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Sample records for 10th percentile rank

  1. Tutorial: Calculating Percentile Rank and Percentile Norms Using SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Ted A.

    2009-01-01

    Practitioners can benefit from using norms, but they often have to develop their own percentile rank and percentile norms. This article is a tutorial on how to quickly and easily calculate percentile rank and percentile norms using SPSS, and this information is presented for a data set. Some issues in calculating percentile rank and percentile…

  2. A Comparison of Three Conditional Growth Percentile Methods: Student Growth Percentiles, Percentile Rank Residuals, and a Matching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Seo, Dong Gi

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three conditional growth percentile methods; student growth percentiles, percentile rank residuals, and a nonparametric matching method. These approaches seek to describe student growth in terms of the relative percentile ranking of a student in relationship to students that had the same…

  3. Percentile ranks of sonar fetal abdominal circumference measurements.

    PubMed

    Tamura, R K; Sabbagha, R E

    1980-11-01

    We present the percentile ranks of sonar fetal abdominal circumference (AC) measurements from 18 to 41 weeks' gestation. The ACs are derived from both longitudinal and cross-sectional ultrasonic studies of 200 low-risk pregnant women. The reproducibility of sonar AC falls within 2% of the mean value; this variation permits antenatal distinction of the fetus with a small AC (less than twenty-fifth percentile) or large (greater than eightieth percentile) reading. The fetal AC measurements add another dimension to the interpretation of cephalic growth, particularly in identifying macrosomic fetuses as well as those who are either asymmetrically or symmetrically undergrown. Additionally fetal AC measurements are useful as adjuncts to the diagnosis of hydrocephalus by quantitating the difference between cephalic and body size. In the presence of fetal ascites the AC also can be used to assess the severity and progression of the abnormality.

  4. I Can Do Maths: Changing Children's Mathematics Percentile Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Bonny; Mabin, Tony; Graham, Sue

    Three groups of children aged 8-10 who scored below the 22nd percentile on the PATests were taught basic math skills for 16 hours. One group received individual instruction using Precision Teaching and Direct Instruction, the second group received group instruction using Precision Teaching and Direct Instruction, and the third group received group…

  5. Standing adult human phantoms based on 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of male and female Caucasian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, V. F.; Milian, F. M.; Kramer, R.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Khoury, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    Computational anthropomorphic human phantoms are useful tools developed for the calculation of absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. The problem is, however, that, strictly speaking, the results can be applied only to a person who has the same anatomy as the phantom, while for a person with different body mass and/or standing height the data could be wrong. In order to improve this situation for many areas in radiological protection, this study developed 18 anthropometric standing adult human phantoms, nine models per gender, as a function of the 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of Caucasian populations. The anthropometric target parameters for body mass, standing height and other body measures were extracted from PeopleSize, a well-known software package used in the area of ergonomics. The phantoms were developed based on the assumption of a constant body-mass index for a given mass percentile and for different heights. For a given height, increase or decrease of body mass was considered to reflect mainly the change of subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, i.e. that organ masses were not changed. Organ mass scaling as a function of height was based on information extracted from autopsy data. The methods used here were compared with those used in other studies, anatomically as well as dosimetrically. For external exposure, the results show that equivalent dose decreases with increasing body mass for organs and tissues located below the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer, such as liver, colon, stomach, etc, while for organs located at the surface, such as breasts, testes and skin, the equivalent dose increases or remains constant with increasing body mass due to weak attenuation and more scatter radiation caused by the increasing adipose tissue mass. Changes of standing height have little influence on the equivalent dose to organs and tissues from external exposure. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have also

  6. Using Beta Distributions to Estimate Percentile Ranks and Accumulate Norms for Student Opinion of Teaching Items. Research Report No. 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; And Others

    Members of the beta family of distributions were used to estimate percentile ranks and to accumulate normative data collected in a university-wide system for gathering student opinions about teaching--including the areas of course content, objectives, instructor's behavior, teaching methods and materials, and outcomes of instruction. The fitted…

  7. Standard Errors of Equating for the Percentile Rank-Based Equipercentile Equating with Log-Linear Presmoothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tianyou

    2009-01-01

    Holland and colleagues derived a formula for analytical standard error of equating using the delta-method for the kernel equating method. Extending their derivation, this article derives an analytical standard error of equating procedure for the conventional percentile rank-based equipercentile equating with log-linear smoothing. This procedure is…

  8. Association of percentile ranking with citation impact and productivity in a large cohort of de novo NIMH-funded R01 grants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J M; Quinn, K; Bodenstein, Y A; Wu, C O; Danthi, N; Lauer, M S

    2015-09-01

    Previous reports from National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation have suggested that peer review scores of funded grants bear no association with grant citation impact and productivity. This lack of association, if true, may be particularly concerning during times of increasing competition for increasingly limited funds. We analyzed the citation impact and productivity for 1755 de novo investigator-initiated R01 grants funded for at least 2 years by National Institute of Mental Health between 2000 and 2009. Consistent with previous reports, we found no association between grant percentile ranking and subsequent productivity and citation impact, even after accounting for subject categories, years of publication, duration and amounts of funding, as well as a number of investigator-specific measures. Prior investigator funding and academic productivity were moderately strong predictors of grant citation impact. PMID:26033238

  9. Percentile-based assessment of craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Wilbrand, Jan-Falco; Bierther, Uta; Nord, Thomas; Reinges, Marcus; Hahn, Andreas; Christophis, Petros; Streckbein, Philipp; Kähling, Christopher; Howaldt, Hans-Peter

    2014-07-01

    Perioperative assessment of craniosynostosis is based mostly on subjective scores. In this study, we sought to find an objective method to assess cranial deformation based on normative craniofacial percentiles. Anthropometric datasets from 104 (79 males, 25 females) patients with craniosynostoses were included. Anthropometric data were compared with normative age-dependent percentiles. Deviations above the 90th or below the 10th percentile were defined as significant cranial deformation. The cohort comprised 69 children with sagittal, 22 metopic, nine coronal, two bicoronal, one lambdoid, and one with coronal + lambdoid craniosynostosis. Most children with sagittal synostosis were above the 90th percentile for cranial circumference and length, whereas only 27.9% were below the 10th percentile for cranial width. Most (83%) children with scaphocephaly had cranial indices below the 10th percentile. For trigonocephaly, we found normal cranial circumference values in most patients (10th-90th percentile), 40.9% were above the 90th percentile for cranial length, and 63.1% and 57.9% were above the 90th percentiles for sagittal and transverse circumferences. For unicoronal synostosis transverse circumference was above the 90th percentile in 83.3% of children. Matching of anthropometric data of craniosynostosis patients with craniofacial norms could be useful in grading the clinical picture and potentially adapting the operative procedure. PMID:24717668

  10. Contrasting OLS and Quantile Regression Approaches to Student "Growth" Percentiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Katherine Elizabeth; Ho, Andrew Dean

    2013-01-01

    Regression methods can locate student test scores in a conditional distribution, given past scores. This article contrasts and clarifies two approaches to describing these locations in terms of readily interpretable percentile ranks or "conditional status percentile ranks." The first is Betebenner's quantile regression approach that results in…

  11. Alternative Statistical Frameworks for Student Growth Percentile Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, J. R.; Castellano, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    This article suggests two alternative statistical approaches for estimating student growth percentiles (SGP). The first is to estimate percentile ranks of current test scores conditional on past test scores directly, by modeling the conditional cumulative distribution functions, rather than indirectly through quantile regressions. This would…

  12. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    large mission in Europe, and a potential comprehensive technology development program followed by a number one selection in the 2020 Decadal Survey in the U.S. The selection of L2 was combined with the selection of L3 and the newly formed eLISA consortium submitted an updated NGO concept under the name eLISA, or Evolved LISA, to the competition. It was widely believed that the launch date of 2028 for L2, would be seen by the selection committee as providing sufficient time to retire any remaining technological risks for LISA. However, the committee selected the 'Hot and Energetic Universe', an X-ray mission, as the science theme for L2 and the 'Gravitational Universe', the eLISA science theme, for L3. Although very disappointed, it was not a surprising decision. LPF did experience further delays just prior to and during the selection process, which may have influenced the decision. The strong technology program in the U.S. never materialized because WFIRST, the highest priority large mission in the 2010 Decadal following JWST, not only moved ahead but was also up-scoped significantly. The L3 selection, the WFIRST schedule, and the missing comprehensive technology development in the U.S. will make a launch of a GW mission in the 2020s very difficult. Although many in the LISA community, including ourselves, did not want to accept this harsh reality, this was the situation just prior to the 10th LISA symposium. However, despite all of this, the LISA team is now hopeful! In May of 2014 the LISA community gathered at the University of Florida in Gainesville to discuss progress in both the science and technology of LISA. The most notable plenary and contributed sessions included updates on the progress of LISA Pathfinder, which remains on track for launch in the second half of 2015(!), the science of LISA which ranges from super-massive black hole mergers and cosmology to the study of compact binaries within our own galaxy, and updates from other programs that share some of

  13. Columbines 10th Anniversary Finds Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    When school administrators hear that the 10th anniversary of the Columbine High School attack is approaching, most shake their heads in disbelief. They are amazed that 10 years have passed since this watershed event, which changed the landscape of K-12 school safety. In this article, the author reflects on the lessons learned from the Columbine…

  14. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    large mission in Europe, and a potential comprehensive technology development program followed by a number one selection in the 2020 Decadal Survey in the U.S. The selection of L2 was combined with the selection of L3 and the newly formed eLISA consortium submitted an updated NGO concept under the name eLISA, or Evolved LISA, to the competition. It was widely believed that the launch date of 2028 for L2, would be seen by the selection committee as providing sufficient time to retire any remaining technological risks for LISA. However, the committee selected the 'Hot and Energetic Universe', an X-ray mission, as the science theme for L2 and the 'Gravitational Universe', the eLISA science theme, for L3. Although very disappointed, it was not a surprising decision. LPF did experience further delays just prior to and during the selection process, which may have influenced the decision. The strong technology program in the U.S. never materialized because WFIRST, the highest priority large mission in the 2010 Decadal following JWST, not only moved ahead but was also up-scoped significantly. The L3 selection, the WFIRST schedule, and the missing comprehensive technology development in the U.S. will make a launch of a GW mission in the 2020s very difficult. Although many in the LISA community, including ourselves, did not want to accept this harsh reality, this was the situation just prior to the 10th LISA symposium. However, despite all of this, the LISA team is now hopeful! In May of 2014 the LISA community gathered at the University of Florida in Gainesville to discuss progress in both the science and technology of LISA. The most notable plenary and contributed sessions included updates on the progress of LISA Pathfinder, which remains on track for launch in the second half of 2015(!), the science of LISA which ranges from super-massive black hole mergers and cosmology to the study of compact binaries within our own galaxy, and updates from other programs that share some of

  15. PREFACE: 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry is an international conference organized by 4 chemistry departments of 4 universities in central Java, Indonesia. The universities are Sebelas Maret University, Diponegoro University, Semarang State University and Soedirman University. The venue was at Solo, Indonesia, at September 8-9, 2015. The total conference participants are 133 including the invited speakers. The conference emphasized the multidisciplinary chemical issue and impact of today's sustainable chemistry which covering the following topics: • Material innovation for sustainable goals • Development of renewable and sustainable energy based on chemistry • New drug design, experimental and theoretical methods • Green synthesis and characterization of material (from molecule to functionalized materials) • Catalysis as core technology in industry • Natural product isolation and optimization

  16. 10th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, racers from C-1 High School in Lafayette County, Missouri, get ready to tackle the course. The team pedaled its way to victory over 29 other teams to take first place honors. It was the second year in a row a team from the school has placed first in the high school division. (NASA/MSFC)

  17. 10th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, Team No. 1 from North Dakota State University in Fargo conquers one of several obstacles on their way to victory. The team captured first place honors in the college level competition.

  18. Shaping academic task engagement with percentile schedules.

    PubMed

    Athens, Elizabeth S; Vollmer, Timothy R; Pipkin, Claire C St Peter

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of percentile schedules as a method of quantifying the shaping procedure in an educational setting. We compared duration of task engagement during baseline measurements for 4 students to duration of task engagement during a percentile schedule. As a secondary purpose, we examined the influence on shaping of manipulations of the number of observations used to determine the criterion for reinforcement (the m parameter of the percentile formula). Results showed that the percentile formula was most effective when a relatively large m value (20 observations) was used.

  19. Shaping Academic Task Engagement with Percentile Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Athens, Elizabeth S; Vollmer, Timothy R; St. Peter Pipkin, Claire C

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of percentile schedules as a method of quantifying the shaping procedure in an educational setting. We compared duration of task engagement during baseline measurements for 4 students to duration of task engagement during a percentile schedule. As a secondary purpose, we examined the influence on shaping of manipulations of the number of observations used to determine the criterion for reinforcement (the m parameter of the percentile formula). Results showed that the percentile formula was most effective when a relatively large m value (20 observations) was used. PMID:17970261

  20. EDITORIAL: 10th anniversary of attosecond pulses 10th anniversary of attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienberger, Reinhard; Chang, Zenghu; Nam, Chang Hee

    2012-04-01

    times in atoms and molecules, such as Auger decay time and autoionization lifetime, have been measured directly as compared to indirect spectroscopic measurements normally done using synchrotron light sources. The reconstruction of molecular orbital wave functions has been demonstrated by developing the molecular tomography method. Ultrafast phenomena in condensed matter and in nanostructures have been tackled also. The successful development of attosecond light sources has thus opened up a variety of new research activities in ultrafast optical science; it will be continued and accelerated further in coming years with intensive research investments by more groups joining the field of attosecond science. In this special issue celebrating the 10th year of attosecond pulse generation 6 review articles and 16 regular articles are included. Although it does not cover all active research areas, we sincerely hope it gives a glimpse of active research activities in attosecond science throughout the world.

  1. Shaping Academic Task Engagement with Percentile Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athens, Elizabeth S.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; St. Peter Pipkin, Claire C.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of percentile schedules as a method of quantifying the shaping procedure in an educational setting. We compared duration of task engagement during baseline measurements for 4 students to duration of task engagement during a percentile schedule. As a secondary purpose, we examined the influence on…

  2. Nineth Rib Syndrome after 10th Rib Resection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yu Sub; Lee, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The 12th rib syndrome is a disease that causes pain between the upper abdomen and the lower chest. It is assumed that the impinging on the nerves between the ribs causes pain in the lower chest, upper abdomen, and flank. A 74-year-old female patient visited a pain clinic complaining of pain in her back, and left chest wall at a 7 on the 0-10 Numeric Rating scale (NRS). She had a lateral fixation at T12-L2, 6 years earlier. After the operation, she had multiple osteoporotic compression fractures. When the spine was bent, the patient complained about a sharp pain in the left mid-axillary line and radiating pain toward the abdomen. On physical examination, the 10th rib was not felt, and an image of the rib-cage confirmed that the left 10th rib was severed. When applying pressure from the legs to the 9th rib of the patient, pain was reproduced. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with 9th rib syndrome, and ultrasound-guided 9th and 10th intercostal nerve blocks were performed around the tips of the severed 10th rib. In addition, local anesthetics with triamcinolone were administered into the muscles beneath the 9th rib at the point of the greatest tenderness. The patient's pain was reduced to NRS 2 point. In this case, it is suspected that the patient had a partial resection of the left 10th rib in the past, and subsequent compression fractures at T8 and T9 led to the deformation of the rib cage, causing the tip of the remaining 10th rib to impinge on the 9th intercostal nerves, causing pain. PMID:27413484

  3. Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community. 10th Anniversary Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Alfie

    2006-01-01

    In this 10th anniversary edition of an Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) best seller, the author reflects on his revolutionary ideas in the context of today's emphasis on school accountability and high-stakes testing. The author relates how his innovative approach--where teachers learn to work with students, rather than…

  4. Birth Weight Reference Percentiles for Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Deng, Changfei; Li, Yanhua; Zhu, Jun; Mu, Yi; Deng, Ying; Mao, Meng; Wang, Yanping; Li, Qi; Ma, Shuangge; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a reference of population-based gestational age-specific birth weight percentiles for contemporary Chinese. Methods Birth weight data was collected by the China National Population-based Birth Defects Surveillance System. A total of 1,105,214 live singleton births aged ≥28 weeks of gestation without birth defects during 2006–2010 were included. The lambda-mu-sigma method was utilized to generate percentiles and curves. Results Gestational age-specific birth weight percentiles for male and female infants were constructed separately. Significant differences were observed between the current reference and other references developed for Chinese or non-Chinese infants. Conclusion There have been moderate increases in birth weight percentiles for Chinese infants of both sexes and most gestational ages since 1980s, suggesting the importance of utilizing an updated national reference for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:25127131

  5. [10th case of lobomycosis observed in French Guiana].

    PubMed

    Roche, J C; Monod, L

    1976-01-01

    Lobomycosis a disease specific to the South-American continent; it is rare but not exceptional, since 11 cases have already been observed in French Guyana. A propos of the 10th case, the authors recall the circumstances of the discovery and the basic elements of the microscopical diagnosis. The actual progress in the in vivo culture techniques should allow a better knowledge of the pathogen agent in the future.

  6. An Activity for Learning to Find Percentiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    This classroom activity is designed to help students practice calculating percentiles. The approach of the activity involves physical sorting and full classroom participation in each calculation. The design encourages a more engaged approach than simply having students make a calculation with numbers on a paper.

  7. meeting summary 10th AMS Symposium on Education.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Hayes, M. C.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Zeitler, J. W.; Murphy, K. A.; Croft, P. J.; Nese, J. M.; Friedman, H. A.; Robinson, H. W.; Thormeyer, C. D.; Ruscher, P. A.; Pandya, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    The American Meteorological Society held its 10th Symposium on Education in conjunction with the 82nd Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The theme of 2001's symposium was enhancing public awareness of the atmospheric and oceanic environments. Thirty-six oral presentations and 38 poster presentations summarized a variety of educational programs or examined educational issues at both the precollege and university levels. There was a special session on increasing awareness of meteorology and oceanography through popular and informal educational activities, as well as a joint session with the 17th International Conference on Interactive Information and Processing Systems (IIPS) for Meteorology, Oceanography, and Hydrology on using the World Wide Web to deliver information pertaining to the atmosphere, oceans, and coastal zone. Over 200 people representing a wide spectrum of the Society attended one or more of the sessions in this 2-day conference. The program for the 10th Symposium on Education can be viewed in the November 2000 issue of the Bulletin.

  8. Birthweight percentiles for twin birth neonates by gestational age in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Cao, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Yiming; Yao, Cong; Xiong, Chao; Zhang, Yaqi; Wang, Youjie; Zhou, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    Localized birthweight references for gestational ages serve as an essential tool in accurate evaluation of atypical birth outcomes. Such references for twin births are currently not available in China. The aim of this study was to construct up-to-data sex specific birth weight references by gestational ages for twin births in China. We conducted a population-based analysis on the data of 22,507 eligible living twin infants with births dated between 8/01/2006 and 8/31/2015 from all 95 hospitals within the Wuhan area. Gestational ages in complete weeks were determined using a combination of last-menstrual-period based (LMP) estimation and ultrasound examination. Smoothed percentile curves were created by the Lambda Mu Sigma (LMS) method. Reference of the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 97th percentiles birth weight by sex and gestational age were made using 11,861 male and 10,646 female twin newborns with gestational age 26–42 weeks. Separate birthweight percentiles curves for male and female twins were constructed. In summary, our study firstly presents percentile curves of birthweight by gestational age for Chinese twin neonates. Further research is required for the validation and implementation of twin birthweight curves into clinical practice. PMID:27506479

  9. Byzantine psychosomatic medicine (10th- 15th century).

    PubMed

    Eftychiadis, A C

    1999-01-01

    Original elements of the psychosomatic medicine are examined by the most important byzantine physicians and medico-philosophers during the 10th -15th centuries. These topics concern the psycosomatic unity of the human personality, the psychosomatic disturbances, diseases and interactions, organic diseases, which cause psychical disorders, psychical pathological reactions, which result in somatic diseases, the psychology of the depth of the soul, the psychosomatic pathogenetic reasons of psychiatric and neurological diseases and suicide, the influence of witchcraft on psychosomatic affections, maniac and demoniac patients. The psychosomatic treatment has a holistic preventive and curative character and encloses sanitary and dietary measures, physiotherapy, curative bathing, strong purgation, pharmaceutical preparations proportional to the disease, religious disposition, psychoanalysis and psychotherapy with dialogue and the contribution of the divine factor. The late byzantine medical science contributed mainly to the progress of the psychosomatic medicine and therapeutics. The saint woman physician Hermione (1st -2nd cent.) is considered as the protectress of psychosomatic medicine. PMID:11624574

  10. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13323.001 PMID:26880623

  11. NIH peer review percentile scores are poorly predictive of grant productivity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Peer review is widely used to assess grant applications so that the highest ranked applications can be funded. A number of studies have questioned the ability of peer review panels to predict the productivity of applications, but a recent analysis of grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US found that the percentile scores awarded by peer review panels correlated with productivity as measured by citations of grant-supported publications. Here, based on a re-analysis of these data for the 102,740 funded grants with percentile scores of 20 or better, we report that these percentile scores are a poor discriminator of productivity. This underscores the limitations of peer review as a means of assessing grant applications in an era when typical success rates are often as low as about 10%. PMID:26880623

  12. Evaluating Additive Interaction Using Survival Percentiles.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Andrea; Bottai, Matteo; Orsini, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of statistical interaction in time-to-event analysis is usually limited to the study of multiplicative interaction, via inclusion of a product term in a Cox proportional-hazard model. Measures of additive interaction are available but seldom used. All measures of interaction in survival analysis, whether additive or multiplicative, are in the metric of hazard, usually assuming that the interaction between two predictors of interest is constant during the follow-up period. We introduce a measure to evaluate additive interaction in survival analysis in the metric of time. This measure can be calculated by evaluating survival percentiles, defined as the time points by which different subpopulations reach the same incidence proportion. Using this approach, the probability of the outcome is fixed and the time variable is estimated. We also show that by using a regression model for the evaluation of conditional survival percentiles, including a product term between the two exposures in the model, interaction is evaluated as a deviation from additivity of the effects. In the simple case of two binary exposures, the product term is interpreted as excess/decrease in survival time (i.e., years, months, days) due to the presence of both exposures. This measure of interaction is dependent on the fraction of events being considered, thus allowing evaluation of how interaction changes during the observed follow-up. Evaluation of interaction in the context of survival percentiles allows deriving a measure of additive interaction without assuming a constant effect over time, overcoming two main limitations of commonly used approaches.

  13. The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database's 10th year anniversary: update 2015

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Allan Peter; Grondin, Cynthia J.; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; King, Benjamin L.; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) was developed out of a need to formalize, harmonize and centralize the information on numerous genes and proteins responding to environmental toxic agents across diverse species. CTD's initial approach was to facilitate comparisons of nucleotide and protein sequences of toxicologically significant genes by curating these sequences and electronically annotating them with chemical terms from their associated references. Since then, however, CTD has vastly expanded its scope to robustly represent a triad of chemical–gene, chemical–disease and gene–disease interactions that are manually curated from the scientific literature by professional biocurators using controlled vocabularies, ontologies and structured notation. Today, CTD includes 24 million toxicogenomic connections relating chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, pathways and interaction modules. In this 10th year anniversary update, we outline the evolution of CTD, including our increased data content, new ‘Pathway View’ visualization tool, enhanced curation practices, pilot chemical–phenotype results and impending exposure data set. The prototype database originally described in our first report has transformed into a sophisticated resource used actively today to help scientists develop and test hypotheses about the etiologies of environmentally influenced diseases. PMID:25326323

  14. PREFACE: ISEC 2005: The 10th International Superconductive Electronics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalla, Horst

    2006-05-01

    The 10th International Superconductive Electronics Conference took place in Noordwijkerhout in the Netherlands, 5-9 September 2005, not far from the birthplace of superconductivity in Leiden nearly 100 years ago. There have been many reasons to celebrate the 10th ISEC: not only was it the 20th anniversary, but also the achievements since the first conference in Tokyo in 1987 are tremendous. We have seen whole new groups of superconductive materials come into play, such as oxide superconductors with maximum Tc in excess of 100 K, carbon nanotubes, as well as the realization of new digital concepts from saturation logic to the ultra-fast RSFQ-logic. We have learned that superconductors not only show s-wave symmetries in the spatial arrangement of the order parameter, but also that d-wave dependence in oxide superconductors is now well accepted and can even be successfully applied to digital circuits. We are now used to operating SQUIDs in liquid nitrogen; fT sensitivity of SQUID magnetometers is not surprising anymore and can even be reached with oxide-superconductor based SQUIDs. Even frequency discriminating wide-band single photon detection with superconductive devices, and Josephson voltage standards with tens of thousands of junctions, nowadays belong to the daily life of advanced laboratories. ISEC has played a very important role in this development. The first conferences were held in 1987 and 1989 in Tokyo, and subsequently took place in Glasgow (UK), Boulder (USA), Nagoya (Japan), Berlin (Germany), Berkeley (USA), Osaka (Japan), Sydney (Australia), and in 2005 for the first time in the Netherlands. These conferences have provided platforms for the presentation of the research and development results of this community and for the vivid discussion of achievements and strategies for the further development of superconductive electronics. The 10th conference has played a very important role in this context. The results in laboratories show great potential and

  15. Relationships between walking and percentiles of adiposity inolder and younger men

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.

    2005-06-01

    To assess the relationship of weekly walking distance to percentiles of adiposity in elders (age {ge} 75 years), seniors (55 {le} age <75 years), middle-age men (35 {le} age <55 years), and younger men (18 {le} age <35 years old). Cross-sectional analyses of baseline questionnaires from 7,082 male participants of the National Walkers Health Study. The walkers BMIs were inversely and significantly associated with walking distance (kg/m{sup 2} per km/wk) in elders (slope {+-} SE: -0.032 {+-} 0.008), seniors (-0.045 {+-} 0.005), and middle-aged men (-0.037 {+-} 0.007), as were their waist circumferences (-0.091 {+-} 0.025, -0.045 {+-} 0.005, and -0.091 {+-} 0.015 cm per km/wk, respectively), and these slopes remained significant when adjusted statistically for reported weekly servings of meat, fish, fruit, and alcohol. The declines in BMI associated with walking distance were greater at the higher than lower percentiles of the BMI distribution. Specifically, compared to the decline at the 10th BMI percentile, the decline in BMI at the 90th percentile was 5.1-fold greater in elders, 5.9-fold greater in seniors, and 6.7-fold greater in middle-age men. The declines in waist circumference associated with walking distance were also greater among men with broader waistlines. Exercise-induced weight loss (or self-selection) causes an inverse relationship between adiposity and walking distance in men 35 and older that is substantially greater among fatter men.

  16. Rank Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  17. Ranking Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the "U.S. News" ranking profiles of four colleges, namely: (1) Smith College; (2) Washington University in St. Louis; (3) Colorado State University at Fort Collins; and (4) Whitman College. Smith College was in the top 10 of the nation's liberal-arts colleges, or just outside it, almost since the "U.S. News" rankings began.…

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, 1936 (Copied from small photo taken by survey members) OLD APARTMENT HOUSE - Jansonist Colony, Old Apartment House, Main Street, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  19. 16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CORNER SHOWS THE DIAGONALLY FLUTED SPIRAL DESIGN OF THE RELIEF COLUMN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. Creating Composite Age Groups to Smooth Percentile Rank Distributions of Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Francesca; Olson, Amy; Bansal, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Individually administered tests are often normed on small samples, a process that may result in irregularities within and across various age or grade distributions. Test users often smooth distributions guided by Thurstone assumptions (normality and linearity) to result in norms that adhere to assumptions made about how the data should look. Test…

  1. Percentile curves for skinfold thickness for Canadian children and youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhle, Stefan; Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Maguire, Bryan; Hamilton, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements are a reliable and feasible method for assessing body fat in children but their use and interpretation is hindered by the scarcity of reference values in representative populations of children. The objective of the present study was to develop age- and sex-specific percentile curves for five SFT measures (biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, medial calf) in a representative population of Canadian children and youth. Methods. We analyzed data from 3,938 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). Standardized procedures were used to measure SFT. Age- and sex-specific centiles for SFT were calculated using the GAMLSS method. Results. Percentile curves were materially different in absolute value and shape for boys and girls. Percentile girls in girls steadily increased with age whereas percentile curves in boys were characterized by a pubertal centered peak. Conclusions. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for five SFT measures in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. PMID:27547554

  2. Percentile curves for skinfold thickness for Canadian children and youth

    PubMed Central

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Maguire, Bryan; Hamilton, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements are a reliable and feasible method for assessing body fat in children but their use and interpretation is hindered by the scarcity of reference values in representative populations of children. The objective of the present study was to develop age- and sex-specific percentile curves for five SFT measures (biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, medial calf) in a representative population of Canadian children and youth. Methods. We analyzed data from 3,938 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). Standardized procedures were used to measure SFT. Age- and sex-specific centiles for SFT were calculated using the GAMLSS method. Results. Percentile curves were materially different in absolute value and shape for boys and girls. Percentile girls in girls steadily increased with age whereas percentile curves in boys were characterized by a pubertal centered peak. Conclusions. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for five SFT measures in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. PMID:27547554

  3. Percentile curves for skinfold thickness for Canadian children and youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhle, Stefan; Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Maguire, Bryan; Hamilton, David C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements are a reliable and feasible method for assessing body fat in children but their use and interpretation is hindered by the scarcity of reference values in representative populations of children. The objective of the present study was to develop age- and sex-specific percentile curves for five SFT measures (biceps, triceps, subscapular, suprailiac, medial calf) in a representative population of Canadian children and youth. Methods. We analyzed data from 3,938 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). Standardized procedures were used to measure SFT. Age- and sex-specific centiles for SFT were calculated using the GAMLSS method. Results. Percentile curves were materially different in absolute value and shape for boys and girls. Percentile girls in girls steadily increased with age whereas percentile curves in boys were characterized by a pubertal centered peak. Conclusions. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for five SFT measures in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth.

  4. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  5. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions.

  6. Changes in Math Proficiency between 8th and 10th Grades. Statistics in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Don; And Others

    Between 8th and 10th grades, many students are asked to make curriculum-related decisions that may ultimately influence their achievement in core academic subjects such as mathematics. While past achievement often limits the level of courses available to a student, aspirations for postsecondary education ultimately determine the level of…

  7. Classroom Achievement Goal Structure, School Engagement, and Substance Use among 10th Grade Students in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Åge; Samdal, Oddrun

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the relationships between students' perceived classroom achievement goals, school engagement and substance use in terms of smoking and drinking, and at investigating gender differences regarding these issues in a sample of 1,239 Norwegian 10th grade students. A multivariate analysis showed that…

  8. A Chemistry Course for High Ability 8th, 9th, and 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Richard, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course designed, in cooperation with local public school districts, to intellectually challenge a group of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade students. Organic chemistry and biochemistry are integrated into the course (titled Chemistry and Everyday Life) to emphasize practical applications of chemistry. The course syllabus is included.…

  9. Changes in Educational Expectations between 10th and 12th Grades across Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sueuk; Wells, Ryan; Bills, David

    2015-01-01

    The mean levels of educational expectations of American high school students have increased over the past generation; individual educational expectations change as students mature. Using the National Education Longitudinal Study and the Education Longitudinal Study, we examined simultaneously the changes in individuals' expectations from 10th to…

  10. Self-Perception and Achievement of Black Urban 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglin, Gary

    Explores the following five dimensions of self-perception held by black urban male 10th-grade students in North Carolina: (1) scholastic competence; (2) athletic competence; (3) physical appearance; (4) behavioral conduct; and (5) job competence. Investigates differences in these aspects of self-concept for 30 students scoring above and 30 scoring…

  11. Comparing Overexcitabilities of Gifted and Non-Gifted 10th Grade Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakmaci-Guzel, Buket; Akarsu, Fusun

    2006-01-01

    The study compares overexcitability scores of Turkish 10th graders who are grouped in terms of their intellectual abilities, motivation, creativity and leadership as well as gender. 711 students who were administered Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test (APM) were divided into three intellectual ability categories. From this pool, 105 subjects…

  12. Program To Increase Selected 9th and 10th Graders' Career Decision-Making Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Linda D.

    This study addresses some of the career decision challenges facing 9th- and 10th-grade students. The researcher discovered that many students possessed inadequate decision-making strategies, that counselors did not focus on career planning prior to and during registration, and that the school district lacked a comprehensive career guidance…

  13. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (10th, Annapolis, Maryland, December 3-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 10th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include measuring success through student assessment, the Bay Schools Project (BSP), and a co-sponsored educational forum with…

  14. Mental Retardation: Definition, Classification, and Systems of Supports. 10th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckasson, Ruth; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon; Buntinx, Wil H. E.; Coulter, David L.; Craig, Ellis M.; Reeve, Alya; Schalock, Robert L.; Snell, Martha E.; Spitalnik, Deborah M.; Spreat, Scott; Tasse, Marc J.

    This manual, the 10th edition of a regularly published definition and classification work on mental retardation, presents five key assumptions upon which the definition of mental retardation is based and a theoretical model of five essential dimensions that explain mental retardation and how to use the companion system. These dimensions include…

  15. County Data Book, 2000: Kentucky Kids Count. 10th Annual Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Danielle; Hall, Douglas; Mellick, Donna; Miller, Debra; Town, Jackie

    This 10th annual Kids Count data book reports on trends in the well-being of Kentucky's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the areas of well being, child risk factors, and demography. The indicators are as follows: (1) healthy births, including birth weights and prenatal care; (2) maternal risk characteristics, including…

  16. Examining the Reliability of Student Growth Percentiles Using Multidimensional IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    Student growth percentiles (SGPs, Betebenner, 2009) are used to locate a student's current score in a conditional distribution based on the student's past scores. Currently, following Betebenner (2009), quantile regression (QR) is most often used operationally to estimate the SGPs. Alternatively, multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) may…

  17. Making a difference: education at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Lara D; Liang, Jennifer O; Pickart, Michael A; Pierret, Chris; Tomasciewicz, Henry G

    2012-12-01

    Scientists, educators, and students met at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics during the 2-day Education Workshop, chaired by Dr. Jennifer Liang and supported in part by the Genetics Society of America. The goal of the workshop was to share expertise, to discuss the challenges faced when using zebrafish in the classroom, and to articulate goals for expanding the impact of zebrafish in education.

  18. Making a Difference: Education at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jennifer O.; Pickart, Michael A.; Pierret, Chris; Tomasciewicz, Henry G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Scientists, educators, and students met at the 10th International Conference on Zebrafish Development and Genetics during the 2-day Education Workshop, chaired by Dr. Jennifer Liang and supported in part by the Genetics Society of America. The goal of the workshop was to share expertise, to discuss the challenges faced when using zebrafish in the classroom, and to articulate goals for expanding the impact of zebrafish in education. PMID:23244686

  19. From the corner of N. 10th St. and W. O'Neill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From the corner of N. 10th St. and W. O'Neill Ave. Looking west. Housing # 157-162 are on the right, building 156 is straight ahead, and buildings 153, 152, 116, and 115 are to the left. The golf course is directly west of these buildings. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. [Infanticide by throwing the child from the 10th floor of a building].

    PubMed

    Schröder, Ann Sophie; Görndt, Jennifer; Püschel, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Childbirth after denial or concealment of pregnancy has an increased risk of mortality for both mother and child. Interdisciplinary cooperation between professional groups is needed to explore the psychological and criminological aspects of infanticide. The case of a primipara mother, who threw her mature and viable newborn from the 10th floor of a high-rise building shortly after a concealed pregnancy, is reported. Forensic medical issues, as well as the characteristics of the offence and the perpetrator, are described.

  1. 14. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. WINDOWS HAVE WHITE TERRA COTTA SILLS, HEADS AND MULLIONS. ARCHES ARE OF TERRA COTTA INCLUDING ORNAMENTATION ABOVE THE 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATIONS BETWEEN ARCHES ARE TERRA COTTA PAINTED IN BRONZE COLOR. LOUVERS ON THE WINDOWS ARE NOT PART OF THE ORIGINAL DESIGN. THIS IS THE FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. Percentile growth charts for biomedical studies using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Corson, A M; Laws, J; Laws, A; Litten, J C; Lean, I J; Clarke, L

    2008-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity and heart disease are compromising quality of life for a growing number of people. There is much research linking adult disease with the growth and development both in utero and during the first year of life. The pig is an ideal model for studying the origins of developmental programming. The objective of this paper was to construct percentile growth curves for the pig for use in biomedical studies. The body weight (BW) of pigs was recorded from birth to 150 days of age and their crown-to-rump length was measured over the neonatal period to enable the ponderal index (PI; kg/m3) to be calculated. Data were normalised and percentile curves were constructed using Cole's lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method for BW and PI. The construction of these percentile charts for use in biomedical research will allow a more detailed and precise tracking of growth and development of individual pigs under experimental conditions. PMID:22444086

  3. Ranking USRDS provider specific SMRs from 1998-2001

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Thomas A.; Paddock, Susan M.; Ridgeway, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Provider profiling (ranking/percentiling) is prevalent in health services research. Bayesian models coupled with optimizing a loss function provide an effective framework for computing non-standard inferences such as ranks. Inferences depend on the posterior distribution and should be guided by inferential goals. However, even optimal methods might not lead to definitive results and ranks should be accompanied by valid uncertainty assessments. We outline the Bayesian approach and use estimated Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) in 1998-2001 from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) as a platform to identify issues and demonstrate approaches. Our analyses extend Liu et al. (2004) by computing estimates developed by Lin et al. (2006) that minimize errors in classifying providers above or below a percentile cut-point, by combining evidence over multiple years via a first-order, autoregressive model on log(SMR), and by use of a nonparametric prior. Results show that ranks/percentiles based on maximum likelihood estimates of the SMRs and those based on testing whether an SMR = 1 substantially under-perform the optimal estimates. Combining evidence over the four years using the autoregressive model reduces uncertainty, improving performance over percentiles based on only one year. Furthermore, percentiles based on posterior probabilities of exceeding a properly chosen SMR threshold are essentially identical to those produced by minimizing classification loss. Uncertainty measures effectively calibrate performance, showing that considerable uncertainty remains even when using optimal methods. Findings highlight the importance of using loss function guided percentiles and the necessity of accompanying estimates with uncertainty assessments. PMID:19343106

  4. Frequency-Rank Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Bertram C.; Griffiths, Jose M.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency, rank, and frequency rank distributions are defined. Extensive discussion on several aspects of frequency rank distributions includes the Poisson process as a means of exploring the stability of ranks; the correlation of frequency rank distributions; and the transfer coefficient, a new measure in frequency rank distribution. (MBR)

  5. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  6. Characterisation of decorations on Iranian (10th-13th century) lustreware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, I.; Brunetti, B.; Giulivi, A.; Sgamellotti, A.; Shokouhi, F.; Oliaiy, P.; Rahighi, J.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Mellini, M.; Viti, C.

    It has been recently shown that lustre decoration of Medieval and Renaissance pottery consists of silver and copper nanoparticles, dispersed within the glassy matrix of the ceramic glaze. Lustre surfaces show peculiar optical effects, such as metallic reflection and iridescence. Here we report the findings of a study on lustred glazes of several shards belonging to Iranian pottery of the 10th and 13th centuries, decorated on both sides. Two different glazes, depending on the side of the sample, have been identified. Different lustre chromatic effects are characterised by the relative presence of silver- and copper-metal nanoparticles dispersed in the glassy matrix.

  7. From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th St., looking west with building 135 (gas station) on the left. Beyond it is building 119 and to the right of 119 is the gable end of the north side of 120. Beyond and perpendicular to building 120 are 118 and 117. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. EDITORIAL: The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011) The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Woo

    2012-05-01

    Measurement and instrumentation have long played an important role in production engineering, through supporting both the traditional field of manufacturing and the new field of micro/nanotechnology. Papers published in this special feature were selected and updated from those presented at The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011) held at KAIST, Daejeon, South Korea, on 29 June-2 July 2011. ISMTII 2011 was organized by ICMI (The International Committee on Measurements and Instrumentation), Korean Society for Precision Engineering (KSPE), Japan Society for Precision Engineering (JSPE), Chinese Society for Measurement (CSM) and KAIST. The Symposium was also supported by the Korea BK21 Valufacture Institute of Mechanical Engineering at KAIST. A total of 225 papers, including four keynote papers, were presented at ISMTII 2011, covering a wide range of topics, including micro/nanometrology, precision measurement, online & in-process measurement, surface metrology, optical metrology & image processing, biomeasurement, sensor technology, intelligent measurement & instrumentation, uncertainty, traceability & calibration, and signal processing algorithms. The organizing members recommended publication of updated versions of some of the best ISMTII 2011 papers in this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology. As guest editor, I believe that this special feature presents the newest information on advances in measurement technology and intelligent instruments from basic research to applied systems for production engineering. I would like to thank all the authors for their great contributions to this special feature and the referees for their careful reviews of the papers. I would also like to express our thanks and appreciation to the publishing staff of MST for their dedicated efforts that have made this special feature possible.

  9. Maternal Genetic Ancestry and Legacy of 10(th) Century AD Hungarians.

    PubMed

    Csősz, Aranka; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csákyová, Veronika; Langó, Péter; Bódis, Viktória; Köhler, Kitti; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Nagy, Melinda; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv

    2016-01-01

    The ancient Hungarians originated from the Ural region in today's central Russia and migrated across the Eastern European steppe, according to historical sources. The Hungarians conquered the Carpathian Basin 895-907 AD, and admixed with the indigenous communities. Here we present mitochondrial DNA results from three datasets: one from the Avar period (7(th)-9(th) centuries) of the Carpathian Basin (n = 31); one from the Hungarian conquest-period (n = 76); and a completion of the published 10(th)-12(th) century Hungarian-Slavic contact zone dataset by four samples. We compare these mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment sequences and haplogroup results with published ancient and modern Eurasian data. Whereas the analyzed Avars represents a certain group of the Avar society that shows East and South European genetic characteristics, the Hungarian conquerors' maternal gene pool is a mixture of West Eurasian and Central and North Eurasian elements. Comprehensively analyzing the results, both the linguistically recorded Finno-Ugric roots and historically documented Turkic and Central Asian influxes had possible genetic imprints in the conquerors' genetic composition. Our data allows a complex series of historic and population genetic events before the formation of the medieval population of the Carpathian Basin, and the maternal genetic continuity between 10(th)-12(th) century and modern Hungarians. PMID:27633963

  10. Drug testing at the 10th Asian Games and 24th Seoul Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Park, S; Lho, D; Choo, H P; Chung, B; Yoon, C; Min, H; Choi, M J

    1990-01-01

    Drug testing (doping test) procedures in the 1986 10th Asian Olympic Games and 1988 24th Seoul Olympic Games are reported. The International Olympic Committee Medical Commission (IOC-MC) conducted its first doping tests at the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble. With the guidance of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) introduced doping tests at the 1986 10th Asian Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea, September 21st to October 5th, 1986. 585 samples were tested at the Doping Control Center, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (DCC/KAIST), for stimulants, narcotics, anabolic steroids, and beta-blockers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high pressure liquid chromatography, and fluorescence polarization immunoassay. These tests covered about 100 different drugs and another 400 as metabolites in addition to pharmacologically related substances. For the Seoul Olympic Games from September 17 to October 2, 1988, the IOC-MC with the DCC/KAIST conducted doping tests on 1601 samples for stimulants, narcotics, beta-blockers, diuretics, and anabolic steroids using GC, HPLC, GC/MSD, GC/MS, LC/MS, and TDx.

  11. Binorm-a fortran subroutine to calculate the percentiles of a standardized binormal distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    BINORM is a FORTRAN subroutine for calculating the percentiles of a standardized binormal distribution. By using a linear transformation, the percentiles of a binormal distribution can be obtained. The percentiles of a binormal distribution are useful for plotting purposes, for establishing confidence intervals, and for sampling from a mixed population that consists of two normal distributions. ?? 1977.

  12. Space Commerce 1994 Forum: The 10th National Space Symposium. Proceedings report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipskin, Beth Ann (Editor); Patterson, Sara (Editor); Aragon, Larry (Editor); Brescia, David A. (Editor); Flannery, Jack (Editor); Mossey, Roberty (Editor); Regan, Christopher (Editor); Steeby, Kurt (Editor); Suhr, Stacy (Editor); Zimkas, Chuck (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The theme of the 10th National Space Symposium was 'New Windows of Opportunity'. These proceedings cover the following: Business Trends in High Tech Commercialization; How to Succeed in Space Technology Business -- Making Dollars and Sense; Obstacles and Opportunities to Success in Technology Commercialization NASA's Commercial Technology Mission -- a New Way of Doing Business: Policy and Practices; Field Center Practices; Practices in Action -- A New Way: Implementation and Business Opportunities; Space Commerce Review; Windows of Opportunity; the International Space Station; Space Support Forum; Spacelift Update; Competitive Launch Capabilities; Supporting Life on Planet Earth; National Security Space Issues; NASA in the Balance; Earth and Space Observations -- Did We Have Cousins on Mars?; NASA: A New Vision for Science; and Space Technology Hall of Fame.

  13. Tuskegee Bioethics Center 10th anniversary presentation: "Commemorating 10 years: ethical perspectives on origin and destiny".

    PubMed

    Prograis, Lawrence J

    2010-08-01

    More than 70 years have passed since the beginning of the Public Health Service syphilis study in Tuskegee, Alabama, and it has been over a decade since President Bill Clinton formally apologized for it and held a ceremony for the Tuskegee study participants. The official launching of the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care took place two years after President Clinton's apology. How might we fittingly discuss the Center's 10th Anniversary and the topic 'Commemorating 10 Years: Ethical Perspectives on Origin and Destiny'? Over a decade ago, a series of writers, many of them African Americans, wrote a text entitled 'African-American Perspectives on Biomedical Ethics'; their text was partly responsible for a prolonged reflection by others to produce a subsequent work, 'African American Bioethics: Culture, Race and Identity'. What is the relationship between the discipline of bioethics and African American culture? This and related questions are explored in this commentary.

  14. 10th World IHEA and ECHE Joint Congress: health economics in the age of longevity.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B; Getzen, Thomas E; Torbica, Aleksandra; Anegawa, Tomofumi

    2014-12-01

    The 10th consecutive World Health Economics conference was organized jointly by International Health Economics Association and European Conference on Health Economics Association and took place at The Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland in July 2014. It has attracted broad participation from the global professional community devoted to health economics teaching,research and policy applications. It has provided a forum for lively discussion on hot contemporary issues such as health expenditure projections, reimbursement regulations,health technology assessment, universal insurance coverage, demand and supply of hospital services, prosperity diseases, population aging and many others. The high-profile debate fostered by this meeting is likely to inspire further methodological advances worldwide and spreading of evidence-based policy practice from OECD towards emerging markets.

  15. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Ashish M.; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B.; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts. PMID:27376139

  16. Tobacco use among 10th grade students in Istanbul and related variables.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge; Bozkurt, Muge

    2014-04-01

    Aim of this study was to determine prevalence of cigarette smoking and hookah use among 10th grade students in Istanbul, Turkey, and to compare sociodemographic, psychological and behavioral variables according to frequency of tobacco use. Cross-sectional online self-report survey conducted in 45 schools from the 15 districts in Istanbul/Turkey. The questionnaire included sections about demographic data, family characteristics, school life, psychological symptoms and use of substances including tobacco, hookah, alcohol, marijuana, volatiles, heroin, cocaine, non-prescribed legal tranquillizers (benzodiazepines, alprazolam etc.) and illegal tranquillizers (flunitrazepam). The analyses were conducted based on the 4957 subjects. Trial at least once in life is observed as 45.4% for hookah use and as 24.4% for cigarette use. Risk of hookah and cigarette use was significantly higher in male students than in female students. Frequency of tobacco use is related with various sociodemographic, psychological and behavioral variables. Our data also shows that using tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of all the other substances use and these effects are interrelated. The data suggest that there is a link between tobacco use and substance use, psychological, behavioral and social factors. There is also a strong association between tobacco use and suicidal behavior as well as self-mutilative, impulsive, hyperactive, delinquent, aggressive and behavioral problems. The illumination of these relationships may be relevant in prevention and management of tobacco use as well as important problems, such as substance use, impulsivity, hyperactivity, delinquent, aggressive self-mutilative and suicidal behavior among 10th grade students in Istanbul.

  17. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  18. Discovered and undiscovered gold endowment of Turkey: a quantitative mineral resource assessment using GIS and rank statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Ozcan

    2012-06-01

    An assessment of the discovered and undiscovered gold endowment of Turkey, a prolific sector in the Tethyan Metallogenic Belt, is developed from a comprehensive Geographic Information System database containing 402 gold deposits and prospects. The majority of the gold deposits and prospects are epithermal, porphyry, volcanic-associated massive sulfides, orogenic gold, and skarn systems. These five major deposit types form more than 90% of the known gold deposits and prospects. Just 87, corresponding to 21.6%, of the deposits and prospects in the data set have current calculated gold reserve and/or resources, containing a total of 54.885 Moz Au. Current gold reserves of the country are 21.447 Moz constituting 39.1% of the total gold resources, of which 17.1 Moz gold are contained in four deposits. Out of these 87 deposits and prospects, only 27 contain significant gold reserve and/or resources (defined as equal to or more than 0.32 Moz or 10 tons Au), and contain 91.8% of the total gold endowment of the country. The cumulative frequency distribution model of the gold endowment of Turkey abides by log-normal distribution. Observed and estimated 10th, 50th (median), and 90th percentiles of the data are 0.0046 Moz [0.0045 Moz estimated], 0.1030 Moz [0.0875 Moz], and 1.4969 Moz [1.6938 Moz], respectively. The 99th percentile of the data is 7.6444 Moz [18.9636 Moz]. The arithmetic mean of the known gold endowment is 0.657 Moz and the Swanson mean size is 0.492 Moz. The arithmetic mean of the 27 significant gold deposit or prospects is 1.94 Moz. Zipf's law estimates of the undiscovered (residual) gold resources of Turkey are based on the current size of the largest, rank 1, gold deposit of Turkey, which is the Kisladag porphyry deposit that has 17.481 Moz gold endowment (including past production). Zipf's law estimates a total of 88.261 Moz natural or total gold endowment, 57.133 Moz or 65% of which has already been found. This predicts at least 31.128 Moz residual or

  19. Report: Combustion Byproducts and Their Health Effects: Summary of the 10th International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Barry; D'Alessio, Antonio; D'Anna, Andrea; Ciajolo, Anna; Gullett, Brian; Henry, Heather; Keener, Mel; Lighty, JoAnn; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Lucas, Donald; Oberdörster, Günter; Pitea, Demetrio; Suk, William; Sarofim, Adel; Smith, Kirk R.; Stoeger, Tobias; Tolbert, Paige; Wyzga, Ron; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The 10th International Congress on Combustion Byproducts and their Health Effects was held in Ischia, Italy, from June 17–20, 2007. It is sponsored by the US NIEHS, NSF, Coalition for Responsible Waste Incineration (CRWI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The congress focused on: the origin, characterization, and health impacts of combustion-generated fine and ultrafine particles; emissions of mercury and dioxins, and the development/application of novel analytical/diagnostic tools. The consensus of the discussion was that particle-associated organics, metals, and persistent free radicals (PFRs) produced by combustion sources are the likely source of the observed health impacts of airborne PM rather than simple physical irritation of the particles. Ultrafine particle-induced oxidative stress is a likely progenitor of the observed health impacts, but important biological and chemical details and possible catalytic cycles remain unresolved. Other key conclusions were: (1) In urban settings, 70% of airborne fine particles are a result of combustion emissions and 50% are due to primary emissions from combustion sources, (2) In addition to soot, combustion produces one, possibly two, classes of nanoparticles with mean diameters of ~10 nm and ~1 nm. (3) The most common metrics used to describe particle toxicity, viz. surface area, sulfate concentration, total carbon, and organic carbon, cannot fully explain observed health impacts, (4) Metals contained in combustion-generated ultrafine and fine particles mediate formation of toxic air pollutants such as PCDD/F and PFRs. (5) The combination of metal-containing nanoparticles, organic carbon compounds, and PFRs can lead to a cycle generating oxidative stress in exposed organisms. PMID:22476005

  20. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  1. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jiménez-Aleixandre, María-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through discourse, and to connect them to actions and decisions in a real-life context. In this paper we examine the process of elaboration of plans for resources management in a marine ecosystem by 10th grade students (15-16 year) in the context of solving an authentic task. A complete class ( N = 14) worked in a sequence about ecosystems. Working in small groups, the students made models of energy flow and trophic pyramids, and used them to solve the problem of feeding a small community for a long time. Data collection included videotaping and audiotaping of all of the sessions, and collecting the students' written productions. The research objective is to examine the process of designing a plan for sustainable resources management in terms of the discursive moves of the students across stages in contextualizing practices, or different degrees of complexity (Jiménez-Aleixandre & Reigosa International Journal of Science Education, 14(1): 51-61 2006), understood as transformations from theoretical statements to decisions about the plan. The analysis of students' discursive moves shows how the groups progressed through stages of connecting different models, between them and with the context, in order to solve the task. The challenges related to taking this sustainability issue to the classroom are discussed.

  2. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake, knowledge and attitude among 10th grade students in Berlin, Germany, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Stöcker, Petra; Dehnert, Manuel; Schuster, Melanie; Wichmann, Ole; Deleré, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Since March 2007, the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) recommends HPV vaccination for all 12–17 y-old females in Germany. In the absence of an immunization register, we aimed at assessing HPV-vaccination coverage and knowledge among students in Berlin, the largest city in Germany, to identify factors influencing HPV-vaccine uptake. Results: Between September and December 2010, 442 students completed the questionnaire (mean age 15.1; range 14–19). In total 281/442 (63.6%) students specified HPV correctly as a sexually transmitted infection. Of 238 participating girls, 161 (67.6%) provided their vaccination records. Among these, 66 (41.0%) had received the recommended three HPV-vaccine doses. Reasons for being HPV-unvaccinated were reported by 65 girls: Dissuasion from parents (40.2%), dissuasion from their physician (18.5%), and concerns about side-effects (30.8%) (multiple choices possible). The odds of being vaccinated increased with age (Odds Ratio (OR) 2.19, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.16, 4.15) and decreased with negative attitude toward vaccinations (OR = 0.33, 95%CI 0.13, 0.84). Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 10th grade school students in 14 participating schools in Berlin to assess socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, and statements on vaccinations. Vaccination records were reviewed. Multivariable statistical methods were applied to identify independent predictors for HPV-vaccine uptake among female participants. Conclusions: HPV-vaccine uptake was low among school girls in Berlin. Both, physicians and parents were influential regarding their HPV-vaccination decision even though personal perceptions played an important role as well. School programs could be beneficial to improve knowledge related to HPV and vaccines, and to offer low-barrier access to HPV vaccination. PMID:22995838

  4. Influence of V-Diagrams on 10th Grade Turkish Students' Achievement in the Subject of Mechanical Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekes, Hanife; Gonen, Selahattin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how the use of V-diagrams one of the learning techniques used in laboratory studies in experiments conducted regarding the 10th grade lesson unit of "waves" influenced students' achievements. In the study, a quasi-experimental design with a pretest and posttest control group was used. The study was…

  5. Investigating the Effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th Grade Students' Self Efficacy and Attitudes toward Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonmez, Duygu; Simcox, Amanda

    The purpose of this study was investigate the effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th grade students' self efficacy and attitudes toward science. The content of the workshop based on high school science curriculum and includes multimedia instruction, laboratory experiment and participation of undergraduate students as mentors. N=93…

  6. School Climate and the Relationship to Student Learning of Hispanic 10th Grade Students in Arizona Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava Delgado, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    This study provided an analysis of Hispanic 10th grade student academic achievement in the areas of mathematics, reading and writing as measured by the Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards. The study is based on data of 163 school districts and 25,103 (95%) students in the state of Arizona as published by the Arizona Department of…

  7. The Effect of Case-Based Instruction on 10th Grade Students' Understanding of Gas Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçinkaya, Eylem; Boz, Yezdan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of case-based instruction on remedying 10th grade students' alternative conceptions related to gas concepts. 128 tenth grade students from two high schools participated in this study. In each school, one of the classes was randomly assigned as the experimental group and the…

  8. Predicting 3rd Grade and 10th Grade FCAT Success for 2006-07. Research Brief. Volume 0601

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Rubiera, Vilma

    2006-01-01

    For the past few years the Florida School Code has set the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) performance requirements for promotion of 3rd graders and graduation for 10th graders. Grade 3 students who do not score at level 2 or higher on the FCAT SSS Reading must be retained unless exempted for special circumstances. Grade 10 students…

  9. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th-10th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population--adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to…

  10. Risk Communication and Public Education in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada on the 10th Anniversary of the "Black Friday" Tornado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard-Boehm, R. Denise; Cook, M. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    In July 1997, on the 10th anniversary of the great "Black Friday" Tornado, city officials of Edmonton, the print and broadcast media, agencies dealing in emergency management, and the national weather organisation recounted stories of the 1987, F5 tornado that struck Edmonton on a holiday weekend. The information campaign also presented…

  11. 3 CFR 8938 - Proclamation 8938 of March 1, 2013. 10th Anniversary of the United States Department of Homeland...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the... of the United States Department of Homeland Security 8938 Proclamation 8938 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8938 of March 1, 2013 Proc. 8938 10th Anniversary of the United States......

  12. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014. (10th, Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 10th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014. The Mobile Learning 2014 International Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and…

  13. Factors Related to Alcohol Use among 6th through 10th Graders: The Sarasota County Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Danice K.; Forthofer, Melinda S.; Zapata, Lauren B.; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; Bryant, Carol A.; Reynolds, Sherri T.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol consumption by youth can produce negative health outcomes. This study identified correlates of lifetime alcohol use, recent alcohol use, and binge drinking among youth in sixth through 10th grade (n = 2,004) in Sarasota County, Fla. Results from a closed-ended, quantitative survey acknowledged a range of personal, social and environmental…

  14. Students' Transition Experience in the 10th Year of Schooling: Perceptions That Contribute to Improving the Quality of Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Ana Cristina; Mouraz, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The study followed students in their 10th year of schooling that entered a new secondary education school in order to examine their perceptions of their previous schools' work and of its relationship with the difficulties they experience when in the transition. The analysis of 155 completed questionnaires of previous students of nine basic…

  15. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Baya Botti, A; Pérez-Cueto, F J A; Vasquez Monllor, P A; Kolsteren, P W

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policy-making at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA) study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clusters from urban and rural areas were selected randomly considering population proportions, 3445 school going adolescents, 12 to 18 y, 45% males; 55% females underwent anthropometric evaluation by trained personnel using standardized protocols for all interviews and examinations. Weight, height, wrist, arm and abdominal circumference data were collected. Body Mass Index was calculated. Smoothed age- and gender specific 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th Bolivian adolescent percentiles(BAP) and Charts(BAC) where derived using LMS regression. Percentile-based reference data for the antropometrics of for Bolivian Adolescents are presented for the first time. PMID:19721903

  16. Colorado Growth Model--Brief Report: Student Growth Percentiles and FRL Status. Accountability & Data Analysis Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report examines the relationship between socioeconomic status, as defined by a free-and-reduced lunch proxy variable, and student growth percentiles by elementary, middle, and high school grade levels for math, reading, and writing. Comparisons were made between median growth percentiles for each educational level by free and reduced lunch…

  17. Development of a percentile based three-dimensional model of the buttocks in computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; He, Xueli; Li, Hongpeng

    2016-05-01

    There are diverse products related to human buttocks, which need to be designed, manufactured and evaluated with 3D buttock model. The 3D buttock model used in present research field is just simple approximate model similar to human buttocks. The 3D buttock percentile model is highly desired in the ergonomics design and evaluation for these products. So far, there is no research on the percentile sizing system of human 3D buttock model. So the purpose of this paper is to develop a new method for building three-dimensional buttock percentile model in computer system. After scanning the 3D shape of buttocks, the cloud data of 3D points is imported into the reverse engineering software (Geomagic) for the reconstructing of the buttock surface model. Five characteristic dimensions of the buttock are measured through mark-points after models being imported into engineering software CATIA. A series of space points are obtained by the intersecting of the cutting slices and 3D buttock surface model, and then are ordered based on the sequence number of the horizontal and vertical slices. The 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, 99th percentile values of the five dimensions and the spatial coordinate values of the space points are obtained, and used to reconstruct percentile buttock models. This research proposes a establishing method of percentile sizing system of buttock 3D model based on the percentile values of the ischial tuberosities diameter, the distances from margin to ischial tuberosity and the space coordinates value of coordinate points, for establishing the Nth percentile 3D buttock model and every special buttock types model. The proposed method also serves as a useful guidance for the other 3D percentile models establishment for other part in human body with characteristic points.

  18. The Earlier the Better? Taking the AP® in 10th Grade. Research Report No. 2012-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Awilda; McKillip, Mary E. M.; Niu, Sunny X.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the authors examine the impact of scoring a 1 or 2 on an AP® Exam in 10th grade on later AP Exam participation and performance. As access to AP courses increases within and across schools, a growing number of students are taking AP courses and exams in the earlier grades of high school. Using a matched sample of AP and no-AP…

  19. Shaping in the 21st century: Moving percentile schedules into applied settings

    PubMed Central

    Galbicka, Gregory

    1994-01-01

    The present paper provides a primer on percentile reinforcement schedules, which have been used for two decades to study response differentiation and shaping in the laboratory. Arranged in applied settings, percentile procedures could be used to specify response criteria, standardizing treatment across subjects, trainers, and times to provide a more consistent training environment while maintaining the sensitivity to the individual's repertoire that is the hallmark of shaping. Percentile schedules are also valuable tools in analyzing the variables of which responding is a function, both inside and outside the laboratory. Finally, by formalizing the rules of shaping, percentile schedules provide a useful heuristic of the processes involved in shaping behavior, even for those situations that may not easily permit their implementation. As such, they may help further sensitize trainers and researchers alike to variables of critical importance in behavior change. ImagesFigure 6 PMID:16795849

  20. How to Rank Journals.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows.

  1. How to Rank Journals

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68–0.84 Spearman’s ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  2. How to Rank Journals.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  3. Menstruation disorders in adolescents with eating disorders – target body mass index percentiles for their resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Beatriz; Brito, Sara; Paulos, Lígia; Moleiro, Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyse the progression of body mass index in eating disorders and to determine the percentile for establishment and resolution of the disease. Methods: A retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study. Review of clinical files of adolescents with eating disorders. Results: Of the 62 female adolescents studied with eating disorders, 51 presented with eating disorder not otherwise specified, 10 anorexia nervosa, and 1 bulimia nervosa. Twenty-one of these adolescents had menstrual disorders; in that, 14 secondary amenorrhea and 7 menstrual irregularities (6 eating disorder not otherwise specified, and 1 bulimia nervosa). In average, in anorectic adolescents, the initial body mass index was in 75th percentile; secondary amenorrhea was established 1 month after onset of the disease; minimum weight was 76.6% of ideal body mass index (at 4th percentile) at 10.2 months of disease; and resolution of amenorrhea occurred at 24 months, with average weight recovery of 93.4% of the ideal. In eating disorder not otherwise specified with menstrual disorder (n=10), the mean initial body mass index was at 85th percentile; minimal weight was in average 97.7% of the ideal value (minimum body mass index was in 52nd percentile) at 14.9 months of disease; body mass index stabilization occured at 1.6 year of disease; and mean body mass index was in 73rd percentile. Considering eating disorder not otherwise specified with secondary amenorrhea (n=4); secondary amenorrhea occurred at 4 months, with resolution at 12 months of disease (mean 65th percentile body mass index). Conclusion: One-third of the eating disorder group had menstrual disorder – two-thirds presented with amenorrhea. This study indicated that for the resolution of their menstrual disturbance the body mass index percentiles to be achieved by female adolescents with eating disorders was 25–50 in anorexia nervosa, and 50–75, in eating disorder not otherwise specified. PMID:25003922

  4. Changes of the time-varying percentiles of daily extreme temperature in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Fang; Xu, Feng; Wang, Xinrui

    2016-09-01

    Identifying the air temperature frequency distributions and evaluating the trends in time-varying percentiles are very important for climate change studies. In order to get a better understanding of the recent temporal and spatial pattern of the temperature changes in China, we have calculated the trends in temporal-varying percentiles of the daily extreme air temperature firstly. Then we divide all the stations to get the spatial patterns for the percentile trends using the average linkage cluster analysis method. To make a comparison, the shifts of trends percentile frequency distribution from 1961-1985 to 1986-2010 are also examined. Important results in three aspects have been achieved: (1) In terms of the trends in temporal-varying percentiles of the daily extreme air temperature, the most intense warming for daily maximum air temperature (Tmax) was detected in the upper percentiles with a significant increasing tendency magnitude (>2.5 °C/50year), and the greatest warming for daily minimum air temperature (Tmin) occurred with very strong trends exceeding 4 °C/50year. (2) The relative coherent spatial patterns for the percentile trends were found, and stations for the whole country had been divided into three clusters. The three primary clusters were distributed regularly to some extent from north to south, indicating the possible large influence of the latitude. (3) The most significant shifts of trends percentile frequency distribution from 1961-1985 to 1986-2010 was found in Tmax. More than half part of the frequency distribution show negative trends less than -0.5 °C/50year in 1961-1985, while showing trends less than 2.5 °C/50year in 1986-2010.

  5. Edited by Bolling and WFB Emotion Awareness Predicts Body Mass Index Percentile Trajectories in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Diana J.; Belden, Andrew C.; Barch, Deanna; Luby, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the rate of change in BMI percentile across three years in relation to emotion identification ability and brain-based reactivity in emotional processing regions. Study design A longitudinal sample of 202 youth completed three fMRI-based facial processing tasks and behavioral emotion differentiation tasks. We examined the rate of change in youth's BMI percentile as a function of reactivity in emotional processing brain regions and behavioral emotion identification tasks using multilevel modeling. Results Lower correct identification of both happiness and sadness measured behaviorally predicted increases in BMI percentiles across development whereas higher correct identification of both happiness and sadness predicted decreases in BMI percentiles, while controlling for children's pubertal status, gender, ethnicity, IQ score, exposure to antipsychotic medication, family income-to-needs ratio, externalizing, internalizing, and depressive symptoms. Greater neural activation in emotion reactivity regions to sad faces also predicted increases in BMI percentiles during development, also controlling for the above-mentioned covariates. Conclusions Findings provide longitudinal developmental data demonstrating a link between both emotion identification ability and greater neural reactivity in emotional processing regions with trajectories of BMI percentiles across childhood. PMID:26227437

  6. Evaluation of the 10th Grade Computerized Mathematics Curriculum from the Perspective of the Teachers and Educational Supervisors in the Southern Region in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tarawneh, Sabri Hassan; Al-Qadi, Haitham Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the 10th grade computerized mathematics curriculum from the perspective of the teachers and supervisors in the southern region in Jordan. The study population consisted of all the teachers who teach the 10th grade in the southern region, with the total of (309) teachers and (20) supervisors. The sample consisted of…

  7. On Rank and Nullity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    This note explains how Emil Artin's proof that row rank equals column rank for a matrix with entries in a field leads naturally to the formula for the nullity of a matrix and also to an algorithm for solving any system of linear equations in any number of variables. This material could be used in any course on matrix theory or linear algebra.

  8. Is the 10th and 11th intercostal space a safe approach for percutaneous nephrostomy and nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W; Omar, Ahmed J S; Younes, Nagy M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point. PMID:15383855

  9. Is the 10th and 11th Intercostal Space a Safe Approach for Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Nephrolithotomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W. Omar, Ahmed J.S.; Younes, Nagy M.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point.

  10. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  11. Impact of percentile computation method on PM 24-h air quality standard.

    PubMed

    Salako, Gbenga Oladoyin; Hopke, Philip K

    2012-09-30

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) introduced a percentile form of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM). Studies had shown that a specified percentile in the frequency distribution of measured values of PM increased the probability of detecting non-attainment areas (power) and decreased the likelihood of misclassification of attainment areas as being non-attainment (type 2 error). However, this new NAAQS used a percentile form that was different from a standard percentile in a distribution. Instead of taking the percentile of the distribution of the required 3 years of measurements, the PM(2.5) values for the selected percentile for each year were determined and the average of these 3 values was used as the NAAQS indicator value. However, no studies have been made of this average of the 3 years method and compared to a standard percentile in the multiyear data. The relationships between the values obtained using these two approaches have been explored. PM data measured at selected US EPA Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) website from January 2004 to December 2008 at 20 sites in 20 different states in United States were utilized. PM samples were collected for 24-h periods from midnight to midnight every third day for PM(2.5) and every sixth day for PM(10). At some sites, continuous measurements of PM(2.5) were made and averaged to provide 24-hr values. Using these data, the NAAQS percentile values were compared with the actual 98th percentile values of the three years of data. Regression and t-test analyses were used to compare these two methods and found high correlation coefficients and no significant difference in most cases. Overall, the two methods showed substantial agreement such that either of the two approaches could serve as the statistical form of the 24-h standard. In exploring the PM(10) standard, an arbitrarily chosen standard value of 85 μg/m(3) was used to explore the

  12. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  13. Evaluation and projection of daily temperature percentiles from statistical and dynamical downscaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanueva, A.; Herrera, S.; Fernández, J.; Frías, M. D.; Gutiérrez, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    The study of extreme events has become of great interest in recent years due to their direct impact on society. Extremes are usually evaluated by using extreme indicators, based on order statistics on the tail of the probability distribution function (typically percentiles). In this study, we focus on the tail of the distribution of daily maximum and minimum temperatures. For this purpose, we analyse high (95th) and low (5th) percentiles in daily maximum and minimum temperatures on the Iberian Peninsula, respectively, derived from different downscaling methods (statistical and dynamical). First, we analyse the performance of reanalysis-driven downscaling methods in present climate conditions. The comparison among the different methods is performed in terms of the bias of seasonal percentiles, considering as observations the public gridded data sets E-OBS and Spain02, and obtaining an estimation of both the mean and spatial percentile errors. Secondly, we analyse the increments of future percentile projections under the SRES A1B scenario and compare them with those corresponding to the mean temperature, showing that their relative importance depends on the method, and stressing the need to consider an ensemble of methodologies.

  14. Estimation of a monotone percentile residual life function under random censorship.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pereira, Alba M; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new estimator of a percentile residual life function with censored data under a monotonicity constraint. Specifically, it is assumed that the percentile residual life is a decreasing function. This assumption is useful when estimating the percentile residual life of units, which degenerate with age. We establish a law of the iterated logarithm for the proposed estimator, and its n-equivalence to the unrestricted estimator. The asymptotic normal distribution of the estimator and its strong approximation to a Gaussian process are also established. We investigate the finite sample performance of the monotone estimator in an extensive simulation study. Finally, data from a clinical trial in primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver are analyzed with the proposed methods. One of the conclusions of our work is that the restricted estimator may be much more efficient than the unrestricted one.

  15. Estimation of a monotone percentile residual life function under random censorship.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pereira, Alba M; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new estimator of a percentile residual life function with censored data under a monotonicity constraint. Specifically, it is assumed that the percentile residual life is a decreasing function. This assumption is useful when estimating the percentile residual life of units, which degenerate with age. We establish a law of the iterated logarithm for the proposed estimator, and its n-equivalence to the unrestricted estimator. The asymptotic normal distribution of the estimator and its strong approximation to a Gaussian process are also established. We investigate the finite sample performance of the monotone estimator in an extensive simulation study. Finally, data from a clinical trial in primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver are analyzed with the proposed methods. One of the conclusions of our work is that the restricted estimator may be much more efficient than the unrestricted one. PMID:23225621

  16. Sonar biparietal diameter. I. Analysis of percentile growth differences in two normal populations using same methodology.

    PubMed

    Sabbagha, R E; Barton, F B; Barton, B A

    1976-10-15

    BPD measurements were obtained from 107 white and 91 black normal gravid women, with established dates, between weeks 16 to 40 of pregnancy. The sonar methodology used is uniform, employing nonpersistent image scanning with electronic calipers. It is noted that the BPD percentile growth patterns derived from these racially different fetuses are alike. Similarly, the fetal age distributions corresponding to white vs. black fetal BPD's show minor differences. From a clinical standpoint, therefore, one percentile curve is constructed for both populations. It is concluded that the BPD differences observed in the currently used growth curves, reported by different investigators, are related to nonuniformity in sonar BPD methodology.

  17. 10th European VLBI Network Symposium and EVN Users Meeting: VLBI and the new generation of radio arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics and the University of Manchester, on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, will host the 10th European VLBI Network Symposium and the EVN Users Meeting from September 20th - 24th, 2010, entitled "VLBI and the new generation of radio arrays". The Symposium will be held at the University of Manchester, UK. At this conference the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI and e-VLBI results will be reported. The timing of this meeting coincides with the development of, and first results from a number of new and upgraded radio facilities around the globe, such as e-MERLIN, LOFAR, EVLA, ALMA, and the SKA pathfinders ASKAP and MeerKAT. This meeting will incorporate some of the first results from these new instruments, in addition to the unique scientific and technical contribution of VLBI in this new era of radio astronomy.

  18. The Interpretations and Applications of Boethius's Introduction to the Arithmetic II,1 at the End of the 10th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otisk, Marek

    This paper deals with comments and glosses to the first chapter of the second book of Boethius's Introduction to Arithmetic from the last quarter of the 10th century. Those texts were written by Gerbert of Aurillac (Scholium ad Boethii Arithmeticam Institutionem l. II, c. 1), Abbo of Fleury (commentary on the Calculus by Victorius of Aquitaine, the so-called De numero, mensura et pondere), Notker of Liège (De superparticularibus) and by the anonymous author (De arithmetica Boetii). The main aim of this paper is to show that Boethius's statements about the converting numerical sequences to equality from this work could be interpreted minimally in two different ways. This paper discussed also the application of this topic in other liberal arts (like astronomy, music, grammar etc.) and in playing game called rithmomachia, the medieval philosophers' game.

  19. Report on the 10th European Fusion Physics Workshop (Vaals, The Netherlands, 9-11 December 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Borba, D.; Bucalossi, J.; Moreau, D.; Sauter, O.; Stober, J.; Vayakis, G.

    2003-06-01

    The 10th European Fusion Physics Workshop took place in December 2002 at Vaals in The Netherlands, hosted by the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC: Associations EURATOM-ERM/KMS, FZJ and FOM), and sponsored by the European Commission and the Foundation SOFT. Within an overall theme of `Operational limits in toroidal devices, with particular reference to steady-state operation', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. In addition, a review of the JET scientific and technical programme under EFDA and an assessment of ITER's measurement requirements and diagnostic development programme were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  20. Optical and microphysical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol observed over Warsaw on 10th July 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicka, Lucja; Stachlewska, Iwona; Veselovskii, Igor; Baars, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning aerosol originating from Canadian forest fires was widely observed over Europe in July 2013. Favorable weather conditions caused long-term westward flow of smoke from Canada to Western and Central Europe. During this period, PollyXT lidar of the University of Warsaw took wavelength dependent measurements in Warsaw. On July 10th short event of simultaneous advection of Canadian smoke and Saharan dust was observed at different altitudes over Warsaw. Different origination of both air masses was indicated by backward trajectories from HYSPLIT model. Lidar measurements performed with various wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), using also Raman and depolarization channels for VIS and UV allowed for distinguishing physical differences of this two types of aerosols. Optical properties acted as input for retrieval of microphysical properties. Comparisons of microphysical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust observed will be presented.

  1. Supracostal Approach for PCNL: Is 10th and 11th Intercostal Space Safe According to Clavien Classification System?

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Cengiz; Değirmenci, Tansu; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Koras, Omer; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success and morbidity of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal space. Between March 2005 and February 2012, 612 patients underwent PCNL, 243 of whom had a supracostal access. The interspace between the 11th and 12th rib was used in 204 cases (group 1) and between the 10th and 11th interspaces in 39 cases (group 2). PCNL was performed using standard supracostal technique in all patients. The operative time, success rate, hospital stay, and complications according to the modified Clavien classification were compared between group 1 and group 2. The stone-free rate was 86.8% in group 1 and 84.6% in group 2 after one session of PCNL. Auxiliary procedures consisting of ureterorenoscopy (URS) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) were required in 5 and 7 patients, respectively, in group 1; and in 1 patient each in group 2 . After the auxiliary procedures, stone-free rates increased to 92.6% in group 1 and 89.7% in group 2. A total of 74 (30.4%) complications were documented in the 2 groups according to modified Clavien classification. Grade-I complications were recorded in 20 (8.2%), grade-II in 38 (15.6%), grade-IIIa in 13 (5.3%), and grade-IIIb in 2 (0.8%) patients; grade-IVa was recorded in 1 (0.4%) patient. There were no grade-IVb or grade-V complications. Overall complication rate was 30.9% in group 1 and 28.2% in group 2. Supracostal PCNL in selected cases is effective and safe with acceptable complications. The modified Clavien system provides a standardized grading system for complications of PCNL. PMID:25437600

  2. Ranking Information in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliassi-Rad, Tina; Henderson, Keith

    Given a network, we are interested in ranking sets of nodes that score highest on user-specified criteria. For instance in graphs from bibliographic data (e.g. PubMed), we would like to discover sets of authors with expertise in a wide range of disciplines. We present this ranking task as a Top-K problem; utilize fixed-memory heuristic search; and present performance of both the serial and distributed search algorithms on synthetic and real-world data sets.

  3. User Guide for the 2014-15 Teacher Median Student Growth Percentile Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    On March 22, 2016, the New Jersey Department of Education ("the Department") published a broadcast memo sharing secure district access to 2014-15 median Student Growth Percentile (mSGP) data for all qualifying teachers. These data describe student growth from the last school year, and comprise 10% of qualifying teachers' 2014-15…

  4. Problems with Percentiles: Student Growth Scores in New York's Teacher Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Drew

    2016-01-01

    New York State has used the Growth Model for Educator Evaluation ratings since the 2011-2012 school year. Since that time, student growth percentiles have been used as the basis for teacher and principal ratings. While a great deal has been written about the use of student test scores to measures educator effectiveness, less attention has been…

  5. A Comparison of Growth Percentile and Value-Added Models of Teacher Performance. Working Paper #39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Stacy, Brian W.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    School districts and state departments of education frequently must choose between a variety of methods to estimating teacher quality. This paper examines under what circumstances the decision between estimators of teacher quality is important. We examine estimates derived from student growth percentile measures and estimates derived from commonly…

  6. Student Growth Percentiles Based on MIRT: Implications of Calibrated Projection. CRESST Report 842

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li; Choi, Kilchan

    2014-01-01

    This research concerns a new proposal for calculating student growth percentiles (SGP, Betebenner, 2009). In Betebenner (2009), quantile regression (QR) is used to estimate the SGPs. However, measurement error in the score estimates, which always exists in practice, leads to bias in the QR-­based estimates (Shang, 2012). One way to address this…

  7. Using Percentile Schedules to Increase Eye Contact in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott S.; Maynes, Natalee P.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Aversion to eye contact is a common behavior of individuals diagnosed with Fragile X syndrome (FXS); however, no studies to date have attempted to increase eye-contact duration in these individuals. In this study, we employed a percentile reinforcement schedule with and without overcorrection to shape eye-contact duration of 6 boys with FXS.…

  8. Blood pressure percentiles by age and body mass index for adults.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Baikpour, Masoud; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Fayaz, Mohammad; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Asady, Hadi; Asgari, Fereshteh; Etemad, Koorosh; Rafei, Ali; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Since no comprehensive study has been conducted on blood pressure (BP) percentiles established upon nationally representative sample population of adults, the present study aimed to construct the blood pressure percentiles by age, sex and body mass index (BMI) of the subjects. Analyses were based on data collected in 2011 from 8,425 adults aged 25 to 69 years old. Data on demographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, and blood pressure was recorded for each subject. Linear Regression analysis was used to assess the adjusted relationship of age-sex-specific standard deviation scores of BMI, height, and weight with blood pressure. Four separate models for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of men and women were constructed for BP percentiles according to age and BMI. Blood pressure increased with the rise in BMI and weight, but showed a negative correlation with height. SBP and DBP rose steadily with increasing age, but the rise in SBP was greater than DBP. Overweight and obese population, seem to fall into the category of hypertensive. The findings of present study show that BP percentiles are steadily increased by age and BMI. In addition, most obese or overweight adults are hypertensive. PMID:26417366

  9. Blood pressure percentiles by age and body mass index for adults

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Baikpour, Masoud; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Fayaz, Mohammad; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Asady, Hadi; Asgari, Fereshteh; Etemad, Koorosh; Rafei, Ali; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Since no comprehensive study has been conducted on blood pressure (BP) percentiles established upon nationally representative sample population of adults, the present study aimed to construct the blood pressure percentiles by age, sex and body mass index (BMI) of the subjects. Analyses were based on data collected in 2011 from 8,425 adults aged 25 to 69 years old. Data on demographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, and blood pressure was recorded for each subject. Linear Regression analysis was used to assess the adjusted relationship of age-sex-specific standard deviation scores of BMI, height, and weight with blood pressure. Four separate models for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of men and women were constructed for BP percentiles according to age and BMI. Blood pressure increased with the rise in BMI and weight, but showed a negative correlation with height. SBP and DBP rose steadily with increasing age, but the rise in SBP was greater than DBP. Overweight and obese population, seem to fall into the category of hypertensive. The findings of present study show that BP percentiles are steadily increased by age and BMI. In addition, most obese or overweight adults are hypertensive. PMID:26417366

  10. Acculturation determines BMI percentile and noncore food intake in Hispanic children.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James F; Cloutier, Michelle M; Wakefield, Dorothy B; Hernandez, Dominica B; Grant, Autherene; Beaulieu, Annamarie; Gorin, Amy A

    2014-03-01

    Hispanic children in the United States are disproportionately affected by obesity. The role of acculturation in obesity is unclear. This study examined the relation between child obesity, dietary intake, and maternal acculturation in Hispanic children. We hypothesized that children of more acculturated mothers would consume more unhealthy foods and would have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. A total of 209 Hispanic mothers of children aged 2-4 y (50% female, 35.3 ± 8.7 mo, BMI percentile: 73.1 ± 27.8, 30% obese, 19% overweight) were recruited for an obesity prevention/reversal study. The associations between baseline maternal acculturation [Brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (Brief ARSMA-II)], child BMI percentile, and child diet were examined. Factor analysis of the Brief ARSMA-II in Puerto Rican mothers resulted in 2 new factors, which were named the Hispanic Orientation Score (4 items, loadings: 0.64-0.81) and U.S. Mainland Orientation Score (6 items, loadings: -0.61-0.92). In the total sample, children who consumed more noncore foods were more likely to be overweight or obese (P < 0.01). Additionally, children of mothers with greater acculturation to the United States consumed more noncore foods (P < 0.0001) and had higher BMI percentiles (P < 0.04). However, mothers with greater Hispanic acculturation served fewer noncore foods (P < 0.0001). In the Puerto Rican subgroup of mothers, Puerto Rican mothers with greater acculturation to the United States served more noncore foods (P < 0.0001), but there was no association between acculturation and child BMI percentile in this subgroup. These mothers, however, served fewer sugar-sweetened beverages (P < 0.01) compared with non-Puerto Rican mothers, and this may have negated the effect of noncore food consumption on BMI percentile. These data suggest a complex relation between acculturation, noncore food consumption, and child BMI percentile in Puerto Rican and non-Puerto Rican

  11. Where the Colleges Rank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Rater, Inc., Allentown, PA.

    This document presents a composite index that numerically ranks the nation's leading undergraduate colleges and universities based on seven criteria. The criteria include admission standards; number of recent recipients of Rhodes, Danforth, and National Science Foundation awards; proportion of recent graduates entering graduate or professional…

  12. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations.

  13. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. PMID:25795511

  14. Investigating the intrinsic and extrinsic work values of 10th grade students in science-oriented charter schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Ozgur

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent gender, achievement level, and income level predict the intrinsic and extrinsic work values of 10th grade students. The study explored whether group differences were good predictors of scores in work values. The research was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted on 131 10th graders who attended science-oriented charter schools. Students took Super's Work Values Instrument, a Likert-type test that links to 15 work values, which can be categorized as intrinsic and extrinsic values (Super, 1970). Multiple regression analysis was employed as the main analysis followed by ANCOVA. Multiple regression analysis results indicated that there is evidence that 8.9% of the variance in intrinsic work values and 10.2% of the variance in extrinsic work values can be explained by the independent variables ( p < .05). Achievement Level and Income Level may help predict intrinsic work value scores; Achievement Level may also help predict extrinsic work values. Achievement Level was the covariate in ANCOVA. Results indicated that males (M = .174) in this sample have a higher mean of extrinsic work values than that of females (M = -.279). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the intrinsic work values by gender. One possible interpretation of this might be school choice; students in these science-oriented charter schools may have higher intrinsic work values regardless of gender. Results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference among the means of extrinsic work values by income level (p < .05). However, free lunch students (M = .268) have a higher mean of intrinsic work values than that of paid lunch students ( M = -.279). A possible interpretation of this might be that lower income students benefit greatly from the intrinsic work values in overcoming obstacles. Further research is needed in each of these areas. The study produced statistically significant results

  15. Energy-drink consumption and its relationship with substance use and sensation seeking among 10th grade students in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge

    2015-06-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of energy-drink (ED) consumption among 10th grade students in Istanbul/Turkey. Cross-sectional online self-report survey conducted in 45 schools from the 15 districts in Istanbul. The questionnaire included sections about demographic data, self-destructive behavior and use of substances including tobacco, alcohol and drugs. Also Psychological Screening Test for Adolescents (PSTA) was used. The analyses were conducted based on the 4957 subjects. Rate of those reported a ED consumption once within last year was 62.0% (n=3072), whereas rate of those reported ED consumption at least once in a month was 31.1%. There were consistent, statistically significant associations between genders, lifetime substance use (tobacco, alcohol and drug use), measures of sensation seeking, psychological problems (depression, anxiety, anger, impulsivity) and self-destructive behavior (self-harming behavior and suicidal thoughts) with ED consumption. In logistic regression models male gender, sensation seeking, life-time tobacco, alcohol and drug use predicted all frequencies of ED consumption. In addition to these predictors, anger and self-harming behavior also predicted ED consumption at least once in a month. There were no interactions between the associations of lifetime tobacco, alcohol and drug use with ED consumption. The findings suggest that the ED consumption of male students is related with three clusters of substances (tobacco, alcohol and drug) through sensation seeking and these relationships do not interact with each other. PMID:26006774

  16. XAFS study of copper and silver nanoparticles in glazes of medieval middle-east lustreware (10th-13th century)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, S.; Puzzovio, D.; Sada, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Borgia, I.; Sgamellotti, A.; Brunetti, B. G.; Cartechini, L.; D'Acapito, F.; Maurizio, C.; Shokoui, F.; Oliaiy, P.; Rahighi, J.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Pantos, E.

    2006-06-01

    It has recently been shown that lustre decoration of medieval and Renaissance pottery consists of silver and copper nanoparticles dispersed in the glassy matrix of the ceramic glaze. Here the findings of an X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) study on lustred glazes of shards belonging to 10th and 13rd century pottery from the National Museum of Iran are reported. Absorption spectra in the visible range have been also measured in order to investigate the relations between colour and glaze composition. Gold colour is mainly due to Ag nanoparticles, though Ag+, Cu+ and Cu2+ ions can be also dispersed within the glassy matrix, with different ratios. Red colour is mainly due to Cu nanoparticles, although some Ag nanoparticles, Ag+ and Cu+ ions can be present. The achievement of metallic Cu and the absence of Cu2+ indicate a higher reduction of copper in red lustre. These findings are in substantial agreement with previous results on Italian Renaissance pottery. In spite of the large heterogeneity of cases, the presence of copper and silver ions in the glaze confirms that lustre formation is mediated by a copper- and silver-alkali ion exchange, followed by nucleation and growth of metal nanoparticles.

  17. Report on the 10th anniversary of international drug discovery science and technology conference, 8 - 10 november 2012, nanjing, china.

    PubMed

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2013-03-01

    The 10th Anniversary of International Drug Discovery Science and Technology (IDDST) Conference was held in Nanjing, China from 8 to 10 November 2012. The conference ran in parallel with the 2nd Annual Symposium of Drug Delivery Systems. Over 400 delegates from both conferences came together for the Opening Ceremony and Keynote Addresses but otherwise pursued separate paths in the huge facilities of the Nanjing International Expo Centre. The IDDST was arranged into 19 separate Chapters covering drug discovery biology, target validation, chemistry, rational drug design, pharmacology and toxicology, drug screening technology, 'omics' technologies, analytical, automation and enabling technologies, informatics, stem cells and regenerative medicine, bioprocessing, generics, biosimilars and biologicals and seven disease areas: cancer, CNS, respiratory and inflammation, autoimmune, emerging infectious, bone and orphan diseases. There were also two sessions of a 'Bench to Bedside to Business' Program and a Chinese Scientist programme. In each period of the IDDST conference, up to seven sessions were running in parallel. This Meeting Highlight samples just a fraction of the content of this large meeting. The talks included have as a link, the use of new approaches to drug discovery. Many other excellent talks could have been highlighted and the author has necessarily had to be selective.

  18. The 10th anniversary of the Junior Members and Affiliates of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed

    Skevaki, Chrysanthi L; Maggina, Paraskevi; Santos, Alexandra F; Rodrigues-Alves, Rodrigo; Antolin-Amerigo, Dario; Borrego, Luis Miguel; Bretschneider, Isabell; Butiene, Indre; Couto, Mariana; Fassio, Filippo; Gardner, James; Xatzipsalti, Maria; Hovhannisyan, Lilit; Hox, Valerie; Makrinioti, Heidi; O Neil, Serena E; Pala, Gianni; Rudenko, Michael; Santucci, Annalisa; Seys, Sven; Sokolowska, Milena; Whitaker, Paul; Heffler, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    This year is the 10th anniversary of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Junior Members and Affiliates (JMAs). The aim of this review is to highlight the work and activities of EAACI JMAs. To this end, we have summarized all the initiatives taken by JMAs during the last 10 yr. EAACI JMAs are currently a group of over 2380 clinicians and scientists under the age of 35 yr, who support the continuous education of the Academy's younger members. For the past decade, JMAs enjoy a steadily increasing number of benefits such as free online access to the Academy's journals, the possibility to apply for Fellowships and the Mentorship Program, travel grants to attend scientific meetings, and many more. In addition, JMAs have been involved in task forces, cooperation schemes with other scientific bodies, organization of JMA focused sessions during EAACI meetings, and participation in the activities of EAACI communication platforms. EAACI JMA activities represent an ideal example of recruiting, training, and educating young scientists in order for them to thrive as future experts in their field. This model may serve as a prototype for other scientific communities, several of which have already adapted similar policies.

  19. Energy-drink consumption and its relationship with substance use and sensation seeking among 10th grade students in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge

    2015-06-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of energy-drink (ED) consumption among 10th grade students in Istanbul/Turkey. Cross-sectional online self-report survey conducted in 45 schools from the 15 districts in Istanbul. The questionnaire included sections about demographic data, self-destructive behavior and use of substances including tobacco, alcohol and drugs. Also Psychological Screening Test for Adolescents (PSTA) was used. The analyses were conducted based on the 4957 subjects. Rate of those reported a ED consumption once within last year was 62.0% (n=3072), whereas rate of those reported ED consumption at least once in a month was 31.1%. There were consistent, statistically significant associations between genders, lifetime substance use (tobacco, alcohol and drug use), measures of sensation seeking, psychological problems (depression, anxiety, anger, impulsivity) and self-destructive behavior (self-harming behavior and suicidal thoughts) with ED consumption. In logistic regression models male gender, sensation seeking, life-time tobacco, alcohol and drug use predicted all frequencies of ED consumption. In addition to these predictors, anger and self-harming behavior also predicted ED consumption at least once in a month. There were no interactions between the associations of lifetime tobacco, alcohol and drug use with ED consumption. The findings suggest that the ED consumption of male students is related with three clusters of substances (tobacco, alcohol and drug) through sensation seeking and these relationships do not interact with each other.

  20. 10th of April 1987 seismic swarm: Correlation with geochemical parameters in Campi Flegrei Caldera (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, Dario; Bottiglieri, Luisa; Pece, Raimondo

    1988-07-01

    A close relationship between geophysical activity (seismicity and ground deformation) and chemical changes in volcanic reservoirs has been proposed several times in active volcanic areas. In Campi Flegrei caldera, especially during the bradyseismic crisis which occurred between 1982-1984, this correlation was never clearly demonstrated because of the high rate of occurrence of earthquakes and the small number of gas samples. After at least two years of both geochemically and geophysically quiescent period, a swarm of 50 earthquakes, felt in the area of the Solfatara crater with 2.0 maximum magnitude, occurred on the 10th of April 1987. At about the same time (before and after), several geochemical parameters showed important changes in concentration. These include water vapour, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane and to a lesser extent hydrogen sulfide in fumarolic gases from Bocca Grande fumarole in the Solfatara crater and the radon content in water wells situated far from the swarm epicentral area. In our opinion, the processes causing the geochemical changes are linked to aseismic creeping mechanisms, which leads to an easier rising of fluids in fumaroles (H2O, N2, H2 and CH4) and in the superficial water table (Rn). The subsequent seismicity could be related to consequent local stress accumulation on gas reservoir rocks induced by creeping.

  1. [Calculating critical loads of acid deposition with different percentiles in China].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming; Zhou, Zhongping; Xie, Shaodong

    2002-09-01

    While mapping critical loads of acid deposition in China, the 1 degree (latitude) x 1 degree (longitude) resolution was always adopted in critical load calculation. However, the results of mapping can not show the difference of sensitivity of ecosystems to acid deposition within a 1 degree x 1 degree grid. For the convenience of policy-makers to formulate acid deposition control strategies based on critical loads, and to improve the representation and practicability of 1 degree x 1 degree results, a series of critical load maps with different percentiles were compiled, which may be accordance with a given economic or technological level, and allows some degree of damage. Based on the cumulative distribution function, the critical load exceedance maps with different percentiles and the maximum allowable deposition of each province was also derived.

  2. Plotting equation for gaussian percentiles and a spreadsheet program for generating probability plots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balsillie, J.H.; Donoghue, J.F.; Butler, K.M.; Koch, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional plotting tools can be of invaluable assistance in analytical scientific pursuits, and have been widely used in the analysis and interpretation of sedimentologic data. We consider, in this work, the use of arithmetic probability paper (APP). Most statistical computer applications do not allow for the generation of APP plots, because of apparent intractable nonlinearity of the percentile (or probability) axis of the plot. We have solved this problem by identifying an equation(s) for determining plotting positions of Gaussian percentiles (or probabilities), so that APP plots can easily be computer generated. An EXCEL example is presented, and a programmed, simple-to-use EXCEL application template is hereby made publicly available, whereby a complete granulometric analysis including data listing, moment measure calculations, and frequency and cumulative APP plots, is automatically produced.

  3. Statewide analysis of the drainage-area ratio method for 34 streamflow percentile ranges in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The drainage-area ratio method commonly is used to estimate streamflow for sites where no streamflow data are available using data from one or more nearby streamflow-gaging stations. The method is intuitive and straightforward to implement and is in widespread use by analysts and managers of surface-water resources. The method equates the ratio of streamflow at two stream locations to the ratio of the respective drainage areas. In practice, unity often is assumed as the exponent on the drainage-area ratio, and unity also is assumed as a multiplicative bias correction. These two assumptions are evaluated in this investigation through statewide analysis of daily mean streamflow in Texas. The investigation was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. More than 7.8 million values of daily mean streamflow for 712 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Texas were analyzed. To account for the influence of streamflow probability on the drainage-area ratio method, 34 percentile ranges were considered. The 34 ranges are the 4 quartiles (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 percent), the 5 intervals of the lower tail of the streamflow distribution (0-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, and 4-5 percent), the 20 quintiles of the 4 quartiles (0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-25, 25-30, 30-35, 35-40, 40-45, 45-50, 50-55, 55-60, 60-65, 65-70, 70-75, 75-80, 80-85, 85-90, 90-95, and 95-100 percent), and the 5 intervals of the upper tail of the streamflow distribution (95-96, 96-97, 97-98, 98-99 and 99-100 percent). For each of the 253,116 (712X711/2) unique pairings of stations and for each of the 34 percentile ranges, the concurrent daily mean streamflow values available for the two stations provided for station-pair application of the drainage-area ratio method. For each station pair, specific statistical summarization (median, mean, and standard deviation) of both the exponent and bias-correction components of the drainage-area ratio

  4. Carpenter, tractors and microbes for the development of logical-mathematical thinking - the way 10th graders and pre-service teachers solve thinking challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Avikam

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this case study was to investigate the ability of 10th graders and pre-service teachers to solve logical-mathematical thinking challenges. The challenges do not require mathematical knowledge beyond that of primary school but rather an informed use of the problem representation. The percentage of correct answers given by the 10th graders was higher than that of the pre-service teachers. Unlike the 10th graders, some of whom used various strategies for representing the problem, most of the pre-service teachers' answers were based on a technical algorithm, without using control processes. The obvious conclusion drawn from the findings supports and recommends expanding and enhancing the development of logical-mathematical thinking, both in specific lessons and as an integral part of other lessons in pre-service frameworks.

  5. Trend estimates of AERONET-observed and model-simulated AOT percentiles between 1993 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea; Chang, Dong Yeong; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    Recent Aerosol Optical thickness (AOT) trend studies used monthly or annual arithmetic means that discard details of the generally right-skewed AOT distributions. Potentially, such results can be biased by extreme values (including outliers). This study additionally uses percentiles (i.e., the lowest 5%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 95% of the monthly cumulative distributions fitted to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-observed and ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC)-model simulated AOTs) that are less affected by outliers caused by measurement error, cloud contamination and occasional extreme aerosol events. Since the limited statistical representativeness of monthly percentiles and means can lead to bias, this study adopts the number of observations as a weighting factor, which improves the statistical robustness of trend estimates. By analyzing the aerosol composition of AERONET-observed and EMAC-simulated AOTs in selected regions of interest, we distinguish the dominant aerosol types and investigate the causes of regional AOT trends. The simulated and observed trends are generally consistent with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.89) and small bias (slope±2σ = 0.75 ± 0.19). A significant decrease in EMAC-decomposed AOTs by water-soluble compounds and black carbon is found over the USA and the EU due to environmental regulation. In particular, a clear reversal in the AERONET AOT trend percentiles is found over the USA, probably related to the AOT diurnal cycle and the frequency of wildfires.

  6. Percentile Distributions of Birth Weight according to Gestational Ages in Korea (2010-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Pediatric Growth Chart (2007) is used as a standard reference to evaluate weight and height percentiles of Korean children and adolescents. Although several previous studies provided a useful reference range of newborn birth weight (BW) by gestational age (GA), the BW reference analyzed by sex and plurality is not currently available. Therefore, we aimed to establish a national reference range of neonatal BW percentiles considering GA, sex, and plurality of newborns in Korea. The raw data of all newborns (470,171 in 2010, 471,265 in 2011, and 484,550 in 2012) were analyzed. Using the Korean Statistical Information Service data (2010–2012), smoothed percentile curves (3rd–97th) by GA were created using the lambda-mu-sigma method after exclusion and the data were distinguished by all live births, singleton births, and multiple births. In the entire cohort, male newborns were heavier than female newborns and singletons were heavier than twins. As GA increased, the difference in BW between singleton and multiples increased. Compared to the previous data published 10 years ago in Korea, the BW of newborns 22–23 gestational weeks old was increased, whereas that of others was smaller. Other countries' data were also compared and showed differences in BW of both singleton and multiple newborns. We expect this updated data to be utilized as a reference to improve clinical assessments of newborn growth. PMID:27247504

  7. Estimated monthly percentile discharges at ungaged sites in the Upper Yellowstone River Basin in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Hull, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Once-monthly streamflow measurements were used to estimate selected percentile discharges on flow-duration curves of monthly mean discharge for 40 ungaged stream sites in the upper Yellowstone River basin in Montana. The estimation technique was a modification of the concurrent-discharge method previously described and used by H.C. Riggs to estimate annual mean discharge. The modified technique is based on the relationship of various mean seasonal discharges to the required discharges on the flow-duration curves. The mean seasonal discharges are estimated from the monthly streamflow measurements, and the percentile discharges are calculated from regression equations. The regression equations, developed from streamflow record at nine gaging stations, indicated a significant log-linear relationship between mean seasonal discharge and various percentile discharges. The technique was tested at two discontinued streamflow-gaging stations; the differences between estimated monthly discharges and those determined from the discharge record ranged from -31 to +27 percent at one site and from -14 to +85 percent at the other. The estimates at one site were unbiased, and the estimates at the other site were consistently larger than the recorded values. Based on the test results, the probable average error of the technique was + or - 30 percent for the 21 sites measured during the first year of the program and + or - 50 percent for the 19 sites measured during the second year. (USGS)

  8. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  9. Loss Function Based Ranking in Two-Stage, Hierarchical Models

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rongheng; Louis, Thomas A.; Paddock, Susan M.; Ridgeway, Greg

    2009-01-01

    -optimal ranks perform well over a broad class of loss functions but can be improved upon when classifying units above or below a percentile cut-point. Importantly, even optimal rank estimates can perform poorly in many real-world settings; therefore, data-analytic performance summaries should always be reported. PMID:20607112

  10. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th–10th Grades

    PubMed Central

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population—adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to represent these constructs with minimal error and to examine whether residual variance unaccounted for by oral language can be captured by specific factors of syntax and vocabulary. A 1-, 3-, 4-, and bifactor model were tested with 1,792 students in 18 schools in 2 large urban districts in the Southeast. Students were individually administered measures of expressive and receptive vocabulary, syntax, and decoding fluency in mid-year. At the end of the year students took the state reading test as well as a group-administered, norm-referenced test of reading comprehension. The bifactor model fit the data best in all 7 grades and explained 72% to 99% of the variance in reading comprehension. The specific factors of syntax and vocabulary explained significant unique variance in reading comprehension in 1 grade each. The decoding fluency factor was significantly correlated with the reading comprehension and oral language factors in all grades, but, in the presence of the oral language factor, was not significantly associated with the reading comprehension factor. Results support a bifactor model of lexical knowledge rather than the 3-factor model of the Simple View of Reading, with the vast amount of variance in reading comprehension explained by a general oral language factor. PMID:26346839

  11. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  12. Relationship between Small Animal Intern Rank and Performance at a University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Saba, Corey; Kent, Marc; Creevy, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between selection committee rankings of internship applicants and the performance of small animal interns. The hypothesis was that there would be a relationship between selection committee rank order and intern performance; the more highly an application was ranked, the better the intern's performance scores would be. In 2007, the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery instituted a standardized approach to its intern selection process both to streamline the process and to track its effectiveness. At the end of intern years 2010-2014, every faculty member in the department was provided an intern assessment form for that year's class. There was no relationship between an individual intern's final rank by the selection committee and his/her performance either as a percentile score or a Likert-type score (p=.25, R2=0.04; p=0.31, R2=0.03, respectively). Likewise, when interns were divided into the top and bottom quartile based on their final rank by the selection committee, there was no relationship between their rank and their performance as a percentile score (median rank 15 vs. 20; p=.14) or Likert-type score (median rank 14 vs. 19; p=.27). Institutions that use a similar intern selection method may need to reconsider the time and effort being expended for an outcome that does not predict performance. Alternatively, specific criteria more predictive of performance outcomes should be identified and employed in the internship selection process.

  13. Relationship between Small Animal Intern Rank and Performance at a University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Saba, Corey; Kent, Marc; Creevy, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between selection committee rankings of internship applicants and the performance of small animal interns. The hypothesis was that there would be a relationship between selection committee rank order and intern performance; the more highly an application was ranked, the better the intern's performance scores would be. In 2007, the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery instituted a standardized approach to its intern selection process both to streamline the process and to track its effectiveness. At the end of intern years 2010-2014, every faculty member in the department was provided an intern assessment form for that year's class. There was no relationship between an individual intern's final rank by the selection committee and his/her performance either as a percentile score or a Likert-type score (p=.25, R2=0.04; p=0.31, R2=0.03, respectively). Likewise, when interns were divided into the top and bottom quartile based on their final rank by the selection committee, there was no relationship between their rank and their performance as a percentile score (median rank 15 vs. 20; p=.14) or Likert-type score (median rank 14 vs. 19; p=.27). Institutions that use a similar intern selection method may need to reconsider the time and effort being expended for an outcome that does not predict performance. Alternatively, specific criteria more predictive of performance outcomes should be identified and employed in the internship selection process. PMID:25809394

  14. Carpenter, Tractors and Microbes for the Development of Logical-Mathematical Thinking--The Way 10th Graders and Pre-Service Teachers Solve Thinking Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazit, Avikam

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this case study was to investigate the ability of 10th graders and pre-service teachers to solve logical-mathematical thinking challenges. The challenges do not require mathematical knowledge beyond that of primary school but rather an informed use of the problem representation. The percentage of correct answers given by the 10th…

  15. Trends in Substance Use among 6th-to 10th-Grade Students from 1998 to 2010: Findings from a National Probability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Farhat, Tilda; Haynie, Denise; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Of the handful of national studies tracking trends in adolescent substance use in the United States, only the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study collects data from 6th through 10th graders. The purpose of this study was to examine trends from 1998 to 2010 (four time points) in the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use…

  16. Advances in Classification Research. Volume 10. Proceedings of the ASIS SIG/CR Classification Research Workshop (10th, Washington, DC, November 1-5, 1999). ASIST Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrechtsen, Hanne, Ed.; Mai, Jens-Erik, Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the papers presented at the 10th ASIS (American Society for Information Science) workshop on classification research. Major themes include the social and cultural informatics of classification and coding systems, subject access and indexing theory, genre analysis and the agency of documents in the ordering of…

  17. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry…

  18. Creating Cultures of Peace: Pedagogical Thought and Practice. Selected Papers from the 10th Triennial World Conference (September 10-15, 2001, Madrid, Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Jean E., Ed.; Swami, Piyush, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The 10th Triennial World Conference of the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI) was held September 10-15, 2001 in Madrid, Spain. The theme of the conference was "Cultures of Peace." Thirty-four papers and presentations are divided into nine sections. Part I, Tributes to the Founders of WCCI, includes: (1) Tribute to Alice Miel…

  19. Gender and Ethnic Differences in Smoking, Drinking and Illicit Drug Use among American 8th, 10th and 12th Grade Students, 1976-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, John M., Jr.; Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.; Cooper, Shauna M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2003-01-01

    Paper examines ethnic differences in licit and illicit drug use among American 8th, 10th, and 12th grade students, with a particular focus on girls. Across ethnic groups, drug use is highest among Native American girls and lowest among black and Asian American girls. Trend data suggest that girls' and boys' drug use patterns are converging.…

  20. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  1. Physical Fitness Percentiles of German Children Aged 9–12 Years: Findings from a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Golle, Kathleen; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Wick, Ditmar; Granacher, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Generating percentile values is helpful for the identification of children with specific fitness characteristics (i.e., low or high fitness level) to set appropriate fitness goals (i.e., fitness/health promotion and/or long-term youth athlete development). Thus, the aim of this longitudinal study was to assess physical fitness development in healthy children aged 9–12 years and to compute sex- and age-specific percentile values. Methods Two-hundred and forty children (88 girls, 152 boys) participated in this study and were tested for their physical fitness. Physical fitness was assessed using the 50-m sprint test (i.e., speed), the 1-kg ball push test, the triple hop test (i.e., upper- and lower- extremity muscular power), the stand-and-reach test (i.e., flexibility), the star run test (i.e., agility), and the 9-min run test (i.e., endurance). Age- and sex-specific percentile values (i.e., P10 to P90) were generated using the Lambda, Mu, and Sigma method. Adjusted (for change in body weight, height, and baseline performance) age- and sex-differences as well as the interactions thereof were expressed by calculating effect sizes (Cohen’s d). Results Significant main effects of Age were detected for all physical fitness tests (d = 0.40–1.34), whereas significant main effects of Sex were found for upper-extremity muscular power (d = 0.55), flexibility (d = 0.81), agility (d = 0.44), and endurance (d = 0.32) only. Further, significant Sex by Age interactions were observed for upper-extremity muscular power (d = 0.36), flexibility (d = 0.61), and agility (d = 0.27) in favor of girls. Both, linear and curvilinear shaped curves were found for percentile values across the fitness tests. Accelerated (curvilinear) improvements were observed for upper-extremity muscular power (boys: 10–11 yrs; girls: 9–11 yrs), agility (boys: 9–10 yrs; girls: 9–11 yrs), and endurance (boys: 9–10 yrs; girls: 9–10 yrs). Tabulated percentiles for the 9-min run test

  2. Validity of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision code for hospitalisation with hyponatraemia in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sonja; Shariff, Salimah Z; Fleet, Jamie L; Weir, Matthew A; Jain, Arsh K; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis code for hyponatraemia (E87.1) in two settings: at presentation to the emergency department and at hospital admission. Design Population-based retrospective validation study. Setting Twelve hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2010. Participants Patients aged 66 years and older with serum sodium laboratory measurements at presentation to the emergency department (n=64 581) and at hospital admission (n=64 499). Main outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value comparing various ICD-10 diagnostic coding algorithms for hyponatraemia to serum sodium laboratory measurements (reference standard). Median serum sodium values comparing patients who were code positive and code negative for hyponatraemia. Results The sensitivity of hyponatraemia (defined by a serum sodium ≤132 mmol/l) for the best-performing ICD-10 coding algorithm was 7.5% at presentation to the emergency department (95% CI 7.0% to 8.2%) and 10.6% at hospital admission (95% CI 9.9% to 11.2%). Both specificities were greater than 99%. In the two settings, the positive predictive values were 96.4% (95% CI 94.6% to 97.6%) and 82.3% (95% CI 80.0% to 84.4%), while the negative predictive values were 89.2% (95% CI 89.0% to 89.5%) and 87.1% (95% CI 86.8% to 87.4%). In patients who were code positive for hyponatraemia, the median (IQR) serum sodium measurements were 123 (119–126) mmol/l and 125 (120–130) mmol/l in the two settings. In code negative patients, the measurements were 138 (136–140) mmol/l and 137 (135–139) mmol/l. Conclusions The ICD-10 diagnostic code for hyponatraemia differentiates between two groups of patients with distinct serum sodium measurements at both presentation to the emergency department and at hospital admission. However, these codes underestimate the true incidence of hyponatraemia

  3. Percentiles of the product of uncertainty factors for establishing probabilistic reference doses.

    PubMed

    Gaylor, D W; Kodell, R L

    2000-04-01

    Exposure guidelines for potentially toxic substances are often based on a reference dose (RfD) that is determined by dividing a no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL), or benchmark dose (BD) corresponding to a low level of risk, by a product of uncertainty factors. The uncertainty factors for animal to human extrapolation, variable sensitivities among humans, extrapolation from measured subchronic effects to unknown results for chronic exposures, and extrapolation from a LOAEL to a NOAEL can be thought of as random variables that vary from chemical to chemical. Selected databases are examined that provide distributions across chemicals of inter- and intraspecies effects, ratios of LOAELs to NOAELs, and differences in acute and chronic effects, to illustrate the determination of percentiles for uncertainty factors. The distributions of uncertainty factors tend to be approximately lognormally distributed. The logarithm of the product of independent uncertainty factors is approximately distributed as the sum of normally distributed variables, making it possible to estimate percentiles for the product. Hence, the size of the products of uncertainty factors can be selected to provide adequate safety for a large percentage (e.g., approximately 95%) of RfDs. For the databases used to describe the distributions of uncertainty factors, using values of 10 appear to be reasonable and conservative. For the databases examined the following simple "Rule of 3s" is suggested that exceeds the estimated 95th percentile of the product of uncertainty factors: If only a single uncertainty factor is required use 33, for any two uncertainty factors use 3 x 33 approximately 100, for any three uncertainty factors use a combined factor of 3 x 100 = 300, and if all four uncertainty factors are needed use a total factor of 3 x 300 = 900. If near the 99th percentile is desired use another factor of 3. An additional factor may be needed for

  4. A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS SCORING ABOVE THE EIGHTIETH PERCENTILE OR BELOW THE TWENTIETH PERCENTILE ON EITHER THE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ABILITY TEST OR THE WATSON-GLASER TEST OF CRITICAL THINKING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CURRY, JOHN

    IN ORDER TO ESTABLISH THE FEASIBILITY OF A CUT-OFF SCORE FOR ENTRANCE INTO TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT NORTH TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY, SCORES OF 1,346 STUDENTS WHO EITHER PLACED ABOVE THE 80TH PERCENTILE (N-672) OR BELOW THE 20TH PERCENTILE (N-674) ON EITHER THE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ABILITY TEST OR THE WATSON-GLASER TEST OF CRITICAL THINKING WERE…

  5. Risk ranking by perception

    SciTech Connect

    Osei, E.K.; Amoh, G.E.A.; Schandorf, C.

    1997-02-01

    The study of people`s perception and acceptability of risk is important in understanding the public reaction to technology and its environmental and health impact. The perception of risk depends on several factors, including early experiences, education, controllability of the risk, the type of consequence, and the type of person(s) who makes the judgment. This paper reviews some of the main factors influencing people`s perception and acceptability of risk. Knowledge about which factors influence the perception of risk may enhance the understanding of different points of view brought into risk controversies, improve risk communication, and facilitate policy making. Results from a risk ranking by perception survey Conducted in Ghana are also presented. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  7. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  8. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Andruske, Cinthya Lee; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Torres, Jose Sulla; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-07-09

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders.

  9. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Lee Andruske, Cinthya; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Sulla Torres, Jose; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders. PMID:26184250

  10. Rank Xerox--management revolution.

    PubMed

    Walker, R

    1992-02-01

    For 20 years Rank Xerox dominated the photocopier market until the Japanese entered the market in the late 1970s. Rank Xerox responded to the competitive challenge by instituting competitive benchmarking, and subsequently the Leadership Through Quality Strategy. The author describes the changes in the management philosophy and the organizational structure which enabled Rank Xerox to win back market share from the Japanese. Rank Xerox is now market led with sharp customer focus. It is strongly business led and has a team working culture to support it.

  11. Report of the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Congress (Organising Chair and Scientific Chair).

    PubMed

    A, Roohi Sharifah; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2016-10-01

    A report on the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for the Surgery of the Hand and 6(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Hand Therapists is submitted detailing the numbers of attendees participating, papers presented and support received as well the some of the challenges faced and how best to overcome them from the local conference chair and scientific chair point of view. PMID:27595972

  12. Report of the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Congress (Organising Chair and Scientific Chair).

    PubMed

    A, Roohi Sharifah; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2016-10-01

    A report on the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for the Surgery of the Hand and 6(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Hand Therapists is submitted detailing the numbers of attendees participating, papers presented and support received as well the some of the challenges faced and how best to overcome them from the local conference chair and scientific chair point of view.

  13. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  14. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  15. Obsession with Rankings Goes Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    A Chinese list of the world's top universities would seem an unlikely concern for French politicians. But this year, France's legislature took aim at the annual rankings produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, which claims to list the 500 best universities in the world. The highest-ranked French entry, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, comes in…

  16. The Association of Employment and Physical Activity among Black and White 10th and 12th Grade Students in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence of an association between employment and physical activity (PA) in youth has been mixed, with studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. We examined the association between employment and PA among U.S. high school students as measured by self-reported overall PA, vigorous exercise, and participation in school athletic teams. Methods We employed a secondary analysis using weighted linear regression to a sample of black and white 10th grade (n=12073) and 12th grade students (n=5500) drawn from the nationally representative cross-sectional 2004 Monitoring the Future Study. Results Overall, 36.5% of 10th and 74.6% of 12th grade students were employed. In multivariable analyses, 10th graders working >10 hours a week reported less overall PA and exercise and those working >20 hours a week reported less participation in team sports. Among 12th graders, any level of employment was associated with lower rates of team sports; those working >10 hours a week reported less overall PA; and those working >20 hours reported less exercise. Conclusions Employment at and above 10 hours per week is negatively associated with PA. Increasing work intensity may shed light on the decline of PA as adolescents grow older and merits further attention in research. PMID:20231752

  17. US dermatology residency program rankings.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-10-01

    Unlike many other adult specialties, US News & World Report does not rank dermatology residency programs annually. We conducted a study to rank individual US dermatology residency programs based on set criteria. For each residency program, data from 2008 related to a number of factors were collected, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Dermatology Foundation (DF) funding received; number of publications from full-time faculty members; number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings; and number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of 6 dermatology journals with the highest impact factors. Most of the data were obtained through extensive Internet searches, and missing data were obtained by contacting individual residency programs. The programs were ranked based on the prior factors according to a weighted ranking algorithm. A list of overall rankings also was created.

  18. State disparities in time trends of adolescent body mass index percentile and weight-related behaviors in the United States.

    PubMed

    Taber, Daniel R; Stevens, June; Poole, Charles; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Evenson, Kelly R; Ward, Dianne S

    2012-02-01

    Evidence is conflicting as to whether youth obesity prevalence has reached a plateau in the United States overall. Trends vary by state, and experts recommend exploring whether trends in weight-related behaviors are associated with changes in weight status trends. Thus, our objective was to estimate between-state variation in time trends of adolescent body mass index (BMI) percentile and weight-related behaviors from 2001 to 2007. A time series design combined cross-sectional Youth Risk Behavior Survey data from 272,044 adolescents in 29 states from 2001 to 2007. Self-reported height, weight, sports participation, physical education, television viewing, and daily consumption of 100% fruit juice, milk, and fruits and vegetables were collected. Linear mixed models estimated state variance in time trends of behaviors and BMI percentile. Across states, BMI percentile trends were consistent despite differences in behavioral trends. Boys experienced a modest linear increase in BMI percentile (ß = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.30); girls experienced a non-linear increase, as the rate of increase declined over time from 1.02 units in 2001-2002 (95% CI: 0.68, 1.36) to 0.23 units in 2006-2007 (95% CI: -0.09, 0.56). States in which BMI percentile decreased experienced a greater decrease in TV viewing than states where BMI percentile increased. Otherwise, states with disparate BMI percentile trends did not differ with respect to behaviors. Future research should explore the role of other behaviors (e.g., soda consumption), measurement units (e.g., portion size), and societal trends (e.g., urban sprawl) on state and national adiposity trends. PMID:21773818

  19. Regression Equations for Monthly and Annual Mean and Selected Percentile Streamflows for Ungaged Rivers in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, Robert W.

    2015-12-03

    The largest average errors of prediction are associated with regression equations for the lowest streamflows derived for months during which the lowest streamflows of the year occur (such as the 5 and 1 monthly percentiles for August and September). The regression equations have been derived on the basis of streamflow and basin characteristics data for unregulated, rural drainage basins without substantial streamflow or drainage modifications (for example, diversions and (or) regulation by dams or reservoirs, tile drainage, irrigation, channelization, and impervious paved surfaces), therefore using the equations for regulated or urbanized basins with substantial streamflow or drainage modifications will yield results of unknown error. Input basin characteristics derived using techniques or datasets other than those documented in this report or using values outside the ranges used to develop these regression equations also will yield results of unknown error.

  20. Development of a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Chest Model for the 5(th) Percentile Female.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Lee, Jong B; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Iwamoto, Masami; Watanabe, Isao; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of the human body have been developed to elucidate injury mechanisms due to automotive crashes. However, these models are mainly focused on 50(th) percentile male. As a first step towards a better understanding of injury biomechanics in the small female, a 3D FE model of a 5(th) percentile female human chest (FEM-5F) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of frontal impact, one set of lateral impact, two sets of oblique impact and a series of ballistic impacts. Two previous FE models, a small female Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS-AF05) occupant version 1.0Beta (Kimpara et al. 2002) and the Wayne State University Human Thoracic Model (WSUHTM, Wang 1995 and Shah et al. 2001) were integrated and modified for this model development. The model incorporated not only geometrical gender differences, such as location of the internal organs and structure of the bony skeleton, but also the biomechanical differences of the ribs due to gender. It includes a detailed description of the sternum, ribs, costal cartilage, thoracic spine, skin, superficial muscles, intercostal muscles, heart, lung, diaphragm, major blood vessels and simplified abdominal internal organs and has been validated against a series of six cadaveric experiments on the small female reported by Nahum et al. (1970), Kroell et al. (1974), Viano (1989), Talantikite et al. (1998) and Wilhelm (2003). Results predicted by the model were well-matched to these experimental data for a range of impact speeds and impactor masses. More research is needed in order to increase the accuracy of predicting rib fractures so that the mechanisms responsible for small female injury can be more clearly defined. PMID:17096277

  1. Using Laplace Regression to Model and Predict Percentiles of Age at Death When Age Is the Primary Time Scale.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Andrea; Discacciati, Andrea; Bottai, Matteo; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Increasingly often in epidemiologic research, associations between survival time and predictors of interest are measured by differences between distribution functions rather than hazard functions. For example, differences in percentiles of survival time, expressed in absolute time units (e.g., weeks), may complement the popular risk ratios, which are unitless measures. When analyzing time to an event of interest (e.g., death) in prospective cohort studies, the time scale can be set to start at birth or at study entry. The advantages of one time origin over the other have been thoroughly explored for the estimation of risks but not for the estimation of survival percentiles. In this paper, we analyze the use of different time scales in the estimation of survival percentiles with Laplace regression. Using this regression method, investigators can estimate percentiles of survival time over levels of an exposure of interest while adjusting for potential confounders. Our findings may help to improve modeling strategies and ease interpretation in the estimation of survival percentiles in prospective cohort studies.

  2. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  3. Influence Analysis of Ranking Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Wai-Yin; Chan, Wai

    2002-01-01

    Developed diagnostic measures to identify observations in Thurstonian models for ranking data that unduly influence parameter estimates obtained by the partition maximum likelihood approach of W. Chan and P. Bender (1998). (SLD)

  4. Validation of the global reference for fetal weight and birth weight percentiles.

    PubMed

    Badade, Anirudh B; Bhide, Amar; Satoskar, Purnima; Wadekar, Darshan

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the global reference curves adapted on the basis of WHO data for India and the Hadlock reference curves fit the population in India and to validate the reference curves. The data were retrieved retrospectively from the records of women registration for antenatal care at a charitable maternity hospital in Mumbai, India. All pregnancies were dated on CRL obtained before 14 weeks. Births before 34(th) week were excluded. The expected frequencies of birth weights below the 1(st), 5(th), 10(th), 50(th), 90(th), 95(th) and 99(th) centiles from three reference ranges were compared with observed frequencies. It was found that the WHO generic reference adapted to India significantly underpredicted the birth weights and that the Hadlock reference ranges significantly overpredicted the birth weights. The use of generic reference adapted to Sri Lanka showed a better fit to the observed data. We concluded that global reference curves adapted on the basis of WHO data for India and the Hadlock reference ranges do not fit all the population in India and the charts need validation. Reference charts modified on the basis of data for Sri Lankan population show a better fit to the observed data, and therefore are more appropriate for use in clinical practice in South India. PMID:24347860

  5. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Daniel; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Tometsko, Mark; Blake, Michelle; Jacob, Allison P; Dougall, William C

    2015-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function and survival. In patients with solid tumor metastasis to the bone, targeting the bone microenvironment by inhibition of RANKL using denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to RANKL, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor-induced osteolysis and subsequent skeletal complications. Recently, a prominent functional role for the RANKL pathway has emerged in the primary bone tumor giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). Expression of both RANKL and RANK is extremely high in GCTB tumors and denosumab treatment was associated with tumor regression and reduced tumor-associated bone lysis in GCTB patients. In order to address the potential role of the RANKL pathway in another primary bone tumor, this study assessed human RANKL and RANK expression in human primary osteosarcoma (OS) using specific mAbs, validated and optimized for immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79) of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy

  6. Parental Activity as Influence on Childrenˋs BMI Percentiles and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Nanette; Kobel, Susanne; Kettner, Sarah; Drenowatz, Clemens; Steinacker, Jürgen M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents play a crucial role in the development of their children’s lifestyle and health behaviour. This study aims to examine associations between parental physical activity (PA) and children’s BMI percentiles (BMIPCT), moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) as well as participation in organised sports. Height and body weight was measured in 1615 in German children (7.1 ± 0.6 years, 50.3% male) and converted to BMIPCT. Parental BMI was calculated based on self-reported height and body weight. Children’s MVPA and sports participation as well as parental PA were assessed via parental questionnaire. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for age and family income was used to examine the association between parental and children’s PA levels as well as BMIPCT. 39.7% of the parents classified themselves as physically active and 8.3% of children were classified as overweight or obese. Lower BMIPCT were observed with both parents being physically active (44.5 ± 26.3 vs. 50.2 ± 26.9 and 52.0 ± 28.4, respectively). There was no association between parental and children’s PA levels but children with at least one active parent displayed a higher participation in organised sports (102.0 ± 96.6 and 117.7 ± 123.6 vs. 73.7 ± 100.0, respectively). Children of active parents were less likely to be overweight and obese. The lack of association between subjectively assessed parental PA and child MVPA suggests that parental support for PA in children is more important than parents being a role model. More active parents, however, may be more likely to facilitate participation in organised sports. These results underline the importance of the inclusion of parents in health promotion and obesity prevention programmes in children. Key points A higher prevalence of overweight or obese children was found with inactive parents. Children’s BMI percentiles were lower if both parents were physically active compared to children whose parents were both inactive or only had one

  7. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes. PMID:26553630

  8. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  9. [Influence of age on blood glucose levels: percentile reference intervals determined on ambulatory patients].

    PubMed

    Sapigni, T; Astolfi, G; Cavallini, L; Cremonini, F

    1981-06-15

    Data of routine chemical and hematological laboratory tests regarding outpatients were collected in four different hospitals of the provinces of Ferrara, Rovigo and Bologna. Data of about 1500 subjects per hospital were cumulated without preliminary selection of patients; sex, age and pregnancy status were also recorded. At the end of the collection, the second (and third) record of the same patient was discarded; only those referring to the first examination were retained. In this report we consider only the values of the blood sugar level which were obtained by enzymatic methods. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were performed utilizing a CDC CYBER 70/76 computer. The means and the variances of the data collected at the four hospital laboratories were very similar (Tab 1). The interlaboratory analysis of variance was poorly significant. All frequency distributions were leptocurtic and skewed to the right (Fig. 1). The blood sugar level tend to increase with age (Tab. 2). This correlation is graphically depicted in a two-dimensional plot (Fig 2) in which the regression line and the 2, 5 and 97,5 percentile levels corrected for age were also reported. We think that this diagram may be more helpful to the clinicians interpreting laboratory results than the usual "normal values". PMID:7284101

  10. Analysis of the Stability of Teacher-Level Growth Scores from the Student Growth Percentile Model. REL 2016-104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Andrea; Makkonen, Reino; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the request of the Nevada Department of Education, examined the stability over years of teacher-level growth scores from the Student Growth Percentile (SGP) model, which many states and districts have selected as a measure of effectiveness in their teacher evaluation systems. The authors conducted a generalizability study…

  11. National primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. Analysis of occurrences of very low 90th percentile lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-06

    This report contains an analysis of 90th percentile lead levels reported to the Federal Reporting Data System (FRDS) between 1992 and March 20, 1995 to estimate the number of large and medium-size water systems with very low levels of lead (i.e., less than or equal to 5 parts per billion) at the tap.

  12. Validation of the 5th and 95th Percentile Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley criteria and injury metrics extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD's). For the ATD injury metrics, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Furthermore, each of these ATD's is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. The requirements require that physical testing be performed with both ATD's to demonstrate compliance. Before compliance testing can be conducted, extensive modeling and simulation are required to determine appropriate test conditions, simulate conditions not feasible for testing, and assess design features to better ensure compliance testing is successful. While finite element (FE) models are currently available for many of the physical ATD's, currently there are no complete models for either the 5th percentile female or the 95th percentile male Hybrid III with a straight spine and articulating pelvis. The purpose of this work is to assess the accuracy of the existing Livermore Software Technology Corporation's FE models of the 5th and 95th percentile ATD's. To perform this assessment, a series of tests will be performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Research Lab using their horizontal impact accelerator sled test facility. The ATD's will be placed in the Orion seat with a modified-advanced-crew-escape-system (MACES) pressure suit and helmet, and driven with loadings similar to what is expected for the actual Orion vehicle during landing, launch abort, and chute deployment. Test data will be compared to analytical predictions and modelling uncertainty factors will be determined for each injury metric. Additionally, the test data will be used to

  13. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic ``nested'' structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm -similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity- here we propose a method which -by exploiting their nested architecture- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  14. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-02-02

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  15. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic “nested” structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm –similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity– here we propose a method which –by exploiting their nested architecture– allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made. PMID:25640575

  16. Radiometric calibration by rank minimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Young; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Shi, Boxin; Kweon, In So; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    We present a robust radiometric calibration framework that capitalizes on the transform invariant low-rank structure in the various types of observations, such as sensor irradiances recorded from a static scene with different exposure times, or linear structure of irradiance color mixtures around edges. We show that various radiometric calibration problems can be treated in a principled framework that uses a rank minimization approach. This framework provides a principled way of solving radiometric calibration problems in various settings. The proposed approach is evaluated using both simulation and real-world datasets and shows superior performance to previous approaches.

  17. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction.

  18. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction. PMID:24064578

  19. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World University Rankings…

  20. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  1. HLA typing with monoclonal antibodies: evaluation of 356 HLA monoclonal antibodies including 181 studied during the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    PubMed

    Colombani, J; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Colombani, M

    1989-08-01

    During the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop (10th WS), 181 HLA MoAbs were studied using lymphocytotoxicity micro-technique (LCT) and/or enzyme immuno-assay (EIA), and their capacity to serve as typing reagents was evaluated. 129 MoAbs were tested by both techniques. Results obtained with 92 class I and 86 class II polymorphic MoAbs (10th WS) were compared to published data concerning 180 class I and 176 class II polymorphic MoAbs, listed in an HLA-MoAbs Register maintained in our laboratory. The following conclusions can be proposed: 1/HLA-A, B typing by LCT with MoAbs is possible for about 14 specificities. Some specificities are clearly recognized (HLA-A3, B8, B13, Bw4, Bw6), others are recognized as cross-reacting groups (B7+27+w22+40), others are not currently recognized by any MoAb with restricted specificity (B5, B15). Several MoAbs confirmed the existence of shared epitopes between products from a single locus (A2-A28, A25-A32), or from A and B loci (A2-B17, Bw4-A9-A32). A single HLA-Cw MoAb has been described. 2/HLA class II typing by LCT with MoAbs is more difficult than class I typing. DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5 and DR7 as well as DRw52 and DRw53 are well defined; other DR specificities are poorly or not at all defined. Particular associations (DR1+DR4, DR3+DRw6, all DR except DR7) are recognized by several MoAbs. All DQw specificities are well recognized, including new specificities defined only by MoAbs: WA (DQw4), TA10 (DQw7), 2B3 (DQw6+w8+w9). Only two HLA-DP MoAbs have been described. 3/Satisfactory results, similar to those of LCT, were obtained with EIA using lymphoid cell lines as targets. 4/Human MoAbs (12 in the Register) are satisfactory typing reagents. They could represent in the future a significant contribution to HLA typing with MoAbs. PMID:2609328

  2. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  3. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling.

  4. Perceptions of High Achieving African American/Black 10th Graders from a Low Socioeconomic Community Regarding Health Scientists and Desired Careers

    PubMed Central

    Boekeloo, Bradley; Randolph, Suzanne; Timmons-Brown, Stephanie; Wang, Min Qi

    2014-01-01

    Measures are needed to assess youth perceptions about health science careers to facilitate research aimed at facilitating youth pursuit of health science. Although the Indiana Instrument provides an established measure of perceptions regarding nursing and ideal careers, we were interested in learning how high achieving 10th graders from relatively low socioeconomic areas who identify as Black/African American (Black) perceive health science and ideal careers. The Indiana Instrument was modified, administered to 90 youth of interest, and psychometrically analyzed. Reliable subscales were identified that may facilitate parsimonious, theoretical, and reliable study of youth decision-making regarding health science careers. Such research may help to develop and evaluate strategies for increasing the number of minority health scientists. PMID:25194058

  5. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling. PMID:19097437

  6. The association between problematic parental substance use and adolescent substance use in an ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Fite, Paula J; Elkins, Sara R; Frissell, Kevin C; Tortolero, Susan R; Stuart, Gregory L; Temple, Jeff R

    2013-12-01

    Adolescents of parents who use substances are at an increased risk for substance use themselves. Both parental monitoring and closeness have been shown to mediate the relationship between parents' and their adolescents' substance use. However, we know little about whether these relationships vary across different substances used by adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, we examined these associations within a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders (N = 927). Path analyses indicated that maternal closeness partially mediated the association between maternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol use. Parental monitoring partially mediated the relationship between paternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, inhalant, and illicit prescription drug use. These results were consistent across gender and race/ethnicity. These findings suggest that parental interventions designed to increase closeness and monitoring may help to reduce adolescent substance use.

  7. The Association Between Problematic Parental Substance Use and Adolescent Substance Use in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of 9th and 10th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Fite, Paula J.; Elkins, Sara R.; Frissell, Kevin C.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Temple, Jeff R.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents of parents who use substances are at an increased risk for substance use themselves. Both parental monitoring and closeness have been shown to mediate the relationship between parents’ and their adolescents’ substance use. However, we know little about whether these relationships vary across different substances used by adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, we examined these associations within a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 9th and 10th graders (N = 927). Path analyses indicated that maternal closeness partially mediated the association between maternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol use. Parental monitoring partially mediated the relationship between paternal problematic substance use and adolescent alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, inhalant, and illicit prescription drug use. These results were consistent across gender and race/ethnicity. These findings suggest that parental interventions designed to increase closeness and monitoring may help to reduce adolescent substance use. PMID:24006209

  8. Potential use of biomarkers in acute kidney injury: report and summary of recommendations from the 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick T; Mehta, Ravindra L; Shaw, Andrew; Ronco, Claudio; Endre, Zoltan; Kellum, John A; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Cruz, Dinna; Ince, Can; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been considerable progress in the discovery and development of biomarkers of kidney disease, and several have now been evaluated in different clinical settings. Although there is a growing literature on the performance of various biomarkers in clinical studies, there is limited information on how these biomarkers would be utilized by clinicians to manage patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Recognizing this gap in knowledge, we convened the 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative meeting to review the literature on biomarkers in AKI and their application in clinical practice. We asked an international group of experts to assess four broad areas for biomarker utilization for AKI: risk assessment, diagnosis, and staging; differential diagnosis; prognosis and management; and novel physiological techniques including imaging. This article provides a summary of the key findings and recommendations of the group, to equip clinicians to effectively use biomarkers in AKI.

  9. Percentile Values for Running Sprint Field Tests in Children Ages 6-17 Years: Influence of Weight Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Pinero, Jose; Gonzalez-Montesinos, Jose Luis; Keating, Xiaofen D.; Mora, Jesus; Sjostrom, Michael; Ruiz, Jonatan R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for six different sprint tests in 2,708 Spanish children (1,234 girls) ages 6-17.9 years. We also examined the influence of weight status on sprint performance across age groups, with a focus on underweight and obese groups. We used the 20-m, 30-m, and 50-m running sprint standing start and…

  10. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  11. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  12. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  13. Class Rank Weighs Down True Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The process of determining class rank does not help students achieve more or reach higher levels of proficiency. Evidence indicates ranking students may diminish students' motivation. High school educators argue that they are compelled to rank-order graduating students because selective colleges and universities require information about…

  14. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  15. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  16. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  17. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  18. A Comprehensive Analysis of Marketing Journal Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Michelle D.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to offer a comprehensive assessment of journal standings in Marketing from two perspectives. The discipline perspective of rankings is obtained from a collection of published journal ranking studies during the past 15 years. The studies in the published ranking stream are assessed for reliability by examining internal…

  19. The complexity and challenges of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification to International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification transition in EDs.

    PubMed

    Krive, Jacob; Patel, Mahatkumar; Gehm, Lisa; Mackey, Mark; Kulstad, Erik; Li, Jianrong John; Lussier, Yves A; Boyd, Andrew D

    2015-05-01

    Beginning October 2015, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services will require medical providers to use the vastly expanded International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) system. Despite wide availability of information and mapping tools for the next generation of the ICD classification system, some of the challenges associated with transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM are not well understood. To quantify the challenges faced by emergency physicians, we analyzed a subset of a 2010 Illinois Medicaid database of emergency department ICD-9-CM codes, seeking to determine the accuracy of existing mapping tools in order to better prepare emergency physicians for the change to the expanded ICD-10-CM system. We found that 27% of 1830 codes represented convoluted multidirectional mappings. We then analyzed the convoluted transitions and found that 8% of total visit encounters (23% of the convoluted transitions) were clinically incorrect. The ambiguity and inaccuracy of these mappings may impact the workflow associated with the translation process and affect the potential mapping between ICD codes and Current Procedural Codes, which determine physician reimbursement. PMID:25863652

  20. Imaging in the Age of Precision Medicine: Summary of the Proceedings of the 10th Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Herold, Christian J; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wibmer, Andreas G; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Dixon, Adrian K; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Geckle, Rena J; Muellner, Ada; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade, with its breakthroughs in systems biology, precision medicine (PM) has emerged as a novel health-care paradigm. Challenging reductionism and broad-based approaches in medicine, PM is an approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle. It involves integrating information from multiple sources in a holistic manner to achieve a definitive diagnosis, focused treatment, and adequate response assessment. Biomedical imaging and imaging-guided interventions, which provide multiparametric morphologic and functional information and enable focused, minimally invasive treatments, are key elements in the infrastructure needed for PM. The emerging discipline of radiogenomics, which links genotypic information to phenotypic disease manifestations at imaging, should also greatly contribute to patient-tailored care. Because of the growing volume and complexity of imaging data, decision-support algorithms will be required to help physicians apply the most essential patient data for optimal management. These innovations will challenge traditional concepts of health care and business models. Reimbursement policies and quality assurance measures will have to be reconsidered and adapted. In their 10th biannual symposium, which was held in August 2013, the members of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology discussed the opportunities and challenges arising for the imaging community with the transition to PM. This article summarizes the discussions and central messages of the symposium. PMID:26465058

  1. The Royal Book by Haly Abbas from the 10th century: one of the earliest illustrations of the surgical approach to skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Aciduman, Ahmet; Arda, Berna; Kahya, Esin; Belen, Deniz

    2010-12-01

    Haly Abbas was one of the pioneering physicians and surgeons of the Eastern world in the 10th century who influenced the Western world by his monumental work, The Royal Book. The book was first partly translated into Latin by Constantinus Africanus in the 11th century without citing the author's name. Haly Abbas was recognized in Europe after full translation of The Royal Book by Stephen of Antioch in 1127. The Royal Book has been accepted as an early source of jerrah-names (surgical books) in the Eastern world. The chapters regarding cranial fractures in Haly Abbas' work include unique management strategies for his period with essential quotations from Paul of Aegina's work Epitome. Both authors preferred free bone flap craniotomy in cranial fractures. Although Paul of Aegina, a Byzantine physician and surgeon, was a connection between ancient traditions and Islamic interpretation, Haly Abbas seemed to play a bridging role between the Roman-Byzantine and the School of Salerno in Europe.

  2. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population. PMID:25256815

  3. It takes a village: the effects of 10th grade college-going expectations of students, parents, and teachers four years later.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Anne; Huang, Francis

    2013-09-01

    Adolescents are surrounded by people who have expectations about their college-going potential. Yet, few studies have examined the link between these multiple sources of college-going expectations and the actual status of students in postsecondary education years later. The study draws on data collected in the 2002-2006 Educational Longitudinal Study and employs an underutilized statistical technique (cross-classified multilevel modeling) to account for teacher reports on overlapping groups of students (typical of high school research). Results showed that positive expectations of students, parents, English, and mathematics teachers in the 10th grade each uniquely predicted postsecondary status 4 years later. As a group, the four sources of expectations explained greater variance in postsecondary education than student characteristics such as socioeconomic status and academic performance. This suggests positive expectations are additive and promotive for students regardless of their risk status. Teacher expectations were also found to be protective for low income students. Implications for future expectancy research and equity-focused interventions are discussed.

  4. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  5. An INTEGRAL view of the high-energy sky (the first 10 years) - 9th INTEGRAL Workshop and celebration of the 10th anniversary of the launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 9th INTEGRAL workshop "An INTEGRAL view of the high-energy sky (the first 10 years)" took place from 15 to 19 October 2012 in Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Bibliothèque François Mitterrand). The workshop was sponsored by ESA, CNES and other French and European Institutions. During this week, and in particular on 17 October 2012, we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the launch of the INTEGRAL mission. The main goal of this workshop was to present and to discuss (via invited and contributed talks and posters) latest results obtained in the field of high-energy astrophysics using the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL, as well as results from observations from other ground- and space-based high-energy observatories and from associated multi-wavelength campaigns. Contributions to the workshop covered the following scientific topics: - X-ray binaries (IGR sources, black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs) - Isolated neutron stars (gamma-ray pulsars, magnetars) - Nucleo-synthesis (SNe, Novae, SNRs, ISM) and gamma-ray lines (511 keV) - Galactic diffuse continuum emission (including Galactic Ridge) - Massive black holes in AGNs, elliptical galaxies, nucleus of the Galaxy - Sky surveys, source populations and unidentified gamma-ray sources - Cosmic background radiation - Gamma-ray bursts - Coordinated observations with other ground- and space-based observatories - Science data processing and analysis (posters only) - Future instruments and missions (posters only)

  6. Evaluation of elemental status of ancient human bone samples from Northeastern Hungary dated to the 10th century AD by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    János, I.; Szathmáry, L.; Nádas, E.; Béni, A.; Dinya, Z.; Máthé, E.

    2011-11-01

    The present study is a multielemental analysis of bone samples belonging to skeletal individuals originating from two contemporaneous (10th century AD) cemeteries (Tiszavasvári Nagy-Gyepáros and Nagycserkesz-Nádasibokor sites) in Northeastern Hungary, using the XRF analytical technique. Emitted X-rays were detected in order to determine the elemental composition of bones and to appreciate the possible influence of the burial environment on the elemental content of the human skeletal remains. Lumbar vertebral bodies were used for analysis. Applying the ED(P)XRF technique concentration of the following elements were determined: P, Ca, K, Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, Fe, Zn, Br and Sr. The results indicated post mortem mineral exchange between the burial environment (soil) and bones (e.g. the enhanced levels of Fe and Mn) and referred to diagenetic alteration processes during burials. However, other elements such as Zn, Sr and Br seemed to be accumulated during the past life. On the basis of statistical analysis, clear separation could not be observed between the two excavation sites in their bone elemental concentrations which denoted similar diagenetic influences, environmental conditions. The enhanced levels of Sr might be connected with the past dietary habits, especially consumption of plant food.

  7. Impact of Doximity Residency Rankings on Emergency Medicine Applicant Rank Lists

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, William J.; Hopson, Laura R.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; White, Melissa; Gallahue, Fiona E.; Burkhardt, John; Rolston, Aimee M.; Santen, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study investigates the impact of the Doximity rankings on the rank list choices made by residency applicants in emergency medicine (EM). Methods We sent an 11-item survey by email to all students who applied to EM residency programs at four different institutions representing diverse geographical regions. Students were asked questions about their perception of Doximity rankings and how it may have impacted their rank list decisions. Results Response rate was 58% of 1,372 opened electronic surveys. This study found that a majority of medical students applying to residency in EM were aware of the Doximity rankings prior to submitting rank lists (67%). One-quarter of these applicants changed the number of programs and ranks of those programs when completing their rank list based on the Doximity rankings (26%). Though the absolute number of programs changed on the rank lists was small, the results demonstrate that the EM Doximity rankings impact applicant decision-making in ranking residency programs. Conclusion While applicants do not find the Doximity rankings to be important compared to other factors in the application process, the Doximity rankings result in a small change in residency applicant ranking behavior. This unvalidated ranking, based principally on reputational data rather than objective outcome criteria, thus has the potential to be detrimental to students, programs, and the public. We feel it important for specialties to develop consensus around measurable training outcomes and provide freely accessible metrics for candidate education. PMID:27330670

  8. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  9. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  10. Implementation and Evaluation of Web-Based Learning Activities on Bonding and the Structure of Matter for 10-th Grade Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailich, Marcel

    This study deals with the development, implementation, and evaluation of web-based activities associated with the topic of chemical bonding , as taught in 10th grade chemistry. A website was developed entitled: "Chemistry and the Chemical Industry in the Service of Mankind", its URL is: http://stwww.weizmann.ac.il/g-chem/learnchem (Kesner, Frailich, & Hofstein, 2003). The main goal of this study was to assess the educational effectiveness of website activities dealing with the chemical bonding concept. These activities include visualization tools, as well as topics relevant to daily life and industrial applications. The study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment regarding the understanding of chemical bonding concepts, students' perceptions of the classroom learning environment, their attitudes regarding the relevance of learning chemistry to everyday life, and their interest in chemistry studies. As mentioned before, in the present study we focused on activities (from the website), all of which deal with chemical bonding concept. The following are the reasons for the decision to focus on this topic: (1) Chemical bonding is a key concept that is taught in 10th grade chemistry in high school. It provides the basis for many other chemistry topics that are taught later, and (2) Chemical bonding is a difficult for students using existing tools (e. g., static models in books, ball-and- stick models), which are insufficient to demonstrate the abstract nature phenomena associated with this topic. The four activities developed for this study are (1) models of the atomic structure, (2) metals -- structure and properties, (3) ionic substances in everyday life and in industry, and (4) molecular substances -- structure, properties, and uses. The study analyzed both quantitative and qualitative research. The quantitative tools of the study included: A Semantic Differential questionnaire and a Chemistry Classroom Web-Based Learning Environment

  11. Fetal Sex Determination using Non-Invasive Method of Cell-free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma of Pregnant Women During 6(th)- 10(th) Weeks of Gestation.

    PubMed

    Zargari, Maryam; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shahhosseiny, Mohammad Hassan; Kamali, Koroush; Saliminejad, Kyomars; Esmaeilzadeh, Ali; Khorshid, Hamid Reza Khorram

    2011-10-01

    In previous years, identification of fetal cells in maternal blood circulation has caused a new revolution in non-invasive method of prenatal diagnosis. Low number of fetal cells in maternal blood and long-term survival after pregnancy limited the use of fetal cells in diagnostic and clinical applications. With the discovery of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in plasma of pregnant women, access to genetic material of the fetus had become possible to determine early gender of a fetus in pregnancies at the risk of X-linked genetic conditions instead of applying invasive methods. Therefore in this study, the probability of detecting sequences on the Y chromosome in pregnant women has been evaluated to identify the gender of fetuses. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 80 pregnant women at 6(th) to 10(th) weeks of gestation and then the fetal DNA was extracted from the plasma. Nested PCR was applied to detect the sequences of single copy SRY gene and multi copy DYS14 & DAZ genes on the Y chromosome of the male fetuses. At the end, all the obtained results were compared with the actual gender of the newborns. In 40 out of 42 born baby boys, the relevant gene sequences were identified and 95.2% sensitivity was obtained. Non-invasive early determination of fetal gender using cffDNA could be employed as a pre-test in the shortest possible time and with a high reliability to avoid applying invasive methods in cases where a fetus is at the risk of genetic diseases.

  12. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  13. Effect of cooperative learning strategies on student verbal interactions and achievement during conceptual change instruction in 10th grade general science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonning, Robert A.

    This study evaluated the effects of cooperative learning on students' verbal interaction patterns and achievement in a conceptual change instructional model in secondary science. Current conceptual change instructional models recognize the importance of student-student verbal interactions, but lack specific strategies to encourage these interactions. Cooperative learning may provide the necessary strategies. Two sections of low-ability 10th-grade students were designated the experimental and control groups. Students in both sections received identical content instruction on the particle model of matter using conceptual change teaching strategies. Students worked in teacher-assigned small groups on in-class assignments. The experimental section used cooperative learning strategies involving instruction in collaborative skills and group evaluation of assignments. The control section received no collaborative skills training and students were evaluated individually on group work. Gains on achievement were assessed using pre- and posttreatment administrations of an investigator-designed short-answer essay test. The assessment strategies used in this study represent an attempt to measure conceptual change. Achievement was related to students' ability to correctly use appropriate scientific explanations of events and phenomena and to discard use of naive conceptions. Verbal interaction patterns of students working in groups were recorded on videotape and analyzed using an investigator-designed verbal interaction scheme. The targeted verbalizations used in the interaction scheme were derived from the social learning theories of Piaget and Vygotsky. It was found that students using cooperative learning strategies showed greater achievement gains as defined above and made greater use of specific verbal patterns believed to be related to increased learning. The results of the study demonstrated that cooperative learning strategies enhance conceptual change instruction. More

  14. Decision Tree Modeling for Ranking Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Philip L. H.; Wan, Wai Ming; Lee, Paul H.

    Ranking/preference data arises from many applications in marketing, psychology, and politics. We establish a new decision tree model for the analysis of ranking data by adopting the concept of classification and regression tree. The existing splitting criteria are modified in a way that allows them to precisely measure the impurity of a set of ranking data. Two types of impurity measures for ranking data are introduced, namelyg-wise and top-k measures. Theoretical results show that the new measures exhibit properties of impurity functions. In model assessment, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is applied to evaluate the tree performance. Experiments are carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the tree model for complete and partially ranked data and promising results are obtained. Finally, a real-world application of the proposed methodology to analyze a set of political rankings data is presented.

  15. On Boolean matrices with full factor rank

    SciTech Connect

    Shitov, Ya

    2013-11-30

    It is demonstrated that every (0,1)-matrix of size n×m having Boolean rank n contains a column with at least √n/2−1 zero entries. This bound is shown to be asymptotically optimal. As a corollary, it is established that the size of a full-rank Boolean matrix is bounded from above by a function of its tropical and determinantal ranks. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  16. Email user ranking based on email networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quang Anh; Vu, Minh Tuan; Frater, Michael; Jiang, Frank

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, four spam-filtering approaches based on the mail networks: Clustering, Extended Clustering Coefficient, PageRank Algorithm and Weighted PageRank Algorithm are analyzed. We also propose a couple of fully worked-out datasets against which the experimental comparisons with the respect to the accuracy of email user ranking and spam filtering are conducted. The results indicate that PageRank algorithm and Extended Clustering Coefficient approaches are better than others. The rate of true detection is over 99.5% while the failed alarm remains below 0.5%.

  17. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis.

  18. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  19. Power Conversion and Transmission Systems: A 9th and/or 10th Grade Industrial Education Curriculum Designed To Fulfill the Kansas State Department of Vocational Education's Level 2 Course Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Harvey R., Ed.

    The document is a guide to a 9th and 10th grade industrial education course investigating the total system of power--how man controls, converts, transmits, and uses energy; the rationale is that if one is to learn of the total system of industry, the subsystem of power must be investigated. The guide provides a "body of knowledge" chart…

  20. Mountain Dew[R] or Mountain Don't?: A Pilot Investigation of Caffeine Use Parameters and Relations to Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in 5th- and 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Bell, Debora J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Caffeine, the only licit psychoactive drug available to minors, may have a harmful impact on students' health and adjustment, yet little is known about its use or effects on students, especially from a developmental perspective. Caffeine use in 5th- and 10th-grade students was examined in a cross-sectional design, and relations and…

  1. The Internet Time Lag: Anticipating the Long-Term Consequences of the Information Revolution. A Report of the Annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (10th, Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Evan I.

    This is a report of the 10th annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001). Participants were also polled after the events of September 11, and these comments have been integrated into the report. The mission of this report is to take a wide-ranging look at the trends that are defining the next new…

  2. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  3. IBC’s 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H.J.; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S.; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  4. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  5. Validity of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision code for hyperkalaemia in elderly patients at presentation to an emergency department and at hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Fleet, Jamie L; Shariff, Salimah Z; Gandhi, Sonja; Weir, Matthew A; Jain, Arsh K; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the validity of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) code for hyperkalaemia (E87.5) in two settings: at presentation to an emergency department and at hospital admission. Design Population-based validation study. Setting 12 hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2010. Participants Elderly patients with serum potassium values at presentation to an emergency department (n=64 579) and at hospital admission (n=64 497). Primary outcome Sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value. Serum potassium values in patients with and without a hyperkalaemia code (code positive and code negative, respectively). Results The sensitivity of the best-performing ICD-10 coding algorithm for hyperkalaemia (defined by serum potassium >5.5 mmol/l) was 14.1% (95% CI 12.5% to 15.9%) at presentation to an emergency department and 14.6% (95% CI 13.3% to 16.1%) at hospital admission. Both specificities were greater than 99%. In the two settings, the positive-predictive values were 83.2% (95% CI 78.4% to 87.1%) and 62.0% (95% CI 57.9% to 66.0%), while the negative-predictive values were 97.8% (95% CI 97.6% to 97.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 96.8% to 97.1%). In patients who were code positive for hyperkalaemia, median (IQR) serum potassium values were 6.1 (5.7 to 6.8) mmol/l at presentation to an emergency department and 6.0 (5.1 to 6.7) mmol/l at hospital admission. For code-negative patients median (IQR) serum potassium values were 4.0 (3.7 to 4.4) mmol/l and 4.1 (3.8 to 4.5) mmol/l in each of the two settings, respectively. Conclusions Patients with hospital encounters who were ICD-10 E87.5 hyperkalaemia code positive and negative had distinct higher and lower serum potassium values, respectively. However, due to very low sensitivity, the incidence of hyperkalaemia is underestimated. PMID:23274674

  6. Fault modeling of the Mw 7.0 shallow intra-slab strike-slip earthquake occurred on 2011 July 10th using near-field tsunami record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, T.; Hino, R.; Iinuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    On 2011 July 10th, an earthquake of Mw 7.0 occurred in the shallow part of the Pacific slab beneath the large coseismic slip area of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. This event has a strike-slip focal mechanism with steep dipping nodal planes. Near the epicenter, aftershocks determined by OBS deployment formed clear two orthogonal lineaments with identical strikes of the focal mechanism solution, suggesting that the aftershock activity occurred along the two conjugate faults. The strikes of these faults were almost parallel to the direction of the magnetic lineations and the fracture zones of the incoming Pacific plate, suggesting that the earthquake was the re-rupture of congenital fractures under the extensional stress induced by the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. It is of great interest to know the down-dip size of the source fault not only to understand the mechanical nature of the slab but also the post-2011 stress state. Coseismic seafloor deformation and tsunami associated with the earthquake were observed by ocean bottom pressure gauges deployed within ~ 100 km from the epicenter. We estimated the finite fault model of this event to discuss the rupture properties of the earthquake. We sought the source model assuming a rectangular fault with a uniform slip assuming the strike of the fault to be one of those of two nodal planes of the focal mechanism. The two preferable source models corresponding to the two nodal planes explained the observed data equally well. For either model, the depth of the downdip end exceeds 40 km below the plate boundary, meaning the fault widths (down-dip size) were much larger than the depth extent of the aftershock distribution (~ 15 km). We sought another source model assuming the simultaneous rupture of the conjugate faults and found that the width of the fault model was more consistent with the aftershock distribution than the single rupture plane models. The 2011 intraslab strike-slip earthquake might be a compound rupture of the

  7. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  8. Canadian University Rankings: Buyer Beware Once Again

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Stewart; Cramer, Kenneth M.; Page, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We present a data-based perspective concerning recent (e.g., 2008) "Maclean's" magazine rankings of Canadian universities, including cluster analysis of the 2008 data. Canadian universities empirically resemble and relate to each other in a manner different from their formal classification and final rank ordering in the "Maclean's" system. Several…

  9. Fundamental Measurement of Rank-Ordered Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linacre, John M.

    A Rasch measurement model can be constructed to meet the requirements of rank ordered data. If multiple rankings of the same objects are available, then the parameters of the objects can be estimated, along with their standard errors and also with statistics summarizing the fit of the data to the measurement model. This paper summarizes the…

  10. A Rational Method for Ranking Engineering Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glower, Donald D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares two methods for ranking academic programs, the opinion poll v examination of career successes of the program's alumni. For the latter, "Who's Who in Engineering" and levels of research funding provided data. Tables display resulting data and compare rankings by the two methods for chemical engineering and civil engineering. (CS)

  11. University Rankings: Status Quo, Dilemmas, and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongcai, Wang

    2009-01-01

    It has been exactly twenty years since the term "university rankings" came into being in China, and people have become relatively rational about the process, after an impetuous beginning. In a sense, the appearance of university rankings in China indicates the birth of something new, or the beginning of social voices in higher education…

  12. A Ranking Method for Evaluating Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparative judgment approach for holistically scored constructed response tasks. In this approach, the grader rank orders (rather than rate) the quality of a small set of responses. A prior automated evaluation of responses guides both set formation and scaling of rankings. Sets are formed to have similar prior scores and…

  13. College Rankings: History, Criticism and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Luke; Robe, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Today, college quality rankings in news magazines and guidebooks are a big business with tangible impacts on the operation of higher education institutions. The college rankings published annually by "U.S. News and World Report" ("U.S. News") are so influential that Don Hossler of Indiana University derisively claims that higher education is the…

  14. Rankings and the Global Reputation Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This chapter delves into the growing influence and impact of rankings on higher education, as a lens through which to view how the race for reputation and status is changing the higher education landscape, both globally and nationally. The author considers the extent to which rankings are driving policy choices and institutional decisions and the…

  15. A Different Approach to University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofallis, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Educationalists are well able to find fault with rankings on numerous grounds and may reject them outright. However, given that they are here to stay, we could also try to improve them wherever possible. All currently published university rankings combine various measures to produce an overall score using an additive approach. The individual…

  16. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  17. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor.

    PubMed

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d_{0}=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d_{0}. PMID:23368001

  18. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d0=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d0.

  19. Risk factors for bulk milk somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts in smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, G; Green, L E; Guzmán, D; Esparza, H; Tadich, N

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the principal management factors that influenced bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) of smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile. One hundred and fifty smallholder milk producers were selected randomly from 42 milk collection centres (MCCs). In April and May of 2002, all farms were visited and a detailed interview questionnaire on dairy-cow management related to milk quality was conducted. In addition, the BMSCC and TBC results from the previous 2 months' fortnightly tests were obtained from the MCCs. The mean BMSCC and TBC were used as the dependent variables in the analyses and were normalised by a natural-logarithm transformation (LN). All independent management variables were categorised into binary outcomes and present (=1) was compared with absent (=0). Biserial correlations were calculated between the LNBMSCC or LNTBC and the management factors of the smallholder farms. Management factors with correlations with P0.05) factors. A random MCC effect was included in the models to investigate the importance of clustering of herds within MCC. In the null model for mean LNTBC, the random effect of MCCs was highly significant. It was explained by: milk collected once a day or less compared with collection twice a day, not cleaning the bucket after milking mastitic cows versus cleaning the bucket and cooling milk in a vat of water versus not cooling milk or using ice or a bulk tank to cool milk. Other factors that increased the LNTBC were a waiting yard with a soil or gravel floor versus concrete, use of plastic buckets for milking instead of metal, not feeding California mastitis test (CMT)-positive milk to calves and cows of dual-purpose breed. The final model explained 35% of the variance. The model predicted that a herd that complied with all the management practices had a mean

  20. Relation between precipitation and the 25th percentile of June and September flows in streams in the Great Lakes, Ohio, and Upper Mississippi River Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winterstein, Thomas A.; Lorenz, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Regression models were developed for the 25th percentile of June and September flows (first quartile of flow) for 47 streamflow-gaging stations (gaging stations) in the Upper Mississippi, Ohio, and Great Lakes drainage basins. The gaging stations that were selected for this analysis are on unregulated rivers, have at least 40 years of record, and have a nearby weather station with at least 70 years of precipitation record. Regression models were developed for each gaging station relating annual 25th percentile of June and September flows to selected precipitation variables. The explanatory variables are monthly precipitation (April-June, July-September) for each year of record, precipitation for the previous year, and average precipitation for the preceding 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-, 25-, and 30-year periods. Short-term precipitation (April-June or July-September monthly precipitation) variables are the most common significant variables in the regression equations for the 25th percentile of June and September streamflows. May and June monthly precipitation are the most common significant variables among the regression models of the 25th percentile of June flows. August and September monthly precipitation are the most common significant variables in the regression models of the 25th percentile of September streamflow. July precipitation also is a significant explanatory variable in regression models of September streamflow. The 25th-percentile flows in this study also are related to intermediate- and long-term precipitation variables. The intermediate-term precipitation variable (previous-year's precipitation) has a more distinct spatial pattern than the long-term precipitation variable (multiyear running averages of annual precipitation) and is more likely to be significant in the western part than in the eastern part of the study area.

  1. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making. PMID:25800813

  2. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank. PMID:23003933

  3. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. PMID:26224206

  4. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

  5. Public perception of cancer survival rankings.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; Scherr, Courtney L; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-12-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly to least deadly). A sample of 400 Indiana adults aged 18 to 89 years (M = 33.88 years) completed a survey with questions regarding perceived cancer survival rates. Most cancers were ranked accurately; however, breast and stomach cancer survival rankings were highly distorted such that breast cancer was perceived to be significantly more deadly and stomach cancer significantly less deadly than reality. Younger participants also overestimated the survival rate for pancreatic cancer. These distortions mirror past content analytic work demonstrating that breast, stomach, and pancreatic cancers are misrepresented in the news. PMID:23463791

  6. Let your users do the ranking.

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-12-01

    Ranking search results is a thorny issue for enterprise search. Search engines rank results using a variety of sophisticated algorithms, but users still complain that search can't ever seem to find anything useful or relevant! The challenge is to provide results that are ranked according to the users' definition of relevancy. Sandia National Laboratories has enhanced its commercial search engine to discover user preferences, re-ranking results accordingly. Immediate positive impact was achieved by modeling historical data consisting of user queries and subsequent result clicks. New data is incorporated into the model daily. An important benefit is that results improve naturally and automatically over time as a function of user actions. This session presents the method employed, how it was integrated with the search engine,metrics illustrating the subsequent improvement to the users' search experience, and plans for implementation with Sandia's FAST for SharePoint 2010 search engine.

  7. Dosimetric impacts of microgravity: an analysis of 5th, 50th and 95th percentile male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Baalen, Mary Van; Shavers, Mark R; Semones, Edward J; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-02-21

    Computational phantoms serve an important role in organ dosimetry and risk assessment performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A previous study investigated the impact on organ dose equivalents and effective doses from the use of the University of Florida hybrid adult male (UFHADM) and adult female (UFHADF) phantoms at differing height and weight percentiles versus those given by the two existing NASA phantoms, the computerized anatomical man (CAM) and female (CAF) (Bahadori et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 1671-94). In the present study, the UFHADM and UFHADF phantoms of different body sizes were further altered to incorporate the effects of microgravity. Body self-shielding distributions are generated using the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT), and the results are combined with depth dose data from the NASA codes BRYNTRN and HZETRN to yield organ dose equivalents and their rates for a variety of space radiation environments. It is found that while organ dose equivalents are indeed altered by the physiological effects ofmicrogravity, the magnitude of the change in overall risk (indicated by the effective dose) is minimal for the spectra and simplified shielding configurations considered. The results also indicate, however, that UFHADMand UFHADF could be useful in designing dose reduction strategies through optimized positioning of an astronaut during encounters with solar particle events.

  8. Hierarchical Rank Aggregation with Applications to Nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Rallo, Robert; George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays in the field of nanotoxicology provide new opportunities for the hazard assessment and ranking of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). It is often necessary to rank lists of materials based on multiple risk assessment parameters, often aggregated across several measures of toxicity and possibly spanning an array of experimental platforms. Bayesian models coupled with the optimization of loss functions have been shown to provide an effective framework for conducting inference on ranks. In this article we present various loss-function-based ranking approaches for comparing ENM within experiments and toxicity parameters. Additionally, we propose a framework for the aggregation of ranks across different sources of evidence while allowing for differential weighting of this evidence based on its reliability and importance in risk ranking. We apply these methods to high throughput toxicity data on two human cell-lines, exposed to eight different nanomaterials, and measured in relation to four cytotoxicity outcomes. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:24839387

  9. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  10. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails. PMID:24580176

  11. Using a Spreadsheet to Compute the Maximum Wind Sector 99.5th Percentile X/Q Value in Accordance with DOE-STD-3009-2014.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Linda

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Standard 3009-2014 requires one of two methods to determine the simple Gaussian relative concentration (X/Q) of pollutant at plume centerline downwind to a receptor for a 2-h exposure duration from a ground-level release (i.e., less than 10 m height) which are (1) the 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method and (2) the 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method. This paper describes how to determine the simple Gaussian 99.5th percentile X/Q for the directionally-dependent method using an electronic spreadsheet. Refer to a previous paper to determine the simple Gaussian 95th percentile X/Q for the directionally-independent method using an electronic spreadsheet (Vickers 2015). The method described herein is simple, quick, accurate, and transparent because all of the data, calculations, and results are visible for validation and verification. PMID:27023153

  12. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in

  13. A cognitive model for aggregating people's rankings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael D; Steyvers, Mark; Miller, Brent

    2014-01-01

    We develop a cognitive modeling approach, motivated by classic theories of knowledge representation and judgment from psychology, for combining people's rankings of items. The model makes simple assumptions about how individual differences in knowledge lead to observed ranking data in behavioral tasks. We implement the cognitive model as a Bayesian graphical model, and use computational sampling to infer an aggregate ranking and measures of the individual expertise. Applications of the model to 23 data sets, dealing with general knowledge and prediction tasks, show that the model performs well in producing an aggregate ranking that is often close to the ground truth and, as in the "wisdom of the crowd" effect, usually performs better than most of individuals. We also present some evidence that the model outperforms the traditional statistical Borda count method, and that the model is able to infer people's relative expertise surprisingly well without knowing the ground truth. We discuss the advantages of the cognitive modeling approach to combining ranking data, and in wisdom of the crowd research generally, as well as highlighting a number of potential directions for future model development.

  14. Modeling Area-Level Health Rankings

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Charles; Soneji, Samir; Tchernis, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rank county health using a Bayesian factor analysis model. Data Sources Secondary county data from the National Center for Health Statistics (through 2007) and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (through 2009). Study Design Our model builds on the existing county health rankings (CHRs) by using data-derived weights to compute ranks from mortality and morbidity variables, and by quantifying uncertainty based on population, spatial correlation, and missing data. We apply our model to Wisconsin, which has comprehensive data, and Texas, which has substantial missing information. Data Collection Methods The data were downloaded from www.countyhealthrankings.org. Principal Findings Our estimated rankings are more similar to the CHRs for Wisconsin than Texas, as the data-derived factor weights are closer to the assigned weights for Wisconsin. The correlations between the CHRs and our ranks are 0.89 for Wisconsin and 0.65 for Texas. Uncertainty is especially severe for Texas given the state's substantial missing data. Conclusions The reliability of comprehensive CHRs varies from state to state. We advise focusing on the counties that remain among the least healthy after incorporating alternate weighting methods and accounting for uncertainty. Our results also highlight the need for broader geographic coverage in health data. PMID:26256684

  15. Pulling Rank: A Plan to Help Students with College Choice in an Age of Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Lloyd

    2008-01-01

    Colleges and universities are "ranksteering"--driving under the influence of popular college rankings systems like "U.S. News and World Report's" Best Colleges. This article examines the criticisms of college rankings and describes how a group of education leaders is honing a plan to end the tyranny of the ratings game and better help students and…

  16. Adjoints and Low-rank Covariance Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measures of the uncertainty of Earth System estimates can be as important as the estimates themselves. Second moments of estimation errors are described by the covariance matrix, whose direct calculation is impractical when the number of degrees of freedom of the system state is large. Ensemble and reduced-state approaches to prediction and data assimilation replace full estimation error covariance matrices by low-rank approximations. The appropriateness of such approximations depends on the spectrum of the full error covariance matrix, whose calculation is also often impractical. Here we examine the situation where the error covariance is a linear transformation of a forcing error covariance. We use operator norms and adjoints to relate the appropriateness of low-rank representations to the conditioning of this transformation. The analysis is used to investigate low-rank representations of the steady-state response to random forcing of an idealized discrete-time dynamical system.

  17. [A modified retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in patients with a highly deformed thorax: obtaining a wide operative field through subperiosteal resection of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuji; Kanou, Takehiro; Takagi, Norito; Tokuda, Yuji; Uozumi, Jiro; Masaki, Zenjiro

    2005-07-01

    We herein report a technique which facilitates a retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in cases of highly deformed thorax due to kyphoscoliosis. The operation consists of a lumbar oblique incision with removal of the 11th rib, combined with the additional removal of the 12th and 10th ribs. Resection of the upper two ribs was performed subperiosteally, leaving the periosteum of the deep side untouched. However, the deep side periosteum of the 12th rib was incised caudal from the pleural margin in order to facilitate exposure of the diaphragm. The retroperitoneal space was entered through the tip of the 11th rib bed. The diaphragm was incised dorso-medially at a level 1 cm caudal from the lower margin of the pleura, to an extent necessary to enable the pleura together with the cranial diaphragm to be manoeuvred in an upward direction. Two cases with renal tuberculosis associated with high-grade kyphosis and one case with staghorn calculi accompanied with lordosis were operated on utilizing this technique. In the former two cases, the thoracic cage was in direct contact with the iliac bone and there was practically no space between the rib border and the iliac crest. This was also true of the third case, but the grade of deformity was not as extensive as in the former two cases. Removal of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs could be achieved without injuring the pleura and a satisfactorily large operating field could thus be developed which enabled a simple nephrectomy to be performed without difficulty. The characteristic feature of the described approach is that resection of the 10th and 11th ribs is simply to facilitate manoevrability of the wound margin, without going through the rib bed. The technique could be advantageous in selected cases where there is a highly deformed thorax. PMID:16083038

  18. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010) Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vullers, Ruud

    2011-10-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010). The workshop was organized in Leuven, Belgium from 30 November to 3 December 2010 by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and the imec/Holst Centre. This was a special PowerMEMS Workshop, for several reasons. First of all, we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the workshop: the first PowerMEMS meeting was organized in Sendai, Japan in 2000. None of the organizers or participants of this first meeting could have predicted the impact of the workshop over the next decade. The second reason was that, for the first time, the conference organization spanned two countries: Belgium and the Netherlands. Thanks to the advances in information technology, teams from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium) and the imec/Holst Centre in Eindhoven (the Netherlands) have been able to work together seamlessly as one team. The objective of the PowerMEMS Workshop is to stimulate innovation in micro and nanotechnology for power generation and energy conversion applications. Its scope ranges from integrated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for power generation, dissipation, harvesting, and management, to novel nanostructures and materials for energy-related applications. True to the objective of the PowerMEMSWorkshop, the 2010 technical program covered a broad range of energy related research, ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale, discussed in 5 invited and 52 oral presentations, and 112 posters. This special section includes 14 papers covering vibration energy harvesters, thermal applications and micro power systems. Finally, we wish to express sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee and last but not least the Local Organizing Committee. This special issue was edited in

  19. Introduction to the special issue on the joint meeting of the 19th IEEE International Symposium on the Applications of Ferroelectrics and the 10th European Conference on the Applications of Polar Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2011-09-01

    The joint meeting of the 19th IEEE International Symposium on the Applications of Ferroelectrics and the 10th European Conference on the Applications of Polar Dielectrics took place in Edinburgh from August 9-12, 2010. The conference was attended by 390 delegates from more than 40 different countries. There were 4 plenary speakers, 56 invited speakers, and a further 222 contributed oral presentations in 7 parallel session. In addition there were 215 poster presentations. Key topics addressed at the conference included piezoelectric materials, leadfree piezoelectrics, and multiferroics.

  20. Nominal versus Attained Weights in Universitas 21 Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Kaycheng

    2014-01-01

    Universitas 21 Ranking of National Higher Education Systems (U21 Ranking) is one of the three new ranking systems appearing in 2012. In contrast with the other systems, U21 Ranking uses countries as the unit of analysis. It has several features which lend it with greater trustworthiness, but it also shared some methodological issues with the other…

  1. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451... AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under... Professional to a senior career employee are set forth in 5 U.S.C. 4507a. (b) To be eligible for a rank...

  2. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451... AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under... Professional to a senior career employee are set forth in 5 U.S.C. 4507a. (b) To be eligible for a rank...

  3. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451... AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under... Professional to a senior career employee are set forth in 5 U.S.C. 4507a. (b) To be eligible for a rank...

  4. World University Rankings: Take with a Large Pinch of Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Soh Kay

    2011-01-01

    Equating the unequal is misleading, and this happens consistently in comparing rankings from different university ranking systems, as the NUT saga shows. This article illustrates the problem by analyzing the 2011 rankings of the top 100 universities in the AWUR, QSWUR and THEWUR ranking results. It also discusses the reasons why the rankings…

  5. Examining Major Rankings According to the Berlin Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, Nian Cai

    2008-01-01

    While the ranking of higher education institutions (HEIs) has become more and more popular, there are increasing concerns about the quality of such ranking. In response to such legitimate expectations, in May 2006, the International Ranking Expert Group (IREG) developed and endorsed a guideline document--the Berlin Principles on Ranking of Higher…

  6. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451... AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under... Professional to a senior career employee are set forth in 5 U.S.C. 4507a. (b) To be eligible for a rank...

  7. 5 CFR 451.302 - Ranks for senior career employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ranks for senior career employees. 451... AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.302 Ranks for senior career employees. (a) The circumstances under... Professional to a senior career employee are set forth in 5 U.S.C. 4507a. (b) To be eligible for a rank...

  8. [Placental weight percentiles and its relationship with fetal weight according to gestational age in an urban area of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Grandi, Carlos; Roman, Estela; Dipierri, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: El peso placentario (PP) y los índices de su relación con el peso al nacer (PN) (PN/PP, PP/PN) predicen morbi-mortalidad perinatal y resultados alejados de la salud. Objetivos: Calcular percentilos del PP e índices por sexo y edad gestacional correspondientes a 867 RNV de la Maternidad Sardá de Buenos Aires, Argentina y compararlos con referencias internacionales. Material y métodos: Se excluyeron feto muerto, embarazo múltiple, edad gestacional <22 y >42 semanas y PP<100g y >2500g. Características maternas y fetales: edad, educación, tabaco, paridad, diabetes, preeclampsia, corioamnionitis, restricción del crecimiento, malformación congénita y prematurez. Se calcularon estadísticos de resumen y percentilos con el método LMS. Las comparaciones se realizaron con test t-Student, ANOVA y referencias internacionales. Resultados: Edad materna media 24 años, educación 10.1 años, 24.5% primíparas, 12.6% fumadoras, 4.9% presentaron diabetes, 8.7% preeclampsia, 7.9% corioamnionitis y 13.0% restricción del crecimiento fetal. El 55.3% de los RN fueron varones, 51.6% prematuros, 18.9% PEG y 7.1% malformados. El PN y EG promedio fue de 2581g y 35.6 semanas respectivamente. Elevada correlación positiva de la EG con PP y PN/PP y negativa con PP/PN (p%lt;0.001); el peso de la placenta e índices fueron mayores en varones. Se presentan los percentiles de PP, PN/PP y PP/PN. Las diferencias con las referencias oscilaron de 0.46% -13%, 4.91% -12.1% y 5.81% -14% para el PP, PN/PP y PP/PN respectivamente. Conclusiones: los percentilos generados son aplicables en investigaciones sobre la relación de la placenta con resultados perinatales y la salud durante el ciclo vital.

  9. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  10. Efficiently Ranking Hyphotheses in Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve

    1997-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of learning the ranking of a set of alternatives based upon incomplete information (e.g. a limited number of observations). At each decision cycle, the system can output a complete ordering on the hypotheses or decide to gather additional information (e.g. observation) at some cost.

  11. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  12. Deep impact: unintended consequences of journal rank

    PubMed Central

    Brembs, Björn; Button, Katherine; Munafò, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Most researchers acknowledge an intrinsic hierarchy in the scholarly journals (“journal rank”) that they submit their work to, and adjust not only their submission but also their reading strategies accordingly. On the other hand, much has been written about the negative effects of institutionalizing journal rank as an impact measure. So far, contributions to the debate concerning the limitations of journal rank as a scientific impact assessment tool have either lacked data, or relied on only a few studies. In this review, we present the most recent and pertinent data on the consequences of our current scholarly communication system with respect to various measures of scientific quality (such as utility/citations, methodological soundness, expert ratings or retractions). These data corroborate previous hypotheses: using journal rank as an assessment tool is bad scientific practice. Moreover, the data lead us to argue that any journal rank (not only the currently-favored Impact Factor) would have this negative impact. Therefore, we suggest that abandoning journals altogether, in favor of a library-based scholarly communication system, will ultimately be necessary. This new system will use modern information technology to vastly improve the filter, sort and discovery functions of the current journal system. PMID:23805088

  13. Spanish Universities and the "Ranking 2005" Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Miguel, Jesus M.; Vaquera, Elizabeth; Sanchez, Jara D.

    2005-01-01

    This article assesses the quality of the Spanish higher education system, focusing mainly on the methodological challenges that the existence of public and private universities represents in the calculation of global higher education rankings. Researchers from the University of Barcelona and the University of Pennsylvania calculated the first…

  14. Measures of Agreement for Incompletely Ranked Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iachan, Ronaldo

    1984-01-01

    Measures of agreement for ordinal-scaled data are suggested that make use of the k categories with the highest ranks. The proposed measures are applied to the Self-Directed Search in order to evaluate its agreement with self-assessment (translation ability) or with the work environment (congruence). (Author)

  15. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  16. An Application of Sylvester's Rank Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kung, Sidney H.

    2011-01-01

    Using two well known criteria for the diagonalizability of a square matrix plus an extended form of Sylvester's Rank Inequality, the author presents a new condition for the diagonalization of a real matrix from which one can obtain the eigenvectors by simply multiplying some associated matrices without solving a linear system of simultaneous…

  17. Ranking Workplace Competencies: Student and Graduate Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainsbury, Elizabeth; Hodges, Dave; Burchell, Noel; Lay, Mark

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand business students and graduates made similar rankings of the five most important workplace competencies: computer literacy, customer service orientation, teamwork and cooperation, self-confidence, and willingness to learn. Graduates placed greater importance on most of the 24 competencies, resulting in a statistically significant…

  18. City Life: Rankings (Livability) versus Perceptions (Satisfaction)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between the popular Mercer city ranking (livability) and survey data (satisfactions). Livability aims to capture "objective" quality of life such as infrastructure. Survey items capture "subjective" quality of life such as satisfaction with city. The relationship between objective measures of quality of life and…

  19. Subject Gateway Sites and Search Engine Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Discusses subject gateway sites and commercial search engines for the Web and presents an explanation of Google's PageRank algorithm. The principle question addressed is the conditions under which a gateway site will increase the likelihood that a target page is found in search engines. (LRW)

  20. The Rank of Reduced Dispersion Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekker, Paul A.; de Leeuw, Jan

    1987-01-01

    Psychometricians working in factor analysis and econometricians working in regression with measurement error in all variables are both interested in the rank of dispersion matrices under variation of diagonal elements. This paper reviews both fields; points out various small errors; and presents a methodological comparision of factor analysis and…

  1. Alternative Class Ranks Using Z-Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Philip H.; Van Niel, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Grades at US colleges and universities have increased precipitously over the last 50 years, suggesting that their signalling power has become attenuated. Moreover, average grades have risen disproportionately in some departments, implying that weak students in departments with high grades may obtain better class ranks than strong students in…

  2. World University Ranking Methodologies: Stability and Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Brian; Parsons, Christine

    2008-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in the number of national university league tables over the last 25 years. By contrast, "World University Rankings" are a more recent development and have received little serious academic scrutiny in peer-reviewed publications. Few researchers have evaluated the sources of data and the statistical approaches used.…

  3. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/.

  4. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  5. To Overcome HITS Rank Similarity Confliction of Web Pages using Weight Calculation and Rank Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Rajender; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-12-01

    Search Engine gives an ordered list of web search results in response to a user query, wherein the important pages are usually displayed at the top with less important ones afterwards. It may be possible that the user may have to look for many screen results to get the required documents. In literatures, many page ranking algorithms has been given to find the page rank of a page. For example PageRank is considered in this work. This algorithm treats all the links equally when distributing rank scores. That's why this algorithm some time gives equal importance to all the pages. But in real this can not be happen because, if two pages have same rank then how we can judge which page is more important then other. So this paper proposes another idea to organize the search results and describe which page is more important when confliction of same rank is produced by the PageRank. So that the user can get more relevant and important results easily and in a short span of time.

  6. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  7. Blood pressure percentiles by age and height for non-overweight Chinese children and adolescents: analysis of the china health and nutrition surveys 1991–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension is an important health problem in China and raised blood pressure in children may lead to future hypertension. Accordingly we aimed to provide a reference blood pressure table for age, gender and height in Chinese children. Methods A reference sample of subjects was drawn from the Chinese Health and National Survey 1999–2009 aged 7–17 years after excluding overweight and obese children, the 50th, 90th and 95th percentiles of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP)are presented corrected for height and age by gender. These values are compared with existing Chinese and US recommendations. Results Results for the 50th, 90th and 95th percentile of SBP and DBP for 6245 boys and 5707 girls were presented by age and height percentiles. These observations were lower than existing Chinese recommendations before 13 years of age at median heightbut went higher in those >13 years old. At same age and height, SBP levels of American children were overall higher than Chinese counterparts from this study by average 9–10 mm Hg, but DBP did not show overall or significant difference. Conclusions The first height-specific blood pressure reference values are proposed for Chinese children and adolescents aged 7–17 years. These are lower than existing US reference values and current Chinese cutoffs. PMID:24274040

  8. Rank-based camera spectral sensitivity estimation.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Graham; Darrodi, Maryam Mohammadzadeh; Mackiewicz, Michal

    2016-04-01

    In order to accurately predict a digital camera response to spectral stimuli, the spectral sensitivity functions of its sensor need to be known. These functions can be determined by direct measurement in the lab-a difficult and lengthy procedure-or through simple statistical inference. Statistical inference methods are based on the observation that when a camera responds linearly to spectral stimuli, the device spectral sensitivities are linearly related to the camera rgb response values, and so can be found through regression. However, for rendered images, such as the JPEG images taken by a mobile phone, this assumption of linearity is violated. Even small departures from linearity can negatively impact the accuracy of the recovered spectral sensitivities, when a regression method is used. In our work, we develop a novel camera spectral sensitivity estimation technique that can recover the linear device spectral sensitivities from linear images and the effective linear sensitivities from rendered images. According to our method, the rank order of a pair of responses imposes a constraint on the shape of the underlying spectral sensitivity curve (of the sensor). Technically, each rank-pair splits the space where the underlying sensor might lie in two parts (a feasible region and an infeasible region). By intersecting the feasible regions from all the ranked-pairs, we can find a feasible region of sensor space. Experiments demonstrate that using rank orders delivers equal estimation to the prior art. However, the Rank-based method delivers a step-change in estimation performance when the data is not linear and, for the first time, allows for the estimation of the effective sensitivities of devices that may not even have "raw mode." Experiments validate our method. PMID:27140768

  9. Rank-based camera spectral sensitivity estimation.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Graham; Darrodi, Maryam Mohammadzadeh; Mackiewicz, Michal

    2016-04-01

    In order to accurately predict a digital camera response to spectral stimuli, the spectral sensitivity functions of its sensor need to be known. These functions can be determined by direct measurement in the lab-a difficult and lengthy procedure-or through simple statistical inference. Statistical inference methods are based on the observation that when a camera responds linearly to spectral stimuli, the device spectral sensitivities are linearly related to the camera rgb response values, and so can be found through regression. However, for rendered images, such as the JPEG images taken by a mobile phone, this assumption of linearity is violated. Even small departures from linearity can negatively impact the accuracy of the recovered spectral sensitivities, when a regression method is used. In our work, we develop a novel camera spectral sensitivity estimation technique that can recover the linear device spectral sensitivities from linear images and the effective linear sensitivities from rendered images. According to our method, the rank order of a pair of responses imposes a constraint on the shape of the underlying spectral sensitivity curve (of the sensor). Technically, each rank-pair splits the space where the underlying sensor might lie in two parts (a feasible region and an infeasible region). By intersecting the feasible regions from all the ranked-pairs, we can find a feasible region of sensor space. Experiments demonstrate that using rank orders delivers equal estimation to the prior art. However, the Rank-based method delivers a step-change in estimation performance when the data is not linear and, for the first time, allows for the estimation of the effective sensitivities of devices that may not even have "raw mode." Experiments validate our method.

  10. Kriging for Simulation Metamodeling: Experimental Design, Reduced Rank Kriging, and Omni-Rank Kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosking, Michael Robert

    This dissertation improves an analyst's use of simulation by offering improvements in the utilization of kriging metamodels. There are three main contributions. First an analysis is performed of what comprises good experimental designs for practical (non-toy) problems when using a kriging metamodel. Second is an explanation and demonstration of how reduced rank decompositions can improve the performance of kriging, now referred to as reduced rank kriging. Third is the development of an extension of reduced rank kriging which solves an open question regarding the usage of reduced rank kriging in practice. This extension is called omni-rank kriging. Finally these results are demonstrated on two case studies. The first contribution focuses on experimental design. Sequential designs are generally known to be more efficient than "one shot" designs. However, sequential designs require some sort of pilot design from which the sequential stage can be based. We seek to find good initial designs for these pilot studies, as well as designs which will be effective if there is no following sequential stage. We test a wide variety of designs over a small set of test-bed problems. Our findings indicate that analysts should take advantage of any prior information they have about their problem's shape and/or their goals in metamodeling. In the event of a total lack of information we find that Latin hypercube designs are robust default choices. Our work is most distinguished by its attention to the higher levels of dimensionality. The second contribution introduces and explains an alternative method for kriging when there is noise in the data, which we call reduced rank kriging. Reduced rank kriging is based on using a reduced rank decomposition which artificially smoothes the kriging weights similar to a nugget effect. Our primary focus will be showing how the reduced rank decomposition propagates through kriging empirically. In addition, we show further evidence for our

  11. Utilization of low rank coal and peat

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.J.

    1987-11-10

    A composition is described including a fuel selected from the group consisting of an oil coated low rank coal and an oil coated peat. The fuel has a moisture content of less than about 5% by weight ground to a 75% minus 200 mesh and water. The composition comprises on a weight percent basis between about 44 to about 70% coal, from about 29 to about 55% water and from about 1 to about 5% oil. The composition is described wherein the low rank coal is selected from the group consisting of sub-bituminous, lignite and brown coal. The composition is described further including a suspension stabilizing agent. The composition is described wherein the suspension stabilizing agent is selected from the group consisting of starch graft polymers, anionic surfactants, alkyl phosphates, alkyl sulfates and alkane sulfuric acids.

  12. Rank-dependant factorization of entanglement evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The description of the entanglement evolution of a complex quantum system can be significantly simplified due to the symmetries of the initial state and the quantum channels, which simultaneously affect parts of the system. Using concurrence as the entanglement measure, we study the entanglement evolution of few qubit systems, when each of the qubits is affected by a local unital channel independently on the others. We found that for low-rank density matrices of the final quantum state, such complex entanglement dynamics can be completely described by a combination of independent factors representing the evolution of entanglement of the initial state, when just one of the qubits is affected by a local channel. We suggest necessary conditions for the rank of the density matrices to represent the entanglement evolution through the factors. Our finding is supported with analytical examples and numerical simulations.

  13. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1992-04-15

    The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) continuation of microbial consortia development and maintenance, (2) crude enzyme study using best decarboxylating organisms, (3) decarboxylation of lignite, demineralized Wyodak coal and model polymers, and (4) characterization of biotreated coals.

  14. A theory of measuring, electing, and ranking

    PubMed Central

    Balinski, Michel; Laraki, Rida

    2007-01-01

    The impossibility theorems that abound in the theory of social choice show that there can be no satisfactory method for electing and ranking in the context of the traditional, 700-year-old model. A more realistic model, whose antecedents may be traced to Laplace and Galton, leads to a new theory that avoids all impossibilities with a simple and eminently practical method, “the majority judgement.” It has already been tested. PMID:17496140

  15. RANK-RANKL signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Renema, Nathalie; Navet, Benjamin; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Lezot, Frédéric; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic events combined with a favourable environment are the two main factors in the oncological process. The tumour microenvironment is composed of a complex, interconnected network of protagonists, including soluble factors such as cytokines, extracellular matrix components, interacting with fibroblasts, endothelial cells, immune cells and various specific cell types depending on the location of the cancer cells (e.g. pulmonary epithelium, osteoblasts). This diversity defines specific "niches" (e.g. vascular, immune, bone niches) involved in tumour growth and the metastatic process. These actors communicate together by direct intercellular communications and/or in an autocrine/paracrine/endocrine manner involving cytokines and growth factors. Among these glycoproteins, RANKL (receptor activator nuclear factor-κB ligand) and its receptor RANK (receptor activator nuclear factor), members of the TNF and TNFR superfamilies, have stimulated the interest of the scientific community. RANK is frequently expressed by cancer cells in contrast with RANKL which is frequently detected in the tumour microenvironment and together they participate in every step in cancer development. Their activities are markedly regulated by osteoprotegerin (OPG, a soluble decoy receptor) and its ligands, and by LGR4, a membrane receptor able to bind RANKL. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the functional implication of the RANK/RANKL system in cancer development, and to underline the most recent clinical studies. PMID:27279652

  16. Rank-frequency relation for Chinese characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2014-02-01

    We show that the Zipf's law for Chinese characters perfectly holds for sufficiently short texts (few thousand different characters). The scenario of its validity is similar to the Zipf's law for words in short English texts. For long Chinese texts (or for mixtures of short Chinese texts), rank-frequency relations for Chinese characters display a two-layer, hierarchic structure that combines a Zipfian power-law regime for frequent characters (first layer) with an exponential-like regime for less frequent characters (second layer). For these two layers we provide different (though related) theoretical descriptions that include the range of low-frequency characters (hapax legomena). We suggest that this hierarchic structure of the rank-frequency relation connects to semantic features of Chinese characters (number of different meanings and homographies). The comparative analysis of rank-frequency relations for Chinese characters versus English words illustrates the extent to which the characters play for Chinese writers the same role as the words for those writing within alphabetical systems.

  17. Correlating RANK ligand/RANK binding kinetics with osteoclast formation and function.

    PubMed

    Warren, Julia T; Zou, Wei; Decker, Corinne E; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK is essential for the differentiation and bone resorbing capacity of the osteoclast. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble homodimer, acts as a decoy receptor for RANKL and thus inhibits osteoclastogenesis. An imbalance in the RANKL/RANK/OPG axis, with decreased OPG and/or increased RANKL, is associated with diseases that favor bone loss, including osteoporosis. Recently, we established a yeast surface display system and screened libraries of randomly mutated RANKL proteins to identify mutations that abolish binding to OPG while preserving recognition of RANK. These efforts yielded several RANKL variants possessing substantially higher affinity for RANK compared to their wild-type (WT) counterpart. Using recombinant RANKL mutant proteins, we find those with increased affinity for RANK produce more robust signaling in osteoclast lineage cells and have greater osteoclastogenic potential. Our results are the first to document gain of function RANKL mutations. They indicate that the physiological RANKL/RANK interaction is not optimized for maximal signaling and function, perhaps reflecting the need to maintain receptor specificity within the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF). Instead, we find, a biphasic relationship exists between RANKL/RANK affinity and osteoclastogenic capacity. In our panel of RANKL variants, this relationship is driven entirely by manipulation of the kinetic off-rate. Our structure-based and yeast surface display-derived insights into manipulating this critical signaling axis may aid in the design of novel anti-resorptive therapies as well as provide a paradigm for design of other receptor-specific TNF superfamily ligand variants. PMID:25864714

  18. Rings whose p-ranks do not exceed 1

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, O. S.; Tsarev, A. V. E-mail: an-tsarev@yandex.ru

    2014-04-30

    We consider associative torsion-free rings of finite rank whose p-ranks do not exceed 1. For these rings, certain analogues of Wedderburn's theorem on finite-dimensional algebras are found. Bibliography: 11 titles. (paper)

  19. Win That Job! 10th Anniversary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Paul

    This book provides practical information on obtaining a job. Though it is published in Australia, 11 chapters introduce a universal range of job search methods, presenting: the importance of goals and self-knowledge; the resume; preparing job search correspondence; the interview; self-promotion; job search tips and unusual strategies; networking;…

  20. 10th Anniversary P.S.

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    John Adams parle de la préhistoire du P.S. avec présentation des dias. Le DG B.Gregory prend la parole. Les organisateurs présentent sous la direction du "Prof.Ocktette"(?) un sketch très humoristique (p.e.existence de Quark etc.....)

  1. 10th Anniversary P.S.

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-28

    John Adams parle de la préhistoire du P.S. avec présentation des dias. Le DG B.Gregory prend la parole. Les organisateurs présentent sous la direction du "Prof.Ocktette"(?) un sketch très humoristique (p.e.existence de Quark etc.....)

  2. Highlights of 10th plasma chemistry meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hozumi, K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical structure is given of a film formed by plasma polymerization from pyridine monomers. The film has a hydrophilic chemical structure, its molecular weight is 900, and the molecular system is C55H50N10O3. The electrical characteristics of a plasma polymerized film are described. The film has good insulating properties and was successfully applied as video disc coating. Etching resistance properties make it possible to use the film as a resist in etching. The characteristics of plasma polymer formed from monomers containing tetramethyltin are discussed. The polymer is in film form, displays good adhesiveness, is similar to UV film UV 35 in light absorption and is highly insulating.

  3. 10th Annual School Construction Report, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    School construction in the United States dipped below $20 billion in 2003, the first time that had happened in the 21st Century, setting off alarm bells that the school construction boom might be fading. That concern appears to be unfounded. In 2004, school districts in the United States once again completed more than $20 billion worth of…

  4. Expanding the landscape of {N} = 2 rank 1 SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyres, Philip C.; Lotito, Matteo; Lü, Yongchao; Martone, Mario

    2016-05-01

    We refine our previous proposal [1-3] for systematically classifying 4d rank-1 {N} = 2 SCFTs by constructing their possible Coulomb branch geometries. Four new recently discussed rank-1 theories [4, 5], including novel {N} = 3 SCFTs, sit beautifully in our refined classification framework. By arguing for the consistency of their RG flows we can make a strong case for the existence of at least four additional rank-1 SCFTs, nearly doubling the number of known rank-1 SCFTs.

  5. Diagnostic Significance of CA15-3 with Combination of HER-2/neu Values at 85th Percentiles in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thriveni, Karuvaje; Deshmane, Vijayalaxmi; Ramaswamy, Girija; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2013-04-01

    The human epidermal receptor-2/neu (HER-2/neu) oncogene encodes a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor. This molecule could have a diagnostic value since the extracellular domain of c-erbB-2 (HER-2) transmembrane is shed into the blood as a circulating antigen. The diagnostic value of serum HER-2/neu was calculated along with the conventional marker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) at 85th percentiles. Serum levels of breast carcinoma antigens HER-2/neu, CEA and CA15-3 were determined in 175 normal individuals and 268 malignant patients. The soluble form of serum HER-2/neu, CEA and CA15-3 was assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in control and breast cancer patients prior to treatment. Serum levels of the tested tumor markers HER-2/neu and CA15-3 and CEA were significantly higher in cancer patients compared to controls. At 85th percentile the sensitivity of HER-2/neu was 51.12 %; the specificity was 86.29 % and the overall accuracy was 64.56 %. The sensitivity of CA15-3 was 73.13 %; the specificity was 85.14 % and the overall accuracy was 77.88 %. The sensitivity of the combined testing was 82.84 %; the specificity was 73.71 % and the overall accuracy was 80.01 %. The sensitivity and the overall accuracy of combined testing were higher than those of HER-2/neu and CA15-3 testing single. The combined testing of HER-2/neu and CA15-3 can increase the sensitivity and overall accuracy of breast cancer diagnosis. The results of this study suggest that the use of multiple tumor markers may be employed as combination and at 85th percentiles to assess the prognosis.

  6. Sum of ranking differences to rank stationary phases used in packed column supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Khalikova, Maria A; Lesellier, Eric; Héberger, Károly

    2015-08-28

    The identification of a suitable stationary phase in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a major source of difficulty for those with little experience in this technique. Several protocols have been suggested for column classification in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), and SFC. However, none of the proposed classification schemes received general acceptance. A fair way to compare columns was proposed with the sum of ranking differences (SRD). In this project, we used the retention data obtained for 86 test compounds with varied polarity and structure, analyzed on 71 different stationary phases encompassing the full range in polarity of commercial packed columns currently available to the SFC chromatographer, with a single set of mobile phase and operating conditions (carbon dioxide-methanol mobile phase, 25°C, 150bar outlet pressure, 3ml/min). First, a reference column was selected and the 70 remaining columns were ranked based on this reference column and the retention data obtained on the 86 analytes. As these analytes previously served for the calculation of linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) on the 71 columns, SRD ranks were compared to LSER methodology. Finally, an external comparison based on the analysis of 10 other analytes (UV filters) related the observed selectivity to SRD ranking. Comparison of elution orders of the UV filters to the SRD rankings is highly supportive of the adequacy of SRD methodology to select similar and dissimilar columns. PMID:26228853

  7. Sum of ranking differences to rank stationary phases used in packed column supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Khalikova, Maria A; Lesellier, Eric; Héberger, Károly

    2015-08-28

    The identification of a suitable stationary phase in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a major source of difficulty for those with little experience in this technique. Several protocols have been suggested for column classification in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), and SFC. However, none of the proposed classification schemes received general acceptance. A fair way to compare columns was proposed with the sum of ranking differences (SRD). In this project, we used the retention data obtained for 86 test compounds with varied polarity and structure, analyzed on 71 different stationary phases encompassing the full range in polarity of commercial packed columns currently available to the SFC chromatographer, with a single set of mobile phase and operating conditions (carbon dioxide-methanol mobile phase, 25°C, 150bar outlet pressure, 3ml/min). First, a reference column was selected and the 70 remaining columns were ranked based on this reference column and the retention data obtained on the 86 analytes. As these analytes previously served for the calculation of linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) on the 71 columns, SRD ranks were compared to LSER methodology. Finally, an external comparison based on the analysis of 10 other analytes (UV filters) related the observed selectivity to SRD ranking. Comparison of elution orders of the UV filters to the SRD rankings is highly supportive of the adequacy of SRD methodology to select similar and dissimilar columns.

  8. Is the 90th Percentile Adequate? The Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Points for Predicting Cardiovascular Risks in 124,643 15-Year-Old Taiwanese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ChinYu; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Yeh, Jade Chienyu; deFerranti, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has increased to alarming proportions globally. However, few studies have investigated the optimal waist circumference (WC) of Asian adolescents. This study sought to establish the optimal WC cutoff points that identify a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) among 15-year-old ethnically Chinese adolescents. This study was a regional population-based study on the CVRFs among adolescents who enrolled in all the senior high schools in Taipei City, Taiwan, between 2011 and 2014. Four cross-sectional health examinations of first-year senior high school (grade 10) students were conducted from September to December of each year. A total of 124,643 adolescents aged 15 (boys: 63,654; girls: 60,989) were recruited. Participants who had at least three of five CVRFs were classified as the high-risk group. We used receiver-operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal WC cutoff points and the accuracy of WC in predicting high cardiovascular risk. WC was a good predictor for high cardiovascular risk for both boys (AUC: 0.845, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.833–0.857) and girls (AUC: 0.763, 95% CI: 0.731–0.795). The optimal WC cutoff points were ≥78.9 cm for boys (77th percentile) and ≥70.7 cm for girls (77th percentile). Adolescents with normal weight and an abnormal WC were more likely to be in the high cardiovascular risk group (odds ratio: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.65–5.17) compared to their peers with normal weight and normal WC. The optimal WC cutoff point of 15-year-old Taiwanese adolescents for identifying CVRFs should be the 77th percentile; the 90th percentile of the WC might be inadequate. The high WC criteria can help health professionals identify higher proportion of the adolescents with cardiovascular risks and refer them for further evaluations and interventions. Adolescents’ height, weight and WC should be measured as a standard practice in routine health checkups. PMID:27389572

  9. Fourth-grade children's dietary recall accuracy for energy intake at school meals differs by social desirability and body mass index percentile in a study concerning retention interval.

    PubMed

    Guinn, Caroline H; Baxter, Suzanne D; Royer, Julie A; Hardin, James W; Mackelprang, Alyssa J; Smith, Albert F

    2010-05-01

    Data from a study concerning retention interval and school-meal observation on children's dietary recalls were used to investigate relationships of social desirability score (SDS) and body mass index percentile (BMI%) to recall accuracy for energy for observed (n = 327) children, and to reported energy for observed and unobserved (n = 152) children. Report rates (reported/observed) correlated negatively with SDS and BMI%. Correspondence rates (correctly reported/observed) correlated negatively with SDS. Inflation ratios (overreported/observed) correlated negatively with BMI%. The relationship between reported energy and each of SDS and BMI% did not depend on observation status. Studies utilizing children's dietary recalls should assess SDS and BMI%. PMID:20460407

  10. Is the 90th Percentile Adequate? The Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Points for Predicting Cardiovascular Risks in 124,643 15-Year-Old Taiwanese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason Jiunshiou; Ho, ChinYu; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Yeh, Jade Chienyu; deFerranti, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has increased to alarming proportions globally. However, few studies have investigated the optimal waist circumference (WC) of Asian adolescents. This study sought to establish the optimal WC cutoff points that identify a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) among 15-year-old ethnically Chinese adolescents. This study was a regional population-based study on the CVRFs among adolescents who enrolled in all the senior high schools in Taipei City, Taiwan, between 2011 and 2014. Four cross-sectional health examinations of first-year senior high school (grade 10) students were conducted from September to December of each year. A total of 124,643 adolescents aged 15 (boys: 63,654; girls: 60,989) were recruited. Participants who had at least three of five CVRFs were classified as the high-risk group. We used receiver-operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal WC cutoff points and the accuracy of WC in predicting high cardiovascular risk. WC was a good predictor for high cardiovascular risk for both boys (AUC: 0.845, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.833-0.857) and girls (AUC: 0.763, 95% CI: 0.731-0.795). The optimal WC cutoff points were ≥78.9 cm for boys (77th percentile) and ≥70.7 cm for girls (77th percentile). Adolescents with normal weight and an abnormal WC were more likely to be in the high cardiovascular risk group (odds ratio: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.65-5.17) compared to their peers with normal weight and normal WC. The optimal WC cutoff point of 15-year-old Taiwanese adolescents for identifying CVRFs should be the 77th percentile; the 90th percentile of the WC might be inadequate. The high WC criteria can help health professionals identify higher proportion of the adolescents with cardiovascular risks and refer them for further evaluations and interventions. Adolescents' height, weight and WC should be measured as a standard practice in routine health checkups. PMID:27389572

  11. Is the 90th Percentile Adequate? The Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Points for Predicting Cardiovascular Risks in 124,643 15-Year-Old Taiwanese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason Jiunshiou; Ho, ChinYu; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Huang, Nicole; Yeh, Jade Chienyu; deFerranti, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent obesity has increased to alarming proportions globally. However, few studies have investigated the optimal waist circumference (WC) of Asian adolescents. This study sought to establish the optimal WC cutoff points that identify a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) among 15-year-old ethnically Chinese adolescents. This study was a regional population-based study on the CVRFs among adolescents who enrolled in all the senior high schools in Taipei City, Taiwan, between 2011 and 2014. Four cross-sectional health examinations of first-year senior high school (grade 10) students were conducted from September to December of each year. A total of 124,643 adolescents aged 15 (boys: 63,654; girls: 60,989) were recruited. Participants who had at least three of five CVRFs were classified as the high-risk group. We used receiver-operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal WC cutoff points and the accuracy of WC in predicting high cardiovascular risk. WC was a good predictor for high cardiovascular risk for both boys (AUC: 0.845, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.833-0.857) and girls (AUC: 0.763, 95% CI: 0.731-0.795). The optimal WC cutoff points were ≥78.9 cm for boys (77th percentile) and ≥70.7 cm for girls (77th percentile). Adolescents with normal weight and an abnormal WC were more likely to be in the high cardiovascular risk group (odds ratio: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.65-5.17) compared to their peers with normal weight and normal WC. The optimal WC cutoff point of 15-year-old Taiwanese adolescents for identifying CVRFs should be the 77th percentile; the 90th percentile of the WC might be inadequate. The high WC criteria can help health professionals identify higher proportion of the adolescents with cardiovascular risks and refer them for further evaluations and interventions. Adolescents' height, weight and WC should be measured as a standard practice in routine health checkups.

  12. Re-Ranking Model Based on Document Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyung-Soon; Park, Young-Chan; Choi, Key-Sun

    2001-01-01

    Describes a model of an information retrieval system that is based on a document re-ranking method, using document clusters. Retrieves documents based on the inverted file method, then analyzes the retrieved documents using document clusters and re-ranks them. Shows significant improvements over the method based on similarity search ranking alone.…

  13. Control by Numbers: New Managerialism and Ranking in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of rankings as an instrument of new managerialism. It shows how rankings are reconstituting the purpose of universities, the role of academics and the definition of what it is to be a student. The paper opens by examining the forces that have facilitated the emergence of the ranking industry and the ideologies…

  14. Higher Education Ranking and Leagues Tables: Lessons Learned from Benchmarking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proulx, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The paper intends to contribute to the debate on ranking and league tables by adopting a critical approach to ranking methodologies from the point of view of a university benchmarking exercise. The absence of a strict benchmarking exercise in the ranking process has been, in the opinion of the author, one of the major problems encountered in the…

  15. Academic Ranking--From Its Genesis to Its International Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rosilene C.; Lima, Manolita C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the visibility and popularity of rankings that encompass the measurement of quality of post-graduate courses, for instance, the MBA (Master of Business Administration) or graduate studies program (MSc and PhD) as do global academic rankings--Academic Ranking of World Universities-ARWU, Times Higher/Thomson Reuters World University Ranking…

  16. Ranking Quality in Higher Education: Guiding or Misleading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergseth, Brita; Petocz, Peter; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    The study examines two different models of measuring, assessing and ranking quality in higher education. Do different systems of quality assessment lead to equivalent conclusions about the quality of education? This comparative study is based on the rankings of 24 Swedish higher education institutions. Two ranking actors have independently…

  17. University Rankings 2.0: New Frontiers in Institutional Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The number of university rankings systems in use around the world has increased dramatically over the last decade. As they have spread, they have mutated; no longer are ranking systems simply clones of the original ranking systems such as "US News" and "World Report". A number of different types of "mutation" have occurred, so that there are now…

  18. 10 CFR 455.131 - State ranking of grant applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false State ranking of grant applications. 455.131 Section 455... hospitals. (c) All eligible applications for energy conservation measures received will be ranked by the... basis, several buildings may be ranked as a single building if the application proposes a single...

  19. 10 CFR 455.131 - State ranking of grant applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false State ranking of grant applications. 455.131 Section 455... hospitals. (c) All eligible applications for energy conservation measures received will be ranked by the... basis, several buildings may be ranked as a single building if the application proposes a single...

  20. 10 CFR 455.131 - State ranking of grant applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State ranking of grant applications. 455.131 Section 455... hospitals. (c) All eligible applications for energy conservation measures received will be ranked by the... basis, several buildings may be ranked as a single building if the application proposes a single...

  1. 10 CFR 455.131 - State ranking of grant applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State ranking of grant applications. 455.131 Section 455... hospitals. (c) All eligible applications for energy conservation measures received will be ranked by the... basis, several buildings may be ranked as a single building if the application proposes a single...

  2. The Importance of Rank Position. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1241

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Richard; Weinhardt, Felix

    2013-01-01

    We find an individual's rank within their reference group has effects on later objective outcomes. To evaluate the impact of local rank, we use a large administrative dataset tracking over two million students in England from primary through to secondary school. Academic rank within primary school has sizable, robust and significant effects…

  3. 14 CFR § 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final ranking. § 1214.1105 Section § 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on...

  4. Academic Ranking of World Universities by Broad Subject Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, Nian Cai

    2007-01-01

    Upon numerous requests to provide ranking of world universities by broad subject fields/schools/colleges and by subject fields/programs/departments, the authors present the ranking methodologies and problems that arose from the research by the Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University on the Academic Ranking of World…

  5. Ranking Scholarly Publishers in Political Science: An Alternative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garand, James C.; Giles, Micheal W.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has documented how political scientists evaluate and rank scholarly journals, but the evaluation and ranking of scholarly book publishers has drawn less attention. In this article, we use data from a survey of 603 American political scientists to generate a ranking of scholarly publishers in political science. We used open-ended…

  6. Value-Added Adjustment in Undergraduate Business School Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreutzer, David W.; Wood, William C.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, "Business Week" issued a highly publicized ranking of undergraduate business schools (Lavelle, 2006). Although the ranking provided useful measures of quality, the high rank of some schools was partly due to the quality of incoming students and educational resources rather than the ability of the school to add value. In this article, the…

  7. Robust Generalized Low Rank Approximations of Matrices.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiarong; Yang, Wei; Zheng, Xiuyun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the intrinsic low rank structure of some datasets has been extensively exploited to reduce dimensionality, remove noise and complete the missing entries. As a well-known technique for dimensionality reduction and data compression, Generalized Low Rank Approximations of Matrices (GLRAM) claims its superiority on computation time and compression ratio over the SVD. However, GLRAM is very sensitive to sparse large noise or outliers and its robust version does not have been explored or solved yet. To address this problem, this paper proposes a robust method for GLRAM, named Robust GLRAM (RGLRAM). We first formulate RGLRAM as an l1-norm optimization problem which minimizes the l1-norm of the approximation errors. Secondly, we apply the technique of Augmented Lagrange Multipliers (ALM) to solve this l1-norm minimization problem and derive a corresponding iterative scheme. Then the weak convergence of the proposed algorithm is discussed under mild conditions. Next, we investigate a special case of RGLRAM and extend RGLRAM to a general tensor case. Finally, the extensive experiments on synthetic data show that it is possible for RGLRAM to exactly recover both the low rank and the sparse components while it may be difficult for previous state-of-the-art algorithms. We also discuss three issues on RGLRAM: the sensitivity to initialization, the generalization ability and the relationship between the running time and the size/number of matrices. Moreover, the experimental results on images of faces with large corruptions illustrate that RGLRAM obtains the best denoising and compression performance than other methods. PMID:26367116

  8. Robust Generalized Low Rank Approximations of Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiarong; Yang, Wei; Zheng, Xiuyun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the intrinsic low rank structure of some datasets has been extensively exploited to reduce dimensionality, remove noise and complete the missing entries. As a well-known technique for dimensionality reduction and data compression, Generalized Low Rank Approximations of Matrices (GLRAM) claims its superiority on computation time and compression ratio over the SVD. However, GLRAM is very sensitive to sparse large noise or outliers and its robust version does not have been explored or solved yet. To address this problem, this paper proposes a robust method for GLRAM, named Robust GLRAM (RGLRAM). We first formulate RGLRAM as an l1-norm optimization problem which minimizes the l1-norm of the approximation errors. Secondly, we apply the technique of Augmented Lagrange Multipliers (ALM) to solve this l1-norm minimization problem and derive a corresponding iterative scheme. Then the weak convergence of the proposed algorithm is discussed under mild conditions. Next, we investigate a special case of RGLRAM and extend RGLRAM to a general tensor case. Finally, the extensive experiments on synthetic data show that it is possible for RGLRAM to exactly recover both the low rank and the sparse components while it may be difficult for previous state-of-the-art algorithms. We also discuss three issues on RGLRAM: the sensitivity to initialization, the generalization ability and the relationship between the running time and the size/number of matrices. Moreover, the experimental results on images of faces with large corruptions illustrate that RGLRAM obtains the best denoising and compression performance than other methods. PMID:26367116

  9. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  10. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction. PMID:27583683

  11. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  12. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction. PMID:27583683

  13. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction.

  14. The Impact of the "Business Week" and "U.S. News & World Report" Rankings on the Business Schools They Rank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednowitz, Ian

    This study examined the widely popular "Business Week" and "U.S. News & World Report" rankings of the top business schools to determine their impact on the admissions outcomes, pricing policies, and career placement outcomes of the business schools they rank. The analysis indicated that both ranking systems have a significant impact on students…

  15. [Biomarkers of vascular calcifications: the osteoprotegerin/RANK/RANK L axis].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Morena, Marion; Arnaud, Josiane; Cavalier, Étienne; Zaoui, Philippe; Delanaye, Pierre; Cristol, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    A better knowledge of physiopathologic phenomena responsible for vascular mineralization leads to emerging biological markers of vascular calcifications. In calcified arteries, the presence of bone matrix as well as osteoblast cells suggest that vascular calcification is an active and highly regulated process. The OPG/RANK/RANKL system is clearly of central significance in controlling vascular calcifications as in bone metabolism. Converging results suggest that circulating OPG determination should be a relevant marker of calcifications. The OPG/RANK/RANKL pathway also represents a potential therapeutic target in diseases associated with high bone resorption.

  16. Beliefs about birth rank and their reflection in reality.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Nicholas C; Zajonc, R B; Wieczorkowska, Grazyna; Cichomski, Bogdan

    2003-07-01

    Beliefs about birth rank reflect what the society regards as social reality, and they may also influence that reality. Three studies found that people believe those with different birth ranks differ in their personalities, that higher birth ranks are likely to attain higher occupational prestige, and that the personality characteristics attributed to the various birth ranks favor the actual attainment of higher occupational prestige. In one example of such beliefs, firstborns were rated as most intelligent but least creative whereas the opposite was true of last-borns. The 4th study found that those with higher birth ranks in fact attain more prestigious occupations and actually do complete more years of schooling.

  17. Physiology and pathophysiology of the RANKL/RANK system.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Reiko; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Penninger, Josef M

    2010-12-01

    The TNF family molecule RANKL and its receptor RANK are key regulators of bone remodeling, lymph node formation, and mammary gland development during pregnancy. RANKL and RANK are also expressed in the central nervous systems (CNS). However, the functional relevance of RANKL/RANK in the brain was entirely unknown. Recently, our group reported that the RANKL/RANK signaling pathway has an essential role in the central regulation of body temperature via the prostaglandin axis. This review discusses novel aspects of the RANKL/RANK system as key regulators of fever and female basal body temperature in the CNS.

  18. Partial Kernelization for Rank Aggregation: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Nadja; Bredereck, Robert; Niedermeier, Rolf

    Rank Aggregation is important in many areas ranging from web search over databases to bioinformatics. The underlying decision problem Kemeny Score is NP-complete even in case of four input rankings to be aggregated into a "median ranking". We study efficient polynomial-time data reduction rules that allow us to find optimal median rankings. On the theoretical side, we improve a result for a "partial problem kernel" from quadratic to linear size. On the practical side, we provide encouraging experimental results with data based on web search and sport competitions, e.g., computing optimal median rankings for real-world instances with more than 100 candidates within milliseconds.

  19. Ranking biomedical annotations with annotator's semantic relevancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aihua

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  20. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator's Semantic Relevancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  1. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  2. An Empirical Study on Credibility of China's University Rankings: A Case Study of Three Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Yu; Jingao, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A university ranking with credibility may provide proper guidance to students and parents in university choice, lead to rational flow of educational resources, promote competition among universities and evaluation mechanism in society, and inform the government in decision making. However, there are quite some disputes and doubts from the public…

  3. Liquefaction of low rank coals with slurry catalysts. Part III. Variable effects. [Low rank coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    One of the most significant achievements over the last several years in development of the SRC II process was extension of its applicability to include low-rank coals. With addition of moderate amounts of pyrite, operation was trouble-free and oil yields exceeding those obtainable with higher rank feedstocks were achieved. In addition, product sulfur level was lower due to the relatively low sulfur content of the lower rank coals. The effects of run conditions with low-rank coals and added pyrite are discussed in this report. The ratio of distillate product to hydrocarbon gas produced (or hydrogen consumed) is increased by lowering the reaction temperature over the range of 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) to 420/sup 0/C (788/sup 0/F). The oil production rate is also decreased, so there is an economic tradeoff between reactor vessel size and hydrogen production requirements. Raising the temperature above 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) at 1.0 hour residence time is detrimental, resulting in increased gas make, reduced oil yield and less conversion to pyridine-soluble components. Operation and yields at 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) and 1.0 hour residence time are improved by increasing the pressure to 2250 from 1800 psig. Operation is not possible at 1600 psig. 5 figures, 7 tables.

  4. Liquefaction of low rank coals with slurry catalysts. Part II. Comparison of catalysts. [Low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    One of the most significant achievements over the last several years in development of the SRC-II process was extension of its applicability to include low rank coals. With addition of moderate amounts of pyrite, operation was trouble free and oil yields exceeding those obtainable with higher rank feedstocks were obtained. In addition, product sulfur level was lower due to the relatively low sulfur content of the lower rank coals. Pyrite was the first catalyst tried and numerous other materials were investigated in an attempt to find a better additive. These included emulsions (Mo, Fe and Ni/Mo), ferric oxide alone and doped with Mo, iron on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and several sources of H/sub 2/S. None were found to be more effective, and on the basis of cost, pyrite is still preferred. Additive levels much lower than those used initially were found to be sufficient for smooth operation. As little as 0.6 wt % FeS/sub 2/, based on MF Belle Ayr coal, provided satisfactory operation, which makes use of low rank coals in the SRC II process even more attractive. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Rankings & Estimates: Rankings of the States 2010 and Estimates of School Statistics 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association Research Department, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The data presented in this combined report--"Rankings & Estimates"--provide facts about the extent to which local, state, and national governments commit resources to public education. As one might expect in a nation as diverse as the United States--with respect to economics, geography, and politics--the level of commitment to education varies on…

  6. Ranking Geochemical Energy Availability in Hydrothermal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. E.; Shock, E. L.; Meyer-Dombard, D.; Amend, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    The energy available to hyperthermophilic microorganisms in hot springs can be theoretically estimated using thermodynamic calculations based on geochemical measurements. The relative abundance of different geochemical energy sources (the "ranking" of these reactions) in particular hot springs may provide one explanation for the differences in hot spring microbial communities and also facilitate the culture of ecologically-relevant microorganisms. Geochemical sampling of seven Yellowstone National Park hot springs was repeated five times from 1999 to 2004 with the intent to compare the geochemistry and geochemical energy available to microorganisms. These seven hot springs were located in three separate regions of Yellowstone National Park: three hot springs, including Obsidian Pool, were sampled in the Mud Volcano area; two in the Sylvan Springs area (Gibbon Meadows); and one each in Imperial Meadows and Sentinel Meadows (Lower Geyser Basin). The hot springs were 75 to 93° C (with one 65° C exception) and spanned the bulk of the pH range at Yellowstone (pH 1.8 to 7.6). Geochemical measurements made on hot springs included redox-active species containing C, N, O, H, S, and Fe; these species were measured by field spectrophotometry and ion chromatography of fluid samples and gas chromatographic analysis of gas samples. From these measurements chemical affinities were calculated for 179 inorganic reactions which encompass the suite of autotrophic energy sources potentially available in each pool. Composite affinities for each reaction were compiled for each of the seven primary pools. The composite for each pool was assembled from repeat measurements from the primary pool as well as nearby pools with similar geochemistry. Calculations show that over half of these inorganic reactions could provide enough energy for a microorganism to survive, based on the threshold value of energy required by {it E. coli} (20 kJ per mole of electron pairs). Some microorganisms

  7. FTA Basic Event & Cut Set Ranking.

    1999-05-04

    Version 00 IMPORTANCE computes various measures of probabilistic importance of basic events and minimal cut sets to a fault tree or reliability network diagram. The minimal cut sets, the failure rates and the fault duration times (i.e., the repair times) of all basic events contained in the minimal cut sets are supplied as input data. The failure and repair distributions are assumed to be exponential. IMPORTANCE, a quantitative evaluation code, then determines the probability ofmore » the top event and computes the importance of minimal cut sets and basic events by a numerical ranking. Two measures are computed. The first describes system behavior at one point in time; the second describes sequences of failures that cause the system to fail in time. All measures are computed assuming statistical independence of basic events. In addition, system unavailability and expected number of system failures are computed by the code.« less

  8. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal decarboxylation. The microbial consortia will be developed using a fermentor system first under batch and then in a continuous system. The main objectives for this quarter were to develop microbial consortia that would decarboxylate coal and isolate potential anaerobic microorganisms with decarboxylating, ability from these enriched microbial consortia, to continue to compare the known cultures with reward to their ability to decarboxylate coal, and to characterize the anaerobically biotreated coal using FTIR to confirm decarboxylation of coal. Significant achievements during the period include: coal decarboxylation was possible only under anaerobic conditions. microbial consortia that can anaerobically decarboxylate coal have been developed using anaerobic vials and batch fermentor system, and loss of carboxyl groups in biotreated coal has been confirmed by FT-IR.

  9. Randomized parallel speedups for list ranking

    SciTech Connect

    Vishkin, U.

    1987-06-01

    The following problem is considered: given a linked list of length n, compute the distance of each element of the linked list from the end of the list. The problem has two standard deterministic algorithms: a linear time serial algorithm, and an O(n log n)/ rho + log n) time parallel algorithm using rho processors. The authors present a randomized parallel algorithm for the problem. The algorithm is designed for an exclusive-read exclusive-write parallel random access machine (EREW PRAM). It runs almost surely in time O(n/rho + log n log* n) using rho processors. Using a recently published parallel prefix sums algorithm the list-ranking algorithm can be adapted to run on a concurrent-read concurrent-write parallel random access machine (CRCW PRAM) almost surely in time O(n/rho + log n) using rho processors.

  10. Incidence of q statistics in rank distributions

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, G. Cigdem; Robledo, Alberto; Gell-Mann, Murray

    2014-01-01

    We show that size-rank distributions with power-law decay (often only over a limited extent) observed in a vast number of instances in a widespread family of systems obey Tsallis statistics. The theoretical framework for these distributions is analogous to that of a nonlinear iterated map near a tangent bifurcation for which the Lyapunov exponent is negligible or vanishes. The relevant statistical–mechanical expressions associated with these distributions are derived from a maximum entropy principle with the use of two different constraints, and the resulting duality of entropy indexes is seen to portray physically relevant information. Whereas the value of the index α fixes the distribution’s power-law exponent, that for the dual index 2 − α ensures the extensivity of the deformed entropy. PMID:25189773

  11. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  12. Impaired ranking of semantic attributes in dementia.

    PubMed

    Grober, E; Buschke, H; Kawas, C; Fuld, P

    1985-11-01

    The present work explored the loss of semantic attributes that is said to occur in dementia. In the first two experiments, subjects had to select attributes that went with concepts like airplane and church. The finding that demented subjects maintained high levels of accuracy when selecting attributes suggested that the semantic content of their concepts was relatively well preserved. The organization of the content was explored in a third experiment by having subjects order attributes according to their relative importance in defining concepts. While demented subjects performed better than chance, they did not rank attributes as well as healthy aged subjects, suggesting a disruption in organization whereby the importance of central attributes is reduced. The hypothesized disruption in organization is viewed in relation to the learning and memory deficit that is the hallmark of the dementias.

  13. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, T.; Leonard, M.

    2005-12-01

    Revenues and profits for many firms surged last year over previous years. The turnaround from last year's global survey is dramatic. Asset- and revenue-rich integrated oil and gas companies dominate the top rungs of the 2005 Platts Top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings. The following industry segments were analyzed: diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers; coal and consumable fuel companies and storage and transfer companies; The total combined revenue for the coal and consumable fuels sector was $74.7 billion. Leaders in this sector were: Yanzhou Coal Mining Co., CONSOl Energy Inc., Peabody Energy Corp., PT Bumi Resources Tbk, Cameco Corp., and Arch Coal. 14 tabs.

  14. Query Specific Rank Fusion for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Yang, Ming; Cour, Timothee; Yu, Kai; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2015-04-01

    Recently two lines of image retrieval algorithms demonstrate excellent scalability: 1) local features indexed by a vocabulary tree, and 2) holistic features indexed by compact hashing codes. Although both of them are able to search visually similar images effectively, their retrieval precision may vary dramatically among queries. Therefore, combining these two types of methods is expected to further enhance the retrieval precision. However, the feature characteristics and the algorithmic procedures of these methods are dramatically different, which is very challenging for the feature-level fusion. This motivates us to investigate how to fuse the ordered retrieval sets, i.e., the ranks of images, given by multiple retrieval methods, to boost the retrieval precision without sacrificing their scalability. In this paper, we model retrieval ranks as graphs of candidate images and propose a graph-based query specific fusion approach, where multiple graphs are merged and reranked by conducting a link analysis on a fused graph. The retrieval quality of an individual method is measured on-the-fly by assessing the consistency of the top candidates' nearest neighborhoods. Hence, it is capable of adaptively integrating the strengths of the retrieval methods using local or holistic features for different query images. This proposed method does not need any supervision, has few parameters, and is easy to implement. Extensive and thorough experiments have been conducted on four public datasets, i.e., the UKbench, Corel-5K, Holidays and the large-scale San Francisco Landmarks datasets. Our proposed method has achieved very competitive performance, including state-of-the-art results on several data sets, e.g., the N-S score 3.83 for UKbench. PMID:26353295

  15. Bayesian Thurstonian models for ranking data using JAGS.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy R; Kuhn, Kristine M

    2013-09-01

    A Thurstonian model for ranking data assumes that observed rankings are consistent with those of a set of underlying continuous variables. This model is appealing since it renders ranking data amenable to familiar models for continuous response variables-namely, linear regression models. To date, however, the use of Thurstonian models for ranking data has been very rare in practice. One reason for this may be that inferences based on these models require specialized technical methods. These methods have been developed to address computational challenges involved in these models but are not easy to implement without considerable technical expertise and are not widely available in software packages. To address this limitation, we show that Bayesian Thurstonian models for ranking data can be very easily implemented with the JAGS software package. We provide JAGS model files for Thurstonian ranking models for general use, discuss their implementation, and illustrate their use in analyses. PMID:23539504

  16. Social Rank, Stress, Fitness, and Life Expectancy in Wild Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Holst, Dietrich; Hutzelmeyer, Hans; Kaetzke, Paul; Khaschei, Martin; Schönheiter, Ronald

    Wild rabbits of the two sexes have separate linear rank orders, which are established and maintained by intensive fights. The social rank of individuals strongly influence their fitness: males and females that gain a high social rank, at least at the outset of their second breeding season, have a much higher lifetime fitness than subordinate individuals. This is because of two separate factors: a much higher fecundity and annual reproductive success and a 50% longer reproductive life span. These results are in contrast to the view in evolutionary biology that current reproduction can be increased only at the expense of future survival and/or fecundity. These concepts entail higher physiological costs in high-ranking mammals, which is not supported by our data: In wild rabbits the physiological costs of social positions are caused predominantly by differential psychosocial stress responses that are much lower in high-ranking than in low-ranking individuals.

  17. Reference data and percentile curves of body composition measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in healthy Chinese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Xu, Yi; Gong, Jian; Tang, Yongjin; Shang, Jingjie; Xu, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) have evident value in evaluating skeletal and muscular status in growing children and adolescents. This study aimed to generate age-related trends for body composition in Chinese children and adolescents, and to establish gender-specific reference percentile curves for the assessment of muscle-bone status. A total of 1541 Chinese children and adolescents aged from 5 to 19 years were recruited from southern China. Bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were measured for total body and total body less head (TBLH). After 14 years, total body LM was significantly higher in boys than girls (p < 0.001). However, total body FM was significantly higher in girls than boys in age groups 13-19 years (p < 0.01). Both LM and FM were consistent independent predictors of total body and subcranial bone mass in both sexes, even after adjustment for the well-known predictors of BMC. The results of multiple linear regression identified LM as the stronger predictor of total body and subcranial skeleton BMC while the fat mass contributed less. For all the subjects, significant positive correlations were observed between total body LM, height, total body BMC and subcranial BMC (p < 0.01). Subcranial BMC had a better correlation with LM than total body BMC. We have also presented gender-specific percentile curves for LM-for-height and BMC-for-LM which could be used to evaluate and follow various pediatric disorders with skeletal manifestations in this population. PMID:25319556

  18. Rank-preserving regression: a more robust rank regression model against outliers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Kowalski, Jeanne; Chen, Rui; Wu, Pan; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Changyong; Tu, Xin M

    2016-08-30

    Mean-based semi-parametric regression models such as the popular generalized estimating equations are widely used to improve robustness of inference over parametric models. Unfortunately, such models are quite sensitive to outlying observations. The Wilcoxon-score-based rank regression (RR) provides more robust estimates over generalized estimating equations against outliers. However, the RR and its extensions do not sufficiently address missing data arising in longitudinal studies. In this paper, we propose a new approach to address outliers under a different framework based on the functional response models. This functional-response-model-based alternative not only addresses limitations of the RR and its extensions for longitudinal data, but, with its rank-preserving property, even provides more robust estimates than these alternatives. The proposed approach is illustrated with both real and simulated data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26934999

  19. Rank-preserving regression: a more robust rank regression model against outliers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Kowalski, Jeanne; Chen, Rui; Wu, Pan; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Changyong; Tu, Xin M

    2016-08-30

    Mean-based semi-parametric regression models such as the popular generalized estimating equations are widely used to improve robustness of inference over parametric models. Unfortunately, such models are quite sensitive to outlying observations. The Wilcoxon-score-based rank regression (RR) provides more robust estimates over generalized estimating equations against outliers. However, the RR and its extensions do not sufficiently address missing data arising in longitudinal studies. In this paper, we propose a new approach to address outliers under a different framework based on the functional response models. This functional-response-model-based alternative not only addresses limitations of the RR and its extensions for longitudinal data, but, with its rank-preserving property, even provides more robust estimates than these alternatives. The proposed approach is illustrated with both real and simulated data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Rank effects on social stress in lactating chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Markham, A. Catherine; Santymire, Rachel M.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Heintz, Matthew R.; Lipende, Iddi; Murray, Carson M.

    2014-01-01

    Given the deleterious consequences associated with chronic stress, individual differences in stress susceptibility can have important fitness implications. These differences may be explained in part by dominance status because high rank is typically associated with decreased aggression and improved nutrition. Here, we examined the relationship between dominance and social stress in lactating chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. We did so by pairing daily demographic and behavioural data with faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentrations collected over 37 months. While there was no main effect of rank, interesting differences emerged by adult subgroup size and adult sex ratio (males/females). We found that differences in FGM concentrations between high- and low-ranking females were most pronounced as adult subgroup size and sex ratio increased. Low-ranking females had higher FGM concentrations in larger subgroups and in subgroups biased towards adult males; we observed no comparable change in FGM concentrations amongst high-ranking females. Because low-ranking females were the recipient of significantly more male aggression relative to females of high rank, these patterns may be driven by psychosocial stress in low-ranking females. There was no significant change in diet quality across subgroup sizes; this finding suggests that nutritional stressors were not driving differences in female FGM concentrations. Being susceptible to social stress has important fitness implications as it may constrain low-ranking females from ‘choosing’ optimal subgroups to take advantage of food resources and/or for the socialization of their offspring. PMID:24791015

  1. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

  2. Extreme learning machine for ranking: generalization analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Peng, Jiangtao; Zhou, Yicong; Li, Luoqing; Pan, Zhibin

    2014-05-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) has attracted increasing attention recently with its successful applications in classification and regression. In this paper, we investigate the generalization performance of ELM-based ranking. A new regularized ranking algorithm is proposed based on the combinations of activation functions in ELM. The generalization analysis is established for the ELM-based ranking (ELMRank) in terms of the covering numbers of hypothesis space. Empirical results on the benchmark datasets show the competitive performance of the ELMRank over the state-of-the-art ranking methods. PMID:24590011

  3. Rank diversity of languages: generic behavior in computational linguistics.

    PubMed

    Cocho, Germinal; Flores, Jorge; Gershenson, Carlos; Pineda, Carlos; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Statistical studies of languages have focused on the rank-frequency distribution of words. Instead, we introduce here a measure of how word ranks change in time and call this distribution rank diversity. We calculate this diversity for books published in six European languages since 1800, and find that it follows a universal lognormal distribution. Based on the mean and standard deviation associated with the lognormal distribution, we define three different word regimes of languages: "heads" consist of words which almost do not change their rank in time, "bodies" are words of general use, while "tails" are comprised by context-specific words and vary their rank considerably in time. The heads and bodies reflect the size of language cores identified by linguists for basic communication. We propose a Gaussian random walk model which reproduces the rank variation of words in time and thus the diversity. Rank diversity of words can be understood as the result of random variations in rank, where the size of the variation depends on the rank itself. We find that the core size is similar for all languages studied.

  4. Rank Diversity of Languages: Generic Behavior in Computational Linguistics

    PubMed Central

    Cocho, Germinal; Flores, Jorge; Gershenson, Carlos; Pineda, Carlos; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Statistical studies of languages have focused on the rank-frequency distribution of words. Instead, we introduce here a measure of how word ranks change in time and call this distribution rank diversity. We calculate this diversity for books published in six European languages since 1800, and find that it follows a universal lognormal distribution. Based on the mean and standard deviation associated with the lognormal distribution, we define three different word regimes of languages: “heads” consist of words which almost do not change their rank in time, “bodies” are words of general use, while “tails” are comprised by context-specific words and vary their rank considerably in time. The heads and bodies reflect the size of language cores identified by linguists for basic communication. We propose a Gaussian random walk model which reproduces the rank variation of words in time and thus the diversity. Rank diversity of words can be understood as the result of random variations in rank, where the size of the variation depends on the rank itself. We find that the core size is similar for all languages studied. PMID:25849150

  5. Low-Rank Matrix Factorization With Adaptive Graph Regularizer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gui-Fu; Wang, Yong; Zou, Jian

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel low-rank matrix factorization algorithm with adaptive graph regularizer (LMFAGR). We extend the recently proposed low-rank matrix with manifold regularization (MMF) method with an adaptive regularizer. Different from MMF, which constructs an affinity graph in advance, LMFAGR can simultaneously seek graph weight matrix and low-dimensional representations of data. That is, graph construction and low-rank matrix factorization are incorporated into a unified framework, which results in an automatically updated graph rather than a predefined one. The experimental results on some data sets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art low-rank matrix factorization methods.

  6. Fusing similarity rankings in ligand-based virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Data fusion is the name given to a range of methods for combining multiple sources of evidence. This mini-review summarizes the use of one such class of methods for combining the rankings obtained when similarity searching is used for ligand-based virtual screening. Two main approaches are described: similarity fusion involves combining rankings from single searches based on multiple similarity measures; and group fusion involves combining rankings from multiple searches based on a single similarity measure. The review then focuses on the rules that are available for combining similarity rankings, and on the evidence that exists for the superiority of fusion-based methods over conventional similarity searching. PMID:24688695

  7. Ranking efficient DMUs using minimizing distance in DEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziari, Shokrollah; Raissi, Sadigh

    2016-01-01

    In many applications, ranking of decision making units (DMUs) is a problematic technical task procedure to decision makers in data envelopment analysis (DEA), especially when there are extremely efficient DMUs. In such cases, many DEA models may usually get the same efficiency score for different DMUs. Hence, there is a growing interest in ranking techniques yet. The main purpose of this paper is to overcome the lack of infeasibility and unboundedness in some DEA ranking methods. The proposed method is for ranking extreme efficient DMUs in DEA based on exploiting the leave-one out and minimizing distance between DMU under evaluation and virtual DMU.

  8. Ranking Slope Stability in Frozen Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Walter, G. R.; Necsoiu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Motivated by the need to assess the risk of permafrost thaw to infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, and pipelines, a landscape-scale approach was developed to rank the risk of slope failures and thermokarst development in areas of seasonally frozen soils underlain by permafrost. The approach has two parts: (i) identifying locations where permafrost thaw is likely to occur under future climates, and (ii) identifying areas where thaw would have consequences with respect to a disturbance. The developed screening tool uses (i) land classification maps developed from remotely sensed data and (ii) a thermohydrologic hazard risk assessment to identify areas susceptible to slope instability under current and future climate states. The screening tool combines a numerical ground thawing and freezing dynamics model for calculating the thickness of the active layer and depth of permafrost with a simple slope stability model that is based upon the Level I Stability Analysis (LISA) approach of Harrell et al. (1992). Instead of using the numerical models directly within probabilistic sampling, a response function for the factor of safety in slope stability is developed from numerical simulations that systematically vary input parameters across their range of applicability. The response function is used within Monte Carlo sampling for each grid cell in a landscape model, with a probability distribution for each input parameter assigned to each grid cell based on (i) classes defined for each grid cell; (ii) a digital elevation model; (iii) empirical, mathematical, and numerical interpretive models; and (iv) probabilistic descriptions of the parameters in the interpretive models. For example, the root cohesion distribution is defined by vegetation class, with vegetation spread across the landscape using Landsat-derived vegetation classification maps. The probability of slope failure is the fraction of parameter realizations that result in a factor of safety less than 1. Ranking

  9. Severe language effect in university rankings: particularly Germany and France are wronged in citation-based rankings.

    PubMed

    van Raan, Anthony F J; van Leeuwen, Thed N; Visser, Martijn S

    2011-08-01

    We applied a set of standard bibliometric indicators to monitor the scientific state-of-arte of 500 universities worldwide and constructed a ranking on the basis of these indicators (Leiden Ranking 2010). We find a dramatic and hitherto largely underestimated language effect in the bibliometric, citation-based measurements of research performance when comparing the ranking based on all Web of Science (WoS) covered publications and on only English WoS covered publications, particularly for Germany and France.

  10. Positive predictive values of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision diagnoses of Gram-negative septicemia/sepsis and urosepsis for presence of Gram-negative bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Søgaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care databases are a valuable resource for infectious disease epidemiology if diagnoses are accurately coded. We examined the ability of diagnostic coding to accurately identify Gram-negative bacteremia. Methods We randomly selected 100 patients among 1,703 patients recorded in the Danish National Patient Register with a diagnosis of either “septicemia/sepsis due to other Gram-negative organisms” (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code A41.5) or “urosepsis” (ICD-10 code A41.9B) who had been admitted at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2012. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of these diagnoses for presence of Gram-negative bacteremia, using microbiological results from blood cultures as standard reference. Complementary clinical information was obtained from the medical records. Results Of the 100 patients registered with Gram-negative septicemia/sepsis or urosepsis, 72 had blood culture confirmed Gram-negative bacteremia, four patients had monomicrobial Gram-positive bacteremia, 21 patients had a negative blood culture, and three had no blood culture taken. The overall PPV of a blood culture confirmed Gram-negative bacteremia diagnosis was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62%–81%); for ICD-10 code A41.5 it was 86% (95% CI: 74%–94%) and for ICD-10 code A41.9B it was 55% (95% CI: 39%–70%). The highest PPV was achieved for diagnoses registered in the most recent calendar period (2009–2012) and for secondary discharge diagnoses. Conclusion Our findings indicated good agreement between ICD-10 code A41.5 “septicemia/sepsis due to other Gram-negative organisms” and Gram-negative bacteremia, whereas ICD-10 code A41.9B “urosepsis” was not suited for identification of Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25709502

  11. A scale for ranking volcanoes by risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandone, Roberto; Bartolini, Stefania; Martí, Joan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple volcanic risk coefficient (VRC) useful for comparing the degree of risk arising from different volcanoes, which may be used by civil protection agencies and volcano observatories to rapidly allocate limited resources even without a detailed knowledge of each volcano. Volcanic risk coefficient is given by the sum of the volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of the maximum expected eruption from the volcano, the logarithm of the eruption rate, and the logarithm of the population that may be affected by the maximum expected eruption. We show how to apply the method to rank the risk using as examples the volcanoes of Italy and in the Canary Islands. Moreover, we demonstrate that the maximum theoretical volcanic risk coefficient is 17 and pertains to the large caldera-forming volcanoes like Toba or Yellowstone that may affect the life of the entire planet. We develop also a simple plugin for a dedicated Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS) software to graphically display the VRC of different volcanoes in a region.

  12. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics. PMID:27364703

  13. Antisymmetric rank-2 tensor unparticle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Taeil; Ko, P.; Wu Xiaohong

    2007-11-01

    We present the phenomenology of antisymmetric rank-2 tensor unparticle operator O{sub U,A}{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} with scaling dimension d{sub U}. We consider the physical effects of operator O{sub U,A}{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} in Z{sup 0} boson invisible decays Z{sup 0}{yields}U, Z{sup 0}{yields}bb channel, the electroweak precision observable S parameter, and the muon anomalous magnetic dipole moment. The Z{sup 0} boson invisible decay gives a very stringent constraint in the ({lambda}{sub U},M{sub U}) plane, and only small r{identical_to}{lambda}{sub U}/M{sub U} < or approx. 0.1 is favored, when {lambda}{sub U} is order of several 100 GeV. When the phenomenological parameter {mu}, which parameterizes the scale invariance breaking, goes to 0, the S parameter and the muon (g-2) diverge for 1

  14. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-07-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics.

  15. University Rankings: How Well Do They Measure Library Service Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    University rankings play an increasingly large role in shaping the goals of academic institutions and departments, while removing universities themselves from the evaluation process. This study compares the library-related results of two university ranking publications with scores on the LibQUAL+™ survey to identify if library service quality--as…

  16. Ranking Regime and the Future of Vernacular Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishikawa, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    World university rankings and their global popularity present a number of far-reaching impacts for vernacular scholarship. This article employs a multidimensional approach to analyze the ranking regime's threat to local scholarship and knowledge construction through a study of Japanese research universities. First, local conditions that have…

  17. Global University Rankings--Impacts and Unintended Side Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Barbara M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, global and other university rankings are critically assessed with regard to their unintended side effects and their impacts on the European and national landscape of universities, as well as on individual institutions. An emphasis is put on the effects of ranking logics rather than on criticising their methodology. Nevertheless,…

  18. The Discipline of Rankings: Tight Coupling and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauder, Michael; Espeland, Wendy Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This article demonstrates the value of Foucault's conception of discipline for understanding organizational responses to rankings. Using a case study of law schools, we explain why rankings have permeated law schools so extensively and why these organizations have been unable to buffer these institutional pressures. Foucault's depiction of two…

  19. Who Should Rank Our Journals...And Based on What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherkowski, Sabre; Currie, Russell; Hilton, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to establish the use of active scholar assessment (ASA) in the field of education leadership as a new methodology in ranking administration and leadership journals. The secondary purpose of this study is to respond to the paucity of research on journal ranking in educational administration and leadership.…

  20. Estimating Independent Locally Shifted Random Utility Models for Ranking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Kar Yin; Koning, Alex J.; Franses, Philip Hans

    2011-01-01

    We consider the estimation of probabilistic ranking models in the context of conjoint experiments. By using approximate rather than exact ranking probabilities, we avoided the computation of high-dimensional integrals. We extended the approximation technique proposed by Henery (1981) in the context of the Thurstone-Mosteller-Daniels model to any…

  1. What Parameters Do Students Value in Business School Rankings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mårtensson, Pär; Richtnér, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The starting point of this paper is the question: Which issues do students think are important when choosing a higher education institution, and how are they related to the factors taken into consideration in ranking institutions? The aim is to identify and rank the parameters students perceive as important when choosing their place of education.…

  2. Positioning Open Access Journals in a LIS Journal Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng

    2012-01-01

    This research uses the h-index to rank the quality of library and information science journals between 2004 and 2008. Selected open access (OA) journals are included in the ranking to assess current OA development in support of scholarly communication. It is found that OA journals have gained momentum supporting high-quality research and…

  3. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOEpatents

    Quigley, David R.

    1992-12-01

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  4. 46 CFR 282.11 - Ranking of flags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ranking of flags. 282.11 Section 282.11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND... COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES Foreign-Flag Competition § 282.11 Ranking of flags. The operators under...

  5. The Real and Perceived Influence of the "US News" Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    How influential has the "US News" Best Colleges ranking been over the last twenty-five years since it was first started in 1983? In what ways does this influence manifest itself? There is strong evidence of the impact of the US News rankings among consumers, prospective students and their parents, and the higher education establishment in the…

  6. A Global Comparison of Business Journal Ranking Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer K.; Scherer, Robert F.; Lecoutre, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The authors compared business journal ranking systems from 6 countries. Results revealed a low degree of agreement among the systems, and a low to moderate relationship between pairs of systems. In addition, the French and United Kingdom ranking systems were different from each other and from the systems in Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, and the…

  7. The Ranking Phenomenon and the Experience of Academics in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, William Yat Wai

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the paper is to examine how global university rankings have influenced the higher education sector in Taiwan from the perspective of academics. A qualitative case study method was used to examine how university ranking influenced the Taiwanese higher education at institutional and individual levels, respectively, thereby…

  8. Australian Library & Information Studies (LIS) Researchers Ranking of LIS Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kerry; Middleton, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the processes and outcomes of the ranking of LIS journal titles by Australia's LIS researchers during 2007-8, first through the Australian federal government's Research Quality Framework (RQF) process, and then by its replacement, the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative. The requirement to rank the journals'…

  9. Global University Rankings: The "Olympic Games" of Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudkevich, Maria; Altbach, Philip G.; Rumbley, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Global university rankings are often thought of as games, defined by roles and rules that universities must play in order to confirm their legitimacy and gain visibility as actors in the global academic market. While some countries are well represented at the top of rankings charts, others are just joining the race and testing out different…

  10. Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals

    DOEpatents

    Quigley, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

  11. The Hierarchical Face: Higher Rankings Lead to Less Cooperative Looks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Patricia; Myers, Christopher G.; Kopelman, Shirli; Garcia, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    In 3 studies, we tested the hypothesis that the higher ranked an individual's group is, the less cooperative the facial expression of that person is judged to be. Study 1 established this effect among business school deans, with observers rating individuals from higher ranked schools as appearing less cooperative, despite lacking prior knowledge…

  12. 50 CFR 84.32 - What are the ranking criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the ranking criteria? 84.32... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.32 What are the ranking criteria? (a) The U.S. Fish and... for regionally decreasing is well-documented (Up to 7 points). The nationally decreasing types...

  13. 50 CFR 84.32 - What are the ranking criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the ranking criteria? 84.32... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.32 What are the ranking criteria? (a) The U.S. Fish and... for regionally decreasing is well-documented (Up to 7 points). The nationally decreasing types...

  14. 50 CFR 84.32 - What are the ranking criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What are the ranking criteria? 84.32... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.32 What are the ranking criteria? (a) The U.S. Fish and... for regionally decreasing is well-documented (Up to 7 points). The nationally decreasing types...

  15. 50 CFR 84.32 - What are the ranking criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the ranking criteria? 84.32... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.32 What are the ranking criteria? (a) The U.S. Fish and... for regionally decreasing is well-documented (Up to 7 points). The nationally decreasing types...

  16. 50 CFR 84.32 - What are the ranking criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the ranking criteria? 84.32... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAM Project Selection § 84.32 What are the ranking criteria? (a) The U.S. Fish and... for regionally decreasing is well-documented (Up to 7 points). The nationally decreasing types...

  17. Item Response Modeling of Paired Comparison and Ranking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Brown, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The comparative format used in ranking and paired comparisons tasks can significantly reduce the impact of uniform response biases typically associated with rating scales. Thurstone's (1927, 1931) model provides a powerful framework for modeling comparative data such as paired comparisons and rankings. Although Thurstonian models are generally…

  18. Ranking State Fiscal Structures Using Theory and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bania, Neil; Stone, Joe A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers unique rankings of the extent to which fiscal structures of U.S. states contribute to economic growth. The rankings are novel in two key respects: They are well grounded in established growth theory, in which the effect of taxes depends both on the level of taxes and on the composition of expenditures; and they are derived from…

  19. Ranking Academic Departments: Empirical Findings and a Theoretical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, David E.; Karpf, Ronald

    1981-01-01

    The history of evaluations of academic departments through peer review rankings and subsequent attempts to identify empirical correlates of the ratings are reviewed. Findings indicate that American Council on Education rankings can be predicted by the departmental rate of publication in highly cited journals. (Author/MLW)

  20. Ranking Schemes in Hybrid Boolean Systems: A New Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Suggests a new ranking scheme especially adapted for hypertext environments in order to produce more effective retrieval results and still use Boolean search strategies. Topics include Boolean ranking schemes; single-term indexing and term weighting; fuzzy set theory extension; and citation indexing. (64 references) (Author/LRW)

  1. Dominance rank reversals and rank instability among male Lemur catta: the effects of female behavior and ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A

    2009-03-01

    In this study, dominance rank instability among male Lemur catta during mating was investigated. Also, data on agonism and sexual behavior across five consecutive mating seasons in a population of L. catta on St. Catherines Island, USA, were collected. Instances of male rank instability were categorized into three types. Type 1 consisted of a temporary switch in the dominance ranks of two males, which lasted for a period of minutes or hours. Type 2 dyadic male agonistic interactions showed highly variable outcomes for a period of time during which wins and losses were neither predictable nor consistent. Type 3 interactions consisted of a single agonistic win by a lower-ranked male over a more dominant male. More Type 2 interactions (indicating greater dominance instability) occurred when males had not spent the previous mating season in the same group, but this trend was not statistically significant. The majority of periods of male rank instability were preceded by female proceptivity or receptivity directed to a lower-ranked male. As such, exhibition of female mate choice for a lower-ranking male appeared to incite male-male competition. Following receipt of female proceptivity or receptivity, males who were lower-ranking took significantly longer to achieve their first agonistic win over a more dominant male than did males who were higher-ranked. Ejaculation frequently preceded loss of dominance. In conclusion, temporary rank reversals and overall dominance rank instability commonly occur among male L. catta in mating contexts, and these temporary increases in dominance status appear to positively affect male mating success.

  2. Grooming, rank, and agonistic support in tufted capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schino, Gabriele; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Studies investigating the relation between allogrooming and social rank in capuchin monkeys (genus Cebus) have yielded inconsistent results. In this study, we investigated the relation between grooming, agonistic support, aggression and social rank in a captive group of tufted capuchin monkeys (C. apella). Differently from most previous studies, we based our analyses on a relatively large database and studied a group with known genealogical relationships. Tufted capuchin females did not exchange grooming for rank-related benefits such as agonistic support or reduced aggression. Coherently with this picture, they did not groom up the hierarchy and did not compete for accessing high-ranking grooming partners. It is suggested that a small group size, coupled with a strong kin bias, may make the exchange of grooming for rank-related benefits impossible or unprofitable, thus eliminating the advantages of grooming up the hierarchy. We provide several possible explanations for the heterogeneity of results across capuchin studies that have addressed similar questions.

  3. Bayesian Inference of Natural Rankings in Incomplete Competition Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juyong; Yook, Soon-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Competition between a complex system's constituents and a corresponding reward mechanism based on it have profound influence on the functioning, stability, and evolution of the system. But determining the dominance hierarchy or ranking among the constituent parts from the strongest to the weakest – essential in determining reward and penalty – is frequently an ambiguous task due to the incomplete (partially filled) nature of competition networks. Here we introduce the “Natural Ranking,” an unambiguous ranking method applicable to a round robin tournament, and formulate an analytical model based on the Bayesian formula for inferring the expected mean and error of the natural ranking of nodes from an incomplete network. We investigate its potential and uses in resolving important issues of ranking by applying it to real-world competition networks. PMID:25163528

  4. The use of the percentile method for searching empirical relationships between compression strength (UCS), Point Load (Is50) and Schmidt Hammer (RL) Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Bobbo, Luigi; Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Is50 and RL indices are commonly used to indirectly estimate the compression strength of a rocky deposit by in situ and in laboratory devices. The widespread use of Point load and Schmidt hammer tests is due to the simplicity and the speediness of the execution of these tests. Their indices can be related to the UCS by means of the ordinary least square regression analyses. Several researchers suggest to take into account the lithology to build high correlated empirical expressions (R2 >0.8) to draw UCS from Is50 or RL values. Nevertheless, the lower and upper bounds of the UCS ranges of values that can be estimated by means of the two indirect indices are not clearly defined yet. Aydin (2009) stated that the Schmidt hammer test shall be used to assess the compression resistance of rocks characterized by UCS>12-20 MPa. On the other hand, the Point load measures can be performed on weak rocks but upper bound values for UCS are not suggested. In this paper, the empirical relationships between UCS, RL and Is50 are searched by means of the percentile method (Bruno et al. 2013). This method is based on looking for the best regression function, between measured data of UCS and one of the indirect indices, drawn from a subset sample of the couples of measures that are the percentile values. These values are taken from the original dataset of both measures by calculating the cumulative function. No hypothesis on the probability distribution of the sample is needed and the procedure shows to be robust with respect to odd values or outliers. In this study, the carbonate sedimentary rocks are investigated. According to the rock mass classification of Dobereiner and De Freitas (1986), the UCS values for the studied rocks range between 'extremely weak' to 'strong'. For the analyzed data, UCS varies between 1,18-270,70 MPa. Thus, through the percentile method the best empirical relationships UCS-Is50 and UCS-RL are plotted. Relationships between Is50 and RL are drawn, too

  5. Community exposures to airborne agricultural pesticides in California: ranking of inhalation risks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sharon; McLaughlin, Robert; Harnly, Martha; Gunier, Robert; Kreutzer, Richard

    2002-12-01

    We assessed inhalation risks to California communities from airborne agricultural pesticides by probability distribution analysis using ambient air data provided by the California Air Resources Board and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The pesticides evaluated include chloropicrin, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate, diazinon, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorvos (naled breakdown product), endosulfan, eptam, methidathion, methyl bromide, methyl isothiocyanate (MITC; metam sodium breakdown product), molinate, propargite, and simazine. Risks were estimated for the median and 75th and 95th percentiles of probability (50, 25, and 5% of the exposed populations). Exposure estimates greater than or equal to noncancer reference values occurred for 50% of the exposed populations (adults and children) for MITC subchronic and chronic exposures, methyl bromide subchronic exposures (year 2000 monitoring), and 1,3-dichloropropene subchronic exposures (1990 monitoring). Short-term chlorpyrifos exposure estimates exceeded the acute reference value for 50% of children (not adults) in the exposed population. Noncancer risks were uniformly higher for children due to a proportionately greater inhalation rate-to-body weight ratio compared to adults and other factors. Target health effects of potential concern for these exposures include neurologic effects (methyl bromide and chlorpyrifos) and respiratory effects (1,3-dichloropropene and MITC). The lowest noncancer risks occurred for simazine and chlorothalonil. Lifetime cancer risks of one-in-a-million or greater were estimated for 50% of the exposed population for 1,3-dichloropropene (1990 monitoring) and 25% of the exposed populations for methidathion and molinate. Pesticide vapor pressure was found to be a better predictor of inhalation risk compared to other methods of ranking pesticides as potential toxic air contaminants. PMID:12460795

  6. Community exposures to airborne agricultural pesticides in California: ranking of inhalation risks.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sharon; McLaughlin, Robert; Harnly, Martha; Gunier, Robert; Kreutzer, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We assessed inhalation risks to California communities from airborne agricultural pesticides by probability distribution analysis using ambient air data provided by the California Air Resources Board and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. The pesticides evaluated include chloropicrin, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate, diazinon, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorvos (naled breakdown product), endosulfan, eptam, methidathion, methyl bromide, methyl isothiocyanate (MITC; metam sodium breakdown product), molinate, propargite, and simazine. Risks were estimated for the median and 75th and 95th percentiles of probability (50, 25, and 5% of the exposed populations). Exposure estimates greater than or equal to noncancer reference values occurred for 50% of the exposed populations (adults and children) for MITC subchronic and chronic exposures, methyl bromide subchronic exposures (year 2000 monitoring), and 1,3-dichloropropene subchronic exposures (1990 monitoring). Short-term chlorpyrifos exposure estimates exceeded the acute reference value for 50% of children (not adults) in the exposed population. Noncancer risks were uniformly higher for children due to a proportionately greater inhalation rate-to-body weight ratio compared to adults and other factors. Target health effects of potential concern for these exposures include neurologic effects (methyl bromide and chlorpyrifos) and respiratory effects (1,3-dichloropropene and MITC). The lowest noncancer risks occurred for simazine and chlorothalonil. Lifetime cancer risks of one-in-a-million or greater were estimated for 50% of the exposed population for 1,3-dichloropropene (1990 monitoring) and 25% of the exposed populations for methidathion and molinate. Pesticide vapor pressure was found to be a better predictor of inhalation risk compared to other methods of ranking pesticides as potential toxic air contaminants. PMID:12460795

  7. Increased Physical Activity and Fitness above the 50(th) Percentile Avoid the Threat of Older Adults Becoming Institutionalized: A Cross-sectional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catarina; Fernandes, Jorge; Raimundo, Armando; Biehl-Printes, Clarissa; Marmeleira, José; Tomas-Carus, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of physical fitness and physical activity on the threat of older adults without cognitive impairment becoming institutionalized. This cross-sectional study involved 195 non-institutionalized (80.1 ± 4.4 years) and 186 institutionalized (83.8 ± 5.2years) participants. Cognitive impairment was assessed using Mini-Mental State Examination, measures of physical fitness were determined by the Senior Fitness Test, and physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Multivariate binary logistic analysis selected four main determinants of institutionalization in both genders: The likelihood of becoming institutionalized increased by +18.6% for each additional year of age, whereas it decreased by -24.8% by each fewer kg/m(2) in body mass index (BMI), by -0.9% for each additional meter performed in the aerobic endurance test, and by -2.0% for each additional 100 metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-min/week of physical activity expenditure (p < 0.05). Values ≤50(th) percentile (age ≥81 years, BMI ≥26.7 kg/m(2), aerobic endurance ≤367.6 meters, and physical activity ≤693 MET-min/week) were computed using receiver operating characteristics analysis as cutoffs discriminating institutionalized from non-institutionalized older adults. The performance of physical activity, allied to an improvement in physical fitness (mainly BMI and aerobic endurance), may avoid the threat of institutionalization of older adults without cognitive impairment only if they are above the 50(th) percentile. The following parameters are highly recommended: Expending ≥693 MET-min/week on physical activity, having a BMI ≤26.7 kg/m(2), and being able to walk ≥367.6 meters in the aerobic endurance test, especially above the age of 80 years. The discovery of this trigger justifies the development of physical activity programs targeting the pointed cutoffs in old and very old adults.

  8. Journal Rankings by Health Management Faculty Members: Are There Differences by Rank, Leadership Status, or Area of Expertise?

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Hogan, Tory H; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2015-01-01

    Health administration (HA) faculty members publish in a variety of journals, including journals focused on management, economics, policy, and information technology. HA faculty members are evaluated on the basis of the quality and quantity of their journal publications. However, it is unclear how perceptions of these journals vary by subdiscipline, department leadership role, or faculty rank. It is also not clear how perceptions of journals may have changed over the past decade since the last evaluation of journal rankings in the field was published. The purpose of the current study is to examine how respondents rank journals in the field of HA, as well as the variation in perception by academic rank, department leadership status, and area of expertise. Data were drawn from a survey of HA faculty members at U.S. universities, which was completed in 2012. Different journal ranking patterns were noted for faculty members of different subdisciplines. The health management-oriented journals (Health Care Management Review and Journal of Healthcare Management) were ranked higher than in previous research, suggesting that journal ranking perceptions may have changed over the intervening decade. Few differences in perceptions were noted by academic rank, but we found that department chairs were more likely than others to select Health Affairs in their top three most prestigious journals (β = 0.768; p < .01). Perceived journal prestige varied between a department chair and untenured faculty in different disciplines, and this perceived difference could have implications for promotion and tenure decisions.

  9. Rethinking Science and Technology Education To Meet the Demands of Future Generations in a Changing World. International Organization for Science and Technology Education (IOSTE) Symposium Proceedings (10th, Foz do Iguacu, Parana, Brazil, July 28-August 2, 2002). Volumes I [and] II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio, Ed.; Kawasaki, Clarice Sumi, Ed.; Ferracioli, Laercio, Ed.; Leyser da Rosa, Vivian, Ed.

    This document is the proceedings of the 10th annual meeting of the International Organization for Science and Technology Education (IOSTE). Papers include: (1) "Liberal Education, Information Assessment and Argumentation in Science-LIA" (Andreas Quale, Anders Isnes, Terje Kristensen, and Ketil Mathiassen); (2) "Placing the History and the…

  10. PIALA 2000: Libraries and Archives--Where Information and Language Literacy Begin [and] Engaged Readers and Writers in Multicultural Island Communities. Selected Papers from the 10th Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives Conference Joint with the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference (Tumon, Guam, November 9-11, 2000)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene, Ed.; Quan, Clarisa G., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This proceedings combines presentations from the jointly held 10th Annual PIALA 2000 Conference and the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference. The volume begins with the welcoming remarks of Mary L. Silk, Christine Ku Scott-Smith, Antonio R. Umpingco, Delia Munoz Rosal, Lawrence Kasperbauer, Rosie Tainatongo, Richard S. Tom, Mary L.…

  11. News Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

  12. An R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In medical informatics, psychology, market research and many other fields, researchers often need to analyze and model ranking data. However, there is no statistical software that provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of ranking data. Here, we present pmr, an R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data with a bundle of tools. The pmr package enables descriptive statistics (mean rank, pairwise frequencies, and marginal matrix), Analytic Hierarchy Process models (with Saaty’s and Koczkodaj’s inconsistencies), probability models (Luce model, distance-based model, and rank-ordered logit model), and the visualization of ranking data with multidimensional preference analysis. Results Examples of the use of package pmr are given using a real ranking dataset from medical informatics, in which 566 Hong Kong physicians ranked the top five incentives (1: competitive pressures; 2: increased savings; 3: government regulation; 4: improved efficiency; 5: improved quality care; 6: patient demand; 7: financial incentives) to the computerization of clinical practice. The mean rank showed that item 4 is the most preferred item and item 3 is the least preferred item, and significance difference was found between physicians’ preferences with respect to their monthly income. A multidimensional preference analysis identified two dimensions that explain 42% of the total variance. The first can be interpreted as the overall preference of the seven items (labeled as “internal/external”), and the second dimension can be interpreted as their overall variance of (labeled as “push/pull factors”). Various statistical models were fitted, and the best were found to be weighted distance-based models with Spearman’s footrule distance. Conclusions In this paper, we presented the R package pmr, the first package for analyzing and modeling ranking data. The package provides insight to users through descriptive statistics of ranking data. Users can also visualize

  13. Parent perception of healthy infant and toddler growth.

    PubMed

    Laraway, Kelly A; Birch, Leann L; Shaffer, Michele L; Paul, Ian M

    2010-04-01

    We hypothesized that parents of infants prefer growth at higher percentiles and are averse to growth at lower percentiles. Of 279 participating parents, only 10% desired their child's weight to be in the lowest quartile. For children weighing in the lowest quartile, 57% of parents thought their child's weight was "too low." In contrast, 66% of parents whose child's weight was in the top quartile preferred their child weigh that much. When viewing hypothetical infant growth trajectories, 47% ranked a growth chart demonstrating growth along the 10th percentile for weight as "least healthy" of 6 growth patterns, and 29% chose charts showing an infant at the 90th percentile for weight at age 1 as "healthiest." In conclusion, parents are averse to growth at the bottom of the weight growth chart but are much less likely to feel negatively about growth at higher percentiles. This is troubling given the childhood obesity epidemic. PMID:19745095

  14. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box-Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9-17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia. PMID:27669294

  15. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box–Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9–17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia. PMID:27669294

  16. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-09-24

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box-Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9-17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia.

  17. Dosimetry of infant exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields: variation of 99th percentile induced electric field value by posture and skin-to-skin contact.

    PubMed

    Li, Congsheng; Wu, Tongning

    2015-04-01

    Infant exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields from power lines was numerically analyzed in this study. Dosimetric variability due to posture and skin-to-skin contact was evaluated using human anatomical models including a recently developed model of a 12-months-old infant. As proposed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the induced E-field strength (99th percentile value, E99 ) for the central nerve systems (E99_CNS ) and peripheral nerve system (E99_PNS ), were used as metrics. Results showed that the single (free of contact with others) infant model has lower E99 (E99_CNS and E99_PNS inclusive) compared with single adult and child models when exposed to the same power-frequency magnetic field. Also, studied postures of sitting, standing, or arm-up, would not change E99 _PNS . However, skin-to-skin contact with other models could significantly raise induced E-field strength in the infant (e.g., contact on 0.93% of the infant's total surface increased E99_PNS by 213%). Simulations with canonical models were conducted to assess different factors contributing to the E99 enhancement. Results indicated the importance of thoroughly investigating the conservativeness of current safety guidelines in the case of skin-to-skin contact, especially with infants.

  18. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  19. Highlighting Entanglement of Cultures via Ranking of Multilingual Wikipedia Articles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013 PMID:24098338

  20. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  1. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013. PMID:24098338

  2. Three scenarios of ranking inconsistencies involving search tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Samuelson, Frank W.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman

    2016-03-01

    Our previous work on assessment of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) image quality revealed inconsistencies in ranking the reconstruction algorithms' performances for a location-known-exactly (LKE) detection and a location-unknown searching task. Such results made us wonder that ranking inconsistencies may not be rare phenomena at all. In this work, we conducted a small literature review that involved three publications (He, Samuelson, Zeng and Sahiner SPIE 2016; Park, Kupinski, Clarkson and Barrett, IPMI 2003 and JOSA 2005). These publications compared the LKE and search performance for a variety of observers using the AUC value as the performance criterion (human observers, CHOs for detection, scanning CHOs for search, and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo ideal observer for detection and search). We categorized the experimental findings into three types of ranking inconsistencies: 1) Ranking inconsistencies in LKE and search tasks; 2) human/ideal observer ranking inconsistencies; and 3) LKE/search ranking inconsistencies in the presence of signal variability. The empirical evidence presented in this work suggested that ranking inconsistencies for imaging systems existed, but these inconsistencies often do not draw enough attention in the literature.

  3. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  4. A cautionary note on the rank product statistic.

    PubMed

    Koziol, James A

    2016-06-01

    The rank product method introduced by Breitling R et al. [2004, FEBS Letters 573, 83-92] has rapidly generated popularity in practical settings, in particular, detecting differential expression of genes in microarray experiments. The purpose of this note is to point out a particular property of the rank product method, namely, its differential sensitivity to over- and underexpression. It turns out that overexpression is less likely to be detected than underexpression with the rank product statistic. We have conducted both empirical and exact power studies that demonstrate this phenomenon, and summarize these findings in this note.

  5. Consequence ranking of radionuclides in Hanford tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schmittroth, F.A.; De Lorenzo, T.H.

    1995-09-01

    Radionuclides in the Hanford tank waste are ranked relative to their consequences for the Low-Level Tank Waste program. The ranking identifies key radionuclides where further study is merited. In addition to potential consequences for intrude and drinking-water scenarios supporting low-level waste activities, a ranking based on shielding criteria is provided. The radionuclide production inventories are based on a new and independent ORIGEN2 calculation representing the operation of all Hanford single-pass reactors and the N Reactor.

  6. Simpson's Paradox and Confounding Factors in University Rankings: A Demonstration Using QS 2011-12 Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Kay Cheng

    2012-01-01

    University ranking has become ritualistic in higher education. Ranking results are taken as bona fide by rank users. Ranking systems usually use large data sets from highly heterogeneous universities of varied backgrounds. This poses the problem of Simpson's Paradox and the lurking variables causing it. Using QS 2011-2012 Ranking data, the dual…

  7. Severe language effect in university rankings: particularly Germany and France are wronged in citation-based rankings.

    PubMed

    van Raan, Anthony F J; van Leeuwen, Thed N; Visser, Martijn S

    2011-08-01

    We applied a set of standard bibliometric indicators to monitor the scientific state-of-arte of 500 universities worldwide and constructed a ranking on the basis of these indicators (Leiden Ranking 2010). We find a dramatic and hitherto largely underestimated language effect in the bibliometric, citation-based measurements of research performance when comparing the ranking based on all Web of Science (WoS) covered publications and on only English WoS covered publications, particularly for Germany and France. PMID:21836762

  8. Rank by Readability: Document Weighting for Information Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbold, Neil; McLaughlin, Harry; Gillam, Lee

    In this paper, we present a new approach to ranking that considers the reading ability (and motivation) of the user. Web pages can be, increasingly, badly written with unfamiliar words, poor use of syntax, ambiguous phrases and so on. Readability research suggests that experts and motivated readers may overcome confusingly written text, but nevertheless find it an irritation. We investigate using readability to re-rank web pages. We take an extended view of readability that considers the reading level of retrieved web pages using techniques that consider both textual and cognitive factors. Readability of a selection of query results is examined, and a re-ranking on readability is compared to the original ranking. Results to date suggest that considering a view of readability for each reader may increase the probability of relevance to a particular user.

  9. The Rank-Ferenczi relationship, as seen from France.

    PubMed

    Lugrin, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Seen from France, where Rank's "American" work is not well known, the Rank-Ferenczi relationship does not allow to state that the two learned colleagues were the best friends. Rank met Ferenczi in 1908, but their most valuable and fruitful working relationship is limited to the 1922-1924 time period. Their working relationship must be read in light of the unique transference links of each to Freud, and in light of the tormented history of the analytic movement, especially after the First World War. The sensible reader will not forget that after the fast extinction of their short collaboration they continued their own works in their own ways, Otto Rank in Paris and in America and Sándor Ferenczi in Budapest. No more friends, nor enemies, but both, in a different style, brave and creative analysts.

  10. Universality in the tail of musical note rank distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán del Río, M.; Cocho, G.; Naumis, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Although power laws have been used to fit rank distributions in many different contexts, they usually fail at the tails. Languages as sequences of symbols have been a popular subject for ranking distributions, and for this purpose, music can be treated as such. Here we show that more than 1800 musical compositions are very well fitted by the first kind two parameter beta distribution, which arises in the ranking of multiplicative stochastic processes. The parameters a and b are obtained for classical, jazz and rock music, revealing interesting features. Specially, we have obtained a clear trend in the values of the parameters for major and minor tonal modes. Finally, we discuss the distribution of notes for each octave and its connection with the ranking of the notes.

  11. Scaling behavior in ranking mobility of Chinese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Xiong, Wanting; Weng, Xin; Wang, Yougui

    2014-08-01

    As an aggregate measure of the variations in individuals, the analysis of mobility provides a substantial and comprehensive perspective into the complexity of socio-economic systems. In this paper, we introduced the ranking mobility index to measure the ranking variations of the stocks in Chinese stock market over time. Using the daily data of 837 constituent stocks of the Shanghai A-Stock Composite Index from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2012, we examined respectively the dependence of ranking mobility with respect to the absolute return, trading volume and turnover ratio on the sampling time interval. The scaling property is observed in all three relations. The fact of long relaxation times gives evidence of long memory property in the stock ranking orders.

  12. The Rank-Ferenczi relationship, as seen from France.

    PubMed

    Lugrin, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Seen from France, where Rank's "American" work is not well known, the Rank-Ferenczi relationship does not allow to state that the two learned colleagues were the best friends. Rank met Ferenczi in 1908, but their most valuable and fruitful working relationship is limited to the 1922-1924 time period. Their working relationship must be read in light of the unique transference links of each to Freud, and in light of the tormented history of the analytic movement, especially after the First World War. The sensible reader will not forget that after the fast extinction of their short collaboration they continued their own works in their own ways, Otto Rank in Paris and in America and Sándor Ferenczi in Budapest. No more friends, nor enemies, but both, in a different style, brave and creative analysts. PMID:23175027

  13. Factors affecting quality of dried low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, M.; Kuma, J.V.M.; Hoe, C.S.; Ngo, D.L.Y.

    2007-07-01

    The chemical and physical properties of coal are strongly affected by the upgrading process employed. For high-moisture coals, upgrading involves thermal dehydration to improve the calorific value of the coal on mass basis. This study evaluates the feasibility of upgrading a low-rank/grade coal using the oven drying method. The objective of this research work is to study the drying characteristics of low-rank coals and to understand the factors affecting the quality of dried low-rank coals. This article describes laboratory experiments conducted on the characterization of the low-rank coals before and after the drying process. The results on drying kinetics, re-absorption of coal samples, and proximate analysis of coal samples before and after drying are discussed. It was found that the upgrading process produced coal with better heating value and combustion characteristics than those of the raw coal samples.

  14. A network-based dynamical ranking system for competitive sports.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Shun; Masuda, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    From the viewpoint of networks, a ranking system for players or teams in sports is equivalent to a centrality measure for sports networks, whereby a directed link represents the result of a single game. Previously proposed network-based ranking systems are derived from static networks, i.e., aggregation of the results of games over time. However, the score of a player (or team) fluctuates over time. Defeating a renowned player in the peak performance is intuitively more rewarding than defeating the same player in other periods. To account for this factor, we propose a dynamic variant of such a network-based ranking system and apply it to professional men's tennis data. We derive a set of linear online update equations for the score of each player. The proposed ranking system predicts the outcome of the future games with a higher accuracy than the static counterparts.

  15. Ranking online quality and reputation via the user activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Guo, Qiang; Hou, Lei; Cheng, Can; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2015-10-01

    How to design an accurate algorithm for ranking the object quality and user reputation is of importance for online rating systems. In this paper we present an improved iterative algorithm for online ranking object quality and user reputation in terms of the user degree (IRUA), where the user's reputation is measured by his/her rating vector, the corresponding objects' quality vector and the user degree. The experimental results for the empirical networks show that the AUC values of the IRUA algorithm can reach 0.9065 and 0.8705 in Movielens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the traditional iterative ranking methods. Meanwhile, the results for the synthetic networks indicate that user degree should be considered in real rating systems due to users' rating behaviors. Moreover, we find that enhancing or reducing the influences of the large-degree users could produce more accurate reputation ranking lists.

  16. A network-based dynamical ranking system for competitive sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motegi, Shun; Masuda, Naoki

    2012-12-01

    From the viewpoint of networks, a ranking system for players or teams in sports is equivalent to a centrality measure for sports networks, whereby a directed link represents the result of a single game. Previously proposed network-based ranking systems are derived from static networks, i.e., aggregation of the results of games over time. However, the score of a player (or team) fluctuates over time. Defeating a renowned player in the peak performance is intuitively more rewarding than defeating the same player in other periods. To account for this factor, we propose a dynamic variant of such a network-based ranking system and apply it to professional men's tennis data. We derive a set of linear online update equations for the score of each player. The proposed ranking system predicts the outcome of the future games with a higher accuracy than the static counterparts.

  17. Learning to rank figures within a biomedical article.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. This ever-increasing sheer volume has made it difficult for scientists to effectively and accurately access figures of their interest, the process of which is crucial for validating research facts and for formulating or testing novel research hypotheses. Current figure search applications can't fully meet this challenge as the "bag of figures" assumption doesn't take into account the relationship among figures. In our previous study, hundreds of biomedical researchers have annotated articles in which they serve as corresponding authors. They ranked each figure in their paper based on a figure's importance at their discretion, referred to as "figure ranking". Using this collection of annotated data, we investigated computational approaches to automatically rank figures. We exploited and extended the state-of-the-art listwise learning-to-rank algorithms and developed a new supervised-learning model BioFigRank. The cross-validation results show that BioFigRank yielded the best performance compared with other state-of-the-art computational models, and the greedy feature selection can further boost the ranking performance significantly. Furthermore, we carry out the evaluation by comparing BioFigRank with three-level competitive domain-specific human experts: (1) First Author, (2) Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article but who works in the same field of the corresponding author of the article, and (3) Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article and who may or may not work in the same field of the corresponding author of an article. Our results show that BioFigRank outperforms Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert and performs as well as Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert. Although BioFigRank underperforms First Author, since most biomedical researchers are either in- or out

  18. Ranking benchmarks of top 100 players in men's professional tennis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Machar; Morris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    In men's professional tennis, players aspire to hold the top ranking position. On the way to the top spot, reaching the top 100 can be seen as a significant career milestone. National Federations undertake extensive efforts to assist their players to reach the top 100. However, objective data considering reasonable ranking yardsticks for top 100 success in men's professional tennis are lacking. Therefore, it is difficult for National Federations and those involved in player development to give empirical programming advice to young players. By taking a closer look at the ranking history of professional male tennis players, this article tries to provide those involved in player development a more objective basis for decision-making. The 100 names, countries, birthdates and ranking histories of the top 100 players listed in the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) at 31 December 2009 were recorded from websites in the public domain. Descriptive statistics were reported for the ranking milestones of interest. Results confirmed the merits of the International Tennis Federation's junior tour with 91% of the top 100 professionals earning a junior ranking, the mean peak of which was 94.1, s=148.9. On average, top 100 professionals achieved their best junior rankings and earned their first ATP point at similar ages, suggesting that players compete on both the junior and professional tours during their transition. Once professionally ranked, players took an average 4.5, s=2.1 years to reach the ATP top 100 at the mean age of 21.5, s=2.6 years, which contrasts with the mean current age of the top 100 of 26.8, s=3.2. The best professional rankings of players born in 1982 or earlier were positively related to the ages at which players earned their first ATP point and then entered the top 100, suggesting that the ages associated with these ranking milestones may have some forecasting potential. Future work should focus on the change in top 100 demographics over time as well

  19. Ranking and selection of motor carrier safety performance by commodity.

    PubMed

    Horrace, William C; Keane, Thomas P

    2004-11-01

    We use recent safety performance data to rank US motor carrier commodity segments (e.g., Tank segment or Produce segment) in terms of several driver-related, vehicle-related, and crash-related safety measures. Ranking and selection inference techniques are used to determine the best and worst performing commodity segments at the 95% confidence level. The results are mixed, however the Passenger segment is generally best, while the Produce, Intermodal, and Refrigerated segments tend to be worst. PMID:15350872

  20. Student Practices, Learning, and Attitudes When Using Computerized Ranking Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.; Prather, E. E.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    Ranking Tasks are a novel type of conceptual exercise based on a technique called rule assessment. Ranking Tasks present students with a series of four to eight icons that describe slightly different variations of a basic physical situation. Students are then asked to identify the order, or ranking, of the various situations based on some physical outcome or result. The structure of Ranking Tasks makes it difficult for students to rely strictly on memorized answers and mechanical substitution of formulae. In addition, by changing the presentation of the different scenarios (e.g., photographs, line diagrams, graphs, tables, etc.) we find that Ranking Tasks require students to develop mental schema that are more flexible and robust. Ranking tasks may be implemented on the computer which requires students to order the icons through drag-and-drop. Computer implementation allows the incorporation of background material, grading with feedback, and providing additional similar versions of the task through randomization so that students can build expertise through practice. This poster will summarize the results of a study of student usage of computerized ranking tasks. We will investigate 1) student practices (How do they make use of these tools?), 2) knowledge and skill building (Do student scores improve with iteration and are there diminishing returns?), and 3) student attitudes toward using computerized Ranking Tasks (Do they like using them?). This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  1. Learning to rank image tags with limited training examples.

    PubMed

    Songhe Feng; Zheyun Feng; Rong Jin

    2015-04-01

    With an increasing number of images that are available in social media, image annotation has emerged as an important research topic due to its application in image matching and retrieval. Most studies cast image annotation into a multilabel classification problem. The main shortcoming of this approach is that it requires a large number of training images with clean and complete annotations in order to learn a reliable model for tag prediction. We address this limitation by developing a novel approach that combines the strength of tag ranking with the power of matrix recovery. Instead of having to make a binary decision for each tag, our approach ranks tags in the descending order of their relevance to the given image, significantly simplifying the problem. In addition, the proposed method aggregates the prediction models for different tags into a matrix, and casts tag ranking into a matrix recovery problem. It introduces the matrix trace norm to explicitly control the model complexity, so that a reliable prediction model can be learned for tag ranking even when the tag space is large and the number of training images is limited. Experiments on multiple well-known image data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework for tag ranking compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for image annotation and tag ranking. PMID:25622318

  2. LogDet Rank Minimization with Application to Subspace Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zhao; Peng, Chong; Cheng, Jie; Cheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Low-rank matrix is desired in many machine learning and computer vision problems. Most of the recent studies use the nuclear norm as a convex surrogate of the rank operator. However, all singular values are simply added together by the nuclear norm, and thus the rank may not be well approximated in practical problems. In this paper, we propose using a log-determinant (LogDet) function as a smooth and closer, though nonconvex, approximation to rank for obtaining a low-rank representation in subspace clustering. Augmented Lagrange multipliers strategy is applied to iteratively optimize the LogDet-based nonconvex objective function on potentially large-scale data. By making use of the angular information of principal directions of the resultant low-rank representation, an affinity graph matrix is constructed for spectral clustering. Experimental results on motion segmentation and face clustering data demonstrate that the proposed method often outperforms state-of-the-art subspace clustering algorithms. PMID:26229527

  3. [The OPG/RANKL/RANK system and bone resorptive disease].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Zhong; Ji, Zong-Ling; Chen, Su-Min

    2003-11-01

    The OPG/RANKL/RANK system plays an important role in osteoclastogenesis and represents a great progress in bone biology. RANKL, which expresses on the surface of osteoblast/stromal cells and activated T cells, binds to RANK on the osteoclastic precursors or mature osteoclasts, and promotes osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. While osteoprotegerin (OPG), which is expressed by osteoblasts/stromal cells, strongly inhibits bone resorption by binding to its ligand RANKL and thereby blocks the interaction between BANKL and RANK. A number of cytokines and hormones exert their effects on bone metabolism by regulating the OPG/RANKL ratio in the bone marrow microenvironment. RANK is also expressed on mammary epithelial cells and RANKL expression in these cells is induced by pregnancy hormones, RANKL and RANK are essential for the formation of the lactating mammary gland and the transmission of maternal calcium to neonates in mammalian species. Modulation of these systems provides a unique opportunity to develop novel therapeutics to inhibit bone loss in osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bone metastasis of cancer. Further research should be focused on the cooperation of OPG/RANKL/RANK system with other signal pathways and the interactions among bone remodeling, immune system and endocrinology system. Currently, the development of OPG analogues or compounds which may stimulate OPG expression is becoming an attractive industry which may be profitable to both patients and manufacturers. PMID:15971575

  4. A new mutually reinforcing network node and link ranking algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenghua; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo; Padgett, Jamie E.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel Normalized Wide network Ranking algorithm (NWRank) that has the advantage of ranking nodes and links of a network simultaneously. This algorithm combines the mutual reinforcement feature of Hypertext Induced Topic Selection (HITS) and the weight normalization feature of PageRank. Relative weights are assigned to links based on the degree of the adjacent neighbors and the Betweenness Centrality instead of assigning the same weight to every link as assumed in PageRank. Numerical experiment results show that NWRank performs consistently better than HITS, PageRank, eigenvector centrality, and edge betweenness from the perspective of network connectivity and approximate network flow, which is also supported by comparisons with the expensive N-1 benchmark removal criteria based on network efficiency. Furthermore, it can avoid some problems, such as the Tightly Knit Community effect, which exists in HITS. NWRank provides a new inexpensive way to rank nodes and links of a network, which has practical applications, particularly to prioritize resource allocation for upgrade of hierarchical and distributed networks, as well as to support decision making in the design of networks, where node and link importance depend on a balance of local and global integrity. PMID:26492958

  5. Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qibin; Zhang, Liqing; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization of incomplete data is a powerful technique for tensor completion through explicitly capturing the multilinear latent factors. The existing CP algorithms require the tensor rank to be manually specified, however, the determination of tensor rank remains a challenging problem especially for CP rank . In addition, existing approaches do not take into account uncertainty information of latent factors, as well as missing entries. To address these issues, we formulate CP factorization using a hierarchical probabilistic model and employ a fully Bayesian treatment by incorporating a sparsity-inducing prior over multiple latent factors and the appropriate hyperpriors over all hyperparameters, resulting in automatic rank determination. To learn the model, we develop an efficient deterministic Bayesian inference algorithm, which scales linearly with data size. Our method is characterized as a tuning parameter-free approach, which can effectively infer underlying multilinear factors with a low-rank constraint, while also providing predictive distributions over missing entries. Extensive simulations on synthetic data illustrate the intrinsic capability of our method to recover the ground-truth of CP rank and prevent the overfitting problem, even when a large amount of entries are missing. Moreover, the results from real-world applications, including image inpainting and facial image synthesis, demonstrate that our method outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for both tensor factorization and tensor completion in terms of predictive performance.

  6. Learning to Rank Figures within a Biomedical Article

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. This ever-increasing sheer volume has made it difficult for scientists to effectively and accurately access figures of their interest, the process of which is crucial for validating research facts and for formulating or testing novel research hypotheses. Current figure search applications can't fully meet this challenge as the “bag of figures” assumption doesn't take into account the relationship among figures. In our previous study, hundreds of biomedical researchers have annotated articles in which they serve as corresponding authors. They ranked each figure in their paper based on a figure's importance at their discretion, referred to as “figure ranking”. Using this collection of annotated data, we investigated computational approaches to automatically rank figures. We exploited and extended the state-of-the-art listwise learning-to-rank algorithms and developed a new supervised-learning model BioFigRank. The cross-validation results show that BioFigRank yielded the best performance compared with other state-of-the-art computational models, and the greedy feature selection can further boost the ranking performance significantly. Furthermore, we carry out the evaluation by comparing BioFigRank with three-level competitive domain-specific human experts: (1) First Author, (2) Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article but who works in the same field of the corresponding author of the article, and (3) Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article and who may or may not work in the same field of the corresponding author of an article. Our results show that BioFigRank outperforms Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert and performs as well as Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert. Although BioFigRank underperforms First Author, since most biomedical researchers are either in- or out

  7. Liquefaction of low rank coals with slurry catalysts. Part I. Comparison of coals. [7 low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    One of the most significant achievements over the last several years in development of the SRC-II process was extension of its applicability to include low-rank coals. With addition of moderate amounts of pyrite, operation was trouble-free and oil yields exceeding those obtainable with higher rank feedstocks were obtained. In addition, product sulfur level was lower due to the relatively low sulfur content of the lower rank coals. Total oil yield generally decreased as rank decreased from high volatile C bituminous to lignite. An exception to this was the oil yield from Texas lignite, which was the highest of those from the seven coals evaluated. Oil yields from all of these coals were greater than those generally obtained from higher rank bituminous coals, however. There was no apparent correlation between rank and conversion to pyridine-soluble material. The distillate products fom these coals were similar in composition, but the hydrogen and heteroatom levels were related to those in the feed coal. 2 figures, 6 tables.

  8. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: The response of 2aO film to small dosages of alpha particles from 3/10th's rad to 8 rads at energy levels 153 MeV, 79 MeV and 47 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, Kevin; Stober, AL

    1984-01-01

    The 2aO film, pre-exposed to a series of neutral density filters which on development under standard conditions will produce the standard H-D curve for that film, were then exposed to Alpha paricles with a dose range of 3/10ths rads to 8 rads while varying the energy of the particles using 153 MeV, 70 MeV, and 47 MeV, respectively. An analysis of the film shows that the 3/10th rad dose produces the lowest optical density changes at 70 MeV and 47 MeV. While the optical density readings for the darker patterns seem to oscillate and decrease when exposed to radiation dosages of 3/10th rads to 8 rads.

  9. Cross ranking of cities and regions: population versus income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueti, Roy; Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the inner economical structure of communities and their population distribution through a rank-rank analysis of official data, along statistical physics ideas within two techniques. The data is taken on Italian cities. The analysis is performed both at a global (national) and at a more local (regional) level in order to distinguish ‘macro’ and ‘micro’ aspects. First, the rank-size rule is found not to be a standard power law, as in many other studies, but a doubly decreasing power law. Next, the Kendall τ and the Spearman ρ rank correlation coefficients which measure pair concordance and the correlation between fluctuations in two rankings, respectively,—as a correlation function does in thermodynamics, are calculated for finding rank correlation (if any) between demography and wealth. Results show non only global disparities for the whole (country) set, but also (regional) disparities, when comparing the number of cities in regions, the number of inhabitants in cities and that in regions, as well as when comparing the aggregated tax income of the cities and that of regions. Different outliers are pointed out and justified. Interestingly, two classes of cities in the country and two classes of regions in the country are found. ‘Common sense’ social, political, and economic considerations sustain the findings. More importantly, the methods show that they allow to distinguish communities, very clearly, when specific criteria are numerically sound. A specific modeling for the findings is presented, i.e. for the doubly decreasing power law and the two phase system, based on statistics theory, e.g. urn filling. The model ideas can be expected to hold when similar rank relationship features are observed in fields. It is emphasized that the analysis makes more sense than one through a Pearson Π value-value correlation analysis

  10. On the ranking of chemicals based on their PBT characteristics: comparison of different ranking methodologies using selected POPs as an illustrative example.

    PubMed

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Zhakupbekova, Arai; Amutova, Farida; Carlsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the environmental behavior of chemicals is a fundamental part of the risk assessment process. The present paper discusses various methods of ranking of a series of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) according to the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) characteristics. Traditionally ranking has been done as an absolute (total) ranking applying various multicriteria data analysis methods like simple additive ranking (SAR) or various utility functions (UFs) based rankings. An attractive alternative to these ranking methodologies appears to be partial order ranking (POR). The present paper compares different ranking methods like SAR, UF and POR. Significant discrepancies between the rankings are noted and it is concluded that partial order ranking, as a method without any pre-assumptions concerning possible relation between the single parameters, appears as the most attractive ranking methodology. In addition to the initial ranking partial order methodology offers a wide variety of analytical tools to elucidate the interplay between the objects to be ranked and the ranking parameters. In the present study is included an analysis of the relative importance of the single P, B and T parameters. PMID:22955049

  11. Visualizing trends and clusters in ranked time-series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gousie, Michael B.; Grady, John; Branagan, Melissa

    2013-12-01

    There are many systems that provide visualizations for time-oriented data. Of those, few provide the means of finding patterns in time-series data in which rankings are also important. Fewer still have the fine granularity necessary to visually follow individual data points through time. We propose the Ranking Timeline, a novel visualization method for modestly-sized multivariate data sets that include the top ten rankings over time. The system includes two main visualization components: a ranking over time and a cluster analysis. The ranking visualization, loosely based on line plots, allows the user to track individual data points so as to facilitate comparisons within a given time frame. Glyphs represent additional attributes within the framework of the overall system. The user has control over many aspects of the visualization, including viewing a subset of the data and/or focusing on a desired time frame. The cluster analysis tool shows the relative importance of individual items in conjunction with a visualization showing the connection(s) to other, similar items, while maintaining the aforementioned glyphs and user interaction. The user controls the clustering according to a similarity threshold. The system has been implemented as a Web application, and has been tested with data showing the top ten actors/actresses from 1929-2010. The experiments have revealed patterns in the data heretofore not explored.

  12. Nonconvex Nonsmooth Low Rank Minimization via Iteratively Reweighted Nuclear Norm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canyi; Tang, Jinhui; Yan, Shuicheng; Lin, Zhouchen

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear norm is widely used as a convex surrogate of the rank function in compressive sensing for low rank matrix recovery with its applications in image recovery and signal processing. However, solving the nuclear norm-based relaxed convex problem usually leads to a suboptimal solution of the original rank minimization problem. In this paper, we propose to use a family of nonconvex surrogates of L0-norm on the singular values of a matrix to approximate the rank function. This leads to a nonconvex nonsmooth minimization problem. Then, we propose to solve the problem by an iteratively re-weighted nuclear norm (IRNN) algorithm. IRNN iteratively solves a weighted singular value thresholding problem, which has a closed form solution due to the special properties of the nonconvex surrogate functions. We also extend IRNN to solve the nonconvex problem with two or more blocks of variables. In theory, we prove that the IRNN decreases the objective function value monotonically, and any limit point is a stationary point. Extensive experiments on both synthesized data and real images demonstrate that IRNN enhances the low rank matrix recovery compared with the state-of-the-art convex algorithms. PMID:26841392

  13. Low-tubal-rank tensor completion using alternating minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Yang; Aeron, Shuchin; Aggarwal, Vaneet; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    The low-tubal-rank tensors have been recently proposed to model real-world multidimensional data. In this paper, we study the low-tubal-rank tensor completion problem, i.e., to recover a third-order tensor by observing a subset of elements selected uniform at random. We propose a fast iterative algorithm, called Tubal-Alt-Min, that is inspired by similar approach for low rank matrix completion. The unknown low-tubal-rank tensor is parameterized as the product of two much smaller tensors with the low-tubal-rank property being automatically incorporated, and Tubal-Alt-Min alternates between estimating those two tensors using tensor least squares minimization. We note that the tensor least squares minimization is different from its counterpart and nontrivial, and this paper gives a routine to carry out this operation. Further, on both synthetic data and real-world video data, evaluation results show that compared with the tensor nuclear norm minimization, the proposed algorithm improves the recovery error by orders of magnitude with smaller running time for higher sampling rates.

  14. AGU journals continue to rank highly in Impact Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jon; Warner, Mary

    2012-07-01

    AGU journals continue to rank highly in the 2011 Journal Citation Reports (JCR), which was released by Thomson Reuters on 28 June. The impact factor of several AGU journals increased significantly, continuing their trend over the previous 5 years, while others remained consistent with the previous year's ranking. Paleoceanography is an outstanding performer in both the Paleontology and Oceanography categories. Since 1995, Paleoceanography has been the top-ranked journal in the Paleontology category (of 49 titles in 2011), with an Impact Factor of 3.357. In the Oceanography group (59 journals total), Paleoceanography ranks third in Impact Factor. Reviews of Geophysics, with an Impact Factor of 12.364 (an increase of 2.826 from the prior year's score of 9.538), ranks second in Geochemistry and Geophysics out of a total of 77 journals in this cohort. Water Resources Research comes in at second place in the Limnology group, with 19 titles, and third place in the Water Resources group, which has a cohort of 78 titles.

  15. Rank regression for analyzing ordinal qualitative data for treatment comparison.

    PubMed

    Fu, L Y; Wang, Y-G; Liu, C J

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT Ordinal qualitative data are often collected for phenotypical measurements in plant pathology and other biological sciences. Statistical methods, such as t tests or analysis of variance, are usually used to analyze ordinal data when comparing two groups or multiple groups. However, the underlying assumptions such as normality and homogeneous variances are often violated for qualitative data. To this end, we investigated an alternative methodology, rank regression, for analyzing the ordinal data. The rank-based methods are essentially based on pairwise comparisons and, therefore, can deal with qualitative data naturally. They require neither normality assumption nor data transformation. Apart from robustness against outliers and high efficiency, the rank regression can also incorporate covariate effects in the same way as the ordinary regression. By reanalyzing a data set from a wheat Fusarium crown rot study, we illustrated the use of the rank regression methodology and demonstrated that the rank regression models appear to be more appropriate and sensible for analyzing nonnormal data and data with outliers.

  16. Reduced rank regression via adaptive nuclear norm penalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Dong, Hongbo; Chan, Kung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Summary We propose an adaptive nuclear norm penalization approach for low-rank matrix approximation, and use it to develop a new reduced rank estimation method for high-dimensional multivariate regression. The adaptive nuclear norm is defined as the weighted sum of the singular values of the matrix, and it is generally non-convex under the natural restriction that the weight decreases with the singular value. However, we show that the proposed non-convex penalized regression method has a global optimal solution obtained from an adaptively soft-thresholded singular value decomposition. The method is computationally efficient, and the resulting solution path is continuous. The rank consistency of and prediction/estimation performance bounds for the estimator are established for a high-dimensional asymptotic regime. Simulation studies and an application in genetics demonstrate its efficacy. PMID:25045172

  17. Optimal Estimation and Rank Detection for Sparse Spiked Covariance Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tony; Ma, Zongming; Wu, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a sparse spiked covariancematrix model in the high-dimensional setting and studies the minimax estimation of the covariance matrix and the principal subspace as well as the minimax rank detection. The optimal rate of convergence for estimating the spiked covariance matrix under the spectral norm is established, which requires significantly different techniques from those for estimating other structured covariance matrices such as bandable or sparse covariance matrices. We also establish the minimax rate under the spectral norm for estimating the principal subspace, the primary object of interest in principal component analysis. In addition, the optimal rate for the rank detection boundary is obtained. This result also resolves the gap in a recent paper by Berthet and Rigollet [2] where the special case of rank one is considered. PMID:26257453

  18. Fuzzy Logic and Its Application in Football Team Ranking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic are a highly suitable and applicable basis for developing knowledge-based systems in physical education for tasks such as the selection for athletes, the evaluation for different training approaches, the team ranking, and the real-time monitoring of sports data. In this paper, we use fuzzy set theory and apply fuzzy clustering analysis in football team ranking. Based on some certain rules, we propose four parameters to calculate fuzzy similar matrix, obtain fuzzy equivalence matrix and the ranking result for our numerical example, T7, T3, T1, T9, T10, T8, T11, T12, T2, T6, T5, T4, and investigate four parameters sensitivity analysis. The study shows that our fuzzy logic method is reliable and stable when the parameters change in certain range. PMID:25032227

  19. Methods for evaluating and ranking transportation energy conservation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santone, L. C.

    1981-04-01

    The energy conservation programs are assessed in terms of petroleum savings, incremental costs to consumers probability of technical and market success, and external impacts due to environmental, economic, and social factors. Three ranking functions and a policy matrix are used to evaluate the programs. The net present value measure which computes the present worth of petroleum savings less the present worth of costs is modified by dividing by the present value of DOE funding to obtain a net present value per program dollar. The comprehensive ranking function takes external impacts into account. Procedures are described for making computations of the ranking functions and the attributes that require computation. Computations are made for the electric vehicle, Stirling engine, gas turbine, and MPG mileage guide program.

  20. Fuzzy logic and its application in football team ranking.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenyi; Li, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic are a highly suitable and applicable basis for developing knowledge-based systems in physical education for tasks such as the selection for athletes, the evaluation for different training approaches, the team ranking, and the real-time monitoring of sports data. In this paper, we use fuzzy set theory and apply fuzzy clustering analysis in football team ranking. Based on some certain rules, we propose four parameters to calculate fuzzy similar matrix, obtain fuzzy equivalence matrix and the ranking result for our numerical example, T 7, T 3, T 1, T 9, T 10, T 8, T 11, T 12, T 2, T 6, T 5, T 4, and investigate four parameters sensitivity analysis. The study shows that our fuzzy logic method is reliable and stable when the parameters change in certain range.

  1. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  2. Ranking Reputation and Quality in Online Rating Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An; Xiao, Rui; Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Chen, Duan-Bing; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    How to design an accurate and robust ranking algorithm is a fundamental problem with wide applications in many real systems. It is especially significant in online rating systems due to the existence of some spammers. In the literature, many well-performed iterative ranking methods have been proposed. These methods can effectively recognize the unreliable users and reduce their weight in judging the quality of objects, and finally lead to a more accurate evaluation of the online products. In this paper, we design an iterative ranking method with high performance in both accuracy and robustness. More specifically, a reputation redistribution process is introduced to enhance the influence of highly reputed users and two penalty factors enable the algorithm resistance to malicious behaviors. Validation of our method is performed in both artificial and real user-object bipartite networks. PMID:24819119

  3. Ranking reputation and quality in online rating systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An; Xiao, Rui; Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Chen, Duan-Bing; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    How to design an accurate and robust ranking algorithm is a fundamental problem with wide applications in many real systems. It is especially significant in online rating systems due to the existence of some spammers. In the literature, many well-performed iterative ranking methods have been proposed. These methods can effectively recognize the unreliable users and reduce their weight in judging the quality of objects, and finally lead to a more accurate evaluation of the online products. In this paper, we design an iterative ranking method with high performance in both accuracy and robustness. More specifically, a reputation redistribution process is introduced to enhance the influence of highly reputed users and two penalty factors enable the algorithm resistance to malicious behaviors. Validation of our method is performed in both artificial and real user-object bipartite networks. PMID:24819119

  4. Predicting Disease Risk Using Bootstrap Ranking and Classification Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Ohad; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are widely used to search for genetic loci that underlie human disease. Another goal is to predict disease risk for different individuals given their genetic sequence. Such predictions could either be used as a “black box” in order to promote changes in life-style and screening for early diagnosis, or as a model that can be studied to better understand the mechanism of the disease. Current methods for risk prediction typically rank single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by the p-value of their association with the disease, and use the top-associated SNPs as input to a classification algorithm. However, the predictive power of such methods is relatively poor. To improve the predictive power, we devised BootRank, which uses bootstrapping in order to obtain a robust prioritization of SNPs for use in predictive models. We show that BootRank improves the ability to predict disease risk of unseen individuals in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data and results in a more robust set of SNPs and a larger number of enriched pathways being associated with the different diseases. Finally, we show that combining BootRank with seven different classification algorithms improves performance compared to previous studies that used the WTCCC data. Notably, diseases for which BootRank results in the largest improvements were recently shown to have more heritability than previously thought, likely due to contributions from variants with low minimum allele frequency (MAF), suggesting that BootRank can be beneficial in cases where SNPs affecting the disease are poorly tagged or have low MAF. Overall, our results show that improving disease risk prediction from genotypic information may be a tangible goal, with potential implications for personalized disease screening and treatment. PMID:23990773

  5. Boolean versus ranked querying for biomedical systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The process of constructing a systematic review, a document that compiles the published evidence pertaining to a specified medical topic, is intensely time-consuming, often taking a team of researchers over a year, with the identification of relevant published research comprising a substantial portion of the effort. The standard paradigm for this information-seeking task is to use Boolean search; however, this leaves the user(s) the requirement of examining every returned result. Further, our experience is that effective Boolean queries for this specific task are extremely difficult to formulate and typically require multiple iterations of refinement before being finalized. Methods We explore the effectiveness of using ranked retrieval as compared to Boolean querying for the purpose of constructing a systematic review. We conduct a series of experiments involving ranked retrieval, using queries defined methodologically, in an effort to understand the practicalities of incorporating ranked retrieval into the systematic search task. Results Our results show that ranked retrieval by itself is not viable for this search task requiring high recall. However, we describe a refinement of the standard Boolean search process and show that ranking within a Boolean result set can improve the overall search performance by providing early indication of the quality of the results, thereby speeding up the iterative query-refinement process. Conclusions Outcomes of experiments suggest that an interactive query-development process using a hybrid ranked and Boolean retrieval system has the potential for significant time-savings over the current search process in the systematic reviewing. PMID:20937152

  6. Maximising information recovery from rank-order codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, B.; Furber, S.

    2007-04-01

    The central nervous system encodes information in sequences of asynchronously generated voltage spikes, but the precise details of this encoding are not well understood. Thorpe proposed rank-order codes as an explanation of the observed speed of information processing in the human visual system. The work described in this paper is inspired by the performance of SpikeNET, a biologically inspired neural architecture using rank-order codes for information processing, and is based on the retinal model developed by VanRullen and Thorpe. This model mimics retinal information processing by passing an input image through a bank of Difference of Gaussian (DoG) filters and then encoding the resulting coefficients in rank-order. To test the effectiveness of this encoding in capturing the information content of an image, the rank-order representation is decoded to reconstruct an image that can be compared with the original. The reconstruction uses a look-up table to infer the filter coefficients from their rank in the encoded image. Since the DoG filters are approximately orthogonal functions, they are treated as their own inverses in the reconstruction process. We obtained a quantitative measure of the perceptually important information retained in the reconstructed image relative to the original using a slightly modified version of an objective metric proposed by Petrovic. It is observed that around 75% of the perceptually important information is retained in the reconstruction. In the present work we reconstruct the input using a pseudo-inverse of the DoG filter-bank with the aim of improving the reconstruction and thereby extracting more information from the rank-order encoded stimulus. We observe that there is an increase of 10 - 15% in the information retrieved from a reconstructed stimulus as a result of inverting the filter-bank.

  7. Network Selection: A Method for Ranked Lists Selection

    PubMed Central

    Figini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the set of rankings that best represents a given group of orderings on the same collection of elements (preference lists). This problem arises from social choice and voting theory, in which each voter gives a preference on a set of alternatives, and a system outputs a single preference order based on the observed voters’ preferences. In this paper, we observe that, if the given set of preference lists is not homogeneous, a unique true underling ranking might not exist. Moreover only the lists that share the highest amount of information should be aggregated, and thus multiple rankings might provide a more feasible solution to the problem. In this light, we propose Network Selection, an algorithm that, given a heterogeneous group of rankings, first discovers the different communities of homogeneous rankings and then combines only the rank orderings belonging to the same community into a single final ordering. Our novel approach is inspired by graph theory; indeed our set of lists can be loosely read as the nodes of a network. As a consequence, only the lists populating the same community in the network would then be aggregated. In order to highlight the strength of our proposal, we show an application both on simulated and on two real datasets, namely a financial and a biological dataset. Experimental results on simulated data show that Network Selection can significantly outperform existing related methods. The other way around, the empirical evidence achieved on real financial data reveals that Network Selection is also able to select the most relevant variables in data mining predictive models, providing a clear superiority in terms of predictive power of the models built. Furthermore, we show the potentiality of our proposal in the bioinformatics field, providing an application to a biological microarray dataset. PMID:22937075

  8. Ranks and relationships in Highland ponies and Highland Cows.

    PubMed

    Clutton-Brock, T H; Greenwood, P J; Powell, R P

    1976-06-01

    Recent studies of primates have questioned the importance of dominance hierarchies in groups living under natural conditions. In a herd of Highland ponies and one of Highland cattle grazing under free-range conditions on the Isle of Rhum (Inner Hebrides) well defined hierarchies were present. The provision of food produced a marked increase in the frequency of agonistic interactions but had no effect on the rank systems of the two herds. While rank was clearly important in affecting the distribution of agonistic interactions, it was poorly related to behaviour in non-agonistic situations. PMID:961125

  9. A Trust Ranking Method to Prevent IM Spam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jun

    The problem of IM (Instant Messaging) SPAM, also known as SPIM, has become a challenge in recent years. The current anti-SPAM methods are not quite suitable for SPIM because of the differences in system infrastructures and characteristics between IM and email service. In order to effectively eliminate SPIM, we propose a trust ranking method in this paper. The mechanism to build up reputation network, global reputation and local trust ranking algorithms, reputation management, and SPIM filtering methods are presented. The experiments under five treat modes and algorithms enhancement are also introduced. The experiment shows that the proposed method is resilient to deal with SPIM attacks under several threat models.

  10. Ranking Predatory Journals: Solve the Problem Instead of Removing It!

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Predatory journals are a well-known issue for scholarly publishing and they are repositories for bogus research. In recent years, the number of predatory journals has risen and it is necessary to present a solution for this challenge. In this paper, we will discuss about a possible ranking of predatory journals. Our ranking approach is based on Beall’s criteria for detection of predatory journals and it can help editors to improve their journals or convert their questionable journals to non-predatory ones. Moreover, our approach could help young editors to protect their journals against predatory practice. Finally, we present a case study to clarify our approach. PMID:27123411

  11. Ranking and clustering of nodes in networks with smart teleportation.

    PubMed

    Lambiotte, R; Rosvall, M

    2012-05-01

    Random teleportation is a necessary evil for ranking and clustering directed networks based on random walks. Teleportation enables ergodic solutions, but the solutions must necessarily depend on the exact implementation and parametrization of the teleportation. For example, in the commonly used PageRank algorithm, the teleportation rate must trade off a heavily biased solution with a uniform solution. Here we show that teleportation to links rather than nodes enables a much smoother trade-off and effectively more robust results. We also show that, by not recording the teleportation steps of the random walker, we can further reduce the effect of teleportation with dramatic effects on clustering. PMID:23004821

  12. Quantum anonymous ranking based on the Chinese remainder theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Song; Guo, Gong-De; Huang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-Fen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient quantum anonymous ranking protocol with single particles is proposed. A semitrusted server is introduced to help multiple users achieve this secure task. At the end of the protocol, each user can obtain the rankings of his private data, and keep these data secret. The Chinese remainder theorem is utilized to reduce the level of signal particles and to improve the efficiency of the presented protocol. Meanwhile, a secret transmission order of the signal particles is used to keep the traveling particles secure. Finally, we discuss the security of this protocol and prove it to be secure against certain common attacks under ideal conditions.

  13. Ranking and clustering of nodes in networks with smart teleportation.

    PubMed

    Lambiotte, R; Rosvall, M

    2012-05-01

    Random teleportation is a necessary evil for ranking and clustering directed networks based on random walks. Teleportation enables ergodic solutions, but the solutions must necessarily depend on the exact implementation and parametrization of the teleportation. For example, in the commonly used PageRank algorithm, the teleportation rate must trade off a heavily biased solution with a uniform solution. Here we show that teleportation to links rather than nodes enables a much smoother trade-off and effectively more robust results. We also show that, by not recording the teleportation steps of the random walker, we can further reduce the effect of teleportation with dramatic effects on clustering.

  14. Worldsheet interpretation of the level-rank duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soroush, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Level-rank duality relates the observables of two different Chern-Simons theories in which the roles of the Chern-Simons level and the rank of the gauge group are exchanged. In this paper, we explore the consequences of this duality in the realm of topological string theory. We show that this duality induces a number of identities between the open Gromov-Witten invariants of the geometries associated with a knot K and its mirror image K ˜ . We show how these identities arise both in the A model and in the dual B model.

  15. Ranking and clustering of nodes in networks with smart teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiotte, R.; Rosvall, M.

    2012-05-01

    Random teleportation is a necessary evil for ranking and clustering directed networks based on random walks. Teleportation enables ergodic solutions, but the solutions must necessarily depend on the exact implementation and parametrization of the teleportation. For example, in the commonly used PageRank algorithm, the teleportation rate must trade off a heavily biased solution with a uniform solution. Here we show that teleportation to links rather than nodes enables a much smoother trade-off and effectively more robust results. We also show that, by not recording the teleportation steps of the random walker, we can further reduce the effect of teleportation with dramatic effects on clustering.

  16. An Investigation of the Relationship between University Rankings and Graduate Starting Wages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, David

    2014-01-01

    The rise of global university rankings has garnered much attention in recent years. Various ranking systems exist, but all are conceptually similar in that universities are evaluated and ranked on the basis of comparable indicators, with a focus on research performance. Although these rankings are widely criticised as over-simplistic and…

  17. 5 CFR 451.301 - Ranks for the Senior Executive Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ranks for the Senior Executive Service... REGULATIONS AWARDS Presidential Rank Awards § 451.301 Ranks for the Senior Executive Service. (a) The circumstances under which the President may award the rank of Distinguished Executive and Meritorious...

  18. In Search of a Better Mousetrap: A Look at Higher Education Ranking Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swail, Watson Scott

    2011-01-01

    College rankings create much talk and discussion in the higher education arena. This love/hate relationship has not necessarily resulted in better rankings, but rather, more rankings. This paper looks at some of the measures and pitfalls of the current rankings systems, and proposes areas for improvement through a better focus on teaching and…

  19. A FORTRAN program for ranking and for calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kempi, V

    1985-11-01

    A FORTRAN IV program is presented for ranking data in ascending order. The ranks corrected for ties are printed together with the corresponding raw data, if requested. After ranking, the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, rs, as well as the corresponding t-value, can be calculated. In these calculations corrections are made for tied values.

  20. ContrastRank: a new method for ranking putative cancer driver genes and classification of tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Basu, Malay K.; Capriotti, Emidio

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recent advance in high-throughput sequencing technologies is generating a huge amount of data that are becoming an important resource for deciphering the genotype underlying a given phenotype. Genome sequencing has been extensively applied to the study of the cancer genomes. Although a few methods have been already proposed for the detection of cancer-related genes, their automatic identification is still a challenging task. Using the genomic data made available by The Cancer Genome Atlas Consortium (TCGA), we propose a new prioritization approach based on the analysis of the distribution of putative deleterious variants in a large cohort of cancer samples. Results: In this paper, we present ContastRank, a new method for the prioritization of putative impaired genes in cancer. The method is based on the comparison of the putative defective rate of each gene in tumor versus normal and 1000 genome samples. We show that the method is able to provide a ranked list of putative impaired genes for colon, lung and prostate adenocarcinomas. The list significantly overlaps with the list of known cancer driver genes previously published. More importantly, by using our scoring approach, we can successfully discriminate between TCGA normal and tumor samples. A binary classifier based on ContrastRank score reaches an overall accuracy >90% and the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) >0.95 for all the three types of adenocarcinoma analyzed in this paper. In addition, using ContrastRank score, we are able to discriminate the three tumor types with a minimum overall accuracy of 77% and AUC of 0.83. Conclusions: We describe ContrastRank, a method for prioritizing putative impaired genes in cancer. The method is based on the comparison of exome sequencing data from different cohorts and can detect putative cancer driver genes. ContrastRank can also be used to estimate a global score for an individual genome about the risk of