source, near a major photospheric field boundary, was consistent with origins of low-speed solar wind typically inferred from interplanetary plasma observations.

  19. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  20. Measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation at 0.5 deg angular scales near the star gamma ursae minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, M. J.; Clapp, A. C.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Lange, A. E.; Lim, M. A.; Lubin, P. M.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present results from a four-frequency observation of a 6 deg x 0.6 deg strip of the sky centered near the star Gamma Ursae Minoris (GUM) during the fourth flight of the Millimeter-wave Anistropy experiment(MAX). The observation was made with a 1.4 deg peak-to-peak sinusoidal chop in all bands. The FWHM beam sizes were 0.55 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 3.5 per cm and 0.75 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 6, 9, and 14 per cm. During this observation significant correlated structure was observed at 3.5, 6 and 9 per cm with amplitudes similar to those observed in the GUM region during the second and third fligts of MAX. The frequency spectrum is consistent with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and inconsistent with thermal emission from interstellar dust. The extrapolated amplitudes of synchrotron and free-free emission are too small to account for the amplitude of the observed structure, If all of the structure is attributed to CMB anisotropy with a Gaussian autocorrelation function and a coherence angle of 25 min, then the most probable values of delta T/T(sub CMB) in the 3.5, 6 and 9 per cm bads are (4.3 +2.7/-1.6) x 10(exp -5), 2.8 (+4.3/-1/1) x 10(exp -5), and 3.5 (+3.0/-1.6) x 10(exp -5) (95% confidence upper and lower limits), respectively.

  1. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, C.J.

    1992-12-01

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

  2. Reliable solar cookers

    SciTech Connect

    Magney, G.K.

    1992-12-31

    The author describes the activities of SERVE, a Christian relief and development agency, to introduce solar ovens to the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. It has provided 5,000 solar cookers since 1984. The experience has demonstrated the potential of the technology and the need for a durable and reliable product. Common complaints about the cookers are discussed and the ideal cooker is described.

  3. Report from solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C.; Acton, L.; Brueckner, G.; Chupp, E. L.; Hudson, H. S.; Roberts, W.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of solar physics is followed by a brief review of recent advances in the field. These advances include: the first direct experimental confirmation of the central role played by thermonuclear processes in stars; the discovery that the 5-minute oscillations of the Sun are a global seismic phenomenon that can be used as a probe of the structure and dynamical behavior of the solar interior; the discovery that the solar magnetic field is subdivided into individual flux tubes with field strength exceeding 1000 gauss. Also covered was a science strategy for pure solar physics. Brief discussions are given of solar-terrestrial physics, solar/stellar relationships, and suggested space missions.

  4. Effect of Nb2O5 and V2O5 addition on the superconducting properties of YBa2Cu3O(y) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.; Bhatnagar, A. K.; Pinto, R.; Pai, S. P.; Apte, P. R.; Purandare, S. C.; Souza, C. P. D.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of Nb2O5 and V2O5 addition on the superconducting properties and microstructure of YBa2Cu3O(y) has been studied in thin films. Polycrystalline targets for laser ablation were prepared by mixing high purity V2O5 or Nb2O5 powders with a well characterized YBa2Cu3O(y) powder in the range 0 to 4 wt percent by solid state reaction method. Thin films (approximately 1500 A thickness) of the above targets were grown on (100) SrTiO3 (STO) and (100) LaAlO3 (LAO) substrates at 700 C temperature by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. In the case of Nb2O5 addition we have noticed an increase in J(sub c) up to 0.5 wt percent and higher additive concentration (greater than 0.5 wt percent) have degraded the superconducting properties. However, in the case of V2O3 addition, there is an improvement in current density and microstructural properties up to 1 wt percent and the superconducting properties degrade for concentrations greater than 1 wt percent. The best J(sub c) for 0.5 wt percent of Nb2O5 added YBCO thin film is 1.6 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm and for that of V2O5 added sample is 3.4 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K as compared to the pure YBa2Cu3O(y) (YBCO) film J(sub c) (1.2 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm) observed on STO substrates. The reason for improvement in J(sub c) and microstructural properties in the case of V2O5 addition could be due to the low melting of V2O5 (690 C) which can act as a very good surfactant during deposition. Over all, we have realized that Nb2O5 addition or V2O5 addition to YBCO have shown significant improvement over the undoped YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films grown under identical conditions.

  5. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  6. CdSe/beta-Pb0.33V2O5 heterostructures: Nanoscale semiconductor interfaces with tunable energetic configurations for solar energy conversion and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milleville, Christopher C.

    This dissertation focuses on the formation and characterization of semiconductor heterostructures, consisting of light-harvesting cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) and single crystalline lead vanadium oxide nanowires (β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs), for the purpose of excited-state charge transfer and photocatalytic production of solar fuels. We reported two distinct routes for assembling CdSe/β-Pb0.33V2O5 heterostructures: linker-assisted assembly (LAA) mediated by a bifunctional ligand and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). In the former case, the thiol end of a molecular linker, cysteine (Cys) is found to bind to the QD surface, whereas a protonated amine moiety interacts electrostatically with the negatively charged NW surface. In the alternative SILAR route, the surface coverage of CdSe on the β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs is tuned by varying the number of successive precipitation cycles. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) measurements revealed that the mid-gap states of β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs are closely overlapped in energy with the valence band edges of CdSe QDs, suggesting that hole transfer from the valence band of CdSe into the mid-gap states is possible. Preliminary evidence of hole transfer was obtained through photoluminescence quenching experiments. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on Cys-CdSe dispersions, mixed dispersions of Cys-CdSe QDs and β-Pb0.33V¬2O5 NWs, and mixed dispersions of Cys-CdS QDs and V2O5 revealed a greater extent of quenching of the emission of Cys-CdSe QDs by β Pb0.33V¬2O5 relative to V2O5. V2O5, devoid of mid-gap states, is unable to accept holes from CdSe and therefore should not quench emission to the same extent as β-Pb0.33V¬2O5. The additional quenching was dynamic, consistent with a mechanism involving the transfer of photogenerated holes from CdSe QDs to the mid-gap states of β Pb0.33V2O5. Transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) was used to probe the dynamics of interfacial

  7. CdSe/beta-Pb0.33V2O5 heterostructures: Nanoscale semiconductor interfaces with tunable energetic configurations for solar energy conversion and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milleville, Christopher C.

    This dissertation focuses on the formation and characterization of semiconductor heterostructures, consisting of light-harvesting cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) and single crystalline lead vanadium oxide nanowires (β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs), for the purpose of excited-state charge transfer and photocatalytic production of solar fuels. We reported two distinct routes for assembling CdSe/β-Pb0.33V2O5 heterostructures: linker-assisted assembly (LAA) mediated by a bifunctional ligand and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). In the former case, the thiol end of a molecular linker, cysteine (Cys) is found to bind to the QD surface, whereas a protonated amine moiety interacts electrostatically with the negatively charged NW surface. In the alternative SILAR route, the surface coverage of CdSe on the β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs is tuned by varying the number of successive precipitation cycles. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) measurements revealed that the mid-gap states of β-Pb0.33V2O5 NWs are closely overlapped in energy with the valence band edges of CdSe QDs, suggesting that hole transfer from the valence band of CdSe into the mid-gap states is possible. Preliminary evidence of hole transfer was obtained through photoluminescence quenching experiments. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on Cys-CdSe dispersions, mixed dispersions of Cys-CdSe QDs and β-Pb0.33V¬2O5 NWs, and mixed dispersions of Cys-CdS QDs and V2O5 revealed a greater extent of quenching of the emission of Cys-CdSe QDs by β Pb0.33V¬2O5 relative to V2O5. V2O5, devoid of mid-gap states, is unable to accept holes from CdSe and therefore should not quench emission to the same extent as β-Pb0.33V¬2O5. The additional quenching was dynamic, consistent with a mechanism involving the transfer of photogenerated holes from CdSe QDs to the mid-gap states of β Pb0.33V2O5. Transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) was used to probe the dynamics of interfacial

  8. Tabulated Pressure Coefficient Data from a Tail Loads Investigation on a 1/15-Scale Model of the Goodyear XZP5K Airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Michael D.

    1956-01-01

    This paper contains tail and hull loads data obtained in an investigation of a l/15-scale model of the Goodyear XZP5K airship. Data are presented in the form of tabulated pressure coefficients over a pitch and yaw range of +/-20 deg and 0 deg to 30 deg respectively, with various rudder and elevator deflections. Two tail configurations of different plan forms were tested on the model. The investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at a Reynolds number of approximately 16.5 x 10(exp 6) based on hull length, which corresponds to a Mach number of about 0.12.

  9. High-power, ultralow-mass solar arrays: FY-77 solar arrays technology readiness assessment report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Young, L. E.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Development efforts are reported in detail for: (1) a lightweight solar array system for solar electric propulsion; (2) a high efficiency thin silicon solar cell; (3) conceptual design of 200 W/kg solar arrays; (4) fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell array; and (5) technology assessment of concentrator solar arrays.

  10. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  11. Solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D.

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  12. Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  13. On the inability of magnetically constricted transition regions to account for the 10 to the 5th to 10 to the 6th K plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, James F., Jr.; Moore, Ronald L.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1987-01-01

    Static models of the plasma in the quiet solar atmosphere incorporating not only conduction and radiation but also the effects of large magnetic constrictions are examined. It is found that the bulk of the solar plasma at temperatures below 7 x 10 to the 5th K cannot be produced by a conductive transition region when it is modeled by flux tubes with constriction compatible with observations. The present findings suggest that the major portion of the UEV plasma may be maintained in an ensemble of small, individual magnetic loops located within the supergranular network and having peak temperatures ranging from chromospheric to coronal values.

  14. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. III - General spectral properties of X1-X5 type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Kreplin, R. W.; Cohen, L.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of six class X1-X5 solar flares are discussed. The spectra were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07 and 3.14-3.24 A. Electron temperatures derived from dielectronic satellite line to resonance line ratios for Fe XXV and Ca XIX are found to remain fairly constant around 22,000,000 and 16,000,000 K respectively during the rise phase of the flares, then decrease by approximately 6,000,000 K during the decay phase. Nonthermal motions derived from line widths for the April 27, 1979 event are found to be greatest during the rise phase (approximately 130 km/sec) and decrease to about 60 km/sec during decay. Volume emission measures for Fe XXV, Ca XIX and Ca XX are derived from photon fluxes as a function of temperature, and examination of the intensity behavior of the Fe K alpha emission as a function of time indicates that it is a result of fluorescence. Differences between the present and previous observations of temperature variation are discussed, and it is concluded that the flare plasmas are close to ionization equilibrium for the flares investigated.

  15. Standardized performance tests of collectors of solar thermal energy: A selectively coated, flat-plate copper collector with one transparent cover and a tube-to-tube spacing of 5 5/8 inches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This preliminary data report gives basic test results of a flat-plate solar collector whose performance was determined in the NASA-Lewis solar simulator. The collector was tested over ranges of inlet temperatures, fluxes and coolant flow rates. Collector efficiency is correlated in terms of inlet temperature and flux level.

  16. Acceleration of electrons and ions by strong lower-hybrid turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V.; Ma, S.; Dawson, J. M.; Mcclements, K. G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in solar flare theory is how to explain the 10-20 keV and greater hard x-ray emissions by a thick target bremsstrahlung model. The model requires the acceleration mechanism to accelerate approximately 10(exp 35) electrons sec(exp -l) with comparable energies, without producing a large return current which persists for long time scales after the beam ceases to exist due to Lenz's law, thereby, producing a self-magnetic field of order a few mega-Gauss. In this paper, we investigate particle acceleration resulting from the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions, producing strong wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that strong lower hybrid wave turbulence collapses in configuration space producing density cavities containing intense electrostatic lower hybrid wave activity. The collapse of these intense nonlinear wave packets saturate by particle acceleration producing energetic electron and ion tails. There are several mechanisms whereby unstable ion distributions could be formed in the solar atmosphere, including reflection at perpendicular shocks, tearing modes, and loss cone depletion. Numerical simulations of ion ring relaxation processes, obtained using a 2 1/2-D fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle in cell code are discussed. We apply the results to the problem of explaining energetic particle production in solar flares. The results show the simultaneous acceleration of both electrons and ions to very high energies: electrons are accelerated to energies in the range 10-500 keV, while ions are accelerated to energies of the order of MeVs, giving rise to x-ray emission and gamma-ray emission respectively. Our simulations also show wave generation at the electron cyclotron frequency. We suggest that these waves are the solar millisecond radio spikes. The strong turbulence collapse process leads to a highly filamented plasma producing many localized regions for particle acceleration and resulting in

  17. Randomized intervention study of solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in Kenyan children aged under 5 years.

    PubMed

    du Preez, Martella; Conroy, Ronan M; Ligondo, Sophie; Hennessy, James; Elmore-Meegan, Michael; Soita, Allan; McGuigan, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of a randomized controlled intervention study (September 2007 to March 2009) investigating the effect of solar disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery, nondysentery diarrhea, and anthropometric measurements of height and weight among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in peri-urban and rural communities in Nakuru, Kenya. We compared 555 children in 404 households using SODIS with 534 children in 361 households with no intervention. Dysentery was recorded using a pictorial diary. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for both number of days and episodes of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea were significantly (P < 0.001) reduced by use of solar disinfection: dysentery days IRR = 0.56 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.79); dysentery episodes IRR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.73); nondysentery days IRR = 0.70 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.84); nondysentery episodes IRR = 0.73 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.84). Anthropometry measurements of weight and height showed median height-for-age was significantly increased in those on SODIS, corresponding to an average of 0.8 cm over a 1-year period over the group as a whole (95% CI 0.7 to 1.6 cm, P = 0.031). Median weight-for-age was higher in those on SODIS, corresponding to a 0.23 kg difference in weight over the same period; however, the confidence interval spanned zero and the effect fell short of statistical significance (95% CI -0.02 to 0.47 kg, P = 0.068). SODIS and control households did not differ in the microbial quality of their untreated household water over the follow-up period (P = 0.119), but E. coli concentrations in SODIS bottles were significantly lower than those in storage containers over all follow-up visits (P < 0.001). This is the first trial to show evidence of the effect of SODIS on childhood anthropometry, compared with children in the control group and should alleviate concerns expressed by some commentators that the lower rates of dysentery associated with SODIS are the product of biased

  18. Current loop models for the circumstellar matter in SN1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. J.

    1992-12-01

    The elliptical ring recently observed to be centered on the supernova can be interpreted as light from ions trapped in the magnetic field of a circular current loop. The current is 1.5 x 10 exp 12 A for a model where gravitational force on 0.03 solar masses of trapped matter balances the electrodynamic expansion of the loop. The magnetic energy of the loop is 2 x 10 exp 41 ergs. Consideration of the magnetized clouds in the solar wind as an analogous source for such a loop leads to the conclusion that the loop formed over the lifetime of the progenitor star.

  19. Toward 10(exp 10) Contrast for Terrestrial Exoplanet Detection: Demonstration of Wavefront Correction in a Shaped Pupil Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Give'on, Amir; Trauger, John T.; Carr, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy N.; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of wavefront control with shaped pupils. Contrast level is maintained across different wavelengths and 10% broadband light. Further improvements in contrast believed to have been possible with more time and parameter optimizations.

  20. Solar Cycle Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2012-01-01

    Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions; just like weather predictions are needed to plan the launch. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting many types of science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Predictions of drag on LEO spacecraft are one of the most important. Launching a satellite with less propellant can mean a higher orbit, but unanticipated solar activity and increased drag can make that a Pyrrhic victory as you consume the reduced propellant load more rapidly. Energetic events at the Sun can produce crippling radiation storms that endanger all assets in space. Solar cycle predictions also anticipate the shortwave emissions that cause degradation of solar panels. Testing solar dynamo theories by quantitative predictions of what will happen in 5-20 years is the next arena for solar cycle predictions. A summary and analysis of 75 predictions of the amplitude of the upcoming Solar Cycle 24 is presented. The current state of solar cycle predictions and some anticipations how those predictions could be made more accurate in the future will be discussed.

  1. Low band gap dyes based on 2-styryl-5-phenylazo-pyrrole: Synthesis and application for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Tsagkournos, D. V.; Balraju, P.; Sharma, G. D.

    A new series of low band gap dyes, C1, C2 and S, based on 2-styryl-5-phenylazo-pyrrole was synthesized. These dyes contain one carboxy, two carboxy and one sulfonic acid anchoring groups, respectively. They were soluble in common organic solvents, showed long-wavelength absorption maximum at ∼620 nm and optical band gap of 1.66-1.68 eV. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of these dyes were investigated and found to be suitable as photosensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The quasi solid state DSSCs with dye S showed a maximum monochromatic incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) of 78% and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.17% under illumination intensity of 100 mW cm -2 (1.5 AM), which is higher than the other dyes (3.26% for C2 and 2.59% for C1). Even though dye S contains one sulfonic acid anchoring group, the higher PCE for the DSSCs based on this dye has been attributed to the higher dye loading at the TiO 2 surface and enhanced electron lifetime in the device, as indicated by absorption spectra and electrochemical impedance spectra measurements. Finally, by increasing the molecular weight of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in electrolyte, the PCE also increases up to 4.8% for the electrolyte with PEO molecular weight of 2.0 × 10 6. This improvement has been attributed to the enhancement in iodide ions diffusion due to the increase in free volume of polymer gel electrolyte.

  2. The Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    The first evidence of the solar wind was provided through observations of comet tail deflections by L. Biermann in 1951. A cometary ion tail is oriented along the difference between the cometary and solar wind velocities, whereas the dust tail is in the antisunward direction; the ion tail directions demonstrated the existence of an outflow of ionized gas from the Sun (the solar wind) and allowed estimates of solar wind speed. Spacecraft observations have now established that at 1 AU the solar wind has a typical ion number density of about 7 /cc and is composed by number of about 95% protons and 5% Helium, with other minor ions also present. The solar wind as observed at 1 AU in the ecliptic has speeds typically in the range 300-700 km/ s. At such speeds ions travel from the Sun to 1 AU in from 2.5 to 6 days. The impact of the solar wind on planets with magnetic fields (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) causes phenomena such as magnetospheres, aurorae, and geomagnetic storms, whereas at objects lacking magnetospheres (Mars, Venus, comets), atmospheric neutrals undergo charge exchange and are picked up by the solar wind flow. The solar wind also shields the Earth from low energy cosmic rays, and is responsible for the existence of the anomalous component of the cosmic rays a low energy component that is created locally rather than in the galaxy. Presented here is a brief introduction to the solar wind and a description of some current topics of research. Solar wind properties vary a great deal due to the changing magnetic structure on the Sun.

  3. Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Solar Energy's solar panels are collectors for a solar energy system which provides heating for a drive-in bank in Akron, OH. Collectors were designed and manufactured by Solar Energy Products, a firm established by three former NASA employees. Company President, Frank Rom, an example of a personnel-type technology transfer, was a Research Director at Lewis Research Center, which conducts extensive solar heating and cooling research, including development and testing of high-efficiency flat-plate collectors. Rom acquired solar energy expertise which helped the company develop two types of collectors, one for use in domestic/commercial heating systems and the other for drying grain.

  4. Comparative Studies for the Sodium and Potassium Atmospheres of the Moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A summary discussion of recent sodium and potassium observations for the atmospheres of the Moon and Mercury is presented with primary emphasis on new full-disk images that have become available for sodium. For the sodium atmosphere, image observations for both the Moon and Mercury are fitted with model calculations (1) that have the same source speed distribution, one recently measured for electron-stimulated desorption and thought to apply equally well to photon-stimulated desorption, (2) that have similar average surface sodium fluxes, about 2.8 x 10(exp 5) to 8.9 x 10(exp 5) atoms cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) for the Moon and approximately 3.5 x 10(exp 5) to 1.4 x 10(exp 6) atoms cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) for Mercury, but (3) that have very different distributions for the source surface area. For the Moon, a sunlit hemispherical surface source of between approximately 5.3 x 10(exp 22) to 1.2 x 10(exp 23) atoms/s is required with a spatial dependence at least as sharp as the square of the cosine of the solar zenith angle. For Mercury, a time dependent source that varies from 1.5 x 10(exp 22) to 5.8 x l0(exp 22) atoms/s is required which is confined to a small surface area located at, but asymmetrically distributed about, the subsolar point. The nature of the Mercury source suggest that the planetary magnetopause near the subsolar point acts as a time varying and partially protective shield through which charged particles may pass to interact with and liberate gas from the planetary surface. Suggested directions for future research activities are discussed.

  5. Identification of the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch in stratospheric solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Goldman, A.; Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic identification for the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch at 830.4/cm is reported based on 0.01/cm resolution solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer and a recent analysis of this band. Least-squares fits to 0.0025/cm resolution laboratory spectra in the Q branch region indicate an integrated intensity of 0.529 x 10(exp -18)/cm/mol/sq cm at 296 K for this weak band. Stratospheric HNO3 retrievals derived from the ATMOS data are consistent with this value within its estimated uncertainty of about +/- 30%. A set of spectroscopic line parameters suitable for atmospheric studies has been generated.

  6. The Dependence of Donor:Acceptor Ratio on the Photovoltaic Performances of Blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzia, Vivi; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Yahya, Muhammad

    2010-10-24

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells using blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3OT) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) have been fabricated. P3OT and PC{sub 71}BM were used as the electron donor (D) and acceptor (A), respectively. Both materials were mixed and dissolved in dichlorobenzene with three different D:A ratios i.e. 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 (weight) while maintained at the concentration of 2 wt%(26 mg/ml). The blended thin films were sandwiched between the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and the aluminum film. This paper reports the influence of donor:acceptor ratio on the performance of solar cell devices measured by current-voltage measurement both in the dark and under 1.5 AM solar illumination. It was found that all devices showed the photovoltaic effect with poor diode behavior and the donor:acceptor ratio significantly influenced on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

  7. Cyclic changes of vitamin D and PTH are primarily regulated by solar radiation: 5-year analysis of a German (50 degrees N) population.

    PubMed

    Reusch, J; Ackermann, H; Badenhoop, K

    2009-05-01

    Cutaneous vitamin D precursor production depends on UV-exposure and is ineffective in most regions above latitudes of 50 degrees in winter. We hypothesized whether the cyclic course of vitamin D levels can be modelled with sunshine duration and would affect parathyroid hormone concentrations, but not calcium in a large patient population. We investigated 13330 blood samples from 6099 in- and out patients for 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, PTH, and total Ca in Frankfurt, Germany over 6.5 years. Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D3 <10 ng/ml] was found in 12.23% and vitamin D insufficiency [25(OH)D3 <20 ng/ml] in 40.62% of all the blood samples and more frequently during winter. We observed a significant difference between men and women, children and adults, migrants and local residents. Cycling of the curve was significantly related to Julian day for 25(OH)D3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH), but not for 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca. The peak concentration of 25(OH)D3 was found at Aug 16th and correlated well with the length of day whereas PTH is inversely related with 25(OH)D (3). Seasonal cycling of 25(OH)D3-levels correlated significantly with Julian Day and inversely with PTH. This tight feed back ensures stable Ca concentrations within narrow limits. We conclude that changes in vitamin D levels are mainly regulated by solar radiation and to a lesser degree by other factors such as nutrition. PMID:19241329

  8. Solar wind travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  9. RXTE and BeppoSAX Observations of MCG-5-23-16: Reflection From Distant Cold Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, B. J.; Weaver, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the spectral variability of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16 using RXTE and BeppoSAX observations spanning 2 years from April 1996 to April 1998. During the first year the X-ray source brightens by a factor of approximately 25% on timescales of days to months. During this time, the reprocessed continuum emission seen with RXTE does not respond measurably to the continuum increase. However, by the end of the second year during the BeppoSAX epoch the X-ray source has faded again. This time, the reprocessed emission has also faded, indicating that the reprocessed flux has responded to the continuum. If these effects are caused by time delays due to the distance between the X-ray source and the reprocessing region, we derive a light crossing time of between approximately 1 light day and approximately 1.5 light years. This corresponds to a distance of 0.001 pc to 0.55 pc, which implies that the reprocessed emission originates between 3 x 10(exp 15) cm and 1.6 x 10(exp l8) cm from the X-ray source. In other words, the reprocessing in MCG-5-23-16 is not dominated by the inner regions of a standard accretion disk.

  10. Dust in the Solar System - Properties and Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    Interplanetary dust pervades the inner Solar System, giving rise to a prominent glow above the horizon at sunrise and sunset known as the zodiacal light. This dust derives from the disintegration of comets as they approach the Sun and from collisions among main-belt asteroids. The Earth accretes roughly 4x10(exp 6) kg/year of 1 - 1,000 micron dust particles as they spiral into the Sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag. Samples of these grains have been collected from deep sea sediments, Antarctic ice and by high-altitude aircraft and balloon flights. Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere have been classified by their IR spectra into olivine, pyroxene, and hydrated silicate-dominated classes. Most IDPs have bulk major and minor element abundances that are similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Hydrated silicate-rich IDPs are thought to derive from asteroids based on their mineralogy and low atmospheric entry velocities estimated from peak temperatures reached during atmospheric entry. Anhydrous IDPs are typically aggregates of 0.1 - approx. 1 micron Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, amorphous silicates (GEMS), Fe, Nisulfides and rare spinel and oxides bound together by carbonaceous material. These IDPs are often argued to derive from comets based on compositional similarities and high atmospheric entry velocities that imply high eccentricity orbits. Infrared spectra obtained from anhydrous IDPs closely match remote IR spectra obtained from comets. The most primitive (anhydrous) IDPs appear to have escaped the parent-body thermal and aqueous alteration that has affected meteorites. These samples thus consist entirely of grains that formed in the ancient solar nebula and pre-solar interstellar and circumstellar environments. Isotopic studies of IDPs have identified silicate stardust grains that formed in the outflows of red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae]. These stardust grains

  11. Solar Cooking

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    ... (kWh/m2/day) Amount of electromagnetic energy (solar radiation) incident on the surface of the earth. Also referred to as total or global solar radiation.   Midday insolation (kWh/m2/day) Average ...

  12. Solar Lentigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperpigmented) lesion caused by natural or artificial ultraviolet (UV) light. Solar lentigines may be single or multiple. This ... simplex) because it is caused by exposure to UV light. Solar lentigines are benign, but they do indicate ...

  13. Organic Synthesis and Potential Microbiology in the Solar Nebula: Are Early Solar Systems Nurseries for Microorganisms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Ibrahim, Y.; El-Shall, M. S.

    2004-11-01

    We observed a new synthetic mechanism that can contribute organics toward the origins of life in the solar nebula. We also observed that microorganisms can grow on carbonaceous asteroid/meteorite materials, suggesting that micoorganisms can multiply in aqueous asteroids in the early Solar System. The new synthetic mechanism is provided by ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cold nebular and interstellar cloud environments, through associative charge transfer (ACT) and associative proton transfer (APT) reactions. For example, ionized benzene (C6H6+) reacts with two CH3CH=CH2 molecules to form C6H12+ that initiates ionic polymerization. Other unsaturated molecules (HCCH, H2CO, HCN, CH3CN) can yield complex organics by this mechanism. The C6H6+ ion also reacts with water molecules to form (H2O)nH+ nucleation centers for ices, in which UV-induced organic synthesis can occur. The organics in the nebula can contribute to the origins of life and support microorganisms. For example, we observed that microorganisms such as Nocardia asteroides, algae, fungi, and even plant cultures (Asparagus officinalis) grow in planetary microcosms based on carbonaceous chondrite, as well as Martian, meteorites. We found high microbial populations (10exp7 CFU/ml) and complex microbial communities in these planetary microcosms. Thermophilic archaebacteria also grew on these materials. The results suggest that early aqueous asteroids can support microorganisms, distribute them through the solar nebula by collisions, deliver them to planets, and possibly eject them to interstellar space. Such natural panspermia processes, or directed panspermia payloads, may seed other young solar systems where microbial life can multiply by similar mechanisms. We thank NASA Grant NNG04GH45G for funding support. References: 1. M. N. Mautner, Planetary Bioresources and Astroecology...., Icarus 2002, 158, 72-86; see www.astroecology.com. 2. M. Mautner and G. L. Matloff, Directed Panspermia...., Bull

  14. High‐Performance Polymer Solar Cells Based on a Wide‐Bandgap Polymer Containing Pyrrolo[3,4‐f]benzotriazole‐5,7‐dione with a Power Conversion Efficiency of 8.63%

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Liuyuan; Chen, Zhiming; Hu, Qin; Zhu, Rui; Cao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A novel donor–acceptor type conjugated polymer based on a building block of 4,8‐di(thien‐2‐yl)‐6‐octyl‐2‐octyl‐5H‐pyrrolo[3,4‐f]benzotriazole‐5,7(6H)‐dione (TZBI) as the acceptor unit and 4,8‐bis(5‐(2‐ethylhexyl)thiophen‐2‐yl)­benzo­[1,2‐b:4,5‐b′]dithiophene as the donor unit, named as PTZBIBDT, is developed and used as an electron‐donating material in bulk‐heterojunction polymer solar cells. The resulting copolymer exhibits a wide bandgap of 1.81 eV along with relatively deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of −5.34 eV. Based on the optimized processing conditions, including thermal annealing, and the use of a water/alcohol cathode interlayer, the single‐junction polymer solar cell based on PTZBIBDT:PC71BM ([6,6]‐phenyl‐C71‐butyric acid methyl ester) blend film affords a power conversion efficiency of 8.63% with an open‐circuit voltage of 0.87 V, a short circuit current of 13.50 mA cm−2, and a fill factor of 73.95%, which is among the highest values reported for wide‐bandgap polymers‐based single‐junction organic solar cells. The morphology studies on the PTZBIBDT:PC71BM blend film indicate that a fibrillar network can be formed and the extent of phase separation can be mani­pulated by thermal annealing. These results indicate that the TZBI unit is a very promising building block for the synthesis of wide‐bandgap polymers for high‐performance single‐junction and tandem (or multijunction) organic solar cells. PMID:27711267

  15. High‐Performance Polymer Solar Cells Based on a Wide‐Bandgap Polymer Containing Pyrrolo[3,4‐f]benzotriazole‐5,7‐dione with a Power Conversion Efficiency of 8.63%

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Liuyuan; Chen, Zhiming; Hu, Qin; Zhu, Rui; Cao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A novel donor–acceptor type conjugated polymer based on a building block of 4,8‐di(thien‐2‐yl)‐6‐octyl‐2‐octyl‐5H‐pyrrolo[3,4‐f]benzotriazole‐5,7(6H)‐dione (TZBI) as the acceptor unit and 4,8‐bis(5‐(2‐ethylhexyl)thiophen‐2‐yl)­benzo­[1,2‐b:4,5‐b′]dithiophene as the donor unit, named as PTZBIBDT, is developed and used as an electron‐donating material in bulk‐heterojunction polymer solar cells. The resulting copolymer exhibits a wide bandgap of 1.81 eV along with relatively deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of −5.34 eV. Based on the optimized processing conditions, including thermal annealing, and the use of a water/alcohol cathode interlayer, the single‐junction polymer solar cell based on PTZBIBDT:PC71BM ([6,6]‐phenyl‐C71‐butyric acid methyl ester) blend film affords a power conversion efficiency of 8.63% with an open‐circuit voltage of 0.87 V, a short circuit current of 13.50 mA cm−2, and a fill factor of 73.95%, which is among the highest values reported for wide‐bandgap polymers‐based single‐junction organic solar cells. The morphology studies on the PTZBIBDT:PC71BM blend film indicate that a fibrillar network can be formed and the extent of phase separation can be mani­pulated by thermal annealing. These results indicate that the TZBI unit is a very promising building block for the synthesis of wide‐bandgap polymers for high‐performance single‐junction and tandem (or multijunction) organic solar cells.

  16. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  17. Buying Solar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  18. Optical properties of thermal control coatings contaminated by MMH/N2O4 5-pound thruster in a vacuum environment with solar simulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommers, R. D.; Raquet, C. A.; Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Cat-a-lac Black and S13G thermal control coatings were exposed to the exhaust of a thrustor in a simulated space environment. Vacuum was maintained at less than 10 microtorr during thrustor firing in the liquid helium cooled facility. The thrustor was fired in a 50-millisecond pulse mode, and the accumulated firing time was 224 seconds. Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of the coatings were measured in-situ at intervals of 300 pulses, using a calorimetric technique. The Cat-a-lac Black coatings showed no change in solar absorptance or thermal emittance. The S13G showed up to 25% increase in solar absorptance but no change in thermal emittance.

  19. Skylab experiments. Volume 5: Astronomy and space physics. [Skylab observations of galactic radiation, solar energy, and interplanetary composition for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The astronomy and space physics investigations conducted in the Skylab program include over 20 experiments in four categories to explore space phenomena that cannot be observed from earth. The categories of space research are as follows: (1) phenomena within the solar system, such as the effect of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere, the composition of interplanetary space, the possibility of an inner planet, and the X-ray radiation from Jupiter, (2) analysis of energetic particles such as cosmic rays and neutrons in the near-earth space, (3) stellar and galactic astronomy, and (4) self-induced environment surrounding the Skylab spacecraft.

  20. Reflectance spectrophotometry (about 0.5-1.0 micron) of oute-belt asteroids - Implications for primitive, organic solar system material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, F.; Smith, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    The surface compositions of outer-belt asteroids were used to obtain information about the origin of these asteroids. High-resolution CCD reflectance spectra of 21 asteroids, primarily P class, were examined for compositional information. Distinct slope changes are observed that suggest that these asteroids are the remnants of a compositional gradation of planetesimals in the outer solar system, which were retained selectively in location when other material was ejected from the solar system. Other data suggest that this gradation could extend through the orbits of Uranus and Neptune.

  1. Solar Cycle dependence of 5-55 keV Cassini/INCA energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the Heliosheath and in situ Voyager/LECP ion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Dialynas, K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    The heliosheath has been identified as the most probable source of ENAs that INCA detects but its variability due to solar activity throughout the solar cycle (SC) has not been resolved to date. We show all-sky, 5-55 keV ENA H maps from the year 2003 to 2014 and compare the solar cycle variation of the ENAs in both the heliospheric nose (upstream) and anti-nose (downstream) directions with the > 30 keV ions measured within the heliosheath by the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) detector on Voyagers 1, 2 (V1, V2) where we measure protons in overlapping energy bands ~30-55 keV. We find that a) Toward the anti-nose direction the ENA-H intensities decline during SC23, i.e. after 2003 ENA intensities decreased by ~ x2 at all energies by the end of year 2011, ~1 year after the observed minimum in solar activity; b) This ENA decrease (5.2-55 keV) during 2009-2011 is consistent with the concurrent intensity decrease of the > 30 keV ions (by a factor of 2-3) observed in situ by V1 and V2 in the heliosheath; c) Toward the nose direction, minimum intensities in both INCA ENAs and the V2 ions at E > 28 keV occur during the year 2013, with a subsequent recovery from 2014 to date (by a factor of ~2 in the > 35 keV ENA data). These quantitative correlations between the decreases of INCA ENAs (in both the heliospheric nose and anti-nose directions) and the in situ V1 and V2 ion measurements (separated by > 130 AU) during the declining phase of SC23, along with their concurrent jointly shared recoveries at the onset of SC24, imply that: 1) the 5-55 keV ENAs are produced in the heliosheath (because their transit times over 100 AU are less than a few months at energies > 40 keV), thus proving that our ENA observations can provide the ground truth for constructing comprehensive global heliosphere models; 2) the global heliosheath responds promptly (within ~1-1.5 yrs) to outward-propagating solar wind changes throughout the solar cycle.

  2. Solar ultraviolet radiation affects the activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments in the intertidal green alga Ulva lactuca L.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Kai; Kräbs, Gudrun; Wiencke, Christian; Hanelt, Dieter

    2002-07-01

    The effect of solar UV radiation on the physiology of the intertidal green macroalga Ulva lactuca L. was investigated. A natural Ulva community at the shore of Helgoland was covered with screening foils, excluding UV-B or UV-B + UV-A from the solar spectrum. In the sampled material, changes in the activity and concentration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco), and the concentration of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments were determined. Exclusion of UV radiation from the natural solar spectrum resulted in an elevated overall activity of Rubisco, related to an increase in its cellular concentration. Among the photosynthetic pigments, lutein concentration was substantially elevated under UV exclusion. In addition, marked UV effects on the xanthophyll cycle were found: exclusion of solar UV radiation (and particularly UV-B) resulted in an increased ratio of zeaxanthin concentration to the total xanthophyll content, indicating adverse effects of UV-B on the efficiency of photoprotection under high irradiances of photosynthetically active radiation. The results confirm a marked impact of present UV-B levels on macroalgal physiology under field conditions.

  3. Solar nutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The topics covered include: an overview of the subject of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the theory of stellar evolution, a description of the main sources of solar neutrinos, a brief summary of the results of the Brookhaven C1-37 experiment, an anaysis of the principal solar neutrino experiments, and a discussion of how solar neutrino experiments can be used to detect the collapse of stars in the Galaxy. A description of how the Ga-71 experiment can be used to decide whether the origin of the present discrepancy between theory and observation lies in conventional solar models or conventional physics is presented.

  4. Solar flair.

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, John S

    2003-01-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  5. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams.

  6. Solar Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    2000-10-04

    Solar opacities are presented from the center of the Sun to the photosphere. The temperatures, densities and hydrogen mass fractions are taken from the standard solar model. For the heavy element abundances the Grevesse mixture is used. In the solar interior photoabsorption is dominated by free-free absorption and they compare two sets of opacities based on two different models for the inverse bremsstrahlung. The radiative luminosities calculated from the two sets of opacities are compared with those predicted by previous models of the standard solar model and also with the known luminosity of the Sun. pressures, specific heats and the speed of sound in the solar plasma are also presented.

  7. Solar flair.

    PubMed

    Manuel, John S

    2003-02-01

    Design innovations and government-sponsored financial incentives are making solar energy increasingly attractive to homeowners and institutional customers such as school districts. In particular, the passive solar design concept of daylighting is gaining favor among educators due to evidence of improved performance by students working in daylit classrooms. Electricity-generating photovoltaic systems are also becoming more popular, especially in states such as California that have high electric rates and frequent power shortages. To help spread the word about solar power, the U.S. Department of Energy staged its first-ever Solar Decathlon in October 2002. This event featured solar-savvy homes designed by 14 college teams. PMID:12573926

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile molecule as a potential acceptor in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazici, Mehmet; Bozar, Sinem; Aydin Yuksel, Sureyya; Ongul, Fatih; Gokce, Halil; Gunes, Serap; Yorur Goreci, Cigdem

    2016-06-01

    A novel soluble asymmetric acrylonitrile derivative, 2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-{[5-(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl)]furan-2-yl}acrylonitrile (CPCPFA, 3) was synthesized in three steps by Knoevenagel condensation. The structure of the CPCPFA was characterized using UV-vis, FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and LC-MS. CPCPFA was evaluated as an electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Its optical and electronic properties as well as photovoltaic performance were investigated.

  9. The 5 Hour Pulse Period and Broadband Spectrum of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 3A 1954+319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Diana M.; Fuerst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Grinberg, Victoria; Miller, Sebstian; Wilms, Joern; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Cadolle Bel, Marion

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the highly variable accreting X-ray pulsar 3A 1954+319 using 2005-2009 monitoring data obtained with INTEGRAL and Swift. This considerably extends the pulse period history and covers flaring episodes in 2005 and 2008. In 2006 the source was identified as one of only a few known symbiotic X-ray binaries, Le" systems composed of a neutron star accreting from the inhomogeneous medium around an M-giant star. The extremely long pulse period of approximately 5.3 h is directly visible in the 2008 INTEGRAL-ISGRI outburst light curve. The pulse profile is double peaked and not significantly energy dependent. During the outburst a strong spin-up of -1.8 x 10(exp -4) h h(exp -1) occurred. Between 2005 and 2008 a long term spin-down trend of 2.1 x 10(exp -5) h h(exp -1) was observed for the first time for this source. The 3-80 keV pulse peak spectrum of 3A 1954+319 during the 2008 flare could be well described by a thermal Comptonization model. We interpret the results within the framework of a recently developed quasi-spherical accretion model for symbiotic X-ray binaries.

  10. Solar Energy: Solar System Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system economics is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies.…

  11. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  12. Solar Sailing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  13. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic accelerator configuration at Mach numbers 1.5 and 2.0. [conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ira J.; Covell, Peter F.; Forrest, Dana K.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a generic hypersonic research vehicle was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). A parametric study was performed to determine the interference effects of various model components. Configuration variables included delta and trapezoidal canards; large and small centerline-mounted vertical tails, along with a set of wing-mounted vertical tails; and a set of model noses with different degrees of bluntness. Wing position was varied by changing the longitudinal location and the incidence angle. The test Mach numbers were 1.5 and 2.0 at Reynolds numbers of 1 x 10(exp 6) per foot, 2 x 10(exp 6) per foot, and 4 x 10(exp 6) per foot. Angle of attack was varied from -4 degrees to 27 degrees, and sideslip angle was varied from -8 degrees to 8 degrees. Generally, the effect of Reynolds number did not deviate from conventional trends. The longitudinal stability and lift-curve slope decreased with increasing Mach number. As the wing was shifted rearward, the lift-curve slope decreased and the longitudinal stability increased. Also, the wing-mounted vertical tails resulted in a more longitudinally stable configuration. In general, the lift-drag ratio was not significantly affected by vertical-tail arrangement. The best lateral-directional stability was achieved with the large centerline-mounted tail, although the wing-mounted vertical tails exhibited the most favorable characteristics at the higher angles of attack.

  14. Angular solar absorptance of absorbers used in solar thermal collectors.

    PubMed

    Tesfamichael, T; Wäckelgård, E

    1999-07-01

    The optical characterization of solar absorbers for thermal solar collectors is usually performed by measurement of the spectral reflectance at near-normal angle of incidence and calculation of the solar absorptance from the measured reflectance. The solar absorptance is, however, a function of the angle of incidence of the light impinging on the absorber. The total reflectance of two types of commercial solar-selective absorbers, nickel-pigmented anodized aluminum, and sputtered nickel nickel oxide coated aluminum are measured at angles of incidence from 5 to 80 in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm by use of an integrating sphere. From these measurements the angular integrated solar absorptance is determined. Experimental data are compared with theoretical calculations, and it is found that optical thin-film interference effects can explain the significant difference in solar absorptance at higher angles for the two types of absorbers.

  15. EDITORIAL Solar harvest Solar harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-12-01

    into the charge transport mechanism and trap distribution in these composites [3]. An advantage of investigating solar cell technology based on organic materials rather than silicon is that silicon photovoltaics requires high-purity silicon, whereas the material demands of organic technology are not nearly so strict. Work by researchers in Denmark and Germany highlights the simplicity and tolerance to ambient conditions of organic photovoltaic fabrication in the demonstration of a nanostructured polymer solar cell made from a thermocleavable polymer material and zinc oxide nanoparticles. All the manipulations during device preparation could be carried out in air at around 20 °C and 35% humidity [4]. A possible route to enhancing cell performance is through the improvment of the transport efficiency. Researchers in Taiwan demonstrate how effectively this can be implemented in a hybrid device comprising TiO2 nanorods and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) [5]. In addition, inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals that have tunable optical bandgaps can be combined with organic semiconductors for the fabrication of hybrid photovoltaic devices with broad spectral sensitivity. A collaboration of researchers in the UK and the US has now developed a near-infrared sensitive hybrid photovoltaic system with PbS nanocrystals and C60. The reported improvement in device performance is attributed to increased carrier mobility of the PbS nanocrystal film [6]. In this issue, Patrick G Nicholson and Fernando A Castro from the National Physical Laboratory in the UK present a topical review on the principles and techniques for the characterization of organic photovoltaics [7]. The review presents a comprehensive picture of the current state-of-the-art understanding of the working mechanisms behind organic solar cells, and also describes electronic morphological considerations relevant to optimizing the devices, as well as different nanoscale techniques for

  16. High quality InP-on-Si for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shellenbarger, Zane A.; Goodwin, Thomas A.; Collins, Sandra R.; Dinetta, Louis C.

    1994-01-01

    InP on Si solar cells combine the low-cost and high-strength of Si with the high efficiency and radiation tolerance of InP. The main obstacle in the growth of single crystal InP-on-Si is the high residual strain and high dislocation density of the heteroepitaxial InP films. The dislocations result from the large differences in lattice constant and thermal expansion mismatch of InP and Si. Adjusting the size and geometry of the growth area is one possible method of addressing this problem. In this work, we conducted a material quality study of liquid phase epitaxy overgrowth layers on selective area InP grown by a proprietary vapor phase epitaxy technique on Si. The relationship between growth area and dislocation density was quantified using etch pit density measurements. Material quality of the InP on Si improved both with reduced growth area and increased aspect ratio (length/width) of the selective area. Areas with etch pit density as low as 1.6 x 10(exp 4) sq cm were obtained. Assuming dislocation density is an order of magnitude greater than etch pit density, solar cells made with this material could achieve the maximum theoretical efficiency of 23% at AMO. Etch pit density dependence on the orientation of the selective areas on the substrate was also studied.

  17. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of the emerging magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.; Shibata, K.; Kaisig, M.

    1993-09-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an emerging magnetic flux tube or sheet in the solar atmosphere is studied through 3D MHD simulations. In the initial state, a horizontal magnetic flux sheet or tube is assumed to be embedded at the bottom of MHD two isothermal gas layers, which approximate the solar photosphere/chromosphere and the corona. The magnetic flux sheet or tube is unstable against the undular mode of the magnetic buoyancy instability. The magnetic loop rises due to the linear and then later nonlinear instabilities caused by the buoyancy enhanced by precipitating the gas along magnetic field lines. We find by 3D simulation that during the ascendance of loops the bundle of flux tubes or even the flux sheet develops into dense gas filaments pinched between magnetic loops. The interchange modes help produce a fine fiber flux structure perpendicular to the magnetic field direction in the linear stage, while the undular modes determine the overall buoyant loop structure. The expansion of such a bundle of magnetic loops follows the self-similar behavior observed in 2D cases studied earlier. Our study finds the threshold flux for arch filament system (AFS) formation to be about 0.3 x 10 exp 20 Mx.

  18. Accurate positions of SiO masers in active star-forming regions - Orion-KL, W51-IRS2, and Sagittarius-B2 MD5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Ukita, Nobuharu; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Ishiguro, Masato

    1992-08-01

    Accurate positional measurements of SiO J = 1-0 masers in active star-forming regions, Orion-KL, W51-IRS2, and Sgr-B2 MD5, were made with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Absolute positional accuracies of 0.12-0.6 arcsec were achieved. The SiO maser in W51-IRS2 is located within 0.4 arcsec (0.5 x 10 exp 17 cm at the distance of W51-IRS2) of the strongest H2O masers. In Sgr-B2 MD5, the SiO maser coincides with the strongest H2O masers, most of the strong OH masers, and the peak of radio continuum emission from the ultracompact H II region within 0.7 arcsec (0.8 x 10 exp 17 cm at the distance of Sgr-B2). Peaks of the emission from hot NH3 were found to exist within about 1 arcsec of the SiO masers in both regions. The precise positional coincidence confirms our former conclusion that the SiO masers in W51-IRS2 and Sgr-B2 MD5 are actually associated with the ongoing activity of star formation, as is the case of Orion-KL.

  19. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3) sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(exp 11)/cc cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A)) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, O, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/ s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/ s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24)/ s, respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Iono- spheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show

  20. Linear side chains in benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione polymers direct self-assembly and solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Cabanetos, Clément; El Labban, Abdulrahman; Bartelt, Jonathan A; Douglas, Jessica D; Mateker, William R; Fréchet, Jean M J; McGehee, Michael D; Beaujuge, Pierre M

    2013-03-27

    While varying the size and branching of solubilizing side chains in π-conjugated polymers impacts their self-assembling properties in thin-film devices, these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. This report emphasizes the determining role that linear side-chain substituents play in poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell applications. We show that replacing branched side chains by linear ones in the BDT motifs induces a critical change in polymer self-assembly and backbone orientation in thin films that correlates with a dramatic drop in solar cell efficiency. In contrast, we show that for polymers with branched alkyl-substituted BDT motifs, controlling the number of aliphatic carbons in the linear N-alkyl-substituted TPD motifs is a major contributor to improved material performance. With this approach, PBDTTPD polymers were found to reach power conversion efficiencies of 8.5% and open-circuit voltages of 0.97 V in BHJ devices with PC71BM, making PBDTTPD one of the best polymer donors for use in the high-band-gap cell of tandem solar cells. PMID:23473262

  1. 1,3,5-Tris(phenyl-2-benzimidazole)-benzene cathode buffer layer thickness dependence in solution-processable organic solar cell based on 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roméo Banoukepa, Gilles; Fujii, Akihiko; Shimizu, Yo; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the insertion effects of a cathode buffer layer on bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2) and 1-(3-methoxy-carbonyl)-propyl-1-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM) by using 1,3,5-tris(phenyl-2-benzimidazole)-benzene (TPBi) as a cathode buffer layer material have been carried out. The external quantum efficiency and the short-circuit current markedly increased, resulting in the enhancement of the power conversion efficiency. The solar cell performance has been discussed from the atomic force microscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Two-fluid 2.5D MHD Simulations of the Fast Solar Wind in Coronal Holes and the Relation to UVCS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent SOHO/UVCS observations indicate that the perpendicular proton and ion temperatures are much larger than electron temperatures. In the present study we simulate numerically the solar wind flow in a coronal hole with the two-fluid approach. We investigate the effects of electron and proton temperatures on the solar wind acceleration by nonlinear waves. In the model the nonlinear waves are generated by Alfvén waves with frequencies in the 10-3 Hz range, driven at the base of the coronal hole. The resulting electron and proton flow profile exhibits density and velocity fluctuations. The fluctuations may steepen into shocks as they propagate away from the sun. We calculate the effective proton temperature by combining the thermal and wave velocity of the protons, and find qualitative agreement with the proton kinetic temperature increase with height deduced from the UVCS Ly-α observations by Kohl et al. (1998).

  3. Solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    A solar greenhouse is disclosed wherein plants are grown and utilized as collectors to absorb solar radiation and produce heat laden humidified air through the process of evapotranspiration. This humidified air is then further heated by solar energy. Energy is then extracted from the humidified air by cooling the air and condensing the water vapor within the air. The extracted heat can then be stored and utilized as required to heat the greenhouse and plants.

  4. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  5. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  6. Search for nuclearites using the MACRO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlen, S.; Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baker, R.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Barish, B. C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.

    1992-09-01

    A negative search using 1/12 of the eventual MACRO detector has yielded nuclearite flux limits of 1.1 x 10 exp -14/sq cm/sr/s for in between 10 exp -10 and 0.1 g, and 5.5 x 10 exp -15/sq cm/sr/s for m greater than 0.1 g. We have modified the formula of De Rujula and Glashow for the light yield of nuclearites to include the UV light absorbed and reemitted in the visible region, and proved that the MACRO sensitivity extends almost to the escape velocity of the earth. Our flux limit, therefore, can be used to address nuclearites that are possibly trapped in the solar system.

  7. A study of the solar wind from the Voyager spacecraft, 1977-1992. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, L.

    1994-12-31

    A reanalysis was performed on the solar wind ion data from the Plasma Science (PLS) Instrument on each of the Voyager 1 and the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The analysis was carried out using an automated fitting routine created by the author. While the solar wind number density was confirmed to be proportional to r(exp {minus}2), where r is the heliocentric distance, it was discovered that the thermal speed was proportional to r(exp {minus}1/3). No systematic variation with distance was seen in the velocity. Temporal variation in the solar wind parameters was sought using 11 years of Voyager data. The most prominent periods detected were 25.4 days (solar sidereal rotation) and 146.3 days which appears not to be correlated with observations of other solar phenomena. The reanalysis included a program for detecting proton double streaming. The behavior of double streaming protons was compared to that of single stream protons and alpha particles. It was found that the magnitude of the velocity difference between double streaming protons can be as large as twice the Alfven speed. This is in contrast to alpha particles and protons whose difference in speed is bounded by the Alfven speed. Finally, it was discovered that the PLS instrument was capable of clearly detecting other ions, namely O(+6) and O(+7) during times of cool, low-speed, high density, plasma streams. The total oxygen flux densities were found to deviate from a linear relation with the alpha particle flux densities at low fluxes. Using the ratio of the O(+6) and O(+7) number densities, the author computed a temperature for the solar corona of 1.7 x 10(exp 6) K, which is in good agreement with that found by others.

  8. Energy Release from Impacting Prominence Material Following the 2011 June 7 Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H. R.; Inglis, A. R.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar filaments exhibit a range of eruptive-like dynamic activity, ranging from the full or partial eruption of the filament mass and surrounding magnetic structure as a coronal mass ejection to a fully confined or failed eruption. On 2011 June 7, a dramatic partial eruption of a filament was observed by multiple instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory. One of the interesting aspects of this event is the response of the solar atmosphere as non-escaping material falls inward under the influence of gravity. The impact sites show clear evidence of brightening in the observed extreme ultraviolet wavelengths due to energy release. Two plausible physical mechanisms for explaining the brightening are considered: heating of the plasma due to the kinetic energy of impacting material compressing the plasma, or reconnection between the magnetic field of low-lying loops and the field carried by the impacting material. By analyzing the emission of the brightenings in several SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly wavelengths, and comparing the kinetic energy of the impacting material (7.6 × 10(exp 26) - 5.8 × 10(exp 27) erg) to the radiative energy (approx. 1.9 × 10(exp 25) - 2.5 × 10(exp 26) erg), we find the dominant mechanism of energy release involved in the observed brightening is plasma compression.

  9. Solar Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Frank; Williams, Robert H.

    1975-01-01

    As fossil fuels decrease in availability and environmental concerns increase, soalr energy is becoming a potential major energy source. Already solar energy is used for space heating in homes. Proposals for solar-electric generating systems include land-based or ocean-based collectors and harnessing wind and wave power. Photosynthesis can also…

  10. Solar Sprint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  11. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image On June 10, 2002 the Moon obscured the central portion of the solar disk in a phenomenon known as an annular solar eclipse. Partial phases of the eclipse were visible throughout much of southeast Asia and North ...

  12. Efficient bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells through disorder by design† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta10091g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Muñoz, José M.; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Jiménez-Solano, Alberto; Li, Yuelong; Lozano, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Herein we realize an optical design that optimizes the performance of bifacial solar cells without modifying any of the usually employed components. In order to do so, dielectric scatterers of controlled size and shape have been successfully integrated in the working electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), resulting in bifacial devices of outstanding performance. Power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 6.7% and 5.4% have been attained under front and rear illumination, respectively, which represent a 25% and a 33% PCE enhancement with respect to an 8 μm-thick standard solar cell electrode using platinum as the catalytic material. The remarkable bifacial character of our approach is demonstrated by the high rear/front efficiency ratio attained, around 80%, which is among the largest reported for this sort of device. The proposed optimized design is based on a Monte Carlo approach in which the multiple scattering of light within the cell is fully accounted for. We identified that the spherical shape of the scatterers is the key parameter controlling the angular distribution of the scattering, the most efficient devices being those in which the inclusions provide a narrow forward-oriented angular distribution of the scattered light. PMID:27019714

  13. Organic Solar Cells Based on a 2D Benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']difuran-Conjugated Polymer with High-Power Conversion Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Huo, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Fan, Bingbing; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Sun, Xiaobo; Wei, Donghui; Yu, Mingming; Liu, Yunqi; Sun, Yanming

    2015-11-18

    A novel 2D benzodifuran (BDF)-based copolymer (PBDF-T1) is synthesized. Polymer solar cells fabricated with PBDF-T1 show high power conversion efficiency of 9.43% and fill factor of 77.4%, which is higher than the performance of its benzothiophene (BDT) counterpart (PBDT-T1). These results provide important progress for BDF-based copolymers and demonstrate that BDF-based copolymers can be competitive with the well-studied BDT counterparts via molecular structure design and device optimization.

  14. Hydrogen passivation of N(+)-P and P(+)-N heteroepitaxial InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Basab; Davis, William C.; Ringel, Steve A.; Hoffman, Richard, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Dislocations and related point defect complexes caused by lattice mismatch currently limit the performance of heteroepitaxial InP cells by introducing shunting paths across the active junction and by the formation of deep traps within the base region. We have previously demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of such defects in specially designed heteroepitaxial InP test structures to probe hydrogen passivation at typical base depths within a cell structure. In this work, we present our results on the hydrogen passivation of actual heteroepitaxial n-p and p-n InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in the base regions of both n(+)-p and p(+)-n heteroepitaxial InP cell structures from as-grown values of 5-7 x 10(exp 14) cm(exp -3), down to 3-5 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3). All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal with no detectable activation of deep levels. One to five analysis indicated a subsequent approximately 100 fold decrease in reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and an improved built in voltage for the p(+)-n structures. In addition to being passivated, dislocations are also shown to participate in secondary interactions during hydrogenation. We find that the presence of dislocations enhances hydrogen diffusion into the cell structure, and lowers the apparent dissociation energy of Zn-H complexes from 1.19 eV for homoepitaxial Zn-doped InP to 1.12 eV for heteroepitaxial Zn-doped InP. This is explained by additional hydrogen trapping at dislocations subsequent to the reactivation of Zn dopants after hydrogenation.

  15. Hydrogen Passivation of N(+)P and P(+)N Heteroepitaxial InP Solar Cell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Davis, W. C.; Ringel, S. A.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Dislocations and related point defect complexes caused by lattice mismatch currently limit the performance of heteroepitaxial InP cells by introducing shunting paths across the active junction and by the formation of deep traps within the base region. We have previously demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of such defects in specially designed heteroepitaxial InP test structures to probe hydrogen passivation at typical base depths within a cell structure. In this work, we present our results on the hydrogen passivation of actual heteroepitaxial n(+)p and p(+)n InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in the base regions of both n(+)p and p(+)n heteroepitaxial InP cell structures from as-grown values of 5 - 7 x 10(exp 14)/cc, down to 3 - 5 x 10(exp 12)/cc. All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal With no detectable activation of deep levels. I-V analysis indicated a subsequent approx. 100 fold decrease In reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and an improved built in voltage for the p(+)n structures. ln addition to being passivated,dislocations are also shown to participate in secondary interactions during hydrogenation. We find that the presence of dislocations enhances hydrogen diffusion into the cell structure, and lowers the apparent dissociation energy of Zn-H complexes from 1.19 eV for homoepitaxial Zn-doped InP to 1.12 eV for heteroepitaxial Zn-doped InP. This is explained by additional hydrogen trapping at dislocations subsequent to the reactivation of Zn dopants after hydrogenation.

  16. Characterization of three types of silicon solar cells for SEPS Deep Space Mission. Volume 3: Current-voltage characteristics of spectrolab sculptured BSR/P+ (K7), BSR/P+ (K6.5) and BSR (K4.5) cells as a function of temperature and intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Wooden, V. A.; Carter, D. E.; Cothren, B. E.; Torstenson, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Three types of high performance silicon solar cells, sculptured BSR/P+(K7), BSR/P+(K6.5) and BSR(K4.5) manufactured by Spectrolab were evaluated for their low temperature and low intensity performance. Sixteen cells of each type were subjected to 11 temperatures and 9 intensities. The sculptured BSR/P+(K7) cells provided the greatest maximum power output both at 1 AU and at LTLI conditions. The average efficiencies of this cell were 14.4 percent at 1 SC/+25 deg C and 18.5 percent at 0.086 SC/-100 deg C.

  17. Characterization of three types of silicon solar cells for SEPS Deep Space Mission. Volume 3: Current-voltage characteristics of spectrolab sculptured BSR/P+ (K7), BSR/P+ (K6.5) and BSR (K4.5) cells as a function of temperature and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Wooden, V. A.; Carter, D. E.; Cothren, B. E.; Torstenson, C. A.

    1980-08-01

    Three types of high performance silicon solar cells, sculptured BSR/P+(K7), BSR/P+(K6.5) and BSR(K4.5) manufactured by Spectrolab were evaluated for their low temperature and low intensity performance. Sixteen cells of each type were subjected to 11 temperatures and 9 intensities. The sculptured BSR/P+(K7) cells provided the greatest maximum power output both at 1 AU and at LTLI conditions. The average efficiencies of this cell were 14.4 percent at 1 SC/+25 deg C and 18.5 percent at 0.086 SC/-100 deg C.

  18. Anomalously weak solar convection.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan M; Duvall, Thomas L; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2012-07-24

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(-2) at r/R([symbol: see text]) = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  19. A search for gamma-ray lines from the decay of Fe-59 in Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, M. J.; Leising, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched spectra of Supernova (SN) 1987A, accumulated during several 35-day intervals after the explosion by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), for gamma-ray lines at 1.099 and 1.292 MeV from the decay of Fe-59 which may have been produced in the progenitor's helium shell. We find no evidence for these lines, down to 3-sigma upper limits approximately = 7 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.099 MeV line, or approximately = 4.5 x 10(exp -4) gamma/sq cm/s for the 1.292 MeV line, in any 35-day interval. We derive a conservative 3-sigma upper limit on the mass fraction of Fe-59 in the helium shell of 2.9 x 10(exp -3).

  20. A Preliminary Model for Spacecraft Propulsion Performance Analysis Based on Nuclear Gain and Subsystem Mass-Power Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidt, G. R.; Thio, Y. C.; Hurst, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid transportation of human crews to destinations throughout the solar system will require propulsion systems having not only very high exhaust velocities (i.e., I(sub sp) >= 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 5) sec) but also extremely low mass-power ratios (i.e., alpha <= 10(exp -2) kg/kW). These criteria are difficult to meet with electric propulsion and other power-limited systems, but may be achievable with propulsion concepts that use onboard power to produce a net gain in energy via fusion or some other nuclear process. This paper compares the fundamental performance of these gain-limited systems with that of power-limited systems, and determines from a generic power balance the gains required for ambitious planetary missions ranging up to 100 AU. Results show that energy gain reduces the required effective mass-power ratio of the system, thus enabling shorter trip times than those of power-limited concepts.

  1. The Observed Galactic Annihilation Line: Possible Signature of Accreting Small Mass Black Holes in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Chardonnet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Various balloon and satellite observatories have revealed what appears to be an extended source of 0.511 MeV annihilation radiation with flux of approx. 10(exp -3) photons/sq cm/s centered on the Galactic Center. Positrons from radioactive products of stellar explosions can account for a significant fraction of the emission. We discuss an additional source for this emission: namely e(+)e(-) pairs produced when X-rays generated from the approx. 2.6 x 10(exp 6) solar mass Galactic Center Black Hole interact with approx. 10 MeV temperature blackbody emission from 10(exp 17) g black holes within 10(exp 14-l5) cm of the center. The number of such Small Mass Black Holes (SMMBHs) can account for the production of the 10(exp 42) e(+)/s that produces the observed annihilation in the inner Galaxy when transport effects are taken into account. We consider the possibility for confirming the presence of these SMMBHs in the Galactic Center region with future generations of gamma-ray instruments if a blackbody like emission of approx. 10 MeV temperature would be detected by them. Small Mass Black Hole can be a potential candidate for dark (invisible) matter hal

  2. RX J1856.5-3754: A Strange Star with Solid Quark Surface?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Renxin; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2003-01-01

    The featureless spectra of isolated 'neutron stars' may indicate that they are actually bare strange stars but a definitive conclusion on the nature of the compact objects cannot be reached until accurate and theoretically calculated spectra of the bare quark surface are known. However due to the complex nonlinearity of quantum chromodynamics it is almost impossible to present a definitive and accurate calculation of the density-dominated quark-gluon plasma from the first principles. Nevertheless it was suggested that cold quark matter with extremely high baryon density could be in a solid state. Within the realms of this possibility we have fitted the 500ks Chandra LETG/HRC data for the brightest isolated neutron star RX 51856.5-3754 with a phenomenological spectral model and found that electric conductivity of quark matter on the stellar surface is about 1.5 x 10(exp 16)/s.

  3. Solar electricity and solar fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, David J.

    1989-04-01

    The nature of solar radiation and its variation with location is described. The distribution of energy in the solar spectrum places immediate limits on the theoretical efficiency of conversion processes, since practical absorbers cannot convert all wavelengths received to useful energy. The principles of solar energy conversion methods are described. Absorption of solar energy can give rise to direct electrical generation, heating, or chemical change. Electrical generation from sunlight can be achieved by photovoltaic systems directly or by thermal systems which use solar heat to drive a heat engine and generator. The technology used and under research for promising ways of producing electricity or fuel from solar energy is described. Photovoltaic technology is established today for remote area, small power applications, and photovoltaic module sales alone are over 100 million dollars per year at present. The photovoltaic market has grown steadily since the mid-1970's, as prices have fallen continuously. Future energy options are briefly described. The merits of a sustainable energy economy, based on renewable energy resources, including solar energy, are emphasized, as this seems to provide the only hope of eliminating the problems caused by the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide, acid rain pollution and nuclear waste disposal. There is no doubt that clean fuels which were derived from solar energy and either did not involve carbon dioxide and used atmospheric carbon dioxide as the source dioxide as the source of carbon would be a worthy ideal. Methods described could one day achieve this.

  4. Solar Terrestrial Physics: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D. M. (Editor); Papadopoulos, K. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The following topics relating to solar-terrestrial interactions are considered: (1) reconnection of magnetic fields; (2) particle acceleration; (3) solar magnetic flux; (4) magnetohydrodynamic waves and turbulence in the Sun and interplanetary medium; (5) coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere; (6) coronal transients; (7) the connection between the magnetosphere and ionosphere; (8) substorms in the magnetosphere; (9) solar flares and the solar terrestrial environment; (10) shock waves in the solar terrestrial environment; (11) plasma transport and convection at high latitudes; and (12) high latitude ionospheric structure.

  5. Interplanetary Fast Shocks and Associated Drivers Observed through the Twenty-Third Solar Minimum by WIND Over its First 2.5 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.; Berdichevsky, D.; Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Vinas, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    A list of the interplanetary (IP) shocks observed by WIND from its launch (in November 1994) to May 1997 is presented. Forty two shocks were identified. The magnetohydrodynamic nature of the shocks is investigated, and the associated shock parameters and their uncertainties are accurately computed using a practical scheme which combines two techniques. These techniques are a combination of the "pre-averaged" magnetic-coplanarity, velocity-coplanarity, and the Abraham-Schrauner-mixed methods, on the one hand, and the Vinas and Scudder [1986] technique for solving the non-linear least-squares Rankine-Hugoniot shock equations, on the other. Within acceptable limits these two techniques generally gave the same results, with some exceptions. The reasons for the exceptions are discussed. It is found that the mean strength and rate of occurrence of the shocks appears to correlated with the solar cycle. Both showed a decrease in 1996 coincident with the time of the lowest ultraviolet solar radiance, indicative of solar minimum and start of solar cycle 23, which began around June 1996. Eighteen shocks appeared to be associated with corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The distribution of their shock normals showed a mean direction peaking in the ecliptic plane and with a longitude (phi(sub n)) in that plane between perpendicular to the Parker spiral and radial from the Sun. When grouped according to the sense of the direction of propagation of the shocks the mean azimuthal (longitude) angle in GSE coordinates was approximately 194 deg for the fast-forward and approximately 20 deg for the fast-reverse shocks. Another 16 shocks were determined to be driven by solar transients, including magnetic clouds. These shocks had a broader distribution of normal directions than those of the CIR cases with a mean direction close to the Sun-Earth line. Eight shocks of unknown origin had normal orientation well off the ecliptic plane. No shock propagated with longitude phi(sub n) >= 220

  6. X-ray Spectra and Pulse Frequency Changes in SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baykal, A.; Stark, M. J.; Swank, J. H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The November 1999 outburst of the transient pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545 was monitored with the large area detectors of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer until the pulsar faded after a year. The 358 s pulsar was spun up for 150 days, at which point the flux dropped quickly by a factor of approximately 7, the frequency saturated and, as the flux continued to decline, a weak spin-down began. The pulses remained strong during the decay and the spin-up/flux correlation can be fit to the Ghosh and Lamb derivations for the spin-up caused by accretion from a thin, pressure-dominated disk, for a distance approximately 3.2 kpc and a surface magnetic field approximately 1.2 x 10(exp 13) Gauss. During the bright spin-up part of the outburst, the flux was subject to strong orbital modulation, peaking approximately 3 days after periastron of the eccentric 12.68 day orbit, while during the faint part, there was little orbital modulation. The X-ray spectra were typical of accreting pulsars, describable by a cut-off power-law, with an emission line near the 6.4 keV of Kappa(sub alpha) fluorescence from cool iron. The equivalent width of this emission did not share the orbital modulation, but nearly doubled during the faint phase, despite little change in the column density. The outburst could have been caused by an episode of increased wind from a Be star, such that a small accretion disk is formed during each periastron passage. A change in the wind and disk structure apparently occurred after 5 months such that the accretion rate was no longer modulated or the diffusion time was longer. The distance estimate implies the X-ray luminosity observed was between 1 X 10(exp 36) ergs s(exp -1) and 6 x 10(exp 34) ergs s(exp -1), with a small but definite correlation of the intrinsic power-law spectral index.

  7. Solar sail

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, K.E.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a solar sail propulsion system comprising: solar sail means for intercepting light pressure to produce thrust, the solar sail means being a thin metal film; tension truss means having two ends attached at one end to the solar sail means for transferring the thrust from the solar sail and for preventing gross deformation of the solar sail under light pressure, the solar sail means being a plurality of separate generally two-dimensional pieces joined by springs to the tension truss means; a payload attached to the other end of the tension truss means, the tension truss means comprising a plurality of attachment means for attaching shroud lines to the top of the tension truss means and a plurality of the shroud lines attached to the attachment means at one of their ends and the payload at the other; a plurality of reel means attached to the shroud lines for controllably varying the length of the lines; and a plurality of reflective panel means attached to the sail means for controlling the orientation of the system.

  8. Variability of the Solar Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, L.; Ulrich, R. K.

    2003-05-01

    Possible temporal variability of the solar radius is important as an indicator of internal energy storage and as a mechanism for changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI). Variations in the TSI with an amplitude of 0.1% have been observed from space for more than two decades. Although the variability of this solar output is definitely established, the detailed dependence of the rate of energy output on the level of solar magnetic activity has not yet been measured with enough continuity and precision to establish the correlation throughout the full solar cycle. Changes in the solar radius could account for a significant fraction of the total irradiance variations. However, studies of the solar radius variation have reported contradictory results in the form of both correlations and anticorrelations between the solar radius and, for example, the cycle of sunspot numbers. Most of these studies however, are affected by the highly inhomogeneous data used in the analysis. This factor becomes particularly critical in the case of measurements that cover a very long period of time. We present consistent solar radius measurements obtained from the Mt Wilson synoptic programme of solar magnetic observations carried out at the 150-foot tower. Two definitions of the solar radius are used: the longest reduced record beginning in 1975 is derived from the fit of a circle to the isophote having an intensity equal to 40%\\ of the central intensity and more recently we have developed a definition based on intensity fits within 16 sectors around the solar circumference. Ulrich and Bertello (Nature, 1995, 377, 214) have made a re-analysis of an older database correcting for such effects as scattered light and atmospheric refraction. The older database is brought up to date and compared to results based on the new radius definition as well as other published radius variations. This work was supported by NASA through grants NAG5-10905 and NAG5-11708 as well as by NSF through grant ATM

  9. Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power on demand to the local utility, Southern California Edison Company. It can do so because it operates not only during sunny parts of the day, but it can store enough thermal energy from the sun to operate during cloudy periods and after dark, for up to three hours, at its rated output of 10 megawatts (MW). For the first time ever, a utility scale solar power plant can supply electricity when the utility needs it most, to satisfy the energy requirements of its customers.

  10. Solar Energy in the Home. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Allen A.; Woodland, James A.

    Recommended for grades 10-12 physical, earth, or general science classes, this 5-7 day unit is designed to give students a general understanding of solar energy and its use as a viable alternative to present energy sources. Along with this technology, students examine several factors of solar energy which influence the choice of solar home site…

  11. The Solar Energy Timetable. Worldwatch Paper 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Denis

    This publication proposes a timetable for converting the world economy to solar energy. The contents include: (1) A solar-powered world by 2025; (2) Heating and cooling; (3) Renewable fuels; (4) Electricity; (5) Getting there from here; and (6) Notes. Numerous facts are presented within these sections. International solar research programs are…

  12. Photochemistry of Triton's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1995-01-01

    The photochemistry of 32 neutral and 21 ion species in Triton's atmosphere is considered. Parent species N2, CH4, and CO (with a mixing ratio of 3 x 10(exp -4) in our basic model) sublime from the ice with rates of 40, 208, and 0.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Chemistry below 50 km is driven mostly by photolysis of methane by the solar and interstellar medium Lyman-alpha photons, producing hydrocarbons C2H4, C2H6, and C2H2 which form haze particles with precipitation rates of 135, 28, and 1.3 g/sq cm/b.y., respectively. Some processes are discussed which increase the production of HCN (by an order of magnitude to a value of 29 g/sq cm/b.y.) and involve indirect photolysis of N2 by neutrals. Reanalysis of the measured methane profiles gives an eddy diffusion coefficient K = 4 x 10(exp 3)sq cm/s above the tropopause and a more accurate methane number density near the surface, (3.1 +/- 0.8)x IO(exp 11)/cu cm. Chemistry above 200 km is driven by the solar EUV radiation (lambda less than 1000 A) and by precipitation of magnetospheric electrons with a total energy input of 10(exp 8) W (based on thermal balance calculations). The most abundant photochemical species are N, H2, H, 0, and C. They escape with the total rates of 7.7 x 10(exp 24)/ s, 4.5 x 10(exp 25)/s, 2.4 x 10(exp 25)/s, 4.4 x 10(exp 22)/s, and 1.1 x 10(exp 24), respectively. Atomic species are transported to a region of 50-200 km and drive the chemistry there. Ionospheric chemistry explains the formation of an E region at 150-240 km with HCO(+) as a major ion, and of an F region above 240 km with a peak at 320 km and C(+) as a major ion. The ionosphere above 500 km consists of almost equal densities of C(+) and N(+) ions. The model profiles agree with the measured atomic nitrogen and electron density profiles. A number of other models with varying rate coefficients of some reactions, differing properties of the haze particles (chemically passive or active), etc., were developed. These models show that there

  13. Transparent ALD-grown Ta2O5 protective layer for highly stable ZnO photoelectrode in solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengcheng; Wang, Tuo; Luo, Zhibin; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Jinlong

    2015-04-30

    This communication describes a highly stable ZnO/Ta2O5 photoanode with Ta2O5 deposited by atomic layer deposition. The ultrathin Ta2O5 protective layer prevents corrosion of ZnO and reduces surface carrier recombination, leading to a nearly two-fold increase of photo-conversion efficiency. The transparency of Ta2O5 to sunlight is identified as the main reason for the excellent stability of the photoelectrode for 5 hours.

  14. X-Ray Emission from the Sun in Its Youth and Old Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorren, J. D.; Gudel, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained ROSAT PSPC (Roentgen Satellite Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) pointed observations of two nearby G stars of ages 70 Myr and 9.5 Gyr that are of unique importance as proxies for the Sun at the two extremes of its main-sequence evolutionary lifetime. The younger star, HD 129333 (EK Dra; G0 V), a rapid rotator with a 2.7 day period, is a strong source with an X-ray luminosity L(x)(0.2-2.4 keV) = (7.5-11.5) x 10(exp 29) erg/s. Modeling suggests a two-temperature corona with T(1) = (2.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 6) K and T(2) = (9.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 6) K (formal uncertainties). A continuous emission measure distribution, increasing to higher temperatures and with a cutoff at (20-30) x 10(exp 6) K, yields even better fits to the data. The old star, beta Hyi (HR 98; G2 IV), represents the Sun in the future, near the end of its hydrogen-core burning stage, when it should be rotating more slowly (present P(rot) = 25.4 day) and should have lower levels of activity. The ROSAT measurements yield L(x) = (0.9-3.0) x 10(exp 27) ergs/s and a rather cool, single coronal temperature of T = (1.7 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 6) K. For comparison, the Sun has L(x) approx. equal to 2 x 10(exp 27) ergs/s and a coronal temperature of about T = 2 x 10(exp 6) K. These stars provide information on the decline of the stellar (and specifically solar) magnetic activity from extreme youth to old age. HD 129333 is also important in that it yields an estimate of the solar soft X-ray flux in the early solar system at the epoch of the terminal stages of planetary accretion.

  15. Nanostructured solar irradiation control materials for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Marshall, Iseley A.; Torrico, Mattew N.; Taylor, Chase R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel; Sauti, Godfrey; Gibbons, Luke J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Park, Cheol; Lowther, Sharon E.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Bryant, Robert G.

    2012-10-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (αs) and thermal emissivity (ɛT) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The αs and ɛT were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the αs and μT by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  16. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  17. Reply to "Comment on the Paper ''On the Determination of Electron Polytrope Indices Within Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind'"'. Appendix 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Riley, P.; Skoug, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We strongly disagree with the essence of the Osherovich (hereafter Osherovich) comment on one of our papers. The following paragraphs provide the basis of our disagreement and elaborate on why we believe that none of the concluding statements in his Comment are true. Our most important point is that one can apply the model developed by Osherovich and colleagues to real data obtained at a single point in space to determine the polytropic index within magnetic clouds if and only if the highly idealized assumptions of that model conform to physical reality. There is good reason to believe that those assumptions do not provide an accurate physical description of real magnetic clouds in the spherically expanding solar wind.

  18. Thermal annealing of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.; Brinker, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Isochronal and isothermal annealing tests were performed on GaAs concentrator cells which were irradiated with electrons of various energies to fluences up to 1 x 10(exp 16) e/sq cm. The results include: (1) For cells irradiated with electrons from 0.7 to 2.3 MeV, recovery decreases with increasing electron energy. (2) As determined by the un-annealed fractions, isothermal and isochronal annealing produce the same recovery. Also, cells irradiated to 3 x 10(exp 15) or 1 x 10(exp 16) e/sq cm recover to similar un-annealed fractions. (3) Some significant annealing is being seen at 150 C although very long times are required.

  19. 3D-Stereoscopic Analysis of Solar Active Region Loops: I: SoHo/EIT Observations at Temperatures of 1.0-1.5 MK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Newmark, Jeff; Delaboudiniere, Jean-Pierre; Neupert, Werner M.; Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice; Gary, G. Allen; Zucker, Arik

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of solar active region NOAA 7986 observed on 1996 August 30 with the Extrem-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) is analyzed. We develop a new method of Dynamic Stereoscopy to reconstruct the 3D geometry of dynamically changing loops, which allows us to determine the orientation of the loop plane with respect to the line-of-sight, a prerequisite to correct properly for projection effects in 3D loop models. With this method and the filter-ratio technique applied to EIT 171 A and 195 A images we determine the 3D coordinates (x(s), y(s), z(s)), the loop width) w(s), the electron density n(sub e)(s), and the electron temperature T(sub e)(s) as function of the loop length s for 30 loop segments. Fitting the loop densities with an exponential density model n(sub e)(h) we find that the so inferred scale height temperatures, T(sub e)(sup lambda) = 1.22 +/- 0.23 MK, match closely the EIT filter-ratio temperatures, T(sub e)(sup FIT) = 1.21 +/- 0.06 MK. We conclude that these rather large-scale loops (with heights of h approx. equals 50 - 200 Mm) that dominate EIT 171 A images are close to thermal equilibrium. Most of the loops show no significant thickness variation w(s), but many exhibit a trend of increasing temperature (dT/ds greater than 0) above the footpoint.

  20. Solar chulha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  1. Solar dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelin, R.W.; Hurst, D.W.; Osos, G.R.

    1984-02-07

    Fabrics are dried by tumbling the fabrics in a drying chamber into which hot air is introduced. The hot air is formed by passing ambient air through a solar heater to heat the air to a first temperature, and then further heating the air with a second heater such as a burner. The burner can be one which burns a fuel in the presence of combustion air. The combustion air can be a portion of the air that is passed through the solar heater. After drying the fabrics by this method, the drying zone can be cooled and the fabrics can be further dried by passing air through the solar heater, and then without further heating the air that has passed through the solar heater, introducing the air to the drying chamber.

  2. Solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, R.I.; Kaplow, R.

    1980-08-26

    An improved solar cell designed for optimum efficiency is comprised of a plurality of series connected unit solar cells formed from a common substrate of semiconductor material. Each unit solar cell has spaced elongate sidewalls, and a ''dead space'' area between adjoining sidewalls of adjacent units is made substantially smaller than an active, light receiving area, extending between the opposite sidewalls of each individual unit. In addition, the width of the active area is concisely limited to ensure that radiation incident on the active area is incident at a point which is spaced from the p-n junction of each unit by no more than a predetermined optimum distance. Reducing the ''dead space'' area while concisely limiting the width of the active area provides improved solar cell performance without requiring focusing lenses.

  3. Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  4. Solar Nexus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jim

    1980-01-01

    The design team for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has pushed the state of the energy art to its current limits for the initial phase, with provisions for foreseeable and even speculative future applications. (Author/MLF)

  5. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  6. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  7. Solar Schematic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The home shown at right is specially designed to accommodate solar heating units; it has roof planes in four directions, allowing placement of solar collectors for best exposure to the sun. Plans (bottom) and complete working blueprints for the solar-heated house are being marketed by Home Building Plan Service, Portland, Oregon. The company also offers an inexpensive schematic (center) showing how a homeowner only moderately skilled in the use of tools can build his own solar energy system, applicable to new or existing structures. The schematic is based upon the design of a low-cost solar home heating system built and tested by NASA's Langley Research Center; used to supplement a warm-air heating system, it can save the homeowner about 40 percent of his annual heating bill for a modest investment in materials and components. Home Building Plan Service saved considerable research time by obtaining a NASA technical report which details the Langley work. The resulting schematic includes construction plans and simplified explanations of solar heat collection, collectors and other components, passive heat factors, domestic hot water supply and how to work with local heating engineers.

  8. NuSTAR Observations of Heavily Obscured Quasars at z Is Approximately 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.; Gandhi, P.; Assef, R. J.; Stern, D.; Aird, J.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Balokovic, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M.; LaMassa, S. M.; Luo, B.; Mullaney, J. R.; Teng, S. H.; Urry, C. M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z approx. = 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O(sub III)] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N(sub H)) are poorly known. In this analysis, (1) we study X-ray emission at greater than 10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N(sub H). (2) We further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at greater than 8 keV with a no-source probability of less than 0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N(sub H) is approximately greater than 5 × 10(exp 23) cm(exp -2). The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low-energy (2-10 keV) and high-energy (10-40 keV) X-ray regimes that are consistent with extreme, Compton-thick absorption (N(sub H) is approximately greater than 10(exp 24) cm(exp -2)). We find that for quasars at z is approximately 0.5, NuSTAR provides a significant improvement compared to lower energy (less than 10 keV) Chandra and XMM-Newton observations alone, as higher column densities can now be directly constrained.

  9. Solar Neutrinos. II. Experimental

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A method is described for observing solar neutrinos from the reaction Cl{sup 37}(nu,e{sup -})Ar{sup 37} in C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}. Two 5 00-gal tanks of C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} were placed in a limestone mine (1800 m.w.e.) and the resulting Ar{sup 37} activity induced by cosmic mesons( mu ) was measured to determine the necessary conditions for solar neutrino observations. (R.E.U.)

  10. Solar terrestrial observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Eight basic solar-terrestrial scientific objectives that benefit from the Shuttle/Platform approach and a program of measurements for each are discussed. The objectives are to understand: (1) solar variability, (2) wave-particle processes, (3) magnetosphere-ionosphere mass transport, (4) the global electric circuit, (5) upper atmospheric dynamics, (6) middle atmospheric chemistry and energetics, (7) lower atmospheric turbidity, and (8) planetary atmospheric waves. A two stage approach to a multidisciplinary payload is developed: an initial STO, that uses a single platform in a low-Earth orbit, and an advanced STO that uses two platforms in differing orbits.

  11. Free-Flight Investigation of Heat Transfer to an Unswept Cylinder Subjected to an Incident Shock and Flow Interference from an Upstream Body at Mach Numbers up to 5.50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Howard S.; Carr, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    Heat-transfer rates have been measured in free flight along the stagnation line of an unswept cylinder mounted transversely on an axial cylinder so that the shock wave from the hemispherical nose of the axial cylinder intersected the bow shock of the unswept transverse cylinder. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 2.53 to 5.50 and at Reynolds numbers based on the transverse cylinder diameter from 1.00 x 10(exp 6) to 1.87 x 10(exp 6). Shadowgraph pictures made in a wind tunnel showed that the flow field was influenced by boundary-layer separation on the axial cylinder and by end effects on the transverse cylinder as well as by the intersecting shocks. Under these conditions, the measured heat-transfer rates had inconsistent variations both in magnitude and distribution which precluded separating the effects of these disturbances. The general magnitude of the measured heating rates at Mach numbers up to 3 was from 0.1 to 0.5 of the theoretical laminar heating rates along the stagnation line for an infinite unswept cylinder in undisturbed flow. At Mach numbers above 4 the measured heating rates were from 1.5 to 2 times the theoretical rates.

  12. A SETI Search of Nearby Solar-Type Stars at the 203-GHz Positronium Hyperfine Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; DeBoer, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of advanced millimeter-wave technology has made it possible to construct low-noise receivers and high-power transmitters comparable to those available at much lower frequencies. This technology, plus certain physical characteristics of the millimeter-wave spectrum, suggests possible advantages for use of this wavelength range for interstellar communications. As a result, a Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence(SETI) type search has been conducted for narrow-bandwidth signals at frequencies near the positronium hyperfine spectral line (203.385 GHz), a potential natural reference frequency. A total of 40 solar-type stars within 23 parsecs were observed, in addition to three locations near the galactic center. No detections were made at the detection threshold of 2.3 x 10(exp -19) W/sq m in each of two orthogonal linear polarizations Future observations will be made with a higher resolution Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyzer (FFTSA), which should improve sensitivity by an order of magnitude and reduce required observing time.

  13. Results of the 2001 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 26, 2001, and July 4, 2001. Fifty-nine modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on nineteen of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on thirty-two modules (forty-six cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. Nine modules were flown for temperature measurement only. The data from the fixed load cells on the first flight was not usable. The temperature dependence of the first-flight data was erratic and we were unable to find a way to extract accurate calibration values. The I-V data from the first flight was good, however, and all data from the second flight was also good. The data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8)km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  14. EXCITATION OF LOW-FREQUENCY WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND BY NEWBORN INTERSTELLAR PICKUP IONS H{sup +} AND He{sup +} AS SEEN BY VOYAGER AT 4.5 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, Colin J.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Murphy, Neil; Schwadron, Nathan A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.ed E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.go

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of a spectral enhancement in the magnetic field fluctuations measured by the MAG instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft during 4.5 hr on DOY 7, 1979 at a heliocentric radial position of 4.5 AU. This time period is contained within a solar wind rarefaction when the large-scale interplanetary magnetic field was nearly radial. The frequency range and polarization of the enhanced fluctuations are consistent with waves generated by newly ionized interstellar H{sup +} and He{sup +}. We show sunward propagation of the waves via a cross-helicity analysis. We compare the observation with a theoretical model and find reasonable agreement given the model assumptions. This event is the first indication of pickup ion-generated waves seen at Voyager. It is also the first identification of pickup He{sup +} waves by any spacecraft.

  15. Superactive regions in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxiu; Chen, Anqin

    2015-08-01

    Solar super active regions (SARs) are characterized by huge sunspot area, strong thermal and non-thermal radiation, severe activity events and obvious decrease of total solar irradiance during their central meridian passage (Chen et al. 2011). They are more close to the star spots observed in integrated stellar radiation. In last 5 solar cycles, the SARs occupied less than 5% of total solar active regions, but hosted more than 40% of X class X-ray flares (or equivalently, major solar flares). With available vector-magnetograph observations, we quantitatively described the SARs in solar cycles 22-23 with four parameters, which were deduced from vector magnetic fields, and suggested a composite vector field Index Icom (Chen and Wang 2012). The SARs with very strong flare activity all have Icom > 1. Comparing with solar cycles 21-23, the level of solar activity in current solar cycle is very low. So far, there are only 5 SARs and 44 X class flares. The monthly smoothed TSI decreased sharply by 0.09% from the maximum of solar cycle 23 to the minima between solar cycle 23 and 24. In this contribution, we present new studies on SARs in solar cycle 24. The SARs in solar cycle 24 have relatively small flare index and relatively small vector field index Icom comparing with the SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23. There is a clearly linear relationship between the flare index and the composite vector field index (Chen and Wang 2015). The emphasis of this contribution is put on the similarity and different behaviors of vector magnetic fields of the SARs in the current solar cycle and the previous ones. We try to get a satisfactory account for the general characteristics and relatively low level of solar flare activity in cycle 24.

  16. Infrared Solar Spectroscopic Measurements of Free Tropospheric CO, C2H6, and HCN above Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Seasonal Variations and Evidence for Enhanced Emissions from the Southeast Asian Fires of 1997-1998. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Stephen, T. M.; Pougatchev, N. S.; Fishman, J.; David, S. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Novelli, P. C.; Jones, N. B.; Connor, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    High spectral resolution (0.003/ cm) infrared solar absorption measurements of CO, C2H6, and HCN have been recorded at the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change station on Mauna Loa, Hawaii, (19.5 deg N, 155.6 deg W, altitude 3.4 km). The observations were obtained on over 250 days between August 1995 and February 1998. Column measurements are reported for the 3.4 - 16 km altitude region, which corresponds approximately to the free troposphere above the station. Average CO mixing ratios computed for this layer have been compared with flask sampling CO measurements obtained in situ at the station during the same time period. Both show asymmetrical seasonal cycles superimposed on significant variability. The first two years of observations exhibit a broad January-April maximum and a sharper CO minimum during late summer. The C2H6 and CO 3.4 - 16 km columns were highly correlated throughout the observing period with the C2H6/CO slope intermediate between higher and lower values derived from similar infrared spectroscopic measurements at 32 deg N and 45 deg S latitude, respectively. Variable enhancements in CO, C2H6, and particularly HCN were observed beginning in about September 1997. The maximum HCN free tropospheric monthly mean column observed in November 1997 corresponds to an average 3.4 - 16 km mixing ratio of 0.7 ppbv (1 ppbv = 10(exp -9) per unit volume), more than a factor of 3 above the background level. The HCN enhancements continued through the end of the observational series. Back-trajectory calculations suggest that the emissions originated at low northern latitudes in southeast Asia. Surface CO mixing ratios and the C2H6 tropospheric columns measured during the same time also showed anomalous autumn 1997 maxima. The intense and widespread tropical wild fires that burned during 3 the strong El Nino warm phase of 1997-1998 are the likely source of the elevated emission products.

  17. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  18. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... addition, a solar simulator should have no significant time-related fluctuations in radiation...

  19. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... addition, a solar simulator should have no significant time-related fluctuations in radiation...

  20. International ultraviolet explorer solar array power degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic electrical performance of each International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) solar array panel is evaluated as a function of several prevailing variables (namely, solar illumination, array temperature and solar cell radiation damage). Based on degradation in the current-voltage characteristics of the array due to solar cell damage accumulated over time by space charged particle radiations, the available IUE solar array power is determined for life goals up to 10 years. Best and worst case calculations are normalized to actual IUE flight data (available solar array power versus observatory position) to accurately predict the future IUE solar array output. It is shown that the IUE solar array can continue to produce more power than is required at most observatory positions for at least 5 more years.

  1. Solar perspectives - Israel, solar pond innovator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsberg, S.

    1981-07-01

    Existing and planned solar pond electricity producing power plants in Israel and California are discussed. Salt ponds, with salinity increasing with depth, are coupled with low temperature, organic working fluid Rankine cycle engines to form self-storage, nonpolluting, electric plants. Average pond thermal gradients range from 25 C surface to 90 C at the bottom; 160 GW of potential power have been projected as currently available from existing natural solar ponds from a partial survey of 14 countries. The largest installation to date has a 220 kW output, and a 5 MW plant is scheduled for completion in 1983. Efficiencies of 10% and a cost of $2,000/kW for a 40 MW plant are projected, a cost which is comparable to that of conventional plants. The 40 MW plant is an optimized design, allowing for modular plant additions to increase capacity.

  2. A redox-mediator-free solar-driven Z-scheme water-splitting system consisting of modified Ta3N5 as an oxygen-evolution photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Ma, Su Su Khine; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Hisatomi, Takashi; Tabata, Masashi; Kudo, Akihiko; Domen, Kazunari

    2013-06-01

    Tantalum nitride (Ta3N5) modified with various O2-evolution cocatalysts was employed as a photocatalyst for water oxidation under visible light (λ>420 nm) in an attempt to construct a redox-mediator-free Z-scheme water-splitting system. Ta3N5 was prepared by nitriding Ta2O5 powder under a flow of NH3 at 1023-1223 K. The activity of Ta3N5 for water oxidation from an aqueous AgNO3 solution as an electron acceptor without cocatalyst was dependent on the generation of a well-crystallized Ta3N5 phase with a low density of anionic defects. Modification of Ta3N5 with nanoparticulate metal oxides as cocatalysts for O2 evolution improved water-oxidation activity. Of the cocatalysts examined, cobalt oxide (CoO(x)) was found to be the most effective, improving the water-oxidation efficiency of Ta3N5 by six to seven times. Further modification of CoO(x)/Ta3N5 with metallic Ir as an electron sink allowed one to achieve Z-scheme water splitting under simulated sunlight through interparticle electron transfer without the need for a shuttle redox mediator in combination with Ru-loaded SrTiO3 doped with Rh as a H2-evolution photocatalyst.

  3. Transonic Aerodynamic Loading Characteristics of a Wing-Body-Tail Combination Having a 52.5 deg. Sweptback Wing of Aspect Ratio 3 With Conical Wing Camber and Body Indentation for a Design Mach Number of Square Root of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassetti, Marlowe D.; Re, Richard J.; Igoe, William B.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effects of conical wing camber and body indentation according to the supersonic area rule on the aerodynamic wing loading characteristics of a wing-body-tail configuration at transonic speeds. The wing aspect ratio was 3, taper ratio was 0.1, and quarter-chord-line sweepback was 52.5 deg. with 3-percent-thick airfoil sections. The tests were conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 and at angles of attack from 0 deg. to 14 deg., with Reynolds numbers based on mean aerodynamic chord varying from 7 x 10(exp 6) to 8 x 10(exp 6). Conical camber delayed wing-tip stall and reduced the severity of the accompanying longitudinal instability but did not appreciably affect the spanwise load distribution at angles of attack below tip stall. Body indentation reduced the transonic chordwise center-of-pressure travel from about 8 percent to 5 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord.

  4. Artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-01

    This contribution was presented as the closing lecture at the Faraday Discussion 155 on artificial photosynthesis, held in Edinburgh Scotland, September 5-7 2011. The world needs new, environmentally friendly and renewable fuels to exchange for fossil fuels. The fuel must be made from cheap and "endless" resources that are available everywhere. The new research area of solar fuels aims to meet this demand. This paper discusses why we need a solar fuel and why electricity is not enough; it proposes solar energy as the major renewable energy source to feed from. The scientific field concerning artificial photosynthesis expands rapidly and most of the different scientific visions for solar fuels are briefly overviewed. Research strategies and the development of artificial photosynthesis research to produce solar fuels are overviewed. Some conceptual aspects of research for artificial photosynthesis are discussed in closer detail.

  5. High-efficiency heteroepitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.; Ward, J. S.; Emery, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    High-efficiency, thin-film InP solar cells grown heteroepitaxially on GaAs and Si single-crystal bulk substrates are being developed as a means of eliminating the problems associated with using single-crystal InP substrates. A novel device structure employing a compositionally graded Ga(x)In(1-x)As layer between the bulk substrate and the InP cell layers is used to reduce the dislocation density and improve the minority carrier properties in the InP. The structures are grown in a continuous sequence of steps using computer-controlled atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (APMOVPE). Dislocation densities as low as 3 x 10(exp 7) sq cm and minority carrier lifetimes as high as 3.3 ns are achieved in the InP layers with this method using both GaAs or Si substrates. Structures prepared in this fashion are also completely free of microcracks. These results represent a substantial improvement in InP layer quality when compared to heteroepitaxial InP prepared using conventional techniques such as thermally cycled growth and post-growth annealing. The present work is is concerned with the fabrication and characterization of high-efficiency, thin-film InP solar cells. Both one-sun and concentrator cells were prepared for device structures grown on GaAs substrates. One-cell cells have efficiencies as high as 13.7 percent at 25 C. However, results for the concentrator cells are emphasized. The concentrator cell performance is characterized as a function of the air mass zero (AM0) solar concentration ratio and operating temperature. From these data, the temperature coefficients of the cell performance parameters are derived as a function of the concentration ratio. Under concentration, the cells exhibit a dramatic increase in efficiency and an improved temperature coefficient of efficiency. At 25 C, a peak conversion efficiency of 18.9 percent is reported. At 80 C, the peak AM0 efficiency is 15.7 percent at 75.6 suns. These are the highest efficiencies yet

  6. Electrostatic bonding of thin (cycle sine 3 mil) 7070 cover glass to Ta2O5 AR-coated thin (cycle sine 2 mil) silicon wafers and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egelkrout, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding of thin cover glass to thin solar cells was researched. Silicon solar cells, wafers, and Corning 7070 glass of from about 0.002" to about 0.003" in thickness were used in the investigation to establish optimum parameters for producing mechanically acceptable bonds while minimizing thermal stresses and resultant solar cell electrical parameter degradation.

  7. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  8. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  9. Solar ADEPT: Efficient Solar Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar ADEPT Project: The 7 projects that make up ARPA-E's Solar ADEPT program, short for 'Solar Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,' aim to improve the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, which convert the sun's rays into electricity. Solar ADEPT projects are integrating advanced electrical components into PV systems to make the process of converting solar energy to electricity more efficient.

  10. Non-Fullerene Polymer Solar Cells Based on Alkylthio and Fluorine Substituted 2D-Conjugated Polymers Reach 9.5% Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bin, Haijun; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Gao, Liang; Chen, Shanshan; Zhong, Lian; Xue, Lingwei; Yang, Changduk; Li, Yongfang

    2016-04-01

    Non-fullerene polymer solar cells (PSCs) with solution-processable n-type organic semiconductor (n-OS) as acceptor have seen rapid progress recently owing to the synthesis of new low bandgap n-OS, such as ITIC. To further increase power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices, it is of a great challenge to develop suitable polymer donor material that matches well with the low bandgap n-OS acceptors thus providing complementary absorption and nanoscaled blend morphology, as well as suppressed recombination and minimized energy loss. To address this challenge, we synthesized three medium bandgap 2D-conjugated bithienyl-benzodithiophene-alt-fluorobenzotriazole copolymers J52, J60, and J61 for the application as donor in the PSCs with low bandgap n-OS ITIC as acceptor. The three polymers were designed with branched alkyl (J52), branched alkylthio (J60), and linear alkylthio (J61) substituent on the thiophene conjugated side chain of the benzodithiophene (BDT) units for studying effect of the substituents on the photovoltaic performance of the polymers. The alkylthio side chain, red-shifted absorption down-shifted the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and improved crystallinity of the 2D conjugated polymers. With linear alkylthio side chain, the tailored polymer J61 exhibits an enhanced JSC of 17.43 mA/cm(2), a high VOC of 0.89 V, and a PCE of 9.53% in the best non-fullerene PSCs with the polymer as donor and ITIC as acceptor. To the best of our knowledge, the PCE of 9.53% is one of the highest values reported in literature to date for the non-fullerene PSCs. The results indicate that J61 is a promising medium bandgap polymer donor in non-fullerene PSCs.

  11. Correlations of solar cycle 22 UV irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, L.; Brueckner, G.; Crane, P.; Prinz, D.; Herring, L.

    1997-01-01

    The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) onboard the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) is an absolutely calibrated UV spectrometer which has measured the solar spectral irradiance over the wavelengths 115 nm to 410 nm since October 1991. This data set now extends for about six years from near the peak of solar cycle 22, through its minimum, to the initial rise associated with solar cycle 23. Generally, the time series of UV spectral irradiances obtained shows behavior similar to that of other solar activity indices. The conditions on the sun, which can in result in dominant 13.5-day periodicity, are analyzed and illustrated. It is found that any combination of presence or absence of dominant 13.5-day in UV irradiance and solar wind velocity is possible depending entirely on the particular surface distribution and orientation of solar active regions.

  12. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  13. Design of high-efficiency, radiation-hard, GaInP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Sarah R.; Bertness, K. A.; Kibbler, A. E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    In recently years, Ga(0.5)In((0.5)P/GaAs cells have drawn increased attention both because of their high efficiencies and because they are well suited for space applications. They can be grown and processed as two-junction devices with roughly twice the voltage and half the current of GaAs cells. They have low temperature coefficients, and have good potential for radiation hardness. We have previously reported the effects of electron irradiation on test cells which were not optimally designed for space. From those results we estimated that an optimally designed cell could achieve 20 percent after irradiation with 10(exp 15) cm(exp -2) 1 MeV electrons. Modeling studies predicted that slightly higher efficiencies may be achievable. Record efficiencies for EOL performance of other types of cells are significantly lower. Even the best Si and InP cells have BOL efficiencies lower than the EOL efficiency we report here. Good GaAs cells have an EOL efficiency of 16 percent. The InP/Ga(0.5)In(0.5)As two-junction, two-terminal device has a BOL efficiency as high as 22.2 percent, but radiation results for these cells were limited. In this study we use the previous modeling and irradiation results to design a set of Ga(0.5)In(0.5)P/GaAs cells that will demonstrate the importance of the design parameters and result in high-efficiency devices. We report record AMO efficiencies: a BOL efficiency of 25.7 percent for a device optimized for BOL performance and two of different designs with EOL efficiencies of 19.6 percent (at 10(exp 15) cm(exp -2) 1MeV electrons). We vary the bottom-cell base doping and the top-cell thickness to show the effects of these two important design parameters. We get an unexpected result indicating that the dopant added to the bottom-cell base also increases the degradation of the top cell.

  14. Solar-Assisted Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Agar, John W. M.; Perkins, Anthony; Tjipto, Alwie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hemodialysis resource use—especially water and power, smarter processing and reuse of postdialysis waste, and improved ecosensitive building design, insulation, and space use—all need much closer attention. Regarding power, as supply diminishes and costs rise, alternative power augmentation for dialysis services becomes attractive. The first 12 months of a solar-assisted dialysis program in southeastern Australia is reported. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A 24-m2, 3-kWh rated solar array and inverter—total cost of A$16,219—has solar-assisted the dialysis-related power needs of a four-chair home hemodialysis training service. All array-created, grid-donated power and all grid-drawn power to the four hemodialysis machines and minireverse osmosis plant pairings are separately metered. After the grid-drawn and array-generated kilowatt hours have been billed and reimbursed at their respective commercial rates, financial viability, including capital repayment, can be assessed. Results From July of 2010 to July of 2011, the four combined equipment pairings used 4166.5 kWh, 9% more than the array-generated 3811.0 kWh. Power consumption at 26.7 c/kWh cost A$1145.79. Array-generated power reimbursements at 23.5 c/kWh were A$895.59. Power costs were, thus, reduced by 76.5%. As new reimbursement rates (60 c/kWh) take effect, system reimbursements will more than double, allowing both free power and potential capital pay down over 7.7 years. With expected array life of ∼30 years, free power and an income stream should accrue in the second and third operative decades. Conclusions Solar-assisted power is feasible and cost-effective. Dialysis services should assess their local solar conditions and determine whether this ecosensitive power option might suit their circumstance. PMID:22223614

  15. Solar cycle 24 from the standpoint of solar paleoastrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    The predictions of the maximum yearly mean sunspot number in the current cycle 24 made by means of the astrophysical approach (by analyzing the instrumental data on solar activity and using various dynamo models) and the paleoastrophysical approach (by analyzing the paleoreconstructions of solar activity spanning the interval from 8555 BC to 1605 AD) are compared. The paleoastrophysical predictions are shown to be considerably more accurate. The amplitude of the next cycle 25 is predicted. It is shown that from the standpoint of solar paleoastrophysics, cycle 25 will most likely be of medium power, R max(25) = 85.0 ± 30.5.

  16. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  17. Conceptual design study of concentrator enhanced solar arrays for space applications. Performance evaluation of 5 KW and 20 KW systems in Si and GaAs at 1 AU employing a flat plate trough concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A simple, efficient and very lightweight preliminary design for a 5 KW and 20 KW BOL output concentrated array evolved and is described by drawings. The relative effectiveness of this design, as compared to an unconcentrated planar array of equal power output, was measured by comparing power to mass performance of and the solar cell area required by each. Improvements in power to mass performance as high as 42% together with array area size reduction of 57% are possible in GaAs systems. By contrast, when the same concentrator design is applied to silicon systems, no improvement in power to mass can be obtained although array area reductions as high as 35% are obtainable.

  18. Novel donor-acceptor polymer containing 4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole for polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 6.21%.

    PubMed

    Han, Liangliang; Bao, Xichang; Hu, Tong; Du, Zhengkun; Chen, Weichao; Zhu, Dangqiang; Liu, Qian; Sun, Mingliang; Yang, Renqiang

    2014-06-01

    In order to improve the solution processability of 4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (DTBT)-based polymers, novel donor-acceptor polymer PTOBDTDTBT containing DTBT and benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) with conjugated side chain is designed and synthesized with narrow band gap 1.67 eV and low lying HOMO energy level -5.4 eV. The blend film of PTOBDTDTBT and PC71 BM exhibits uniform and smooth film with root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness 1.15 nm because of the excellent solubility of PTOBDTDTBT when six octyloxy side chains are introduced. The hole mobility of the blend film is measured to be 4.4 × 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) by the space-charge-limited current (SCLC) model. The optimized polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on PTOBDTDTBT/PC71 BM exhibits an improved PCE of 6.21% with Voc = 0.80 V, Jsc = 11.94 mA cm(-2) and FF = 65.10%, one of the highest PCE in DTBT containing polymers.

  19. Solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.; Startevant, R.C.

    1985-01-22

    A solar heater has an outlet conduit above an inlet conduit intercoupling a solar heating chamber with the inside of a building through a window opening. In one form the solar collecting chamber is outside the building below the window and the outlet conduit and inlet conduit are contiguous and pass through the window opening between the windowsill and the lower sash. In another form of the invention the solar collecting chambers are located beside each side of the window and joined at the top by the outlet conduit that passes through an opening between the upper window sash and the top of the window frame and at the bottom by an inlet conduit that passes through an opening between the lower sash and the windowsill. The outlet conduit carries photoelectric cells that provide electrical energy for driving a squirrel-cage fan in the outlet conduit through a mercury switch seated on a damper actuated by a bimetallic coil that closes the damper when the temperature in the outlet conduit goes below a predetermined temperature.

  20. Solar VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapping, K. F.; Kuijpers, J.

    1986-01-01

    In April, 1981, radio telescopes at Dwingeloo (The Netherlands) and Onsala (Sweden) were used as a long-baseline interferometer at a wavelength of 18 cm. The baseline of 619 km gave a spatial resolution on the Sun of about 45 km. The major problems of Solar Very Long Baseline Interferometry are discussed.