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Sample records for 11-cis 4-oh retinal

  1. Low aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinal limits the rate of pigment formation and dark adaptation in salamander rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Boyer, Nicholas P; Nickle, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Kalyan S; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K; Oprian, Daniel; Cornwall, M Carter

    2012-06-01

    We report experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinoids plays a significant role in the rate of visual pigment regeneration. Therefore, we have compared the aqueous solubility and the partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes of native 11-cis-retinal and an analogue retinoid, 11-cis 4-OH retinal, which has a significantly higher solubility in aqueous medium. We have then correlated these parameters with the rates of pigment regeneration and sensitivity recovery that are observed when bleached intact salamander rod photoreceptors are treated with physiological solutions containing these retinoids. We report the following results: (a) 11-cis 4-OH retinal is more soluble in aqueous buffer than 11-cis-retinal. (b) Both 11-cis-retinal and 11-cis 4-OH retinal have extremely high partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes, though the partition coefficient of 11-cis-retinal is roughly 50-fold greater than that of 11-cis 4-OH retinal. (c) Intact bleached isolated rods treated with solutions containing equimolar amounts of 11-cis-retinal or 11-cis 4-OH retinal form functional visual pigments that promote full recovery of dark current, sensitivity, and response kinetics. However, rods treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal regenerated on average fivefold faster than rods treated with 11-cis-retinal. (d) Pigment regeneration from recombinant and wild-type opsin in solution is slower when treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal than with 11-cis-retinal. Based on these observations, we propose a model in which aqueous solubility of cis-retinoids within the photoreceptor cytosol can place a limit on the rate of visual pigment regeneration in vertebrate photoreceptors. We conclude that the cytosolic gap between the plasma membrane and the disk membranes presents a bottleneck for retinoid flux that results in slowed pigment regeneration and dark adaptation in rod photoreceptors.

  2. Effects of Infrared Laser Radiation on the In Vitro Isomerization of All-Trans Retinal to 11-Cis Retinal

    PubMed Central

    Liegner, J.; Taboada, J.; Tsin, A. T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro effect of infrared laser light on the isomerization of all-trans retinal dissolved in an ether/hexane and also an ethanol solvent was studied. Pulsed laser energy at 1064 nm was used to drive the molecular reconfiguration of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the conversion. Overall isomerization was minimal (0.2 percent to 1.0 percent), yet, a significant difference in isomerization due to pulsed infrared laser energy over non-modulated monochromatic laser light was detected (up to 168 percent difference). Potentially, pulsed laser radiation tuned to the ethylenic stretch frequency of the C11=C12 bond of retinal may induce rotational changes to the chromophore. PMID:26321787

  3. ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 and chemical isomerization protect photoreceptor cells from the toxic accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal.

    PubMed

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    The visual cycle is a series of enzyme-catalyzed reactions which converts all-trans-retinal to 11-cis-retinal for the regeneration of visual pigments in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Although essential for vision, 11-cis-retinal like all-trans-retinal is highly toxic due to its highly reactive aldehyde group and has to be detoxified by either reduction to retinol or sequestration within retinal-binding proteins. Previous studies have focused on the role of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA4 associated with Stargardt macular degeneration and retinol dehydrogenases (RDH) in the clearance of all-trans-retinal from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. How rod and cone cells prevent the accumulation of 11-cis-retinal in photoreceptor disk membranes in excess of what is required for visual pigment regeneration is not known. Here we show that ABCA4 can transport N-11-cis-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), the Schiff-base conjugate of 11-cis-retinal and PE, from the lumen to the cytoplasmic leaflet of disk membranes. This transport function together with chemical isomerization to its all-trans isomer and reduction to all-trans-retinol by RDH can prevent the accumulation of excess 11-cis-retinal and its Schiff-base conjugate and the formation of toxic bisretinoid compounds as found in ABCA4-deficient mice and individuals with Stargardt macular degeneration. This segment of the visual cycle in which excess 11-cis-retinal is converted to all-trans-retinol provides a rationale for the unusually high content of PE and its long-chain unsaturated docosahexaenoyl group in photoreceptor membranes and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for Stargardt macular degeneration.

  4. Identification of the 11-cis-specific retinyl-ester synthase in retinal Müller cells as multifunctional O-acyltransferase (MFAT)

    PubMed Central

    Kaylor, Joanna J.; Cook, Jeremy D.; Makshanoff, Jacob; Bischoff, Nicholas; Yong, Jennifer; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of a photon by a rhodopsin or cone-opsin pigment isomerizes its 11-cis-retinaldehyde (11-cis-RAL) chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde (all-trans-RAL), which dissociates after a brief period of activation. Light sensitivity is restored to the resulting apo-opsin when it recombines with another 11-cis-RAL. Conversion of all-trans-RAL to 11-cis-RAL is carried out by an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium. A second visual cycle is present in Müller cells of the retina. The retinol isomerase for this noncanonical pathway is dihydroceramide desaturase (DES1), which catalyzes equilibrium isomerization of retinol. Because 11-cis-retinol (11-cis-ROL) constitutes only a small fraction of total retinols in an equilibrium mixture, a subsequent step involving selective removal of 11-cis-ROL is required to drive synthesis of 11-cis-retinoids for production of visual chromophore. Selective esterification of 11-cis-ROL is one possibility. Crude homogenates of chicken retinas rapidly convert all-trans-ROL to 11-cis-retinyl esters (11-cis-REs) with minimal formation of other retinyl-ester isomers. This enzymatic activity implies the existence of an 11-cis-specific retinyl-ester synthase in Müller cells. Here, we evaluated multifunctional O-acyltransferase (MFAT) as a candidate for this 11-cis-RE-synthase. MFAT exhibited much higher catalytic efficiency as a synthase of 11-cis-REs versus other retinyl-ester isomers. Further, we show that MFAT is expressed in Müller cells. Finally, homogenates of cells coexpressing DES1 and MFAT catalyzed the conversion of all-trans-ROL to 11-cis-RP, similar to what we observed with chicken-retina homogenates. MFAT is therefore an excellent candidate for the retinyl-ester synthase that cooperates with DES1 to drive synthesis of 11-cis-retinoids by mass action. PMID:24799687

  5. Thermal decay of rhodopsin: role of hydrogen bonds in thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in the binding site and hydrolysis of protonated Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Monica Yun; Nguyen, Jennifer B; Bhagat, Aditi; Mooney, Victoria; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2009-07-01

    Although thermal stability of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is directly related to its extremely low dark noise level and has recently generated considerable interest, the chemistry behind the thermal decay process of rhodopsin has remained unclear. Using UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC analysis, we have demonstrated that the thermal decay of rhodopsin involves both hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base and thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal. Examining the unfolding of rhodopsin by circular dichroism spectroscopy and measuring the rate of thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in solution, we conclude that the observed thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal happens when 11-cis retinal is in the binding pocket of rhodopsin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that solvent deuterium isotope effects are involved in the thermal decay process by decreasing the rates of thermal isomerization and hydrolysis, suggesting that the rate-determining step of these processes involves breaking hydrogen bonds. These results provide insight into understanding the critical role of an extensive hydrogen-bonding network on stabilizing the inactive state of rhodopsin and contribute to our current understanding of the low dark noise level of rhodopsin, which enables this specialized protein to function as an extremely sensitive biological light detector. Because similar hydrogen-bonding networks have also been suggested by structural analysis of two other GPCRs, beta1 and beta2 adrenergic receptors, our results could reveal a general role of hydrogen bonds in facilitating GPCR function.

  6. Biochemical Measurements of Free Opsin in Macular Degeneration Eyes: Examining the 11-CIS Retinal Deficiency Hypothesis of Delayed Dark Adaptation (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Anne; Neikirk, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer; Kono, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed dark adaptation in patients with macular degeneration is due to an excess of free unliganded opsin (apo-opsin) and a deficiency of the visual chromophore, 11 -cis retinal, in rod outer segments. A total of 50 human autopsy eyes were harvested from donors with and without macular degeneration within 2-24 hrs. postmortem. Protocols were developed which permitted dark adaptation of normal human eyes after death and enucleation. Biochemical methods of purifying rod outer segments were optimized and the concentration of rhodopsin and apo-opsin was measured with UV-visible scanning spectroscopy. The presence of apo-opsin was calculated by measuring the difference in the rhodopsin absorption spectra before and after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. A total of 20 normal eyes and 16 eyes from donors with early, intermediate and advanced stages of macular degeneration were included in the final analysis. Dark adaptation was achieved by harvesting whole globes in low light, transferring into dark (light-proof) canisters and dissecting the globes using infrared light and image converters for visualization. Apo-opsin was readily detected in positive controls after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. Normal autopsy eyes showed no evidence of apo-opsin. Eyes with macular degeneration also showed no evidence of apo-opsin, regardless of the severity of disease. Methods have been developed to study dark adaptation in human autopsy eyes. Eyes with age-related macular degeneration do not show a deficiency of 11 -cis retinal or an excess of apo-opsin within rod outer segments.

  7. RDH13L, an enzyme responsible for the aldehyde-alcohol redox coupling reaction (AL-OL coupling reaction) to supply 11-cis retinal in the carp cone retinoid cycle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Miyazono, Sadaharu; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru

    2015-01-30

    Cone photoreceptors require effective pigment regeneration mechanisms to maintain their sensitivity in the light. Our previous studies in carp cones suggested the presence of an unconventional and very effective mechanism to produce 11-cis retinal, the necessary component in pigment regeneration. In this reaction (aldehyde-alcohol redox coupling reaction, AL-OL coupling reaction), formation of 11-cis retinal, i.e. oxidation of 11-cis retinol is coupled to reduction of an aldehyde at a 1:1 molar ratio without exogenous NADP(H) which is usually required in this kind of reaction. Here, we identified carp retinol dehydrogenase 13-like (RDH13L) as an enzyme catalyzing the AL-OL coupling reaction. RDH13L was partially purified from purified carp cones, identified as a candidate protein, and its AL-OL coupling activity was confirmed using recombinant RDH13L. We further examined the substrate specificity, subcellular localization, and expression level of RDH13L. Based on these results, we concluded that RDH13L contributes to a significant part, but not all, of the AL-OL coupling activity in carp cones. RDH13L contained tightly bound NADP(+) which presumably functions as a cofactor in the reaction. Mouse RDH14, a mouse homolog of carp RDH13L, also showed the AL-OL coupling activity. Interestingly, although carp cone membranes, carp RDH13L and mouse RDH14 all showed the coupling activity at 15-37 °C, they also showed a conventional NADP(+)-dependent 11-cis retinol oxidation activity above 25 °C without addition of aldehydes. This dual mechanism of 11-cis retinal synthesis attained by carp RDH13L and mouse RDH14 probably contribute to effective pigment regeneration in cones that function in the light. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Effect of 11-Cis 13-Demethylretinal on Phototransduction in Bleach-Adapted Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Corson, D.Wesley; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Cornwall, M. Carter; Crouch, Rosalie K.

    2000-01-01

    We used 11-cis 13-demethylretinal to examine the physiological consequences of retinal's noncovalent interaction with opsin in intact rod and cone photoreceptors during visual pigment regeneration. 11-Cis 13-demethylretinal is an analog of 11-cis retinal in which the 13 position methyl group has been removed. Biochemical experiments have shown that it is capable of binding in the chromophore pocket of opsin, forming a Schiff-base linkage with the protein to produce a pigment, but at a much slower rate than the native 11-cis retinal (Nelson, R., J. Kim deReil, and A. Kropf. 1970. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA. 66:531–538). Experimentally, this slow rate of pigment formation should allow separate physiological examination of the effects of the initial binding of retinal in the pocket and the subsequent formation of the protonated Schiff-base linkage. Currents from solitary rods and cones from the tiger salamander were recorded in darkness before and after bleaching and then after exposure to 11-cis 13-demethylretinal. In bleach-adapted rods, 11-cis 13-demethylretinal caused transient activation of phototransduction, as evidenced by a decrease of the dark current and sensitivity, acceleration of the dim flash responses, and activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase and guanylyl cyclase. The steady state of phototransduction activity was still higher than that of the bleach-adapted rod. In contrast, exposure of bleach-adapted cones to 11-cis 13-demethylretinal resulted in an immediate deactivation of transduction as measured by the same parameters. These results extend the validity of a model for the effects of the noncovalent binding of a retinoid in the chromophore pockets of rod and cone opsins to analogs capable of forming a Schiff-base and imply that the noncovalent binding by itself may play a role for the dark adaptation of photoreceptors. PMID:10919871

  9. The role of 11-cis-retinyl esters in vertebrate cone vision.

    PubMed

    Babino, Darwin; Perkins, Brian D; Kindermann, Aljoscha; Oberhauser, Vitus; von Lintig, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A cycle of cis-to-trans isomerization of the chromophore is intrinsic to vertebrate vision where rod and cone photoreceptors mediate dim- and bright-light vision, respectively. Daylight illumination can greatly exceed the rate at which the photoproduct can be recycled back to the chromophore by the canonical visual cycle. Thus, an additional supply pathway(s) must exist to sustain cone-dependent vision. Two-photon microscopy revealed that the eyes of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) contain high levels of 11-cis-retinyl esters (11-REs) within the retinal pigment epithelium. HPLC analyses demonstrate that 11-REs are bleached by bright light and regenerated in the dark. Pharmacologic treatment with all-trans-retinylamine (Ret-NH2), a potent and specific inhibitor of the trans-to-cis reisomerization reaction of the canonical visual cycle, impeded the regeneration of 11-REs. Intervention with 11-cis-retinol restored the regeneration of 11-REs in the presence of all-trans-Ret-NH2. We used the XOPS:mCFP transgenic zebrafish line with a functional cone-only retina to directly demonstrate that this 11-RE cycle is critical to maintain vision under bright-light conditions. Thus, our analyses reveal that a dark-generated pool of 11-REs helps to supply photoreceptors with the chromophore under the varying light conditions present in natural environments. © FASEB.

  10. Conditional Ablation of Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Causes Delayed Dark Adaption in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Sun, Wenyu; Perusek, Lindsay; Parmar, Vipulkumar; Le, Yun-Zheng; Griswold, Michael D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is a crucial step in the visual cycle required to sustain vision. This cycle consists of sequential biochemical reactions that occur in photoreceptor cells and the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Oxidation of 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal is accomplished by a family of enzymes termed 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenases, including RDH5 and RDH11. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh11 does not limit the production of 11-cis-retinal in mice. Here we describe a third retinol dehydrogenase in the RPE, RDH10, which can produce 11-cis-retinal. Mice with a conditional knock-out of Rdh10 in RPE cells (Rdh10 cKO) displayed delayed 11-cis-retinal regeneration and dark adaption after bright light illumination. Retinal function measured by electroretinogram after light exposure was also delayed in Rdh10 cKO mice as compared with controls. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh10 (cDKO) in mice caused elevated 11/13-cis-retinyl ester content also seen in Rdh5−/−Rdh11−/− mice as compared with Rdh5−/− mice. Normal retinal morphology was observed in 6-month-old Rdh10 cKO and cDKO mice, suggesting that loss of Rdh10 in the RPE does not negatively affect the health of the retina. Compensatory expression of other retinol dehydrogenases was observed in both Rdh5−/− and Rdh10 cKO mice. These results indicate that RDH10 acts in cooperation with other RDH isoforms to produce the 11-cis-retinal chromophore needed for vision. PMID:26391396

  11. Highly efficient retinal metabolism in cones

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Shimauchi-Matsukawa, Yoshie; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    After bleaching of visual pigment in vertebrate photoreceptors, all-trans retinal is reduced to all-trans retinol by retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs). We investigated this reaction in purified carp rods and cones, and we found that the reducing activity toward all-trans retinal in the outer segment (OS) of cones is >30 times higher than that of rods. The high activity of RDHs was attributed to high content of RDH8 in cones. In the inner segment (IS) in both rods and cones, RDH8L2 and RDH13 were found to be the major enzymes among RDH family proteins. We further found a previously undescribed and effective pathway to convert 11-cis retinol to 11-cis retinal in cones: this oxidative conversion did not require NADP+ and instead was coupled with reduction of all-trans retinal to all-trans retinol. The activity was >50 times effective than the oxidizing activity of RDHs that require NADP+. These highly effective reactions of removal of all-trans retinal by RDH8 and production of 11-cis retinal by the coupling reaction are probably the underlying mechanisms that ensure effective visual pigment regeneration in cones that function under much brighter light conditions than rods. PMID:18836074

  12. Ionothermal synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic study of Co2PO4OH isostructural with caminite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangmei; Valldor, Martin; Spielberg, Eike T; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-03-17

    A new framework cobalt(II) hydroxyl phosphate, Co2PO4OH, was prepared by ionothermal synthesis using 1-butyl-4-methyl-pyridinium hexafluorophosphate as the ionic liquid. As the formation of Co2PO4F competes in the synthesis, the synthesis conditions have to be judiciously chosen to obtain well-crystallized, single phase Co2PO4OH. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal Co2PO4OH crystallizes with space group I41/amd (a = b = 5.2713(7) Å, c = 12.907(3) Å, V = 358.63(10) Å(3), and Z = 4). Astonishingly, it does not crystallize isotypically with Co2PO4F but rather isotypically with the hydroxyl minerals caminite Mg1.33[SO4(OH)0.66(H2O)0.33] and lipscombite Fe(2–y)PO4(OH) (0 ≤ y ≤ 2/3). Phosphate tetrahedra groups interconnect four rod-packed face-sharing ∞(1){CoO(6/2)} octahedra chains to form a three-dimensional framework structure. The compound Co2PO4OH was further characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform–infrared, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, confirming the discussed structure. The magnetic measurement reveals that Co2PO4OH undergoes a magnetic transition and presents at low temperatures a canted antiferromagnetic spin order in the ground state.

  13. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  14. Crystal structure of tetra­wickmanite, Mn2+Sn4+(OH)6

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Barbara; Yang, Hexiong; Downs, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of tetra­wickmanite, ideally Mn2+Sn4+(OH)6 [mangan­ese(II) tin(IV) hexa­hydroxide], has been determined based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected from a natural sample from Långban, Sweden. Tetra­wickmanite belongs to the octa­hedral-framework group of hydroxide-perovskite minerals, described by the general formula BB’(OH)6 with a perovskite derivative structure. The structure differs from that of an ABO3 perovskite in that the A site is empty while each O atom is bonded to an H atom. The perovskite B-type cations split into ordered B and B′ sites, which are occupied by Mn2+ and Sn4+, respectively. Tetra­wickmanite exhibits tetra­gonal symmetry and is topologically similar to its cubic polymorph, wickmanite. The tetra­wickmanite structure is characterized by a framework of alternating corner-linked [Mn2+(OH)6] and [Sn4+(OH)6] octa­hedra, both with point-group symmetry -1. Four of the five distinct H atoms in the structure are statistically disordered. The vacant A site is in a cavity in the centre of a distorted cube formed by eight octa­hedra at the corners. However, the hydrogen-atom positions and their hydrogen bonds are not equivalent in every cavity, resulting in two distinct environments. One of the cavities contains a ring of four hydrogen bonds, similar to that found in wickmanite, while the other cavity is more distorted and forms crankshaft-type chains of hydrogen bonds, as previously proposed for tetra­gonal stottite, Fe2+Ge4+(OH)6. PMID:25878828

  15. Regeneration of bovine and octopus opsins in situ with natural and artificial retinals

    SciTech Connect

    Koutalos, Y.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.

    1989-03-21

    The authors consider the problem of color regulation in visual pigments for both bovine rhodopsin and octopus rhodopsin. Both pigments have 11-cis-retinal as their chromophore. These rhodopsins were bleached in their native membranes, and the opsins were regenerated with natural and artificial chromophores. Both bovine and octopus opsins were regenerated with the 9-cis- and 11-cis-retinal isomers, but the octopus opsin was additionally regenerated with the 13-cis and all-trans isomers. Titration of the octopus opsin with 11-cis-retinal gave an extinction coefficient for octopus rhodopsin of 27,000 {plus minus} 3,000 M{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} at 475 nm. The absorption maxima of bovinemore » artificial pigments formed by regenerating opsin with the 11-cis dihydro series of chromophores support a color regulation model for bovine rhodopsin in which the chromophore-binding site of the protein has two negative charges: one directly hydrogen bonded to the Schiff base nitrogen and another near carbon-13. Formation of octopus artificial pigments with both all-trans and 11-cis dihydro chromophores leads to a similar model for octopus rhodopsin and metarhodopsin: there are two negative charges in the chromophore-binding site, one directly hydrogen bonded to the Schiff base nitrogen and a second near carbon-13. The interaction of this second charge with the chromophore in octopus rhodopsin is weaker than in bovine, while in metarhodopsin it is as strong as in bovine.« less

  16. Lipofuscin and N-Retinylidene-N-Retinylethanolamine (A2E) Accumulate in Retinal Pigment Epithelium in Absence of Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nicholas P.; Higbee, Daniel; Currin, Mark B.; Blakeley, Lorie R.; Chen, Chunhe; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    The age-dependent accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been associated with the development of retinal diseases, particularly age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. A major component of lipofuscin is the bis-retinoid N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). The current model for the formation of A2E requires photoactivation of rhodopsin and subsequent release of all-trans-retinal. To understand the role of light exposure in the accumulation of lipofuscin and A2E, we analyzed RPEs and isolated rod photoreceptors from mice of different ages and strains, reared either in darkness or cyclic light. Lipofuscin levels were determined by fluorescence imaging, whereas A2E levels were quantified by HPLC and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The identity of A2E was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Lipofuscin and A2E levels in the RPE increased with age and more so in the Stargardt model Abca4−/− than in the wild type strains 129/sv and C57Bl/6. For each strain, the levels of lipofuscin precursor fluorophores in dark-adapted rods and the levels and rates of increase of RPE lipofuscin and A2E were not different between dark-reared and cyclic light-reared animals. Both 11-cis- and all-trans-retinal generated lipofuscin-like fluorophores when added to metabolically compromised rod outer segments; however, it was only 11-cis-retinal that generated such fluorophores when added to metabolically intact rods. The results suggest that lipofuscin originates from the free 11-cis-retinal that is continuously supplied to the rod for rhodopsin regeneration and outer segment renewal. The physiological role of Abca4 may include the translocation of 11-cis-retinal complexes across the disk membrane. PMID:22570475

  17. Stability and Degradation Mechanisms of Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing the Zr6O4(OH)4 Secondary Building Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-18

    0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Stability and degradation mechanisms of metal ...Stability and degradation mechanisms of metal –organic frameworks containing the Zr6O4(OH)4 secondary building unit Report Title See publication. 3...Stability and degradation mechanisms of metal –organic frameworks containing the Zr6O4(OH)4 secondary building unit Approved for public release; distribution

  18. Theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis-, and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Nozirov, Farhod, E-mail: teobaldk@gmail.com, E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com; Stachów, Michał, E-mail: michal.stachow@gmail.com; Kupka, Teobald, E-mail: teobaldk@gmail.com, E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis- and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes is reported. The results obtained using density functional theory (DFT) combined with large basis sets and gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations were critically compared with experiment and conventional, higher level correlated electronic structure methods. Accurate structural, vibrational, and NMR parameters of difluoroethylenes were obtained using several density functionals combined with dedicated basis sets. B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) optimized structures of difluoroethylenes closely reproduced experimental geometries and earlier reported benchmark coupled cluster results, while BLYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) produced accurate harmonic vibrational frequencies. The most accurate vibrations were obtained using B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd)more » with correction for anharmonicity. Becke half and half (BHandH) density functional predicted more accurate {sup 19}F isotropic shieldings and van Voorhis and Scuseria's τ-dependent gradient-corrected correlation functional yielded better carbon shieldings than B3LYP. A surprisingly good performance of Hartree-Fock (HF) method in predicting nuclear shieldings in these molecules was observed. Inclusion of zero-point vibrational correction markedly improved agreement with experiment for nuclear shieldings calculated by HF, MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods but worsened the DFT results. The threefold improvement in accuracy when predicting {sup 2}J(FF) in 1,1-difluoroethylene for BHandH density functional compared to B3LYP was observed (the deviations from experiment were −46 vs. −115 Hz)« less

  19. Spectral characterization of guanine C4-OH adduct: a radiation and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Phadatare, Suvarna D; Sharma, Kiran Kumar K; Rao, B S M; Naumov, S; Sharma, Geeta K

    2011-11-24

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) with guanine was investigated under restricted pH condition (pH 4.6) using pulse radiolysis technique. The time-resolved optical transient absorption spectra showed two peaks centered at 300 and 330 nm at 4 μs after the pulse which exhibited different reactivity toward molecular oxygen (O(2)). The peak at 300 nm was found to be relatively more stable than the peak at 330 nm. The peak corresponding to 330 nm decayed within 20 μs having a first order rate constant 4-7 × 10(4) s(-1) and was pH dependent. On longer time scale, the species decayed by a bimolecular process. The presence of O(2) did not affect its decay rate constant. The (•)OH reacts with guanine at pH 4.6 with a diffusion-controlled second order rate constant of ≥1 × 10(10) mol(-1) dm(3) s(-1). The reaction of Br(2)(•-), O(2)(•-), and 2-hydroxy-2-propyl radical with guanine was also investigated to differentiate among the one-electron oxidized, one-electron reduced species of guanine and the guanine-OH adducts formed in the reaction of (•)OH at pH 4.6. On the basis of the spectral characteristics and reactivity toward O(2), two guanine-OH adduct species were identified (i) the C4-OH adduct species absorbing at 330 nm which has not been reported so far and (ii) the C8-OH adduct species absorbing at 300 nm in agreement with the known literature absorption features. Quantum chemical calculations using BHandHLYP with 6-31+G(d,p) basis set and excited state calculations using TDDFT for all possible transients complement the assignment of the observed spectral peak at 330 nm to the C4-OH adduct of guanine. Furthermore, steady state radiolysis revealed the formation of 8-hydroxy-guanine whose precursor is known to be the C8-OH adduct species. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Spectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the interaction between PAMAM G4-OH and 5-fluorouracil in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Adam; Urbaniak, Pawel; Piekarski, Henryk; Palecz, Bartlomiej

    2017-01-01

    The results of spectroscopic measurements (an increase in solubility, equilibrium dialysis, 1H NMR titration) and calorimetric measurements (isothermal titration ITC) indicate spontaneous (ΔG < 0) binding of 5-fluorouracil molecules by PAMAM G4-OH dendrimer with terminal hydroxyl groups in an aqueous solution. PAMAM G4-OH dendrimer bonds about n = 8 ± 1 molecules of the drug with an equilibrium constant of K = 70 ± 10. The process of saturating the dendrimer active sites by the drug molecules is exothermal (ΔH < 0) and is accompanied by an advantageous change in entropy (ΔS > 0). The parameters of binding 5-fluorouracil by PAMAM G4-OH dendrimer were compared with those of binding this drug by the macromolecules of PAMAM G3-OH and G5-OH.

  1. Impact of calcium ion on cytotoxic effect of the boroxine derivative, K2[B3O3F4OH].

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Sinisa; Stojkovic, Ranko; Maksimovic, Milka; Galic, Borivoj; Milos, Mladen

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Ca 2+ ions on the cytotoxic ability of boron heterocyclic compound dipotassium-trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate (K 2 [B 3 O 3 F 4 OH]), on in vitro tumor cells (mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1, melanoma B16F10 and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII) and non-tumoral fibroblast cells (mouse dermal L929 and hamster lung V79) was examined. At small concentrations of Ca 2+ ions (0.42 mM), K 2 [B 3 O 3 F 4 OH] (3.85 mM) has a very strong cytotoxic effect on all cancer cells tested (89.1, 85.6 and 84.6%) and significantly less effect on normal cells (19.5 and 24.2%), respectively. Applying larger concentrations of Ca 2+ ions (9.42-72.42 mM), at the same concentration of K 2 [B 3 O 3 F 4 OH], no significant cytotoxic effect was detected on cancer cells and normal cells investigated. The selective ability of K 2 [B 3 O 3 F 4 OH], in the medium with a low concentration of Ca 2+ ions has a strong cytotoxic effect on cancer cells and very weak effect in normal cells, opens up the possibility of its application in antitumor therapy.

  2. CMV retinitis

    MedlinePlus

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is a viral infection of the retina of the eye resulting in inflammation. ... CMV retinitis is caused by a member of a group of herpes-type viruses. Infection with CMV ...

  3. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001029.htm Retinitis pigmentosa To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retinitis pigmentosa is an eye disease in which there is ...

  4. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  5. Retinal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Listen Retinal Diseases Macular Degeneration Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that causes ... is the most common form of inherited juvenile macular degeneration. The progressive vision loss associated with Stargardt disease ...

  6. Determination of the crystal structure and composition of Li6Be4OH12 by the stochastic method.

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, L

    1990-01-01

    Because of the failure to find a structure for LiBeH3 with a face-centered unit cube with edge 5.09 A, the x-ray powder pattern has been reindexed for a body-centered unit cube with edge 7.24 A. Application of the principles of structural chemistry leads to the formula Li6Be4OH12 and to a structure involving Be4OH12 clusters formed by 4 BeOH3 tetrahedra with their O corner shared, Be--(H,O) bond length 1.59 A, and with the clusters joined to one another by Li with octahedral or rectangular-planar coordination of 6 H or 4 H, Li-H bond lengths about 1.92 A. PMID:11607052

  7. Determination of the crystal structure and composition of Li6Be4OH12 by the stochastic method.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1990-01-01

    Because of the failure to find a structure for LiBeH3 with a face-centered unit cube with edge 5.09 A, the x-ray powder pattern has been reindexed for a body-centered unit cube with edge 7.24 A. Application of the principles of structural chemistry leads to the formula Li6Be4OH12 and to a structure involving Be4OH12 clusters formed by 4 BeOH3 tetrahedra with their O corner shared, Be--(H,O) bond length 1.59 A, and with the clusters joined to one another by Li with octahedral or rectangular-planar coordination of 6 H or 4 H, Li-H bond lengths about 1.92 A.

  8. Magnetic excitations from an S=1/2 diamond-shaped tetramer compound Cu 2PO 4OH

    DOE PAGES

    Matsuda, Masaaki; Dissanayake, Sachith E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; ...

    2015-11-30

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have been carried out on a powder sample of Cu 2PO 4OH, which consists of diamond-shaped tetramer spin units with S=1/2. We have observed two nearly dispersionless magnetic excitations at E 1 ~2 and E 2 ~0 meV, whose energy width are broader than the instrumental resolution. The simplest square tetramer model with one dominant interaction, which predicts two sharp excitation peaks at E 1 and E 2(=2E 1), does not explain the experimental result. We found that two diagonal intratetramer interactions compete with the main interaction and weak intertetramer interactions connect the tetramers. The mainmore » intratetramer interaction is found to split into two inequivalent ones due to a structural distortion below 160 K. Cu 2PO 4OH is considered to be a good material to study the S=1/2 Heisenberg tetramer system.« less

  9. NTP toxicology and carcinogensis Studies of 2,4-hexadienal (89% trans,trans isomer, CAS No. 142-83-6; 11% cis,trans isomer) (Gavage Studies).

    PubMed

    2003-10-01

    2,4-Hexadienal, a colorless to yellow liquid with a pungent "green" or citrus odor, is used as a food additive for flavor enhancement, as a fragrance agent, as a starting material or intermediate in synthetic reactions in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, as a fumigant, and as a corrosion inhibitor for steel. 2,4-Hexadienal was nominated for study by the National Cancer Institute because of the potential for carcinogenicity based on its alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde structure and the potential link between exposure to lipid peroxidation products in the diet and human malignancies. The commercial product is a mixture containing chiefly trans,trans-2,4-hexadienal in equilibrium with cis,trans-2,4-hexadienal. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice received 2,4-hexadienal (89% trans,trans; 11% cis,trans) in corn oil by gavage for 16 days, 14 weeks, or 2 years. Tissues and plasma from dosed rats were examined for malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations, and DNA adducts were characterized in liver and forestomach samples from dosed rats and mice. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, rat and mouse bone marrow cells, and mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were administered 0, 3, 9, 27, 80, or 240 mg 2,4-hexadienal/kg body weight in corn oil by gavage, 5 days per week, for 16 days. Three male and three female 240 mg/kg rats died before the end of the study. Mean body weight gains of 240 mg/kg rats were significantly less than those of the vehicle controls. Clinical findings included diarrhea, ataxia, lethargy, and nasal/eye discharge in males, and lethargy, paleness, and abnormal breathing in females in the 240 mg/kg groups. Liver weights of 240 mg/kg females were significantly greater than those of the vehicle controls. Gross and microscopic lesions indicative of forestomach necrosis and ulceration were present in most 240 mg/kg rats, and forestomach

  10. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D.; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators. PMID:26075817

  11. High performance sodium-ion hybrid capacitor based on Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Binson; Shaijumon, M. M.

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid Na-ion capacitors bridge the performance gap between Na-ion batteries and supercapacitors and offer excellent energy and power characteristics. However, designing efficient anode and cathode materials with improved kinetics and long cycle life is essential for practical implementation of this technology. Herein, layered sodium titanium oxide hydroxide, Na2Ti2O4(OH)2, synthesized through hydrothermal technique, is studied as efficient anode material for hybrid Na-ion capacitor. Half-cell electrochemical studies vs. Na/Na+ showed excellent performance for Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 electrode, with ∼57.2% of the total capacity (323.3 C g-1 at 1.0 mV s-1) dominated by capacitive behavior and the remaining due to Na-intercalation. The obtained values are in good agreement with Trasatti plots indicating the potential of this material as efficient anode for hybrid Na-ion capacitor. Further, a full cell Na-ion capacitor is fabricated with Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 as anode and chemically activated Rice Husk Derived Porous Carbon (RHDPC-KOH) as cathode by using organic electrolyte. The hybrid device, operated at a maximum cell voltage of 4 V, exhibits stable electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of ∼65 Wh kg-1 (at 500 W kg-1, 0.20 A g-1) and with more than ∼ 93% capacitive retention after 3000 cycles.

  12. Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently miscommunicate in consulting on patients with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent papers on this diagnosis. Recent findings 1) The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease have recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; 2) Behçet’s disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; 3) retinal imaging including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; 4) although monoclonal antibodies to IL-17A or IL-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet’s disease, antibodies to TNF alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. Summary Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet’s disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of non-infectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management. PMID:26945335

  13. The Visual Cycle in the Inner Retina of Chicken and the Involvement of Retinal G-Protein-Coupled Receptor (RGR).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Nicolás M; Morera, Luis P; Tempesti, Tomas; Guido, Mario E

    2017-05-01

    The vertebrate retina contains typical photoreceptor (PR) cones and rods responsible for day/night vision, respectively, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involved in the regulation of non-image-forming tasks. Rhodopsin/cone opsin photopigments in visual PRs or melanopsin (Opn4) in ipRGCs utilizes retinaldehyde as a chromophore. The retinoid regeneration process denominated as "visual cycle" involves the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or Müller glial cells. Opn4, on the contrary, has been characterized as a bi/tristable photopigment, in which a photon of one wavelength isomerizes 11-cis to all-trans retinal (Ral), with a second photon re-isomerizing it back. However, it is unknown how the chromophore is further metabolized in the inner retina. Nor is it yet clear whether an alternative secondary cycle occurs involving players such as the retinal G-protein-coupled receptor (RGR), a putative photoisomerase of unidentified inner retinal activity. Here, we investigated the role of RGR in retinoid photoisomerization in Opn4x (Xenopus ortholog) (+) RGC primary cultures free of RPE and other cells from chicken embryonic retinas. Opn4x (+) RGCs display significant photic responses by calcium fluorescent imaging and photoisomerize exogenous all-trans to 11-cis Ral and other retinoids. RGR was found to be expressed in developing retina and in primary cultures; when its expression was knocked down, the levels of 11-cis, all-trans Ral, and all-trans retinol in cultures exposed to light were significantly higher and those in all-trans retinyl esters lower than in dark controls. The results support a novel role for RGR in ipRGCs to modulate retinaldehyde levels in light, keeping the balance of inner retinal retinoid pools.

  14. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomered product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing FDA-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by mass spectrometry. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that displays features of Stargardt’s and age-related retinal degeneration. PMID:22198730

  15. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 20 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids; cryotherapy; daunorubicin; fluorouracil plus low-molecular-weight heparin; laser photocoagulation; pneumatic retinopexy; scleral buckling; short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade; silicone oil tamponade; and vitrectomy. PMID:19450333

  16. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal "break" allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent progression from retinal breaks or lattice degeneration to retinal detachment? What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, cryotherapy, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, laser photocoagulation, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:21406128

  17. In vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of the halogenated boroxine dipotassium-trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate (K2[B3O3F4OH]).

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Sinisa; Stojkovic, Ranko; Galic, Zoran; Galic, Borivoj; Ostojic, Jelena; Marasovic, Maja; Milos, Mladen

    2015-06-01

    Dipotassium-trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K2[B3O3F4OH] was listed as a promising new therapeutic for cancer diseases. For in vitro and in vivo investigation of its antitumor effects 4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma, B16F10 melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII were used. The detailed in vitro investigation undoubtedly showed that K2[B3O3F4OH] affects the growth of cancer cells. The proliferation of cells depends on the concentration so that aqueous solution of K2[B3O3F4OH], the concentrations of 10(-4) M and less, does not affect cell growth, but the concentrations of 10(-3) M or more, significantly slows cells growth. B16F10 and SCCVII cells show higher sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of K2[B3O3F4OH] compared to 4T1 cells. Under in vivo conditions, K2[B3O3F4OH] slows the growth of all three tumors tested compared to the control, and the inhibitory effect was most pronounced during the application of the substance. There is almost no difference if K2[B3O3F4OH] was applied intraperitoneally, intratumor, peroral or as ointment. Addition of 5-FU did not further increase the antitumor efficacy of K2[B3O3F4OH].

  18. The Relationship of the Silicon Surface Roughness and Gate Oxide Integrity in NH4OH/H2O2 Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, M.; Verhaverbeke, S.; Mertens, P. W.; Heyns, M. M.; Hellemans, L.; Bruynseraede, Y.; Philipossian, A.

    1992-11-01

    In this study some recent findings on the cleaning action of the NH4OH/H2O2 (SC1) step in a pre-gate oxidation cleaning (RCA cleaning) are given. An important parameter in this mixture is the NH4OH/H2O2 ratio. The Fe contamination on the silicon surface after this cleaning step is found to increase upon decreasing the NH4OH/H2O2 ratio. This can be attributed to the incorporation of Fe in the chemical oxide, grown by the hydrogen peroxide. The particle removal efficiency of the cleaning step is found to decrease upon decreasing the NH4OH/H2O2 ratio. On the other hand, using a lower NH4OH concentration results in a less severe silicon surface roughening. It is demonstrated in this study that the NH4OH/H2O2 ratio during the SC1 step of the cleaning is the determining parameter for the breakdown properties of a gate oxide. A (0.25/1/5) NH4OH/H2O2/H2O mixture at 75°C in our experimental conditions is suggested to be the best compromise between particle removal and surface roughness during the SC1 step.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy of the phosphate mineral kovdorskite - Mg2PO4(OH)ṡ3H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Granja, Amanda; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    The mineral kovdorskite Mg2PO4(OH)ṡ3H2O was studied by electron microscopy, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. A comparison of the vibrational spectroscopy of kovdorskite is made with other magnesium bearing phosphate minerals and compounds. Electron probe analysis proves the mineral is very pure. The Raman spectrum is characterized by a band at 965 cm-1 attributed to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Raman bands at 1057 and 1089 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes. Raman bands at 412, 454 and 485 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν2 bending modes. Raman bands at 536, 546 and 574 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν4 bending modes. The Raman spectrum in the OH stretching region is dominated by a very sharp intense band at 3681 cm-1 assigned to the stretching vibration of OH units. Infrared bands observed at 2762, 2977, 3204, 3275 and 3394 cm-1 are attributed to water stretching bands. Vibrational spectroscopy shows that no carbonate bands are observed in the spectra; thus confirming the formula of the mineral as Mg2PO4(OH)ṡ3H2O.

  20. Micro/nano hierarchical structured titanium treated by NH4OH/H2O2 for enhancing cell response

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Kang, Yi; Zuo, Jun; Xie, Youneng; Ma, Li; Ren, Xuelei; Bian, Zeyu; Zhou, Kechao; Wang, Xiyang; Yu, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of titanium surfaces with novel micro/nano hierarchical structures, namely Etched (E) surface and Sandblast and etched (SE) surface, were successfully fabricated by NH4OH and H2O2 mixture. And their cellular responses of MG63 were investigated compared with Sandblast and acid-etching (SLA) surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Surface profiler, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Contact angle instrument were employed to assess the surface morphologies, roughness, chemistry and wettability respectively. Hierarchical structures with micro holes of 10–30 μm in diameter and nano pits of tens of nanometers in diameter formed on both E and SE surfaces. The size of micro holes is very close to osteoblast cell, which makes them wonderful beds for osteoblast. Moreover, these two kinds of surfaces possess similar roughness and superior hydrophilicity to SLA. Reactive oxygen species were detected on E and SE surface, and thus considerable antimicrobial performance and well fixation can be speculated on them. The cell experiments also demonstrated a boost in cell attachment, and that proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were achieved on them, especially on SE surface. The results indicate that the treatment of pure titanium with H2O2/NH4OH is an effective technique to improve the initial stability of implants and enhance the osseointegration, which may be a promising surface treatment to titanium implant. PMID:29723214

  1. Retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment, where a retinal 'break' allows the ingress of fluid from the vitreous cavity to the subretinal space, resulting in retinal separation. It occurs in about 1 in 10,000 people a year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of different surgical interventions in people with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment? What are the effects of interventions to treat proliferative vitreoretinopathy occurring as a complication of retinal detachment or previous treatment for retinal detachment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 14 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, daunorubicin, fluorouracil plus low molecular weight heparin, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, short-acting or long-acting gas tamponade, silicone oil tamponade, and vitrectomy. PMID:24807890

  2. Co5In(BTC)4[B2O4(OH)]2: the first MOF material constructed by borate polyanions and carboxylate mixed ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Sa-Ying; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-07

    A novel heterometallic organic-inorganic hybrid MOF material, Co5In(BTC)4[B2O4(OH)]2, has been synthesized under ionothermal conditions. Its structure is characterized as a 3D open framework constructed by the Co2.5In0.5[B2O4(OH)] cluster and the 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate ligand. Furthermore, its fluorescent and adsorption properties have also been studied.

  3. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  4. Retinol esterification in bovine retinal pigment epithelium: reversibility of lecithin:retinol acyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Saari, J C; Bredberg, D L; Farrell, D F

    1993-01-01

    Esterification of all-trans-retinol is a key reaction of the vertebrate visual cycle, since it produces an insoluble, relatively non-toxic, form of the vitamin for storage and supplies substrate for the isomerization reaction. CoA-dependent and -independent pathways have been described for retinol esterification in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The CoA-independent reaction, catalysed by lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) was examined in more detail in this study. Addition of retinol to RPE microsomes results in a burst of retinyl ester synthesis, followed by a rapid apparent cessation of the reaction. However, [3H]retinol, added when retinyl ester synthesis has apparently ceased, is rapidly incorporated into retinyl ester without a net increase in the amount of ester. The specific radioactivities of [3H]retinol and [3H]retinyl ester reach the same value. [14C]Palmitate from palmitoyl-CoA is incorporated into preexisting retinyl ester in the absence of net ester synthesis, too. These exchange reactions suggest that the reaction has reached equilibrium at the plateau of the progress curve and that only the accumulation of retinyl ester, and not its synthesis, has stopped during this phase of the reaction. Studies with geometrical isomers of retinol revealed that the rate of exchange of all-trans-retinol with all-trans-retinyl esters was about 6 times more rapid than exchange of 11-cis-retinol with 11-cis-retinyl ester. This is the first demonstration of the reversibility of LRAT and the first example of stereospecificity of retinyl ester synthesis in the visual system. Reversal of the LRAT reaction could contribute to the mobilization of 11-cis-retinol from 11-cis-retinyl ester pools. Images Figure 3 PMID:8489497

  5. A novel RPE65 inhibitor CU239 suppresses visual cycle and prevents retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghwa; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Petrukhin, Konstantin; Cioffi, Christopher L; Muthuraman, Parthasarathy; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2018-07-01

    The retinoid visual cycle is an ocular retinoid metabolism specifically dedicated to support vertebrate vision. The visual cycle serves not only to generate light-sensitive visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, but also to clear toxic byproducts of normal visual cycle (i.e. all-trans-retinal and its condensation products) from the retina, ensuring both the visual function and the retinal health. Unfortunately, various conditions including genetic predisposition, environment and aging may attribute to a functional decline of the all-trans-retinal clearance. To combat all-trans-retinal mediated retinal degeneration, we sought to slow down the retinoid influx from the RPE by inhibiting the visual cycle with a small molecule. The present study describes identification of CU239, a novel non-retinoid inhibitor of RPE65, a key enzyme in the visual cycle. Our data demonstrated that CU239 selectively inhibited isomerase activity of RPE65, with IC 50 of 6 μM. Further, our results indicated that CU239 inhibited RPE65 via competition with its substrate all-trans-retinyl ester. Mice with systemic injection of CU239 exhibited delayed chromophore regeneration after light bleach, and conferred a partial protection of the retina against injury from high intensity light. Taken together, CU239 is a potent visual cycle modulator and may have a therapeutic potential for retinal degeneration. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacotherapy of retinal disease with visual cycle modulators.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rehan M; Gregori, Ninel Z; Ciulla, Thomas A; Lam, Byron L

    2018-04-01

    Pharmacotherapy with visual cycle modulators (VCMs) is under investigation for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Stargardt macular dystrophy (SMD) and nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), all blinding diseases that lack effective treatment options. Areas covered: The authors review investigational VCMs, including oral retinoids, 9-cis-retinyl-acetate (zuretinol) and 9-cis-β-carotene, which restore 11-cis-retinal levels in RP and LCA caused by LRAT and RPE65 gene mutations, and may improve visual acuity and visual fields. Therapies for SMD aiming to decrease accumulation of toxic Vitamin A dimers and lipofuscin in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) include C20-D3-vitamin A (ALK-001), isotretinoin, VM200, emixustat, and A1120. Mouse models of SMD show promising data for these treatments, though proof of efficacy in humans is currently lacking. Fenretinide and emixustat are investigational VCMs for dry AMD, though neither has been shown to reduce geographic atrophy or improve vision in human trials. A1120 prevents retinol transport into the RPE and may spare the side effects typically seen in VCMs (nyctalopia and chromatopsia) per mouse studies. Expert opinion: Oral VCMs may be feasible treatment options for degenerative retinal diseases based on pre-clinical and some early clinical studies. Further trials are warranted to assess their efficacy and safety in humans.

  7. Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3(NO3): An Example of SHG Crystal in Metal Bromates Containing π-Conjugated Planar Triangle.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fang; Hu, Chun-Li; Liang, Ming-Li; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2016-01-19

    The first example of SHG crystal in the metal bromates containing π-conjugated planar triangle systems, namely, Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3(NO3), was successfully synthesized via the hydrothermal method. Furthermore, a single crystal of centrosymmetric Pb8O(OH)6(BrO3)6(NO3)2·H2O was also obtained. Both compounds contain similar [Pb4(OH)4] cubane-like tetranuclear clusters, but they display different one-dimensional (1D) chain structures. Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3(NO3) features a zigzag [Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3](+) 1D chain, while Pb8O(OH)6(BrO3)6(NO3)2·H2O is composed of two different orthogonal chains: the linear [Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)2](2+) 1D chain along the b-axis and the zigzag [Pb4O2(OH)2(BrO3)4](2-) 1D chain along the a-axis. The NO3 planar triangles of the compounds are all isolated and located in the spaces of the structures. Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3(NO3) exhibits the first example of SHG crystal in the metal bromates with π-conjugated planar triangle. The second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of Pb4(OH)4(BrO3)3(NO3) is approximately equal to that of KDP and it is phase-matchable. Dipole moment and theory calculations indicate that BrO3, NO3, and PbO4 groups are the origin of its SHG efficiency, although some of the contributions cancel each other out.

  8. Phase change of hydromagnesite, Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 4H2O by thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, G. I.; Kyono, A.; Tamura, T.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the global warming is the most important environment problem, and thus attempts of CO2 geological storage have been made to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere all over the world (XUE and Nakao 2008). Regarding mineral CO2 sequestration, CO2 is chemically stored in solid carbonates by carbonation of minerals. Magnesium and calcium carbonates have long been known as a good CO2 storage. Hydrous magnesium carbonates can be, however, considered as much better candidates for CO2 storage because they precipitate easily from aqueous solutions. The typical hydrous magnesium carbonates are nesquehonite, MgCO3 3H2O and hydromagnesite, Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 4H2O. Concerning their thermal properties, the former has been studied in detail, whereas, the latter is not enough. In this study, we performed in-site high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal (TG-DTA) analyses to reveal the phase change of hydromagnesite at high temperature. The high-temperature XRD and TG-DTA were measured up to 320 oC and 550 oC, respectively. The results of in-site high-temperature XRD showed that, no significant change was observed up to 170 oC. With increasing temperature, the intensities of started to decrease at 200 oC, and all peaks disappeared at 290 oC. Above the temperature of the decomposition a few peaks corresponding to periclase appeared. The results of TG-DTA clearly showed that there were two weight loss steps in the temperature range of 200 to 340 oC and 340 to 500 oC, which correspond to the dehydration and decarbonation of hydromagnesite, respectively. These weight losses were accompanied by the endothermic maxima in the DTA. The dihydroxylation of hydromagnesite is spread over the two steps. Therefore, hydromagnesite decomposes into periclase, carbon dioxide, and water without passing through magnesite around 300 oC as following reaction: Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 4H2O → 5MgO + 4CO2 + 5H2O.

  9. High-quality draft genome sequence of Sedimenticola selenatireducens strain AK4OH1T, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from estuarine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Tiffany S.; Giovannelli, Donato; Yee, Nathan

    Sedimenticola selenatireducens strain AK4OH1 T (= DSM 17993 T = ATCC BAA-1233 T) is a microaerophilic bacterium isolated from sediment from the Arthur Kill intertidal strait between New Jersey and Staten Island, NY. S. selenatireducens is Gram-negative and belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. Strain AK4OH1 T was the first representative of its genus to be isolated for its unique coupling of the oxidation of aromatic acids to the respiration of selenate. It is a versatile heterotroph and can use a variety of carbon compounds, but can also grow lithoautotrophically under hypoxic and anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the draft genome comprises 4,588,530 bpmore » and 4276 predicted protein-coding genes including genes for the anaerobic degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate and benzoate. We report the main features of the genome of S. selenatireducens strain AK4OH1 T.« less

  10. High-quality draft genome sequence of Sedimenticola selenatireducens strain AK4OH1T, a gammaproteobacterium isolated from estuarine sediment

    DOE PAGES

    Louie, Tiffany S.; Giovannelli, Donato; Yee, Nathan; ...

    2016-09-08

    Sedimenticola selenatireducens strain AK4OH1 T (= DSM 17993 T = ATCC BAA-1233 T) is a microaerophilic bacterium isolated from sediment from the Arthur Kill intertidal strait between New Jersey and Staten Island, NY. S. selenatireducens is Gram-negative and belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. Strain AK4OH1 T was the first representative of its genus to be isolated for its unique coupling of the oxidation of aromatic acids to the respiration of selenate. It is a versatile heterotroph and can use a variety of carbon compounds, but can also grow lithoautotrophically under hypoxic and anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the draft genome comprises 4,588,530 bpmore » and 4276 predicted protein-coding genes including genes for the anaerobic degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate and benzoate. We report the main features of the genome of S. selenatireducens strain AK4OH1 T.« less

  11. Thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the boro silicate mineral datolite - CaBSiO4(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Horta, Laura Frota Campos; Lopez, Andres

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the thermal stability and vibrational spectra of datolite CaBSiO4(OH) and relate these properties to the structure of the mineral. The thermal analysis of datolite shows a mass loss of 5.83% over a 700-775 °C temperature range. This mass loss corresponds to 1 water (H2O) molecules pfu. A quantitative chemical analysis using electron probe was undertaken. The Raman spectrum of datolite is characterized by bands at 917 and 1077 cm-1 assigned to the symmetric stretching modes of BO and SiO tetrahedra. A very intense Raman band is observed at 3498 cm-1 assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units in the structure of datolite. BOH out-of-plane vibrations are characterized by the infrared band at 782 cm-1. The vibrational spectra are based upon the structure of datolite based on sheets of four- and eight-membered rings of alternating SiO4 and BO3(OH) tetrahedra with the sheets bonded together by calcium atoms.

  12. Retinal detachment and retinal holes in retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    PubMed

    Csaky, K; Olk, R J; Mahl, C F; Bloom, S M

    1991-01-01

    Retinal detachment and retinal holes in two family members with retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento are reported. We believe these are the first such cases reported in the literature. We describe the presenting symptoms and management, including cryotherapy, scleral buckling procedure, and sulfur hexafluoride injection (SF6), resulting in stable visual acuity in one case and retinal reattachment and improved visual acuity in the other case.

  13. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  14. Retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-10-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis).

  15. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Maeda, Tadao; Bereta, Grzegorz; Okano, Kiichiro; Golczak, Marcin; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment mediating vision under dim light, is composed of the apoprotein opsin and the chromophore ligand 11-cis-retinal. A P23H mutation in the opsin gene is one of the most prevalent causes of the human blinding disease, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cultured cell and transgenic animal models have been developed, there remains controversy over whether they fully mimic the human phenotype; and the exact mechanism by which this mutation leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration remains unknown. By generating P23H opsin knock-in mice, we found that the P23H protein was inadequately glycosylated with levels 1–10% that of wild type opsin. Moreover, the P23H protein failed to accumulate in rod photoreceptor cell endoplasmic reticulum but instead disrupted rod photoreceptor disks. Genetically engineered P23H mice lacking the chromophore showed accelerated photoreceptor cell degeneration. These results indicate that most synthesized P23H protein is degraded, and its retinal cytotoxicity is enhanced by lack of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore during rod outer segment development. PMID:21224384

  16. Involvement of all-trans-retinal in acute light-induced retinopathy of mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiko; Maeda, Tadao; Golczak, Marcin; Chou, Steven; Desai, Amar; Hoppel, Charles L; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-05-29

    Exposure to bright light can cause visual dysfunction and retinal photoreceptor damage in humans and experimental animals, but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We investigated whether the retinoid cycle (i.e. the series of biochemical reactions required for vision through continuous generation of 11-cis-retinal and clearance of all-trans-retinal, respectively) might be involved. Previously, we reported that mice lacking two enzymes responsible for clearing all-trans-retinal, namely photoreceptor-specific ABCA4 (ATP-binding cassette transporter 4) and RDH8 (retinol dehydrogenase 8), manifested retinal abnormalities exacerbated by light and associated with accumulation of diretinoid-pyridinium-ethanolamine (A2E), a condensation product of all-trans-retinal and a surrogate marker for toxic retinoids. Now we show that these mice develop an acute, light-induced retinopathy. However, cross-breeding these animals with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase knock-out mice lacking retinoids within the eye produced progeny that did not exhibit such light-induced retinopathy until gavaged with the artificial chromophore, 9-cis-retinal. No significant ocular accumulation of A2E occurred under these conditions. These results indicate that this acute light-induced retinopathy requires the presence of free all-trans-retinal and not, as generally believed, A2E or other retinoid condensation products. Evidence is presented that the mechanism of toxicity may include plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial poisoning that lead to caspase activation and mitochondria-associated cell death. These findings further understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-induced retinal degeneration.

  17. Importance of tunneling in H-abstraction reactions by OH radicals. The case of CH4 + OH studied through isotope-substituted analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberts, T.; Fedoseev, G.; Kästner, J.; Ioppolo, S.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-03-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study focussing on the quantum tunneling of atoms in the reaction between CH4 and OH. The importance of this reaction pathway is derived by investigating isotope substituted analogs. Quantitative reaction rates needed for astrochemical models at low temperature are currently unavailable both in the solid state and in the gas phase. Here, we study tunneling effects upon hydrogen abstraction in CH4 + OH by focusing on two reactions: CH4 + OD → CH3 + HDO and CD4 + OH → CD3 + HDO. The experimental study shows that the solid-state reaction rate RCH4 + OD is higher than RCD4 + OH at 15 K. Experimental results are accompanied by calculations of the corresponding unimolecular and bimolecular reaction rate constants using instanton theory taking into account surface effects. For the work presented here, the unimolecular reactions are particularly interesting as these provide insight into reactions following a Langmuir-Hinshelwood process. The resulting ratio of the rate constants shows that the H abstraction (kCH4 + OD) is approximately ten times faster than D-abstraction (kCD4 + OH) at 65 K. We conclude that tunneling is involved at low temperatures in the abstraction reactions studied here. The unimolecular rate constants can be used by the modeling community as a first approach to describe OH-mediated abstraction reactions in the solid phase. For this reason we provide fits of our calculated rate constants that allow the inclusion of these reactions in models in a straightforward fashion.

  18. Structural variability in neptunium(V) oxalate compounds: synthesis and structural characterization of Na2NpO2(C2O4)OH.H2O.

    PubMed

    Bean, Amanda C; Garcia, Eduardo; Scott, Brian L; Runde, Wolfgang

    2004-10-04

    Reaction of a (237)Np(V) stock solution in the presence of oxalic acid, calcium chloride, and sodium hydroxide under hydrothermal conditions produces single crystals of a neptunium(V) oxalate, Na(2)NpO(2)(C(2)O(4))OH.H(2)O. The structure consists of one-dimensional chains running down the a axis and is the first example of a neptunium(V) oxalate compound containing hydroxide anions.

  19. Integrating multi-omics analyses of Nonomuraea dietziae to reveal the role of soybean oil in [(4'-OH)MeLeu]4-CsA overproduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Jin, Lina; Wang, Cheng; Liang, Shaoxiong; Wen, Jianping

    2017-07-14

    Nonomuraea dietziae is a promising microorganism to mediate the region-specific monooxygenation reaction of cyclosporine A (CsA). The main product [(4'-OH)MeLeu] 4 -CsA possesses high anti-HIV/HCV and hair growth-stimulating activities while avoiding the immunosuppressive effect of CsA. However, the low conversion efficiency restricts the clinical application. In this study, the production of [(4'-OH)MeLeu] 4 -CsA was greatly improved by 55.6% from 182.8 to 284.4 mg/L when supplementing soybean oil into the production medium, which represented the highest production of [(4'-OH)MeLeu] 4 -CsA so far. To investigate the effect of soybean oil on CsA conversion, some other plant oils (corn oil and peanut oil) and the major hydrolysates of soybean oil were fed into the production medium, respectively. The results demonstrated that the plant oils, rather than the hydrolysates, could significantly improve the [(4'-OH)MeLeu] 4 -CsA production, suggesting that soybean oil might not play its role in the lipid metabolic pathway. To further unveil the mechanism of [(4'-OH)MeLeu] 4 -CsA overproduction under the soybean oil condition, a proteomic analysis based on the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was implemented. The results showed that central carbon metabolism, genetic information processing and energy metabolism were significantly up-regulated under the soybean oil condition. Moreover, the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analysis indicated that soybean oil had a great effect on amino acid metabolism and tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, the transcription levels of cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (CYP) genes for CsA conversion were determined by RT-qPCR and the results showed that most of the CYP genes were up-regulated under the soybean oil condition. These findings indicate that soybean oil could strengthen the primary metabolism and the CYP system to enhance the mycelium growth and the

  20. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations—F45L, V209M and F220C—yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5. PMID:27694816

  1. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  2. Outer Retinal Tubulation in Degenerative Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Naomi R.; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Laud, Ketan; Tsang, Stephen; Freund, K. Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in various degenerative retinal disorders. Methods This was a retrospective review of the multimodal imaging of 29 eyes of 15 patients with various retinal dystrophies and inflammatory maculopathies manifesting ORT. The morphologic features of ORT and its evolution over time were analyzed using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) data. Results Outer retinal tubulation was identified as round or ovoid structures with hyper-reflective borders in pattern dystrophy (6 eyes), acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (5 eyes), retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), Stargardt disease (4 eyes), gyrate atrophy (2 eyes), choroideremia (2 eyes), and various other degenerative conditions. These structures appeared to develop from the invagination of photoreceptors at the junction of intact and atrophic outer retina. During follow-up, the number and distribution of ORT largely remained stable. As zones of atrophy enlarged, the frequency of ORT appeared to increase. The ORT structures were found in fewer than 10% of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt, or pattern dystrophy. Conclusion Outer retinal tubulation is found in various degenerative retinal disorders that share in common damage to the outer retina and/or retinal pigment epithelium. The presence of ORT may be in an indicator of underlying disease stage and severity. PMID:23676993

  3. Metal-organic frameworks assembled from lanthanide and 2,5-pyridinedicaboxylate with cubane-like [Ln4(OH)4] building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Amghouz, Zakariae; Fernández-Zapico, Eva; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R.

    2015-09-01

    Lanthanide-organic frameworks based on 2,5-pyridinedicaboxylate (25p) ligand, formulated as [Yb4(OH)4(25p)4(H2O)3]·H2O (25pYb), [Y4(OH)4(25p)4(H2O)3]·H2O (25pY-1) and [Y6(OH)8(25p)5(H2O)2] (25pY-2), have been obtained as single phases under hydrothermal conditions. 25pYb and 25pY-1 are isostructural, and crystallize in the triclinic space group, P-1, with a=8.6075(5) Å, b=14.8478(7) Å, c=15.9164(9) Å, α=86.277(4)°, β=80.196(5)°, γ=81.785(4)°, and a=8.7166(6) Å, b=14.966(1) Å, c=15.966(1) Å, α=86.260(6)°, β=80.036(6)°, γ=81.599(6)°, respectively. 25pY-2 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group, P21/c, with a=24.9117(17) Å, b=13.7340(8) Å, c=14.3385(10) Å, β=100.551(7)°. 25pYb and 25pY-2 have been structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The 25pYb structure is based on tetranuclear cubane-like [Yb4(OH)4]8+ clusters, which are interconnected to eight neighbouring clusters through teen surrounding 25p ligands leading to neutral 3D framework, while the structure of 25pY-2 is based on two independent cuban-like [Y4(OH)4]8+ clusters, which are joined together through Y1 cation leading to the formation of hexanuclear [Y6(OH)8]10+ clusters, which in turn are joined via Y2 cation resulting in infinite inorganic chain extending along c-axis, and each chain is interconnected to six adjacent chains through 25p ligands leading finally to 3D framework. The luminescence properties of Eu3+ and Tb3+ doped 25pY-1 and 25pY-2 compounds have also been investigated. All materials has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses (TG-SDTA-MS), FTIR spectroscopy, C-H-N elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), and powder X-ray thermodiffraction.

  4. Metal–organic frameworks assembled from lanthanide and 2,5-pyridinedicaboxylate with cubane-like [Ln{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}] building units

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S.M.; Amghouz, Zakariae, E-mail: amghouz.uo@uniovi.es; Servicios Científico-Técnicos, University of Oviedo—CINN, Oviedo 33006

    Lanthanide–organic frameworks based on 2,5-pyridinedicaboxylate (25p) ligand, formulated as [Yb{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(25p){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]·H{sub 2}O (25pYb), [Y{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(25p){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]·H{sub 2}O (25pY-1) and [Y{sub 6}(OH){sub 8}(25p){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (25pY-2), have been obtained as single phases under hydrothermal conditions. 25pYb and 25pY-1 are isostructural, and crystallize in the triclinic space group, P-1, with a=8.6075(5) Å, b=14.8478(7) Å, c=15.9164(9) Å, α=86.277(4)°, β=80.196(5)°, γ=81.785(4)°, and a=8.7166(6) Å, b=14.966(1) Å, c=15.966(1) Å, α=86.260(6)°, β=80.036(6)°, γ=81.599(6)°, respectively. 25pY-2 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group, P2{sub 1}/c, with a=24.9117(17) Å, b=13.7340(8) Å, c=14.3385(10) Å, β=100.551(7)°. 25pYb and 25pY-2 have been structurally characterizedmore » by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The 25pYb structure is based on tetranuclear cubane-like [Yb{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 8+} clusters, which are interconnected to eight neighbouring clusters through teen surrounding 25p ligands leading to neutral 3D framework, while the structure of 25pY-2 is based on two independent cuban-like [Y{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 8+} clusters, which are joined together through Y1 cation leading to the formation of hexanuclear [Y{sub 6}(OH){sub 8}]{sup 10+} clusters, which in turn are joined via Y2 cation resulting in infinite inorganic chain extending along c-axis, and each chain is interconnected to six adjacent chains through 25p ligands leading finally to 3D framework. The luminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} doped 25pY-1 and 25pY-2 compounds have also been investigated. All materials has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses (TG–SDTA–MS), FTIR spectroscopy, C–H–N elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), and powder X-ray thermodiffraction. - Graphical abstract: Nowadays, lanthanide–organic frameworks (LOFs

  5. Ifosfamide metabolites CAA, 4-OH-Ifo and Ifo-mustard reduce apical phosphate transport by changing NaPi-IIa in OK cells.

    PubMed

    Patzer, L; Hernando, N; Ziegler, U; Beck-Schimmer, B; Biber, J; Murer, H

    2006-11-01

    Renal Fanconi syndrome occurs in about 1-5% of all children treated with Ifosfamide (Ifo) and impairment of renal phosphate reabsorption in about 20-30% of them. Pathophysiological mechanisms of Ifo-induced nephropathy are ill defined. The aim has been to investigate whether Ifo metabolites affect the type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate transporter (NaPi-IIa) in viable opossum kidney cells. Ifo did not influence viability of cells or NaPi-IIa-mediated transport up to 1 mM/24 h. Incubation of confluent cells with chloroacetaldehyde (CAA) and 4-hydroperoxyIfosfamide (4-OH-Ifo) led to cell death by necrosis in a concentration-dependent manner. At low concentrations (50-100 microM/24 h), cell viability was normal but apical phosphate transport, NaPi-IIa protein, and -mRNA expression were significantly reduced. Coincubation with sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA) prevented the inhibitory action of CAA but not of 4-OH-Ifo; DiMESNA had no effect. Incubation with Ifosfamide-mustard (Ifo-mustard) did alter cell viability at concentrations above 500 microM/24 h. At lower concentrations (50-100 microM/24 h), it led to significant reduction in phosphate transport, NaPi-IIa protein, and mRNA expression. MESNA did not block these effects. The effect of Ifo-mustard was due to internalization of NaPi-IIa. Cyclophosphamide-mustard (CyP-mustard) did not have any influence on cell survival up to 1000 microM, but the inhibitory effect on phosphate transport and on NaPi-IIa protein was the same as found after Ifo-mustard. In conclusion, CAA, 4-OH-Ifo, and Ifo- and CyP-mustard are able to inhibit sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport in viable opossum kidney cells. The Ifo-mustard effect took place via internalization and reduction of de novo synthesis of NaPi-IIa. Therefore, it is possible that Ifo-mustard plays an important role in pathogenesis of Ifo-induced nephropathy.

  6. Focal retinal phlebitis.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Quan V; Freund, K Bailey; Klancnik, James M; Sorenson, John A; Cunningham, Emmett T; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    To report three cases of solitary, focal retinal phlebitis. An observational case series. Three eyes in three patients were noted to have unilateral decreased vision, macular edema, and a focal retinal phlebitis, which was not at an arteriovenous crossing. All three patients developed a branch retinal vein occlusion at the site of inflammation. These patients had no other evidence of intraocular inflammation, including vitritis, retinitis, retinal vasculitis, or choroiditis, nor was there any systemic disorder associated with inflammation, infection, or coagulation identified. Focal retinal phlebitis appears to be an uncommon and unique entity that produces macular edema and ultimately branch retinal vein occlusion. In our patients, the focal phlebitis and venous occlusion did not occur at an arteriovenous crossing, which is the typical site for branch retinal venous occlusive disease. This suggests that our cases represent a distinct clinical entity, which starts with a focal abnormality in the wall of a retinal venule, resulting in surrounding exudation and, ultimately, ends with branch retinal vein occlusion.

  7. Employing linear tetranuclear [Zn4(COO)4(OH)2] clusters as building subunits to construct a new Zn(II) coordination polymer with tunable luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu-Wu; Zhang, Zun-Ting

    2016-02-01

    A new Zn(II) coordination polymer, [Zn2(btc) (biimpy) (OH)]n (1 H3btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, biimpy = 2,6-bis(1-imdazoly)pyridine) has been successfully synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, powder single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Compound 1 features a 3D framework employing linear tetranuclear [Zn4(COO)4(OH)2] cluster as building subunits. Topological analysis reveals it represents a (3,10)-connected structural topology by viewing btc3-, linear tetranuclear clusters and biimpy as 3-connected nodes, 10-connected nodes, linear linkers, respectively. Moreover, the thermal stability and luminescent property of compound 1 have been well investigated.

  8. Hydrogen bonding in basic copper salts: a spectroscopic study of malachite, Cu2(OH)2CO3, and brochantite, Cu4(OH)6SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Lutz, H. D.

    1993-05-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of the basic copper salts malachite, Cu2(OH)2CO3, and brochantite, Cu4(OH)6SO4, as well as of deuterated and 13C substituted samples are presented and discussed in terms of group theory and the hydrogen bonds present. The main results are that (i) the hydrogen donor strengths of the OH- ions are strongly increased due to the very great synergetic effect of the copper ions, (ii) the acceptor strengths of the H-bond acceptor groups (SO4 2-, CO3 2-, and OH- ions) are significantly modified by the linkage and coordination of the acceptor atoms — this complicates true assignment of the OH bands observed to the two and six different OH- ions present in malachite and brochantite, respectively -, and (iii) the Cu — O stretching modes at 430 590 cm-1 and 420 520 cm-1 for malachite and brochantite, respectively, exhibit strong, partially covalent Cu — O bonding.

  9. Human Blue Cone Opsin Regeneration Involves Secondary Retinal Binding with Analog Specificity.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Morillo, Margarita; Ramon, Eva; Jiménez-Rosés, Mireia; Cordomí, Arnau; Garriga, Pere

    2018-03-27

    Human color vision is mediated by the red, green, and blue cone visual pigments. Cone opsins are G-protein-coupled receptors consisting of an opsin apoprotein covalently linked to the 11-cis-retinal chromophore. All visual pigments share a common evolutionary origin, and red and green cone opsins exhibit a higher homology, whereas blue cone opsin shows more resemblance to the dim light receptor rhodopsin. Here we show that chromophore regeneration in photoactivated blue cone opsin exhibits intermediate transient conformations and a secondary retinoid binding event with slower binding kinetics. We also detected a fine-tuning of the conformational change in the photoactivated blue cone opsin binding site that alters the retinal isomer binding specificity. Furthermore, the molecular models of active and inactive blue cone opsins show specific molecular interactions in the retinal binding site that are not present in other opsins. These findings highlight the differential conformational versatility of human cone opsin pigments in the chromophore regeneration process, particularly compared to rhodopsin, and point to relevant functional, unexpected roles other than spectral tuning for the cone visual pigments. Copyright © 2018 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retinal Remodeling in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B.W.; Pfeiffer, R.L.; Ferrell, W. D.; Watt, C.B.; Marmor, M.; Marc, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  11. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Middlemiss, Derek S; Blanc, Frédéric; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare P

    2015-06-09

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba 2 In 2 O 5 , Ba 2 In 2 O 4 (OH) 2 , is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H 2 O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25-32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba 2 In 2 O 4 (OH) 2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1 H and 17 O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1 H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1 H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17 O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1 H- 17 O double resonance experiments.

  12. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  13. Single-crystal growth of C u4(OH) 6BrF and universal behavior in quantum spin liquid candidates synthetic barlowite and herbertsmithite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasco, C. M.; Trump, B. A.; Tran, Thao T.; Kelly, Z. A.; Hoffmann, C.; Heinmaa, I.; Stern, R.; McQueen, T. M.

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic barlowite, C u4(OH) 6BrF , has emerged as a new quantum spin liquid (QSL) host, containing kagomé layers of S =1 /2 C u2 + ions separated by interlayer C u2 + ions. Similar to synthetic herbertsmithite, ZnC u3(OH) 6C l2 , it has been reported that Z n2 + substitution for the interlayer C u2 + induces a QSL ground state. Here we report a scalable synthesis of single crystals of C u4(OH) 6BrF . Through x-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction measurements coupled with magic angle spinning 19F and 1H NMR spectroscopy, we resolve the previously reported positional disorder of the interlayer C u2 + ions and find that the structure is best described in the orthorhombic space group, Cmcm, with lattice parameters a =6.665 (13 )Å ,b =11.521 (2 )Å ,c =9.256 (18 )Å , and an ordered arrangement of interlayer C u2 + ions. Infrared spectroscopy measurements of the O—H and F—H stretching frequencies demonstrate that the orthorhombic symmetry persists upon substitution of Z n2 + for C u2 + . Specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements of Zn-substituted barlowite, Z nxC u4 -x(OH) 6BrF , reveal striking similarities with the behavior of Z nxC u4 -x(OH) 6C l2 . These parallels imply universal behavior of copper kagomé lattices even in the presence of small symmetry-breaking distortions. Thus, synthetic barlowite demonstrates universality of the physics of synthetic C u2 + kagomé minerals and furthers the development of real QSL states.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Retinitis pigmentosa Retinitis pigmentosa Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  15. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... eye doctor can close the holes using a laser. This procedure is most often done in the ...

  16. Retinal detachment following endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, P T; Marcus, D A; Bovino, J A

    1985-08-01

    Fifty-five consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of bacterial endophthalmitis were reviewed. All patients were treated with systemic, periocular, topical, and intravitreal antibiotics. In addition, 33 of the patients underwent a pars plana vitrectomy. Nine retinal detachments occurred within six months of initial diagnosis. The higher frequency of retinal detachment in the vitrectomy group (21%) as compared to those patients managed without vitrectomy (9%) may be explained by a combination of surgical complications and the increased severity of endophthalmitis in the vitrectomy group. The two patients who developed retinal detachment during vitrectomy surgery rapidly progressed to no light perception. Conversely, the repair of retinal detachments diagnosed postoperatively had a good prognosis.

  17. Modern retinal laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  18. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba 2In 2O 4(OH) 2 Structure and Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Dervisoglu, Riza; Middlemiss, Derek S.; Blanc, Frederic; ...

    2015-05-01

    Here, a structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba 2In 2O 5, Ba 2In 2O 4(OH) 2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H 2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics 2004, 170, 25–32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculationsmore » of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba 2In 2O 4(OH) 2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H– 17O double resonance experiments.« less

  19. Structural and magnetic characterization of the one-dimensional S = 5/2 antiferromagnetic chain system SrMn(VO 4)(OH)

    DOE PAGES

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D.; Garlea, Vasile O.; McGuire, Michael A.; ...

    2016-06-06

    The descloizite-type compound, SrMn(VO 4)(OH), was synthesized as large single crystals (1-2mm) using a high-temperature high-pressure hydrothermal technique. X-ray single crystal structure analysis reveals that the material crystallizes in the acentric orthorhombic space group of P2 12 12 1 (no. 19), Z = 4. The structure exhibits a one-dimensional feature, with [MnO 4] chains propagating along the a-axis which are interconnected by VO 4 tetrahedra. Raman and infrared spectra were obtained to identify the fundamental vanadate and hydroxide vibrational modes. Magnetization data reveal a broad maximum at approximately 80 K, arising from one-dimensional magnetic correlations with intrachain exchange constant ofmore » J/k B = 9.97(3) K between nearest Mn neighbors and a canted antiferromagnetic behavior below T N = 30 K. Single crystal neutron diffraction at 4 K yielded a magnetic structure solution in the lower symmetry of the magnetic space group P2 1 with two unique chains displaying antiferromagnetically ordered Mn moments oriented nearly perpendicular to the chain axis. Lastly, the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii Moriya antisymmetric exchange interaction leads to a slight canting of the spins and gives rise to a weak ferromagnetic component along the chain direction.« less

  20. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the borate mineral colemanite - CaB3O4(OH)3·H2O - implications for the molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda Maria; Cândido Filho, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    Colemanite CaB3O4(OH)3·H2O is a secondary borate mineral formed from borax and ulexite in evaporate deposits of alkaline lacustrine sediments. The basic structure of colemanite contains endless chains of interlocking BO2(OH) triangles and BO3(OH) tetrahedrons with the calcium, water and extra hydroxide units interspersed between these chains. The Raman spectra of colemanite is characterized by an intense band at 3605 cm-1 assigned to the stretching vibration of OH units and a series of bands at 3182, 3300, 3389 and 3534 cm-1 assigned to water stretching vibrations. Infrared bands are observed in similar positions. The BO stretching vibrations of the trigonal and tetrahedral boron are characterized by Raman bands at 876, 1065 and 1084 cm-1. The OBO bending mode is defined by the Raman band at 611 cm-1. It is important to characterize the very wide range of borate minerals including colemanite because of the very wide range of applications of boron containing minerals.

  1. Retinal Oximetry Discovers Novel Biomarkers in Retinal and Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Einar; Olafsdottir, Olof Birna; Einarsdottir, Anna Bryndis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn Scheving; Eysteinsson, Thor; Vehmeijer, Wouter; Vandewalle, Evelien; Bek, Toke; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon

    2017-05-01

    Biomarkers for several eye and brain diseases are reviewed, where retinal oximetry may help confirm diagnosis or measure severity of disease. These include diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. Retinal oximetry is based on spectrophotometric fundus imaging and measures oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles and venules in a noninvasive, quick, safe manner. Retinal oximetry detects changes in oxygen metabolism, including those that result from ischemia or atrophy. In diabetic retinopathy, venous oxygen saturation increases and arteriovenous difference decreases. Both correlate with diabetic retinopathy severity as conventionally classified on fundus photographs. In CRVO, vein occlusion causes hypoxia, which is measured directly by retinal oximetry to confirm the diagnosis and measure severity. In both diseases, the change in oxygen levels is a consequence of disturbed blood flow with resulting tissue hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. In atrophic diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma, retinal oxygen consumption is reduced and this is detected by retinal oximetry. Retinal oximetry correlates with visual field damage and retinal atrophy. It is an objective metabolic measure of the degree of retinal atrophy. Finally, the retina is part of the central nervous system tissue and reflects central nervous system diseases. In Alzheimer's disease, a change in retinal oxygen metabolism has been discovered. Retinal oximetry is a novel, noninvasive technology that opens the field of metabolic imaging of the retina. Biomarkers in metabolic, ischemic, and atrophic diseases of the retina and central nervous system have been discovered.

  2. An opsin shift in rhodopsin: retinal S0-S1 excitation in protein, in solution, and in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bravaya, Ksenia; Bochenkova, Anastasia; Granovsky, Alexander; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2007-10-31

    We considered a series of model systems for treating the photoabsorption of the 11-cis retinal chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form in vacuum, solutions, and the protein environment. A high computational level, including the quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach for solution and protein was utilized in simulations. The S0-S1 excitation energies in quantum subsystems were evaluated by means of an augmented version of the multiconfigurational quasidegenerate perturbation theory (aug-MCQDPT2) with the ground-state geometry parameters optimized in the density functional theory PBE0/cc-pVDZ approximation. The computed positions of absorption bands lambdamax, 599(g), 448(s), and 515(p) nm for the gas phase, solution, and protein, respectively, are in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental data, 610(g), 445(s), and 500(p) nm. Such consistency provides a support for the formulated qualitative conclusions on the role of the chromophore geometry, environmental electrostatic field, and the counterion in different media. An essentially nonplanar geometry conformation of the chromophore group in the region of the C14-C15 bond was obtained for the protein, in particular, owing to the presence of the neighboring charged amino acid residue Glu181. Nonplanarity of the C14-C15 bond region along with the influence of the negatively charged counterions Glu181 and Glu113 are found to be important to reproduce the spectroscopic features of retinal chromophore inside the Rh cavity. Furthermore, the protein field is responsible for the largest bond-order decrease at the C11-C12 double bond upon excitation, which may be the reason for the 11-cis photoisomerization specificity.

  3. Superficial retinal precipitates in patients with syphilitic retinitis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Evelyn X; Geraets, Ryan L; Dodds, Emilio M; Echandi, Laura V; Colombero, Daniel; McDonald, H Richard; Jumper, J Michael; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence of superficial retinal precipitates in patients with syphilitic retinitis. This was a retrospective, observational case series of nine eyes of eight patients with syphilitic retinitis associated with superficial retinal precipitates. The clinical, photographic, angiographic, and laboratory records were reviewed. Characteristics and treatment response of these superficial retinal precipitates were observed. All patients were Caucasian men, including 5 men who have sex with men (62.5%) and 6 (75.0%) who were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. None of the patients were previously diagnosed with syphilis. All patients developed panuveitis and a distinctly diaphanous or ground-glass retinitis associated with creamy yellow superficial retinal precipitates. In 3 patients (37.5%), the retinitis had a distinctive wedge-shaped appearance. Five patients (62.5%) had associated retinal vasculitis, 3 (37.5%) had serous retinal detachment, 2 (22.2%) had intraretinal hemorrhage, and 2 (22.2%) had papillitis. Within 2 weeks of initiating intravenous penicillin treatment, 7 patients (87.5%) experienced visual recovery to >or= 20/40. All affected eyes showed rapid resolution of clinical signs with minimal alternations of the retinal pigment epithelium in areas of prior retinitis after completion of antibiotic therapy. Characteristic superficial retinal precipitates may occur over areas of syphilitic retinitis. Improved recognition of this highly suggestive clinical sign may aid in early diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO 2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO 2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO 2 was reduced, but raSatO 2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO 2 and might also be related to increased raSatO 2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO 2 but unrelated to raSatO 2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Port, Alexander D; Orlin, Anton; Kiss, Szilard; Patel, Sarju; D'Amico, Donald J; Gupta, Mrinali P

    2017-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous DNA herpes virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. CMV retinitis is a potentially blinding manifestation of CMV infection that was commonly seen in advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the era before modern combination antiretroviral therapy era, but is also recognized in patients with immune deficiency from multiple causes. The advent of and advances in antiretroviral therapies for human immunodeficiency virus have decreased the incidence of CMV retinitis by over 90% among AIDS patients, and improved visual outcomes in those affected. The diagnosis is generally a clinical one, and treatment modalities include systemic and intravitreal antiviral medications. Retinal detachment and immune recovery uveitis are sight-threatening complications of CMV retinitis that require specific treatments.

  6. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral lulzacite Sr2Fe2+(Fe2+,Mg)2Al4(PO4)4(OH)10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Belotti, Fernanda M.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    The mineral lulzacite from Saint-Aubin des Chateaux mine, France, with theoretical formula Sr2Fe2+(Fe2+,Mg)2Al4(PO4)4(OH)10 has been studied using a combination of electron microscopy with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Chemical analysis shows a Sr, Fe, Al phosphate with minor amounts of Ga, Ba and Mg. Raman spectroscopy identifies an intense band at 990 cm-1 with an additional band at 1011 cm-1. These bands are attributed to the PO43-ν1 symmetric stretching mode. The ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes are observed by a large number of Raman bands. The Raman bands at 1034, 1051, 1058, 1069 and 1084 together with the Raman bands at 1098, 1116, 1133, 1155 and 1174 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations of PO43- and the HOPO32- units. The observation of these multiple Raman bands in the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching region gives credence to the concept that both phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units exist in the structure of lulzacite. The series of Raman bands at 567, 582, 601, 644, 661, 673 and 687 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43-ν2 bending modes. The series of Raman bands at 437, 468, 478, 491, 503 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- and HOPO32-ν4 bending modes. No Raman bands of lulzacite which could be attributed to the hydroxyl stretching unit were observed. Infrared bands at 3511 and 3359 cm-1 are ascribed to the OH stretching vibration of the OH units. Very broad bands at 3022 and 3299 cm-1 are attributed to the OH stretching vibrations of water. Vibrational spectroscopy offers insights into the molecular structure of the phosphate mineral lulzacite.

  7. The molecular structure of the phosphate mineral beraunite Fe2+Fe53+(PO4)4(OH)5ṡ4H2O - A vibrational spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Lana, Cristiano

    2014-07-01

    The mineral beraunite from Boca Rica pegmatite in Minas Gerais with theoretical formula Fe2+Fe53+(PO4)4(OH)5ṡ4H2O has been studied using a combination of electron microscopy with EDX and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Raman spectroscopy identifies an intense band at 990 cm-1 and 1011 cm-1. These bands are attributed to the PO43- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. The ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes are observed by a large number of Raman bands. The Raman bands at 1034, 1051, 1058, 1069 and 1084 together with the Raman bands at 1098, 1116, 1133, 1155 and 1174 cm-1 are assigned to the ν3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations of PO43- and the HOPO32- units. The observation of these multiple Raman bands in the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching region gives credence to the concept that both phosphate and hydrogen phosphate units exist in the structure of beraunite. The series of Raman bands at 567, 582, 601, 644, 661, 673, and 687 cm-1 are assigned to the PO43- ν2 bending modes. The series of Raman bands at 437, 468, 478, 491, 503 cm-1 are attributed to the PO43- and HOPO32- ν4 bending modes. No Raman bands of beraunite which could be attributed to the hydroxyl stretching unit were observed. Infrared bands at 3511 and 3359 cm-1 are ascribed to the OH stretching vibration of the OH units. Very broad bands at 3022 and 3299 cm-1 are attributed to the OH stretching vibrations of water. Vibrational spectroscopy offers insights into the molecular structure of the phosphate mineral beraunite.

  8. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  9. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  11. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  12. Retinoids and Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular understanding of the retinoid cycle in mammalian retina stems from painstaking biochemical reconstitution studies supported by natural or engineered animal models with known genetic lesions and studies of humans with specific genetic blinding diseases. Structural and membrane biology have been used to detect critical retinal enzymes and proteins and their substrates and ligands, placing them in a cellular context. These studies have been supplemented by analytical chemistry methods that have identified small molecules by their spectral characteristics, often in conjunction with the evaluation of models of animal retinal disease. It is from this background that rational therapeutic interventions to correct genetic defects or environmental insults are identified. Thus, most presently accepted modulators of the retinoid cycle already have demonstrated promising results in animal models of retinal degeneration. These encouraging signs indicate that some human blinding diseases can be alleviated by pharmacological interventions. PMID:27917399

  13. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  14. Sector retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Van Woerkom, Craig; Ferrucci, Steven

    2005-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common hereditary retinal dystrophies and causes of visual impairment affecting all age groups. The reported incidence varies, but is considered to be between 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 7,000. Sector retinitis pigmentosa is an atypical form of RP that is characterized by regionalized areas of bone spicule pigmentation, usually in the inferior quadrants of the retina. A 57-year-old Hispanic man with a history of previously diagnosed retinitis pigmentosa came to the clinic with a longstanding symptom of decreased vision at night. Bone spicule pigmentation was found in the nasal and inferior quadrants in each eye. He demonstrated superior and temporal visual-field loss corresponding to the areas of the affected retina. Clinical measurements of visual-field loss, best-corrected visual acuity, and ophthalmoscopic appearance have remained stable during the five years the patient has been followed. Sector retinitis pigmentosa is an atypical form of RP that is characterized by bilateral pigmentary retinopathy, usually isolated to the inferior quadrants. The remainder of the retina appears clinically normal, although studies have found functional abnormalities in these areas as well. Sector RP is generally considered a stationary to slowly progressive disease, with subnormal electro-retinogram findings and visual-field defects corresponding to the involved retinal sectors. Management of RP is very difficult because there are no proven methods of treatment. Studies have shown 15,000 IU of vitamin A palmitate per day may slow the progression, though this result is controversial. Low vision rehabilitation, long wavelength pass filters, and pedigree counseling remain the mainstay of management.

  15. Attikaite, Ca3Cu2Al2(AsO4)4(OH)4 · 2H2O, a new mineral species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Pekov, I. V.; Zadov, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    Attikaite, a new mineral species, has been found together with arsenocrandalite, arsenogoyazite, conichalcite, olivenite, philipsbornite, azurite, malachite, carminite, beudantite, goethite, quartz, and allophane at the Christina Mine No. 132, Kamareza, Lavrion District, Attiki Prefecture (Attika), Greece. The mineral is named after the type locality. It forms spheroidal segregations (up to 0.3 mm in diameter) consisting of thin flexible crystals up to 3 × 20 × 80 μm in size. Its color is light blue to greenish blue, with a pale blue streak. The Mohs’ hardness is 2 to 2.5. The cleavage is eminent mica-like parallel to {001}. The density is 3.2(2) g/cm3 (measured in heavy liquids) and 3.356 g/cm3 (calculated). The wave numbers of the absorption bands in the infrared spectrum of attikaite are (cm-1; sh is shoulder; w is a weak band): 3525 sh, 3425, 3180, 1642, 1120 w, 1070 w, 1035 w, 900 sh, 874, 833, 820, 690 w, 645 w, 600 sh, 555, 486, 458, and 397. Attikaite is optically biaxial, negative, α = 1.642(2), β = γ = 1.644(2) ( X = c) 2 V means = 10(8)°, and 2 V calc = 0°. The new mineral is microscopically colorless and nonpleochroic. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average over 4 point analyses, wt %) is: 0.17 MgO, 17.48 CaO, 0.12 FeO, 16.28 CuO, 10.61 Al2O3, 0.89 P2O5, 45.45 As2O5, 1.39 SO3, and H2O (by difference) 7.61, where the total is 100.00. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of (O,OH,H2O)22 is: Ca2.94Cu{1.93/2+} Al1.97Mg0.04Fe{0.02/2+} [(As3.74S0.16P0.12)Σ4.02O16.08](OH)3.87 · 2.05H2 O. The simplified formula is Ca3Cu2Al2(AsO4)4(OH)4 · 2H2O. Attikaite is orthorhombic, space group Pban, Pbam or Pba2; the unit-cell dimensions are a = 10.01(1), b = 8.199(5), c = 22.78(1) Å, V = 1870(3) Å3, and Z = 4. In the result of the ignition of attikaite for 30 to 35 min at 128 140°, the H2O bands in the IR spectrum disappear, while the OH-group band is not modified; the weight loss is 4.3%, which approximately corresponds to two H2O

  16. Hilarionite, Fe{2/3+}(SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, a new supergene mineral from Lavrion, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Rusakov, V. S.; Belakovsky, D. I.; Turchkova, A. G.; Voudouris, P.; Magganas, A.; Katerinopoulos, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new mineral, hilarionite, ideally Fe{2/3+} (SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, has been found in the Hilarion Mine, Agios Konstantinos, Kamariza, Lavrion district, Attiki Prefecture, Greece. It was formed in the oxidation zone of a sulfide-rich orebody in association with goethite, gypsum, bukovskyite, jarosite, melanterite, chalcanthite, allophane, and azurite. Hilarionite occurs as light green (typically with an olive or grayish tint) to light yellowish green spherulites (up to 1 mm in size) and bunches of prismatic to acicular "individuals" up to 0.5 mm long that are in fact near-parallel or divergent aggregates of very thin, curved fibers up to 0.3 mm long and usually lesser than 2 μm thick. The luster is silky to vitreous. The Mohs' hardness is ca. 2. Hilarionite is ductile, its "individuals" are flexible and inelastic; fracture is uneven or splintery. D(meas) = 2.40(5), D(calc) = 2.486 g/cm3. IR spectrum shows the presence of arsenate and sulfate groups and H2O molecules in significant amounts. The Mössbauer spectrum indicates the presence of Fe3+ at two six-fold coordinated sites and the absence of Fe2+. Hilarionite is optically biaxial (+), α = 1.575(2), γ = 1.64(2), 2 V is large. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average of 7 point analyses; H2O determined by modified Penfield method) is as follows, wt %: 0.03 MnO, 0.18 CuO, 0.17 ZnO, 33.83 Fe2O3, 0.22 P2O5, 18.92 As2O5, 22.19 SO3, 26.3 H2O, total is 101.82%. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 15 O is: (Fe{1.90/3+}Cu0.01Zn0.01)Σ1.92[(SO4)1.24(AsO4)0.74(PO4)0.01]Σ1.99(OH)1.01 · 6.03H2O. The X-ray powder diffraction data show close structural relationship of hilarionite and kaňkite, Fe{2/3+}(AsO4)2 · 7H2O. Hilarionite is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, Cm or C2, a = 18.53(4), b = 17.43(3), c = 7.56(1) Å, β = 94.06(15)°, V = 2436(3) Å3, Z = 8. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern ( d, Å- I[ hkl]) are: 12.66-100[110], , 5.00-10[22l], , 4

  17. Zincoberaunite, ZnFe3+ 5(PO4)4(OH)5ṡ6H2O, a new mineral from the Hagendorf South pegmatite, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, Nikita V.; Pekov, Igor V.; Grey, Ian E.; Price, Jason R.; Britvin, Sergey N.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G.; Kampf, Anthony R.; Dünkel, Bernhard; Keck, Erich; Belakovskiy, Dmitry I.; MacRae, Colin M.

    2017-06-01

    The new mineral zincoberaunite, ideally ZnFe3+ 5(PO4)4(OH)5·6H2O, the Zn analogue of beraunite, is found in the Hagendorf South granitic pegmatite, Hagendorf, Bavaria, Germany, in two associations: (1) with potassium feldspar, quartz, jungite, phosphophyllite and mitridatite (the holotype) and (2) with flurlite, plimerite, Zn-bearing beraunite, schoonerite, parascholzite/scholzite, robertsite and altered phosphophyllite (the cotype). Zincoberaunite occurs as radial or randomly oriented aggregates of flexible fibers up to 1.5 mm long and up to 3 μm thick. D calc is 2.92 g/cm3 for the holotype and 2.94 g/cm3 for the cotype. Zincoberaunite is optically biaxial (-), α = 1.745(5), β = 1.760(5), γ = 1.770(5), 2 V meas = 80(5)°. Chemical composition of the holotype (electron probe microanalyser; H2O by gas chromatography of ignition products) is: MgO 0.28 wt%, CaO 0.47 wt%, ZnO 7.36 wt%, Al2O3 0.88 wt%, Fe2O3 42.42 wt%, P2O5 31.63 wt%, H2O 16.2 wt%, total 101.1 wt%. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 27 oxygen atoms per formula unit is (Zn0.83Ca0.08Mg0.06)∑0.97(Fe3+ 4.88Al0.16)∑5.04(PO4)4.09(OH)4.78 · 5.86H2O. Zincoberaunite is monoclinic, space group C2 /c; refined unit cell parameters (for the holotype at room temperature and the cotype at 100 K, respectively) are: a 20.837(2) and 20.836(4), b 5.1624(4) and 5.148(1), c 19.250(1) and 19.228(4) Å, β 93.252(5) and 93.21(3)°, V 2067.3(3) and 2059.2(7) Å3, Z = 4. The crystal structure of the holotype specimen has been refined by the Rietveld method ( R p = 0.30 %; R B = 0.18 %) whereas the structure of the cotype has been solved from the single crystal data and refined to R 1 = 0.056 based on 1900 unique reflections with I > 2σ( I). The strongest reflections of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the holotype specimen [( d, Å) ( I, %) ( hkl)] are: 10.37 (100) (200), 9.58 (32) (002), 7.24 (26) (20-2), 4.817 (22) (111), 4.409 (13) (112), 3.483 (14) (11-4, 600), 3.431 (14) (404), 3.194 (15

  18. Oxidation of CO on a carbon-based material composed of nickel hydroxide and hydroxyl graphene oxide, (Ni4(OH)3-hGO)--a first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chen-Hao; Ho, Jia-Jen

    2015-03-21

    Nickel or nickel hydroxide clusters and graphene oxide (GO) composites are novel nanomaterials in the application of electrochemical catalysts. In this work, we calculated the energy of Ni4 adsorbed onto saturated hydroxyl graphene oxide (hGO), which forms a Ni4(OH)3 cluster on the hydroxyl graphene oxide (Ni4(OH)3-hGO) and releases 4.47 eV (5.22 eV with DFT-D3 correction). We subsequently studied the oxidation of CO on the Ni4(OH)3-hGO system via three mechanisms - LH, ER and carbonated mechanisms. Our results show that the activation energy for oxidation of the first CO molecule according to the ER mechanism is 0.14 eV (0.12 eV with DFT-D3 correction), much smaller than that with LH (Ea = 0.65 eV, 0.61 eV with DFT-D3 correction) and with carbonated (Ea = 1.28 eV, 1.20 eV with DFT-D3 correction) mechanisms. The barrier to oxidation of the second CO molecule to CO2 with the ER mechanism increases to 0.43 eV (0.37 eV with DFT-D3 correction), but still less than that via LH (Ea = 1.09 eV, 1.07 eV with DFT-D3 correction), indicating that CO could be effectively oxidized through the ER mechanism on the Ni4(OH)3/hGO catalyst.

  19. [Co(NH3)6]3[Cu4(OH)(CO3)8].2H2O--a new carbonato-copper(II) anion stabilized by extensive hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Brendan F; Haywood, Marissa G; Robson, Richard

    2004-04-21

    Addition of Co(NH3)6(3+) to aqueous solutions of Cu(II) in excess carbonate promotes the assembly of a new highly charged carbonato-copper(II) anion, [Cu4(OH)(CO3)8](9-), which contains an unusual mu4 hydroxo-bridged square Cu4 arrangement, stabilised in the crystal by no less than forty hydrogen bonds (< 3 Angstrom) to hexammine cations.

  20. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  1. Effects of dipotassium-trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate, K2[B3O3F4OH], on cell viability and gene expression of common human cancer drug targets in a melanoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Pojskic, Lejla; Haveric, Sanin; Lojo-Kadric, Naida; Hadzic, Maida; Haveric, Anja; Galic, Zoran; Galic, Borivoj; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Milos, Mladen

    2016-12-01

    Recently it was found that dipotassium-trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate, K2(B3O3F4OH), is a potent and highly specific inhibitor of precancerous cell processes. We conducted gene expression profiling of human melanoma cells before and after treatment with two concentrations (0.1 and 1 mM) of this boron inorganic derivative in order to assess its effects on deregulation of genes associated with tumor pathways. Parallel trypan blue exclusion assay was performed to assess the cytotoxicity effects of this chemical. Treatment with K2(B3O3F4OH) induced a significant decrease of cell viability in melanoma cellline at both tested concentrations. Furthermore, these treatments caused deregulation of more than 30 genes known as common anti-tumor drug targets. IGF-1 and hTERT were found to be significantly downregulated and this result may imply potential use of K2(B3O3F4OH) as an inhibitor or human telomerase and insulin-like growth factor 1, both of which are associated with various tumor pathways.

  2. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New vanadium tellurites: Syntheses, structures, optical properties of noncentrosymmetric VTeO{sub 4}(OH), centrosymmetric Ba{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10})

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ming-Li; State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002; Marsh, Matthew

    Two new vanadium tellurites, VTeO{sub 4}(OH) (1) and Ba{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10}) (2), have been synthesized successfully with the use of hydrothermal reactions. The crystal structures of the two compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the polar space group Pca2{sub 1} (No. 29) while compound 2 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group C2/c (No. 15). The topography of compound 1 reveals a two-dimensional, layered structure comprised of VO{sub 6} octahedral chains and TeO{sub 3}(OH) zig-zag chains. Compound 2, on the contrary, features a three-dimensional [V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10})]{sup 4-} anionic framework withmore » Ba{sup 2+} ions filled into the 10-member ring helical tunnels. The [V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10})]{sup 4-} anionic network is the first 3D vanadium tellurite framework to be discovered in the alkaline-earth vanadium tellurite system. Powder second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements indicate that compound 1 shows a weak SHG response of about 0.3×KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) under 1064 nm laser radiation. Infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermal analysis, and dipole moment calculations have also been carried out. - Graphical abstract: VTeO{sub 4}(OH) (1) crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Pca2{sub 1} (No. 29) while Ba{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10}) (2) crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group C2/c (No. 15). - Highlights: • VTeO{sub 4}(OH) (1) and Ba{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10}) (2) have been synthesized successfully with the use of hydrothermal reactions. • VTeO{sub 4}(OH) (1) crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Pca2{sub 1} and displays a weak SHG response. • VTeO{sub 4}(OH) (1) represents only the fourth SHG-active material found in vanadium tellurite systems. • Ba{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O{sub 10}) (2) exhibits a novel three-dimensional [V{sub 4}O{sub 8}(Te{sub 3}O

  4. [Retinal detachment in HIV-infected patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A L; Kolbasko, A V; Tatarnikova, G N; Grebenchuk, O S

    2014-01-01

    The authors present their own clinical experience in three HIV-infected patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis aged from 8 to 36 years. Detailed analysis of the results of physical and laboratory examinations is provided. Given short life expectancy for these patients, the authors pose a deontological question as to whether or not active treatment of retinal detachment in patients with AIDS and CMV retinitis is reasonable.

  5. [Navigated retinal laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Kernt, M; Ulbig, M; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2013-08-01

    Navigated laser therapy introduces for the first time computerized assistance systems for retinal laser therapy. The Navilas system offers high precision and safety and provides additional benefits regarding standardization of planning, execution, documentation and quality assurance. The current focus of clinical application for navigated laser therapy besides laser treatment after retinal vein occlusion and panretinal laser photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is diabetic macular edema. Recent data indicate that combined initial anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and navigated macular laser therapy allows achievement and maintenance of treatment success with a minimum number of interventions. Despite very promising results the current assessment of navigated laser therapy is still limited by the evidence available worldwide.

  6. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  7. Protecting retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Khatib, T Z; Martin, K R

    2017-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies several conditions which give rise to significant visual compromise, including glaucoma, hereditary optic neuropathies, ischaemic optic neuropathies, and demyelinating disease. In this review, we discuss the emerging strategies for neuroprotection specifically in the context of glaucoma, including pharmacological neuroprotection, mesenchymal stem cells, and gene therapy approaches. We highlight potential pitfalls that need to be considered when developing these strategies and outline future directions, including the prospects for clinical trials.

  8. Protecting retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, T Z; Martin, K R

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies several conditions which give rise to significant visual compromise, including glaucoma, hereditary optic neuropathies, ischaemic optic neuropathies, and demyelinating disease. In this review, we discuss the emerging strategies for neuroprotection specifically in the context of glaucoma, including pharmacological neuroprotection, mesenchymal stem cells, and gene therapy approaches. We highlight potential pitfalls that need to be considered when developing these strategies and outline future directions, including the prospects for clinical trials. PMID:28085136

  9. Retinal imaging in uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishali; Al-Dhibi, Hassan A.; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Ancillary investigations are the backbone of uveitis workup for posterior segment inflammations. They help in establishing the differential diagnosis and making certain diagnosis by ruling out certain pathologies and are a useful aid in monitoring response to therapy during follow-up. These investigations include fundus photography including ultra wide field angiography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography and multimodal imaging. This review aims to be an overview describing the role of these retinal investigations for posterior uveitis. PMID:24843301

  10. The peripheral retinal 'map'.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The condition of the periphery of the retinal field of the human eye is of considerable significance, it is suggested, to those participating in various sporting activities. Its boundaries shrink and expand depending upon the physiological conditions imposed both upon the eye and upon the organism as a whole. Consequently its message to the brain may be impaired under stress with resulting danger owing to delayed response. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1148574

  11. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-13

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  12. Branch retinal arterial occlusion.

    PubMed

    Subedi, S; Shrestha, C

    2010-01-01

    Retinal arterial occlusion is an ocular emergency in which visual prognosis is poor mostly due to late presentation of the patient and macular involvement. The casee described, in this report is ane incidence of Branch Retinal Arterial Occlusion in a 22 year old female with grade II Mitral Regurgitation. The patiente presented witha complaint of painless, diminution of vision in the right eyn. She also presented with perception of black shadow in the superior visual fiel n of the same eye5 for five days. There was no significant systemic ord personal history. Her visual acuity at presentation was 6/60 and 6/6 in the right and left eyes,y which did not improve with glasses or pin-hole. Anterior segment including papillary reaction was normal in both eyes while Fundus examination of the right eye revealed retinal whitening inside the inferotemporal vascular arcade that was encroaching foveolar avascular zone. Visual field defect was detected at superonasally inside arhade but Fundus Fluorescence Angiography was normal. An echoycardiograph revealed grade II Mitral Regurgitation. The patient was kept on observation and after two2 days of follow-up, vision in the right eye was improved to 6/6 unaided but visual field defect was remained same.

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital intracellular organelle for retinal cell function and survival. There is growing confirmation to support an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and a number of retinal degenerations. Investigations have also unveiled mitochondrial genomic instability as one of the contributing factors for age-related retinal pathophysiology. This review highlights the role of mitochondrial dysfunction originating from oxidative stress in the etiology of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage associated with AMD due to susceptibility of mtDNA to oxidative damage and failure of mtDNA repair pathways is also highlighted in this review. The susceptibility of neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria to oxidative damage with ageing appears to be a major factor in retinal degeneration. It thus appears that the mitochondrion is a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of retinal cells. In addition, failure of mtDNA repair pathways can also specifically contribute towards pathogenesis of AMD. This review will further summarize the prospective role of mitochondria targeting therapeutic agents for the treatment of retinal disease. Mitochondria based drug targeting to diminish oxidative stress or promote repair of mtDNA damage may offer potential alternatives for the treatment of various retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:21978133

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Mitra, Ashim K

    2011-12-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital intracellular organelle for retinal cell function and survival. There is growing confirmation to support an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and a number of retinal degenerations. Investigations have also unveiled mitochondrial genomic instability as one of the contributing factors for age-related retinal pathophysiology. This review highlights the role of mitochondrial dysfunction originating from oxidative stress in the etiology of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage associated with AMD due to susceptibility of mtDNA to oxidative damage and failure of mtDNA repair pathways is also highlighted in this review. The susceptibility of neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria to oxidative damage with ageing appears to be a major factor in retinal degeneration. It thus appears that the mitochondrion is a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of retinal cells. In addition, failure of mtDNA repair pathways can also specifically contribute towards pathogenesis of AMD. This review will further summarize the prospective role of mitochondria targeting therapeutic agents for the treatment of retinal disease. Mitochondria based drug targeting to diminish oxidative stress or promote repair of mtDNA damage may offer potential alternatives for the treatment of various retinal degenerative diseases.

  15. Retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence as a measure of retinal health.

    PubMed

    Elner, Susan G; Elner, Victor M; Field, Matthew G; Park, Seung; Heckenlively, John R; Petty, Howard R

    2008-01-01

    To establish that increased autofluorescence of mitochondrial flavoproteins, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidative stress, correlates with retinal cell dysfunction. Retinal flavoprotein autofluorescence (FA) was imaged in humans with a fundus camera modified with 467DF8-nm excitation and 535-nm emission filters and a back-illuminated, electron-multiplying, charge-coupled device camera interfaced with a computer equipped with customized image capture software. Multiple digital images, centered on the fovea, were obtained from each eye. Histograms of pixel intensities in grayscale units were analyzed for average intensity and average curve width. Adults with diabetes mellitus, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), central serous retinopathy, and retinal dystrophies, as well as healthy control volunteers, were imaged. Monolayers of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) cells, HRPE cells exposed to sublethal doses of H2O2, and HRPE cells exposed to H2O2 in the presence of antioxidants were imaged for FA using fluorescent photomicroscopy. Control patients demonstrated low levels of retinal FA, which increased progressively with age. Diabetics without visible retinopathy demonstrated increased FA levels compared to control volunteers (P < .001). Diabetics with retinopathy demonstrated significantly higher FA values than those without retinopathy (P < .04). Patients with ARMD, central serous retinopathy, or retinal dystrophies also demonstrated significantly increased FA. Compared to control RPE cells, cells oxidatively stressed with H2O2 had significantly elevated FA (P < .05), which was prevented by antioxidants (P < .05). Retinal FA is significantly increased with age and diseases known to be mediated by oxidative stress. Retinal FA imaging may provide a novel, noninvasive method of assessing retinal health and retinal dysfunction prior to retinal cell death.

  16. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

    PubMed

    Arcinue, Cheryl A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R

    2015-01-01

    To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  17. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  18. Panoramic autofluorescence: highlighting retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Samantha; Sherman, Jerome

    2012-05-01

    Recent technological advances in fundus autofluorescence (FAF) are providing new opportunities for insight into retinal physiology and pathophysiology. FAF provides distinctly different imaging information than standard photography or color separation. A review of the basis for this imaging technology is included to help the clinician understand how to interpret FAF images. Cases are presented to illustrate image interpretation. Optos, which manufactures equipment for simultaneous panoramic imaging, has recently outfitted several units with AF capabilities. Six cases are presented in which panoramic autofluorescent (PAF) images highlight retinal pathology, using Optos' Ultra-Widefield technology. Supportive imaging technologies, such as Optomap® images and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), are used to assist in the clinical interpretation of retinal pathology detected on PAF. Hypofluorescent regions on FAF are identified to occur along with a disruption in the photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium, as borne out on SD-OCT. Hyperfluorescent regions on FAF occur at the advancing zones of retinal degeneration, indicating impending damage. PAF enables such inferences to be made in retinal areas which lie beyond the reach of SD-OCT imaging. PAF also enhances clinical pattern recognition over a large area and in comparison with the fellow eye. Symmetric retinal degenerations often occur with genetic conditions, such as retinitis pigmentosa, and may impel the clinician to recommend genetic testing. Autofluorescent ophthalmoscopy is a non-invasive procedure that can detect changes in metabolic activity at the retinal pigment epithelium before clinical ophthalmoscopy. Already, AF is being used as an adjunct technology to fluorescein angiography in cases of age-related macular degeneration. Both hyper- and hypoautofluorescent changes are indicative of pathology. Peripheral retinal abnormalities may precede central retinal impacts, potentially

  19. Central retinal artery occlusion - rethinking retinal survival time.

    PubMed

    Tobalem, Stephan; Schutz, James S; Chronopoulos, Argyrios

    2018-04-18

    The critical time from onset of complete occlusion of the central retinal artery (CRA) to functionally significant inner retinal infarction represents a window of opportunity for treatment and also has medical-legal implications, particularly when central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) complicates therapeutic interventions. Here, we review the evidence for time to infarction from complete CRAO and discuss the implications of our findings. A Medline search was performed using each of the terms "central retinal artery occlusion", "retinal infarction", "retinal ischemia", and "cherry red spot" from 1970 to the present including articles in French and German. All retrieved references as well as their reference lists were screened for relevance. An Internet search using these terms was also performed to look for additional references. We find that the experimental evidence showing that inner retinal infarction occurs after 90-240 min of total CRAO, which is the interval generally accepted in the medical literature and practice guidelines, is flawed in important ways. Moreover, the retinal ganglion cells, supplied by the CRA, are part of the central nervous system which undergoes infarction after non-perfusion of 12-15 min or less. Retinal infarction is most likely to occur after only 12-15 min of complete CRAO. This helps to explain why therapeutic maneuvers for CRAO are often ineffective. Nevertheless, many CRAOs are incomplete and may benefit from therapy after longer intervals. To try to avoid retinal infarcton from inadvertent ocular compression by a headrest during prone anesthesia, the eyes should be checked at intervals of less than 15'.

  20. Retinal astrocytoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Keiichi; Kice, Nathan; Ota-Kuroki, Juri

    2017-09-01

    A miniature schnauzer dog presenting with hyphema and glaucoma of the right eye had a retinal neoplasm. Neoplastic cells stained positively for glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and S-100 and largely negatively for oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 by immunohistochemistry. The clinical and histopathological features of canine retinal astrocytomas are discussed.

  1. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:22275207

  2. [Cytomegalovirus retinitis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Wakako; Mizushima, Yuka; Abematsu, Noriko; Nakao, Kumiko; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2008-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis usually affects severely immunosuppressed individuals. We report two immunocompetent patients who developed CMV retinitis. Case 1 was a 65-year-old man who was referred to us with blurred vision and floaters of 2 weeks duration in his left eye. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy showed keratic precipitates, aqueous cells, and vitreous opacity in his left eye. Funduscopic examination revealed yellow-white retinal lesions with arterial sheathing in the superotemporal midperiphery. Case 2 was a 63-year-old man who presented with a 2-week history of blurred vision in his left eye. Ophthalmologic examination of the left eye showed keratic precipitates, aqueous cells, vitreous opacity, and yellow-white lesions in the superotemporal peripheral retina. In both cases, CMV DNA was detected in the aqueous humor and therefore the diagnosis was CMV retinitis. CMV retinitis in both cases was indolent and was resolved in one month without treatment with antiviral drugs. Although both patients had diabetes mellitus, the results of their laboratory examinations were unremarkable and they were immunocompetent. Unlike CMV retinitis in immunocompromised patients, CMV retinitis in immunocompetent patients had significant anterior and vitreous inflammation but did not require antiviral treatment. A possible association between CMV retinitis and diabetes mellitus was suggested.

  3. Retinal imaging and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships.

  4. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  5. [HIV retinal vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Drake-Casanova, P; Moreno-Arrones, J Paz; Gorroño Echebarría, M; Dapena-Sevilla, I; Pareja-Esteban, J; Vleming-Pinilla, E

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 47 year-old woman, infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnosed 5 years ago without receiving any treatment, who had floaters in her left eye. A peripheral retinal vasculitis was discovered and confirmed by an angiography. No source of infection was found, antiretroviral and corticosteroid treatment was given, with a complete resolution of the vasculitis. From 70-80% of positive untreated HIV patients develop ocular complications, with intraocular inflammation in more than half of them. Intraocular inflammation can be associated with opportunistic infections, tumours and as in our case, secondary to the HIV. Antiretroviral therapy is the proper treatment in these patients.

  6. Two actinide-organic frameworks constructed by a tripodal flexible ligand: Occurrence of infinite {(UO2)O2(OH)3}4n and hexanuclear {Th6O4(OH)4} motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lingling; Zhang, Ronglan; Zhao, Jianshe; Liu, Chiyang; Weng, Ng Seik

    2016-11-01

    Two new actinide metal-organic frameworks were constructed by using a tripodal flexible ligand tris (2-carboxyethyl) isocyanurate (H3tci) under hydrothermal condition. The combination of H3tci and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in aqueous solution leads to the isolation of [(UO2)2(H2O)4]0.5(tci)2(UO2)4(OH)4·18H2O (1), which contains two distinct UO22+ coordination environments. Four uranyl cations, linked through μ3-OH respectively, result in the edge-sharing ribbons. Then, the layer structure is constructed by U-O clusters linked through other eight-coordinated uranyl unions, giving rise to a porous structure in the space. Topological analysis reveals that complex 1 belongs to a (4, 8)-connected net with a schläfli symbol of (34.26.3)2(34.46.56.68.73.8). Th3(tci)2O2(OH)2(H2O)3·12H2O (2) generated by the reaction of H3tci and thorium nitrate tetrahydrate, possesses nine-fold coodinated Th(IV) centers with a monocapped square antiprismatic geometry. The hexamers "Th6O4(OH)4" motifs are connected together by the carboxylate groups, showing a three-dimensional structures. Complex 2 takes on an 8-connected architecture and the point symbol is (424.64).

  7. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    PubMed

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  8. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat [Albuquerque, NM; Wessendorf, Kurt O [Albuquerque, NM; Christenson, Todd R [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  9. Combined Central Retinal Vein and Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion Post Intense Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Coca, Mircea; Tecle, Nahom; Amde, Wendewessen; Mehta, Ankur

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of combined central retinal vein occlusion and branch retinal artery occlusion. A previously healthy 47-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the right eye after completing a half marathon. A fundus exam and retinal imaging revealed a combined central retinal vein and branch retinal artery occlusion. In the present report, we review the literature and discuss the possible mechanisms behind combined retinal vessel occlusions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of combined central retinal vein occlusion and branch retinal artery occlusion following intense exercise.

  10. Combined Central Retinal Vein and Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion Post Intense Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tecle, Nahom; Amde, Wendewessen; Mehta, Ankur

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of combined central retinal vein occlusion and branch retinal artery occlusion. A previously healthy 47-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the right eye after completing a half marathon. A fundus exam and retinal imaging revealed a combined central retinal vein and branch retinal artery occlusion. In the present report, we review the literature and discuss the possible mechanisms behind combined retinal vessel occlusions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of combined central retinal vein occlusion and branch retinal artery occlusion following intense exercise. PMID:29067224

  11. Automated detection of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Helmchen, Lorens A; Lehmann, Harold P; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2014-11-01

    Nearly 4 in 10 Americans with diabetes currently fail to undergo recommended annual retinal exams, resulting in tens of thousands of cases of blindness that could have been prevented. Advances in automated retinal disease detection could greatly reduce the burden of labor-intensive dilated retinal examinations by ophthalmologists and optometrists and deliver diagnostic services at lower cost. As the current availability of ophthalmologists and optometrists is inadequate to screen all patients at risk every year, automated screening systems deployed in primary care settings and even in patients' homes could fill the current gap in supply. Expanding screens to all patients at risk by switching to automated detection systems would in turn yield significantly higher rates of detecting and treating diabetic retinopathy per dilated retinal examination. Fewer diabetic patients would develop complications such as blindness, while ophthalmologists could focus on more complex cases.

  12. Concentric retinitis pigmentosa: clinicopathologic correlations.

    PubMed

    Milam, A H; De Castro, E B; Smith, J E; Tang, W X; John, S K; Gorin, M B; Stone, E M; Aguirre, G D; Jacobson, S G

    2001-10-01

    Progressive concentric (centripetal) loss of vision is one pattern of visual field loss in retinitis pigmentosa. This study provides the first clinicopathologic correlations for this form of retinitis pigmentosa. A family with autosomal dominant concentric retinitis pigmentosa was examined clinically and with visual function tests. A post-mortem eye of an affected 94 year old family member was processed for histopathology and immunocytochemistry with retinal cell specific antibodies. Unrelated simplex/multiplex patients with concentric retinitis pigmentosa were also examined. Affected family members of the eye donor and patients from the other families had prominent peripheral pigmentary retinopathy with more normal appearing central retina, good visual acuity, concentric field loss, normal or near normal rod and cone sensitivity within the preserved visual field, and reduced rod and cone electroretinograms. The eye donor, at age 90, had good acuity and function in a central island. Grossly, the central region of the donor retina appeared thinned but otherwise normal, while the far periphery contained heavy bone spicule pigment. Microscopically the central retina showed photoreceptor outer segment shortening and some photoreceptor cell loss. The mid periphery had a sharp line of demarcation where more central photoreceptors were near normal except for very short outer segments and peripheral photoreceptors were absent. Rods and cones showed abrupt loss of outer segments and cell death at this interface. It is concluded that concentric retinitis pigmentosa is a rare but recognizable phenotype with slowly progressive photoreceptor death from the far periphery toward the central retina. The disease is retina-wide but shows regional variation in severity of degeneration; photoreceptor death is severe in the peripheral retina with an abrupt edge between viable and degenerate photoreceptors. Peripheral to central gradients of unknown retinal molecule(s) may be defective

  13. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  14. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, J T; Saxton, J; Hoffman, G

    1976-01-01

    A patient presented with unilateral findings of night blindness shown by impaired rod function and dark adaptation, constricted visual fields with good central acuity, a barely recordable electro-retinographic b-wave, and a unilaterally impaired electro-oculogram. There were none of the pigmentary changes usually associated with retinitis pigmentosa. The unaffected right eye was normal in all respects. Therefore the case is most probably one of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento. Images PMID:952804

  15. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, J T; Saxton, J; Hoffman, G

    1976-05-01

    A patient presented with unilateral findings of night blindness shown by impaired rod function and dark adaptation, constricted visual fields with good central acuity, a barely recordable electro-retinographic b-wave, and a unilaterally impaired electro-oculogram. There were none of the pigmentary changes usually associated with retinitis pigmentosa. The unaffected right eye was normal in all respects. Therefore the case is most probably one of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

  16. MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF SYPHILITIC MULTIFOCAL RETINITIS.

    PubMed

    Curi, Andre L; Sarraf, David; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2015-01-01

    To describe multimodal imaging of syphilitic multifocal retinitis. Observational case series. Two patients developed multifocal retinitis after treatment of unrecognized syphilitic uveitis with systemic corticosteroids in the absence of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Multimodal imaging localized the foci of retinitis within the retina in contrast to superficial retinal precipitates that accumulate on the surface of the retina in eyes with untreated syphilitic uveitis. Although the retinitis resolved after treatment with systemic penicillin in both cases, vision remained poor in the patient with multifocal retinitis involving the macula. Treatment of unrecognized syphilitic uveitis with corticosteroids in the absence of antitreponemal treatment can lead to the development of multifocal retinitis. Multimodal imaging, and optical coherence tomography in particular, can be used to distinguish multifocal retinitis from superficial retinal precipitates or accumulations.

  17. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  18. Focal posterior pole viral retinitis.

    PubMed

    Hazirolan, Dicle; Sungur, Gulten; Demir, Necati; Kasim, Remzi; Duman, Sunay

    2010-01-01

    To describe the clinical features of an atypical form of viral retinitis in immunocompetent patients. This was a retrospective noncomparative case series. The charts of 8 patients diagnosed with and treated for focal posterior viral retinitis were reviewed. Clinical and demographic features were evaluated. All the patients had extensive laboratory tests, fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography of macula, and polymerase chain reaction of vitreous. All the patients were referred to our Uveitis Service from other hospitals, as their uveitis symptoms deteriorated in spite of treatment. The mean age of 4 male and 4 female patients was 32.1 years (range, 22-42 years). The mean follow-up period was 10 months (range, 6-18 months). All of the patients had unilateral disease. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of vitreous specimen was positive for herpes simplex virus-1 in 5 patients and varicella zoster virus in 3 patients. Retinitis resolved after systemic acyclovir treatment in all patients. Viral etiology must be borne in mind in the differential diagnosis of atypical retinitis. It can be a milder form of viral retinitis like focal viral retinitis, as mentioned in this study. The prognosis of this disease is better than the other forms of necrotizing retinopathies involving a larger area of retina.

  19. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  20. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Minireview: Fibronectin in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles G; Budoff, Greg; Prenner, Jonathan L; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2017-01-01

    Retinal fibrosis, characterized by dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition by retinal endothelial cells, pigment epithelial cells, and other resident cell-types, is a unifying feature of several common retinal diseases. Fibronectin is an early constituent of newly deposited ECM and serves as a template for assembly of other ECM proteins, including collagens. Under physiologic conditions, fibronectin is found in all layers of Bruch's membrane. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a complication of retinal surgery, is characterized by ECM accumulation. Among the earliest histologic manifestations of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is capillary basement membrane thickening, which occurs due to perturbations in ECM homeostasis. Neovascularization, the hallmark of late stage DR as well as exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), involves ECM assembly as a scaffold for the aberrant new vessel architecture. Rodent models of retinal injury demonstrate a key role for fibronectin in complications characteristic of PVR, including retinal detachment. In mouse models of DR, reducing fibronectin gene expression has been shown to arrest the accumulation of ECM in the capillary basement membrane. Alterations in matrix metalloproteinase activity thought to be important in the pathogenesis of AMD impact the turnover of fibronectin matrix as well as collagens. Growth factors involved in PVR, AMD, and DR, such as PDGF and TGFβ, are known to stimulate fibronectin matrix assembly. A deeper understanding of how pathologic ECM deposition contributes to disease progression may help to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. Ruptured retinal arterial macroaneurysm: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Speilburg, Ashley M; Klemencic, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an acquired, focal dilation of a retinal artery, typically occurring within the first three bifurcations of the central retinal artery. The clinical presentation of a retinal arterial macroaneurysm is highly variable, making initial diagnosis difficult and differentials many. Identification of retinal arterial macroaneurysms is crucial to appropriately co-manage with the primary care physician for hypertension control. Prognosis is generally good and observation is often an adequate treatment. However, in cases of macular threat or involvement, some treatment options are available and referral to a retinal specialist is indicated. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Retinal pigmentary changes in chronic uveitis mimicking retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, D Damla; Davoudi, Samaneh; Comander, Jason; Sobrin, Lucia

    2017-09-01

    To present retinal pigmentary changes mimicking retinitis pigmentosa (RP) as a finding of advanced uveitis. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients without a family history of inherited retinal degenerations who presented with retinal pigment changes and signs of past or present intraocular inflammation. Comprehensive eye examination including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination was performed on all patients in addition to color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography (FA), and full-field electroretinogram testing. We identified five patients with ages ranging from 33 to 66 years, who presented with RP-like retinal pigmentary changes which were eventually attributed to longstanding uveitis. The changes were bilateral in three cases and unilateral in two cases. Four of five cases presented with active inflammation, and the remaining case showed evidence of active intraocular inflammation during follow-up. This study highlights the overlapping features of advanced uveitis and RP including the extensive pigmentary changes. Careful review of possible past uveitis history, detailed examination of signs of past or present inflammation and ancillary testing, with FA often being most helpful, are required for the correct diagnosis. This is important, because intervention can prevent further damage if the cause of the pigmentary changes is destructive inflammation.

  4. Characteristics of eyes with inner retinal cleavage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young Hoon; Kim, Yong Yeon; Kim, Hwang Ki; Sohn, Yong Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inner retinal cleavage can be misdiagnosed as a glaucomatous retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defect. This study was performed to characterize eyes with inner retinal cleavage. Inner retinal cleavage is defined as the appearance of a dark spindle-shaped space between the nerve fibers. Patients who presented at our institution with inner retinal cleavage were enrolled in the study. All participants were evaluated by fundus examination, visual field testing with standard automated perimetry, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. A total of 15 eyes of 11 subjects with inner retinal cleavage were included in the study. The median age of the subjects was 57 years (age range, 30-67 years). In each case, inner retinal cleavage was located adjacent to retinal blood vessels. Tissue bridging the cleavage area was observed in ten eyes. Six eyes had epiretinal membranes (ERMs), two eyes had glaucoma, and one eye had ERM in addition to glaucoma. Six eyes with inner retinal cleavage without combined ocular abnormalities had highly myopic refractive error (-6.50 to -8.50 diopters). Cross-sectional OCT images of the areas of inner retinal cleavage demonstrated defects with irregular margins and empty spaces in the inner layers of the retina. During the follow-up period, no eye showed changes in inner retinal layer cleavage or visual field sensitivity. Inner retinal cleavage was found in eyes with high myopia or ERMs. Inner retinal cleavage was associated with structural changes distinct from those associated with glaucomatous RNFL defects.

  5. Temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Retinal photocoagulation lacks objective dosage in clinical use, thus the commonly applied lesions are too deep and strong, associated with pain reception and the risk of visual field defects and induction of choroidal neovascularisations. Optoacoustics allows real-time non-invasive temperature measurement in the fundus during photocoagulation by applying short probe laser pulses additionally to the treatment radiation, which excite the emission of ultrasonic waves. Due to the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter, the amplitudes of the ultrasonic waves can be used to derive the temperature of the absorbing tissue. By measuring the temperatures in real-time and automatically controlling the irradiation by feedback to the treatment laser, the strength of the lesions can be defined. Different characteristic functions for the time and temperature dependent lesion sizes were used as rating curves for the treatment laser, stopping the irradiation automatically after a desired lesion size is achieved. The automatically produced lesion sizes are widely independent of the adjusted treatment laser power and individual absorption. This study was performed on anaesthetized rabbits and is a step towards a clinical trial with automatically controlled photocoagulation.

  6. Excited-state structure and isomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin from resonance Raman intensities.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Mathies, R A

    1988-01-01

    Resonance Raman excitation profiles have been measured for the bovine visual pigment rhodopsin using excitation wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm. A complete Franck-Condon analysis of the absorption spectrum and resonance Raman excitation profiles has been performed using an excited-state, time-dependent wavepacket propagation technique. This has enabled us to determine the change in geometry upon electronic excitation of rhodopsin's 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore along 25 normal coordinates. Intense low-frequency Raman lines are observed at 98, 135, 249, 336, and 461 cm-1 whose intensities provide quantitative, mode-specific information about the excited-state torsional deformations that lead to isomerization. The dominant contribution to the width of the absorption band in rhodopsin results from Franck-Condon progressions in the 1,549 cm-1 ethylenic normal mode. The lack of vibronic structure in the absorption spectrum is shown to be caused by extensive progressions in low-frequency torsional modes and a large homogeneous linewidth (170 cm-1 half-width) together with thermal population of low-frequency modes and inhomogeneous site distribution effects. The resonance Raman cross-sections of rhodopsin are unusually weak because the excited-state wavepacket moves rapidly (approximately 35 fs) and permanently away from the Franck-Condon geometry along skeletal stretching and torsional coordinates. PMID:3416032

  7. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, R. D., E-mail: rdguerrerom@unal.edu.co; Arango, C. A., E-mail: caarango@icesi.edu.co; Reyes, A., E-mail: areyesv@unal.edu.co

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearlymore » chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.« less

  8. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  9. [Retinal vasculitis and systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gascon, P; Jarrot, P-A; Matonti, F; Kaplanski, G

    2018-06-19

    Retinal vasculitis (RV) is an inflammation of retinal blood vessels that can be associated with uveitis or be isolated, and can induce vascular occlusion and retinal ischemia. Visual acuity can be severely affected in case of macular involvement or neovessel formation. The diagnosis relies on fundoscopy and fluorescein angiography. Systemic diseases may be associated with RV, the most frequently encountered are Behçet's disease, sarcoidosis or multiple sclerosis, all predominantly associated with venous involvement, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus and necrotizing vasculitis are less frequently observed and predominantly associated with arterial or mixed vasculitis. Treatments are usually aggressive in order to preserve a good visual acuity and to reduce retinal inflammation and chronic ischemia. Steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, retinal laser photocoagulation, intravitreal anti-VEGF injections are usual treatments and more recently, anti-TNFalpha monoclonal therapeutic antibodies have been shown to be very successful. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of Murine Retinal Function by Electroretinography

    PubMed Central

    Benchorin, Gillie; Calton, Melissa A.; Beaulieu, Marielle O.; Vollrath, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is a sensitive and noninvasive method for testing retinal function. In this protocol, we describe a method for performing ERGs in mice. Contact lenses on the mouse cornea measure the electrical response to a light stimulus of photoreceptors and downstream retinal cells, and the collected data are analyzed to evaluate retinal function. PMID:29177186

  11. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  12. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  13. Exploring the retinal connectome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James R; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Shaw, Margaret V; Yang, Jia-Hui; Demill, David; Lauritzen, James S; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross; Marc, Robert E

    2011-02-03

    A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈ 2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive axonal veto synapses. (3

  14. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  15. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  16. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  17. Retinal image quality during accommodation.

    PubMed

    López-Gil, Norberto; Martin, Jesson; Liu, Tao; Bradley, Arthur; Díaz-Muñoz, David; Thibos, Larry N

    2013-07-01

    We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552 nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye's higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced visual function may be a useful

  18. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  19. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the silicate-carbonate mineral carletonite - KNa4Ca4Si8O18(CO3)4(OH,F)·H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Belotti, Fernanda Maria

    2013-06-01

    An assessment of the molecular structure of carletonite a rare phyllosilicate mineral with general chemical formula given as KNa4Ca4Si8O18(CO3)4(OH,F)·H2O has been undertaken using vibrational spectroscopy. Carletonite has a complex layered structure. Within one period of c, it contains a silicate layer of composition NaKSi8O18·H2O, a carbonate layer of composition NaCO3·0.5H2O and two carbonate layers of composition NaCa2CO3(F,OH)0.5. Raman bands are observed at 1066, 1075 and 1086 cm-1. Whether these bands are due to the CO32- ν1 symmetric stretching mode or to an SiO stretching vibration is open to question. Multiple bands are observed in the 300-800 cm-1 spectral region, making the attribution of these bands difficult. Multiple water stretching and bending modes are observed showing that there is much variation in hydrogen bonding between water and the silicate and carbonate surfaces.

  20. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2(III)(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L.

    2017-01-01

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905 cm- 1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO43 -. The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136 cm- 1 correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO42 -. The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875 cm- 1 clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO43 - (807 and 843 cm- 1) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875 cm- 1). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate.

  1. Ultrasensitive peroxynitrite-based luminescence with L-012 as a screening system for antioxidative/antinitrating substances, e.g. Tylenol (acetaminophen), 4-OH tempol, quercetin and carboxy-PTIO.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Knox; Ghareeb, Erica; Van Dyke, Mark; Van Thiel, David H

    2007-01-01

    Previously our group developed a water-soluble antioxidant screening system using the luminescence of the reaction of peroxynitrite and luminol. In the present study we replaced luminol with the luminol-like compound L-012. This increases the production of luminescence approximately 100-fold and therefore, with a higher signal:noise ratio, this new system can detect antioxidation and antinitration effects at lower doses of the inhibitor. We studied acetaminophen (Tylenol) and its metabolite 3-nitroacetaminophen, tyrosine and nitrotyrosine and all these substances were inhibitory in a dose-responsive manner and below micromolar amounts. In addition quercetin, a polyphenol, was highly active (below micromolar amounts) as an antioxidant and antinitrating compound. 4-OH tempol, the stable free radical, superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic, was inhibitory in a dose-responsive manner and below micromolar amounts. Carboxy-PTIO was inhibitory at 10 times micromolar amount but not below that dose, which may be related to colour quenching, since the drug is deeply blue, or possibly it is an inhibitor with a slow kinetic profile. Finally, the amino acid tyrosine has been found to be inhibitory in micromolar amounts, similar to acetaminophen. This indicates that tyrosine can act as an antioxidant and antinitration target alone or conjugated in protein, e.g. insulin. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Thermodynamics of concentrated electrolyte mixtures and the prediction of mineral solubilities to high temperatures for mixtures in the system Na-K-Mg-Cl-SO 4-OH-H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, Roberto T.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1987-09-01

    Mineral solubilities in binary and ternary electrolyte mixtures in the system Na-K-Mg-Cl-SO 4-OH-H 2O are calculated to high temperatures using available thermodynamic data for solids and for aqueous electrolyte solutions. Activity and osmotic coefficients are derived from the ion-interaction model of Pitzer (1973, 1979) and co-workers, the parameters of which are evaluated from experimentally determined solution properties or from solubility data in binary and ternary mixtures. Excellent to good agreement with experimental solubilities for binary and ternary mixtures indicate that the model can be successfully used to predict mineral-solution equilibria to high temperatures. Although there are currently no theoretical forms for the temperature dependencies of the various model parameters, the solubility data in ternary mixtures can be adequately represented by constant values of the mixing term θ ij and values of ψ ijk which are either constant or have a simple temperature dependence. Since no additional parameters are needed to describe the thermodynamic properties of more complex electrolyte mixtures, the calculations can be extended to equilibrium studies relevant to natural systems. Examples of predicted solubilities are given for the quaternary system NaCl-KCl-MgCl 2-H 2O.

  3. Crystal structure of triaquamaleatostrontium(II) monohydrate, [Sr(C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(OH{sub 2}{sub 3}) {center_dot}] H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz de Delgado, G.; Parra, P.P.; Briceno, A.

    1995-05-01

    (Sr(C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(OH{sub 2}{sub 3}) {center_dot} H{sub 2}O is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, with a = 11.476(2), b = 7.027(1), c = 12.344(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.74(3){degrees}, V= 896.67 {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4. The Sr atom is surrounded by nine oxygen atoms which come from four different maleate anions and three water molecules. The Sr-O distances range from 2.546(2) to 2.808(2) {angstrom}. The C-O distances are equal within the standard deviation 1.263(3) to 1.258(3) {angstrom}). In the maleate anion, the planes that contain the carboxylate groups form an angle of 74.44(9){degrees}. Both carboxylate groups deviate significantly from planarity. Themore » different coordination modes of the carboxylate group and the extensive hydrogen bonding present are responsible for the polymeric nature of the structure.« less

  4. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  5. Determination of retinal surface area.

    PubMed

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Logan, Nicola S

    2017-09-01

    Previous attempts at determining retinal surface area and surface area of the whole eye have been based upon mathematical calculations derived from retinal photographs, schematic eyes and retinal biopsies of donor eyes. 3-dimensional (3-D) ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a more direct measurement, it can be used to image the eye in vivo, and there is no risk of tissue shrinkage. The primary purpose of this study is to compare, using T2-weighted 3D MRI, retinal surface areas for superior-temporal (ST), inferior-temporal (IT), superior-nasal (SN) and inferior-nasal (IN) retinal quadrants. An ancillary aim is to examine whether inter-quadrant variations in area are concordant with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Seventy-three adult participants presenting without retinal pathology (mean age 26.25 ± 6.06 years) were scanned using a Siemens 3-Tesla MRI scanner to provide T2-weighted MR images that demarcate fluid-filled internal structures for the whole eye and provide high-contrast delineation of the vitreous-retina interface. Integrated MRI software generated total internal ocular surface area (TSA). The second nodal point was used to demarcate the origin of the peripheral retina in order to calculate total retinal surface area (RSA) and quadrant retinal surface areas (QRSA) for ST, IT, SN, and IN quadrants. Mean spherical error (MSE) was -2.50 ± 4.03D and mean axial length (AL) 24.51 ± 1.57 mm. Mean TSA and RSA for the RE were 2058 ± 189 and 1363 ± 160 mm 2 , respectively. Repeated measures anova for QRSA data indicated a significant difference within-quadrants (P < 0.01) which, contrasted with ST (365 ± 43 mm 2 ), was significant for IT (340 ± 40 mm 2 P < 0.01), SN (337 ± 40 mm 2 P < 0.01) and IN (321 ± 39 mm 2 P < 0.01) quadrants. For all quadrants, QRSA was significantly correlated with AL (P < 0.01) and exhibited

  6. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  7. [Surgical managment of retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Haritoglou, C; Wolf, A

    2015-05-01

    The detachment of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium can be related to breaks of the retina allowing vitreous fluid to gain access to the subretinal space, to exudative changes of the choroid such as tumours or inflammatory diseases or to excessive tractional forces exerted by interactions of the collagenous vitreous and the retina. Tractional retinal detachment is usually treated by vitrectomy and exudative detachment can be addressed by treatment of the underlying condition in many cases. In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment two different surgical procedures, vitrectomy and scleral buckling, can be applied for functional and anatomic rehabilitation of our patients. The choice of the surgical procedure is not really standardised and often depends on the experience of the surgeon and other more ocular factors including lens status, the number of retinal breaks, the extent of the detachment and the amount of preexisting PVR. Using both techniques, anatomic success rates of over 90 % can be achieved. Especially in young phakic patients scleral buckling offers the true advantage to prevent the progression of cataract formation requiring cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Therefore, scleral buckling should be considered in selected cases as an alternative surgical option in spite of the very important technical refinements in modern vitrectomy techniques. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  9. Retinal Oxygen: from animals to humans

    PubMed Central

    Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses retinal oxygenation and retinal metabolism by focusing on measurements made with two of the principal methods used to study O2 in the retina: measurements of PO2 with oxygen-sensitive microelectrodes in vivo in animals with a retinal circulation similar to that of humans, and oximetry, which can be used non-invasively in both animals and humans to measure O2 concentration in retinal vessels. Microelectrodes uniquely have high spatial resolution, allowing the mapping of PO2 in detail, and when combined with mathematical models of diffusion and consumption, they provide information about retinal metabolism. Mathematical models, grounded in experiments, can also be used to simulate situations that are not amenable to experimental study. New methods of oximetry, particularly photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy and visible light optical coherence tomography, provide depth-resolved methods that can separate signals from blood vessels and surrounding tissues, and can be combined with blood flow measures to determine metabolic rate. We discuss the effects on retinal oxygenation of illumination, hypoxia and hyperoxia, and describe retinal oxygenation in diabetes, retinal detachment, arterial occlusion, and macular degeneration. We explain how the metabolic measurements obtained from microelectrodes and imaging are different, and how they need to be brought together in the future. Finally, we argue for revisiting the clinical use of hyperoxia in ophthalmology, particularly in retinal arterial occlusions and retinal detachment, based on animal research and diffusion theory. PMID:28109737

  10. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  11. Esperanzaite, NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)*2H2O, a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Mexico: descriptive mineralogy and atomic arrangement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Hughes, J.M.; Cureton, F.; Maxwell, C.H.; Falster, A.U.; Sommer, A.J.; Hlava, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Esperanzaite, ideally NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)??2H2O, Z = 2, is a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Durango State, Mexico. The mineral occurs as blue-green botryoidal crystalline masses on rhyolite, with separate spheres up to 1.5 mm in diameter. The Mohs hardness is 4 1/2 , and the specific gravity, 3.24 (obs.) and 3.36(3) (calc.). Optical properties were measured in 589 nm light. Esperanzaite is biaxial (-), X = Y = Z = colorless, ?? 1.580(1), ?? 1.588(1), and ?? 1.593(1); 2V(obs) is 74(1)??and 2V(calc) is 76.3??. The dispersion is medium, r < v, and the optic axes are oriented according to a ?? Z = +50.5??, b = Y, c ?? X = +35??. The strongest five X-ray-diffraction maxima in the powder pattern [d in A??(I)(hkl)] are: 2.966(100)(131, 311, 031), 3.527(90)(220), 2.700(90)(221,002,040), 5.364(80)(001,020) and 4.796(80)(011). Esperanzaite is monoclinic, a 9.687(5), b 10.7379(6), c 5.5523(7) A??, ?? 105.32(1)??, space group P21/m. The atomic arrangement of esperanzaite was solved by direct methods and Fourier analysis (R = 0.032). The Fundamental Building Block (FBB) is formed of [001] stacks of heteropolyhedral tetramers; the tetramers are formed of two arsenate tetrahedra and two Al octahedra, corner-linked in four-member rings. The FBBs are linked by irregular Na??5 and Ca??8 polyhedra.

  12. Bioaccumulation and elimination kinetics of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (2'-OH-BDE68 and 4-OH-BDE90) and their distribution pattern in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxia; Zhang, Guolong; Liu, Sisi; Qu, Baocheng; Wang, Yanli; Hu, Dingfei; Jiang, Jingqiu; Quan, Xie; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-06-15

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) have attracted wide concerns due to their toxicities and universal presence in wildlife and humans. The relatively high Kow values of OH-PBDEs imply these compounds may have a significant bioaccumulation potential, but so far, the existing data provide little information regarding the kinetics of uptake and depuration in any organisms. Here we exposed common carps separately to two OH-PBDEs, 2'-OH-BDE68 and 4-OH-BDE90, for 30 days (d) in a flow-through system, followed by a 60-d depuration period in clean water to investigate compound-specific bioaccumulation and tissue distribution. Two OH-PBDEs could accumulate in common carp, and the high concentration was observed in liver or kidney. The uptake rates (k1) of two OH-PBDEs ranged from 0.15 to 21.3 d(-1) in fish, and the elimination rates (k2) ranged from 0.027 to 0.075 d(-1), which leaded to their BCF values in 4.8-299.2 ranges. Half-lives ranged from 9.2 d to 25.6 d. The exposure concentration significantly affected BCF values but didn't change their relative compositions in liver, kidney and muscle after a long exposure time. To our knowledge, this is the first study to systematically assess uptake, depuration kinetics and tissue distribution for OH-PBDEs via a controlled experimental animal model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuang; Ye, Jun-jie; Zhao, Jia-liang; Li, Tai-sheng; Han, Yang

    2011-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most severe intraocular complication that results in total retinal destruction and loss of visual acuity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to investigate the fundus characteristics, systemic manifestations and therapeutic outcomes of CMV retinitis associated with AIDS. It was a retrospective case series. CMV retinitis was present in 39 eyes (25 patients). Best corrected visual acuities, anterior segment, fundus features, fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts of the patients with CMV retinitis associated with AIDS were analyzed. Intravitreal injections of ganciclovir (400 µg) were performed in 4 eyes (2 patients). Retinal vasculitis, dense, full-thickness, yellow-white lesions along vascular distribution with irregular granules at the border, and hemorrhage on the retinal surface were present in 28 eyes. The vitreous was clear or mildly opaque. Late stage of the retinopathy was demonstrated in 8 eyes characterized as atrophic retina, sclerotic and attenuated vessels, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, and optic nerve atrophy. Retinal detachment was found in 3 eyes. The average CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood of the patients with CMV retinitis was (30.6 ± 25.3) × 10(6)/L (range, (0 - 85) × 10(6)/L). After intravitreal injections of ganciclovir, visual acuity was improved and fundus lesions regressed. CMV retinitis is the most severe and the most common intraocular complication in patients with AIDS. For the patients with yellow-white retinal lesions, hemorrhage and retinal vasculitis without clear cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology should be performed. Routine eye examination is also indicated in HIV positive patients.

  14. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  16. Current perspectives of herpesviral retinitis and choroiditis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, H N; Priya, K; Biswas, J

    2004-10-01

    Vision-threatening viral retinitis are primarily caused by members of the herpesvirus family. The biology and molecular characterization of herpesviruses, clinical presentations of retinopathies, pathology and pathogenesis including the host responses, epidemiology and the laboratory methods of aetiological diagnosis of these diseases are described. Clinical syndromes are acute retinal necrosis (ARN), progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN), cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis, multifocal choroiditis and serpiginous choroiditis besides other viral retinopathies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) retinitis is more common in immunocompetent persons while varicella zoster virus (VZV) affects both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients equally. CMV retinitis is most common among patients with AIDS. The currently employed laboratory methods of antigen detection, virus isolation and antibody detection by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) have low sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the value of diagnosis due to its high clinical sensitivity and absolute specificity in detection of herpesviruses in intraocular specimens.

  17. Evaluation of hyaloid-retinal relationship during triamcinolone-assisted vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Dheepak; Takkar, Brijesh; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Chawla, Rohan; Temkar, Shreyas; Azad, Shorya Vardhan; Vohra, Rajpal

    2018-03-01

    To determine hyaloid-retinal relationship in primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment during vitreous surgery. This is a prospective, interventional study of patients (n = 72) undergoing triamcinolone-assisted 25G vitreous surgery for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Hyaloid-retinal relationship was noted intraoperatively to identify regions and patterns of firm attachment and was classified into subgroups. Analysis was done to determine association between hyaloid-retinal relationship patterns and preoperative findings: posterior vitreous detachment, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, type of retinal tear, the presence of peripheral degenerations, and postoperative outcomes. Three patterns of hyaloid-retinal relationship were identified: type1 (complete absence of posterior vitreous detachment (21%)), type 2 (incomplete posterior vitreous detachment (47%)) and type 3 (complete posterior vitreous detachment (32%)). Posterior vitreous detachment in some form was present in 84% of the cases with retinal tears as the causative break but none of the cases with retinal holes (p < 0.001). None of the cases with vitreoretinal degeneration had complete posterior vitreous detachment (p = 0.001). 69% of proliferative vitreoretinopathy-C cases had type 1 hyaloid-retinal relationship as compared to 11% cases with no proliferative vitreoretinopathy (p < 0.001). Proliferative vitreoretinopathy-related anatomical failure was seen in 7.5%, and 80% of these eyes with recurrent RD had type 1 hyaloid-retinal relationship (p<0.001). Nearly half the patients diagnosed as complete posterior vitreous detachment preoperatively were found to have incomplete posterior vitreous detachment intraoperatively. Majority of the cases with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment have some form of strong vitreoretinal adhesion. Hyaloid-retinal relationship varies with types of retinal breaks, retinal degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Intraoperative hyaloid-retinal relationship is

  18. Retinal ganglion cells in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Timothy S; Barber, Alistair J

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy has long been recognized as a vascular disease that develops in most patients, and it was believed that the visual dysfunction that develops in some diabetics was due to the vascular lesions used to characterize the disease. It is becoming increasingly clear that neuronal cells of the retina also are affected by diabetes, resulting in dysfunction and even degeneration of some neuronal cells. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the best studied of the retinal neurons with respect to the effect of diabetes. Although investigations are providing new information about RGCs in diabetes, including therapies to inhibit the neurodegeneration, critical information about the function, anatomy and response properties of these cells is yet needed to understand the relationship between RGC changes and visual dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:18565995

  19. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    visual impairment usually ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease) . As new interventions b... retinitis pigmentosa continues at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five additional recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the

  1. Evaluation of the Zeiss retinal vessel analyser

    PubMed Central

    Polak, K.; Dorner, G.; Kiss, B.; Polska, E.; Findl, O.; Rainer, G.; Eichler, H.; Schmetterer, L.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the reproducibility and sensitivity of the Zeiss retinal vessel analyser, a new method for the online determination of retinal vessel diameters in healthy subjects.
METHODS—Two model drugs were administered, a peripheral vasoconstrictor (the α receptor agonist phenylephrine) and a peripheral vasodilator (the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside) in stepwise increasing doses. Nine healthy young subjects were studied in a placebo controlled double masked three way crossover design. Subjects received intravenous infusions of either placebo or stepwise increasing doses of phenylephrine (0.5, 1, or 2 µg/kg/min) or sodium nitroprusside (0.5, 1, or 2 µg/kg/min). Retinal vessel diameters were measured with the new Zeiss retinal vessel analyser. Retinal leucocyte velocity, flow, and density were measured with the blue field entoptic technique. The reproducibility of measurements was assessed with coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients.
RESULTS—Placebo and phenylephrine did not influence retinal haemodynamics, although the α receptor antagonist significantly increased blood pressure. Sodium nitroprusside induced a significant increase in retinal venous and arterial diameters (p<0.001 each), leucocyte density (p=0.001), and leucocyte flow (p=0.024) despite lowering blood pressure to a significant degree. For venous and arterial vessel size measurements short term coefficients of variation were 1.3% and 2.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The sensitivity was between 3% and 5% for retinal veins and 5% and 7% for retinal arteries.
CONCLUSIONS—These data indicate that the Zeiss retinal vessel analyser is an accurate system for the assessment of retinal diameters in healthy subjects. In addition, nitric oxide appears to have a strong influence on retinal vascular tone.

 PMID:11049956

  2. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  3. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of mouse retinal mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Lückoff, Anika; Scholz, Rebecca; Sennlaub, Florian; Xu, Heping; Langmann, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    The innate immune system is activated in a number of degenerative and inflammatory retinal disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Retinal microglia, choroidal macrophages, and recruited monocytes, collectively termed 'retinal mononuclear phagocytes', are critical determinants of ocular disease outcome. Many publications have described the presence of these cells in mouse models for retinal disease; however, only limited aspects of their behavior have been uncovered, and these have only been uncovered using a single detection method. The workflow presented here describes a comprehensive analysis strategy that allows characterization of retinal mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in situ. We present standardized working steps for scanning laser ophthalmoscopy of microglia from MacGreen reporter mice (mice expressing the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor GFP transgene throughout the mononuclear phagocyte system), quantitative analysis of Iba1-stained retinal sections and flat mounts, CD11b-based retinal flow cytometry, and qRT-PCR analysis of key microglia markers. The protocol can be completed within 3 d, and we present data from retinas treated with laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV), bright white-light exposure, and Fam161a-associated inherited retinal degeneration. The assays can be applied to any of the existing mouse models for retinal disorders and may be valuable for documenting immune responses in studies for immunomodulatory therapies.

  5. Tractional retinal detachment in Usher syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Rani, Alka; Pal, Nikhil; Azad, Raj Vardhan; Sharma, Yog Raj; Chandra, Parijat; Vikram Singh, Deependra

    2005-08-01

    Retinal detachment is a rare complication in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. A case is reported of tractional retinal detachment in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa and sensorineural hearing loss, which was diagnosed as Usher syndrome type II. Because of the poor visual prognosis, the patient refused surgery in that eye. Tractional retinal detachment should be added to the differential diagnoses of visual loss in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  6. Formation pathway, structural characterization and optimum processing parameters of synthetic topaz – Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(OH,F){sub 2} – by CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo-Vázquez, E., E-mail: evatrujillo87@gmail.com; Pech-Canul, M.I., E-mail: martin.pech@cinvestav.edu.mx

    2015-10-15

    A novel synthesis route for topaz (Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(OH,F){sub 2}) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} as solid precursor was developed. Synthesis tests were conducted with and without a flow of nitrogen, positioning the Al(OH){sub 3} substrate at 0° and 90° with respect to the gas flow direction, at 700 and 750 °C, for 60 and 90 min, respectively. It was found that topaz is synthesized through two pathways, directly and indirectly, involving a series of endothermic and exothermic, heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions between Al(OH){sub 3} and SiF{sub 4}(g). Analytical structural determination confirmed existence of orthorhombic polycrystalsmore » with lattice parameters of a =4.6558 Å, b=8.8451 Å and c=8.4069 Å. According to ANOVA, while temperature, time and interaction of substrate angular position with atmosphere (P×A) are the parameters that most significantly influence the variability in the amount of topaz formed – equivalent contributions of 31% – topaz lattice parameters are mostly impacted by the same factors (T, t, P, A), but without the interaction factor. The projected amount of topaz is in good agreement with that obtained in confirmation tests under optimal conditions: Al(OH){sub 3} substrate compact placed at 0°, treated at 750 °C for 90 min in the absence of N{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Topaz synthesis as a unique phase by CVD, using solid precursor Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} is feasible. • Two pathways, a series of endothermic/exothermic, heterogeneous/homogeneous reactions. • Crystal structure, orthorhombic polycrystals: a =4.6558 Å, b=8.8451 Å, c=8.4069 Å. • Anova: amount of topaz formed and lattice parameters are impacted by same factors. • Projection of topaz quantity in good agreement with those from confirmation tests.« less

  7. High-temperature crystal chemistry of layered calcium borosilicates: CaBSiO4(OH) (datolite), Ca4B5Si3O15(OH)5 (`bakerite') and Ca2B2SiO7 (synthetic analogue of okayamalite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G.; Gorelova, L. A.; Bubnova, R. S.; Pekov, I. V.; Krivovichev, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    The high-temperature behaviour of three Ca borosilicates has been studied by in situ powder high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry in the temperature range 30-900 °C for natural samples of datolite, CaBSiO4(OH), and `bakerite', Ca4B5Si3O15(OH)5, and a synthetic analogue of okayamalite, Ca2B2SiO7. The latter was obtained by heating datolite at 800 °C for 5 h. Datolite and bakerite start to dehydroxylate above 700 and 500 °C, respectively, and decompose fully to form a high-temperature modification of okayamalite, HT-Ca2B2SiO7, and wollastonite, CaSiO3 at about 730 °C. Above 900 °C, HT-okayamalite decomposes with the formation of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and metaborate CaB2O4. The latter melts at about 990 °C. Above 1000 °C, only the existence of wollastonite, CaSiO3 and cristobalite, SiO2 was observed. According to the HTXRD data, in the temperature range 30-500 °C, datolite and `bakerite' demonstrate very similar and relatively low volumetric thermal expansion: α v = 29 and 27 × 10-6 °C-1, respectively. A high thermal expansion anisotropy ( α max/ α min 3) is caused by both the layered character of the crystal structures and the shear deformations of their monoclinic unit cells. The direction of maximum expansion is intermediate between the normal direction to the layers and the ( a + c) vector. A possible transformation mechanism from the datolite to the okayamalite structure topology is proposed from geometrical considerations. The synthetic analogue of okayamalite, Ca2B2SiO7, undergoes a reversible polymorphic transition at about 550 °C with a decrease in symmetry from tetragonal to orthorhombic. The crystal structure of the high-temperature (HT) modification of okayamalite was solved from the powder-diffraction data [900 °C: P21212, a = 7.3361(4), b = 7.1987(4), c = 4.8619(4) Å, V = 256.76(3) Å3, R wp = 6.61, R Bragg = 2.68%].

  8. Carbonate mineral solubility at low temperatures in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Giles M.

    2001-06-01

    Carbonate minerals have played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Earth, and may have also played an important role in the geochemical evolution of Mars and Europa. Several models have been published in recent years that describe chloride and sulfate mineral solubilities in concentrated brines using the Pitzer equations. Few of these models are parameterized for subzero temperatures, and those that are do not include carbonate chemistry. The objectives of this work are to estimate Pitzer-equation bicarbonate-carbonate parameters and carbonate mineral solubility products and to incorporate them into the FREZCHEM model to predict carbonate mineral solubilities in the Na-K-Mg-Ca-H-Cl-SO 4-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-H 2O system at low temperatures (≤25°C) with a special focus on subzero temperatures. Most of the Pitzer-equation parameters and equilibrium constants are taken from the literature and extrapolated into the subzero temperature range. Solubility products for 14 sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium bicarbonate and carbonate minerals are included in the model. Most of the experimental data are at temperatures ≥ -8°C; only for the NaHCO 3-NaCl-H 2O and Na 2CO 3-NaCl-H 2O systems are there bicarbonate and carbonate data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. In general, the fit of the model to the experimental data is good. For example, calculated eutectic temperatures and compositions for NaHCO 3, Na 2CO 3, and their mixtures with NaCl and Na 2SO 4 salts are in good agreement with experimental data to temperatures as low as -21.6°C. Application of the model to eight saline, alkaline carbonate waters give predicted pHs ranging from 9.2 to 10.2, in comparison with measured pHs that range from 8.7 to 10.2. The model suggests that the CaCO 3 mineral that precipitates during seawater freezing is probably calcite and not ikaite. The model demonstrates that a proposed salt assemblage for the icy surface of Europa consisting of highly hydrated MgSO 4

  9. Crewmembers in the middeck with the Retinal Photography experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mission Pilot Robert Cabana conducting the Retinal Photography life sciences experiment on test subject Mission Specialist Michael Clifford. The Retinal Photography experiment is Detailed Supplementary Objective # 474.

  10. ADULT WITH CHICKENPOX COMPLICATED BY SYSTEMIC VASCULITIS AND BILATERAL RETINAL VASCULITIS WITH RETINAL VASCULAR OCCLUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Jennifer; Carvounis, Petros E

    2017-01-01

    To describe an adult with chickenpox resulting in systemic vasculitis and bilateral retinal vascular occlusions. Single case report. A 58-year-old man with chickenpox complicated by disseminated varicella-zoster systemic and retinal vasculitis resulting in a combined arterial and venous occlusion in one eye with multiple branch retinal vein occlusions in the other eye. There was no evidence of retinitis. The patient systemically improved after treatment with acyclovir and steroids; however, his vision remained poor. Chickenpox can be associated with systemic vasculopathy and may rarely result in multiple systemic and ocular infarcts, including severe retinal vascular occlusions.

  11. How Methylation Modifies the Photophysics of the Native All- trans-Retinal Protonated Schiff Base: A CASPT2/MD Study in Gas Phase and in Methanol.

    PubMed

    Barata-Morgado, Rute; Sánchez, M Luz; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Martín, M Elena; Olivares Del Valle, Francisco J; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2018-03-22

    A comparison between the free-energy surfaces of the all- trans-retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) and its 10-methylated derivative in gas phase and methanol solution is performed at CASSCF//CASSCF and CASPT2//CASSCF levels. Solvent effects were included using the average solvent electrostatic potential from molecular dynamics method. This is a QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) method that makes use of the mean field approximation. It is found that the methyl group bonded to C10 produces noticeable changes in the solution free-energy profile of the S 1 excited state, mainly in the relative stability of the minimum energy conical intersections (MECIs) with respect to the Franck-Condon (FC) point. The conical intersections yielding the 9- cis and 11- cis isomers are stabilized while that yielding the 13- cis isomer is destabilized; in fact, it becomes inaccessible by excitation to S 1 . Furthermore, the planar S 1 minimum is not present in the methylated compound. The solvent notably stabilizes the S 2 excited state at the FC geometry. Therefore, if the S 2 state has an effect on the photoisomerization dynamics, it must be because it permits the RPSB population to branch around the FC point. All these changes combine to speed up the photoisomerization in the 10-methylated compound with respect to the native compound.

  12. Normal central retinal function and structure preserved in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Roman, Alejandro J; Aleman, Tomas S; Sumaroka, Alexander; Herrera, Waldo; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Atkinson, Lori A; Schwartz, Sharon B; Steinberg, Janet D; Cideciyan, Artur V

    2010-02-01

    To determine whether normal function and structure, as recently found in forms of Usher syndrome, also occur in a population of patients with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Patients with simplex, multiplex, or autosomal recessive RP (n = 238; ages 9-82 years) were studied with static chromatic perimetry. A subset was evaluated with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Co-localized visual sensitivity and photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness were measured across the central retina to establish the relationship of function and structure. Comparisons were made to patients with Usher syndrome (n = 83, ages 10-69 years). Cross-sectional psychophysical data identified patients with RP who had normal rod- and cone-mediated function in the central retina. There were two other patterns with greater dysfunction, and longitudinal data confirmed that progression can occur from normal rod and cone function to cone-only central islands. The retinal extent of normal laminar architecture by OCT corresponded to the extent of normal visual function in patients with RP. Central retinal preservation of normal function and structure did not show a relationship with age or retained peripheral function. Usher syndrome results were like those in nonsyndromic RP. Regional disease variation is a well-known finding in RP. Unexpected was the observation that patients with presumed recessive RP can have regions with functionally and structurally normal retina. Such patients will require special consideration in future clinical trials of either focal or systemic treatment. Whether there is a common molecular mechanism shared by forms of RP with normal regions of retina warrants further study.

  13. Bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment due to unusual retinal degeneration in Down syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yonemoto, Yumiko; Morishita, Seita; Fukumoto, Masanori; Mimura, Masashi; Sato, Takaki; Kida, Teruyo; Kojima, Shota; Oku, Hidehiro; Sugasawa, Jun; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of Down syndrome (DS) complicated with bilateral retinal detachment (RD) due to unusual retinal degeneration. A 9-year-old girl complained of bilateral visual disturbance during a follow-up examination for myopia and strabismus. Slit-lamp examination revealed moderate posterior subcapsular cataract in both eyes. B-mode echography showed bilateral bullous RD; however, it was difficult to detect the causal retinal breaks due to poor mydriasis. For treatment, the patient underwent bilateral lensectomy, vitrectomy, and silicone oil tamponade. Intraoperative findings revealed symmetrical retinal breaks and unusual caterpillar-like retinal degeneration on the upper temporal side of both eyes. Three months later, the patient underwent bilateral silicone oil removal and intraocular lens implantation. In this case, the retinal degeneration was morphologically different from retinal lattice degeneration, thus suggesting that it might be involved in the onset of DS-related bilateral RD.

  14. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  15. Retinitis pigmentosa, Coats disease and uveitis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A; Banin, E; Anteby, I; Benezra, D

    1999-01-01

    To study the anamnestic immune response to retinal specific antigens of two patients suffering from a rare triad of retinitis pigmentosa, Coats disease and uveitis. 17-year-old girl presented with an acute episode of panuveitis, and her 19-year-old brother suffered from chronic uveitis. On examination, both patients showed retinal vascular changes and subretinal exudations typical of Coats disease, with bone-spicule pigmentary changes as observed in retinitis pigmentosa. All routine examinations were unrevealing. However, the peripheral lymphocytes from these two siblings gave a specific anamnestic response to retinal antigens in vitro. A stimulation index of 4.6 was obtained when the sister's lymphocytes were stimulated with interphotoreceptor binding protein, IRBP--during the acute stage of the uveitis. The brother's lymphocytes showed a stimulation index of 2.7 towards S-Ag during the chronic phase of his uveitic condition. These results indicate that autoimmunity towards retinal antigens may play some role in specific types of retinitis pigmentosa. Whether these autoimmune reactions are a primary pathological mechanism or are secondary to the extensive destruction of the photoreceptor layer resulting from the retinitis pigmentosa remains debatable.

  16. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    strategies can be designed , tested and adopted as standard care. 2 While repeat evaluation and study of affected patients are vital to rigorously...following document is a summary of our experience and research in testing retinal structure and function in eyes with degenerative retinal diseases...Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Patricia Zilliox, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: National Neurovision Research Institute Owings

  17. Imaging of retinal and choroidal vascular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H; Jmor, F; Damato, B

    2013-01-01

    The most common intraocular vascular tumours are choroidal haemangiomas, vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastomas. Rarer conditions include cavernous retinal angioma and arteriovenous malformations. Options for ablating the tumour include photodynamic therapy, argon laser photocoagulation, trans-scleral diathermy, cryotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents, plaque radiotherapy, and proton beam radiotherapy. Secondary effects are common and include retinal exudates, macular oedema, epiretinal membranes, retinal fibrosis, as well as serous and tractional retinal detachment, which are treated using standard methods (ie, intravitreal anti-angiogenic agents or steroids as well as vitreoretinal procedures, such as epiretinal membrane peeling and release of retinal traction). The detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of vascular tumours and their complications have improved considerably thanks to advances in imaging. These include spectral domain and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and EDI-OCT, respectively), wide-angle photography and angiography as well as wide-angle fundus autofluorescence. Such novel imaging has provided new diagnostic clues and has profoundly influenced therapeutic strategies so that vascular tumours and secondary effects are now treated concurrently instead of sequentially, enhancing any opportunities for conserving vision and the eye. In this review, we describe how SD-OCT, EDI-OCT, autofluorescence, wide-angle photography and wide-angle angiography have facilitated the evaluation of eyes with the more common vascular tumours, that is, choroidal haemangioma, retinal vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastoma. PMID:23196648

  18. [Indications for Retinal Laser Therapy Revisited].

    PubMed

    Enders, P; Schaub, F; Fauser, S

    2017-02-10

    Background Laser therapy is an important treatment option in retinal diseases, especially in cases of vascular involvement. Most approaches are based on coagulation of retinal structures. As there is increasing use of agents targetting vascular endothelial growth factor in the treatment of macular diseases, indications for the use of laser treatment need to be reviewed carefully, especially with respect to their significance in first line therapy. This article explains recent strategies and treatment protocols. Materials and Methods Review of current literature in PubMed as well as synopsis of relevant guidelines. Results and Conclusion Retinal laser therapy is still widely used within retinal opthalmology and covers a large spectrum of indications. Despite the success of medical approaches, retinal laser therapy remains an indispensable treatment option for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, central or peripheral vein occlusion and less frequent pathologies, such as retinopathy of prematurity or Coats's disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [Viral retinitis following intravitreal triamcinolone injection].

    PubMed

    Zghal, I; Malek, I; Amel, C; Soumaya, O; Bouguila, H; Nacef, L

    2013-09-01

    Necrotizing viral retinitis is associated with infection by the Herpes family of viruses, especially herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and occasionally cytomegalovirus (CMV). When the diagnosis is suspected clinically, antiviral therapy must be instituted immediately. We report the case of a patient presenting with necrotizing viral retinitis 3 months following intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide for diabetic macular edema. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated a superior temporal occlusive vasculitis. A diagnostic anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to obtain deoxyribo-nucleic acid (DNA) for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for viral retinitis. PCR was positive for CMV. The patient was placed on intravenous ganciclovir. CMV retinitis is exceedingly rare in immunocompetent patients; however, it remains the most common cause of posterior uveitis in immunocompromised patients. The incidence of this entity remains unknown. Local immunosuppression, the dose and the frequency of injections may explain the occurrence of this severe retinitis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. [To cognize retinitis pigmentosa with scientific view].

    PubMed

    Li, Gen-lin

    2009-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited eye disease that usually leads into blind, and is high simplex and clinical heterogeneity. Recent years, some new hereditary forms have been found, such as digenic RP, mitochondrial RP, incomplete dominant inheritance RP. The phenotype of RP is multiplicity. Incompatible phenomenon between genotype and phenotypes was shown in some genes such as peripherin/RDS, RHO, RP2 and RP3. The complicated phenotype was shown in the rare RP forms, such as centricity RP, stemma RP, retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento, and retinal degeneration slow. Retinal transplantation, retinal implantation, drug and neurotrophic factor therapy, and gene therapy have been well studied worldwide and presented some hopeful efficacy. Ophthalmologists and practitioners should cognize the new advance and new knowledge on RP therapy with a scientific view for better serving the RP patients.

  1. Retinal Implants for Blind Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothermel, Albrecht

    Recently, very promising results have been obtained in clinical trials with eye-prostheses for the blind. There is a chance that advances in surgical techniques, microelectronics design, and material science may lead to the first really useful applications of retinal implants in the near future. This chapter will focus on the actual status of subretinal surgery and implant technologies. Opportunities and limitations of the different technologies will be discussed in terms of patients benefit and technological challenges. Finally, a vision on how the devices may work and look like in the future will be given.

  2. Astigmatism following retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, R; Crewdson, J; Chignell, A H

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-three patients on whom successful retinal detachment had been performed were studied to note astigmatic changes following surgery. In the majority of cases the errors following such surgery are of no great clinical importance. However, in some situations a high degree of astigmatism may be produced. This study showed that these sequelae are particularly likely after radial buckling procedures, and surgeons favouring these techniques should be aware that astigmatic errors can be induced. The astigmatic errors may persist for several years after surgery. PMID:6838807

  3. Telemedicine diagnosis of cytomegalovirus retinitis by nonophthalmologists.

    PubMed

    Yen, Michael; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Chen, Jenny; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Heiden, David; Holland, Gary N; Margolis, Todd P; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis continues to be a leading cause of blindness in many developing countries. Telemedicine holds the potential to increase the number of people screened for CMV retinitis, but it is unclear whether nonophthalmologists could be responsible for interpreting fundus photographs captured in a telemedicine program. To determine the accuracy of nonophthalmologist photographic graders in diagnosing CMV retinitis from digital fundus photographs. Fifteen nonexpert graders each evaluated 182 mosaic retinal images taken from the eyes of patients with AIDS who were evaluated at the Ocular Infectious Diseases Clinic at Chiang Mai University in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Graders diagnosed each image as CMV retinitis present, CMV retinitis absent, or unknown. The results from each grader were compared with those of an indirect ophthalmoscopic examination from an experienced on-site ophthalmologist as well as with the consensus grade given by a panel of CMV retinitis experts. Relative to the on-site ophthalmologist, the sensitivity of remote CMV retinitis diagnosis by nonexpert graders ranged from 64.0% to 95.5% (mean, 84.1%; 95% CI, 78.6%-89.6%)), and the specificity ranged from 65.6% to 92.5% (mean, 82.3%; 95% CI, 76.6%-88.0%)). Agreement between nonexpert and expert graders was high: the mean sensitivity and specificity values of nonexpert diagnosis using expert consensus as the reference standard were 93.2% (95% CI, 90.6%-95.8%) and 88.4% (95% CI, 85.4%-91.1%), respectively. Mean intrarater reliability also was high (mean Cohen κ, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.78-0.87). The sensitivity and specificity of remote diagnosis of CMV retinitis by nonexpert graders was variable, although several nonexperts achieved a level of accuracy comparable to that of CMV retinitis experts. More intensive training and periodic evaluations would be required if nonexperts are to be used in clinical practice.

  4. Tatarinovite Ca3Al(SO4)[B(OH)4](OH)6 · 12H2O, a new ettringite-group mineral from the Bazhenovskoe deposit, Middle Urals, Russia, and its crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Kasatkin, A. V.; Zubkova, N. V.; Britvin, S. N.; Pautov, L. A.; Pekov, I. V.; Varlamov, D. A.; Bychkova, Ya. V.; Loskutov, A. B.; Novgorodova, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    A new mineral, tatarinovite, ideally Ca3Al(SO4)[B(OH)4](OH)6 · 12H2O, has been found in cavities of rhodingites at the Bazhenovskoe chrysotile asbestos deposit, Middle Urals, Russia. It occurs (1) colorless, with vitreous luster, bipyramidal crystals up to 1 mm across in cavities within massive diopside, in association with xonotlite, clinochlore, pectolite and calcite, and (2) as white granular aggregates up to 5 mm in size on grossular with pectolite, diopside, calcite, and xonotlite. The Mohs hardness is 3; perfect cleavage on (100) is observed. D meas = 1.79(1), D calc = 1.777 g/cm3. Tatarinovite is optically uniaxial (+), ω = 1.475(2), ɛ = 1.496(2). The IR spectrum contains characteristic bands of SO4 2-, CO3 2-, B(OH)4 -, B(OH)3, Al(OH)6 3-, Si(OH)6 2-, OH-, and H2O. The chemical composition of tatarinovite (wt %; ICP-AES; H2O was determined by the Alimarin method; CO2 was determined by selective sorption on askarite) is as follows: 27.40 CaO, 4.06 B2O3, 6.34 A12O3, 0.03 Fe2O3, 2.43 SiO2, 8.48 SO3, 4.2 CO2, 46.1 H2O, total is 99.04. The empirical formula (calculated on the basis of 3Ca apfu) is H31.41Ca3.00(Al0.76Si0.25)Σ1.01 · (B0.72S0.65C0.59)Σ1.96O24.55. Tatarinovite is hexagonal, space gr. P63, a = 11.1110(4) Å, c = 10.6294(6) Å, V = 1136.44(9) A3, Z = 2. Its crystal chemical formula is Ca3(Al0.70Si0.30) · {[SO4]0.34[B(OH)4]0.33[CO3]0.24}{[SO4]0.30[B(OH)4]0.34[CO3]0.30[B(OH)3]0.06}(OH5·73O0.27) · 12H2O. The strongest reflections of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern [ d, Å ( I, %) ( hkl)] are 9.63 (100) (100), 5.556 (30) (110), 4.654 (14) (102), 3.841 (21) (112), 3.441 (12) (211), 2.746 (10) (302), 2.538 (12) (213). Tatarinovite was named in memory of the Russian geologist and petrologist Pavel Mikhailovich Tatarinov (1895-1976), a well-known specialist in chrysotile asbestos deposits. Type specimens have been deposited at the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

  5. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FINDINGS IN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS RETINITIS: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Alessandro; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Ravera, Vittoria; Oldani, Marta; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Viola, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the vitreal, retinal, and choroidal features using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in eyes affected by cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. Patients diagnosed with either active or inactive CMV retinitis were included in the study. Complete ophthalmic examination, serial color fundus photography, and SD-OCT (with and without enhanced depth imaging function) were performed for all the subjects at baseline and follow-up visits. The SD-OCT images were analyzed by two independent graders to evaluate the structural changes in areas of CMV retinitis. Prevalence data for vitreal, retinal, and choroidal SD-OCT features were collected. Twelve eyes from 9 patients (6 males, mean age: 52.7 ± 10.3 years) were enrolled. Nine eyes were diagnosed with active CMV retinitis at baseline. Active disease SD-OCT characteristic findings included nebulous vitritis (100%), posterior hyaloid thickening (83.3%), epiretinal membrane (100%), and retinal swelling (100%). Two distinct patterns of chorioretinal involvement were observed in active retinitis: 1) full-thickness retinitis (Full thickness retinitis) (n = 7 eyes) with choriocapillaris alterations and retinal pigment epithelial thickening and 2) cavernous retinitis (n = 3 eyes) characterized by inner retinal hyperreflectivity, large empty spaces in outer nuclear layer, and bridges of retinal tissue but retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris sparing. Patients with cavernous retinitis develop retinal detachment during follow-up. Eyes with Full thickness retinitis developed choriocapillaris atrophy and choroidal thinning and retinal scars as the lesions healed. There are two distinct patterns of chorioretinal involvement in CMV retinitis. SD-OCT is a useful tool in the diagnosis, management, and prediction of the outcome of CMV retinitis.

  6. Chronic retinal necrosis: cytomegalovirus necrotizing retinitis associated with panretinal vasculopathy in non-HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eric W; Elner, Susan G; van Kuijk, Frederik J; Goldberg, Naomi; Lieberman, Ronni M; Eliott, Dean; Johnson, Mark W

    2013-10-01

    To characterize a unique cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated retinopathy in patients with limited immune dysfunction. Retrospective observational case series. CMV was confirmed as the pathogenic agent via polymerase chain reaction analysis of aqueous or vitreous humor samples or via immunohistochemical analysis of retinal biopsy specimens. Five non-HIV patients with granular necrotizing retinitis, vitritis, and severe occlusive vasculopathy were identified. Patient histories all suggested a basis for limited immune dysfunction including advanced age (n = 4), diabetes mellitus (n = 4), and noncytotoxic immunotherapy (n = 3). Diagnosis of CMV retinitis was delayed in all cases and patients received either no antiviral therapy (n = 2) or incorrect antiviral therapy (n = 3) for presumed herpes simplex/varicella zoster-related acute retinal necrosis. Retinitis subsequently regressed in all cases with introduction of systemic ganciclovir/valganciclovir (n = 5) and/or intravitreal foscarnet (n = 2). Four of five patients developed neovascularization because of extensive retinal ischemia. The clinical expression of CMV-associated retinopathy is strongly related to immune status. In patients with limited immune dysfunction, a mixed clinical picture of intraocular inflammation with panretinal occlusive vasculopathy, more characteristic of acute retinal necrosis, and peripheral slowly progressive granular retinitis, more characteristic of classic CMV retinitis, is observed. Recognition of this atypical clinical presentation, which the authors term chronic retinal necrosis, should prompt molecular testing for CMV to determine the appropriate antiviral therapy. Consideration should also be given to prophylactic panretinal photocoagulation in such eyes, given the high risk of neovascular complications.

  7. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  8. Necrotizing retinitis of multifactorial etiology

    PubMed Central

    Pirvulescu, Ruxandra Angela; Popa, Cherecheanu Alina; Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Obretin, Dana; Iancu, Raluca; Vasile, Danut

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We present the case of a 73-year-old woman with osteoporosis, who presented to the emergency room with a sudden vision loss and ocular pain in the right eye, which appeared two days before. The patient mentioned loss of appetite, weight loss for three months and low fever for two weeks. Materials and methods. Among the ophthalmological findings, the most important were panuveitis, and large confluent necrotic areas in the peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed with RE Panuveitis and acute necrotizing retinitis. Results. Blood exams showed leukocytosis and monocytosis, thrombocytosis and anemia. Further investigations showed high levels of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) anti IgG and Herpes Simplex (HS) type 1 virus anti IgM, urinary infection, and secondary hepatic cytolysis. The CT and MRI of the thorax and abdomen showed no sign of neoplastic disease, and no explanation for the CMV infection was found. The patient received general corticotherapy and antiviral therapy, and, after one month, RE BCVA was 20/ 30. Particularity of the case. Acute necrotizing retinitis in an old patient with CMV and HSV type 1, associated with secondary hepatic cytolysis, without any other immunosuppressive disease and very good outcome. PMID:29450371

  9. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  10. Retinal slit lamp video mosaicking.

    PubMed

    De Zanet, Sandro; Rudolph, Tobias; Richa, Rogerio; Tappeiner, Christoph; Sznitman, Raphael

    2016-06-01

    To this day, the slit lamp remains the first tool used by an ophthalmologist to examine patient eyes. Imaging of the retina poses, however, a variety of problems, namely a shallow depth of focus, reflections from the optical system, a small field of view and non-uniform illumination. For ophthalmologists, the use of slit lamp images for documentation and analysis purposes, however, remains extremely challenging due to large image artifacts. For this reason, we propose an automatic retinal slit lamp video mosaicking, which enlarges the field of view and reduces amount of noise and reflections, thus enhancing image quality. Our method is composed of three parts: (i) viable content segmentation, (ii) global registration and (iii) image blending. Frame content is segmented using gradient boosting with custom pixel-wise features. Speeded-up robust features are used for finding pair-wise translations between frames with robust random sample consensus estimation and graph-based simultaneous localization and mapping for global bundle adjustment. Foreground-aware blending based on feathering merges video frames into comprehensive mosaics. Foreground is segmented successfully with an area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9557. Mosaicking results and state-of-the-art methods were compared and rated by ophthalmologists showing a strong preference for a large field of view provided by our method. The proposed method for global registration of retinal slit lamp images of the retina into comprehensive mosaics improves over state-of-the-art methods and is preferred qualitatively.

  11. Multifocal retinitis in New Zealand sheep dogs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P L; Dubielzig, R R; Kazacos, K R

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-nine percent of 1,448 working sheep dogs were affected with varying degrees of multifocal retinal disease on ophthalmoscopic examination. Lesions consisted of localized areas of hyperreflexia in the tapetal fundus, often associated with hyperpigmentation. Severely affected animals had widespread hyperreflexia with retinal vascular attenuation. Only 6% of 125 New Zealand dogs raised in urban environment were similarly affected. Both eyes of 70 dogs from New Zealand were examined histologically. Forty-seven of 70 dogs had ocular inflammatory disease. Ten other dogs had noninflammatory eye disease, and 13 dogs had normal eyes. Histologically, eyes with inflammatory disease were divided into three categories: Dogs 3 years of age or less with active inflammatory disease of the retina, uvea, and vitreous. Four dogs in this group had migrating nematode larvae identified morphologically as genus Toxocara. Diffuse retinitis and retinal atrophy in conjunction with localized retinal necrosis and choroidal fibrosis. Dogs in this category were severely, clinically affected. Chronic, low-grade retinitis with variable retinal atrophy. Most dogs in this category were over 3 years of age, and many were visually functional. The existence of a definable spectrum of morphological changes associated with inflammation, suggests that Toxocara sp. ocular larva migrans may be the cause of a highly prevalent, potentially blinding syndrome of working sheep dogs in New Zealand.

  12. Retinitis pigmentosa, pigmentary retinopathies, and neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, M Tariq

    2006-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal diseases with phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The pathophysiologic basis of the progressive visual loss in patients with RP is not completely understood but is felt to be due to a primary retinal photoreceptor cell degenerative process mainly affecting the rods of the peripheral retina. In most cases RP is seen in isolation (nonsyndromic), but in some other cases it may be a part of a genetic, metabolic, or neurologic syndrome or disorder. Nyctalopia, or night blindness, is the most common symptom of RP. The classic fundus appearance of RP includes retinal pigment epithelial cell changes resulting in retinal hypo- or hyperpigmentation ("salt-and-pepper"), retinal granularity, and bone spicule formation. The retinal vessels are often narrowed or attenuated and there is a waxy pallor appearance of the optic nerve head. Electroretinography will demonstrate rod and cone photoreceptor cell dysfunction and is a helpful test in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with RP. A detailed history with pedigree analysis, a complete ocular examination, and the appropriate paraclinical testing should be performed in patients complaining of visual difficulties at night or in dim light. This review discusses the clinical manifestations of RP as well as describing the various systemic diseases, with a special emphasis on neurologic diseases, associated with a pigmentary retinopathy.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  15. Paediatric retinal detachment: aetiology, characteristics and outcomes.

    PubMed

    McElnea, Elizabeth; Stephenson, Kirk; Gilmore, Sarah; O'Keefe, Michael; Keegan, David

    2018-01-01

    To provide contemporary data on the aetiology, clinical features and outcomes of paediatric retinal detachment. A retrospective review of all those under 16y who underwent surgical repair for retinal detachment at a single centre between the years 2008 and 2015 inclusive was performed. In each case the cause of retinal detachment, the type of detachment, the presence or absence of macular involvement, the number and form of reparative surgeries undertaken, and the surgical outcome achieved was recorded. Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients, 15 (62.5%) of whom were male and 9 (37.5%) of whom were female, their mean age being 11.6y and range 2-16y developed retinal detachment over the eight year period studied. Trauma featured in the development of retinal detachment in 14 (50.0%) cases. Retinal detachment was associated with other ocular and/or systemic conditions in 11 (39.3%) cases. A mean of 3.0 procedures with a range of 1-9 procedures per patient were undertaken in the management of retinal detachment. Complex vitrectomy combined with scleral buckling or complex vitrectomy alone were those most frequently performed. Mean postoperative visual acuity was 1.2 logMAR with range 0.0-3.0 logMAR. In 22 of 26 (84.6%) cases which underwent surgical repair the retina was attached at last follow-up. Aggressive management of paediatric retinal detachment including re-operation increases the likelihood of anatomical success. In cases where the retinal detachment can be repaired by an external approach alone there is a more favourable visual outcome.

  16. A selected review of current retinal research and study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J

    1979-02-01

    This paper presents a digest of 50 retinal research projects reported in one British and two American journals from July 1976 through June 1977. The articles reviewed report recent developments pertaining to effects of excessive light on retinal tissue in newborn rats, pathogenesis of cotton-wool spots, control of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetes, infections, macular diseases, variations in retinal pigment epithelium, and retinal detachment.

  17. Surgical treatment of central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Berker, Nilufer; Batman, Cosar

    2008-05-01

    The treatment of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is still a subject of debate. Medical therapy efforts, as well as retinal laser photocoagulation, have mostly dealt with management of the sequelae of CRVO, and have shown limited success in improving visual acuity. The unsatisfactory results of such therapeutic efforts led to the development of new treatment strategies focused on the surgical treatment of the occluded retinal vein. The purpose of this review is to summarize the outcomes of commonly reported surgical treatment strategies and to review different opinions on the various surgical approaches to the treatment of CRVO.

  18. Nanoparticles for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber’s congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. PMID:20452457

  19. Nuclear Migration During Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Lisa M.; Link, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we focus on the mechanisms, regulation, and cellular consequences of nuclear migration in the developing retina. In the nervous system, nuclear migration is prominent during both proliferative and post-mitotic phases of development. Interkinetic nuclear migration is the process where the nucleus oscillates from the apical to basal surfaces in proliferative neuroepithelia. Proliferative nuclear movement occurs in step with the cell cycle, with M-phase being confined to the apical surface and G1-, S-, and G2-phases occurring at more basal locations. Later, following cell cycle exit, some neuron precursors migrate by nuclear translocation. In this mode of cellular migration, nuclear movement is the driving force for motility. Following discussion of the key components and important regulators for each of these processes, we present an emerging model where interkinetic nuclear migration functions to distinguish cell fates among retinal neuroepithelia. PMID:17560964

  20. Integration of retinal image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  1. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms. PMID:20689798

  3. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Karia, Niral

    2010-07-30

    This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.

  4. Adaptive optics imaging of inherited retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Michalis; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Patterson, Emily J; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-11-15

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy allows for non-invasive retinal phenotyping on a microscopic scale, thereby helping to improve our understanding of retinal diseases. An increasing number of natural history studies and ongoing/planned interventional clinical trials exploit AO ophthalmoscopy both for participant selection, stratification and monitoring treatment safety and efficacy. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolution of AO ophthalmoscopy, recent developments and its application to a broad range of inherited retinal diseases, including Stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia. Finally, we describe the impact of this in vivo microscopic imaging on our understanding of disease pathogenesis, clinical trial design and outcome metrics, while recognising the limitation of the small cohorts reported to date. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ou; Wang, Yimin; Konduru, Ranjith K; Zhang, Xinbo; Sadda, SriniVas R; Huang, David

    2012-09-18

    Noncontact retinal blood flow measurements are performed with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a circumpapillary double circular scan (CDCS) that scans around the optic nerve head at 3.40 mm and 3.75 mm diameters. The double concentric circles are performed 6 times consecutively over 2 sec. The CDCS scan is saved with Doppler shift information from which flow can be calculated. The standard clinical protocol calls for 3 CDCS scans made with the OCT beam passing through the superonasal edge of the pupil and 3 CDCS scan through the inferonal pupil. This double-angle protocol ensures that acceptable Doppler angle is obtained on each retinal branch vessel in at least 1 scan. The CDCS scan data, a 3-dimensional volumetric OCT scan of the optic disc scan, and a color photograph of the optic disc are used together to obtain retinal blood flow measurement on an eye. We have developed a blood flow measurement software called "Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation" (DOCTORC). This semi-automated software is used to measure total retinal blood flow, vessel cross section area, and average blood velocity. The flow of each vessel is calculated from the Doppler shift in the vessel cross-sectional area and the Doppler angle between the vessel and the OCT beam. Total retinal blood flow measurement is summed from the veins around the optic disc. The results obtained at our Doppler OCT reading center showed good reproducibility between graders and methods (<10%). Total retinal blood flow could be useful in the management of glaucoma, other retinal diseases, and retinal diseases. In glaucoma patients, OCT retinal blood flow measurement was highly correlated with visual field loss (R(2)>0.57 with visual field pattern deviation). Doppler OCT is a new method to perform rapid, noncontact, and repeatable measurement of total retinal blood flow using widely available Fourier-domain OCT instrumentation. This new technology may improve the

  7. Safety of iPhone retinal photography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng Chiong; Wynn-Williams, Giles; Wilson, Graham

    2017-04-01

    With the advancement in mobile technology, smartphone retinal photography is becoming a popular practice. However, there is limited information about the safety of the latest smartphones used for retinal photography. This study aims to determine the photobiological risk of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus when used in conjunction with a 20Diopter condensing lens for retinal photography. iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus (Apple, Cupertino, CA) were used in this study. The geometrical setup of the study was similar to the indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. The phone was set up at one end of the bench with its flash turned on at maximal brightness; a 20 Dioptre lens was placed 15 cm away from the phone. The light that passes through the lens was measured with a spectroradiometer and an illuminance probe at the other end to determine the spectral profile, spatial irradiance, radiant power emitted by the phone's flash. Trigonometric and lens formula were applied to determine the field of view and retinal surface in order to determine the weighted retinal irradiance and weighted retinal radiant exposure. Taking ocular transmission and the distribution of the beam's spatial irradiance into account, the weighted retinal irradiance is 1.40 mW/cm 2 and the weighted retinal radiant exposure is 56.25 mJ/cm 2 . The peak weighted foveal irradiance is 1.61 mW/cm 2 . Our study concluded that the photobiological risk posed by iPhone 6 indirect ophthalmoscopy was at least 1 order of magnitude below the safety limits set by the ISO15004-2.2.

  8. Retinal vessel tortuosity measures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Kalitzeos, Angelos A; Lip, Gregory Y H; Heitmar, Rebekka

    2013-01-01

    Structural retinal vascular characteristics, such as vessel calibers, tortuosity and bifurcation angles are increasingly quantified in an objective manner, slowly replacing subjective qualitative disease classification schemes. This paper provides an overview of the current methodologies and calculations used to compute retinal vessel tortuosity. We set out the different parameter calculations and provide an insight into the clinical applications, while critically reviewing its pitfalls and shortcomings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Retinal vasculitis associated with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Diaz, M.; Mira, M.; Nevado, L.; Galván, A.; Berenguer, A.; Bureo, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Although systemic vasculitis can be a complication of inflammatory bowel disease at several locations (skin, eyes, brain, mesentery, and lung) the association of retinal vasculitis with Crohn's disease is rare. We studied a 26-year-old woman with biopsy-demonstrated Crohn's disease who developed a severe bilateral retinal arteritis and phlebitis, with acute loss of vision. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7746779

  10. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0566 TITLE: Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joseph A. Brzezinski IV...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0566 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA-seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest

  11. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiantong; Jin, Hongfang; Yang, Liu

    2017-01-01

    As the third gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) plays a crucial role in the physiology and pathophysiology of many systems in the body, such as the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. The mechanisms for its effects, including inhibiting ischemic injury, reducing oxidative stress damage, regulating apoptosis, and reducing the inflammation reaction in different systems, have not been fully understood. Recently, H 2 S and its endogenous synthesis pathway were found in the mammalian retina. This review describes the production and the metabolism of H 2 S and the evidence of a role of H 2 S in the retina physiology and in the different retinal diseases, including retinal degenerative diseases and vascular diseases. In the retina, H 2 S is generated in the presence of cystathionine-β-synthase, cystathionine-γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase from L-cysteine. The role of endogenous H 2 S and its physiologic effect in the retina are still elusive. However, strong evidence shows that retina-derived H 2 S might play protective or deleterious role in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases. For example, by regulating Ca 2+ influx, H 2 S can protect retinal neurons against light-induced degeneration. H 2 S preconditioning can mediate the anti-apoptotic effect of retinal ganglion cells in retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Treatment with H 2 S in rats relieves diabetic retinopathy by suppressing oxidative stress and reducing inflammation. Further studies would greatly improve our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for retinal diseases and the potential for the H 2 S-related therapy of the retinal diseases as well.

  12. Digital Tracking and Control of Retinal Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears or breaks. Both the location and...one second and typical treatment for a disease such as diabetic retinopathy requires as many as 2000 lesions per eye. This type of tedious task is...Oxygenation and Laser Treatment in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy ", American Journal of Ophthalmology, Volume 113, January 1992, pp 36 - 38. [21

  13. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-21

    AD Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries0 0 " Midterm Report (September 30, 1987 through March 31, 1989) .rj1- .I N. Naveh, M.D. Michael Belkin...208 11. TITLE (Incude Secunty Olasufiation) Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries 12. PERSONAL. AUTHOR(S) M. Belkin, NJ. Naveh 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...enhancement in arachidonic acid metabolism and that steroid treatment curtailed this response. In the prsent study we investigated the involvement of

  14. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    AD TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES cANNUAL/FINAL REPORT MICHAEL BELKIN INAVA NAVEH JANUARY 1985 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH...CF ,I446 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (U) Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Michael Belkin 13a. TYPE...ciliary body as seen in uveitis , is associated by elevation of aqueous humor protein levels. Therefore, protein was used by some investigators as an

  15. Telemedicine Applications in Pediatric Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S.; Moshfeghi, Darius M.

    2017-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is a developing field that presents diverse opportunities. One of its most successful applications to date has been in pediatric retinal disease, particularly in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies have shown that using telemedicine for ROP screening allows a remote ophthalmologist to identify abnormal findings and implement early interventions. Here, we review the literature on uses of telemedicine in pediatric retinal disease and consider future applications. PMID:28333078

  16. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology☆

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started. PMID:24843304

  17. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  18. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Delu; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich's ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD. PMID:23825457

  19. Fundus autofluorescence and retinal structure as determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and retinal function in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Aya; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the association between fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and retinal structure and function in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). For image acquisition, HRA2 (Heidelberg Engineering) and 3D-OCT1000 (Topcon Corp.) were used. Based on FAF examination, 88 eyes of 44 RP patients were categorized into three types. The area within the hyperautofluorescent ring and the area of preserved retinal autofluorescence with FAF was calculated. The association between the pattern of FAF and the residual area of the junction between the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors (IS/OS line), and the relationship between the area within hyperautofluorescent ring, the area of preserved retinal autofluorescence and the mean deviation (MD) of static perimetry were assessed. Twenty-four eyes were with preserved retinal autofluorescence without hyperautofluorescent ring, 54 eyes were with hyperautofluorescent ring and ten eyes were with abnormal foveal autofluorescence both in the fovea and the periphery of the 30° scan. In the first type, the IS/OS line was clearly detected. In the second type, the residual area of the partially distinct IS/OS line corresponded with the area within hyperautofluorescent ring with significant correlation between the area within hyperautofluorescent ring and the MD (R(2) = 0.705, p < 0.001); however, there was no correlation between the area of preserved retinal autofluorescence and the MD, or between the area of preserved retinal autofluorescence and the area within hyperautofluorescent ring. In the third type, the IS/OS line was completely absent. The residual IS/OS line can be found in the area inside the hyperautofluorescent ring and correlates with residual visual function.

  20. Active retinitis in an infant with postnatally acquired cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Piersigilli, F; Catena, G; De Gasperis, M R; Lozzi, S; Auriti, C

    2012-07-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is frequently associated with active retinitis. In contrast, in the immunocompetent neonate with postnatally acquired CMV infection retinitis is rarely present and usually does not progress. We describe the case of an infant with postnatal CMV infection and active retinitis diagnosed at 20 days of life. Owing to the rapid progression of the retinitis, therapy with intravenous ganciclovir was performed, with prompt regression of the retinitis. Therapy was then continued with oral valganciclovir for one further week. Although very unusual, CMV retinitis has to be taken into consideration in neonates with early postnatally acquired CMV infection, as an early diagnosis and treatment may be crucial to avoid visual impairment.

  1. Survey on diagnosis of diseases from retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sneha; Malathy, C.

    2018-04-01

    Retina is a thin membranous layer of tissue that occupies at the back of the eye which provides central vision needed for daily routines. Identifying retinal diseases at the early stage is a challenging task since healthy retina is required for central vision. Several retinal diseases affect the eye such as retinal tear, retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hole and macular degeneration etc. These maladies will encounter a secondary growth in the close future as the age of the person increases. A survey is made which tells about the diagnosis of the retinal diseases from the retinal images using machine learning techniques.

  2. Giant Retinal Tear With Retinal Detachment in Regressed Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity Treated by Laser.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Parijat; Tewari, Ruchir; Salunkhe, Nitesh; Kumawat, Devesh; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-06-29

    Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after successfully regressed retinopathy of prematurity is a rare occurrence. Late onset rhegmatogenous retinal detachment has been reported infrequently. The authors report a case of aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity that underwent uneventful regression after laser photocoagulation and later developed an inoperable closed funnel retinal detachment due to a giant retinal tear. This case represents the earliest development of such complications in regressed aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity treated by laser. Development of a giant retinal tear has also not been previously reported after laser treatment. This case highlights that successful regression of severe retinopathy of prematurity does not safeguard against future complications and requires frequent long-term follow-up. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54:e34-e36.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Long-term safety of human retinal progenitor cell transplantation in retinitis pigmentosa patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Shao Jun; Li, Shi Ying; Qu, Ling Hui; Meng, Xiao Hong; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hai Wei; Liang, Zhi Qing; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-09-29

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a common genetic disease that causes retinal degeneration and blindness for which there is currently no curable treatment available. Vision preservation was observed in retinitis pigmentosa animal models after retinal stem cell transplantation. However, long-term safety studies and visual assessment have not been thoroughly tested in retinitis pigmentosa patients. In our pre-clinical study, purified human fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were transplanted into the diseased retina of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Based on these results, we conducted a phase I clinical trial to establish the safety and tolerability of transplantation of RPCs in eight patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Patients were studied for 24 months. After RPC transplantation in RCS rats, we observed moderate recovery of vision and maintenance of the outer nuclear layer thickness. Most importantly, we did not find tumor formation or immune rejection. In the retinis pigmentosa patients given RPC injections, we also did not observe immunological rejection or tumorigenesis when immunosuppressive agents were not administered. We observed a significant improvement in visual acuity (P < 0.05) in five patients and an increase in retinal sensitivity of pupillary responses in three of the eight patients between 2 and 6 months after the transplant, but this improvement did not appear by 12 months. Our study for the first time confirmed the long-term safety and feasibility of vision repair by stem cell therapy in patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. WHO Trial Registration, ChiCTR-TNRC-08000193 . Retrospectively registered on 5 December 2008.

  4. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  5. Multi-MHz retinal OCT

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang; Reznicek, Lukas; Neubauer, Aljoscha; Kampik, Anselm; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the benefits and problems of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina at A-scan rates in excess of 1 MHz, using a 1050 nm Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser. Different scanning strategies enabled by MHz OCT line rates are investigated, and a simple multi-volume data processing approach is presented. In-vivo OCT of the human ocular fundus is performed at different axial scan rates of up to 6.7 MHz. High quality non-mydriatic retinal imaging over an ultra-wide field is achieved by a combination of several key improvements compared to previous setups. For the FDML laser, long coherence lengths and 72 nm wavelength tuning range are achieved using a chirped fiber Bragg grating in a laser cavity at 419.1 kHz fundamental tuning rate. Very large data sets can be acquired with sustained data transfer from the data acquisition card to host computer memory, enabling high-quality averaging of many frames and of multiple aligned data sets. Three imaging modes are investigated: Alignment and averaging of 24 data sets at 1.68 MHz axial line rate, ultra-dense transverse sampling at 3.35 MHz line rate, and dual-beam imaging with two laser spots on the retina at an effective line rate of 6.7 MHz. PMID:24156052

  6. Multi-MHz retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang; Reznicek, Lukas; Neubauer, Aljoscha; Kampik, Anselm; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the benefits and problems of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina at A-scan rates in excess of 1 MHz, using a 1050 nm Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser. Different scanning strategies enabled by MHz OCT line rates are investigated, and a simple multi-volume data processing approach is presented. In-vivo OCT of the human ocular fundus is performed at different axial scan rates of up to 6.7 MHz. High quality non-mydriatic retinal imaging over an ultra-wide field is achieved by a combination of several key improvements compared to previous setups. For the FDML laser, long coherence lengths and 72 nm wavelength tuning range are achieved using a chirped fiber Bragg grating in a laser cavity at 419.1 kHz fundamental tuning rate. Very large data sets can be acquired with sustained data transfer from the data acquisition card to host computer memory, enabling high-quality averaging of many frames and of multiple aligned data sets. Three imaging modes are investigated: Alignment and averaging of 24 data sets at 1.68 MHz axial line rate, ultra-dense transverse sampling at 3.35 MHz line rate, and dual-beam imaging with two laser spots on the retina at an effective line rate of 6.7 MHz.

  7. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-10-01

    Life on earth is subject to alternating cycles of day and night imposed by the rotation of the earth. Consequently, living things have evolved photodetective systems to synchronize their physiology and behavior with the external light-dark cycle. This form of photodetection is unlike the familiar "image vision," in that the basic information is light or darkness over time, independent of spatial patterns. "Nonimage" vision is probably far more ancient than image vision and is widespread in living species. For mammals, it has long been assumed that the photoreceptors for nonimage vision are also the textbook rods and cones. However, recent years have witnessed the discovery of a small population of retinal ganglion cells in the mammalian eye that express a unique visual pigment called melanopsin. These ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive and drive a variety of nonimage visual functions. In addition to being photoreceptors themselves, they also constitute the major conduit for rod and cone signals to the brain for nonimage visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Here we review what is known about these novel mammalian photoreceptors.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions NARP Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that causes a variety ...

  9. Clinical applications of retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Thake, Miriam; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Many currently incurable forms of blindness affecting the retina have a genetic etiology and several others, such as those resulting from retinal vascular disturbances, respond to repeated, potentially indefinite administration of molecular based treatments. The recent clinical advances in retinal gene therapy have shown that viral vectors can deliver genes safely to the retina and the promising initial results from a number of clinical trials suggest that certain diseases may potentially be treatable. Gene therapy provides a means of expressing proteins within directly transduced cells with far greater efficacy than might be achieved by traditional systemic pharmacological approaches. Recent developments have demonstrated how vector gene expression may be regulated and further improvements to vector design have limited side effects and improved safety profiles. These recent steps have been most significant in bringing gene therapy into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Nevertheless translating retinal gene therapy from animal research into clinical trials is still a lengthy process, including complexities in human retinal diseases that have been difficult to model in the laboratory. The focus of this review is to summarize the genetic background of the most common retinal diseases, highlight current concepts of gene delivery technology, and relate those technologies to pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a rupture to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and rupture was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (rupture) takes place at 180-190°C. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.

  11. Bilateral intraocular calcification in necrotizing cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Samuray; Oray, Merih; Yildirim, Yeliz; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur

    2014-10-01

    We report a unique case of bilateral intraocular calcification due to necrotizing cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis associated with congenital CMV infection. A 7-month-old boy with a history of congenital CMV infection showed bilateral intraocular calcific plaques on computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. We reviewed the patient's medical files for the purpose of this report. The patient had a prior medical history of hospitalization for fever and swelling in the neck at 3 months of age. Systemic findings (anemia, neutropenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and reactive lymphadenomegaly) in association with a low CD4 count, high blood CMV viral load, and positivity for urine CMV DNA by polymerase chain reaction led to the diagnosis of bone marrow suppression and congenital CMV infection. At 7 months, he developed horizontal nystagmus and bilateral leukocoria over 20 days. Cranial CT and ultrasonography revealed bilateral intraocular calcific plaques and the patient was referred to rule out retinoblastoma. Fundoscopy was consistent with bilateral hemorrhagic, necrotizing CMV retinitis. Significant resolution of the retinal infiltrations occurred 2 weeks after initiation of systemic treatment with ganciclovir. Intraocular calcification may be a sign of active CMV retinitis. To our knowledge this is the first report of bilateral intraocular calcification serving as the presenting clinical manifestation of necrotizing CMV retinitis.

  12. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature and then crossing the blood-retinal barrier; and through the choroidal blood supply, crossing the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The blood-retinal barrier is functionally similar to the blood-brain barrier, normally restricting transport of larger sized materials, but particles in the lower nanomaterial size range can be expected to transit. The blood flow to the retinal choroid is, on a tissue mass basis, one of the highest in the body raising the potential for rapid delivery of nanomaterials to the RPE. In vitro, RPE cells rapidly uptake nano particles, transport and agglomerate them in the perinuclear cytoplasm. In vivo studies have shown that the eye can uptake nanomaterials and retain them longer than many other tissues after cessation of exposure. Toxicity from nanomaterials to the neural retina or the RPE would be expected to follow common mechanisms identified for other tissues including generation of reactive oxygen species, alteration of cellular redox status, altered intracellular signaling, and release of toxic metal ions from soluble metallic particles. The retina and other ocular tissues, however, have potential for additional phototoxic mechanism

  13. Reprogramming the metabolome rescues retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Karen Sophia; Xu, Christine L; Cui, Xuan; Tsang, Stephen H

    2018-05-01

    Metabolomics studies in the context of ophthalmology have largely focused on identifying metabolite concentrations that characterize specific retinal diseases. Studies involving mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have shown that individuals suffering from retinal diseases exhibit metabolic profiles that markedly differ from those of control individuals, supporting the notion that metabolites may serve as easily identifiable biomarkers for specific conditions. An emerging branch of metabolomics resulting from biomarker studies, however, involves the study of retinal metabolic dysfunction as causes of degeneration. Recent publications have identified a number of metabolic processes-including but not limited to glucose and oxygen metabolism-that, when perturbed, play a role in the degeneration of photoreceptor cells. As a result, such studies have led to further research elucidating methods for prolonging photoreceptor survival in an effort to halt degeneration in its early stages. This review will explore the ways in which metabolomics has deepened our understanding of the causes of retinal degeneration and discuss how metabolomics can be used to prevent retinal degeneration from progressing to its later disease stages.

  14. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Yang, Jin; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H

    2017-02-02

    Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients' diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  15. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited retinal degenerative diseases is estimated at approximately 200,000 individuals. RP... Retinitis Pigmentosa ). NNRI is awaiting final protocol review and HRPO approval for NNRI and the three enrolling clinical sites- the CTEC site at...acid) in individuals with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , with the ability to expand the enrollment to individuals with autosomal recessive

  16. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable...34Preservation of the inner retina in retinitis pigmentosa . A morphometric analysis," Arch Ophthalmol, vol. 115, no. 4, pp. 511-515, Apr.1997...Towards a completely implantable, light-sensitive intraocular retinal prosthesis. M.S. Humayun, J.D. Weiland, B. Justus1, C. Merrit1, J. Whalen, D

  17. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers) during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with amniotic fluid (AF), RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1) confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells. PMID:22490806

  18. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Sanie-Jahromi, Fatemeh; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Davari, Maliheh; Ghaderi, Shima; Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Samiei, Shahram; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Pakravesh, Jalil; Bagheri, Abouzar

    2012-04-10

    Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers) during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with amniotic fluid (AF), RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1) confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  19. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  20. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  1. Novel method for edge detection of retinal vessels based on the model of the retinal vascular network and mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Hengyi; Yu, Yajun

    1998-09-01

    Accurate edge detection of retinal vessels is a prerequisite for quantitative analysis of subtle morphological changes of retinal vessels under different pathological conditions. A novel method for edge detection of retinal vessels is presented in this paper. Methods: (1) Wavelet-based image preprocessing. (2) The signed edge detection algorithm and mathematical morphological operation are applied to get the approximate regions that contain retinal vessels. (3) By convolving the preprocessed image with a LoG operator only on the detected approximate regions of retinal vessels, followed by edges refining, clear edge maps of the retinal vessels are fast obtained. Results: A detailed performance evaluation together with the existing techniques is given to demonstrate the strong features of our method. Conclusions: True edge locations of retinal vessels can be fast detected with continuous structures of retinal vessels, less non- vessel segments left and insensitivity to noise. The method is also suitable for other application fields such as road edge detection.

  2. Progress toward the maintenance and repair of degenerating retinal circuitry.

    PubMed

    Vugler, Anthony A

    2010-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa remain major causes of severe vision loss in humans. Clinical trials for treatment of retinal degenerations are underway and advancements in our understanding of retinal biology in health/disease have implications for novel therapies. A review of retinal biology is used to inform a discussion of current strategies to maintain/repair neural circuitry in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis. In age-related macular degeneration/retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive loss of rods/cones results in corruption of bipolar cell circuitry, although retinal output neurons/photoreceptive melanopsin cells survive. Visual function can be stabilized/enhanced after treatment in age-related macular degeneration, but in advanced degenerations, reorganization of retinal circuitry may preclude attempts to restore cone function. In Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis, useful vision can be restored by gene therapy where central cones survive. Remarkable progress has been made in restoring vision to rodents using light-responsive ion channels inserted into bipolar cells/retinal ganglion cells. Advances in genetic, cellular, and prosthetic therapies show varying degrees of promise for treating retinal degenerations. While functional benefits can be obtained after early therapeutic interventions, efforts should be made to minimize circuitry changes as soon as possible after rod/cone loss. Advances in retinal anatomy/physiology and genetic technologies should allow refinement of future reparative strategies.

  3. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  4. Molecular biology of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Zhou, H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are the output neurons that encode and transmit information from the eye to the brain. Their diverse physiologic and anatomic properties have been intensively studied and appear to account well for a number of psychophysical phenomena such as lateral inhibition and chromatic opponency. In this paper, we summarize our current view of retinal ganglion cell properties and pose a number of questions regarding underlying molecular mechanisms. As an example of one approach to understanding molecular mechanisms, we describe recent work on several POU domain transcription factors that are expressed in subsets of retinal ganglion cells and that appear to be involved in ganglion cell development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8570601

  5. Handheld four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Larry C.; Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2000-06-01

    Several techniques for measuring the oxygen saturation of blood in retinal vessels have been reported. One interesting application of retinal vessel oximetry is the identification of occult blood loss in trauma victims. However, all the devices described to date are too bulky and cumbersome to be used in a trauma bay or in the field. We present a design for a handheld instrument that performs four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry. This device is comparable in size and weight to a commercially available camcorder, and is suitable for use in the trauma bay. The compact size of this device could also extend its applications beyond traditional clinical settings, as it could be used by primary care physicians and home health care workers for the screening and monitoring of ophthalmic diseases. Principles of operation and preliminary data from the device will be described.

  6. Retinal pigment epithelium changes in Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Maria D; Ventura, Camila V; Dias, João R; Chang, Ta Chen P; Berrocal, Audina M

    2018-06-01

    We present the first case in the literature of a patient with Kartagener syndrome and ocular findings of nonexudative age-related macular degeneration. A 55-year-old woman with Kartagener syndrome and chronic angle closure glaucoma presented for evaluation of the retina. Optos ultra-widefield imaging of the fundus showed glaucomatous cupping, drusen, and retinal pigment epithelium changes within the macular region. Humphrey visual field testing confirmed glaucomatous changes. Drusenoid pigment epithelial detachments were observed bilaterally with optical coherence tomography. We hypothesize that in addition to the lungs, spermatozoa and the Fallopian tubes, the retinal pigment epithelium may also be affected by ciliary dysfunction in individuals with Kartagener syndrome. Given recent advances in our knowledge of retinal ciliopathies, further studies are needed to understand how ciliary dysfunction affects the retina in Kartagener syndrome.

  7. Automated retinal layer segmentation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Jonathan; Briley, David; Boretsky, Adam; Motamedi, Massoud

    2014-05-01

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a valuable diagnostic tool in both clinical and research settings. The depth-resolved intensity profiles generated by light backscattered from discrete layers of the retina provide a non-invasive method of investigating progressive diseases and injury within the eye. This study demonstrates the application of steerable convolution filters capable of automatically separating gradient orientations to identify edges and delineate tissue boundaries. The edge maps were recombined to measure thickness of individual retinal layers. This technique was successfully applied to longitudinally monitor changes in retinal morphology in a mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and human data from age-related macular degeneration patients. The steerable filters allow for direct segmentation of noisy images, while novel recombination of weaker segmentations allow for denoising post-segmentation. The segmentation before denoising strategy allows the rapid detection of thin retinal layers even under suboptimal imaging conditions.

  8. Involvement of Erythropoietin in Retinal Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Dreixler, John C.; Hagevik, Sarah; Hemmert, Jonathan W.; Shaikh, Afzhal R.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Roth, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the role of erythropoietin in retinal ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Methods Rats were subjected to retinal ischemia after IPC. Electroretinography assessed functional recovery after ischemia; retinal sections were examined to determine loss of retinal ganglion cells, and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling was used to assess apoptosis. Levels of downstream mediators were measured in retinal homogenates by Western blotting. To assess the involvement of erythropoietin in IPC, we measured levels of erythropoietin and its receptor (EPO-R) in retinal homogenates following IPC, using Western blotting. To examine erythropoietin’s role in IPC, we studied the impact of blocking erythropoietin via intravitreal injection of soluble EPO-R (sEPO-R) before IPC. Results Erythropoietin levels did not change following IPC, but EPO-R increased. Intravitreal injection of sEPO-R significantly attenuated both the functional and histological neuroprotection produced by IPC in comparison to control injection of denatured sEPO-R. Apoptotic damage after ischemia was enhanced in the sEPO-R treated retinas as indicated by fluorescent Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling. Phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27), but not protein kinase B (Akt), upregulated in denatured sEPO-R treated retinae, were attenuated in eyes injected with sEPO-R. Conclusions These results indicate that EPO-R upregulation is a critical component of the functional, histological, and anti-apoptotic protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on ischemia in the retina and that several downstream effectors may be involved in the neuroprotective actions of erythropoietin. PMID:19322943

  9. Reading Visual Braille with a Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z.; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A.; Dorn, Jessy D.; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2–4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients. PMID:23189036

  10. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  11. Retinal health information and notification system (RHINO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashtbozorg, Behdad; Zhang, Jiong; Abbasi-Sureshjani, Samaneh; Huang, Fan; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.

    2017-03-01

    The retinal vasculature is the only part of the blood circulation system that can be observed non-invasively using fundus cameras. Changes in the dynamic properties of retinal blood vessels are associated with many systemic and vascular diseases, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease and diabetes. The assessment of the characteristics of the retinal vascular network provides important information for an early diagnosis and prognosis of many systemic and vascular diseases. The manual analysis of the retinal vessels and measurement of quantitative biomarkers in large-scale screening programs is a tedious task, time-consuming and costly. This paper describes a reliable, automated, and efficient retinal health information and notification system (acronym RHINO) which can extract a wealth of geometric biomarkers in large volumes of fundus images. The fully automated software presented in this paper includes vessel enhancement and segmentation, artery/vein classification, optic disc, fovea, and vessel junction detection, and bifurcation/crossing discrimination. Pipelining these tools allows the assessment of several quantitative vascular biomarkers: width, curvature, bifurcation geometry features and fractal dimension. The brain-inspired algorithms outperform most of the state-of-the-art techniques. Moreover, several annotation tools are implemented in RHINO for the manual labeling of arteries and veins, marking optic disc and fovea, and delineating vessel centerlines. The validation phase is ongoing and the software is currently being used for the analysis of retinal images from the Maastricht study (the Netherlands) which includes over 10,000 subjects (healthy and diabetic) with a broad spectrum of clinical measurements

  12. New Therapeutic Modalities of Retinal Laser Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Clawticarroni New Therapeutic Modalities for Retinal Laser Injury 1 2 . PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Tim T.Lar. Ph.D., .and Mark Q.M. Tso. M.D. 13a. TYPE OF...Experimental treatment of retinal laser Injury 4 1.3: Clinical therapy 4 1.4: Our hypothesis and approaches 4 Chapter 2 : Accidental laser Injury to the...human retina 7 2.1: Introduction 7 2.2: Case 1 7 2.3: Case 2 8 2.4: General comments 9 2.5: Clinical course 10 2.6: Implications 10 Chapter 3: Sub

  13. Classification and management of hereditary retinal angiomas.

    PubMed

    Augsburger, J J; Shields, J A; Goldberg, R E

    1981-08-01

    Two distinct types of retinal angiomas are currently recognized. Capillary hemangiomas occur most characteristically as part of the von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. The retinal capillary hemangiomas typically appear as globular red-orange tumors with dilated and tortuous afferent arterioles and efferent venules. Cavernous hemangiomas typically appear as grape-like clusters of dilated vascular sacs without pronounced alteration in the adjacent arterioles and venules. The spectrum of clinical features of these two types of hemangiomatosis and current approaches to management of patients with these disorders is reviewed.

  14. [Retinitis septica Roth--a case report].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Spirková, J; Vican, J

    2011-10-01

    We report of a case of retinitis septica in a 37-years old man one month after his tooth's extraction. Because of decreased right eye's central vision and a presence of typical retinal Roth's spots we called internists for a possibility of bacterial endocarditis. Cardiologic examination confirmed this disease together with aortal valve's defect. The course of hearth's disease was weary heavy, with attack of septic fever and cardial decompensation. After acute stage control, defocusation and antibiotic therapy, he underwent a surgical intervention with exchange of aortal valve.

  15. Retinal detachment caused by Arruga suture scleral intrusion. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Rueda-Rueda, T; González-García, M L; López-Herrero, F; Sánchez-Vicente, P; Castilla-Lázpita, A

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of an 81-year-old man with retinal detachment caused by intrusion of an Arruga suture. The encircling buckle was located in the sub-retinal space and caused retinal breaks with retinal detachment A pars plana vitrectomy was performed along with intraocular cutting of the Arruga suture with retinal re-attachment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Retinitis pigmentosa and congenital toxoplasmosis: a rare coexistence.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Manpreet S; Prakash, Gunjan; Vashisht, Nagender; Garg, S P

    2007-01-01

    We describe a previously unreported co-existence of retinitis pigmentosa and congenital toxoplasmosis. An eight year old male presented to our center with complaints of decreased night vision. Fundus evaluations in both the eyes demonstrated features typical of retinitis pigmentosa. There were well-defined punched out healed chorio-retinal scars suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis. On the basis of history, clinical findings and reduction of a and b wave amplitudes on scotopic and photopic electroretinograph, a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa with congenital toxoplasmosis was made. Retinitis pigmentosa may co-exist with congenital toxoplasmosis that may affect the patient's overall ocular morbidity and visual acuity.

  17. [Retinal whitening following vitrectomy for epiretinal macular membrane].

    PubMed

    Uemura, A

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the clinical pictures of retinal whitening following epiretinal membrane dissection. I studied retrospectively the records of 18 eyes which had undergone vitrectomy. Two types of retinal whitening were observed: cotton wool-like spots within the superficial retinal layers and a linear or dendritic pattern within the deep retinal layers. The spots were mainly noted in idiopathic cases and resolved completely in a few weeks, and the pattern was observed in macular pucker cases after retinal detachment surgery and persisted for a long time after vitrectomy.

  18. Novel mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein gene (RLBP1) associated with retinitis punctata albescens: evidence of interfamilial genetic heterogeneity and fundus changes in heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Gerald A; Roberts, Mary Flynn; Derlacki, Deborah J; Grimsby, Jonna L; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sharon, Dror; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular genetic defects associated with retinitis punctata albescens (RPA) in 5 patients from 3 families with this disease. We examined 3 probands and 2 clinically affected relatives with RPA. Clinical examinations included best-corrected visual acuity, visual field testing, electroretinography, dilated fundus examination, and fundus photography. Leukocyte DNA was analyzed for mutations in the exons of the genes encoding cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein 1 (RLBP1), 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenase (RDH5), interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (RBP3), and photoreceptor all-trans-retinol dehydrogenase (RDH8). Not all patients were evaluated for mutations in each gene. The exons were individually amplified and screened for mutations by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis or direct genomic sequencing. The 3 probands had similar clinical findings, including a history of poor night vision, the presence of punctate white deposits in the retina, and substantially reduced or absent rod responses on electroretinogram testing. One of the probands (patient 2:III:2) had 2 novel mutations in the RLBP1 gene (Arg151Trp and Gly31[2-base pair deletion], [GGA-->G-]). Segregation analysis showed that the 2 mutations were allelic and that the patient was a compound heterozygote. Both parents of the proband manifested round white deposits in the retina. The other 2 probands had no detected pathogenic mutations in RLBP1 or in the other 3 genes evaluated. The identification of novel RLBP1 mutations in 1 of our 3 probands, all with RPA, is further evidence of genetic (nonallelic) heterogeneity in this disease. The presence of round white deposits in the retina may be observed in those heterozygous for RLBP1. Clinical Relevance Patients with a clinical presentation of RPA can have genetically different mutations. Drusen-like lesions may be observed in heterozygotes in families with this disease and a mutation in RLBP1.

  19. Retinal patching: a new approach to the management of selected retinal breaks.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C E; Grierson, I; McLeod, D

    1989-01-01

    Restoration of retinal continuity by a patching technique is proposed as a new means of treating selected rhegmatogenous retinal detachments where established techniques frequently fail. The patch consists of a substrate and adhesive applied to the inner surface of the retina surrounding the retinal break. Bovine eye cup experiments have been performed to explore the effectiveness of a range of adhesives, and cyanoacrylates and Tisseel have been found to be effective. Studies of these adhesives on confluent cultures of bovine retinal pigment epithelial cells and glia revealed temporary cyanoacrylate toxicity and stimulation of proliferation by Tisseel. Substrate biocompatability was investigated by observing the growth of cells on various substrates in tissue culture; biological substrates such as lens capsule supported cell growth whereas synthetic membranes only did so if pretreated with fibronectin.

  20. Repair of Traumatic Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Combined with Congenital Falciform Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Mano, Fukutaro; Chang, Kuo-Chung; Mano, Tomiya

    2018-01-01

    To report a case of surgical repair of traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment combined with congenital falciform retinal detachment (FRD). A retrospective case report. A 36-year-old man with traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment complicating a previously known FRD was successfully treated despite residual FRD following pars plana lensectomy, vitrectomy, and encircling scleral buckling. His best corrected visual acuity improved from hand motion at 50 cm to 20/1,000. We concluded that the root of the FRD is susceptible to trauma because of the contraction of fibrovascular tissue. The early intervention of modern vitrectomy to traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment complicating a previously known FRD is an important consideration for enhanced quality of care and optimal patient outcomes.

  1. Repair of Traumatic Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Combined with Congenital Falciform Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Fukutaro; Chang, Kuo-Chung; Mano, Tomiya

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of surgical repair of traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment combined with congenital falciform retinal detachment (FRD). Methods A retrospective case report. Results A 36-year-old man with traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment complicating a previously known FRD was successfully treated despite residual FRD following pars plana lensectomy, vitrectomy, and encircling scleral buckling. His best corrected visual acuity improved from hand motion at 50 cm to 20/1,000. Conclusion We concluded that the root of the FRD is susceptible to trauma because of the contraction of fibrovascular tissue. The early intervention of modern vitrectomy to traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment complicating a previously known FRD is an important consideration for enhanced quality of care and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:29643782

  2. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, A.; Rozin, R.; Eliash, T.; Friedman, N.; Jung, K. H.; Sheves, M.; Ruhman, S.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs) are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn), within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR). Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  3. The Blood-Retinal Barrier in the Management of Retinal Disease: EURETINA Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Vaz, José

    2017-01-01

    Retinal diseases are the main causes of blindness in the Western world. Diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration continue to increase in prevalence and as main causes of vision loss. Intravitreal anti-VEGF and steroid injections have raised new expectations for their successful treatment. These agents act by stabilizing the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Our group defined the BRB by identifying for the first time the tight junctions that unite retinal endothelial cells and are the basis for the inner BRB, an observation later confirmed in retinal pigment epithelial cells and in brain vessels. A major role of active transport processes was also identified. Today, the BRB is understood to play a fundamental role in retinal function in both health and disease. Retinal edema, an ubiquitous manifestation of retinal disease, is directly associated with breakdown of the BRB and with vision loss. In its most common form (i.e., vasogenic edema), due to breakdown of the BRB, Starling's law of capillary filtration may be used to interpret the mechanisms of fluid accumulation in the retina. The main factors involved in the development of retinal edema are BRB permeability, capillary hydrostatic pressure, tissue hydrostatic pressure, tissue osmotic pressure, and plasma osmotic pressure. In the clinical environment, breakdown of the BRB has been identified by fluorescein angiography and vitreous fluorometry, requiring the intravenous administration of fluorescein. An OCT-based method, OCT-Leakage, recently introduced by our group is capable of noninvasively identifying and quantifying sites of alteration of the BRB by mapping areas of lower-than-normal optical reflectivity, thus reflecting changes in the retinal extracellular fluid. We found good correspondence between the location of increased areas of low optical reflectivity identified by OCT-Leakage and the main sites of leakage on fluorescein angiography. Furthermore, with OCT-Leakage the areas of abnormal

  4. Retinal detachment associated with AIDS-related cytomegalovirus retinitis: risk factors in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Yen, Michael; Chen, Jenny; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Shantha, Jessica; Holland, Gary N; Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    To determine risk factors predictive of retinal detachment in patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a setting with limited access to ophthalmic care. Case-control study. Sixty-four patients with CMV retinitis and retinal detachment were identified from the Ocular Infectious Diseases and Retina Clinics at Chiang Mai University. Three control patients with CMV retinitis but no retinal detachment were selected for each case, matched by calendar date. The medical records of each patient were reviewed, with patient-level and eye-level features recorded for the clinic visit used to match cases and controls, and also for the initial clinic visit at which CMV retinitis was diagnosed. Risk factors for retinal detachment were assessed separately for each of these time points using multivariate conditional logistic regression models that included 1 eye from each patient. Patients with a retinal detachment were more likely than controls to have low visual acuity (odds ratio [OR], 1.24 per line of worse vision on the logMAR scale; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.33) and bilateral disease (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 0.92-4.90). Features present at the time of the initial diagnosis of CMV retinitis that predicted subsequent retinal detachment included bilateral disease (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.18-6.08) and lesion size (OR, 2.64 per 10% increase in lesion size; 95% CI, 1.41-4.94). Bilateral CMV retinitis and larger lesion sizes, each of which is a marker of advanced disease, were associated with subsequent retinal detachment. Earlier detection and treatment may reduce the likelihood that patients with CMV retinitis develop a retinal detachment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Retinal Detachment Associated with AIDS-Related Cytomegalovirus Retinitis: Risk Factors in a Resource-Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Michael; Chen, Jenny; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Shantha, Jessica; Holland, Gary N; Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors predictive of retinal detachment in patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a setting with limited access to ophthalmic care. Design Case-control study. Methods Sixty-four patients with CMV retinitis and retinal detachment were identified from the Ocular Infectious Diseases and Retina Clinics at Chiang Mai University. Three control patients with CMV retinitis but no retinal detachment were selected for each case, matched by calendar date. The medical records of each patient were reviewed, with patient-level and eye-level features recorded for the clinic visit used to match cases and controls, and also for the initial clinic visit at which CMV retinitis was diagnosed. Risk factors for retinal detachment were assessed separately for each of these time points using multivariate conditional logistic regression models that included 1 eye from each patient. Results Patients with a retinal detachment were more likely than controls to have low visual acuity (OR, 1.24 per line of worse vision on the logMAR scale; 95%CI, 1.16-1.33) and bilateral disease (OR, 2.12; 95%CI, 0.92-4.90). Features present at the time of the initial diagnosis of CMV retinitis that predicted subsequent retinal detachment included bilateral disease (OR, 2.68; 95%CI, 1.18-6.08) and lesion size (OR, 2.64 per 10% increase in lesion size; 95%CI, 1.41-4.94). Conclusion Bilateral CMV retinitis and larger lesion sizes, each of which is a marker of advanced disease, were associated with subsequent retinal detachment. Earlier detection and treatment may reduce the likelihood that patients with CMV retinitis develop a retinal detachment. PMID:25448999

  6. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays.

    PubMed

    Light, Jacob G; Fransen, James W; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V; McCall, Maureen A; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-11-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6-12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16-26 weeks post-implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission. Published

  7. Peripheral Retinal Vascular Patterns in Patients with Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Wu, Wen-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    This is an observational study of fluorescein angiography (FA) in consecutive patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in Changhua Christian Hospital to investigate the peripheral retinal vascular patterns in those patients. All patients had their age, sex, axial length (AXL), and refraction status (RF) recorded. According to the findings in FA of the peripheral retina, the eyes were divided into 4 groups: in group 1, there was a ramified pattern of peripheral retinal vasculature with gradual tapering; in group 2, there was an abrupt ending of peripheral vasculature with peripheral non-perfusion; in group 3, there was a curving route of peripheral vasculature forming vascular arcades or anastomosis; and in group 4, the same as in group 3, but with one or more wedge-shaped avascular notches. Comparisons of age, sex, AXL, and RF, association of breaks with lattice degeneration and retinal non-perfusion, surgical procedures utilized, and mean numbers of operations were made among the four groups. Of the 73 eyes studied, there were 13 eyes (17.8%) in group 1, 3 eyes (4.1%) in group 2, 40 eyes (54.8%) in group 3 and 17 eyes (23.3%) in group 4. Significant differences in age, AXL and RF, and association of retinal breaks to non-perfusion were noted among the four groups. Patients in group 1 had older ages, while younger ages were noted in groups 3 and 4. Eyes in group 1 had the shortest average AXL and were least myopic in contrast to the eyes in groups 3 and 4. Association of retinal breaks and retinal non-perfusion was significantly higher in groups 2, 3 and 4 than in group 1. In conclusion, peripheral vascular anomalies are common in cases with RRD. Patients with peripheral non-perfusion tend to be younger, with longer axial length and have the breaks associated with retinal non-perfusion. PMID:26909812

  8. Management of giant retinal tear and retinal detachment in a patient with active toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nathan L; Sridhar, Jayanth; Flynn, Harry W

    2018-06-01

    To describe the management of a giant retinal tear with retinal detachment in a patient with active toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis. While receiving systemic medications for toxoplasmosis, the patient underwent scleral buckling, pars plana vitrectomy, and C3F8 gas tamponade without removal of the lens. At last follow-up, best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 with an attached retina and the toxoplasmosis lesion was inactive. and Importance: Using modern surgical techniques, anatomic and clinical success is possible during active retinochoroiditis.

  9. STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT OF HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RING IN PATIENTS WITH RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

    PubMed Central

    LIMA, LUIZ H.; CELLA, WENER; GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; WANG, NAN-KAI; BUSUIOC, MIHAI; THEODORE SMITH, R.; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the retinal structure underlying the hyperautofluorescent ring visible on fundus autofluorescence in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Twenty-four eyes of 13 patients with retinitis pigmentosa, aged 13 years to 67 years, were studied. The integrity of the photoreceptor cilia, also known as the inner/outer segment junction of the photoreceptors, the outer nuclear layer, and retinal pigment epithelium, was evaluated outside, across, and inside the ring with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results Inside the foveal area, fundus autofluorescence did not detect abnormalities. Outside the ring, fundus autofluorescence revealed hypoautofluorescence compatible with the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium degeneration. Spectral-domain OCT inside the ring, in the area of normal foveal fundus autofluorescence, revealed an intact retinal structure in all eyes and total retinal thickness values that were within normal limits. Across the ring, inner/outer segment junction disruption was observed and the outer nuclear layer was decreased in thickness in a centrifugal direction in all eyes. Outside the hyperautofluorescent ring, the inner/outer segment junction and the outer nuclear layer appeared to be absent and there were signs of retinal pigment epithelium degeneration. Conclusion Disruption of the inner/outer segment junction and a decrease in outer retinal thickness were found across the central hyperautofluorescent ring seen in retinitis pigmentosa. Outer segment phagocytosis by retinal pigment epithelium is necessary for the formation of an hyperautofluorescent ring. PMID:19584660

  10. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  11. Potential for autoimmune pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever virus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H; King, Charles H; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-09-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication.

  12. Potential for Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J.; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H.; King, Charles H.; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication. PMID:23918215

  13. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker–induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  14. INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING-DEPENDENT RETINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES AFTER VITRECTOMY IN RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Toshio; Tachibana, Takashi; Notomi, Shoji; Koyanagi, Yoshito; Murakami, Yusuke; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Enaida, Hiroshi; Murata, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Taiji; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2018-03-01

    To examine retinal changes after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, we used 3-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment cases. The 68 eyes from 67 patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were studied, including 35 detached macula cases (51%) and 33 attached macula cases. Internal limiting membrane peeling was performed with fine forceps after brilliant blue G staining. The 3D-OCT images were obtained with volume-rendering technologies from cross-sectional OCT images. The 3D-OCT detected 45 eyes (66%) with ILM peeling-dependent retinal changes, including dissociated optic nerve fiber layer appearance, dimple sign, temporal macular thinning, ILM peeling area thinning, or forceps-related retinal thinning. The ILM peeled area was detectable in only 9 eyes with 3D-OCT, whereas it was undetectable in other 59 eyes. The dissociated optic nerve fiber layer appearance was detected in 8 of the total cases (12%), and dimple signs were observed in 14 cases (21%). Forceps-related thinning was also noted in eight cases (24%) of attached macula cases and in four cases (11%) of detached macula cases. No postoperative macular pucker was noted in the observational period. The 3D-OCT clearly revealed spatial and time-dependent retinal changes after ILM peeling. The changes occurred in 2 months and remained thereafter.

  15. Laser-induced retinal injury thresholds: variation with retinal irradiated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Schulmeister, Karl; Seiser, Bernhard; Edthofer, Florian

    2005-04-01

    The retinal injury threshold for exposure to a laser source varies as a function of the irradiated area on the retina. Currently accepted guidelines for the safe use of lasers provide that the MPE will increase as the diameter of the irradiated area for retinal diameters between 25 mm and 1700 mm, based on the ED50 data available in the late 1970s. Recent studies by Zuclich and Lund produced data showing that the ED50 for ns-duration exposures at 532 nm and ms duration exposures at 590 nm varied as the square of the diameter of the irradiated area on the retina. This paper will discuss efforts to resolve the disagreement between the new data and the earlier data though an analysis of all accessible data relating the retinal injury threshold to the diameter of the incident beam on the retina and through simulations using computer models of laser-induced injury. The results show that the retinal radiant exposure required to produce retinal injury is a function of both exposure duration and retinal irradiance diameter and that the current guidelines for irradiance diameter dependence do not accurately reflect the variation of the threshold data.

  16. Laser-induced retinal damage thresholds for annular retinal beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Paul K.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.; Till, Stephen; Stuck, Bruce E.; Hollins, Richard C.

    2004-07-01

    The dependence of retinal damage thresholds on laser spot size, for annular retinal beam profiles, was measured in vivo for 3 μs, 590 nm pulses from a flashlamp-pumped dye laser. Minimum Visible Lesion (MVL)ED50 thresholds in rhesus were measured for annular retinal beam profiles covering 5, 10, and 20 mrad of visual field; which correspond to outer beam diameters of roughly 70, 160, and 300 μm, respectively, on the primate retina. Annular beam profiles at the retinal plane were achieved using a telescopic imaging system, with the focal properties of the eye represented as an equivalent thin lens, and all annular beam profiles had a 37% central obscuration. As a check on experimental data, theoretical MVL-ED50 thresholds for annular beam exposures were calculated using the Thompson-Gerstman granular model of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina. Threshold calculations were performed for the three experimental beam diameters and for an intermediate case with an outer beam diameter of 230 μm. Results indicate that the threshold vs. spot size trends, for annular beams, are similar to the trends for top hat beams determined in a previous study; i.e., the threshold dose varies with the retinal image area for larger image sizes. The model correctly predicts the threshold vs. spot size trends seen in the biological data, for both annular and top hat retinal beam profiles.

  17. Visual Acuity is Related to Parafoveal Retinal Thickness in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, Robert J.; Gaudio, Alexander R.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the prevalence and effect on visual acuity of macular cysts in a large cohort of patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods In 316 patients with typical forms of retinitis pigmentosa, we measured visual acuities with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts, detected macular cysts with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified retinal thicknesses by OCT. We used the FREQ, LOGISTIC, and GENMOD procedures of SAS to evaluate possible risk factors for cyst prevalence and the MIXED procedure to quantify the relationships of visual acuity to retinal thickness measured at different locations within the macula. Results We found macular cysts in 28% of the patients, 40% of whom had cysts in only one eye. Macular cysts were seen most often in patients with dominant disease and not at all in patients with X-linked disease (p = 0.006). In eyes with macular cysts, multiple regression analysis revealed that visual acuity was inversely and independently related to retinal thickness at the foveal center (p = 0.038) and within a ring spanning an eccentricity of 5° to 10° from the foveal center (p = 0.004). Conclusions Macular cysts are a common occurrence in retinitis pigmentosa, especially among patients with dominantly-inherited disease. Visual acuity is influenced by edema in the parafovea, as well as in the fovea. PMID:18552390

  18. Retinal Structure Measurements as Inclusion Criteria for Stem Cell-Based Therapies of Retinal Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Matsui, Rodrigo; Sumaroka, Alexander; Cideciyan, Artur V

    2016-04-01

    We reviewed and illustrated the most optimal retinal structural measurements to make in stem cell clinical trials. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and autofluorescence (AF) imaging were used to evaluate patients with severe visual loss from nonsyndromic and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), ABCA4-Stargardt disease, and nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Outer nuclear layer (ONL), rod outer segment (ROS) layer, inner retina, ganglion cell layer (GCL), and nerve fiber layer (NFL) thicknesses were quantified. All patients had severely reduced visual acuities. Retinitis pigmentosa patients had limited visual fields; maculopathy patients had central scotomas with retained peripheral function. For the forms of RP illustrated, there was detectable albeit severely reduced ONL across the scanned retina, and normal or hyperthick GCL and NFL. Maculopathy patients had no measurable ONL centrally; it became detectable with eccentricity. Some maculopathy patients showed unexpected GCL losses. Autofluorescence imaging illustrated central losses of RPE integrity. A hypothetical scheme to relate patient data with different phases of retinal remodeling in animal models of retinal degeneration was presented. Stem cell science is advancing, but it is not too early to open the discussion of criteria for patient selection and monitoring. Available clinical tools, such as OCT and AF imaging, can provide inclusion/exclusion criteria and robust objective outcomes. Accepting that early trials may not lead to miraculous cures, we should be prepared to know why-scientifically and clinically-so we can improve subsequent trials. We also must determine if retinal remodeling is an impediment to efficacy.

  19. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in AIDS patients: a different appearance of varicella-zoster retinitis.

    PubMed

    Pavesio, C E; Mitchell, S M; Barton, K; Schwartz, S D; Towler, H M; Lightman, S

    1995-01-01

    Retinal infections caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have been reported in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Two cases of a VZV-related retinitis are described with the characteristic features of the recently described progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome. Both patients suffered from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with greatly reduced peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts, and presented with macular retinitis without vitritis. The disease was bilateral in one case and unilateral in the other. The clinical course was rapidly progressive with widespread retinal involvement and the development of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with complete loss of vision in the affected eyes despite intensive intravenous antiviral therapy. VZV DNA was identified in vitreous biopsies, by molecular techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in both patients. At present, the use of very high-dose intravenous acyclovir may be the best therapeutic option in these patients for whom the visual prognosis is poor. Intravitreal antiviral drugs could also contribute to the management of these cases.

  20. Photovoltaic Retinal Prosthesis with High Pixel Density

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the “image capturing” photoreceptors, while neurons in the “image processing” inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems, which deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation was produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations from 0.5 to 4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances from 0.2 to 10 mW/mm2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 μm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully-integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density. PMID:23049619

  1. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Mauricio; Mendonça, Luisa; Brant, Rodrigo; Abud, Murilo; Regatieri, Caio; Diniz, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledge about stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinal degeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell has been growth in culture for a long time, and started to be explored in the treatment of blinding conditions. The Food and Drug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trials using SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, as Stargardt’s dystrophy, and patients with geographic atrophy, providing good outcomes. This study’s intent is to overview the critical regeneration of the subretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epithelium transplantation, with the goal of reestablish important pathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of the brain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotent quiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationship with a primary retinal injury, different techniques of transplantation, management of immune rejection and tumorigenicity, its potential application in improving patients’ vision, and, finally, approaching future directions and challenges for the treatment of several conditions. PMID:25621115

  2. H1N1-associated acute retinitis.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Lana; Schaal, Shlomit

    2012-06-01

    To present the first reported case of bilateral H(1)N(1)-associated acute retinitis and its successful treatment. Interventional case report. A 41-year-old HIV-positive male presented with acute vision loss, panuveitis, and retinitis. A diagnostic and therapeutic vitrectomy with intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ganciclovir and endolaser was performed. One month later, the patient returned with similar symptoms in the fellow eye and underwent the same procedure. ELISA immunoassay revealed H(1)N(1) antibodies in both the vitreous and serum. PCR for herpes viruses included HSV, CMV, and VZV. Bacterial and fungal cultures were negative. On 1-year follow-up, the vision remained 20/20 in both eyes without evidence of recurrent inflammation. H(1)N(1) should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient with a history of recent influenza A (H(1)N(1)) infection and acute retinitis. H(1)N(1) may carry a better prognosis than other viruses causing acute retinitis.

  3. Carotid artery Doppler ultrasonography in retinal macroaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Thurairajan, G; Potamitis, T; Naylor, G; Gibson, J

    1998-01-01

    It is postulated that retinal arterial macroaneurysms (RAMs) occur at the site of incomplete embolic occlusion of a branch retinal artery. Embolic events of the retinal vessels are related to the state of the carotid artery tree and therefore Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in these patients is of particular interest. We have examined 13 patients with retinal artery macroaneurysms with carotid artery Doppler ultrasonography (CADU). Eight of these patients (61.5%) exhibited atheromatous plaques on the same side as the RAM with a moderate degree of arterial narrowing. Although our group of patients did not show advanced carotid artery disease, alterations of the arterial wall found at the level of the carotid artery were higher than expected in a similar hypertensive population. To our knowledge this is the first study of the carotid arterial tree in these patients. Our results support the theory that RAMs may be of embolic origin. Furthermore they demonstrate that CADU is a useful investigation in patients with RAMs.

  4. The Retinitis Pigmentosa Student: Selected Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Franklin N.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic features of RP (retinitis pigmentosa-an untreatable conditions usually resulting in night blindness) are discussed and functioning considerations in the classroom (including the use of protective devices and mobility aids) are noted. Classroom modifications such as darklined paper and black pens are suggested. (CL)

  5. A Psychophysical Test for Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Thomas R; Mancini, Michael

    A new test designed to detect an hereditary eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is described. This condition is revealed by pigmentation in the retina, but early diagnosis is difficult because the symptoms are subtle, and since it is genetically recessive it frequently occurs in families with no history of early blindness. In many cases…

  6. Type 3 Neovascularization Associated with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sayadi, Jihene; Miere, Alexandra; Souied, Eric H; Cohen, Salomon Y

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of type 3 neovascular lesion in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) complicated by macular edema. A 78-year-old man with a long follow-up for RP was referred for painless visual acuity decrease in the right eye. Best-corrected visual acuity was 20/125 in the right eye and 20/40 in the left. Fundus examination showed typical RP and macular edema in both eyes. In the right eye, spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed a marked cystic macular edema associated with disruption of the Bruch membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex overlying a pigmentary epithelium detachment, with a vascular structure which appeared to originate from the deep capillary plexus and to be connected with the subretinal pigment epithelium space. Optical coherence tomography angiography showed a high-flow vessel infiltrating the outer retinal layers in the deep capillary plexus segmentation, and a tuft-shaped, bright, high-flow network that seemed to be connected with the subretinal pigment epithelium space in the outer retinal layer segmentation. This presentation was consistent with an early type 3 neovascular lesion in the right eye. Type 3 neovascularization may be considered a possible complication of RP.

  7. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  8. Retinitis pigmentosa: genes and disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Ponzin, Diego; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy.

  9. Retinitis Pigmentosa: Genes and Disease Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Ponzin, Diego; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy. PMID:22131869

  10. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening.

    PubMed

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-02-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Retinal haemorrhage in infants with pertussis.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Naz; Pereira, Susana; Dai, Shuan; Neutze, Jocelyn; Grant, Cameron Charles; Kelly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that paroxysmal coughing in infantile pertussis (whooping cough) could produce retinal haemorrhages identical to those seen in abusive head trauma. We aimed to test this hypothesis. This is a prospective study of infants hospitalised with pertussis in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2009 to 2014. The clinical severity of pertussis was categorised. All infants recruited had retinal examination through dilated pupils by the paediatric ophthalmology service using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Forty-eight infants with pertussis, aged 3 weeks to 7 months, were examined after a mean of 18 days of coughing. Thirty-nine had severe pertussis and nine had mild pertussis. All had paroxysmal cough, and all were still coughing at the time of examination. No retinal haemorrhages were seen. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that pertussis may cause the pattern of retinal haemorrhages seen in abusive head trauma in infants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Inner retinal vasculopathy in Zika virus disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mandeep S; Marquezan, Maria Carolina; Omiadze, Revaz; Reddy, Ashvini K; Belfort, Rubens; May, William N

    2018-06-01

    Zika virus infection is associated with vision-threatening ocular complications including uveitis and outer retinopathy. The aim of this report is to describe a case of an adult patient with serologically confirmed Zika infection who presented with retinal vascular abnormalities that coincided with systemic post-viral neurological manifestations of the disease. A 34-year-old white female presented with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy following serologically confirmed Zika virus infection that was acquired in Puerto Rico four months prior to presentation. Ocular evaluation revealed perifoveal microaneurysms which were not associated with visual symptoms. These data potentially expand the phenotypic spectrum of Zika virus retinopathy. In addition to outer retinal abnormalities which are well-described in infants and adults, inner retinal vascular abnormalities may also occur and may be temporally associated with post-viral neurological sequelae of Zika virus infection. Clinicians should be aware of potential retinal involvement in affected patients who present with neurological symptoms after recovery from acute Zika virus infection.

  13. a Review of Retinal Prosthesis Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, Tran Trung; Maul, Tomas; Bargiela, Andrzej

    Age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa are two of the most common diseases that cause degeneration in the outer retina, which can lead to several visual impairments up to blindness. Vision restoration is an important goal for which several different research approaches are currently being pursued. We are concerned with restoration via retinal prosthetic devices. Prostheses can be implemented intraocularly and extraocularly, which leads to different categories of devices. Cortical Prostheses and Optic Nerve Prostheses are examples of extraocular solutions while Epiretinal Prostheses and Subretinal Prostheses are examples of intraocular solutions. Some of the prostheses that are successfully implanted and tested in animals as well as humans can restore basic visual functions but still have limitations. This paper will give an overview of the current state of art of Retinal Prostheses and compare the advantages and limitations of each type. The purpose of this review is thus to summarize the current technologies and approaches used in developing Retinal Prostheses and therefore to lay a foundation for future designs and research directions.

  14. Enhanced retinal responses in Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Jocelynn R; Heath, Laura M; Bergey, Dani E; Kelly, John P; Smith, Corrie; Laurino, Mercy Y; Weiss, Avery; Price, Nathan D; LaSpada, Albert; Bird, Thomas D; Jayadev, Suman

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by chorea, cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms. Retinal examination of HD patients as well as in HD animal models have shown evidence of retinal dysfunction. However, a detailed retinal study employing clinically available measurement tools has not been reported to date in HD. The goal of this study was to assess retinal responses measured by electroretinogram (ERG) between HD patients and controls and evaluate any correlation between ERG measurements and stage of disease. Eighteen patients and 10 controls with inclusion criteria of ages 18-70 years (average age HD subjects: 52.1 yrs and control subjects: 51.9 yrs) were recruited for the study. Subjects with previous history of retinal or ophthalmologic disease were excluded. Retinal function was examined by full-field ERG in both eyes of each subject. Amplitudes and latencies to increasing flash intensities in both light- and dark-adaptation were measured in all subjects. Statistical analyses employed generalized estimating equations, which account for repeated measures per subject. We analyzed the b-wave amplitudes of ERG response in all flash intensities and with 30 Hz flicker stimulation. We found statistically significant increased amplitudes in HD patients compared to controls at light-adapted (photopic) 24.2 and 60.9 cd.sec/m2 intensities, dark-adapted (scotopic, red flash) 0.22 cd.sec/m2 intensity, and a trend toward significance at light-adapted 30 Hz flicker. Furthermore, we found a significant increase in light-adapted ERG response from female compared to male HD patients, but no significant difference between gender amongst controls. We also noted a positive association between number of CAG repeats and ERG response at the smallest light adapted intensity (3.1 cd.sec/m2). ERG studies revealed significantly altered retinal responses at multiple flash intensities in subjects with an HD

  15. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  16. Iron homeostasis and toxicity in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Xining; Hahn, Paul; Iacovelli, Jared; Wong, Robert; King, Chih; Bhisitkul, Robert; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2007-11-01

    Iron is essential for many metabolic processes but can also cause damage. As a potent generator of hydroxyl radical, the most reactive of the free radicals, iron can cause considerable oxidative stress. Since iron is absorbed through diet but not excreted except through menstruation, total body iron levels buildup with age. Macular iron levels increase with age, in both men and women. This iron has the potential to contribute to retinal degeneration. Here we present an overview of the evidence suggesting that iron may contribute to retinal degenerations. Intraocular iron foreign bodies cause retinal degeneration. Retinal iron buildup resulting from hereditary iron homeostasis disorders aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich's ataxia, and panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration cause retinal degeneration. Mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin have age-dependent retinal iron overload and a resulting retinal degeneration with features of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Post mortem retinas from patients with AMD have more iron and the iron carrier transferrin than age-matched controls. Over the past 10 years much has been learned about the intricate network of proteins involved in iron handling. Many of these, including transferrin, transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter-1, ferritin, ferroportin, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, iron-regulatory protein, and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I-like protein involved in iron homeostasis (HFE) have been found in the retina. Some of these proteins have been found in the cornea and lens as well. Levels of the iron carrier transferrin are high in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The functions of these proteins in other tissues, combined with studies on cultured ocular tissues, genetically engineered mice, and eye exams on patients with hereditary iron diseases provide clues regarding their ocular functions. Iron may play a role in a broad range of ocular diseases, including

  17. Iron homeostasis and toxicity in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    He, Xining; Hahn, Paul; Iacovelli, Jared; Wong, Robert; King, Chih; Bhisitkul, Robert; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is essential for many metabolic processes but can also cause damage. As a potent generator of hydroxyl radical, the most reactive of the free radicals, iron can cause considerable oxidative stress. Since iron is absorbed through diet but not excreted except through menstruation, total body iron levels build up with age. Macular iron levels increase with age, in both men and women. This iron has the potential to contribute to retinal degeneration. Here we present an overview of the evidence suggesting that iron may contribute to retinal degenerations. Intraocular iron foreign bodies cause retinal degeneration. Retinal iron buildup resulting from hereditary iron homeostasis disorders aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s Ataxia, and panthothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration cause retinal degeneration. Mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin have age-dependent retinal iron overload and a resulting retinal degeneration with features of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Post mortem retinas from patients with AMD have more iron and the iron carrier transferrin than age- matched controls. Over the past ten years much has been learned about the intricate network of proteins involved in iron handling. Many of these, including transferrin, transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter 1, ferritin, ferroportin, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, iron regulatory protein, and histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I-like protein involved in iron homeostasis (HFE) have been found in the retina. Some of these proteins have been found in the cornea and lens as well. Levels of the iron carrier transferrin are high in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The functions of these proteins in other tissues, combined with studies on cultured ocular tissues, genetically engineered mice, and eye exams on patients with hereditary iron diseases provide clues regarding their ocular functions. Iron may play a role in a broad range of ocular diseases, including

  18. Two actinide-organic frameworks constructed by a tripodal flexible ligand: Occurrence of infinite ((UO{sub 2})O{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}){sub 4n} and hexanuclear (Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}) motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Lingling; Zhang, Ronglan; Zhao, Jianshe, E-mail: jszhao@nwu.edu.cn

    Two new actinide metal-organic frameworks were constructed by using a tripodal flexible ligand tris (2-carboxyethyl) isocyanurate (H{sub 3}tci) under hydrothermal condition. The combination of H{sub 3}tci and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in aqueous solution leads to the isolation of [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 0.5}(tci){sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(OH){sub 4}·18H{sub 2}O (1), which contains two distinct UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} coordination environments. Four uranyl cations, linked through μ{sub 3}-OH respectively, result in the edge-sharing ribbons. Then, the layer structure is constructed by U-O clusters linked through other eight-coordinated uranyl unions, giving rise to a porous structure in the space. Topological analysis reveals thatmore » complex 1 belongs to a (4, 8)-connected net with a schläfli symbol of (3{sup 4.}2{sup 6.}3){sub 2}(3{sup 4.}4{sup 6.}5{sup 6.}6{sup 8.}7{sup 3.}8). Th{sub 3}(tci){sub 2}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·12H{sub 2}O (2) generated by the reaction of H{sub 3}tci and thorium nitrate tetrahydrate, possesses nine-fold coodinated Th(IV) centers with a monocapped square antiprismatic geometry. The hexamers “Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}” motifs are connected together by the carboxylate groups, showing a three-dimensional structures. Complex 2 takes on an 8-connected architecture and the point symbol is (4{sup 24.}6{sup 4}). - Graphical abstract: Two new 3D actinide metal-organic frameworks were constructed by using a tripodal flexible ligand tris (2-carboxyethyl) isocyanurate (H3tci) and their topological structures were displayed. The infinite ((UO{sub 2})O{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}){sub 4n} and hexanuclear (Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}) motifs were found in the title actinides networks.« less

  19. Vitritis in pediatric genetic retinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stunkel, Maria; Bhattarai, Sajag; Kemerley, Andrew; Stone, Edwin M; Wang, Kai; Mullins, Robert F; Drack, Arlene V

    2015-01-01

    To determine which types of pediatric retinal degeneration are associated with inflammatory cells in the anterior vitreous. Retrospective, observational study in humans. Retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric patients with suspected retinal degeneration presenting to a single examiner from 2008 to 2013. Age, visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp examination of anterior vitreous (SLAV), and clinical and molecular genetic diagnoses were documented. Anterior vitreous cells were graded clinically with SLAV from rare cells (1-4) to 1+ (5-9), 2+ (10-30), or 3+ (>30). Cells were also counted in magnified slit beam photographs masked to molecular diagnosis when obtainable. Cell counts in SLAV, best-corrected VA, and molecular and clinical diagnoses. We evaluated 105 charts, 68 of which (64.8%) included SLAV data. Numerous (1+ or greater) cells were present in 22 of 68 patients (32.4%), whereas 4 of 68 (5.9%) had rare cells and 42 of 68 (61.8%) had no cells. The average age between patients with cells, no cells, and rare cells did not differ significantly (P = 0.25). The VA averaged 20/124 in patients with cells, 20/143 in patients with no cells, and 20/68 in patients with rare cells (P = 0.70). The most frequent diagnoses with cells included Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), and retinitis pigmentosa. The most frequent diagnoses without cells included congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), LCA, Stargardt disease, and blue cone monochromacy. A nonrandom subset of pediatric retinal degenerations exhibit vitritis. Cells were present in 5 of 5 BBS patients (a progressive degeneration), whereas cells were not detected in any of the 12 patients with CSNB (a stable dysfunction). Studying vitritis in pediatric retinal degenerations may reveal whether inflammation accompanies progressive vision loss in certain subtypes. Potentially, inflammation could be treated. In addition, SLAV may aid in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American

  20. Interphotoreceptor matrix components in retinal cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, B; Mieziewska, K; Bergström, A; Wilke, K; Van Veen, T; Ehinger, B

    1994-05-01

    To further investigate the functional potential of retinal transplants we have used immunocytochemistry to study the distribution of four different interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM)-specific components in rabbit retinal transplants. The different components were: interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), chondroitin-6-sulfate, F22 antigen and peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding structures. IRBP acts as a retinoid-transport protein between the neural retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. Chondroitin-6-sulfate is a glycosaminoglycan and a part of the insoluble IPM skeleton. The identity and role of the F22 antigen is not known. However, it is a 250 kDa protein localized to specific extracellular compartments such as teh IPM. PNA is a lectin with a high binding affinity for D-galactose-beta (1-3) N-acetyl-D-galactosamine disaccharide linkages and binds to IPM domains surrounding cones, but not rods. The transplants (15-day-old embryonic rabbit retina) were placed between the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium in adult hosts. The transplants developed the typical rosette formations with photoreceptors toward the center. IRBP labeling was distinct in the IPM in the host retina. However, no IRBP labeling could be detected in the transplants. The chondroitin-6-sulfate and F22 antibodies strongly labeled the IPM in the host retina and corresponding structures in the center of rosettes. A cone-specific labeling with PNA could be seen in the host retina. In the transplants, however, PNA labeling appeared in association with many more photoreceptors than in the host retina. There is no previous study available on the IPM in retinal cell transplants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Measurement of retinal wall-to-lumen ratio by adaptive optics retinal camera: a clinical research.

    PubMed

    Meixner, Eva; Michelson, Georg

    2015-11-01

    To measure the wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) and the cross-sectional area of the vascular wall (WCSA) of retinal arterioles by an Adaptive Optics (AO) retinal camera. Forty-seven human subjects were examined and their medical history was explored. WLR and WCSA were measured on the basis of retinal arteriolar wall thickness (VW), lumen diameter (LD) and vessel diameter (VD) assessed by rtx1 Adaptive Optics retinal camera. WLR was calculated by the formula [Formula: see text]. Arterio-venous ratio (AVR) and microvascular abnormalities were attained by quantitative and qualitative assessment of fundus photographs. Influence of age, arterial hypertension, body mass index (BMI) and retinal microvascular abnormalities on the WLR was examined. An age-adjusted WLR was created to test influences on WLR independently of age. Considering WLR and WCSA, a distinction between eutrophic and hypertrophic retinal remodeling processes was possible. The intra-observer variability (IOV) was 6 % ± 0.9 for arteriolar wall thickness and 2 % ± 0.2 for arteriolar wall thickness plus vessel lumen. WLR depended significantly on the wall thickness (r = 0.715; p < 0.01) of retinal arterioles, but was independent of the total vessel diameter (r = 0.052; p = 0.728). WLR correlated significantly with age (r = 0.769; p < 0.01). Arterial hypertension and a higher BMI were significantly associated with an increased age-adjusted WLR. WLR correlated significantly with the stage of microvascular abnormalities. 55 % of the hypertensive subjects and 11 % of the normotensive subjects showed eutrophic remodeling, while hypertrophic remodeling was not detectable. WLR correlated inversely with AVR. AVR was independent of the arteriolar wall thickness, age and arterial hypertension. The technique of AO retinal imaging allows a direct measurement of the retinal vessel wall and lumen diameter with good intra-observer variability. Age, arterial hypertension and an elevated BMI level

  2. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine; Tu, Hong Anh; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. Methods We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients’ lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. Results One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life

  3. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic disorders that involves the breakdown and loss of photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and eventual blindness. The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the only currently available surgical implantable device approved by Health Canada. It has been shown to improve visual function in patients with severe visual loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. The objective of this analysis was to examine the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, budget impact, and safety of the Argus II system in improving visual function, as well as exploring patient experiences with the system. We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies examining the effects of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa, and appraised the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, focusing on visual function, functional outcomes, quality of life, and adverse events. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care over a 10-year time horizon. We also conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. We used a qualitative design and an interview methodology to examine patients' lived experience, and we used a modified grounded theory methodology to analyze information from interviews. Transcripts were coded, and themes were compared against one another. One multicentre international study and one single-centre study were included in the clinical review. In both studies, patients showed improved visual function with the Argus II system. However, the sight-threatening surgical complication rate was substantial. In the base-case analysis, the Argus II system was cost-effective compared with standard care only if willingness-to-pay was more than $207,616 per quality-adjusted life-year. The 5-year budget

  4. Role of Bax in death of uninfected retinal cells during murine cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Mo, Juan; Marshall, Brendan; Covar, Jason; Zhang, Nancy Y; Smith, Sylvia B; Atherton, Sally S; Zhang, Ming

    2014-10-08

    Extensive death of uninfected bystander neuronal cells is an important component of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus retinitis. Our previous results have shown that caspase 3-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in death of uninfected bystander cells during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis and also that Bcl-2, an important inhibitor of apoptosis via the Bax-mediated mitochondrial pathway, is downregulated during this process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bax-mediated mitochondrial damage has a significant role in the death of uninfected retinal cells. BALB/c mice, Bax(-/-) mice, or Bax(+/+) mice were immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and infected with 5 × 10(3) plaque-forming units (PFU) of the K181 strain of MCMV via the supraciliary route. Injected eyes were analyzed by plaque assay, electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, TUNEL assay, Western blot (for caspase 3, caspase 12, Bax, receptor interacting protein-1 [RIP1] and receptor interacting protein-3 [RIP3]), as well as immunohistochemical staining for MCMV early antigen and cleaved caspase 3. Significantly more Bax was detected in mitochondrial fractions of MCMV-infected eyes than in mitochondrial fractions of mock-infected control eyes. Furthermore, the level of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly lower in MCMV-infected Bax(-/-) eyes than in MCMV-infected Bax(+/+) eyes. However, more caspase 3-independent cell death of uninfected bystander retinal cells and more cleaved RIP1 were observed in Bax(-/-) than in Bax(+/+) eyes. During MCMV retinitis, Bax is activated and has an important role in death of uninfected bystander retinal cells by caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. Although the exact mechanism remains to be deciphered, active Bax might also prevent death of some types of uninfected retinal cells by a caspase 3-independent pathway. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. Role of Bax in Death of Uninfected Retinal Cells During Murine Cytomegalovirus Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Juan; Marshall, Brendan; Covar, Jason; Zhang, Nancy Y.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Atherton, Sally S.; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Extensive death of uninfected bystander neuronal cells is an important component of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus retinitis. Our previous results have shown that caspase 3–dependent and –independent pathways are involved in death of uninfected bystander cells during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis and also that Bcl-2, an important inhibitor of apoptosis via the Bax-mediated mitochondrial pathway, is downregulated during this process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bax-mediated mitochondrial damage has a significant role in the death of uninfected retinal cells. Methods. BALB/c mice, Bax−/− mice, or Bax+/+ mice were immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and infected with 5 × 103 plaque-forming units (PFU) of the K181 strain of MCMV via the supraciliary route. Injected eyes were analyzed by plaque assay, electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, TUNEL assay, Western blot (for caspase 3, caspase 12, Bax, receptor interacting protein-1 [RIP1] and receptor interacting protein-3 [RIP3]), as well as immunohistochemical staining for MCMV early antigen and cleaved caspase 3. Results. Significantly more Bax was detected in mitochondrial fractions of MCMV-infected eyes than in mitochondrial fractions of mock-infected control eyes. Furthermore, the level of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly lower in MCMV-infected Bax−/− eyes than in MCMV-infected Bax+/+ eyes. However, more caspase 3–independent cell death of uninfected bystander retinal cells and more cleaved RIP1 were observed in Bax−/− than in Bax+/+ eyes. Conclusions. During MCMV retinitis, Bax is activated and has an important role in death of uninfected bystander retinal cells by caspase 3–dependent apoptosis. Although the exact mechanism remains to be deciphered, active Bax might also prevent death of some types of uninfected retinal cells by a caspase 3–independent pathway. PMID:25298417

  6. HIF-1α stabilization reduces retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Olivares-González, Lorena; Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hervás, David; Millán, José María; Rodrigo, Regina

    2018-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of vision due to rod and cone degeneration. Evidence suggests that an inappropriate oxygen level could contribute to its pathogenesis. Rod cell death could increase oxygen concentration, reduce hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) and contribute to cone cell death. The purposes of this study were: 1) to analyze the temporal profile of HIF-1α, its downstream effectors VEGF, endothelin-1 (ET-1), iNOS, and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), and neuroinflammation in retinas of the murine model of rd10 ( retinal degeneration 10) mice with RP; 2) to study oxygen bioavailability in these retinas; and 3) to investigate how stabilizing HIF-1α proteins with dimethyloxaloglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, affects retinal degeneration, neuroinflammation, and antioxidant response in rd10 mice. A generalized down-regulation of HIF-1α and its downstream targets was detected in parallel with reactive gliosis, suggesting high oxygen levels during retinal degeneration. At postnatal d 18, DMOG treatment reduced photoreceptor cell death and glial activation. In summary, retinas of rd10 mice seem to be exposed to a hyperoxic environment even at early stages of degeneration. HIF-1α stabilization could have a temporal neuroprotective effect on photoreceptor cell survival, glial activation, and antioxidant response at early stages of RP.-Olivares-González, L., Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, C., Hervás, D., Millán, J. M., Rodrigo, R. HIF-1α stabilization reduces retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. Clinically undetected retinal breaks causing retinal detachment: A review of options for management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Ching, Jared; Tornambe, Paul E

    2017-08-12

    The successful detection of retinal breaks is a critical step in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery in order to prevent persistent/recurrent retinal detachments. Not all retinal breaks causing retinal detachments are obvious. Retinal breaks may be obscured by opacities that are either anterior segment related, lens related, or posterior segment related. Rules to identify breaks based on subretinal fluid configuration are more difficult to apply in pseudophakic, aphakic, and scleral buckle encircled eyes-and in eyes with repeat detachments and those with proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Exudative detachments exhibit characteristic features and must be ruled out. A thorough clinical examination preoperatively is important even if a vitrectomy is planned. We review the incidence and causes of undetected breaks, along with preoperative/clinical issues that may hinder break detection. We review the literature with respect to investigative approaches and techniques that are available to the vitreoretinal surgeon when primary breaks remain clinically undetected during the preoperative examination. We broadly divide the surgical approaches into ones where the surgeon utilizes techniques to pursue actively a search for breaks versus adopting a purely speculative approach. Advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are appraised. Intuitively one might argue that an encircling scleral buckle combined with vitrectomy would give higher single operation success than pars plana vitrectomy alone because "undetected" retinal breaks would be addressed by a 360° plombage. We could not confirm this concept. Newer techniques, such as pars plana vitrectomy augmented with dye extrusion or endoscopic-assisted pars plana vitrectomy, show encouraging results. Technological advances such as intraoperative optical coherence tomography will also help to broaden the vitreoretinal surgeon's armamentarium. At this time, there is no gold standard in terms of the recommended

  8. Clinical Features of Newly Diagnosed Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Keenan, Jeremy D; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Khouri, Claire M; Skalet, Alison H; Heiden, David; Holland, Gary N; Margolis, Todd P

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the clinical manifestations of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in northern Thailand. Design Prospective, observational cross-sectional study. Methods We recorded characteristics of 52 consecutive patients newly diagnosed with CMV retinitis at a tertiary university-based medical center in northern Thailand. Indirect ophthalmoscopy by experienced ophthalmologists was supplemented with fundus photography to determine the proportion of eyes with various clinical features of CMV retinitis. Results Of the 52 patients with CMV retinitis, 55.8% were female. All were HIV-positive. The vast majority (90.4%) had started antiretroviral therapy. CMV retinitis was bilateral in 46.2% of patients. Bilateral visual acuity worse than 20/60 was observed in 23.1% of patients. Of 76 eyes with CMV retinitis, 61.8% had zone I disease and 21.6% had lesions involving the fovea. Lesions larger than 25% of the retinal area were observed in 57.5% of affected eyes. CMV retinitis lesions commonly had marked or severe border opacity (47.4% of eyes). Vitreous haze was often present (46.1% of eyes). Visual impairment was more common in eyes with larger retinitis lesions. Retinitis lesion size, used as a proxy for duration of disease, was associated with fulminant appearance (OR 1.24 [1.01 – 1.51]), and marked or severe border opacity (OR 1.36 [1.11 – 1.67]). Based on lesion size, retinitis preceded antiretroviral treatment in each patient. Conclusions Patients presenting to a tertiary medical center in northern Thailand have advanced CMV retinitis, possibly due to delayed diagnosis. Earlier screening and treatment of CMV retinitis may limit progression of disease and prevent visual impairment in this population. PMID:22265148

  9. WIDEFIELD SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF PERIPHERAL ROUND RETINAL HOLES WITH OR WITHOUT RETINAL DETACHMENT.

    PubMed

    Casswell, Edward J; Abou Ltaif, Sleiman; Carr, Thomas; Keane, Pearse A; Charteris, David G; Wickham, Louisa

    2018-03-02

    To describe the widefield spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of peripheral round retinal holes, with or without associated retinal detachment (RD). Retrospective, observational study of 28 eyes with peripheral round retinal holes, with and without RD. Patients underwent imaging with a widefield 50-degree spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) and Optos ultra-widefield imaging systems (Optos, United Kingdom). Vitreous attachment at the site of the retinal hole was detected in 27/28 (96.4%) cases. Cases were split into three groups: RHs with RD (n = 12); RHs with subretinal fluid (n = 5), and flat RHs (n = 11), with minimal or no subretinal fluid. 91.6% retinal holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD had vitreous attachment at the site of the hole. Eighty percent had vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole, in a U-shape configuration, which appeared to exert traction. By contrast, flat retinal holes had visible vitreous attachment only at one edge of the retinal hole in 45.4%. Vitreous attachment was commonly seen at the site of round retinal holes. Vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole in a U-shape configuration was more commonly seen at holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD.

  10. Reprogramming retinal neurons and standardized quantification of their differentiation in 3-dimensional retinal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hiler, Daniel J.; Barabas, Marie E.; Griffiths, Lyra M.; Dyer, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Postmitotic differentiated neurons are among the most difficult cells to reprogram into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) because they have poor viability when cultured as dissociated cells. Other protocols to reprogram postmitotic neurons have required the inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. We describe a method that does not require p53 inactivation and induces reprogramming in cells purified from the retinae of reprogrammable mice in aggregates with wild-type retinal cells. After the first 10 days of reprogramming, the aggregates are then dispersed and plated on irradiated feeder cells to propagate and isolate individual iPSC clones. The reprogramming efficiency of different neuronal populations at any stage of development can be quantitated using this protocol. Reprogramming retinal neurons with this protocol will take 56 days, and these retina-derived iPSCs can undergo retinal differentiation to produce retinae in 34 days. In addition, we describe a quantitative assessment of retinal differentiation from these neuron-derived iPSCs called STEM-RET. The procedure quantitates eye field specification, optic cup formation, and retinal differentiation in 3-dimensional cultures using molecular, cellular and morphological criteria. An advanced level of cell culture experience is required to carry out this protocol. PMID:27658012

  11. Peripheral retinal non-perfusion and treatment response in branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Abri Aghdam, Kaveh; Reznicek, Lukas; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Framme, Carsten; Bajor, Anna; Klingenstein, Annemarie; Kernt, Marcus; Seidensticker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the size of peripheral retinal non-perfusion and the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with treatment-naive branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and macular edema. A total of 53 patients with treatment-naive BRVO and macular edema were included. Each patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination including optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and ultra wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA). Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections were applied according to the recommendations of the German Ophthalmological Society. Two independent, masked graders quantified the areas of peripheral retinal non-perfusion. Intravitreal injections improved best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) significantly from 22.23±16.33 Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters to 36.23±15.19 letters (P<0.001), and mean central subfield thickness significantly reduced from 387±115 µm to 321±115 µm (P=0.01). Mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections was 3.61±1.56. The size of retinal non-perfusion correlated significantly with the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections (R=0.724, P<0.001). Peripheral retinal non-perfusion in patients with BRVO associates significantly with intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with BRVO and macular edema.

  12. Peripheral retinal non-perfusion and treatment response in branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Abri Aghdam, Kaveh; Reznicek, Lukas; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Framme, Carsten; Bajor, Anna; Klingenstein, Annemarie; Kernt, Marcus; Seidensticker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the association between the size of peripheral retinal non-perfusion and the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with treatment-naive branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and macular edema. METHODS A total of 53 patients with treatment-naive BRVO and macular edema were included. Each patient underwent a full ophthalmologic examination including optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and ultra wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA). Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections were applied according to the recommendations of the German Ophthalmological Society. Two independent, masked graders quantified the areas of peripheral retinal non-perfusion. RESULTS Intravitreal injections improved best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) significantly from 22.23±16.33 Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters to 36.23±15.19 letters (P<0.001), and mean central subfield thickness significantly reduced from 387±115 µm to 321±115 µm (P=0.01). Mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections was 3.61±1.56. The size of retinal non-perfusion correlated significantly with the number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections (R=0.724, P<0.001). CONCLUSION Peripheral retinal non-perfusion in patients with BRVO associates significantly with intravitreal ranibizumab injections in patients with BRVO and macular edema. PMID:27366688

  13. Application of stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelium in retinal degenerative diseases: present and future.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mingyue; Chen, Youxin

    2018-01-01

    As a constituent of blood-retinal barrier and retinal outer segment (ROS) scavenger, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is fundamental to normal function of retina. Malfunctioning of RPE contributes to the onset and advance of retinal degenerative diseases. Up to date, RPE replacement therapy is the only possible method to completely reverse retinal degeneration. Transplantation of human RPE stem cell-derived RPE (hRPESC-RPE) has shown some good results in animal models. With promising results in terms of safety and visual improvement, human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) can be expected in clinical settings in the near future. Despite twists and turns, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE) is now being intensely investigated to overcome genetic and epigenetic instability. By far, only one patient has received iPSC-RPE transplant, which is a hallmark of iPSC technology development. During follow-up, no major complications such as immunogenicity or tumorigenesis have been observed. Future trials should keep focusing on the safety of stem cell-derived RPE (SC-RPE) especially in long period, and better understanding of the nature of stem cell and the molecular events in the process to generate SC-RPE is necessary to the prosperity of SC-RPE clinical application.

  14. Changes in morphology of retinal ganglion cells with eccentricity in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E E; Greferath, U; Fletcher, E L

    2016-05-01

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and are known to remodel during the subtle plasticity changes that occur following the death of photoreceptors in inherited retinal degeneration. We examine the influence of retinal eccentricity on anatomical remodelling and ganglion cell morphology well after photoreceptor loss. Rd1 mice that have a mutation in the β subunit of phosphodiesterase 6 were used as a model of retinal degeneration and gross remodelling events were examined by processing serial sections for immunocytochemistry. Retinal wholemounts from rd1-Thy1 and control Thy1 mice that contained a fluorescent protein labelling a subset of ganglion cells were processed for immunohistochemistry at 11 months of age. Ganglion cells were classified based on their soma size, dendritic field size and dendritic branching pattern and their dendritic fields were analysed for their length, area and quantity of branching points. Overall, more remodelling was found in the central compared with the peripheral retina. In addition, the size and complexity of A2, B1, C1 and D type ganglion cells located in the central region of the retina decreased. We propose that the changes in ganglion cell morphology are correlated with remodelling events in these regions and impact the function of retinal circuitry in the degenerated retina.

  15. RETINAL DEEP CAPILLARY ISCHEMIA ASSOCIATED WITH AN OCCLUDED CONGENITAL RETINAL MACROVESSEL.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Taiji; Ogata, Nahoko

    2017-01-01

    To report the case of a patient with an occluded congenital retinal macrovessel accompanied by retinal deep capillary ischemia. A 38-year-old woman presented with a 2-day history of a paracentral scotoma of her right eye. Fundus photograph showed a dilated congenital retinal macrovessel with arteriovenous anastomosis, an intravascular white region indicating the thrombus at arteriovenous anastomotic region, and an area of retinal whitening temporal to the fovea. The spectral domain optical coherence tomography images through the area of retinal whitening showed a thickening and highly reflectivity at the level of the inner nuclear layer, which is likely due to the deep capillary ischemia. After 6 weeks, spectral domain optical coherence tomography images through the same area demonstrated a thinning and atrophy of only the inner nuclear layer, and the patient's paracentral scotoma persisted. Acute capillary hemodynamic changes caused deep capillary ischemia. The spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed a highly reflective lesion at the level of the inner nuclear layer in the acute phase.

  16. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after intravitreal bevacizumab injection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Bae, So Hyun; Kim, Tae Wan; Chung, Hum; Heo, Jang Won

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis after intravitreal bevacizumab injection. A 61-year-old woman with diabetic macular edema developed dense vitritis and necrotizing retinitis 3 weeks after intravitreal bevacizumab injection. A diagnostic vitrectomy was performed. The undiluted vitreous sample acquired by vitrectomy was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and culture. Polymerase chain reaction of the vitreous was positive for CMV DNA. Other laboratory results did not show evidence of other infectious retinitis and systemic immune dysfunction. Human immunodeficiency virus antibodies were also negative. After systemic administration of ganciclovir, retinitis has resolved and there has been no recurrence of retinitis during the follow-up period of 12 months. Ophthalmologists should be aware of potential risk for CMV retinitis after intravitreal bevacizumab injection.

  17. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Maria H.; Boia, Raquel; Santos, Paulo F.; Ambrósio, António F.; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25873768

  18. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Kumar, Suresh; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-07-28

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  19. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  20. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Kumar, Suresh; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-01-01

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action. PMID:28788088

  1. Combined branch retinal vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Fabio Bom; Novelli, Fernando José de; Rosa, Evandro Luis; Nobrega, Mário Junqueira

    2016-01-01

    A 22-year-old man complained of low visual acuity and pain in his left eye for five days. His ophthalmological examination revealed 2+ anterior chamber reaction and a white, poorly defined retinal lesion at the proximal portion of the inferotemporal vascular arcade. There were retinal hemorrhages in the inferotemporal region extending to the retinal periphery. In addition, venous dilation, increased tortuosity, and ischemic retinal whitening along the inferotemporal vascular arcade were also observed. A proper systemic work-up was performed, and the patient was diagnosed with ocular toxoplasmosis. He was treated with an anti-toxoplasma medication, and his condition slowly improved. Inferior macular inner and middle retinal atrophy could be observed on optical coherence tomography as a sequela of ischemic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of combined retinal branch vein and artery occlusion in toxoplasmosis resulting in a striking and unusual macular appearance.

  2. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury in central retinal artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H; Akduman, Levent

    2013-10-21

    A 53-year-old man presented with sudden painless diminution of vision in his right eye for 3 days. His fundus examination showed diffuse whitening of the retina with a cherry red spot at the fovea with cilioretinal artery sparing. On fluorescein angiography delayed arteriovenous transit was observed. Three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used to assess retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and average macular central subfield thickness on days 3, 7, 30 and 90. Marked retinal oedema due to ischaemia was observed on day 3 of occurrence of central retinal artery occlusion. On day 7, significant decrease in retinal nerve fibre thickness and macular thickness was noted suggestive of acute reperfusion injury. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and macular thickness returned to near normal on day 30 due to restoration of blood supply with wash out of stress mediators. Retinal atrophy was observed on day 90.

  3. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury in central retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sandeep; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H; Akduman, Levent

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with sudden painless diminution of vision in his right eye for 3 days. His fundus examination showed diffuse whitening of the retina with a cherry red spot at the fovea with cilioretinal artery sparing. On fluorescein angiography delayed arteriovenous transit was observed. Three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used to assess retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and average macular central subfield thickness on days 3, 7, 30 and 90. Marked retinal oedema due to ischaemia was observed on day 3 of occurrence of central retinal artery occlusion. On day 7, significant decrease in retinal nerve fibre thickness and macular thickness was noted suggestive of acute reperfusion injury. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and macular thickness returned to near normal on day 30 due to restoration of blood supply with wash out of stress mediators. Retinal atrophy was observed on day 90. PMID:24145508

  4. Ocular toxoplasmosis and retinal detachment: five case reports.

    PubMed

    Kianersi, F; Naderi Beni, A; Ghanbari, H; Fazel, F

    2012-10-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a potentially blinding cause of posterior uveitis. Retinal detachment is rare complication of ocular toxoplasmosis. To report the clinical course and prognosis of retinal breaks and detachments occurring in patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. This study was a retrospective, non-comparative case series of five patients with ocular toxoplasmosis who had consulted us with retinal detachment. All of the participants had retinal detachment after severe and treatment resistant toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis, leaving one of them with decreased visual acuity to light perception in spite of treatment and final visual acuity was 20/100 or better in four patients. The functional prognosis for the patients with retinal detachment was poor. Careful retinal examination in ocular toxoplasmosis is warranted, especially in patients with severe intraocular inflammation.

  5. See-through ophthalmoscope for retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentras, Dino; Moser, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    With the miniaturization of scanning mirrors and the emergence of wearable health monitoring, an intriguing step is to investigate the potential of a laser scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for retinal imaging with wearable glasses. In addition to providing morphological information of the retina, such as vasculature, LSO images could also be used to provide information on general health conditions. A compact eyeglass with LSO capability would give access, on demand, to retinal parameters without disturbing the subject's activity. One of the main challenges in this field is the creation of a device that does not interrupt the user's field of view. We report, to our knowledge, the first see-through ophthalmoscope. The system is analyzed with three-dimensional simulations and tested in a proof-of-concept setup with the same key parameters of a wearable device. Finally, image quality is analyzed by acquiring images of an ex-vivo human eye sample.

  6. Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.

  7. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nazar, C; Feldman, M; González, R; Espinoza, R

    2017-06-01

    A 27-year-old woman with a history of nyctalopia and constriction of visual field of the right eye. The ophthalmological examination showed a visual field and electroretinogram that were compatible with unilateral retinitis pigmentosa (RP). After a one year follow-up, the unilateral condition remained. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa is a rare condition, with a frequency between 0.2%-5% of the RP. It mainly affects women and older age groups than bilateral RP. For a definitive diagnosis, it is necessary to have a funduscopy and electroretinogram (ERG) altered unilaterally, and exclude infectious, inflammatory, and vascular causes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Action spectrum for retinal thermal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.

    1999-06-01

    The action spectrum for light-induced damage to the retina results from the wavelength dependence transmission of the preretinal ocular media, wavelength dependent absorption in retinal chromophores and chromatic aberration of the eye optics. While various light/tissue interaction mechanisms have been implicated, thermal mechanisms dominate in the red and near-infrared for all exposure durations and in the visible for exposures shorter than a few seconds. A number of investigators have measured the transmission of the eye and the spectra of retinal absorbers, and thermal models based on these data predict the broad features of the action spectrum. Dose/response studies with lasers and incoherent light sources, conducted over the past 10 years mainly validate the thermal models.

  9. Optic Disc Pit with Sectorial Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Taskapili, Muhittin; Yilmaz, Tolga; Teke, Mehmet Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Sectorial retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and optic disc pit (ODP) are rare clinical conditions. We present a 40-year-old woman with a history of mild night blindness and decreased vision in the right eye for about 5 years. Fundus examination revealed retinal pigmentary changes in the superior and inferotemporal sectors covering the macula and reduced arterial calibre and ODP at the temporal edge of the optic disc. In addition, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and multifocal electroretinogram scans confirmed these clinical findings. Visual acuity was decreased due to an atrophic-appearing foveal lesion. No intervention was suggested because of the poor visual potential. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe coexistent optic disc pit and sectorial RP in the superior and inferotemporal sectors covering the macula in the same eye with figures. PMID:23781365

  10. Optic disc pit with sectorial retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Balikoglu-Yilmaz, Melike; Taskapili, Muhittin; Yilmaz, Tolga; Teke, Mehmet Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Sectorial retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and optic disc pit (ODP) are rare clinical conditions. We present a 40-year-old woman with a history of mild night blindness and decreased vision in the right eye for about 5 years. Fundus examination revealed retinal pigmentary changes in the superior and inferotemporal sectors covering the macula and reduced arterial calibre and ODP at the temporal edge of the optic disc. In addition, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and multifocal electroretinogram scans confirmed these clinical findings. Visual acuity was decreased due to an atrophic-appearing foveal lesion. No intervention was suggested because of the poor visual potential. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe coexistent optic disc pit and sectorial RP in the superior and inferotemporal sectors covering the macula in the same eye with figures.

  11. Negative electroretinograms in pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kondo, Mineo; Nakamura, Makoto; Hotta, Junko; Terasaki, Hiroko; Miyake, Yozo; Hida, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings are described of three consecutive cases with pericentral pigmentary retinal degeneration. The responses to bright flashes after dark adaptation showed negative waveform shape in all cases. Rod responses were strongly reduced compared with cone responses. Cone electroretinograms elicited by long-duration stimuli showed greater loss of the on-response than the off-response. The ratio of the on-response amplitude to off-response amplitude of these patients (0.52 +/- 0.12; mean +/- SD, n = 6) was significantly smaller than that of normal subject (0.83 +/- 0.21; mean +/- SD, n = 8) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.01). The electrophysiological findings of these cases suggest a greater defect of inner retinal function, especially in transmission between photoreceptors and depolarizing bipolar cells.

  12. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  13. Biophotons Contribute to Retinal Dark Noise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehua; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of dark noise in retinal photoreceptors resulted in a long-lasting controversy over its origin and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a novel ultra-weak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) to detect biophotonic activity (emission) under dark conditions in rat and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) retinas in vitro. We found a significant temperature-dependent increase in biophotonic activity that was completely blocked either by removing intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) together or inhibiting phosphodiesterase 6. These findings suggest that the photon-like component of discrete dark noise may not be caused by a direct contribution of the thermal activation of rhodopsin, but rather by an indirect thermal induction of biophotonic activity, which then activates the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. Therefore, this study suggests a possible solution regarding the thermal activation energy barrier for discrete dark noise, which has been debated for almost half a century.

  14. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  15. [12-year observation of atypical retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Moszczyńska-Kowalska, A; Dróbecka-Brydakowa, E

    1990-07-01

    Analysis of the clinical course of retinal degeneration in 40 patients in whom one suspected a retinal dystrophy "sine pigmento", a sector or unilateral dystrophy or a mixed conerod form. Eventually the diagnosis was possible only after performing a complex of investigations: the visual acuity, visual field, adaptation, the ERG and in some cases also the fluorescein angiography. No exact correlation between the results of a particular test could be established but the degree of abnormality of some of them was decisive for the moment of the first reference of the patient for examination by an ophthalmic specialist. In the course of observation the progress of the condition was evident but the dynamics of it was not the same and it was dependent on many factors.

  16. Strategy for the management of uncomplicated retinal detachments: the European vitreo-retinal society retinal detachment study report 1.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Ron A; Parnes, Aaron J; Ducournau, Didier

    2013-09-01

    To study success and failure in the treatment of uncomplicated rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs). Nonrandomized, multicenter retrospective study. One hundred seventy-six surgeons from 48 countries spanning 5 continents provided information on the primary procedures for 7678 cases of RRDs including 4179 patients with uncomplicated RRDs. Reported data included specific clinical findings, the method of repair, and the outcome after intervention. Final failure of retinal detachment repair (level 1 failure rate), remaining silicone oil at the study's conclusion (level 2 failure rate), and need for additional procedures to repair the detachment (level 3 failure rate). Four thousand one hundred seventy-nine uncomplicated cases of RRD were included. Combining phakic, pseudophakic, and aphakic groups, those treated with scleral buckle alone (n = 1341) had a significantly lower final failure rate than those treated with vitrectomy, with or without a supplemental buckle (n = 2723; P = 0.04). In phakic patients, final failure rate was lower in the scleral buckle group compared with those who had vitrectomy, with or without a supplemental buckle (P = 0.028). In pseudophakic patients, the failure rate of the initial procedure was lower in the vitrectomy group compared with the scleral buckle group (P = 3×10(-8)). There was no statistically significant difference in failure rate between segmental (n = 721) and encircling (n = 351) buckles (P = 0.5). Those who underwent vitrectomy with a supplemental scleral buckle (n = 488) had an increased failure rate compared with those who underwent vitrectomy alone (n = 2235; P = 0.048). Pneumatic retinopexy was found to be comparable with scleral buckle when a retinal hole was present (P = 0.65), but not in cases with a flap tear (P = 0.034). In the treatment of uncomplicated phakic retinal detachments, repair using scleral buckle may be a good option. There was no significant difference between segmental versus 360-degree buckle

  17. Mechanism by which Untwisting of Retinal Leads to Productive Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle States

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Tino; Elstner, Marcus; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Relaxation of the twisted-retinal photoproduct state triggers proton-coupled reaction cycle in retinal proteins. A key open question is whether the retinal relaxation path is governed by the intrinsic torsional properties of the retinal or rather by the interactions of the retinal with protein and water groups, given the crowded protein environments in which the retinal resides. We address this question by performing systematic quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics computations of retinal dynamics in bacteriorhodopsin at different temperatures, reaction path computations, and assessment of the vibrational fingerprints of the retinal molecule. Our results demonstrate a complex dependence of the retinal dynamicsmore » and preferred geometry on temperature. As the temperature increases, the retinal dihedral angle samples values largely determined by its internal conformational energy. The protein environment shapes the energetics of retinal relaxation and provides hydrogen-bonding partners that stabilize the retinal geometry.« less

  18. Retinal Prosthetics, Optogenetics, and Chemical Photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  19. Diagnostic Exercise: Retinal Lesions in a Mouse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-07

    retinal degeneration is reported as an autosomal recessive trait, particularly prevalent in Swiss-derived strains; and the allele responsible is...should be used for breeding purposes. Affected mice can be identified by indirect ophthalmoscopy at 3 weeks of age. 10 This precaution alone will not...should be carefully screened prior to initiation of the study. REFERENCES 1. Bellhom R W, Laboratory Animal Ophthalmology . In Gelatt K N ed

  20. Retinal Biochemistry, Physiology and Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ricardo Luiz; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Chong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The vitreous, the vasculature of the retina, macular pigments, phototransduction, retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the extracellular matrix, all play an important role in the normal function of the retina as well as in diseases. Understanding the pathophysiology allows us to target treatment. As ocular angiogenesis, immunity and inflammation are covered elsewhere, those subjects will not be discussed in this chapter. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Retinal Layer Abnormalities as Biomarkers of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Samani, Niraj N; Proudlock, Frank A; Siram, Vasantha; Suraweera, Chathurie; Hutchinson, Claire; Nelson, Christopher P; Al-Uzri, Mohammed; Gottlob, Irene

    2018-06-06

    Schizophrenia is associated with several brain deficits, as well as visual processing deficits, but clinically useful biomarkers are elusive. We hypothesized that retinal layer changes, noninvasively visualized using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), may represent a possible "window" to these abnormalities. A Leica EnvisuTM SD-OCT device was used to obtain high-resolution central foveal B-scans in both eyes of 35 patients with schizophrenia and 50 demographically matched controls. Manual retinal layer segmentation was performed to acquire individual and combined layer thickness measurements in 3 macular regions. Contrast sensitivity was measured at 3 spatial frequencies in a subgroup of each cohort. Differences were compared using adjusted linear models and significantly different layer measures in patients underwent Spearman Rank correlations with contrast sensitivity, quantified symptoms severity, disease duration, and antipsychotic medication dose. Total retinal and photoreceptor complex thickness was reduced in all regions in patients (P < .0001). Segmentation revealed consistent thinning of the outer nuclear layer (P < .001) and inner segment layer (P < .05), as well as a pattern of parafoveal ganglion cell changes. Low spatial frequency contrast sensitivity was reduced in patients (P = .002) and correlated with temporal parafoveal ganglion cell complex thinning (R = .48, P = .01). Negative symptom severity was inversely correlated with foveal photoreceptor complex thickness (R = -.54, P = .001) and outer nuclear layer thickness (R = -.47, P = .005). Our novel findings demonstrate considerable retinal layer abnormalities in schizophrenia that are related to clinical features and visual function. With time, SD-OCT could provide easily-measurable biomarkers to facilitate clinical assessment and further our understanding of the disease.

  2. Ultrashort Laser Retinal Damage Threshold Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-15

    epithelium . Below one nanosecond both stress-confinement in melanosomes and self-focusing reduce the threshold for damage as measured in corneal radiant... epithelium (RPE). Below 1 ns, both stress confinement in melanosomes and self-focusing reduce the threshold for damage as measured in corneal radiant...collimated laser light is focused to a very small spot on the retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) contains melanosomes, which are the primary

  3. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials.

  4. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  5. Retinal Drug Delivery System, Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    retinal lesions, need an antibiotic, an anti-inflammatory agent, and an analgesic, and, recent research suggests that it might be advantageous to treat...predetermined) manner, that is, control over time, amount and sequence, either continuously or pulsed. This system would have all of the advantages of...delivery would produce the same therapeutic benefits while reducing side effects and toxic exposure. Recent studies have shown the advantages of pulse

  6. Carotenoid Antenna Binding and Function in Retinal Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-13

    REPORT Carotenoid antenna binding and function in retinal proteins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Xanthorhodopsin, a proton pump from the...eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, is a unique dual chromophore system that contains, in addition to retinal, the carotenoid salinixanthin as a light... carotenoid ring near the retinal ring. Substitution of the small glycine with bulky tryptophan in this site eliminates binding. The second factor is the 4

  7. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS after initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, Douglas A.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Holland, Gary N.; Danis, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the rates of new-onset cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis and worsening existing CMV retinitis in patients with AIDS after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and the role of an immune recovery inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Design Cohort study Methods Immune recovery was defined as an increase in CD4+ T cells to ≥100 cells/μL; rates of new-onset CMV retinitis and of worsening of CMV retinitis (either increasing border activity or retinitis progression) were compared between those with and without immune recovery. Results Among patients without CMV retinitis, 1 of 75 patients with immune recovery developed CMV retinitis in the first 6 months after initiating cART vs. 1 of 31 without immune recovery (P=0.14). Among patients with CMV retinitis, the rates of retinitis progression and increasing retinitis border activity among patients during the first 6 months after initiating cART in those with immune recovery were 0.11/PY (95% confidence interval [CI] 0, 0.62) and 0.11/PY (95% CI 0, 0.62), respectively, vs. 0.67/PY (95% CI 0.22, 1.56) and 0.40/PY (95% CI 0.08, 1.17), respectively, for those without immune recovery (P=0.11 and 0.47). Conclusions Among persons with AIDS who experience immune recovery, there was neither an increased rate of new-onset CMV retinitis nor worsening of existing CMV retinitis in the first 6 months after initiating cART vs. those without immune recovery. These data are consistent with the known 3–6 month lag in recovery of specific immunity to CMV after initiating cART and suggest that “immune recovery retinitis”, a proposed IRIS phenomenon, is rare. PMID:27984023

  8. Avascular Retinal Findings in a Child With Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hong-Uyen T; Tran, Kimberly D; Medina, Carlos A; Fallas, Brenda; Negron, Cathy; Berrocal, Audina M

    2017-03-01

    The authors present clinical and angiographic findings in a 12-year-old girl with achondroplasia who presented with bilateral retinal peripheral nonperfusion and unilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, which has not been previously described in achondroplasia. This report contributes incremental knowledge regarding aberrant retinal vascular phenomena observed in pediatric disease states and implicates the possible role of mutations in the FGFR3 gene in peripheral vascular abnormalities. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:272-274.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    PubMed Central

    Joondeph, Stephanie A.; Joondeph, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions. PMID:24106626

  10. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury.

    PubMed

    Joondeph, Stephanie A; Joondeph, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  11. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for retinal vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Da; An, Ying; Zhang, Jing-Shang; Wan, Xiu-Hua; Jonas, Jost B; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    To examine the potential of intravitreally implanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to affect vascular repair and the blood-retina barrier in mice and rats with oxygen-induced retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy or retinal ischaemia-reperfusion damage. Three study groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 18 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received BMSCs injected intravitreally. Control groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 12 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received an intravitreal injection of phosphate-buffered saline. We applied immunohistological techniques to measure retinal vascularization, spectroscopic measurements of intraretinally extravasated fluorescein-conjugated dextran to quantify the blood-retina barrier breakdown, and histomorphometry to assess retinal thickness and retinal ganglion cell count. In the oxygen-induced retinopathy model, the study group with intravitreally injected BMSCs as compared with the control group showed a significantly (p = 0.001) smaller area of retinal neovascularization. In the diabetic retinopathy model, study group and control group did not differ significantly in the amount of intraretinally extravasated dextran. In the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model, on the 7th day after retina injury, the retina was significantly thicker in the study group than in the control group (p = 0.02), with no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell count (p = 0.36). Intravitreally implanted human BMSCs were associated with a reduced retinal neovascularization in the oxygen-induced retinopathy model and with a potentially cell preserving effect in the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model. Intravitreal BMSCs may be of potential interest for the therapy of retinal vascular disorders. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley

  12. Reversibility of Retinal Microvascular Changes in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Richard J.; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Joshi, Sonia; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj K.; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2014-01-01

    Malarial retinopathy allows detailed study of central nervous system vascular pathology in living patients with severe malaria. An adult with cerebral malaria is described who had prominent retinal whitening with corresponding retinal microvascular obstruction, vessel dilatation, increased vascular tortuosity, and blood retinal barrier leakage with decreased visual acuity, all of which resolved on recovery. Additional study of these features and their potential role in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is warranted. PMID:24935949

  13. Reversibility of retinal microvascular changes in severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard J; Kingston, Hugh W F; Joshi, Sonia; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj K; White, Nicholas J; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2014-09-01

    Malarial retinopathy allows detailed study of central nervous system vascular pathology in living patients with severe malaria. An adult with cerebral malaria is described who had prominent retinal whitening with corresponding retinal microvascular obstruction, vessel dilatation, increased vascular tortuosity, and blood retinal barrier leakage with decreased visual acuity, all of which resolved on recovery. Additional study of these features and their potential role in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is warranted. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Progressive outer retinal necrosis and immunosuppressive therapy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  15. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  16. Retinitis Pigmentosa Sine Pigmento Mimicking a Chiasm Disease.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Francesco; Prosdocimo, Giovanni; Romano, Francesco; Interlandi, Emanuela

    2017-08-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented to her ophthalmologist complaining of visual loss for several years. The ophthalmic examination was remarkable for a bitemporal visual field defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain was normal without evidence of chiasm compression. Neuro-ophthalmic examination was consistent with a retinal rather than a chiasmal disease. Retinal multimodal imaging helped in the correct diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, later confirmed by genetic testing.

  17. Retinitis Pigmentosa Sine Pigmento Mimicking a Chiasm Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Francesco; Prosdocimo, Giovanni; Romano, Francesco; Interlandi, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 75-year-old woman presented to her ophthalmologist complaining of visual loss for several years. The ophthalmic examination was remarkable for a bitemporal visual field defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain was normal without evidence of chiasm compression. Neuro-ophthalmic examination was consistent with a retinal rather than a chiasmal disease. Retinal multimodal imaging helped in the correct diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, later confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:29344059

  18. Idiopathic Juxtafoveolar Retinal Telangiectasis: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Nowilaty, Sawsan R.; Al-Shamsi, Hanan N.; Al-Khars, Wajeeha

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis (IJFT), also known as parafoveal telangiectasis or idiopathic macular telangiectasia, refers to a heterogeneous group of well-recognized clinical entities characterized by telangiectatic alterations of the juxtafoveolar capillary network of one or both eyes, but which differ in appearance, presumed pathogenesis, and management strategies. Classically, three groups of IJFT are identified. Group I is unilateral easily visible telangiectasis occurring predominantly in males, and causing visual loss as a result of macular edema. Group II, the most common, is bilateral occurring in both middle-aged men and women, and presenting with telangiectasis that is more difficult to detect on biomicroscopy, but with characteristic and diagnostic angiographic and optical coherence tomography features. Vision loss is due to retinal atrophy, not exudation, and subretinal neovascularization is common. Group III is very rare characterized predominantly by progressive obliteration of the perifoveal capillary network, occurring usually in association with a medical or neurologic disease. This paper presents a current review of juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis, reviewing the classification of these entities and focusing primarily on the two most common types encountered in clinical practice, i.e., groups I and II, describing their clinical features, histopathology, natural history, complications, latest results from imaging modalities and functional studies, differential diagnosis, and treatment modalities. PMID:20844678

  19. Barrier properties of cultured retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2014-09-01

    The principal function of an epithelium is to form a dynamic barrier that regulates movement between body compartments. Each epithelium is specialized with barrier functions that are specific for the tissues it serves. The apical surface commonly faces a lumen, but the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) appears to be unique by a facing solid tissue, the sensory retina. Nonetheless, there exists a thin (subretinal) space that can become fluid filled during pathology. RPE separates the subretinal space from the blood supply of the outer retina, thereby forming the outer blood-retinal barrier. The intricate interaction between the RPE and sensory retina presents challenges for learning how accurately culture models reflect native behavior. The challenge is heightened by findings that detail the variation of RPE barrier proteins both among species and at different stages of the life cycle. Among the striking differences is the expression of claudin family members. Claudins are the tight junction proteins that regulate ion diffusion across the spaces that lie between the cells of a monolayer. Claudin expression by RPE varies with species and life-stage, which implies functional differences among commonly used animal models. Investigators have turned to transcriptomics to supplement functional studies when comparing native and cultured tissue. The most detailed studies of the outer blood-retinal barrier have focused on human RPE with transcriptome and functional studies reported for human fetal, adult, and stem-cell derived RPE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinal pigment epithelial dystrophy in Briard dogs.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, R M; Cabral, L; Gooch, L; Bedford, P G; Boulton, M E

    1996-01-01

    The eyes of normal Briard dogs, Briards affected with inherited retinal pigment epithelial dystrophy (RPED) and a range of normal crossbred and beagle dogs were examined and the histopathology of RPED in the Briard was compared with the histopathological features of ageing in the normal canine retina. RPED was characterised by the accumulation of auto-fluorescent lipofuscin-like inclusions in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which initially involved only non-pigmented RPE cells overlying the tapetum but subsequently spread to all pigmented RPE cells. Secondary neuro-retinal degeneration was characterised by a gradual loss of the outer nuclear layer and the subsequent atrophy and degeneration of the inner retina. The loss of primary photoreceptors in the peripheral retina was accompanied by the migration of photoreceptor nuclei and appeared to resemble severe changes due to ageing. Intra-vitreal radiolabelled leucine was used to examine the rate of turnover of the outer segments of the rods in some Briards, but no significant variations were found. The activity of acid phosphatase in RPE was assayed in vitro and showed comparable regional variations in Briard and crossbred dogs. The results suggest that RPED in the Briard is unlikely to be due either to an increased rate of turnover of rod outer segments (and thus an increased phagocytic load) or to a primary insufficiency of lysosomal enzyme.

  1. Adaptive optics retinal imaging: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Godara, Pooja; Dubis, Adam M; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    The human retina is a uniquely accessible tissue. Tools like scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography provide clinicians with remarkably clear pictures of the living retina. Although the anterior optics of the eye permit such non-invasive visualization of the retina and associated pathology, the same optics induce significant aberrations that obviate cellular-resolution imaging in most cases. Adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems use active optical elements to compensate for aberrations in the optical path between the object and the camera. When applied to the human eye, AO allows direct visualization of individual rod and cone photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, and white blood cells. AO imaging has changed the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists see the retina, helping to clarify our understanding of retinal structure, function, and the etiology of various retinal pathologies. Here, we review some of the advances that were made possible with AO imaging of the human retina and discuss applications and future prospects for clinical imaging.

  2. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  3. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migrationmore » in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.« less

  4. Automatic retinal interest evaluation system (ARIES).

    PubMed

    Yin, Fengshou; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Yow, Ai Ping; Lee, Beng Hai; Quan, Ying; Zhang, Zhuo; Gopalakrishnan, Kavitha; Li, Ruoying; Liu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the use of automatic computer-based systems for the detection of eye diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. However, in practice, retinal image quality is a big concern as automatic systems without consideration of degraded image quality will likely generate unreliable results. In this paper, an automatic retinal image quality assessment system (ARIES) is introduced to assess both image quality of the whole image and focal regions of interest. ARIES achieves 99.54% accuracy in distinguishing fundus images from other types of images through a retinal image identification step in a dataset of 35342 images. The system employs high level image quality measures (HIQM) to perform image quality assessment, and achieves areas under curve (AUCs) of 0.958 and 0.987 for whole image and optic disk region respectively in a testing dataset of 370 images. ARIES acts as a form of automatic quality control which ensures good quality images are used for processing, and can also be used to alert operators of poor quality images at the time of acquisition.

  5. Orientation-Selective Retinal Circuits in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Antinucci, Paride; Hindges, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Visual information is already processed in the retina before it is transmitted to higher visual centers in the brain. This includes the extraction of salient features from visual scenes, such as motion directionality or contrast, through neurons belonging to distinct neural circuits. Some retinal neurons are tuned to the orientation of elongated visual stimuli. Such ‘orientation-selective’ neurons are present in the retinae of most, if not all, vertebrate species analyzed to date, with species-specific differences in frequency and degree of tuning. In some cases, orientation-selective neurons have very stereotyped functional and morphological properties suggesting that they represent distinct cell types. In this review, we describe the retinal cell types underlying orientation selectivity found in various vertebrate species, and highlight their commonalities and differences. In addition, we discuss recent studies that revealed the cellular, synaptic and circuit mechanisms at the basis of retinal orientation selectivity. Finally, we outline the significance of these findings in shaping our current understanding of how this fundamental neural computation is implemented in the visual systems of vertebrates. PMID:29467629

  6. Orientation-Selective Retinal Circuits in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Antinucci, Paride; Hindges, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Visual information is already processed in the retina before it is transmitted to higher visual centers in the brain. This includes the extraction of salient features from visual scenes, such as motion directionality or contrast, through neurons belonging to distinct neural circuits. Some retinal neurons are tuned to the orientation of elongated visual stimuli. Such 'orientation-selective' neurons are present in the retinae of most, if not all, vertebrate species analyzed to date, with species-specific differences in frequency and degree of tuning. In some cases, orientation-selective neurons have very stereotyped functional and morphological properties suggesting that they represent distinct cell types. In this review, we describe the retinal cell types underlying orientation selectivity found in various vertebrate species, and highlight their commonalities and differences. In addition, we discuss recent studies that revealed the cellular, synaptic and circuit mechanisms at the basis of retinal orientation selectivity. Finally, we outline the significance of these findings in shaping our current understanding of how this fundamental neural computation is implemented in the visual systems of vertebrates.

  7. Optimal retinal cyst segmentation from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Ipek; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and reproducible segmentation of cysts and fluid-filled regions from retinal OCT images is an important step allowing quantification of the disease status, longitudinal disease progression, and response to therapy in wet-pathology retinal diseases. However, segmentation of fluid-filled regions from OCT images is a challenging task due to their inhomogeneous appearance, the unpredictability of their number, size and location, as well as the intensity profile similarity between such regions and certain healthy tissue types. While machine learning techniques can be beneficial for this task, they require large training datasets and are often over-fitted to the appearance models of specific scanner vendors. We propose a knowledge-based approach that leverages a carefully designed cost function and graph-based segmentation techniques to provide a vendor-independent solution to this problem. We illustrate the results of this approach on two publicly available datasets with a variety of scanner vendors and retinal disease status. Compared to a previous machine-learning based approach, the volume similarity error was dramatically reduced from 81:3+/-56:4% to 22:2+/-21:3% (paired t-test, p << 0:001).

  8. DNA linkage studies of degenerative retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Daiger, S P; Heckenlively, J R; Lewis, R A; Pelias, M Z

    1987-01-01

    DNA linkage studies of human genetic diseases have led to rapid characterization of a number of otherwise intractable disease loci. Detection of a linked DNA marker, the first step in "reverse genetics", has permitted cloning of the genes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, retinoblastoma and chronic granulomatosis disease, among others. Thus, the case for applying these techniques to retinitis pigmentosa and related diseases, and the urgency in capitalizing on molecular developments, is justified and compelling. The first major success regarding RP was in demonstrating linkage of the DNA marker DXS7 (L1.28) to XRP. For autosomal forms of the disease, conventional linkage studies have provided tentative evidence for linkage of ADRP to the Rh blood group on chromosome lp and for linkage of Usher's syndrome to Gc and 4q. These provisional assignments are, at least, an important starting point for DNA analysis. The Support Program for DNA Linkage Studies of Degenerative Retinal Diseases was established to provide access for the scientific community to appropriate families, using the resources of the Human Genetic Mutant Cell Repository to prepare, store and distribute lymphoblast lines. To date, two extensive, well-characterized families are included in the program: the autosomal dominant RP family UCLA-RP01, and the Usher's syndrome families LSU-US01. It is highly likely that rapid progress will be made in mapping and characterizing the inherited retinal dystrophies. We believe the support program will facilitate this progress.

  9. In vivo fluorescence imaging of primate retinal ganglion cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Daniel C.; Merigan, William; Wolfing, Jessica I.; Gee, Bernard P.; Porter, Jason; Dubra, Alfredo; Twietmeyer, Ted H.; Ahamd, Kamran; Tumbar, Remy; Reinholz, Fred; Williams, David R.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to resolve single cells noninvasively in the living retina has important applications for the study of normal retina, diseased retina, and the efficacy of therapies for retinal disease. We describe a new instrument for high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the mammalian retina that combines the benefits of confocal detection, adaptive optics, multispectral, and fluorescence imaging. The instrument is capable of imaging single ganglion cells and their axons through retrograde transport in ganglion cells of fluorescent dyes injected into the monkey lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In addition, we demonstrate a method involving simultaneous imaging in two spectral bands that allows the integration of very weak signals across many frames despite inter-frame movement of the eye. With this method, we are also able to resolve the smallest retinal capillaries in fluorescein angiography and the mosaic of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells with lipofuscin autofluorescence.

  10. Retinal complications after aqueous shunt surgical procedures for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Law, S K; Kalenak, J W; Connor, T B; Pulido, J S; Han, D P; Mieler, W F

    1996-12-01

    To assess retinal complications and to identify risk factors for retinal complications following aqueous shunt procedures. Records of 38 consecutive aqueous shunt procedures that were performed on 36 patients at the Eye Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, from June 1993 to March 1995 (minimum follow-up, 6 months) were reviewed. The mean +/- SD follow-up was 11.4 +/- 5.2 months (median, 10.5 months). Twelve patients (32%) had the following retinal complications: 4 serous choroidal effusions (10%) that required drainage, 3 suprachoroidal hemorrhages (8%), 2 vitreous hemorrhages (5%), 1 rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (3%), 1 endophthalmitis (3%), and 1 scleral buckling extrusion (3%). Surgical procedures for retinal complications were required in 8 (67%) of these 12 patients. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 9 (75%) of these 12 patients. The median onset of a postoperative retinal complication was 12.5 days, with 10 patients (83%) experiencing complications within 35 days. Serous choroidal effusions developed in 10 other patients (26%), and these effusions resolved spontaneously. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 2 (20%) of these additional 10 patients. Patients who experienced serious retinal complications were significantly older, had a higher rate of hypertension, and postoperative ocular hypotony. Serious retinal complications were distributed evenly among patients with Krupin valves with discs and Molteno and Baerveldt devices. Experience with the Ahmed glaucoma valve implant was limited. Aqueous shunt procedures may be associated with significant retinal complications and subsequent visual loss.

  11. Syphilitic punctate inner retinitis in immunocompetent gay men.

    PubMed

    Wickremasinghe, Sanjeewa; Ling, Cecilia; Stawell, Richard; Yeoh, Jonathan; Hall, Anthony; Zamir, Ehud

    2009-06-01

    To describe the features of an unusual syphilitic uveitis syndrome in a cluster of homosexual patients. Retrospective case series. Five consecutive patients diagnosed with syphilitic retinitis in our Melbourne uveitis clinic over a period of 8 months. The case notes of patients diagnosed with syphilitic retinitis were reviewed and the clinical features are presented and discussed. Description of retinal findings and documentation of any associated sequelae. All patients were homosexual men. Two were human immunodeficiency virus positive. None of the patients had been previously diagnosed with syphilis, although 3 presented with systemic symptoms and signs of secondary syphilis. All patients had marked anterior uveitis and vitritis. All patients had acute retinal arteriolitis and inner retinitis, with distinctive, inner retinal and preretinal white dots. These retinal findings were remarkably similar in all patients, and resolved with little or no sequelae after standard systemic treatment for syphilis, combined with oral prednisolone. Syphilitic retinitis may be an increasingly common clinical problem, reflecting the growing incidence of syphilis among homosexual men in Australia. Our patients showed stereotypical ocular and systemic features, which are useful in differentiating this condition clinically from other types of acute posterior uveitis, such as necrotizing viral retinitis. Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.

  12. Implantable multilayer microstrip antenna for retinal prosthesis: antenna testing.

    PubMed

    Permana, Hans; Fang, Qiang; Rowe, Wayne S T

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis has come to a more mature stage and become a very strategic answer to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) diseases. In a retinal prosthesis system, wireless link holds a great importance for the continuity of the system. In this paper, an implantable multilayer microstrip antenna was proposed for the retinal prosthesis system. Simulations were performed in High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) with the surrounding material of air and Vitreous Humor fluid. The fabricated antenna was measured for characteristic validation in free space. The results showed that the real antenna possessed similar return loss and radiation pattern, while there was discrepancy with the gain values.

  13. Inner neural retina loss in central retinal artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Fumiko; Kishi, Shoji

    2010-09-01

    To report morphologic retinal changes and visual outcomes in acute and chronic central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). We reviewed ten eyes of ten patients with CRAO (age, 65.3 ± 10.2 years) and measured retinal thicknesses at the central fovea and the perifovea using optical coherence tomography (OCT) over 8 ± 4 months. During the acute phase (within 10 days), the mean inner retinal thicknesses were 148% and 139% of normal values at 1 mm nasal and temporal to the fovea. They decreased to 22% and 11% of normal inner retinal thickness during the chronic phase (3 months or later). The retinal thickness at the perifovea decreased linearly until 3 months but was stable during the chronic phase. In contrast, the foveal thickness increased slightly in the acute phase but was equivalent to the normal level during the chronic phase. As a result of inner retinal atrophy, the foveal pit was shallow during the chronic phase. The final visual acuity was correlated positively with retinal thickness at the perifovea during the chronic CRAO phase. OCT showed that inner retinal necrosis with early swelling and late atrophy occurred in CRAO. The fovea and outer retina appeared to be excluded from ischemic change. The residual inner retina at the perifovea determined the final visual outcomes.

  14. Stem cells in retinal regeneration: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Conor M; Powner, Michael B; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F; Smart, Matthew J K; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    Stem cell therapy for retinal disease is under way, and several clinical trials are currently recruiting. These trials use human embryonic, foetal and umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells to treat visual disorders such as age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease and retinitis pigmentosa. Over a decade of analysing the developmental cues involved in retinal generation and stem cell biology, coupled with extensive surgical research, have yielded differing cellular approaches to tackle these retinopathies. Here, we review these various stem cell-based approaches for treating retinal diseases and discuss future directions and challenges for the field.

  15. The influence of retinal eye diseases on painting.

    PubMed

    Ivanišević, Petar; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-03-01

    In this work the possible influences of some retinal eye problems on paintings of several famous artists are considered. The change of painting styles and artistic expression in different periods and ages in a group of world-wide well-known painters are described and correlated with known or suspected retinal diseases. Some of them largely became recognizable because of that. Contemplations are offered about the effects of retinal diseases in the works of Degas, Munch, Cézanne, O'Keeffe, Constable and Goya. Retinal eye diseases have a significant impact on the work of selected famous painters.

  16. Expression Profiling Analysis Reveals Key MicroRNA-mRNA Interactions in Early Retinal Degeneration in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Anasagasti, Ander; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Caffarel, María M; Otaegui, David; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) that might play an important role in the etiology of retinal degeneration in a genetic mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa (rd10 mice) at initial stages of the disease. miRNAs-mRNA interaction networks were generated for analysis of biological pathways involved in retinal degeneration. Of more than 1900 miRNAs analyzed, we selected 19 miRNAs on the basis of (1) a significant differential expression in rd10 retinas compared with control samples and (2) an inverse expression relationship with predicted mRNA targets involved in biological pathways relevant to retinal biology and/or degeneration. Seven of the selected miRNAs have been associated with retinal dystrophies, whereas, to our knowledge, nine have not been previously linked to any disease. This study contributes to our understanding of the etiology and progression of retinal degeneration.

  17. Retinal Laminar Architecture in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by Rhodopsin Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Herrera, Waldo; White, D. Alan; Kaushal, Shalesh; Naidu, Anjani; Roman, Alejandro J.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the underlying retinal micropathology in subclasses of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) caused by rhodopsin (RHO) mutations. Methods. Patients with RHO-ADRP (n = 17, ages 6–73 years), representing class A (R135W and P347L) and class B (P23H, T58R, and G106R) functional phenotypes, were studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT), and colocalized visual thresholds were determined by dark- and light-adapted chromatic perimetry. Autofluorescence imaging was performed with near-infrared light. Retinal histology in hT17M-rhodopsin mice was compared with the human results. Results. Class A patients had only cone-mediated vision. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) thinned with eccentricity and was not detectable within 3 to 4 mm of the fovea. Scotomatous extracentral retina showed loss of ONL, thickening of the inner retina, and demelanization of RPE. Class B patients had superior–inferior asymmetry in function and structure. The superior retina could have normal rod and cone vision, normal lamination (including ONL) and autofluorescence of the RPE melanin; laminopathy was found in the scotomas. With Fourier-domain-OCT, there was apparent inner nuclear layer (INL) thickening in regions with ONL thinning. Retinal regions without ONL had a thick hyporeflective layer that was continuous with the INL from neighboring regions with normal lamination. Transgenic mice had many of the laminar abnormalities found in patients. Conclusions. Retinal laminar abnormalities were present in both classes of RHO-ADRP and were related to the severity of colocalized vision loss. The results in human class B and the transgenic mice support the following disease sequence: ONL diminution with INL thickening; amalgamation of residual ONL with the thickened INL; and progressive retinal remodeling with eventual thinning. PMID:18385078

  18. Decreased Retinal-Choroidal Blood Flow in Retinitis Pigmentosa as measured by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Harrison, Joseph M; Nateras, Oscar San Emeterio; Chalfin, Steven; Duong, Timothy Q

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal and choroidal blood flow (BF) using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as visual function measured by the electroretinogram (ERG) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods MRI studies were performed in 6 RP patients (29-67 years) and 5 healthy volunteers (29-64 years) on a 3-Tesla scanner with a custom-made surface coil. Quantitative BF was measured using the pseudo-continuous arterial-spin-labeling technique at 0.5x0.8x6.0mm. Full-field ERGs of all patients were recorded. Amplitudes and implicit times of standard ERGs were analyzed. Results Basal BF in the posterior retinal-choroid was 142±16 ml/100ml/min (or 1.14±0.13 μl/mm2/min) in the control group and was 70±19 ml/100ml/min (or 0.56±0.15 μl/mm2/min) in the RP group. Retinal-choroidal BF was significantly reduced by 52±8% in RP patients compared to controls (P<0.05). ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes of RP patients were reduced and b-wave implicit times were delayed. There were statistically significant correlations between a-wave amplitude and BF value (r=0.9, P<0.05) but not between b-wave amplitude and BF value (r =0.7, P=0.2). Conclusions This study demonstrates a novel non-invasive MRI approach to measure quantitative retinal and choroidal BF in RP patients. We found that retinal-choroidal BF was markedly reduced and significantly correlated with reduced amplitudes of the a-wave of the standard combined ERG. PMID:23408312

  19. Clinical Outcome of Retinal Vasculitis and Predictors for Prognosis of Ischemic Retinal Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharief, Lazha; Lightman, Sue; Blum-Hareuveni, Tamar; Bar, Asaf; Tomkins-Netzer, Oren

    2017-05-01

    To determine factors affecting the visual outcome in eyes with retinal vasculitis and the rate of neovascularization relapse in ischemic vasculitis. Retrospective cohort study. We reviewed 1169 uveitis patients from Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK. Retinal vasculitis was observed in 236 eyes (121 ischemic, 115 nonischemic) that were compared with a control group (1022 eyes) with no retinal vasculitis. Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography images were obtained in 63 eyes with ischemic vasculitis to quantify area of nonperfusion measured as ischemic index. The risk of vision loss was significantly more in the retinal vasculitis compared with the non-vasculitis group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.25, P = .001). Retinal vasculitis had twice the risk of macular edema compared to the non-vasculitis group. Macular ischemia increased the risk of vision loss in vasculitis eyes by 4.4 times. The use of systemic prednisolone in eyes with vasculitis was associated with a reduced risk of vision loss (HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.15-0.82, P = .01). Laser photocoagulation was administered in 75 eyes (62.0%), out of which 29 (38.1%) had new vessel relapse and required additional laser treatment. The median ischemic index was 25.8% (interquartile range 10.2%-46%). Ischemia involving ≥2 quadrants was associated with increased risk of new vessel formation (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.5, P = .003). Retinal vasculitis is associated with an increased risk of vision loss, mainly secondary to macular ischemia, and has a higher risk of macular edema compared to eyes with no vasculitis. Ischemia involving ≥2 quadrants is a risk factor for new vessel formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinal infiltrates secondary to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as infectious retinitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rishi P; Steinle, Nathan C; Bedi, Rumneek; Kaiser, Peter; Lowder, Careen Y

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a case of metastatic carcinoma to the retina. Retrospective chart review and systematic literature review. The patient was a 78-year-old man with history of small-cell lung cancer and with the development of metastatic carcinoma to the retina. The review of this case and previous literature reveals that the presentation of retinal metastases can occasionally be misinterpreted as infectious retinitis, which can delay the diagnosis of the disease. Metastatic carcinoma to the retina is a rare condition, which should be considered in patients who are suspected of having infectious retinopathy and who fail to respond to traditional antimicrobial therapies.

  1. Effect of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration on retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mice.

    PubMed

    Dysli, Chantal; Dysli, Muriel; Zinkernagel, Martin S; Enzmann, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) was used to investigate retinal autofluorescence lifetimes in mouse models of pharmacologically induced retinal degeneration over time. Sodium iodate (NaIO 3 , 35 mg/kg intravenously) was used to induce retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration with subsequent loss of photoreceptors (PR) whereas N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, 45 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was employed for degeneration of the photoreceptor cell layer alone. All mice were measured at day 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the respective injection of NaIO 3 , MNU or NaCl (control). Fluorescence lifetime imaging was performed using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Fluorescence was excited at 473 nm and fluorescence lifetimes were measured in a short and a long spectral channel (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were consecutively acquired and histology was performed at the end of the experiments. Segmentation of OCT images and histology verified the cell type-specific degeneration process over time. Retinal autofluorescence lifetimes increased from day 3 to day 28 in mice after NaIO 3 treatment. Finally, at day 28, fluorescence lifetimes were prolonged by 8% in the short and 61% in the long spectral channel compared to control animals (p = 0.21 and p = 0.004, respectively). In mice after MNU treatment, the mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes were already decreased at day 3 and retinal lifetimes were finally shortened by 27% in the short and 51% in the long spectral channel at day 28 (p = 0.0028). In conclusion, degeneration of the RPE with subsequent photoreceptor degeneration by NaIO 3 lead to longer mean fluorescence lifetimes of the retina compared to control mice, whereas during specific degeneration of the photoreceptor layer induced by MNU shorter lifetimes were measured. Therefore, short retinal fluorescence lifetimes may originate

  2. Surgical management of retinal diseases: proliferative diabetic retinopathy and traction retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Iñigo, Yousef J; Acabá, Luis A; Berrocal, Maria H

    2014-01-01

    Current indications for pars plana vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) include vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment (TRD), combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (CTRRD), diabetic macular edema associated with posterior hyaloidal traction, and anterior segment neovascularization with media opacities. This chapter will review the indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincision surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for PDR, TRD, and CTRRD. With the availability of new microincision vitrectomy technology, wide-angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from PDR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Vitritis in Pediatric Genetic Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stunkel, Maria; Bhattarai, Sajag; Kemerley, Andrew; Stone, Edwin M.; Wang, Kai; Mullins, Robert F.; Drack, Arlene V.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose To determine which types of pediatric retinal degeneration are associated with inflammatory cells in the anterior vitreous (AV). Design Retrospective, observational study in humans. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric patients with suspected retinal degeneration presenting to a single examiner from 2008–2013. Age, visual acuity (VA), slit lamp examination of AV (SLAV), clinical and molecular genetic diagnoses were documented. Anterior vitreous cells were graded clinically with SLAV from rare cells (1–4) to 1+ (5–9), 2+ (10–30), or 3+ (more than 30). Cells were also counted in magnified slit beam photographs masked to molecular diagnosis when obtainable. Main outcome measures Cell counts in SLAV, best corrected VA, molecular and clinical diagnoses. Results One hundred and five charts were evaluated, 68 of which (64.8%) included SLAV data. Numerous (1+ or greater) cells were present in 22/68 (32.4%) patients, whereas 4/68 (5.9%) had rare cells and 42/68 (61.8%) had no cells. The average age between patients with cells, no-cells, and rare cells did not differ significantly (p=0.25). VA averaged 20/124 in patients with cells, 20/143 in patients with no-cells, and 20/68 in patients with rare cells (p= 0.70). The most frequent diagnoses with cells included Bardet Biedl syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), and retinitis pigmentosa. The most frequent diagnoses without cells included congenital stationary night blindness, LCA, Stargardt disease, and blue cone monochromacy. Discussion A non-random subset of pediatric retinal degenerations exhibit vitritis. Cells were present in 5/5 BBS patients (a progressive degeneration) whereas cells were not detected in any of the 12 patients with CSNB (a stable dysfunction). Conclusion Studying vitritis in pediatric retinal degenerations may reveal whether inflammation accompanies progressive vision loss in certain sub-types. Potentially, inflammation could be treated

  4. [Early therapeutic trials for retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Dufier, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Non syndromic forms of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) constitute a collection of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited retinal degenerative diseases. They are characterized by a bilateral progressive visual loss susceptible to cause blindness. These diseases are transmitted through pedigrees according to all known modes of inheritance. They are bilateral and usually start during infancy. However, very early clinical presentations exist, such as those observed in children affected by Leber Congenital Amaurosis, as well as late onset autosomal dominant forms of retinitis pigmentosa. The characteristic clinical aspect of the rod-cone RP dystrophies is marked by alterations of the peripheral retina associated with a night blindness and a progressive narrowing of the visual field. The ophthalmoscopic examination of RP patients commonly reveals thin retinal arteries and scattered pigmentary accumulations. In contrast, there are cone rod retinal dystrophies whose onset is marked by a decreased visual acuity before the appearance of any visual field alteration. Some forms of RPs display an ocular fundus devoid of any pigmentary alteration. Syndromic forms of RPs are not uncommon. The association of deafness with RP is detected in nearly 30% of the patients. Other associations with RP can include mental deficiency, facial dysmorphy, microcephaly, obesity, kidney deficiency, immune deficiencies, metabolic disorders. The existence of such syndromic forms of RP localizes RPs at the crossroad of several medical specialties. A long lasting collaboration between our department of ophthalmology and the department of medical genetics of the Necker-Sick Children Hospital has allowed us to establish numerous genotype-phenotype correlations, especially in LCA and Stargardt's disease. ABCR gene mutations cause Stargardt disease. ABCR mutations may also cause some types of Ages Related Macular Degenerations (AMD). Nowadays, there is no known efficient therapy available for

  5. Retinal O-linked N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications: implications for postnatal retinal vascularization and the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sieg, Kelsey M.; Shallow, Keegan D.; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hyperglycemia activates several metabolic pathways, including the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. Uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is the product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and the substrate for O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) modification. This modification affects a wide range of proteins by altering their activity, cellular localization, and/or protein interactions. However, the role O-GlcNAcylation may play in normal postnatal retinal vascular development and in the ocular complications of diabetes, including diabetic retinopathy, requires further investigation. Methods The total levels of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins were evaluated by western blot analysis of lysates prepared from retinas obtained at different days during postnatal retinal vascularization and oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy. Similar experiments were performed with retinal lysate prepared from diabetic Ins2Akita/+ mice with different durations of diabetes and retinal vascular cells cultured under various glucose conditions. The localization of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in the retinal vasculature was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. The impact of altered O-GlcNAcylation on the migration of retinal vascular cells was determined using scratch wound and transwell migration assays. Results We detected an increase in protein O-GlcNAcylation during mouse postnatal retinal vascularization and aging, in part through the regulation of the enzymes that control this modification. The study of the diabetic Ins2Akita/+ mouse retina showed an increase in the O-GlcNAc modification of retinal proteins. We also observed an increase in retinal O-GlcNAcylated protein levels during the neovascularization phase of oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy. Our fluorescence microscopy data confirmed that the alterations in retinal O-GlcNAcylation are similarly represented in the retinal vasculature and in retinal pericytes and endothelial cells. Particularly, the migration of

  6. A High Serum Iron Level Causes Mouse Retinal Iron Accumulation Despite an Intact Blood-Retinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liangliang; Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Theurl, Milan; Wang, Chenguang; Cwanger, Alyssa; Su, Guanfang; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    The retina can be shielded by the blood-retinal barrier. Because photoreceptors are damaged by excess iron, it is important to understand whether the blood-retinal barrier protects against high serum iron levels. Bone morphogenic protein 6 (Bmp6) knockout mice have serum iron overload. Herein, we tested whether the previously documented retinal iron accumulation in Bmp6 knockout mice might result from the high serum iron levels or, alternatively, low levels of retinal hepcidin, an iron regulatory hormone whose transcription can be up-regulated by Bmp6. Furthermore, to determine whether increases in serum iron can elevate retinal iron levels, we i.v. injected iron into wild-type mice. Retinas were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence to assess the levels of iron-regulated genes/proteins and oxidative stress. Retinal hepcidin mRNA levels in Bmp6 knockout retinas were the same as, or greater than, those in age-matched wild-type retinas, indicating that Bmp6 knockout does not cause retinal hepcidin deficiency. Changes in mRNA levels of L ferritin and transferrin receptor indicated increased retinal iron levels in i.v. iron-injected wild-type mice. Oxidative stress markers were elevated in photoreceptors of mice receiving i.v. iron. These findings suggest that elevated serum iron levels can overwhelm local retinal iron regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25174877

  7. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in a fourteen-year-old girl with retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento.

    PubMed

    Hatta, M; Hayasaka, S; Kato, T; Kadoi, C

    2000-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl complained of a sudden decrease in right visual acuity. The patient had night blindness, a mottled retina but no pigments, extinguished scotopic electroretinographic response, central scotoma in the right eye and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. She had initially received laser photocoagulation around the retinal tear and then corticosteroid therapy, cryoretinopexy and segmental buckling. Her right visual acuity increased to 1.0. The association of retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento, retrobulbar optic neuritis and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, as demonstrated in our patient, may be uncommon. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation in a healthy young Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Fu, Yue; Dong, Yanmin; Lin, Leilei; Huang, Xia; Li, Yujie; Lin, Xiaofeng; Gao, Qianying

    2016-06-01

    To measure retinal vessel oxygen saturation in a healthy young Chinese population and to determine the effects of multiple factors (gender, age, dioptre, vessel diameter and ocular perfusion pressure - OPP) on retinal oxygen saturation. A total of 126 healthy Chinese individuals aged from 19 to 30 were included in this study. A retinal oximeter (Oxymap T1) was used to measure retinal vessel oxygen saturation by retinal imaging at two different wavelengths. The mean retinal vessel oxygen saturation (Sat_O2 ) of arterioles, venules and arteriovenous (AV) difference overall and in four separate quadrants were measured. Intra-ocular pressure, blood pressure, finger pulse oximetry value, vessel diameter and dioptre were also measured. The correlations between OPP and dioptre, OPP and vessel diameter, and dioptre and vessel diameter were analysed. And the effects of multiple factors on the retinal oxygen saturation were analysed. The mean oxygen saturation was 93.2 ± 6.3% in the retinal arterioles, 60.4 ± 5.3% in venules and 32.9 ± 6.4% in AV difference. The temporal quadrants had lower measurements of arteriolar and venular oxygen saturation and AV difference compared with nasal quadrants (p < 0.001). The oxygen saturation of the arterioles, venules and AV difference were unaffected by any unique factor. Arteriolar and venular retinal oxygen saturation correlated negatively with the product of dioptre and OPP. Arteriolar retinal oxygen saturation correlated positively with the product of dioptre and vessel diameter. This study provided a normal reference of Sat_O2 in healthy young Chinese individuals. It was a reflection of the normal state of retinal oxygen metabolism affected by several factors. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: predisposing anatomy and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mitry, Danny; Fleck, Brian W; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Charteris, David G

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is complex, and our knowledge of the exact mechanism of vitreoretinal attachment and detachment remains incomplete. We performed a Medline, Ovid, and EMBASE search using search words rhegmatogenous, retinal detachment, vitreous, and retinal adhesion. All appropriate articles were reviewed, and the evidence was compiled. Cortical vitreous contains fibrillar collagens type II, V/XI, and IX. The inner limiting membrane of the retina contains collagens type I, IV, VI, and XVIII as well as numerous other glycoproteins and potential adhesion molecules. The distribution and age-related changes in the structure of these molecules play an important role in the formation of a retinal break, which may compromise and disrupt the normal mechanisms of neurosensory retinal adhesion. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment development is intimately related to changes in the fibrillar structure of the aging vitreous culminating in posterior vitreous detachment with regions of persistent and tangential vitreoretinal traction predisposing to retinal tear formation. A complex interplay of factors such as weakening of vitreoretinal adhesion, posterior migration of the vitreous base, and molecular changes at the vitreoretinal interface are important in predisposing to focal areas of vitreoretinal traction precipitating rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Once formed, the passage of liquefied vitreous through a retinal break may overwhelm normal neurosensory-retinal pigment epithelium adhesion perpetuating and extending detachment and causing visual loss. To understand the molecular events underlying rhegmatogenous retinal detachment so that new therapies can be developed, it is important to appreciate the structural organization of the vitreous, the biology underlying vitreous liquefaction and posterior vitreous detachment, and the mechanisms of vitreoretinal attachment and detachment.

  10. RETINAL DISEASES IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Uhumwangho, O M; Itina, E I

    2015-01-01

    Retinal diseases are an important and common cause of ophthalmic consultation. To determine the pattern of retinal diseases in the ophthalmic department of a tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria. A retrospective review of the case folders of patients with retinal pathologies seen between 2012 and 2013 was performed. Relevant demographic and clinical data was recorded. Analysis was performed for frequencies, proportions and percentages with the GraphPad Instat Software, Inc. version V2.05a program, San Diego, CA. There were 185 patients made of 94 (50.8%) males and 91 (49.2%) females with a peak age group of 61-70 years, (range 1-85 years) who made consultations for retinal diseases. Age related macular degeneration, 37(15.0%), and macula hole, 10(4.0%), were the common macula pathologies while retinal detachment, 11(4.5%), was the most common condition that required emergency vitreo-retinal surgical intervention. Diabetic retinopathy/maculopathy, 31(12.6%), hypertensive retinopathy 22(8.9%), and retinal vascular occlusion 12(4.8%), were the common retinal vascular diseases found. Bilateral visual impairment (low vision and blindness) from retinal diseases was present in 28(14.4%) persons. The common vitreo-retinal treatment options were use of intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factors 32(13.0%), laser 16(6.5%), and vitreoretinal surgery in 22(8.9%) eyes. Retinal diseases remain an important cause of ophthalmic consultation and visual loss. Provision of facilities to manage these conditions will improve service delivery and quality of lives of affected patients.

  11. Diosmin alleviates retinal edema by protecting the blood-retinal barrier and reducing retinal vascular permeability during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Nianting; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yating; Gong, Yuanyuan; Yin, Lili; Qiu, Qinghua; Wu, Xingwei

    2013-01-01

    Retinal swelling, leading to irreversible visual impairment, is an important early complication in retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Diosmin, a naturally occurring flavonoid glycoside, has been shown to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects against I/R injury. The present study was performed to evaluate the retinal microvascular protective effect of diosmin in a model of I/R injury. Unilateral retinal I/R was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 110 mm Hg for 60 min followed by reperfusion. Diosmin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. Rats were evaluated for retinal functional injury by electroretinogram (ERG) just before sacrifice. Retinas were harvested for HE staining, immunohistochemistry assay, ELISA, and western blotting analysis. Evans blue (EB) extravasation was determined to assess blood-retinal barrier (BRB) disruption and the structure of tight junctions (TJ) was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Diosmin significantly ameliorated the reduction of b-wave, a-wave, and b/a ratio in ERG, alleviated retinal edema, protected the TJ structure, and reduced EB extravasation. All of these effects of diosmin were associated with increased zonular occluden-1 (ZO-1) and occludin protein expression and decreased VEGF/PEDF ratio. Maintenance of TJ integrity and reduced permeability of capillaries as well as improvements in retinal edema were observed with diosmin treatment, which may contribute to preservation of retinal function. This protective effect of diosmin may be at least partly attributed to its ability to regulate the VEGF/PEDF ratio.

  12. Investigation of Retinal Morphology Alterations Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in a Mouse Model of Retinal Branch and Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ebneter, Andreas; Agca, Cavit; Dysli, Chantal; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion is a leading cause of visual impairment. Experimental models of this condition based on laser photocoagulation of retinal veins have been described and extensively exploited in mammals and larger rodents such as the rat. However, few reports exist on the use of this paradigm in the mouse. The objective of this study was to investigate a model of branch and central retinal vein occlusion in the mouse and characterize in vivo longitudinal retinal morphology alterations using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal veins were experimentally occluded using laser photocoagulation after intravenous application of Rose Bengal, a photo-activator dye enhancing thrombus formation. Depending on the number of veins occluded, variable amounts of capillary dropout were seen on fluorescein angiography. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were markedly elevated early and peaked at day one. Retinal thickness measurements with spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed significant swelling (p<0.001) compared to baseline, followed by gradual thinning plateauing two weeks after the experimental intervention (p<0.001). Histological findings at day seven correlated with spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. The inner layers were predominantly affected by degeneration with the outer nuclear layer and the photoreceptor outer segments largely preserved. The application of this retinal vein occlusion model in the mouse carries several advantages over its use in other larger species, such as access to a vast range of genetically modified animals. Retinal changes after experimental retinal vein occlusion in this mouse model can be non-invasively quantified by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and may be used to monitor effects of potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25775456

  13. Duration of spiral aftereffect as a function of retinal size, retinal place, and hemiretinal transfer.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1964-01-01

    This experiment has shown that, although both rods and cones mediate the spiral aftereffect, cone areas give a larger response. Increasing size of the retinal image results in longer durations of SAE but rods are more affected by this increase than a...

  14. Detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects in retinal fundus images using Gabor filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hatanaka, Yuji; Aoyama, Akira; Kakogawa, Masakatsu; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD) is one of the most important findings for the diagnosis of glaucoma reported by ophthalmologists. However, such changes could be overlooked, especially in mass screenings, because ophthalmologists have limited time to search for a number of different changes for the diagnosis of various diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and glaucoma. Therefore, the use of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system can improve the results of diagnosis. In this work, a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images is proposed. In the preprocessing step, blood vessels are "erased" from the original retinal fundus image by using morphological filtering. The preprocessed image is then transformed into a rectangular array. NFLD regions are observed as vertical dark bands in the transformed image. Gabor filtering is then applied to enhance the vertical dark bands. False positives (FPs) are reduced by a rule-based method which uses the information of the location and the width of each candidate region. The detected regions are back-transformed into the original configuration. In this preliminary study, 71% of NFLD regions are detected with average number of FPs of 3.2 per image. In conclusion, we have developed a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images. Promising results have been obtained in this initial study.

  15. RI in central retinal artery as assessed by CDI does not correspond to retinal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Polska, E; Kircher, K; Ehrlich, P; Vecsei, P V; Schmetterer, L

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ultrasound Doppler measurements of resistive index (RI) in the central retinal artery and retinal vascular resistance (R) assessed with laser Doppler velocimetry, vessel size measurement, and calculation of ocular perfusion pressure (PP) in healthy subjects. An increase in vascular resistance was induced by inhalation of 100% O(2). During hyperoxia no significant changes in PP were observed. Mean flow velocity in main retinal veins was reduced by -27.5 +/- 2.0%. The average decrease in diameter was -11.5 +/- 1.0%. R, which was calculated as the ratio of PP to flow rate, increased by 97.6 +/- 7.7%. RI increased as well, but the effect was much smaller (6.6 +/- 2.2%). In addition, a negative correlation was found between baseline values of R and RI (r = -0.83). During hyperoxia R and RI were not associated. In conclusion, our data indicate that RI as assessed with color Doppler imaging in the central retinal artery is not an adequate measure of R.

  16. Cone dysfunctions in retinitis pigmentosa with retinal nerve fiber layer thickening

    PubMed Central

    Sobacı, Güngör; Özge, Gökhan; Gündoğan, Fatih Ç

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether or not thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients relates to functional abnormalities of the photoreceptors. Methods Optical coherence tomography-based RNFL thickness was measured by Stratus-3™ (Zeiss, Basel, Switzerland) optical coherence tomography and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings made using the RETI-port® system (Roland, Wiesbaden, Germany) in 27 patients with retinitis pigmentosa and in 30 healthy subjects. Results Photopic ERG b-wave amplitude, cone ERG b-wave latency, 30 Hz flicker amplitude, and 30 Hz flicker latency had significant correlations to the RNFL-temporal (r = −0.55, P = 0.004, r = 0.68, P = 0.001, r = −0.65, P = 0.001, and r = −0.52, P = 0.007, respectively). Eyes with thicker RNFL (ten eyes) differed significantly from those with thinner RNFL (eight eyes) regarding cone ERG b-wave latency values only (P = 0.001). Conclusion Thicker RNFL in patients with retinitis pigmentosa may be associated with functional abnormality of the cone system. PMID:22536039

  17. Cone dysfunctions in retinitis pigmentosa with retinal nerve fiber layer thickening.

    PubMed

    Sobacı, Güngör; Ozge, Gökhan; Gündoğan, Fatih Ç

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether or not thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients relates to functional abnormalities of the photoreceptors. Optical coherence tomography-based RNFL thickness was measured by Stratus-3™ (Zeiss, Basel, Switzerland) optical coherence tomography and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings made using the RETI-port(®) system (Roland, Wiesbaden, Germany) in 27 patients with retinitis pigmentosa and in 30 healthy subjects. Photopic ERG b-wave amplitude, cone ERG b-wave latency, 30 Hz flicker amplitude, and 30 Hz flicker latency had significant correlations to the RNFL-temporal (r = -0.55, P = 0.004, r = 0.68, P = 0.001, r = -0.65, P = 0.001, and r = -0.52, P = 0.007, respectively). Eyes with thicker RNFL (ten eyes) differed significantly from those with thinner RNFL (eight eyes) regarding cone ERG b-wave latency values only (P = 0.001). Thicker RNFL in patients with retinitis pigmentosa may be associated with functional abnormality of the cone system.

  18. Automatic segmentation of pigment deposits in retinal fundus images of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Brancati, Nadia; Frucci, Maria; Gragnaniello, Diego; Riccio, Daniel; Di Iorio, Valentina; Di Perna, Luigi

    2018-06-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa is an eye disease that presents with a slow loss of vision and then evolves until blindness results. The automatic detection of the early signs of retinitis pigmentosa acts as a great support to ophthalmologists in the diagnosis and monitoring of the disease in order to slow down the degenerative process. A large body of literature is devoted to the analysis of Retinitis Pigmentosa. However, all the existing approaches work on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) data, while hardly any attempts have been made working on fundus images. Fundus image analysis is a suitable tool in daily practice for an early detection of retinal diseases and the monitoring of their progression. Moreover, the fundus camera represents a low-cost and easy-access diagnostic system, which can be employed in resource-limited regions and countries. The fundus images of a patient suffering from retinitis pigmentosa are characterized by an attenuation of the vessels, a waxy disc pallor and the presence of pigment deposits. Considering that several methods have been proposed for the analysis of retinal vessels and the optic disk, this work focuses on the automatic segmentation of the pigment deposits in the fundus images. The image distortions are attenuated by applying a local pre-processing. Next, a watershed transformation is carried out to produce homogeneous regions. Working on regions rather than on pixels makes the method very robust to the high variability of pigment deposits in terms of color and shape, so allowing the detection even of small pigment deposits. The regions undergo a feature extraction procedure, so that a region classification process is performed by means of an outlier detection analysis and a rule set. The experiments have been performed on a dataset of images of patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa. Although the images present a high variability in terms of color and illumination, the method provides a good performance in terms of

  19. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  20. The Edge Detectors Suitable for Retinal OCT Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Gao, Qian; Zhou, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Retinal layer thickness measurement offers important information for reliable diagnosis of retinal diseases and for the evaluation of disease development and medical treatment responses. This task critically depends on the accurate edge detection of the retinal layers in OCT images. Here, we intended to search for the most suitable edge detectors for the retinal OCT image segmentation task. The three most promising edge detection algorithms were identified in the related literature: Canny edge detector, the two-pass method, and the EdgeFlow technique. The quantitative evaluation results show that the two-pass method outperforms consistently the Canny detector and the EdgeFlow technique in delineating the retinal layer boundaries in the OCT images. In addition, the mean localization deviation metrics show that the two-pass method caused the smallest edge shifting problem. These findings suggest that the two-pass method is the best among the three algorithms for detecting retinal layer boundaries. The overall better performance of Canny and two-pass methods over EdgeFlow technique implies that the OCT images contain more intensity gradient information than texture changes along the retinal layer boundaries. The results will guide our future efforts in the quantitative analysis of retinal OCT images for the effective use of OCT technologies in the field of ophthalmology. PMID:29065594

  1. Deblurring adaptive optics retinal images using deep convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiao; Zhao, Junlei; Zhao, Haoxin; Yun, Dai; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-12-01

    The adaptive optics (AO) can be used to compensate for ocular aberrations to achieve near diffraction limited high-resolution retinal images. However, many factors such as the limited aberration measurement and correction accuracy with AO, intraocular scatter, imaging noise and so on will degrade the quality of retinal images. Image post processing is an indispensable and economical method to make up for the limitation of AO retinal imaging procedure. In this paper, we proposed a deep learning method to restore the degraded retinal images for the first time. The method directly learned an end-to-end mapping between the blurred and restored retinal images. The mapping was represented as a deep convolutional neural network that was trained to output high-quality images directly from blurry inputs without any preprocessing. This network was validated on synthetically generated retinal images as well as real AO retinal images. The assessment of the restored retinal images demonstrated that the image quality had been significantly improved.

  2. A Qualitative Self-Study of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourie, Robert James

    2007-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a retinal degenerative disease causing progressive blindness. Most research on RP is biomedical, and mostly from an observer perspective, therefore poorly reflecting the lived experience of having RP. Accordingly, the researcher conducted a retrospective qualitative self-study, to analyze reflections on his own…

  3. Retinitis-pigmentosa-like tapetoretinal degeneration in a rabbit breed.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, A; Baar, U

    1985-08-15

    By chance, we found a rabbit strain with retinal dystrophy. The eyes of these rabbits were examined by ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography, histology, and cytology--the latter after retina dissociation with papaine. The results suggest this rabbit strain to be a possible animal model for human retinitis pigmentosa.

  4. Deblurring adaptive optics retinal images using deep convolutional neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Xiao; Zhao, Junlei; Zhao, Haoxin; Yun, Dai; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive optics (AO) can be used to compensate for ocular aberrations to achieve near diffraction limited high-resolution retinal images. However, many factors such as the limited aberration measurement and correction accuracy with AO, intraocular scatter, imaging noise and so on will degrade the quality of retinal images. Image post processing is an indispensable and economical method to make up for the limitation of AO retinal imaging procedure. In this paper, we proposed a deep learning method to restore the degraded retinal images for the first time. The method directly learned an end-to-end mapping between the blurred and restored retinal images. The mapping was represented as a deep convolutional neural network that was trained to output high-quality images directly from blurry inputs without any preprocessing. This network was validated on synthetically generated retinal images as well as real AO retinal images. The assessment of the restored retinal images demonstrated that the image quality had been significantly improved. PMID:29296496

  5. Clinical applications of fundus autofluorescence in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Yung, Madeline; Klufas, Michael A; Sarraf, David

    2016-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a non-invasive retinal imaging modality used in clinical practice to provide a density map of lipofuscin, the predominant ocular fluorophore, in the retinal pigment epithelium. Multiple commercially available imaging systems, including the fundus camera, the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope, and the ultra-widefield imaging device, are available to the clinician. Each offers unique advantages for evaluating various retinal diseases. The clinical applications of FAF continue to expand. It is now an essential tool for evaluating age related macular degeneration, macular dystrophies, retinitis pigmentosa, white dot syndromes, retinal drug toxicities, and various other retinal disorders. FAF may detect abnormalities beyond those detected on funduscopic exam, fluorescein angiography, or optical coherence tomography, and can be used to elucidate disease pathogenesis, form genotype-phenotype correlations, diagnose and monitor disease, and evaluate novel therapies. Given its ease of use, non-invasive nature, and value in characterizing retinal disease, FAF enjoys increasing clinical relevance. This review summarizes common ocular fluorophores, imaging modalities, and FAF findings for a wide spectrum of retinal disorders.

  6. AGGRESSIVE RETINAL ASTROCYTOMAS IN FOUR PATIENTS WITH TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Jerry A; Eagle, Ralph C; Shields, Carol L; Marr, Brian P

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To report the clinical and histopathologic findings of retinal astrocytic tumors that showed progressive growth in four patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Methods Four young children each developed an enlarging retinal neoplasm that eventually necessitated enucleation of the affected eye. The systemic findings, clinical course, and histopathologic findings were reviewed. Results Each patient had a progressively enlarging retinal mass associated with a total exudative retinal detachment and neovascular glaucoma. Enucleation was necessary in each case because the affected eye became blind and painful. The mean patient age at enucleation was 7 years, and the median age was 3 years. At the time of enucleation the tumors ranged from 10 to 20 mm in basal diameter and from 10 to 25 mm in thickness. Histopathologic studies of each eye revealed a giant cell astrocytoma that had produced a total exudative retinal detachment. The tumor cells showed positive immunoreactivity to neuron-specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. The retinal neoplasms in these cases were identical histopathologically to the subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that typifies TSC in the brain. One tumor filled the entire eye and perforated the globe. Although the lesions simulated retinoblastoma clinically, each patient had ocular and systemic findings of TSC, supporting the diagnosis of astrocytic hamartoma. Conclusions Although retinal astrocytic lesions of TSC generally are stationary, they can sometimes grow relentlessly and cause severe ocular complications. Patients with retinal astrocytic hamartomas should have serial ophthalmic evaluations because of this possibility. PMID:15747752

  7. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  8. Neuroprotective Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of memantine in our rat model of laser-induced retinal-lesions. Methods: Argon laser retinal lesions were...inflicted in the eyes of 36 pigmented rats. The treated group received memantine 10 mg/kg dissolved in saline, immediately after exposure to laser and then

  9. Retinal adaptation to dim light vision in spectacled caimans (Caiman crocodilus fuscus): Analysis of retinal ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Karl, Anett; Agte, Silke; Zayas-Santiago, Astrid; Makarov, Felix N; Rivera, Yomarie; Benedikt, Jan; Francke, Mike; Reichenbach, Andreas; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Bringmann, Andreas

    2018-05-19

    It has been shown that mammalian retinal glial (Müller) cells act as living optical fibers that guide the light through the retinal tissue to the photoreceptor cells (Agte et al., 2011; Franze et al., 2007). However, for nonmammalian species it is unclear whether Müller cells also improve the transretinal light transmission. Furthermore, for nonmammalian species there is a lack of ultrastructural data of the retinal cells, which, in general, delivers fundamental information of the retinal function, i.e. the vision of the species. A detailed study of the cellular ultrastructure provides a basic approach of the research. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the retina of the spectacled caimans at electron and light microscopical levels to describe the structural features. For electron microscopy, we used a superfast microwave fixation procedure in order to achieve more precise ultrastructural information than common fixation techniques. As result, our detailed ultrastructural study of all retinal parts shows structural features which strongly indicate that the caiman retina is adapted to dim light and night vision. Various structural characteristics of Müller cells suppose that the Müller cell may increase the light intensity along the path of light through the neuroretina and, thus, increase the sensitivity of the scotopic vision of spectacled caimans. Müller cells traverse the whole thickness of the neuroretina and thus may guide the light from the inner retinal surface to the photoreceptor cell perikarya and the Müller cell microvilli between the photoreceptor segments. Thick Müller cell trunks/processes traverse the layers which contain light-scattering structures, i.e., nerve fibers and synapses. Large Müller cell somata run through the inner nuclear layer and contain flattened, elongated Müller cell nuclei which are arranged along the light path and, thus, may reduce the loss of the light intensity along the retinal light path. The

  10. Regulation of human retinal blood flow by endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Polak, Kaija; Luksch, Alexandra; Frank, Barbara; Jandrasits, Kerstin; Polska, Elzbieta; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-05-01

    There is evidence from in vitro and animal studies that endothelin is a major regulator of retinal blood flow. We set out to characterize the role of the endothelin-system in the blood flow control of the human retina. Two studies in healthy subjects were performed. The study design was randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, balanced, two-way crossover in protocol A and three way-way crossover in protocol B. In protocol A 18 healthy male subjects received intravenous endothelin-1 (ET-1) in a dose of 2.5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) for 30 min or placebo on two different study days and retinal vessel diameters were measured. In protocol B 12 healthy male subjects received ET-1 in stepwise increasing doses of 0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) (each infusion step over 20 min) in co-infusion with the specific ET(A)-receptor antagonist BQ123 (60 microg min (-1)) or placebo or BQ123 alone investigating retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocity and retinal blood flow. Measurements of retinal vessel size were done with the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. Measurements of blood velocities were done with bi-directional laser Doppler velocimetry. From these measurements retinal blood flow was calculated. In protocol A exogenous ET-1 tended to decrease retinal arterial diameter, but this effect was not significant versus placebo. No effect on retinal venous diameter was seen. In protocol B retinal venous blood velocity and retinal blood flow was significantly reduced after administration of exogenous ET-1. These effects were significantly blunted when BQ-123 was co-administered. By contrast, BQ-123 alone had no effect on retinal hemodynamic parameters. Concluding, BQ123 antagonizes the effects of exogenously administered ET-1 on retinal blood flow in healthy subjects. In addition, the results of the present study are compatible with the hypothesis that ET-1 exerts its vasoconstrictor effects in the retina mainly on the microvessels.

  11. Statistical Modeling of Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Amini, Zahra; Rabbani, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model for retinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images is proposed. This statistical model is based on introducing a nonlinear Gaussianization transform to convert the probability distribution function (pdf) of each OCT intra-retinal layer to a Gaussian distribution. The retina is a layered structure and in OCT each of these layers has a specific pdf which is corrupted by speckle noise, therefore a mixture model for statistical modeling of OCT images is proposed. A Normal-Laplace distribution, which is a convolution of a Laplace pdf and Gaussian noise, is proposed as the distribution of each component of this model. The reason for choosing Laplace pdf is the monotonically decaying behavior of OCT intensities in each layer for healthy cases. After fitting a mixture model to the data, each component is gaussianized and all of them are combined by Averaged Maximum A Posterior (AMAP) method. To demonstrate the ability of this method, a new contrast enhancement method based on this statistical model is proposed and tested on thirteen healthy 3D OCTs taken by the Topcon 3D OCT and five 3D OCTs from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patients, taken by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT. Comparing the results with two contending techniques, the prominence of the proposed method is demonstrated both visually and numerically. Furthermore, to prove the efficacy of the proposed method for a more direct and specific purpose, an improvement in the segmentation of intra-retinal layers using the proposed contrast enhancement method as a preprocessing step, is demonstrated.

  12. Frequency Responses of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cloherty, Shaun L.; Hung, Yu-Shan; Kameneva, Tatiana; Ibbotson, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    There are 15–20 different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in the mammalian retina, each encoding different aspects of the visual scene. The mechanism by which post-synaptic signals from the retinal network generate spikes is determined by each cell’s intrinsic electrical properties. Here we investigate the frequency responses of morphologically identified rat RGCs using intracellular injection of sinusoidal current waveforms, to assess their intrinsic capabilities with minimal contributions from the retinal network. Recorded cells were classified according to their morphological characteristics (A, B, C or D-type) and their stratification (inner (i), outer (o) or bistratified) in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Most cell types had low- or band-pass frequency responses. A2, C1 and C4o cells were band-pass with peaks of 15–30 Hz and low-pass cutoffs above 56 Hz (A2 cells) and ~42 Hz (C1 and C4o cells). A1 and C2i/o cells were low-pass with peaks of 10–15 Hz (cutoffs 19–25 Hz). Bistratified D1 and D2 cells were also low-pass with peaks of 5–10 Hz (cutoffs ~16 Hz). The least responsive cells were the B2 and C3 types (peaks: 2–5 Hz, cutoffs: 8–11 Hz). We found no difference between cells stratifying in the inner and outer IPL (i.e., ON and OFF cells) or between cells with large and small somas or dendritic fields. Intrinsic physiological properties (input resistance, spike width and sag) had little impact on frequency response at low frequencies, but account for 30–40% of response variability at frequencies >30 Hz. PMID:27341669

  13. Towards real time speckle controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliedtner, Katharina; Seifert, Eric; Stockmann, Leoni; Effe, Lisa; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Photocoagulation is a laser treatment widely used for the therapy of several retinal diseases. Intra- and inter-individual variations of the ocular transmission, light scattering and the retinal absorption makes it impossible to achieve a uniform effective exposure and hence a uniform damage throughout the therapy. A real-time monitoring and control of the induced damage is highly requested. Here, an approach to realize a real time optical feedback using dynamic speckle analysis is presented. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser is used for coagulation. During coagulation, speckle dynamics are monitored by a coherent object illumination using a 633nm HeNe laser and analyzed by a CMOS camera with a frame rate up to 1 kHz. It is obvious that a control system needs to determine whether the desired damage is achieved to shut down the system in a fraction of the exposure time. Here we use a fast and simple adaption of the generalized difference algorithm to analyze the speckle movements. This algorithm runs on a FPGA and is able to calculate a feedback value which is correlated to the thermal and coagulation induced tissue motion and thus the achieved damage. For different spot sizes (50-200 μm) and different exposure times (50-500 ms) the algorithm shows the ability to discriminate between different categories of retinal pigment epithelial damage ex-vivo in enucleated porcine eyes. Furthermore in-vivo experiments in rabbits show the ability of the system to determine tissue changes in living tissue during coagulation.

  14. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  15. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  16. Computing retinal contour from optical biometry.

    PubMed

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; López-Gil, Norberto; Navarro, Rafael; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, Jose Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To describe a new methodology that derives horizontal posterior retinal contours from partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and ray tracing using the corneal topography. Corneal topography and PCI for seven horizontal visual field eccentricities correspondent to the central 60 degrees of the posterior pole were obtained in 55 myopic eyes. A semicustomized eye model based on the subject's corneal topography and the Navarro eye model was generated using Zemax-EE software. The model was used to compute the optical path length in the seven directions where PCI measurements were obtained. Vitreous chamber depth was computed using the PCI values obtained at each of those directions. Matlab software was developed to fit the best conic curve to the set of points previously obtained. We tested the limit in the accuracy of the methodology when the actual cornea of the subject is not used and for two different lens geometries. A standard eye model can induce an error in the retina sagitta estimation of the order of hundreds of micrometers in comparison with the semicustomized eye model. However, the use of a different lens model leads to an error of the order of tens of micrometers. The apical radius and conic constant of the average fit were -11.91 mm and -0.15, respectively. In general, a nasal-temporal asymmetry in the retina contour was found, showing mean larger values of vitreous chamber depth in the nasal side of the eye. The use of a semicustomized eye model, together with optical path length measured by PCI for different angles, can be used to predict the retinal contour within tenths of micrometers. This methodology can be useful in studies trying to understand the effect of peripheral retinal location on myopia progression as well as modeling the optics of the human eye for a wide field.

  17. Human organotypic retinal flat-mount culture (HORFC) as a model for retinitis pigmentosa11.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh Pormehr, Leila; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadian, Shahin; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shafiezadeh, Mahshid

    2018-05-10

    The splicing factor PRPF31 is the most commonly mutated general splicing factor in the retinitis pigmentosa. We used a rapid, convenient and cost effective transfection method with an efficient PRPF31 knockdown in HORFC in order to study the effect of PRPF31 downregulation on retinal gene expressions in an ex vivo model. Modified calcium phosphate method was used to transfect HORFC by PRPF31 siRNA. Different times and doses of siRNA for transfection were assayed and optimum condition was obtained. PRPF31 mRNA and protein downregulation were assessed by qRTPCR and Western blot. The tissue viability of HORFC was measured using the MTT. ImageJ analysis on stained retinal sections by immunohistochemistry was used for thickness measurement of outer nuclear photoreceptor layer. The PRPF31 gene downregulation effects on retinal specific gene expression were analyzed by qRTPCR. A total of 50 nM of PRPF31 siRNA transfection after 63 h in HORFC, showed the optimum reduction in the level of PRPF31 mRNA and protein as shown by qRTPCR and Western blot (over 90% and 50% respectively). The PRPF31 mRNA silencing with calcium phosphate had no effect on cell viability in the period of the experiment. Thickness measurement of outer nuclear photoreceptor layer with IHC showed the significant reduction after 63 h of study (P value = 0.02). siRNA induced PRPF31 knockdown, led to reduction of retinal specific mRNA gene expression involved in phototransduction (RHO, GNAT1, RP1), photoreceptor structure (ROM1, FSCN2, CA4, SEMA4) and transcription factor (CRX) (fold change >5), after 63 h. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Retinal biometrics based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Tajima, Mikiya; Kawasaki, Ryo; Saito, Koko; Ogohara, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Sunayama, Wataru; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    The pattern of blood vessels in the eye is unique to each person because it rarely changes over time. Therefore, it is well known that retinal blood vessels are useful for biometrics. This paper describes a biometrics method using the Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) based on blood vessel regions in retinal image pairs. The retinal image pairs were rough matched by the center of their optic discs. Moreover, the image pairs were aligned using the Iterative Closest Point algorithm based on detailed blood vessel skeletons. For registration, perspective transform was applied to the retinal images. Finally, the pairs were classified as either correct or incorrect using the JSC of the blood vessel region in the image pairs. The proposed method was applied to temporal retinal images, which were obtained in 2009 (695 images) and 2013 (87 images). The 87 images acquired in 2013 were all from persons already examined in 2009. The accuracy of the proposed method reached 100%.

  19. SPOTTED FEVER GROUP RICKETTSIA RETINITIS IN A TRAVELER TO AFRICA.

    PubMed

    Duval, Renaud; Merrill, Pauline T

    2016-01-01

    To describe a case of rickettsial retinitis in a traveler returning from Africa. Case description. A 67-year-old woman returning from an excursion in the jungles of Africa presented with a 2-day history of floaters and decreased vision in the right eye. In the two preceding weeks, she had experienced fever, malaise, a black eschar on the right elbow, and a rash on her extremities. Examination revealed panuveitis with a solitary, white retinal lesion adjacent to a retinal vessel in the posterior pole of each eye. Extensive diagnostic workup revealed a positive serology for rickettsial antibodies. Her treatment consisted of a course of oral doxycycline. Rickettsial retinitis is an emerging ocular infection in several endemic areas. This case description constitutes the first report of spotted fever group rickettsial retinitis in a traveler to Africa.

  20. Cytomegalovirus retinitis complicating combination therapy with rituximab and fludarabine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas S Y; Cheung, Carol Y M; Yeung, Ian Y L; Hwang, Yu-Yan; Gill, Harinder; Wong, Ian Y; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2015-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is exceptionally rare outside the clinical context of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and organ allografting. In a population where seropositivity for past CMV infection exceeded 90 %, CMV retinitis was observed in five of 138 patients (3.6 %) receiving fludarabine-containing regimens together with rituximab, which was significantly more frequent than in 141 patients receiving fludarabine-containing regimens alone, where no case was observed (P = 0.029). Treatment of CMV retinitis comprised both intravitreal and systemic ganciclovir/foscarnet. Upon recovery, secondary retinal atrophy occurred in all patients, leading to blindness in 86 % of affected eyes. CMV retinitis is an important complication in patients receiving concomitant rituximab and fludarabine-containing regimens.

  1. Retinitis due to opportunistic infections in Iranian HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Ali; Mohraz, Minoo; Rasoulinejad, Mehrnaz; Shariati, Mona; Kheirandish, Parastou; Abdollahi, Maryam; Soori, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    We tried to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of Iranian HIV infected patients with retinitis due to opportunistic infections. In this cross sectional study, we evaluated 106 HIV infected patients via indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination by 90 lens to find retinitis cases. General information and results of ophthalmologic examination were analyzed. Prevalence of retinitis due to opportunistic infections was 6.6%: cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis 1.88%, toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis 1.88% and tuberculosis chorioretinitis 2.83%. CD4 count was higher than 50 cell/µlit in both cases with CMV retinitis. Along with increasing survival in the HIV infected patients, the prevalence of complications such as ocular manifestation due to opportunistic infections are increasing and must be more considered.

  2. Effects of methylprednisolone on laser-induced retinal injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Mordechai; Tchirkov, Marina; Dubinski, Galina; Solberg, Yoram; Belkin, Michael

    1997-05-01

    Methylprednisolone have been demonstrated to ameliorate retinal photic injury. In the current study we examined its effect on laser induced retinal injury. Retinal lesions were inflicted by argon laser in 36 pigmented DA rats. The treated groups received intra-peritoneally methylprednisolone in saline, injected 3 times a day for 2 days, starting immediately after exposure. The controls received the vehicle on the same schedule. The rats were sacrificed 3, 20 or 60 days after laser exposure and the lesions were evaluated by light microscopy and morphometric measurements. Laser injuries were associated with disruption of the outer retinal layers. Three and 20 days after exposure, the loss of the photoreceptor-cell nuclei was significantly milder in the treated groups as compared with controls. There was no difference 60 days after exposure. In conclusion, methylprednisolone reduced temporarily the photoreceptor cell loss in argon laser induced retinal injury, when treatment was started immediately after laser exposure. There was no long term effect.

  3. [Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 associated to pigmentary retinitis].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Caballero, Pedro Enrique; Serviá, Mónica

    2010-07-01

    Ocular disorders are useful in the characterisation of the different types of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA); pigmentary retinitis is an alteration that is specifically associated to SCA type 7 and is characterised by night blindness, sensitivity to glare and progressive narrowing of the visual field. A 34-year-old woman with clinical symptoms of progressive ataxia and visual impairment secondary to pigmentary retinitis. The patient had a personal history with an autosomal dominant pattern of a similar disorder in her father and paternal grandmother. In the genetic study she presented a triplet expansion in the SCA type 2 gene. CONCLUSIONS; Although pigmentary retinitis belongs to the SCA type 7 phenotype, our patient presented this retinal disorder, as in other cases of SCA type 2. A genetic study for SCA type 2 must therefore be conducted in patients with a degenerative ataxic clinical picture and who present evidence of pigmentary retinitis.

  4. Nondiabetic retinal pathology - prevalence in diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nathan; Jackson, Claire; Spurling, Geoffrey; Cranstoun, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of photographic signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology in Australian general practice patients with diabetes. Three hundred and seven patients with diabetes underwent retinal photography at two general practices, one of which was an indigenous health centre. The images were assessed for signs of pathology by an ophthalmologist. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were detected in 31% of subjects with adequate photographs. Features suspicious of glaucoma were detected in 7.7% of subjects. Other abnormalities detected included signs of age related macular degeneration (1.9%), epiretinal membranes (2.4%), vascular pathology (9.6%), chorioretinal lesions (2.9%), and congenital disc anomalies (2.9%). Indigenous Australian patients were more likely to have signs of retinal pathology and glaucoma. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were frequently encountered. In high risk groups, general practice based diabetic retinopathy screening may reduce the incidence of preventable visual impairment, beyond the benefits of detection of diabetic retinopathy alone.

  5. Retinal Origin of Direction Selectivity in the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuefeng; Barchini, Jad; Ledesma, Hector Acaron; Koren, David; Jin, Yanjiao; Liu, Xiaorong; Wei, Wei; Cang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Detecting visual features in the environment such as motion direction is crucial for survival. The circuit mechanisms that give rise to direction selectivity in a major visual center, the superior colliculus (SC), are entirely unknown. Here, we optogenetically isolate the retinal inputs that individual direction-selective SC neurons receive and find that they are already selective as a result of precisely converging inputs from similarly-tuned retinal ganglion cells. The direction selective retinal input is linearly amplified by the intracollicular circuits without changing its preferred direction or level of selectivity. Finally, using 2-photon calcium imaging, we show that SC direction selectivity is dramatically reduced in transgenic mice that have decreased retinal selectivity. Together, our studies demonstrate a retinal origin of direction selectivity in the SC, and reveal a central visual deficit as a consequence of altered feature selectivity in the retina. PMID:28192394

  6. An introduction to OCT in retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) has been available to ophthalmologists for many years and has had a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of many eye conditions. This fast and non-invasive way to image the eye has had a considerable effect on ophthalmic photography services. OCT can be used to assess the structure of the cornea, iris, anterior chamber, optic nerve and retina. This article focuses upon its use in retinal conditions and explores how the technique is used to aid treatment and diagnosis.

  7. Digital Tracking and Control of Retinal Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    combination of Ketamine (35 mg/kg) and Rompan (5.9 mg/kg). The rabbit’s eye was then dilated with Atropine and a speculum inserted to open the eyelid. A...experiments 251 xviii Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Overview Dr. A.J. Welch, Dr. H. Grady Rylander III M.D., and associated researchers have worked toward the...obtain a high contrast image of the retina. Specifically, it is used to image microaneurysms associated with critical retinal diseases long before the

  8. Directional imaging of the retinal cone mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Iglesias, Ignacio; Artal, Pablo

    2004-05-01

    We describe a near-IR scanning laser ophthalmoscope that allows the retinal cone mosaic to be imaged in the human eye in vivo without the use of wave-front correction techniques. The method takes advantage of the highly directional quality of cone photoreceptors that permits efficient coupling of light to individual cones and subsequent detection of most directional components of the backscattered light produced by the light-guiding effect of the cones. We discuss details of the system and describe cone-mosaic images obtained under different conditions.

  9. Histogenesis of retinal dysplasia in trisomy 13

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ada; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Heffner, Reid; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Background Although often associated with holoprosencephaly, little detail of the histopathology of cyclopia is available. Here, we describe the ocular findings in a case of trisomy 13 to better understand the histogenesis of the rosettes, or tubules, characteristic of the retinal dysplasia associated with this condition. Methods A full pediatric autopsy was performed of a near term infant who died shortly after birth from multiple congenital anomalies including fused facial-midline structures. A detailed histopathological study of the ocular structures was performed. The expression of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP), rod opsin, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) were studied by immunohistochemistry. Results Holoprosencephaly, and a spectrum of anatomical findings characteristic of Patau's syndrome, were found. Cytogenetic studies demonstrated trisomy 13 [47, XY, +13]. The eyes were fused but contained two developed separate lenses. In contrast, the cornea, and angle structures were hypoplastic, and the anterior chamber had failed to form. The retina showed areas of normally laminated neural retina, whereas in other areas it was replaced by numerous neuronal rosettes. Histological and immunohistochemical studies revealed that the rosettes were composed of differentiated retinal neurons and Müller cell glia. In normally laminated retina, Shh expression was restricted to retinal-ganglion cells, and to a population of neurons in the inner zone of the outer nuclear layer. In contrast, Shh could not be detected in the dysplastic rosettes. Conclusion The histopathology of cyclopia appears to be more complex than what may have been previously appreciated. In fact, the terms "cyclopia" and "synophthalmia" are misnomers as the underlying mechanism is a failure of the eyes to form separately during development. The rosettes found in the dysplastic retina are fundamentally different than those of retinoblastoma, being

  10. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    PubMed Central

    Ling, R.; James, B.

    1998-01-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be provided, along with the work-up of the differential diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10211348

  11. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    PubMed

    Ling, R; James, B

    1998-10-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be provided, along with the work-up of the differential diagnosis.

  12. Retinal light trapping in textured photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, V. G.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2010-10-01

    We suggest a new structure for light trapping in solar cells which is loosely based on retina of human eye. In this design, the incident light is scattered by noble metal nanoparticles acting as amacrine retinal cells and then is guided and concentrated by conelike structures. We show that the proposed textured structure should lead to a significant enhancement of optical path of trapped light resulting in a higher degree of light conversion into electric current. The proposed design should work efficiently in direct sunlight and in cloudy weather.

  13. Automated measurement of retinal vascular tortuosity.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, W. E.; Goldbaum, M.; Côté, B.; Kube, P.; Nelson, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Automatic measurement of blood vessel tortuosity is a useful capability for automatic ophthalmological diagnostic tools. We describe a suite of automated tortuosity measures for blood vessel segments extracted from RGB retinal images. The tortuosity measures were evaluated in two classification tasks: (1) classifying the tortuosity of blood vessel segments and (2) classifying the tortuosity of blood vessel networks. These tortuosity measures were able to achieve a classification rate of 91% for the first problem and 95% on the second problem, which confirms that they capture much of the ophthalmologists' notion of tortuosity. Images Figure 1 PMID:9357668

  14. Retinal tissue thickness in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Pritchard, Nicola; Sampson, Geoff P; Edwards, Katie; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to investigate full retinal and inner retinal thickness in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Eighty-four individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), 67 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 42 non-diabetic individuals (control group) were enrolled. Participants underwent full retinal thickness evaluation in the central retinal, parafoveal and perifoveal zones and in the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC), using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. As a preliminary step, the key variables of interest - age, sex, diabetic retinopathy (DR), duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels - were analysed and compared between the three groups. Full retinal thickness, RNFL and GCC thicknesses were also compared between the groups. The relationship between the type of diabetes and retinal tissue thickness was explored, adjusting for the five potential confounders. Compared to individuals with T1DM, individuals with T2DM had significantly reduced full retinal thickness in the parafovea and perifovea and reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. The mean differences were six (p = 0.020), seven (p = 0.008), six (p = 0.021) and four micrometres (p = 0.013) for the parafovea, perifovea, RNFL and GCC thicknesses, respectively. Thicknesses within the central zone (p = 0.018) and at the parafovea (p = 0.007) were significantly reduced in T2DM when compared to the control group. After adjusting for age, sex, diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels, the relationship between type of diabetes and retinal tissue thickness was not statistically significant (p > 0.056). Retinal tissue thickness is not significantly different between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, when adjusted for age, sex, diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  15. Evaluation of patient suitability for a retinal prosthesis using structural and functional tests of inner retinal integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuhen; Chowdhury, Vivek; Coroneo, Minas Theodore

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess inner retinal structure and function in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the retina, and electrical stimulation of the retina with a contact lens electrode. OCT images of 17 RP patients were acquired at the macula and at four quadrants of the peripheral retina in both eyes. Analysis was made of the residual inner retinal thickness and nerve fibre layer thickness in RP patients, and this was compared to normal controls. Eight of these patients further underwent contact lens electrical stimulation of one eye and thresholds for phosphene perception were obtained. OCT imaging showed a significant amount of inner retinal preservation in the peripheral retina and the macula of RP patients despite severe visual acuity and visual field loss. Phosphene thresholds were obtained across the range of pulse durations tested but were much higher than those obtained in normal controls. Phosphene thresholds in RP patients moderately correlated with inner retinal thicknesses as measured by OCT. Preservation of inner retinal structure in patients with RP and the responsiveness of these eyes to electrical stimulation suggest adequate inner retinal preservation for a retinal prosthesis to be successful.

  16. Juvenile X-linked retinoschisis presenting as juxtapapillary retinal fold mimicking combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pointdujour-Lim, Renelle; Say, Emil Anthony T; Shields, Carol L

    2017-04-01

    A 21-month-old boy presumptively diagnosed with combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium was found to have juvenile X-linked retinoschisis with vitreomacular traction and prominent retinal folding. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY FINDINGS IN MACULA-INVOLVING CYTOMEGALOVIRUS RETINITIS.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinali P; Patel, Sarju; Orlin, Anton; Marlow, Elizabeth; Chee, Ru-Ik; Nadelmann, Jennifer; Chan, R V Paul; DʼAmico, Donald J; Kiss, Szilard

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the microstructural features of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Subjects were patients with macula-involving CMV retinitis with OCT imaging. The leading edge of retinitis in the macula was identified based on fundus imaging, and OCT findings were longitudinally evaluated in three areas: within the area of active retinitis, at the leading edge of retinitis, and just beyond the leading edge of retinitis. Optical coherence tomography imaging of macular CMV retinitis identified vitreous cells in 10 eyes (100%), posterior vitreous detachment in four eyes (40%), broad-based vitreomacular traction in one eye (10%), epiretinal membrane in eight eyes (80%), and lamellar hole-associated epiretinal proliferation associated with an atrophic hole in one eye (10%). Retinal architectural disruption, disruption of inner retinal layers, disruption of the external limiting membrane, and ellipsoid zone abnormalities were noted within the area of retinitis in all eyes and decreased in frequency and severity at and beyond the leading edge of retinitis, although all 10 eyes (100%) exhibited one of these abnormalities, especially outer retinal microabnormalities, beyond the leading edge of retinitis. Microstructural abnormalities were frequently noted on OCT of CMV retinitis, including within the retina beyond the leading edge of retinitis identified by corresponding fundus imaging. Outer retinal abnormalities were noted more frequently than inner retinal abnormalities beyond the leading edge of retinitis. These findings provide insight into the effects of CMV retinitis on retinal microstructure and potentially on vision and highlight the potential utility of OCT for monitoring microprogression of macula-involving CMV retinitis.

  18. Retinal Prosthesis System for Advanced Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Health Technology Assessment Update

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine; Tu, Hong Anh; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of inherited disorders characterized by the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the retina, resulting in progressive vision loss. The Argus II system is designed to restore partial functional vision in patients with profound vision loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa. At present, it is the only treatment option approved by Health Canada for this patient population. In June 2016, Health Quality Ontario published a health technology assessment of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system for patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Based on that assessment, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee recommended against publicly funding the Argus II system for this population. It also recommended that Health Quality Ontario re-evaluate the evidence in 1 year. The objective of this report was to examine new evidence published since the 2016 health technology assessment. Methods We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences related to the Argus II system. We performed a systematic literature search for studies published since the 2016 Argus II health technology assessment. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the Argus II system compared with standard care, and we calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios over a 20-year time horizon. We also conducted a five-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with retinitis pigmentosa about their lived experience with vision loss, and with the Argus II system. Results Four publications from one multicentre international study were included in the clinical review. Patients showed significant improvements in visual function and functional outcomes with the Argus II system, and these outcomes were sustained up to a 5-year follow-up (moderate quality of evidence). The safety profile was generally acceptable. In

  19. Retinal Connectomics: Towards Complete, Accurate Networks

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Robert E.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Anderson, James R.; Sigulinsky, Crystal; Lauritzen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Connectomics is a strategy for mapping complex neural networks based on high-speed automated electron optical imaging, computational assembly of neural data volumes, web-based navigational tools to explore 1012–1015 byte (terabyte to petabyte) image volumes, and annotation and markup tools to convert images into rich networks with cellular metadata. These collections of network data and associated metadata, analyzed using tools from graph theory and classification theory, can be merged with classical systems theory, giving a more completely parameterized view of how biologic information processing systems are implemented in retina and brain. Networks have two separable features: topology and connection attributes. The first findings from connectomics strongly validate the idea that the topologies complete retinal networks are far more complex than the simple schematics that emerged from classical anatomy. In particular, connectomics has permitted an aggressive refactoring of the retinal inner plexiform layer, demonstrating that network function cannot be simply inferred from stratification; exposing the complex geometric rules for inserting different cells into a shared network; revealing unexpected bidirectional signaling pathways between mammalian rod and cone systems; documenting selective feedforward systems, novel candidate signaling architectures, new coupling motifs, and the highly complex architecture of the mammalian AII amacrine cell. This is but the beginning, as the underlying principles of connectomics are readily transferrable to non-neural cell complexes and provide new contexts for assessing intercellular communication. PMID:24016532

  20. Optoelectronic retinal prosthesis: system design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, J. D.; Simanovskii, D. M.; Vijayraghavan, K.; Sramek, C. K.; Butterwick, A. F.; Huie, P.; McLean, G. Y.; Palanker, D. V.

    2007-03-01

    The design of high-resolution retinal prostheses presents many unique engineering and biological challenges. Ever smaller electrodes must inject enough charge to stimulate nerve cells, within electrochemically safe voltage limits. Stimulation sites should be placed within an electrode diameter from the target cells to prevent 'blurring' and minimize current. Signals must be delivered wirelessly from an external source to a large number of electrodes, and visual information should, ideally, maintain its natural link to eye movements. Finally, a good system must have a wide range of stimulation currents, external control of image processing and the option of either anodic-first or cathodic-first pulses. This paper discusses these challenges and presents solutions to them for a system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a head-mounted near-to-eye projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths. Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by applying a common biphasic bias waveform. The resulting prosthesis will provide stimulation with a frame rate of up to 50 Hz in a central 10° visual field, with a full 30° field accessible via eye movements. Pixel sizes are scalable from 100 to 25 µm, corresponding to 640-10 000 pixels on an implant 3 mm in diameter.

  1. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Chiotan, C; Radu, L; Serban, R; Cornăcel, C; Cioboata, M; Anghel, A

    2014-06-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has the ability to affect any organ in the body. In 70% of HIV-infected patients ocular manifestations were observed, which in the vast majority reflect the systemic disease and may be the first sign of a disseminated infection. The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence and the clinical aspects of cytomegalovirus retinitis in HIV/AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) patients. The study is retrospective, conducted in the Ophthalmology Office of "Matei Bals" Infectious Diseases Hospital in Bucharest during the period August 1, 2007 - August 1, 2013. Each patient was examined thoroughly at the slit lamp biomicroscope by using a lens of 90D and a 20D lens using the indirect microscope after administration of topical mydriatics. 131 patients were followed for HIV / AIDS with posterior segment ocular involvement. 36.64% of the 131 patients having affected the posterior segment have been diagnosed with CMV retinitis. Doctors should be aware of the existence of ocular damage in HIV/AIDS and to emphasize the importance of regular ophthalmologic examination of patients with HIV/AIDS.

  2. Blind source separation in retinal videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; Truitt, Paul W.; Pattichis, Marios S.; Tüso, Dan; Kwon, Young H.; Kardon, Randy H.; Soliz, Peter

    2003-05-01

    An optical imaging device of retina function (OID-RF) has been developed to measure changes in blood oxygen saturation due to neural activity resulting from visual stimulation of the photoreceptors in the human retina. The video data that are collected represent a mixture of the functional signal in response to the retinal activation and other signals from undetermined physiological activity. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1.0% of the total reflected intensity level which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods since it is masked by the other signals that are present. In this paper, we apply principal component analysis (PCA), blind source separation (BSS), using Extended Spatial Decorrelation (ESD) and independent component analysis (ICA) using the Fast-ICA algorithm to extract the functional signal from the retinal videos. The results revealed that the functional signal in a stimulated retina can be detected through the application of some of these techniques.

  3. Endovascular Management of Central Retinal Arterial Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Gala, Nihar B; Baumrind, Benjamin; Hansberry, David R; Thabet, Ahmad M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2016-11-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is an ophthalmologic emergency due to the sudden cessation of circulation to the inner retinal layer. Without immediate treatment, permanent blindness may ensue. Several treatment options exist, ranging from noninvasive medical management to thrombolysis. Nonetheless, ongoing debate exists regarding the best therapeutic strategy. The authors present the case of a 78-year-old woman with a medical history of hypercholesterolemia and rheumatoid arthritis who experienced complete loss of vision in her left eye. Following ophthalmologic evaluation demonstrating left CRAO, anterior chamber paracentesis was performed. Endovascular intervention was performed via local intra-arterial fibrinolysis with alteplase. Her vision returned to 20/20 following the procedure. In general, conventional therapies have not significantly improved patient outcomes. Several management options exist for CRAO. In general, conservative measures have not been reported to yield better patient outcomes as compared to the natural history of this medical emergency. Endovascular approaches are another option as observed with this case reported. In cases of CRAO, therapeutic strategies such as intra-arterial fibrinolysis utilize a local infusion of reactive tissue plasminogen activator directly at the site of occlusion via catheterization of the ophthalmic artery. Although several case series do show promising results after treating CRAO with intra-arterial fibrinolysis, further studies are required given the reports of complications.

  4. Intravitreal memantine retinal toxicity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moreno Páramo, D; Reyna Vielma, S; Rodríguez Reyes, A; Hernández Ayuso, I; Quiroz Mercado, H

    2016-02-01

    To histologically evaluate whether the intravitreal application of memantine produces retinal toxicity in rabbits. A cross-sectional design, experimental, descriptive study was performed on 16 eyes of 16 New Zealand rabbits of 3 kg, divided in 4 groups of 4 rabbits. A dose of 70 ng/ml of intravitreal memantine was administered in Group A, a dose of 150 ng/ml in Group B, a dose of 400 ng/ml in Group C, and Group D received 1 ml of balanced salt solution. The injected eye of half of each group was enucleated 15 days after the injection, and the rest within 30 days after injection. Following enucleation, each eye was placed in 10% formaldehyde. Histopathological analysis was performed on all enucleated eyes. The animals were treated according to the guidelines of the Association for Research on Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO). Groups A, B and D did not show any histopathological changes after their enucleation at 15 and 30 days. Group C showed changes in the photoreceptor layer after enucleation at 15 and 30 days. In our study, it was observed that memantine concentrations at 70 ng/ml and 150 ng/ml are safe when administered intravitreally; however, doses of 400 ng/ml produced retinal structural changes. This research should continue to assess its clinical usefulness. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved photoacoustic dosimetry for retinal laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Suzie; Brown, Robert B.; Gallant, Pascal; Mermut, Ozzy

    2018-02-01

    Lasers are employed for numerous medical interventions by exploiting ablative, disruptive or thermal effects. In ocular procedures, lasers have been used for decades to treat diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, macular edema and aged related macular degeneration via photocoagulation of retinal tissues. Although laser photocoagulation is well established in today's practice, efforts to improve clinical outcomes by reducing the collateral damage from thermal diffusion is leading to novel treatments using shorter (μs) laser pulses (e.g. selective retinal therapy) which result in physical rather than thermal damage. However, for these new techniques to be widely utilized, a method is required to ensure safe but sufficient dosage has been applied, since no visible effects can be seen by ophthalmoscopy directly post treatment. Photoacoustic feedback presents an attractive solution, as the signal is dependent directly on absorbed dosage. Here, we present a method that takes advantage of temporal pulse formatting technology to minimize variation in absorbed dose in ophthalmic laser treatment and provide intelligent dosimetry feedback based on photoacoustic (PA) response. This method tailors the pulse to match the frequency response of the sample and/or detection chain. Depending on the system, this may include the absorbing particle size, the laser beam diameter, the laser pulse duration, tissue acoustic properties and the acoustic detector frequency response. A significant improvement (<7x) of photoacoustic signal-to-noise ratio over equivalent traditional pulse formats have been achieved, while spectral analysis of the detected signal provides indications of cavitation events and other sample properties.

  6. Guidance of retinal axons in mammals.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Eloísa; Erskine, Lynda; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz

    2017-11-26

    In order to navigate through the surrounding environment many mammals, including humans, primarily rely on vision. The eye, composed of the choroid, sclera, retinal pigmented epithelium, cornea, lens, iris and retina, is the structure that receives the light and converts it into electrical impulses. The retina contains six major types of neurons involving in receiving and modifying visual information and passing it onto higher visual processing centres in the brain. Visual information is relayed to the brain via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a projection known as the optic pathway. The proper formation of this pathway during development is essential for normal vision in the adult individual. Along this pathway there are several points where visual axons face 'choices' in their direction of growth. Understanding how these choices are made has advanced significantly our knowledge of axon guidance mechanisms. Thus, the development of the visual pathway has served as an extremely useful model to reveal general principles of axon pathfinding throughout the nervous system. However, due to its particularities, some cellular and molecular mechanisms are specific for the visual circuit. Here we review both general and specific mechanisms involved in the guidance of mammalian RGC axons when they are traveling from the retina to the brain to establish precise and stereotyped connections that will sustain vision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Retinal imaging analysis based on vessel detection.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Arshad; Hazim Alkawaz, Mohammed; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2017-07-01

    With an increase in the advancement of digital imaging and computing power, computationally intelligent technologies are in high demand to be used in ophthalmology cure and treatment. In current research, Retina Image Analysis (RIA) is developed for optometrist at Eye Care Center in Management and Science University. This research aims to analyze the retina through vessel detection. The RIA assists in the analysis of the retinal images and specialists are served with various options like saving, processing and analyzing retinal images through its advanced interface layout. Additionally, RIA assists in the selection process of vessel segment; processing these vessels by calculating its diameter, standard deviation, length, and displaying detected vessel on the retina. The Agile Unified Process is adopted as the methodology in developing this research. To conclude, Retina Image Analysis might help the optometrist to get better understanding in analyzing the patient's retina. Finally, the Retina Image Analysis procedure is developed using MATLAB (R2011b). Promising results are attained that are comparable in the state of art. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Retinal Findings on OCT in Systemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chhablani, Preeti Patil; Ambiya, Vikas; Nair, Akshay G; Bondalapati, Sailaja; Chhablani, Jay

    2017-06-22

    Imaging technology has advanced by leaps and bounds in the recent past and has resulted in a much greater understanding of ocular diseases. The aim of this review article is to summarize optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings of various systemic conditions. A systematic literature search of the Medline/PubMed database was performed. English articles up to April 2015 were included. Terms used for search included: Alzheimer's Disease; Multiple Sclerosis; Parkinson's Disease; Behçet's Disease; Schizophrenia; Migraine; Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome; Neurofibromatosis; Sickle Cell Disease; Renal diseases; Lupus Retinopathy; Valsalva Retinopathy; Whiplash Retinopathy; Shaken-Baby Syndrome; Choroidal metastases; Intracranial Hypertension; Drug toxicity; Deferoxamine; Sildenafil; Tamoxifen; Hydroxychloroquine; Chloroquine; Ethambutol; Lead; Sickle Cell Disease; and Thalassemia along with OCT. Studies have shown that inner retinal thinning could be the earliest sign of neurological diseases and may help to differentiate individuals with abnormalities. Outer retinal damage was noted in cancer-related retinopathy and secondary to drug toxicity as a diagnostic sign. This review article summarizes the OCT findings and their importance in early diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in a varying spectrum of systemic diseases including neurological diseases, hematological diseases, cancer-related retinopathies, and systemic drug toxicity. OCT findings are useful to predict the probability of a disease, to diagnose it early, to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy tissue, and to assess the effect of therapeutic interventions in many systemic diseases.

  9. Wavelength dependence of laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2005-04-01

    The threshold for laser-induced retinal damage is dependent primarily upon the laser wavelength and the exposure duration. The study of the wavelength dependence of the retinal damage threshold has been greatly enhanced by the availability of tunable lasers. The Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO), capable of providing useful pulse energy throughout a tuning range from 400 nm to 2200 nm, made it possible to determine the wavelength dependence of laser-induced retinal damage thresholds for q-switched pulses throughout the visible and NIR spectrum. Studies using the a tunable TI:Saph laser and several fixed-wavelength lasers yielded threshold values for 0.1 s exposures from 440 nm to 1060 nm. Laser-induced retinal damage for these exposure durations results from thermal conversion of the incident laser irradiation and an action spectrum for thermal retinal damage was developed based on the wavelength dependent transmission and absorption of ocular tissue and chromatic aberration of the eye optics. Long (1-1000s) duration exposures to visible laser demonstrated the existence of non-thermal laser-induced retinal damage mechanisms having a different action spectrum. This paper will present the available data for the wavelength dependence of laser-induced thermal retinal damage and compare this data to the maximum permissible exposure levels (MPEs) provided by the current guidelines for the safe use of lasers.

  10. Retinal and visual system: occupational and environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Occupational chemical exposure often results in sensory systems alterations that occur without other clinical signs or symptoms. Approximately 3000 chemicals are toxic to the retina and central visual system. Their dysfunction can have immediate, long-term, and delayed effects on mental health, physical health, and performance and lead to increased occupational injuries. The aims of this chapter are fourfold. First, provide references on retinal/visual system structure, function, and assessment techniques. Second, discuss the retinal features that make it especially vulnerable to toxic chemicals. Third, review the clinical and corresponding experimental data regarding retinal/visual system deficits produced by occupational toxicants: organic solvents (carbon disulfide, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, styrene, toluene, and mixtures) and metals (inorganic lead, methyl mercury, and mercury vapor). Fourth, discuss occupational and environmental toxicants as risk factors for late-onset retinal diseases and degeneration. Overall, the toxicants altered color vision, rod- and/or cone-mediated electroretinograms, visual fields, spatial contrast sensitivity, and/or retinal thickness. The findings elucidate the importance of conducting multimodal noninvasive clinical, electrophysiologic, imaging and vision testing to monitor toxicant-exposed workers for possible retinal/visual system alterations. Finally, since the retina is a window into the brain, an increased awareness and understanding of retinal/visual system dysfunction should provide additional insight into acquired neurodegenerative disorders. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa: Reports of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Emrah; Yilmaz, Turgut; Aydemir, Orhan; Güler, Mete; Kurt, Jülide

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Describing the ophthalmic findings of an exudative vasculopathy called as Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa on three patients. The etiology of the Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa is obscure. The principal theories have been discussed in this article. Methods: Three observational case series have been discussed. Complete ophthalmic examinations and color fundus photos, visual field, and fluorescein angiography have been performed. Results: We have identified 3 patients who have some typical clinical features of Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa; peripheral serous retinal detachment, telangiectasia, prominent lipid deposition, pigmentary changes in peripheral retina, and loss of vision. None of the three patients had positive family history. All of the patients have had symptoms of nyctalopia, decreased central vision, and two of them have had constriction of visual field. All of the patients have had cataracts and two of them underwent cataract surgery. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography of patients revealed typical retinitis pigmentosa with Coats-type changes in bilateral inferiotemporal quadrants. Conclusion: A better understanding of clinical features and genetic etiology of Coats-type retinitis pigmentosa will aid diagnosis and development of new therapies. If sufficient conditions arise, genetic factors that influence the expression of CRB1 mutations in Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa should be detected. PMID:19668510

  12. Arrestin gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, M; Wada, Y; Tamai, M

    1998-04-01

    To assess the clinical and molecular genetic studies of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa associated with a mutation in the arrestin gene. Results of molecular genetic screening and case reports with DNA analysis and clinical features. University medical center. One hundred twenty anamnestically unrelated patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. DNA analysis was performed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by nucleotide sequencing to search for a mutation in exon 11 of the arrestin gene. Clinical features were characterized by visual acuity slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundus examinations, fluorescein angiography, kinetic visual field testing, and electroretinography. We identified 3 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa associated with a homozygous 1-base-pair deletion mutation in codon 309 of the arrestin gene designated as 1147delA. All 3 patients showed pigmentary retinal degeneration in the midperipheral area with or without macular involvement. Patient 1 had a sibling with Oguchi disease associated with the same mutation. Patient 2 demonstrated pigmentary retinal degeneration associated with a golden-yellow reflex in the peripheral fundus. Patients 1 and 3 showed features of retinitis pigmentosa without the golden-yellow fundus reflex. Although the arrestin 1147delA has been known as a frequent cause of Oguchi disease, this mutation also may be related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. This phenomenon may provide evidence of variable expressivity of the mutation in the arrestin gene.

  13. Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa: Reports of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kan, Emrah; Yilmaz, Turgut; Aydemir, Orhan; Güler, Mete; Kurt, Jülide

    2007-06-01

    Describing the ophthalmic findings of an exudative vasculopathy called as Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa on three patients. The etiology of the Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa is obscure. The principal theories have been discussed in this article. Three observational case series have been discussed. Complete ophthalmic examinations and color fundus photos, visual field, and fluorescein angiography have been performed. We have identified 3 patients who have some typical clinical features of Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa; peripheral serous retinal detachment, telangiectasia, prominent lipid deposition, pigmentary changes in peripheral retina, and loss of vision. None of the three patients had positive family history. All of the patients have had symptoms of nyctalopia, decreased central vision, and two of them have had constriction of visual field. All of the patients have had cataracts and two of them underwent cataract surgery. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography of patients revealed typical retinitis pigmentosa with Coats-type changes in bilateral inferiotemporal quadrants. A better understanding of clinical features and genetic etiology of Coats-type retinitis pigmentosa will aid diagnosis and development of new therapies. If sufficient conditions arise, genetic factors that influence the expression of CRB1 mutations in Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa should be detected.

  14. Screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin

    2009-02-01

    Transplant technologies have been studied for the recovery of vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In several rodent retinal degeneration models and in patients, retinal progenitor cells transplanted as layers to the subretinal space have been shown to restore or preserve vision. The methods for evaluation of transplants are expensive considering the large amount of animals. Alternatively, time-domain Stratus OCT was previously shown to be able to image the morphological structure of transplants to some extent, but could not clearly identify laminated transplants. The efficacy of screening retinal transplants with Fourier-domain OCT was studied on 37 S334ter line 3 rats with retinal degeneration 6-67 days after transplant surgery. The transplants were morphologically categorized as no transplant, detachment, rosettes, small laminated area and larger laminated area with both Fourier-domain OCT and histology. The efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants was evaluated by comparing the categorization results with OCT and histology. Additionally, 4 rats were randomly selected for multiple OCT examinations (1, 5, 9, 14 and 21days post surgery) in order to determine the earliest image time of OCT examination since the transplanted tissue may need some time to show its tendency of growing. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of Fourier-domain OCT in screening retinal transplants in early stages and determined the earliest imaging time for OCT. Fourier-domain OCT makes itself valuable in saving resource spent on animals with unsuccessful transplants.

  15. LONGITUDINAL STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN LATE-ONSET RETINAL DEGENERATION.

    PubMed

    Cukras, Catherine; Flamendorf, Jason; Wong, Wai T; Ayyagari, Radha; Cunningham, Denise; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    To characterize longitudinal structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Two affected siblings, both with a S163R missense mutation in the causative gene C1QTNF5, were followed for 8+ years. Color fundus photos, fundus autofluorescence images, near-infrared reflectance fundus images, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scans were acquired during follow-up. Both patients, aged 45 and 50 years, had good visual acuities (>20/20) in the context of prolonged dark adaptation. Baseline color fundus photography demonstrated yellow-white, punctate lesions in the temporal macula that correlated with a reticular pattern on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Baseline spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging revealed subretinal deposits that resemble reticular pseudodrusen described in age-related macular degeneration. During follow-up, these affected areas developed confluent thickening of the retinal pigment epithelial layer and disruption of the ellipsoid zone of photoreceptors before progressing to overt retinal pigment epithelium and outer retinal atrophy. Structural changes in early stages of late-onset retinal degeneration, revealed by multimodal imaging, resemble those of reticular pseudodrusen observed in age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases. Longitudinal follow-up of these lesions helps elucidate their progression to frank atrophy and may lend insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying diverse retinal degenerations.

  16. Snapshot hyperspectral retinal imaging using compact spectral resolving detector array.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Wenzhong; Dong, Biqin; Kaluzny, Joel V; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2017-06-01

    Hyperspectral retinal imaging captures the light spectrum from each imaging pixel. It provides spectrally encoded retinal physiological and morphological information, which could potentially benefit diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of retinal diseases. The key challenges in hyperspectral retinal imaging are how to achieve snapshot imaging to avoid motions between the images from multiple spectral bands, and how to design a compact snapshot imager suitable for clinical use. Here, we developed a compact, snapshot hyperspectral fundus camera for rodents using a novel spectral resolving detector array (SRDA), on which a thin-film Fabry-Perot cavity filter was monolithically fabricated on each imaging pixel. We achieved hyperspectral retinal imaging with 16 wavelength bands (460 to 630 nm) at 20 fps. We also demonstrated false-color vessel contrast enhancement and retinal oxygen saturation (sO 2 ) measurement through spectral analysis. This work could potentially bring hyperspectral retinal imaging from bench to bedside. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Genetic characterization and disease mechanism of retinitis pigmentosa; current scenario.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang; Yuan, Ping Xi

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetically transmitted disorders affecting 1 in 3000-8000 individual people worldwide ultimately affecting the quality of life. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized as a heterogeneous genetic disorder which leads by progressive devolution of the retina leading to a progressive visual loss. It can occur in syndromic (with Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome) as well as non-syndromic nature. The mode of inheritance can be X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. To date 58 genes have been reported to associate with retinitis pigmentosa most of them are either expressed in photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. This review focuses on the disease mechanisms and genetics of retinitis pigmentosa. As retinitis pigmentosa is tremendously heterogeneous disorder expressing a multiplicity of mutations; different variations in the same gene might induce different disorders. In recent years, latest technologies including whole-exome sequencing contributing effectively to uncover the hidden genesis of retinitis pigmentosa by reporting new genetic mutations. In future, these advancements will help in better understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of disease and likely to develop new therapies.

  18. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature.

  19. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H.; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  20. Retinal tear: an unusual complication of ocular toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ali Riza Cenk; Kilavuzoglu, Ayse Ebru; Altiparmak, Ugur Emrah; Cosar, Cemile Banu; Ozkiris, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    It is aimed to report on a 16-year-old patient with acquired ocular toxoplasmosis complicated by a retinal tear. Retrospective medical chart review. A 16-year-old Caucasian female presented with vision loss in her right eye. In addition to a white active lesion between the fovea and the optic nerve head, marked vitreous opacification was noted. She was diagnosed with ocular toxoplasmosis. The patient was treated with oral azithromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. One month later, retinochoroiditis resolved and vitreous cleared. Three months after onset, patient presented with floaters in the right eye and a retinal tear was located at the temporal region of the retina. Prophylactic argon laser treatment that encircled the retinal tear was performed. No other abnormalities were noted during 6 months of follow-up. Retinal tear associated with ocular toxoplasmosis is rare; however, a retinal tear can occur due to vitreoretinal traction following post-inflammatory structural alteration of the vitreous. Retinal tears may be seen during the healing phase, when the inflammation turns into tightening of vitreous substance. Careful retinal examination in cases of ocular toxoplasmosis is warranted, especially in patients with severe vitreous inflammation.

  1. Abnormal vascularization in mouse retina with dysregulated retinal cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Omarova, Saida; Charvet, Casey D.; Reem, Rachel E.; Mast, Natalia; Zheng, Wenchao; Huang, Suber; Peachey, Neal S.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a link between age-related macular degeneration and retinal cholesterol maintenance. Cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitously expressed mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase that plays an important role in the metabolism of cholesterol and cholesterol-related compounds. We conducted a comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation of mice lacking CYP27A1. We found that the loss of CYP27A1 led to dysregulation of retinal cholesterol homeostasis, including unexpected upregulation of retinal cholesterol biosynthesis. Cyp27a1–/– mice developed retinal lesions characterized by cholesterol deposition beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. Further, Cyp27a1-null mice showed pathological neovascularization, which likely arose from both the retina and the choroid, that led to the formation of retinal-choroidal anastomosis. Blood flow alterations and blood vessel leakage were noted in the areas of pathology. The Cyp27a1–/– retina was hypoxic and had activated Müller cells. We suggest a mechanism whereby abolished sterol 27-hydroxylase activity leads to vascular changes and identify Cyp27a1–/– mice as a model for one of the variants of type 3 retinal neovascularization occurring in some patients with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:22820291

  2. Retinal oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Eri; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Sato, Shino; Ukegawa, Kaori; Nakano, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2017-08-01

    This study compared retinal vessel oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery. Retinal oxygen saturation in glaucoma patients was measured using a non-invasive spectrophotometric retinal oximeter. Adequate image quality was found in 49 of the 108 consecutive glaucoma patients recruited, with 30 undergoing trabeculectomy, 11 EX-PRESS and eight trabeculotomy. Retinal oxygen saturation measurements in the retinal arterioles and venules were performed at 1 day prior to and at approximately 10 days after surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. After glaucoma surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased from 19.8 ± 7.7 mmHg to 9.0 ± 5.7 mmHg (p < 0.001). Although oxygen saturation in retinal arterioles remained unchanged before and after surgery (104.7 ± 10.6% before and 105.4 ± 9.3% after surgery, p = 0.58), the oxygen saturation in the venules increased from 54.9 ± 7.4% to 57.4 ± 5.7% (p = 0.01). Intraocular pressure (IOP) decreases caused by glaucoma surgery had an effect on the retinal venous oxygen saturation. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Retinal compensatory changes after light damage in albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Soler, Luis; Alarcón-Martínez, Luis; Jiménez-López, Manuel; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Galindo-Romero, Caridad; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrízio; García-Ayuso, Diego; Avilés-Trigueros, Marcelino; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anatomic and functional changes triggered by light exposure in the albino mouse retina and compare them with those observed in the albino rat. Methods BALB/c albino mice were exposed to 3,000 lx of white light during 24 h and their retinas analyzed from 1 to 180 days after light exposure (ALE). Left pupil mydriasis was induced with topical atropine. Retinal function was analyzed by electroretinographic (ERG) recording. To assess retinal degeneration, hematoxylin and eosin staining, the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique, and quantitative immunohistofluorescence for synaptophysin and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) were used in cross sections. Intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase and Fluoro-Gold™ tracing were used in whole-mounted retinas to study the retinal vasculature and the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population, respectively. Results Light exposure caused apoptotic photoreceptor death in the central retina. This death was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina, sparing the periphery. Neither retinal vascular leakage nor retinal ganglion cell death was observed ALE. The electroretinographic a-wave was permanently impaired, while the b-wave decreased but recovered gradually by 180 days ALE. The scotopic threshold responses, associated with the inner retinal function, diminished at first but recovered completely by 14 days ALE. This functional recovery was concomitant with the upregulation of protein kinase Cα and synaptophysin. Similar results were obtained in both eyes, irrespective of mydriasis. Conclusions In albino mice, light exposure induces substantial retinal damage, but the surviving photoreceptors, together with compensatory morphological/molecular changes, allow an important restoration of the retinal function. PMID:22509098

  4. The effect of autoimmune retinopathy on retinal vessel oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Waizel, Maria; Türksever, Cengiz; Todorova, Margarita G

    2018-05-22

    To study the retinal vessel oxygen saturation alterations in patients with autoimmune retinopathy (AIR) and patients with autoimmune retinopathy associated with retinitis pigmentosa (AIR-RP) in comparison with healthy controls and patients with isolated retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Prospective, cross-sectional, and non-interventional study. Retinal vessel oximetry (RO) was performed on a total of 139 eyes: six eyes suffering from AIR and four eyes with AIR-RP were compared to 59 healthy control eyes and to 70 eyes with RP. A computer-based program of the retinal vessel analyser unit (IMEDOS Systems UG, Jena, Germany) was used to evaluate retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The mean oxygen saturation in the first and second branch retinal arterioles (A-SO 2 ) and venules (V-SO 2 ) were measured and their difference (A-V SO 2 ) was calculated. In addition, we measured the diameter of the retinal arterioles (D-A) and venules (D-V). Oxygen metabolism is altered in patients with isolated AIR and AIR-RP. Both, AIR and AIR-RP groups, differed from healthy controls showing significantly higher V-SO 2 values and significantly lower A-V SO 2 values (p < 0.025). In addition, the AIR-RP group could be differentiated from eyes suffering from isolated RP by means of significantly higher V-SO 2 values. Comparing retinal vessel diameters, both, the AIR and AIR-RP groups, presented with significant arterial (p = 0.05) and venular (p < 0.03) vessel attenuation than the healthy control group. Based on our results, in analogy to patients suffering from RP, oxygen metabolism seems to be altered in AIR patients.

  5. Obesity, Blood Pressure, and Retinal Vessels: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Köchli, Sabrina; Endes, Katharina; Infanger, Denis; Zahner, Lukas; Hanssen, Henner

    2018-06-01

    Retinal vessel imaging is a noninvasive diagnostic tool used to evaluate cardiovascular risk. Childhood obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) are associated with retinal microvascular alterations. To systematically review and meta-analyze associations between obesity, BP, and physical activity with retinal vessel diameters in children. We conducted a literature search through the databases of PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. School- and population-based cross-sectional data. General information, study design, participants, exposure, and outcomes. A total of 1751 studies were found, and 30 full-text articles were analyzed for eligibility. Twenty-two articles (18 865 children and adolescents) were used for further assessment and reflection. Eleven articles were finally included in the meta-analysis. We found that a higher BMI is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar (pooled estimate effect size -0.37 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.50 to -0.24]) and wider venular diameters (0.35 [95% CI: 0.07 to 0.63]). Systolic and diastolic BP are associated with retinal arteriolar narrowing (systolic BP: -0.63 [95% CI: -0.92 to -0.34]; diastolic BP: -0.60 [95% CI -0.95 to -0.25]). Increased physical activity and fitness are associated with favorable retinal vessel diameters. Long-term studies are needed to substantiate the prognostic relevance of retinal vessel diameters for cardiovascular risk in children. Our results indicate that childhood obesity, BP, and physical inactivity are associated with retinal microvascular abnormalities. Retinal vessel diameters seem to be sensitive microvascular biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification in children. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  7. Fundus spectroscopy and studies in retinal oximetry using intravitreal illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, David Alan

    This dissertation documents the development of a new illumination technique for use in the studies of retinal oximetry and fundus spectroscopy. Intravitreal illumination is a technique where the back of the eye is illuminated trans-sclerally using a scanning monochromator coupled into a fiber optic illuminator. Retinal oximetry is the process of measuring the oxygen saturation of blood contained in retinal vessels by quantitative measurement of the characteristic color shift seen as blood oxygen saturation changes from oxygenated blood (reddish) to deoxygenated blood (bluish). Retinal oximetry was first attempted in 1963 but due to a variety of problems with accuracy and difficulty of measurement, has not matured to the point of clinical acceptability or commercial viability. Accurate retinal oximetry relies in part on an adequate understanding of the spectral reflectance characteristics of the fundus. The use of intravitreal illumination allows new investigations into the spectral reflectance properties of the fundus. The results of much research in fundus reflectance and retinal oximetry is detailed in this document, providing new insight into both of these related fields of study. Intravitreal illumination has been used to study retinal vessel oximetry and fundus reflectometry resulting in several important findings that are presented in this document. Studies on enucleated swine eyes have provided new insight into the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the fundus. Research on live swine has shown accurate measurement of retinal vessel oxygen saturation and provided the first in vivo spectral transmittance measurement of the sensory retina. A secondary discovery during this research suggests that vitrectomy alters the retinal vasculature, an finding that should spawn new research in its own right.

  8. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine; Pratt, Thomas; Liu, Min; Jeffery, Glen; Price, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey) and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+) showed that