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Sample records for 11-cis retinal chromophore

  1. Effects of Infrared Laser Radiation on the In Vitro Isomerization of All-Trans Retinal to 11-Cis Retinal

    PubMed Central

    Liegner, J.; Taboada, J.; Tsin, A. T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro effect of infrared laser light on the isomerization of all-trans retinal dissolved in an ether/hexane and also an ethanol solvent was studied. Pulsed laser energy at 1064 nm was used to drive the molecular reconfiguration of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the conversion. Overall isomerization was minimal (0.2 percent to 1.0 percent), yet, a significant difference in isomerization due to pulsed infrared laser energy over non-modulated monochromatic laser light was detected (up to 168 percent difference). Potentially, pulsed laser radiation tuned to the ethylenic stretch frequency of the C11=C12 bond of retinal may induce rotational changes to the chromophore. PMID:26321787

  2. Low aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinal limits the rate of pigment formation and dark adaptation in salamander rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Boyer, Nicholas P; Nickle, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Kalyan S; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K; Oprian, Daniel; Cornwall, M Carter

    2012-06-01

    We report experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinoids plays a significant role in the rate of visual pigment regeneration. Therefore, we have compared the aqueous solubility and the partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes of native 11-cis-retinal and an analogue retinoid, 11-cis 4-OH retinal, which has a significantly higher solubility in aqueous medium. We have then correlated these parameters with the rates of pigment regeneration and sensitivity recovery that are observed when bleached intact salamander rod photoreceptors are treated with physiological solutions containing these retinoids. We report the following results: (a) 11-cis 4-OH retinal is more soluble in aqueous buffer than 11-cis-retinal. (b) Both 11-cis-retinal and 11-cis 4-OH retinal have extremely high partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes, though the partition coefficient of 11-cis-retinal is roughly 50-fold greater than that of 11-cis 4-OH retinal. (c) Intact bleached isolated rods treated with solutions containing equimolar amounts of 11-cis-retinal or 11-cis 4-OH retinal form functional visual pigments that promote full recovery of dark current, sensitivity, and response kinetics. However, rods treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal regenerated on average fivefold faster than rods treated with 11-cis-retinal. (d) Pigment regeneration from recombinant and wild-type opsin in solution is slower when treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal than with 11-cis-retinal. Based on these observations, we propose a model in which aqueous solubility of cis-retinoids within the photoreceptor cytosol can place a limit on the rate of visual pigment regeneration in vertebrate photoreceptors. We conclude that the cytosolic gap between the plasma membrane and the disk membranes presents a bottleneck for retinoid flux that results in slowed pigment regeneration and dark adaptation in rod photoreceptors.

  3. Ultrashort IR Laser Pulse Isomerization Of All-Trans Retinal To 11 CIS Retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, J.; Liegner, J.; Tsin, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    The mammalian ocular system possesses a significant IR transmission window between the longest visually detectable light wavelength at 700 nm and the cut off water absorption band at 1400 nm. This near IR optical band may provide a channel for controlling vision processes. Of particular interest is the regeneration process which involves the re -Wmerization of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal and the molecular recoupling of retinal with opsin.". This re-isomerization, moving against potential energy gradient, is the rate limiting step is assumed to involve either a vitamin A intermediate or a directly applied enzyme, "isomerase"). The concept investigated in this study concerns the possibility of directly influencing the isomerization process by ultrashort IR laser pulses.

  4. 11-cis retinal torsion: A QTAIM and stress tensor analysis of the S1 excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, Julio R.; Jenkins, Samantha; Kirk, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate torsion about the C11-C12 bond mid-point for the S1 state of 11-cis retinal, using a QTAIM and stress tensor analysis. The QTAIM and stress tensor responses to a torsion ±α increase at a faster rate for the preferred direction of torsion though the CI seam. A QTAIM and stress tensor vector-based analysis provides an alternative way of characterising the asymmetry of the S1 potential energy surface. In the vicinity of the CI seam the ellipticity ε attained minimum values. The application of this analysis to molecular rotary motors is briefly discussed.

  5. Retinal degeneration associated with RDH12 mutations results from decreased 11-cis retinal synthesis due to disruption of the visual cycle.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Debra A; Janecke, Andreas R; Lange, Jessica; Feathers, Kecia L; Hübner, Christian A; McHenry, Christina L; Stockton, David W; Rammesmayer, Gabriele; Lupski, James R; Antinolo, Guillermo; Ayuso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Gouras, Peter; Heckenlively, John R; den Hollander, Anneke; Jacobson, Samuel G; Lewis, Richard A; Sieving, Paul A; Wissinger, Bernd; Yzer, Suzanne; Zrenner, Eberhart; Utermann, Gerd; Gal, Andreas

    2005-12-15

    Retinoid dehydrogenases/reductases catalyze key oxidation-reduction reactions in the visual cycle that converts vitamin A to 11-cis retinal, the chromophore of the rod and cone photoreceptors. It has recently been shown that mutations in RDH12, encoding a retinol dehydrogenase, result in severe and early-onset autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy (arRD). In a cohort of 1011 individuals diagnosed with arRD, we have now identified 20 different disease-associated RDH12 mutations, of which 16 are novel, in a total of 22 individuals (2.2%). Haplotype analysis suggested a founder mutation for each of the three common mutations: p.L99I, p.T155I and c.806_810delCCCTG. Patients typically presented with early disease that affected the function of both rods and cones and progressed to legal blindness in early adulthood. Eleven of the missense variants identified in our study exhibited profound loss of catalytic activity when expressed in transiently transfected COS-7 cells and assayed for ability to convert all-trans retinal to all-trans retinol. Loss-of-function appeared to result from decreased protein stability, as expression levels were significantly reduced. For the p.T49M variant, differing activity profiles were associated with each of the alleles of the common p.R161Q RDH12 polymorphism, suggesting that genetic background may act as a modifier of mutation effect. A locus (LCA3) for Leber congenital amaurosis, a severe, early-onset form of arRD, maps close to RDH12 on chromosome 14q24. Haplotype analysis in the family in which LCA3 was mapped excluded RDH12 as the LCA3 gene and thus suggests the presence of a novel arRD gene in this region.

  6. Measurements of the stabilities of isolated retinal chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musbat, L.; Nihamkin, M.; Toker, Y.; Dilger, J. M.; Fuller, D. R.; El-Baba, T. J.; Clemmer, D. E.; Sarkar, S.; Kronik, L.; Hirshfeld, A.; Friedman, N.; Sheves, M.

    2017-01-01

    The barrier energies for isomerization and fragmentation were measured for a series of retinal chromophore derivatives using a tandem ion mobility spectrometry approach. These measurements allow us to quantify the effect of charge delocalization on the rigidity of chromophores. We find that the role of the methyl group on the C 13 position is pivotal regarding the ground state dynamics of the chromophore. Additionally, a correlation between quasi-equilibrium isomer distribution and fragmentation pathways is observed.

  7. Location of the retinal chromophore in the activated state of rhodopsin*.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shivani; Crocker, Evan; Eilers, Markus; Hornak, Viktor; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Ziliox, Martine; Syrett, Natalie; Reeves, Philip J; Khorana, H Gobind; Sheves, Mordechai; Smith, Steven O

    2009-04-10

    Rhodopsin is a highly specialized G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated by the rapid photochemical isomerization of its covalently bound 11-cis-retinal chromophore. Using two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we defined the position of the retinal in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Distance constraints were obtained between amino acids in the retinal binding site and specific (13)C-labeled sites located on the beta-ionone ring, polyene chain, and Schiff base end of the retinal. We show that the retinal C20 methyl group rotates toward the second extracellular loop (EL2), which forms a cap on the retinal binding site in the inactive receptor. Despite the trajectory of the methyl group, we observed an increase in the C20-Gly(188) (EL2) distance consistent with an increase in separation between the retinal and EL2 upon activation. NMR distance constraints showed that the beta-ionone ring moves to a position between Met(207) and Phe(208) on transmembrane helix H5. Movement of the ring toward H5 was also reflected in increased separation between the Cepsilon carbons of Lys(296) (H7) and Met(44) (H1) and between Gly(121) (H3) and the retinal C18 methyl group. Helix-helix interactions involving the H3-H5 and H4-H5 interfaces were also found to change in the formation of metarhodopsin II reflecting increased retinal-protein interactions in the region of Glu(122) (H3) and His(211) (H5). We discuss the location of the retinal in metarhodopsin II and its interaction with sequence motifs, which are highly conserved across the pharmaceutically important class A GPCR family, with respect to the mechanism of receptor activation.

  8. RDH13L, an enzyme responsible for the aldehyde-alcohol redox coupling reaction (AL-OL coupling reaction) to supply 11-cis retinal in the carp cone retinoid cycle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Miyazono, Sadaharu; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru

    2015-01-30

    Cone photoreceptors require effective pigment regeneration mechanisms to maintain their sensitivity in the light. Our previous studies in carp cones suggested the presence of an unconventional and very effective mechanism to produce 11-cis retinal, the necessary component in pigment regeneration. In this reaction (aldehyde-alcohol redox coupling reaction, AL-OL coupling reaction), formation of 11-cis retinal, i.e. oxidation of 11-cis retinol is coupled to reduction of an aldehyde at a 1:1 molar ratio without exogenous NADP(H) which is usually required in this kind of reaction. Here, we identified carp retinol dehydrogenase 13-like (RDH13L) as an enzyme catalyzing the AL-OL coupling reaction. RDH13L was partially purified from purified carp cones, identified as a candidate protein, and its AL-OL coupling activity was confirmed using recombinant RDH13L. We further examined the substrate specificity, subcellular localization, and expression level of RDH13L. Based on these results, we concluded that RDH13L contributes to a significant part, but not all, of the AL-OL coupling activity in carp cones. RDH13L contained tightly bound NADP(+) which presumably functions as a cofactor in the reaction. Mouse RDH14, a mouse homolog of carp RDH13L, also showed the AL-OL coupling activity. Interestingly, although carp cone membranes, carp RDH13L and mouse RDH14 all showed the coupling activity at 15-37 °C, they also showed a conventional NADP(+)-dependent 11-cis retinol oxidation activity above 25 °C without addition of aldehydes. This dual mechanism of 11-cis retinal synthesis attained by carp RDH13L and mouse RDH14 probably contribute to effective pigment regeneration in cones that function in the light.

  9. S1 and S2 excited states of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores: a time-dependent density functional theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Ding, Yong; Cui, Ganglong; Liu, Yajun

    2007-04-19

    In concert with the recent photoabsorption experiments of gas-phase Schiff-base retinal chromophores (Nielsen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 018304), quantum chemical calculations using time-dependent density functional theory coupled with different functionals and under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation were made on the first two excited states (S1 and S2) of two retinal chromophores: 11-cis and all-trans protonated Schiff bases. The calculated vertical excitation energies (Tv) and oscillator strengths (f) are consistent with the experimental absorption bands. The experimentally observed phenomenon that the transition dipole moment (mu) of S2 is much smaller that of S1 was interpreted by 3D representation of transition densities. The different optical behaviors (linear and nonlinear optical responds) of the excited states were investigated by considering different strengths of external electric fields.

  10. Regeneration of bovine and octopus opsins in situ with natural and artificial retinals

    SciTech Connect

    Koutalos, Y.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.; Odashima, K.; Lien, T.; Park, M.H.; Shimizu, N.; Derguini, F.; Nakanishi, K.; Gilson, H.R.; Honig, B. )

    1989-03-21

    The authors consider the problem of color regulation in visual pigments for both bovine rhodopsin and octopus rhodopsin. Both pigments have 11-cis-retinal as their chromophore. These rhodopsins were bleached in their native membranes, and the opsins were regenerated with natural and artificial chromophores. Both bovine and octopus opsins were regenerated with the 9-cis- and 11-cis-retinal isomers, but the octopus opsin was additionally regenerated with the 13-cis and all-trans isomers. Titration of the octopus opsin with 11-cis-retinal gave an extinction coefficient for octopus rhodopsin of 27,000 {plus minus} 3,000 M{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} at 475 nm. The absorption maxima of bovine artificial pigments formed by regenerating opsin with the 11-cis dihydro series of chromophores support a color regulation model for bovine rhodopsin in which the chromophore-binding site of the protein has two negative charges: one directly hydrogen bonded to the Schiff base nitrogen and another near carbon-13. Formation of octopus artificial pigments with both all-trans and 11-cis dihydro chromophores leads to a similar model for octopus rhodopsin and metarhodopsin: there are two negative charges in the chromophore-binding site, one directly hydrogen bonded to the Schiff base nitrogen and a second near carbon-13. The interaction of this second charge with the chromophore in octopus rhodopsin is weaker than in bovine, while in metarhodopsin it is as strong as in bovine.

  11. Optomechanical Control of Quantum Yield in Trans-Cis Ultrafast Photoisomerization of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Alessio; Rivero, Daniel; Zapata, Felipe; García-Iriepa, Cristina; Marazzi, Marco; Palmeiro, Raúl; Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Sampedro, Diego; Olivucci, Massimo; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2017-03-27

    The quantum yield of a photochemical reaction is one of the most fundamental quantities in photochemistry, as it measures the efficiency of the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Nature has evolved photoreceptors in which the reactivity of a chromophore is enhanced by its molecular environment to achieve high quantum yields. The retinal chromophore sterically constrained inside rhodopsin proteins represents an outstanding example of such a control. In a more general framework, mechanical forces acting on a molecular system can strongly modify its reactivity. Herein, we show that the exertion of tensile forces on a simplified retinal chromophore model provokes a substantial and regular increase in the trans-to-cis photoisomerization quantum yield in a counterintuitive way, as these extension forces facilitate the formation of the more compressed cis photoisomer. A rationale for the mechanochemical effect on this photoisomerization mechanism is also proposed.

  12. The chromophore retinal hinders passive proton/hydroxide ion translocation through bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Burghaus, P.A.; Dencher, N.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to examine any influence of the chromophore retinal in bacteriorhodopsin (BR) on the passive proton/hydroxide ion flux through this integral membrane protein. BR was reconstituted into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)-phosphatidylserine or DMPC-dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol unilamellar vesicles with molar lipid to protein ratios ranging from 30 to 150. The entrapped fluorescence dye pyranine served as a reliable indicator of the internal proton concentration. Transmembrane pH-gradients were quickly established across the vesicular membrane and the kinetics of the induced fluorescence changes were compared for vesicles with incorporated native BR, BR bleached to the chromophore-free protein bacterioopsin, and BR regenerated from bacterioopsin with all-trans-retinal, respectively. For aggregated protein molecules, the H+/OH- diffusion across bacterioopsin was always considerably faster than that through the protein containing covalently bound retinal. The decay rate of the imposed pH-gradient was 4.4-9.1 and 2.0-5.1 times slower for native and regenerated BR, respectively, as compared to bacterioopsin. Stepwise regeneration of bacterioopsin with all-trans-retinal revealed a linear dependence of the predominant delta pH-decay time on the degree of regeneration. Essentially the same observations were made with monomeric protein molecules in vesicular lipid membranes. The results demonstrate that the chromophore retinal itself blocks the H+/OH- conducting pathway across the transmembrane protein BR or indirectly controls this path by inducing conformational changes in the protein upon binding.

  13. Direct measurement of the isomerization barrier of the isolated retinal chromophore.

    PubMed

    Dilger, Jonathan; Musbat, Lihi; Sheves, Mordechai; Bochenkova, Anastasia V; Clemmer, David E; Toker, Yoni

    2015-04-13

    Isomerizations of the retinal chromophore were investigated using the IMS-IMS technique. Four different structural features of the chromophore were observed, isolated, excited collisionally, and the resulting isomer and fragment distributions were measured. By establishing the threshold activation voltages for isomerization for each of the reaction pathways, and by measuring the threshold activation voltage for fragmentation, the relative energies of the isomers as well as the energy barriers for isomerization were determined. The energy barrier for a single cis-trans isomerization is (0.64±0.05) eV, which is significantly lower than that observed for the reaction within opsin proteins.

  14. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  15. Molecular bases for the selection of the chromophore of animal rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Melaccio, Federico; Rinaldi, Silvia; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The functions of microbial and animal rhodopsins are triggered by the isomerization of their all-trans and 11-cis retinal chromophores, respectively. To lay the molecular basis driving the evolutionary transition from the all-trans to the 11-cis chromophore, multiconfigurational quantum chemistry is used to compare the isomerization mechanisms of the sensory rhodopsin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 (ASR) and of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh). It is found that, despite their evolutionary distance, these eubacterial and vertebrate rhodopsins start to isomerize via distinct implementations of the same bicycle-pedal mechanism originally proposed by Warshel [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260:678–683]. However, by following the electronic structure changes of ASR (featuring the all-trans chromophore) during the isomerization, we find that ASR enters a region of degeneracy between the first and second excited states not found in Rh (featuring the 11-cis chromophore). We show that such degeneracy is modulated by the preorganized structure of the chromophore and by the position of the reactive double bond. It is argued that the optimization of the electronic properties of the chromophore, which affects the photoisomerization efficiency and the thermal isomerization barrier, provided a key factor for the emergence of the striking amino acid sequence divergence observed between the microbial and animal rhodopsins. PMID:26607446

  16. Mechanism of Rhodopsin Activation as Examined with Ring-constrained Retinal Analogs and the Crystal Structure of the Ground State Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Geeng-Fu; Kuksa, Vladimir; Filipek, Stawomir; Bartl||, Franz; Ritter, Eglof; Gelb, Michael H.; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptor superfamily (GPCR) is comprised of a large group of membrane proteins involved in a wide range of physiological signaling processes. The functional switch from a quiescent to an active conformation is at the heart of GPCR action. The GPCR rhodopsin has been studied extensively because of its key role in scotopic vision. The ground state chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, holds the transmembrane region of the protein in the inactive conformation. Light induces cis-trans isomerization and rhodopsin activation. Here we show that rhodopsin regenerated with a ring-constrained 11-cis-retinal analog undergoes photoisomerization; however, it remains marginally active because isomerization occurs without the chromophore-induced conformational change of the opsin moiety. Modeling the locked chromophore analogs in the active site of rhodopsin suggests that the β-ionone ring rotates but is largely confined within the binding site of the natural 11-cis-retinal chromophore. This constraint is a result of the geometry of the stable 11-cis-locked configuration of the chromophore analogs. These results suggest that the native chromophore cis-trans isomerization is merely a mechanism for repositioning of the β-ionone ring which ultimately leads to helix movements and determines receptor activation. PMID:11316815

  17. Vitamin A Derivatives as Treatment Options for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65) known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients. PMID:23857173

  18. Effects of modified chromophores on the spectral sensitivity of salamander, squirrel and macaque cones.

    PubMed

    Makino, C L; Kraft, T W; Mathies, R A; Lugtenburg, J; Miley, M E; van der Steen, R; Baylor, D A

    1990-05-01

    1. Chemically modified retinal chromophores were used to investigate the mechanisms that produce the characteristic spectral absorptions of cone pigments. Spectral sensitivities of single cones from the salamander, squirrel and macaque retina were determined by electrical recording. The chromophore was then replaced by bleaching the pigment and regenerating it with a retinal analogue. 2. Exposing a bleached cone to 9-cis-retinal for a brief period (less than 20 min) caused its flash sensitivity to recover to about 0.2 of the pre-bleach value. Similar exposure to a locked 6-s-cis, 9-cis analogue gave a recovery to about 0.03 of the pre-bleach value. 3. Unlike the flash sensitivity, the saturating photocurrent amplitude often recovered completely after bleaching and regenerating the pigment. 4. When the 3-dehydroretinal chromophore in the salamander long-wavelength-sensitive (red) cone was replaced with 11-cis-retinal, shortening the conjugated chain in the chromophore, the spectral sensitivity underwent a blue shift of 67 nm. 5. Pigments containing the planar-locked 6-s-cis.9-cis-retinal analogue absorbed at substantially longer wavelength than those containing unmodified 9-cis-retinal. The opsin shift, a measure of the protein's ability to modify the chromophore's absorption was larger for the locked analogue than for 9-cis-retinal. This suggests that the native chromophore assumes a twisted 6-s-cis conformation in these pigments. 6. The spectral sensitivities of red and green macaque cones containing 9-cis-retinal or planar-locked 6-s-cis.9-cis-retinal retained the 30 nm separation characteristic of the native pigments. This suggests that the different absorptions of of the 6-7 carbon bond in the retinal chromophore.

  19. Systemic Retinaldehyde Treatment Corrects Retinal Oxidative Stress, Rod Dysfunction, and Impaired Visual Performance in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Kern, Timothy S.; Bissig, David; Patel, Priya; Bhatia, Ankit; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes appears to induce a visual cycle defect because rod dysfunction is correctable with systemic treatment of the visual cycle chromophore 11-cis-retinaldehyde. However, later studies have found no evidence for visual cycle impairment. Here, we further examined whether photoreceptor dysfunction is corrected with 11-cis-retinaldehyde. Because antioxidants correct photoreceptor dysfunction in diabetes, the hypothesis that exogenous visual chromophores have antioxidant activity in the retina of diabetic mice in vivo was tested. Methods Rod function in 2-month-old diabetic mice was evaluated using transretinal electrophysiology in excised retinas and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) MRI to measure light-evoked expansion of subretinal space (SRS) in vivo. Optokinetic tracking was used to evaluate cone-based visual performance. Retinal production of superoxide free radicals, generated mostly in rod cells, was biochemically measured with lucigenin. Diabetic mice were systemically treated with a single injection of either 11-cis-retinaldehyde, 9-cis-retinaldehyde (a chromophore surrogate), or all-trans-retinaldehyde (the photoisomerization product of 11-cis-retinaldehyde). Results Consistent with previous reports, diabetes significantly reduced (1) dark-adapted rod photo responses (transretinal recording) by ∼18%, (2) rod-dominated light-stimulated SRS expansion (ADC MRI) by ∼21%, and (3) cone-dominated contrast sensitivity (using optokinetic tracking [OKT]) by ∼30%. Both 11-cis-retinaldehyde and 9-cis-retinaldehyde largely corrected these metrics of photoreceptor dysfunction. Higher-than-normal retinal superoxide production in diabetes by ∼55% was also significantly corrected following treatment with 11-cis-retinaldehyde, 9-cis-retinaldehyde, or all-trans-retinaldehyde. Conclusions Collectively, data suggest that retinaldehydes improve photoreceptor dysfunction in diabetic mice, independent of the visual cycle, via an antioxidant mechanism. PMID

  20. Rhodopsins carrying modified chromophores--the 'making of', structural modelling and their light-induced reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ockenfels, Andreas; Schapiro, Igor; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    A series of vitamin-A aldehydes (retinals) with modified alkyl group substituents (9-demethyl-, 9-ethyl-, 9-isopropyl-, 10-methyl, 10-methyl-13-demethyl-, and 13-demethyl retinal) was synthesized and their 11-cis isomers were used as chromophores to reconstitute the visual pigment rhodopsin. Structural changes were selectively introduced around the photoisomerizing C11=C12 bond. The effect of these structural changes on rhodopsin formation and bleaching was determined. Global fit of assembly kinetics yielded lifetimes and spectral features of the assembly intermediates. Rhodopsin formation proceeds stepwise with prolonged lifetimes especially for 9-demethyl retinal (longest lifetime τ3 = 7500 s, cf., 3500 s for retinal), and for 10-methyl retinal (τ3 = 7850 s). These slowed-down processes are interpreted as either a loss of fixation (9dm) or an increased steric hindrance (10me) during the conformational adjustment within the protein. Combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations provided structural insight into the retinal analogues-assembled, full-length rhodopsins. Extinction coefficients, quantum yields and kinetics of the bleaching process (μs-to-ms time range) were determined. Global fit analysis yielded lifetimes and spectral features of bleaching intermediates, revealing remarkably altered kinetics: whereas the slowest process of wild-type rhodopsin and of bleached and 11-cis retinal assembled rhodopsin takes place with lifetimes of 7 and 3.8 s, respectively, this process for 10-methyl-13-demethyl retinal was nearly 10 h (34670 s), coming to completion only after ca. 50 h. The structural changes in retinal derivatives clearly identify the precise interactions between chromophore and protein during the light-induced changes that yield the outstanding efficiency of rhodopsin.

  1. Potential Therapeutic Agents Against Retinal Diseases Caused by Aberrant Metabolism of Retinoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Chen, Jingmeng; Liu, Zhe; Li, Jie; Yao, Ke; Wu, Yalin

    2016-03-01

    The retinoid (visual) cycle is a complex enzymatic pathway that operates in the retina for the regeneration of 11-cis-retinal (11-cis-Ral), the inherent visual chromophore indispensable for vision. Deficiencies in the retinoid metabolism are involved in pathologic mechanisms of several forms of retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and Leber's congenital amaurosis, for which no effective cures presently exist. Nevertheless, the interference of abnormal retinoid metabolism with chemicals has been considered to be a promising strategy aimed at alleviating these retinal dysfunctions. Moreover, since gene therapy is gaining increasing importance in clinical practice, the modulation of key enzymes implicated with the retinoid cycle at a genetic level will hold great promise for the treatment of patients with degenerative diseases of the retina.

  2. Direct Measurement of the Isomerization Barrier of the Isolated Retinal Chromophore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-03

    retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB). Photoisomerization of the RPSB is the primary in animal vision. We find that the energy barrier for a single...determine in- ternal energy barrier for isomerization [1]. Here we apply the technique to the important case of the retinal protonated Schiff base

  3. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  4. Photoisomerization Dynamics of dMe-OMe-NAIP, a Model for the Retinal Chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Kieda, Ryan D.; Shin, Jaeyoon; Paccani, Ricardo Rossi; Fusi, Stefania; Olivucci, Massimo; Crim, F. Fleming

    2012-06-01

    The N-alkylated indanylidene pyrroline Schiff bases (NAIP) mimic the speed and efficiency of photoisomerization of retinal, whose photoisomerization is a key step in the molecular mechanism of vision. We present here a study of the ultrafast isomerization and subsequent relaxation of dMe-OMe-NAIP, a newly synthesized compound in the NAIP class with less steric congestion near the reactive double bond. We show that the excited-state dynamics of dMe-OMe-NAIP are slower than in previously studied NAIP compounds. This simpler compound also lacks the pronounced coherent vibrational motion observed in retinal and other NAIP compounds. We attribute these differences to pre-twisting about the double bond in the ground state of the previously studied compounds that is absent in dMe-OMe-NAIP. The speed of the isomerization and structure of the electronically excited potential energy surface in NAIP compounds make them attractive targets for studies of vibrationally mediated photochemistry. Previous studies from our group have shown that vibrational excitation before promotion to reactive electronic states can influence the course of reactions in isolated molecules. We seek to extend these experiments to molecules in more complicated environments, specifically the solution phase. To that end, we also present preliminary results of experiments probing the timescale of vibrational energy transfer in dMe-OMe-NAIP and other photoreactive Schiff bases.

  5. Retinal orientation and interactions in rhodopsin reveal a two-stage trigger mechanism for activation

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A.; Ziliox, Martine; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Vogel, Reiner; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis retinal chromophore is tightly packed within the interior of the visual receptor rhodopsin and isomerizes to the all-trans configuration following absorption of light. The mechanism by which this isomerization event drives the outward rotation of transmembrane helix H6, a hallmark of activated G protein-coupled receptors, is not well established. To address this question, we use solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy to define the orientation and interactions of the retinal chromophore in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Here we show that isomerization of the 11-cis retinal chromophore generates strong steric interactions between its β-ionone ring and transmembrane helices H5 and H6, while deprotonation of its protonated Schiff's base triggers the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues on H6 and within the second extracellular loop. We integrate these observations with previous structural and functional studies to propose a two-stage mechanism for rhodopsin activation. PMID:27585742

  6. Retinal Chromophore Structure and Schiff Base Interactions in Red-Shifted Channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs), which form a distinct branch of the microbial rhodopsin family, control phototaxis in green algae. Because ChRs can be expressed and function in neuronal membranes as light-gated cation channels, they have rapidly become an important optogenetic tool in neurobiology. While channelrhodopsin-2 from the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2) is the most commonly used and extensively studied optogenetic ChR, little is known about the properties of the diverse group of other ChRs. In this study, near-infrared confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy along with hydrogen–deuterium exchange and site-directed mutagenesis were used to study the structure of red-shifted ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1). These measurements reveal that (i) CaChR1 has an all-trans-retinal structure similar to those of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and sensory rhodopsin II but different from that of the mixed retinal composition of CrChR2, (ii) lowering the pH from 7 to 2 or substituting neutral residues for Glu169 or Asp299 does not significantly shift the ethylenic stretch frequency more than 1–2 cm–1 in contrast to BR in which a downshift of 7–9 cm–1 occurs reflecting neutralization of the Asp85 counterion, and (iii) the CaChR1 protonated Schiff base (SB) has stronger hydrogen bonding than BR. A model is proposed to explain these results whereby at pH 7 the predominant counterion to the SB is Asp299 (the homologue to Asp212 in BR) while Glu169 (the homologue to Asp85 in BR) exists in a neutral state. We observe an unusual constancy of the resonance Raman spectra over the broad range from pH 9 to 2 and discuss its implications. These results are in accord with recent visible absorption and current measurements of CaChR1 [Sineshchekov, O. A., et al. (2013) Intramolecular proton transfer in channelrhodopsins. Biophys. J. 104, 807–817; Li, H., et al. (2014) Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3) displays similar ground state and first excited state potential energy features as those of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. Recently, PSB3 has been used to benchmark several electronic structure methods, including highly correlated multireference wave function approaches, highlighting the necessity to accurately describe the electronic correlation in order to obtain reliable properties even along the ground state (thermal) isomerization paths. In this work, we apply two quantum Monte Carlo approaches, the variational Monte Carlo and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo, to study the energetics and electronic properties of PSB3 along representative minimum energy paths and scans related to its thermal cis–trans isomerization. Quantum Monte Carlo is used in combination with the Jastrow antisymmetrized geminal power ansatz, which guarantees an accurate and balanced description of the static electronic correlation thanks to the multiconfigurational nature of the antisymmetrized geminal power term, and of the dynamical correlation, due to the presence of the Jastrow factor explicitly depending on electron–electron distances. Along the two ground state isomerization minimum energy paths of PSB3, CASSCF calculations yield wave functions having either charge transfer or diradical character in proximity of the two transition state configurations. Here, we observe that at the quantum Monte Carlo level of theory, only the transition state with charge transfer character can be located. The conical intersection, which becomes highly sloped, is observed only if the path connecting the two original CASSCF transition states is extended beyond the diradical one, namely by increasing the bond-length-alternation (BLA). These findings are in good agreement with the results obtained by MRCISD+Q calculations, and they demonstrate the importance of having an accurate description of the static and

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Coccia, Emanuele; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-03-10

    The penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3) displays similar ground state and first excited state potential energy features as those of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. Recently, PSB3 has been used to benchmark several electronic structure methods, including highly correlated multireference wave function approaches, highlighting the necessity to accurately describe the electronic correlation in order to obtain reliable properties even along the ground state (thermal) isomerization paths. In this work, we apply two quantum Monte Carlo approaches, the variational Monte Carlo and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo, to study the energetics and electronic properties of PSB3 along representative minimum energy paths and scans related to its thermal cis–trans isomerization. Quantum Monte Carlo is used in combination with the Jastrow antisymmetrized geminal power ansatz, which guarantees an accurate and balanced description of the static electronic correlation thanks to the multiconfigurational nature of the antisymmetrized geminal power term, and of the dynamical correlation, due to the presence of the Jastrow factor explicitly depending on electron–electron distances. Along the two ground state isomerization minimum energy paths of PSB3, CASSCF calculations yield wave functions having either charge transfer or diradical character in proximity of the two transition state configurations. Here, we observe that at the quantum Monte Carlo level of theory, only the transition state with charge transfer character can be located. The conical intersection, which becomes highly sloped, is observed only if the path connecting the two original CASSCF transition states is extended beyond the diradical one, namely by increasing the bond-length-alternation (BLA). These findings are in good agreement with the results obtained by MRCISD+Q calculations, and they demonstrate the importance of having an accurate description of the static and

  9. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Maeda, Tadao; Bereta, Grzegorz; Okano, Kiichiro; Golczak, Marcin; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment mediating vision under dim light, is composed of the apoprotein opsin and the chromophore ligand 11-cis-retinal. A P23H mutation in the opsin gene is one of the most prevalent causes of the human blinding disease, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cultured cell and transgenic animal models have been developed, there remains controversy over whether they fully mimic the human phenotype; and the exact mechanism by which this mutation leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration remains unknown. By generating P23H opsin knock-in mice, we found that the P23H protein was inadequately glycosylated with levels 1–10% that of wild type opsin. Moreover, the P23H protein failed to accumulate in rod photoreceptor cell endoplasmic reticulum but instead disrupted rod photoreceptor disks. Genetically engineered P23H mice lacking the chromophore showed accelerated photoreceptor cell degeneration. These results indicate that most synthesized P23H protein is degraded, and its retinal cytotoxicity is enhanced by lack of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore during rod outer segment development. PMID:21224384

  10. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  11. Prolonged Prevention of Retinal Degeneration with Retinylamine Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Anthony; Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Gao, Song-Qi; Yu, Guanping; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration impairs the vision of millions in all age groups worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that the etiology of many retinal degenerative diseases is associated with impairment in biochemical reactions involved in the visual cycle, a metabolic pathway responsible for regeneration of the visual chromophore (11-cis-retinal). Inefficient clearance of toxic retinoid metabolites, especially all-trans-retinal, is considered responsible for photoreceptor cytotoxicity. Primary amines, including retinylamine, are effective in lowing the concentration of all-trans-retinal within the retina and thus prevent retina degeneration in mouse models of human retinopathies. Here we achieved prolonged prevention of retinal degeneration by controlled delivery of retinylamine to the eye from polylactic acid nanoparticles in Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− (DKO) mice, an animal model of Stargardt disease/age-related macular degeneration. Subcutaneous administration of the nanoparticles containing retinylamine provided a constant supply of the drug to the eye for about a week and resulted in effective prolonged prevention of light-induced retinal degeneration in DKO mice. Retinylamine nanoparticles hold promise for prolonged prophylactic treatment of human retinal degenerative diseases, including Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:25617130

  12. NinaB is essential for Drosophila vision but induces retinal degeneration in opsin-deficient photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Voolstra, Olaf; Oberhauser, Vitus; Sumser, Emerich; Meyer, Nina E; Maguire, Michael E; Huber, Armin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    In animals, visual pigments are essential for photoreceptor function and survival. These G-protein-coupled receptors consist of a protein moiety (opsin) and a covalently bound 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore. The chromophore is derived from dietary carotenoids by oxidative cleavage and trans-to-cis isomerization of double bonds. In vertebrates, the necessary chemical transformations are catalyzed by two distinct but structurally related enzymes, the carotenoid oxygenase beta-carotenoid-15,15'-monooxygenase and the retinoid isomerase RPE65 (retinal pigment epithelium protein of 65 kDa). Recently, we provided biochemical evidence that these reactions in insects are catalyzed by a single enzyme family member named NinaB. Here we show that in the fly pathway, carotenoids are mandatory precursors of the chromophore. After chromophore formation, the retinoid-binding protein Pinta acts downstream of NinaB and is required to supply photoreceptors with chromophore. Like ninaE encoding the opsin, ninaB expression is eye-dependent and is activated as a downstream target of the eyeless/pax6 and sine oculis master control genes for eye development. The requirement for coordinated synthesis of chromophore and opsin is evidenced by analysis of ninaE mutants. Retinal degeneration in opsin-deficient photoreceptors is caused by the chromophore and can be prevented by restricting its supply as seen in an opsin and chromophore-deficient double mutant. Thus, our study identifies NinaB as a key component for visual pigment production and provides evidence that chromophore in opsin-deficient photoreceptors can elicit retinal degeneration.

  13. Energetics of the all-trans{yields}13-cis isomerization of the retinal chromophore of bacteriorhodopsin: Electronic structure calculations for a simple model system

    SciTech Connect

    Woywod, Clemens; Vallet, Valerie; Li, Jingrui; Goerling, Andreas

    2008-12-08

    Understanding the molecular mechanism for the photoinduced transmembrane proton pump in the bacteriorhodopsin system is of fundamental importance. This study attempts to investigate the energetics of the initial step of the proton transport cycle, the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore. The exact reaction pathway and the question of how many excited electronic states are involved in the internal conversion process are still unresolved. The problem is approached by constructing a reaction coordinate suggested by crystallographic studies for a simplified chromophore model system. The CASSCF and CASPT2 electronic structure methods are employed to calculate the energies of the four lowest lying singlet states as a function of the reaction coordinate. The effect of negatively charged protein residues on the reaction is simulated by inclusion of a negative point charge in the model. The results indicate that trans{yields}cis isomerization around the C{sub {beta}} = C{sub {gamma}} bond may be accompanied by twisting around the C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond in order to drive the proton pump. The presence of a counterion does not seem to reduce the barrier for isomerization or the S{sub 0}-S{sub 1} energy difference but clearly stabilizes the cis--product. At first sight the results appear to support the idea of a participation of no other electronic states beyond S{sub 0} and first singly {pi}{pi}* excited state in the photoreaction. However, the relevance of this prediction is rather limited because of the small size of the model system. Other states of retinal, corresponding in particular to the partly doubly {pi}{pi}* excited S{sub 2} state of the model, are likely to have a vertical excitation energy similar to the first singly {pi}{pi}* excited state or even below.

  14. A large photolysis-induced pKa increase of the chromophore counterion in bacteriorhodopsin: implications for ion transport mechanisms of retinal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Braiman, M S; Dioumaev, A K; Lewis, J R

    1996-01-01

    The proton-pumping mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin is dependent on a photolysis-induced transfer of a proton from the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore to the aspartate-85 counterion. Up until now, this transfer was ascribed to a > 7-unit decrease in the pKa of the protonated Schiff base caused by photoisomerization of the retinal. However, a comparably large increase in the pKa of the Asp-85 acceptor also plays a role, as we show here with infrared measurements. Furthermore, the shifted vibrational frequency of the Asp-85 COOH group indicates a transient drop in the effective dielectric constant around Asp-85 to approximately 2 in the M photointermediate. This dielectric decrease would cause a > 40 kJ-mol-1 increase in free energy of the anionic form of Asp-85, fully explaining the observed pK alpha increase. An analogous photolysis-induced destabilization of the Schiff base counterion could initiate anion transport in the related protein, halorhodopsin, in which aspartate-85 is replaced by Cl- and the Schiff base proton is consequently never transferred. PMID:8789111

  15. Solid-state sup 13 C NMR of the retinal chromophore in photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: Characterization of two forms of M

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.O.; Courtin, J.; van den Berg, E.; Winkel, C.; Lugtenburg, J.; Herzfeld, J.; Griffin, R.G. )

    1989-01-10

    Solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the M photocycle intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) have been obtained from purple membrane regenerated with retinal specifically {sup 13}C labeled at positions 5, 12, 13, 14, and 15. The M intermediate was trapped at {minus}40{degree}C and pH = 9.5-10.0 in either 100 mM NaCl (M (NaCl)) or 500 mM guanidine hydrochloride (M (Gdn-HCl)). The {sup 13}C-12 chemical shift at 125.8 ppm in M (NaCl) and 128.1 ppm in M (Gdn-HCl) indicates that the C{sub 13}{double bond}C{sub 14} double bond has a cis configuration, while the {sup 13}C-13 chemical shift at 146.7 ppm in M (NaCl) and 14.57 ppm in M (Gdn-HCl) demonstrates that the Schiff base in unprotonated. The principal values of the chemical shift tensor of the {sup 13}C-5 resonance in both M (NaCl) and M (Gdn-HCl) are consistent with a 6-s-trans structure and a negative protein charge localized near C-5 as was observed in dark adapted bR. The {approximately}5 ppm upfield shift of the {sup 13}C-5 M resonance relative to {sup 13}C-5 bR{sub 568} and bR{sub 548} is attributed to an unprotonated Schiff base in the M chromophore. Of particular interest in this study were the results obtained from {sup 13}C-14 M. In M (NaCl), a dramatic upfield shift was observed for the {sup 13}C-14 resonance relative to unprotonanted Schiff base model compounds. In contrast, in M (Gdn-HCl) the {sup 13}C-14 resonance was observed at 125.7 ppm. The different {sup 13}C-14 chemical shifts in these two M preparations may be explained by different C{double prime}N configurations of the retinal-lysine Schiff base linkage, namely, syn in NaCl and anti in guanidine hydrochloride.

  16. The role of retinal photoisomerase in the visual cycle of the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The compound eye of the honeybee has previously been shown to contain a soluble retinal photoisomerase which, in vitro, is able to catalyze stereospecifically the photoconversion of all-trans retinal to 11-cis retinal. In this study we combine in vivo and in vitro techniques to demonstrate how the retinal photoisomerase is involved in the visual cycle, creating 11-cis retinal for the generation of visual pigment. Honeybees have approximately 2.5 pmol/eye of retinal associated with visual pigments, but larger amounts (4-12 pmol/eye) of both retinal and retinol bound to soluble proteins. When bees are dark adapted for 24 h or longer, greater than 80% of the endogenous retinal, mostly in the all-trans configuration, is associated with the retinal photoisomerase. On exposure to blue light the retinal is isomerized to 11-cis, which makes it available to an alcohol dehydrogenase. Most of it is then reduced to 11-cis retinol. The retinol is not esterified and remains associated with a soluble protein, serving as a reservoir of 11-cis retinoid available for renewal of visual pigment. Alternatively, 11-cis retinal can be transferred directly to opsin to regenerate rhodopsin, as shown by synthesis of rhodopsin in bleached frog rod outer segments. This retinaldehyde cycle from the honeybee is the third to be described. It appears very similar to the system in another group of arthropods, flies, and differs from the isomerization processes in vertebrates and cephalopod mollusks. PMID:2007885

  17. Role of the 9-methyl group of retinal in cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydip; Crouch, Rosalie K; Ma, Jian-xing; Oprian, Daniel D; Kono, Masahiro

    2004-05-11

    In rhodopsin, the 9-methyl group of retinal has previously been identified as being critical in linking the ligand isomerization with the subsequent protein conformational changes that result in the activation of its G protein, transducin. Here, we report studies on the role of this methyl group in the salamander rod and cone pigments. Pigments were generated by combining proteins expressed in COS cells with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, where the 9-methyl group on the polyene chain has been deleted. The absorption spectra of all pigments were blue-shifted. The red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments were unstable to hydroxylamine; whereas, the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments were stable. The lack of the 9-methyl group of the chromophore did not affect the ability of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments to activate transducin. On the other hand, with the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments, activation was diminished. Interestingly, the red cone pigment containing the retinal analogue remained active longer than the native pigment. Thus, the 9-methyl group of retinal is not important in the activation pathway of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments. However, for the red cone pigment, the 9-methyl group of retinal appears to be critical in the deactivation pathway.

  18. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations—F45L, V209M and F220C—yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5. PMID:27694816

  19. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  20. The molecular basis for UV vision in birds: spectral characteristics, cDNA sequence and retinal localization of the UV-sensitive visual pigment of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Wilkie, S E; Vissers, P M; Das, D; Degrip, W J; Bowmaker, J K; Hunt, D M

    1998-02-15

    Microspectrophotometric (msp) studies have shown that the colour-vision system of many bird species is based on four pigments with absorption peaks in the red, green, blue and UV regions of the spectrum. The existence of a fourth pigment (UV) is the major difference between the trichromacy of humans and the tetrachromacy of such birds, and recent studies have shown that it may play a determining role in such diverse aspects of behaviour as mate selection and detection of food. Avian visual pigments are composed of an opsin protein covalently bound via a Schiff-base linkage to the chromophore 11-cis-retinal. Here we report the cDNA sequence of a UV opsin isolated from an avian species, Melopsittacus undulatus (budgerigar or small parakeet). This sequence has been expressed using the recombinant baculovirus system; the pigment generated from the expressed protein on addition of 11-cis-retinal yielded an absorption spectrum typical of a UV photopigment, with lambdamax 365+/-3 nm. This is the first UV opsin from an avian species to be sequenced and expressed in a heterologous system. In situ hybridization of this sequence to budgerigar retinas selectively labelled a sub-set of UV cones, representing approx. 9% of the total cone population, that are distributed in a semi-regular pattern across the entire retina.

  1. Geometries and Vertical Excitation Energies in Retinal Analogues Resolved at the CASPT2 Level of Theory: Critical Assessment of the Performance of CASSCF, CC2, and DFT Methods.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Elżbieta; Szefczyk, Borys; Andruniów, Tadeusz

    2013-11-12

    A systematic investigation of structural properties and vertical excitation energies of a series of structurally modified 11-cis-retinal chromophores in vacuo was performed by means of multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2). CASPT2-based geometries agree reasonably well with Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2), local second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (LCC2), and density functional theory (DFT) geometries, while the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method exaggerates dramatically the bond length pattern in the polyene chain. The quality of the resulting vertical excitation energies obtained by employing CASSCF, second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (CC2), LCC2, and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approaches is assessed with respect to the CASPT2 data. We show that the commonly used CASSCF/CASPT2 approach works reasonably well in the case of vertical excitation energies of planar structures, but lack of dynamic correlation leads to large errors in energetics for strongly strained structures. For example, the highly twisted conformers of 9,10-dimethyl and 9,10,13-trimethyl species are found as global minima at the CASSCF level, whereas they turn almost planar at the CASPT2, MP2, LCC2, and DFT levels of theory. The CC2 method has shown a remarkable performance, manifested by a maximum deviation of 0.05 eV from the reference CASPT2 results, whereas the local version of CC2 seems to fail to describe the charge-transfer character of the S0 → S1 transitions correctly. We believe that our CASPT2 benchmark set will provide a reference that can be utilized for validation and development studies on 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore analogues.

  2. Strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecule present near the retinal chromophore of Leptosphaeria rhodopsin, the bacteriorhodopsin-like proton pump from a eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Sumii, Masayo; Furutani, Yuji; Waschuk, Stephen A; Brown, Leonid S; Kandori, Hideki

    2005-11-22

    Leptosphaeria rhodopsin (LR) is an archaeal-type rhodopsin found in fungi, and is the first light-driven proton-pumping retinal protein from eukaryotes. LR pumps protons in a manner similar to that of bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a light-driven proton pump of haloarchaea. The amino acid sequence of LR is more homologous to that of Neurospora rhodopsin (NR) than BR, whereas NR has no proton-pumping activity. These facts raise the question of how the proton-pumping function is achieved. In this paper, we studied structural changes of LR following the retinal photoisomerization by means of low-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and compared the obtained spectra with those for BR and NR. While the light-induced photoisomerization from the all-trans to 13-cis form was commonly observed among LR, BR, and NR, we found that the structural changes of LR are closer to those of BR than to those of NR in terms of detailed vibrational bands of retinal and protein. The most prominent difference was seen for the water O-D stretching vibrations (measured in D2O). LR exhibits an O-D stretch of water at 2257 cm(-1), indicating the presence of a strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecule. Such strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules (O-D stretch at <2400 cm(-1)) were observed for BR, but not for NR. Comprehensive studies of BR mutants and archaeal rhodopsins have revealed that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are found only in the proteins exhibiting proton-pumping activity, suggesting that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules and transient weakening of their binding are essential for the proton-pumping function of rhodopsins. This observation for LR provided additional experimental evidence of the correlation between strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules and proton-pumping activity of archaeal rhodopsins.

  3. Chromophores in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Antony R.

    1997-05-01

    Human skin, especially the epidermis, contains several major solar ultraviolet-radiation- (UVR-) absorbing endogenous chromophores including DNA, urocanic acid, amino acids, melanins and their precursors and metabolites. The lack of solubility of melanins prevents their absorption spectra being defined by routine techniques. Indirect spectroscopic methods show that their spectral properties depend on the stimulus for melanogenesis. The photochemical consequences of UVR absorption by some epidermal chromophores are relatively well understood whereas we lack a detailed understanding of the consequent photobiological and clinical responses. Skin action spectroscopy is not a reliable way of relating a photobiological outcome to a specific chromophore but is important for UVR hazard assessment. Exogenous chromophores may be administered to the skin in combination with UVR exposure for therapeutic benefit, or as sunscreens for the prevention of sunburn and possibly skin cancer.

  4. Prolonged Inner Retinal Photoreception Depends on the Visual Retinoid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiwu; Pack, Weston; Khan, Naheed W.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to rods and cones, mammals have inner retinal photoreceptors called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which use the photopigment melanopsin and mediate nonimage-forming visual responses, such as pupil reflexes and circadian entrainment. After photic activation, photopigments must be reverted to their dark state to be light-sensitive again. For rods and to some extent cones, photopigment regeneration depends on the retinoid cycle in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By contrast, ipRGCs are far from the RPE, and previous work suggests that melanopsin is capable of light-dependent self-regeneration. Here, we used in vitro ipRGC recording and in vivo pupillometry to show that the RPE is required for normal melanopsin-based responses to prolonged light, especially at high stimulus intensities. Melanopsin-based photoresponses of rat ipRGCs were remarkably sustained when a functional RPE was attached to the retina, but became far more transient if the RPE was removed, or if the retinoid cycle was inhibited, or when Müller glia were poisoned. Similarly, retinoid cycle inhibition markedly reduced the steady-state amplitude of melanopsin-driven pupil reflexes in both mice and rats. However, melanopsin photoresponses in RPE-separated rat retinas became more sustained in the presence of an 11-cis-retinal analog. In conclusion, during prolonged illumination, melanopsin regeneration depends partly on 11-cis-retinal from the RPE, possibly imported via Müller cells. Implications for RPE-related eye diseases and the acne drug isotretinoin (a retinoid cycle inhibitor) are discussed. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) contain the photopigment melanopsin and drive subconscious physiological responses to light, e.g., pupillary constriction and neuroendocrine regulation. In darkness, each photopigment molecule in ipRGCs, as well as rod/cone photoreceptors, contains 11-cis-retinal (a

  5. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  6. Chromophore Supply Rate-Limits Mammalian Photoreceptor Dark Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-shan; Nymark, Soile; Frederiksen, Rikard; Estevez, Maureen E.; Shen, Susan Q.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Cornwall, M. Carter

    2014-01-01

    Efficient regeneration of visual pigment following its destruction by light is critical for the function of mammalian photoreceptors. Here, we show that misexpression of a subset of cone genes in the rd7 mouse hybrid rods enables them to access the normally cone-specific retina visual cycle. The rapid supply of chromophore by the retina visual cycle dramatically accelerated the mouse rod dark adaptation. At the same time, the competition between rods and cones for retina-derived chromophore slowed cone dark adaptation, indicating that the cone specificity of the retina visual cycle is key for rapid cone dark adaptation. Our findings demonstrate that mammalian photoreceptor dark adaptation is dominated by the supply of chromophore. Misexpression of cone genes in rods may represent a novel approach to treating visual disorders associated with mutations of visual cycle proteins or with reduced retinal pigment epithelium function due to aging. PMID:25143602

  7. Bruise chromophore concentrations over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Mark G.; Caspall, Jayme J.; Mappus, Rudolph L., IV; Kong, Linghua; Yi, Dingrong; Sprigle, Stephen H.

    2008-03-01

    During investigations of potential child and elder abuse, clinicians and forensic practitioners are often asked to offer opinions about the age of a bruise. A commonality between existing methods of bruise aging is analysis of bruise color or estimation of chromophore concentration. Relative chromophore concentration is an underlying factor that determines bruise color. We investigate a method of chromophore concentration estimation that can be employed in a handheld imaging spectrometer with a small number of wavelengths. The method, based on absorbance properties defined by Beer-Lambert's law, allows estimation of differential chromophore concentration between bruised and normal skin. Absorption coefficient data for each chromophore are required to make the estimation. Two different sources of this data are used in the analysis- generated using Independent Component Analysis and taken from published values. Differential concentration values over time, generated using both sources, show correlation to published models of bruise color change over time and total chromophore concentration over time.

  8. Human infrared vision is triggered by two-photon chromophore isomerization.

    PubMed

    Palczewska, Grazyna; Vinberg, Frans; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Bircher, Martin P; Salom, David; Komar, Katarzyna; Zhang, Jianye; Cascella, Michele; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-12-16

    Vision relies on photoactivation of visual pigments in rod and cone photoreceptor cells of the retina. The human eye structure and the absorption spectra of pigments limit our visual perception of light. Our visual perception is most responsive to stimulating light in the 400- to 720-nm (visible) range. First, we demonstrate by psychophysical experiments that humans can perceive infrared laser emission as visible light. Moreover, we show that mammalian photoreceptors can be directly activated by near infrared light with a sensitivity that paradoxically increases at wavelengths above 900 nm, and display quadratic dependence on laser power, indicating a nonlinear optical process. Biochemical experiments with rhodopsin, cone visual pigments, and a chromophore model compound 11-cis-retinyl-propylamine Schiff base demonstrate the direct isomerization of visual chromophore by a two-photon chromophore isomerization. Indeed, quantum mechanics modeling indicates the feasibility of this mechanism. Together, these findings clearly show that human visual perception of near infrared light occurs by two-photon isomerization of visual pigments.

  9. Human infrared vision is triggered by two-photon chromophore isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Palczewska, Grazyna; Vinberg, Frans; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Bircher, Martin P.; Salom, David; Komar, Katarzyna; Zhang, Jianye; Cascella, Michele; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Vision relies on photoactivation of visual pigments in rod and cone photoreceptor cells of the retina. The human eye structure and the absorption spectra of pigments limit our visual perception of light. Our visual perception is most responsive to stimulating light in the 400- to 720-nm (visible) range. First, we demonstrate by psychophysical experiments that humans can perceive infrared laser emission as visible light. Moreover, we show that mammalian photoreceptors can be directly activated by near infrared light with a sensitivity that paradoxically increases at wavelengths above 900 nm, and display quadratic dependence on laser power, indicating a nonlinear optical process. Biochemical experiments with rhodopsin, cone visual pigments, and a chromophore model compound 11-cis-retinyl-propylamine Schiff base demonstrate the direct isomerization of visual chromophore by a two-photon chromophore isomerization. Indeed, quantum mechanics modeling indicates the feasibility of this mechanism. Together, these findings clearly show that human visual perception of near infrared light occurs by two-photon isomerization of visual pigments. PMID:25453064

  10. Evidence from Chlamydomonas on the photoactivation of rhodopsins without isomerization of their chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kenneth W.; Saranak, Jureepan; Krane, Sonja; Johnson, Randy L.; Nakanishi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Attachment of retinal to opsin forms the chromophore N-retinylidene which isomerizes during photoactivation of rhodopsins. To test whether isomerization is crucial, custom-tailored chromophores lacking the β-ionone ring and any isomerizable bonds were incorporated in vivo into the opsin of a blind mutant of the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analogues restored phototaxis with the anticipated action spectra, ruling out the need for isomerization in photoactivation. To further elucidate photoactivation, responses to chromophores formed from naphthalene aldehydes were studied. The resulting action spectral shifts suggest that charge separation within the excited chromophore leads to electric field induced polarization of nearby amino-acid residues and altered hydrogen bonding. This redistribution of charge faciliates the reported multiple bond rotations and protein rearrangements of rhodopsin activation. These results provide new insight into the activation of rhodopsins and related GPCRs. PMID:21700209

  11. Carotenoid Antenna Binding and Function in Retinal Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-13

    REPORT Carotenoid antenna binding and function in retinal proteins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Xanthorhodopsin, a proton pump from the...eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, is a unique dual chromophore system that contains, in addition to retinal, the carotenoid salinixanthin as a light... carotenoid ring near the retinal ring. Substitution of the small glycine with bulky tryptophan in this site eliminates binding. The second factor is the 4

  12. Chromophores in lignin-free cellulosic materials belong to three compound classes. Chromophores in cellulosics, XII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CRI (chromophore release and identification) method isolates well-defined chromophoric substances from different cellulosic matrices, such as highly bleached pulps, cotton linters, bacterial cellulose, viscose or lyocell fibers, and cellulose acetates. The chromophores are present only in extrem...

  13. Ground-state properties of the retinal molecule: from quantum mechanical to classical mechanical computations of retinal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Suhai, Sandor

    2011-01-01

    Retinal proteins are excellent systems for understanding essential physiological processes such as signal transduction and ion pumping. Although the conjugated polyene system of the retinal chromophore is best described with quantum mechanics, simulations of the long-timescale dynamics of a retinal protein in its physiological, flexible, lipid-membrane environment can only be performed at the classical mechanical level. Torsional energy barriers are a critical ingredient of the classical force-field parameters. Here we review briefly current retinal force fields and discuss new quantum mechanical computations to assess how the retinal Schiff base model and the approach used to derive the force-field parameters may influence the torsional potentials.

  14. The Drosophila visual cycle and de novo chromophore synthesis depends on rdhB

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Tao; Ni, Jinfei D.; von Lintig, Johannes; Montell, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian rods and cones, light activation of the visual pigments leads to release of the chromophore, which is then recycled through a multistep enzymatic pathway, referred to as the visual or retinoid cycle. In invertebrates such as Drosophila, a visual cycle was thought not to exist since the rhodopsins are bistable photopigments, which consist of a chromophore that normally stays bound to the opsin following light activation. Nevertheless, we recently described a visual cycle in Drosophila that serves to recycle the free chromophore that is released following light induced internalization of rhodopsin, and a retinol dehydrogenase (RDH) that catalyzes the first step of the pathway. Here, we describe the identification of a putative RDH, referred to as RDHB (Retinal Dehydrogenase B), which functions in the visual cycle and in de novo synthesis of the chromophore. RDHB was expressed in the retinal pigment cells (RPCs), where it promoted the final enzymatic reaction necessary for the production of the chromophore. Mutation of rdhB caused moderate light-dependent degeneration of the phototransducing compartment of the photoreceptor cells— the rhabdomeres, reminiscent of the effects of mutations in some human RDH genes. Since the first and last steps in the visual cycle take place in the RPCs, it appears that these cells are the sites of action for this entire enzymatic pathway in Drosophila. PMID:22399771

  15. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  16. Fundamental Studies in the Molecular Basis of Laser Induced Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-30

    absorption of light in the chromophore. In all visual pigments, the chromophore is a derivative of retinal ( Vitamin A aldehyde). Thus, a detailed...average angle 8 to the subphase normal but have a random distribution of azimuthal angle, then ɘ> ZzZ- PcOs 3 0 <P>z - -L Psin 20cosO 5 The vanishing

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Bacteriorhodopsin's Photoisomerization Using Ab Initio Forces for the Excited Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shigehiko; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Retinal proteins are photoreceptors found in many living organisms. They possess a common chromophore, retinal, that upon absorption of light isomerizes and thereby triggers biological functions ranging from light energy conversion to phototaxis and vision. The photoisomerization of retinal is extremely fast, highly selective inside the protein matrix, and characterized through optimal sensitivity to incoming light. This article describes the first report of an ab initio quantum mechanical description of the in situ isomerization dynamics of retinal in bacteriorhodopsin, a microbial retinal protein that functions as a light-driven proton pump. The description combines ab initio multi-electronic state molecular dynamics of a truncated retinal chromophore model (N-methyl-γ-methylpenta-2,4-dieniminium cation fragment) with molecular mechanics of the protein motion and unveils in complete detail the photoisomerization process. The results illustrate the essential role of the protein for the characteristic kinetics and high selectivity of the photoisomerization: the protein arrests inhomogeneous photoisomerization paths and funnels them into a single path that initiates the functional process. Supported by comparison with dynamic spectral modulations observed in femtosecond spectroscopy, the results identify the principal molecular motion during photoisomerization. PMID:12944261

  18. Comparative study of phototactic and photophobic receptor chromophore properties in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, D N; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Spudich, J L

    1993-01-01

    The motile, unicellular, eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits two distinct behavioral reactions to light stimuli, phototaxis and the photophobic response. Both are mediated by retinal-containing receptors. This paper focuses on a direct comparison of the two photoresponses and the chromophore requirements for their photoreceptor(s). Using computerized motion analysis assays for phototaxis and photophobic responses by the same populations of cells, we measured the ability of various isomers and analogues of retinal to reconstitute photobehavior in the pigment-deficient mutant FN68. The results indicate that photophobic and phototaxis responses each require chromophores with an all-trans polyene chain configuration, planar ionone ring/polyene chain conformation, and the ability to isomerize around the retinal C13-C14 double bond. One difference between the two behaviors is that the photophobic response becomes highly desensitized after light stimuli to which the phototaxis response does not become desensitized, indicating the existence of at least one distinct step in the photophobic response pathway. A second difference is that the retinal regeneration of the photophobic response but not of phototaxis is inhibited by a 5-membered ring 13-trans-locked analogue. While showing close similarity in the chromophore structural requirements of the two behaviors, the results indicate that differences exist between the two responses at the level of their photoreceptor proteins and/or in their transduction processes. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8369455

  19. The Retinal Pigment Epithelium: Something More than a Constituent of the Blood-Retinal Barrier—Implications for the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Rafael; Villarroel, Marta; Corraliza, Lídia; Hernández, Cristina; Garcia-Ramírez, Marta

    2010-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is an specialized epithelium lying in the interface between the neural retina and the choriocapillaris where it forms the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB). The main functions of the RPE are the following: (1) transport of nutrients, ions, and water, (2) absorption of light and protection against photooxidation, (3) reisomerization of all-trans-retinal into 11-cis-retinal, which is crucial for the visual cycle, (4) phagocytosis of shed photoreceptor membranes, and (5) secretion of essential factors for the structural integrity of the retina. An overview of these functions will be given. Most of the research on the physiopathology of diabetic retinopathy has been focused on the impairment of the neuroretina and the breakdown of the inner BRB. By contrast, the effects of diabetes on the RPE and in particular on its secretory activity have received less attention. In this regard, new therapeutic strategies addressed to modulating RPE impairment are warranted. PMID:20182540

  20. Theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis-, and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Nozirov, Farhod E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com; Stachów, Michał; Kupka, Teobald E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis- and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes is reported. The results obtained using density functional theory (DFT) combined with large basis sets and gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations were critically compared with experiment and conventional, higher level correlated electronic structure methods. Accurate structural, vibrational, and NMR parameters of difluoroethylenes were obtained using several density functionals combined with dedicated basis sets. B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) optimized structures of difluoroethylenes closely reproduced experimental geometries and earlier reported benchmark coupled cluster results, while BLYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) produced accurate harmonic vibrational frequencies. The most accurate vibrations were obtained using B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) with correction for anharmonicity. Becke half and half (BHandH) density functional predicted more accurate {sup 19}F isotropic shieldings and van Voorhis and Scuseria's τ-dependent gradient-corrected correlation functional yielded better carbon shieldings than B3LYP. A surprisingly good performance of Hartree-Fock (HF) method in predicting nuclear shieldings in these molecules was observed. Inclusion of zero-point vibrational correction markedly improved agreement with experiment for nuclear shieldings calculated by HF, MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods but worsened the DFT results. The threefold improvement in accuracy when predicting {sup 2}J(FF) in 1,1-difluoroethylene for BHandH density functional compared to B3LYP was observed (the deviations from experiment were −46 vs. −115 Hz)

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  2. Retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001029.htm Retinitis pigmentosa To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retinitis pigmentosa is an eye disease in which there is ...

  3. Chromophore-enhanced bacterial photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckleby, Jana K.; Morton, Rebecca J.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1999-06-01

    The use of chromophore dyes to enhance the bactericidal effect of laser energy was studied as a means to optimize laser treatment for the decontamination of wound. Using an in vitro study, various concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG), carbon black, and fluorescein were mixed with a suspension of bacteria and plated on tryptic soy agar. Plates were exposed to a laser beam of 10-15 watts for times ranging from 0 to 180 seconds, incubated overnight, and colony counts were performed. Bacteria not mixed with chromophore were used as controls. Six bacterial strains encompassing a range of bacterial types were used: Staphylococcus aureau, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus spore suspensions, and Clostridium perfringens. Laser treatment alone had no effect on any of the bacteria. Significant killing of gram-positive bacteria, including spores of Bacillus cereus, was observed only with the use of ICG and diode laser energy. No effect was observed using any of the chromophores on the gram-negative bacteria. The results of this study indicate that successful killing of gram-positive bacteria can be achieved using ICG combined with appropriate laser energy and wavelength. Efforts to enhance the susceptibility of gram-negative bacteria to photothermolysis by laser energy were unsuccessful.

  4. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... men more than women and whites more than African Americans. A retinal detachment is also more likely to occur in people who Are extremely nearsighted Have had a retinal detachment in the other eye Have a family history of retinal detachment Have had cataract surgery Have ...

  5. Directed Evolution of a Bright Near-Infrared Fluorescent Rhodopsin Using a Synthetic Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Lukas; Rice, Austin J; Bedbrook, Claire N; Zhang, Ruijie K; Lignell, Antti; Cahn, Jackson K B; Renata, Hans; Dodani, Sheel C; Cho, Inha; Cai, Long; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H

    2017-03-16

    By engineering a microbial rhodopsin, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), to bind a synthetic chromophore, merocyanine retinal, in place of the natural chromophore all-trans-retinal (ATR), we generated a protein with exceptionally bright and unprecedentedly red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence. We show that chromophore substitution generates a fluorescent Arch complex with a 200-nm bathochromic excitation shift relative to ATR-bound wild-type Arch and an emission maximum at 772 nm. Directed evolution of this complex produced variants with pH-sensitive NIR fluorescence and molecular brightness 8.5-fold greater than the brightest ATR-bound Arch variant. The resulting proteins are well suited to bacterial imaging; expression and stability have not been optimized for mammalian cell imaging. By targeting both the protein and its chromophore, we overcome inherent challenges associated with engineering bright NIR fluorescence into Archaerhodopsin. This work demonstrates an efficient strategy for engineering non-natural, tailored properties into microbial opsins, properties relevant for imaging and interrogating biological systems.

  6. Retinal degeneration in animal models with a defective visual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Continuous generation of visual chromophore through the visual (retinoid) cycle is essential to maintain eyesight and retinal heath. Impairments in this cycle and related pathways adversely affect vision. In this review, we summarize the chemical reactions of vitamin A metabolites involved in the retinoid cycle and describe animal models of associated human diseases. Development of potential therapies for retinal disorders in these animal models is also introduced. PMID:25210527

  7. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms ... Pigmentosa Additional Resources for Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to ...

  8. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  9. Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, James D.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated from the laboratory to the clinical over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives. Improved mobility and object detection are some of the more notable findings from the clinical trials. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. This paper reviews the recent clinical trials, highlights technology breakthroughs that will contribute to next generation of retinal prostheses. PMID:24710817

  10. HCN and chromophore formation on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Ishikawa, Yoji

    1987-01-01

    Reaction paths for the formation of HCN and chromophores on Jupiter are suggested. The reactions involve photolysis of ammonia/acetylene mixtures. Experimental data supporting these pathways are reported.

  11. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  12. Retinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision Diabetic eye disease Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is ... children. Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula Macular hole - ...

  13. Beyond spectral tuning: human cone visual pigments adopt different transient conformations for chromophore regeneration.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Cordomí, Arnau; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2016-03-01

    Human red and green visual pigments are seven transmembrane receptors of cone photoreceptor cells of the retina that mediate color vision. These pigments share a very high degree of homology and have been assumed to feature analogous structural and functional properties. We report on a different regeneration mechanism among red and green cone opsins with retinal analogs using UV-Vis/fluorescence spectroscopic analyses, molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that photoactivated green cone opsin adopts a transient conformation which regenerates via an unprotonated Schiff base linkage with its natural chromophore, whereas red cone opsin forms a typical protonated Schiff base. The chromophore regeneration kinetics is consistent with a secondary retinal uptake by the cone pigments. Overall, our findings reveal, for the first time, structural differences in the photoactivated conformation between red and green cone pigments that may be linked to their molecular evolution, and support the proposal of secondary retinal binding to visual pigments, in addition to binding to the canonical primary site, which may serve as a regulatory mechanism of dark adaptation in the phototransduction process.

  14. Laboratory Investigations of Jupiter's Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Robert W.; Baines, K. H.

    2009-09-01

    Ultraviolet- irradiated ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH) ice and its byproducts have long been postulated to be the source of the reddish coloring of the Great Red Spot (e,g., Lewis and Prinn (1970), West et al., 1986, Baines et al., 2004). NH4SH aerosols created near the 2.5-bar level on Jupiter may be transported upward to the 300-mbar level in the anti-cylonic environment of the Great Red Spot, where they are then subjected to solar ultraviolet irradiation. The irradiated ices and byproducts could be concentrated by the vortex action of the GRS, enhancing the reddish color above that which would be seen by an irradiated NH4SH cloud in the typical zone/belt structure of Jupiter. We have initiated an experimental study of potential sulfurous chromophores using a photolysis flow cell with temperatures and pressures controlled to simulate Jovian conditions. Photolysis is produced using Hg, Zn, or D2 lamps, each with different spectral characteristics. Analysis of the photoproducts is performed using ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectroscopy and the gaseous and sublimed products are also characterized using mass spectroscopy. Our first experiments have been with NH4SH condensed from mixtures of NH3 and H2S at 240 K. The irradiated condensate exhibits broad ultraviolet and visible features that may be attributed to absorptions by polysulfide ions (SnS2-) in ammonium polysulfide [(NH4+)2 SnS2-] and possibly to absorptions by hydropolysulfide ions (HSnS-). The measurements and comparisons to Jovian spectra will be presented.

  15. Retinal pathways influence temporal niche

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Susan E.; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Hillson, Holly; Menaker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, light input from the retina entrains central circadian oscillators located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The phase of circadian activity rhythms with respect to the external light:dark cycle is reversed in diurnal and nocturnal species, although the phase of SCN rhythms relative to the light cycle remains unchanged. Neural mechanisms downstream from the SCN are therefore believed to determine diurnality or nocturnality. Here, we report a switch from nocturnal to diurnal entrainment of circadian activity rhythms in double-knockout mice lacking the inner-retinal photopigment melanopsin (OPN4) and RPE65, a key protein used in retinal chromophore recycling. These mice retained only a small amount of rod function. The change in entrainment phase of Rpe65−/−;Opn4−/− mice was accompanied by a reversal of the rhythm of clock gene expression in the SCN and a reversal in acute masking effects of both light and darkness on activity, suggesting that the nocturnal to diurnal switch is due to a change in the neural response to light upstream from the SCN. A switch from nocturnal to diurnal activity rhythms was also found in wild-type mice transferred from standard intensity light:dark cycles to light:dark cycles in which the intensity of the light phase was reduced to scotopic levels. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which changes in retinal input can mediate acute temporal-niche switching. PMID:18695249

  16. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  17. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-11

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  18. Retine revisited.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D E

    2002-10-01

    Retine, so named by Albert Szent-Györgyi, an inhibitor of the growth of transplanted malignant tumours in animals, is present in all mammalian tissues and in urine. Its inhibitory activity was extensively investigated by Szent-Györgyi, but its exact chemical identity was not determined. Details of the reported physical and chemical properties of retine and its ubiquitous occurrence identify it as being identical to a complex mixture of lipid 2,4-diketones of similar ubiquitous occurrence. This lipid mixture has been extensively studied, and individual members have been synthesized.

  19. Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  20. A Possibly Universal Red Chromophore for Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Baines, Kevin; Fry, Patrick M.

    2016-10-01

    A new laboratory-generated chemical compound made from photodissociated ammonia (NH3) molecules reacting with acetylene (C2H2) was suggested as a possible coloring agent for Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) by Carlson et al. (2016, Icarus 274, 106-115). Baines et al. (2016, AAS/DPS Meeting abstract) showed that the GRS spectrum measured by the visual channels of the Cassini VIMS instrument in 2000 could be accurately fit by a cloud model in which the chromophore appeared as small particles in a physically thin layer immediately above the main cloud layer of the GRS. Here we show that the same chromophore and similar layer structure can also provide close matches to the 0.4-1 micron spectra of many other cloud features on Jupiter, suggesting that this material may be a nearly universal chromophore responsible for the various degrees of red coloration on Jupiter. This is a robust conclusion, even for 12 percent changes in VIMS calibration and large uncertainties in the refractive index of the main cloud layer due to uncertain fractions of NH4SH and NH3 in its cloud particles. The chromophore layer can account for color variations among north and south equatorial belts, equatorial zone, and the Great Red Spot, by varying particle size from 0.12 to 0.29 micron and optical depth from 0.06 to 0.76. The total mass of the chromophore layer is much less variable than its optical depth, staying mainly within 6-10 micrograms/cm2 range, but is only about half that amount in the equatorial zone. We also found a depression of the ammonia volume mixing ratio in the two belt regions, which averaged 0.4-0.5 × 10-4 immediately below the ammonia condensation level, while the other regions averaged twice that value.LAS and PMF acknowledge support from NASA Grant NNX14AH40G.

  1. Biophotons Contribute to Retinal Dark Noise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zehua; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of dark noise in retinal photoreceptors resulted in a long-lasting controversy over its origin and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we used a novel ultra-weak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) to detect biophotonic activity (emission) under dark conditions in rat and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) retinas in vitro. We found a significant temperature-dependent increase in biophotonic activity that was completely blocked either by removing intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) together or inhibiting phosphodiesterase 6. These findings suggest that the photon-like component of discrete dark noise may not be caused by a direct contribution of the thermal activation of rhodopsin, but rather by an indirect thermal induction of biophotonic activity, which then activates the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. Therefore, this study suggests a possible solution regarding the thermal activation energy barrier for discrete dark noise, which has been debated for almost half a century.

  2. Action spectrum for retinal thermal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Edsall, Peter R.

    1999-06-01

    The action spectrum for light-induced damage to the retina results from the wavelength dependence transmission of the preretinal ocular media, wavelength dependent absorption in retinal chromophores and chromatic aberration of the eye optics. While various light/tissue interaction mechanisms have been implicated, thermal mechanisms dominate in the red and near-infrared for all exposure durations and in the visible for exposures shorter than a few seconds. A number of investigators have measured the transmission of the eye and the spectra of retinal absorbers, and thermal models based on these data predict the broad features of the action spectrum. Dose/response studies with lasers and incoherent light sources, conducted over the past 10 years mainly validate the thermal models.

  3. Modulation of spectral properties and pump activity of proteorhodopsins by retinal analogues.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Srividya; Bécheau, Odette; Venselaar, Hanka; Frölich, Siebren; van der Steen, Jeroen B; Chen, Que; Radwan, Sarah; Lugtenburg, Johan; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; de Groot, Huub J M; de Grip, Willem J

    2015-04-15

    Proteorhodopsins are heptahelical membrane proteins which function as light-driven proton pumps. They use all-trans-retinal A1 as a ligand and chromophore and absorb visible light (520-540 nm). In the present paper, we describe modulation of the absorbance band of the proteorhodopsin from Monterey Bay SAR 86 gammaproteobacteria (PR), its red-shifted double mutant PR-D212N/F234S (PR-DNFS) and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR). This was approached using three analogues of all-trans-retinal A1, which differ in their electronic and conformational properties: all-trans-6,7-s-trans-locked retinal A1, all-trans-phenyl-retinal A1 and all-trans-retinal A2. We further probed the effect of these retinal analogues on the proton pump activity of the proteorhodopsins. Our results indicate that, whereas the constraints of the retinal-binding pocket differ for the proteorhodopsins, at least two of the retinal analogues are capable of shifting the absorbance bands of the pigments either bathochromically or hypsochromically, while maintaining their proton pump activity. Furthermore, the shifts implemented by the analogues add up to the shift induced by the double mutation in PR-DNFS. This type of chromophore substitution may present attractive applications in the field of optogenetics, towards increasing the flexibility of optogenetic tools or for membrane potential probes.

  4. High-sensitivity neutron diffraction of membranes: Location of the Schiff base end of the chromophore of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, M.P.; Westerhausen, J.; Wallat, I.; Seiff, F. )

    1988-04-01

    Three important events in the functional cycle of bacteriorhodopsin occur at the chromophore: the primary absorption of light, the isomerization from the all-trans to the 13-cis form, and the deprotonation and reprotonation of its Schiff base. The protonated Schiff base linkage of the chromophore with lysine-216 plays an essential role in the color regulation of the pigment and is most likely directly involved in the charge translocation of this light-driven proton pump. Although much is known about the structure of the protein, the position of this key functional group has not yet been determined. The authors have synthesized a retinal in which the five protons closest to the Schiff base are replaced by deuterons. The labeled retinal was spontaneously incorporated into bacteriorhodopsin by using a mutant of Halobacterium halobium that is deficient in the synthesis of retinal. The position of the labeled Schiff base end of the chromophore was determined in the two-dimensional projected density of dark-adapted bacteriorhodopsin by neutron diffraction. The result fits very well with their previous work using retinals that were selectively deuterated in the middle of the polyene chain or in the cyclohexene ring. A coherent structure emerges with the three labeled positions on one line, separated by distances that are in good agreement with the tilt angle of the polyene chain (about 20{degree}). The results show that it is possible to locate a small group containing as few as five deuterons in a membrane protein of molecular weight 27,000.

  5. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  6. Constraints of opsin structure on the ligand-binding site: studies with ring-fused retinals.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takahiro; Lim, In Taek; Kim, Don Moon; Zheng, Xiang-Guo; Yoshihara, Kazuo; Oyama, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroo; Shichida, Yoshinori; Ishiguro, Masaji

    2002-12-01

    Ring-fused retinal analogs were designed to examine the hula-twist mode of the photoisomerization of the 9-cis retinylidene chromophore. Two 9-cis retinal analogs, the C11-C13 five-membered ring-fused and the C12-C14 five-membered ring-fused retinal derivatives, formed the pigments with opsin. The C11-C13 ring-fused analog was isomerized to a relaxed all-trans chromophore (lambda(max) > 400 nm) at even -269 degrees C and the Schiff base was kept protonated at 0 degrees C. The C12-C14 ring-fused analog was converted photochemically to a bathorhodopsin-like chromophore (lambda(max) = 583 nm) at -196 degrees C, which was further converted to the deprotonated Schiff base at 0 degrees C. The model-building study suggested that the analogs do not form pigments in the retinal-binding site of rhodopsin but form pigments with opsin structures, which have larger binding space generated by the movement of transmembrane helices. The molecular dynamics simulation of the isomerization of the analog chromophores provided a twisted C11-C12 double bond for the C12-C14 ring-fused analog and all relaxed double bonds with a highly twisted C10-C11 bond for the C11-C13 ring-fused analog. The structural model of the C11-C13 ring-fused analog chromophore showed a characteristic flip of the cyclohexenyl moiety toward transmembrane segments 3 and 4. The structural models suggested that hula twist is a primary process for the photoisomerization of the analog chromophores.

  7. Jovian Chromophore Characteristics from Multispectral HST Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strycker, Paul D.; Chanover, N. J.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Banfield, D.; Gierasch, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    Characterizing the chromophores responsible for coloring the Jovian atmosphere remains a challenging problem. In this study, we used radiative transfer models to derive spectral shapes of chromophore particles at seven wavelengths in the visible regime from HST WFPC2 data. The observations we selected are from 15 May, 28 June, and 08 July 2008, covering a passage of Oval BA and the Great Red Spot, and include nine filters: F255W, F343N, F375N, F390N, F410M, F437N, F469N, F502N, and F673N. We employed a forward-modeling approach using an adding-doubling radiative transfer code developed to analyze Galileo SSI data (Simon-Miller et al. 2001, Icarus 154, 459). We adopted a model atmosphere with three aerosol layers: a stratospheric haze, upper tropospheric haze, and tropospheric cloud. We parametrized each aerosol layer by a base pressure, optical depth, particle radius, and particle color (a single scattering albedo at each wavelength). For filters F375N-F673N, we assumed the chromophore (non-white) component resides solely in the upper tropospheric haze. We present derived particle colors for Jovian locations with a large variation in observed color and a discussion of the number of independent chromophores necessary to produce the variations in derived particle color. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program through grant number NNX08AF53A. This work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #GO/DD11498.

  8. Molecular selectivity of brown carbon chromophores.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Roach, Patrick; Eckert, Peter; Gilles, Mary K; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and microspectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene SOA (LSOA) and α-pinene SOA (PSOA). The LSOA compounds readily formed adducts with Na(+) under electrospray ionization conditions, with only a small fraction of compounds detected in the protonated form. In contrast, a significant fraction of PSOA compounds appeared in the protonated form because of their increased molecular rigidity. Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas was detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl-imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the α-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  9. Theory of optical transitions in curved chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barford, William; Marcus, Max

    2016-09-01

    Using first order perturbation theory in the Born-Oppenheimer regime of the Frenkel-Holstein model, we develop a theory for the optical transitions in curved chromophores of π-conjugated polymers. Our key results are that for absorption, A, and emission, I, polarized parallel to the 0-0 transition, I01/I00 ≃ A01/A00 = S(N), where S(N) = S(1)/IPR is the effective Huang-Rhys parameter for a chromophore of N monomers and IPR is the inverse participation ratio. In contrast, absorption and emission polarized perpendicular to the 0-0 transition acquires vibronic intensity via the Herzberg-Teller effect. This intensity generally increases as the curvature increases and consequently I01/I00 increases (where I01 is the total 0-1 emission intensity). This effect is enhanced for long chromophores and in the anti-adiabatic regime. We show via DMRG calculations that this theory works well in the adiabatic regime relevant to π-conjugated polymers, i.e., ħ ω/|J| ≲ 0.2.

  10. Crystallographic Structure of Xanthorhodopsin, the Light-Driven Proton Pump With a Dual Chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Luecke, H.; Schobert, B.; Stagno, J.; Imasheva, E.S.; Wang, J.M.; Balashov, S.P.; Lanyi, J.K.

    2009-05-19

    Homologous to bacteriorhodopsin and even more to proteorhodopsin, xanthorhodopsin is a light-driven proton pump that, in addition to retinal, contains a noncovalently bound carotenoid with a function of a light-harvesting antenna. We determined the structure of this eubacterial membrane protein-carotenoid complex by X-ray diffraction, to 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. Although it contains 7 transmembrane helices like bacteriorhodopsin and archaerhodopsin, the structure of xanthorhodopsin is considerably different from the 2 archaeal proteins. The crystallographic model for this rhodopsin introduces structural motifs for proton transfer during the reaction cycle, particularly for proton release, that are dramatically different from those in other retinal-based transmembrane pumps. Further, it contains a histidine-aspartate complex for regulating the pK{sub a} of the primary proton acceptor not present in archaeal pumps but apparently conserved in eubacterial pumps. In addition to aiding elucidation of a more general proton transfer mechanism for light-driven energy transducers, the structure defines also the geometry of the carotenoid and the retinal. The close approach of the 2 polyenes at their ring ends explains why the efficiency of the excited-state energy transfer is as high as {approx}45%, and the 46{sup o} angle between them suggests that the chromophore location is a compromise between optimal capture of light of all polarization angles and excited-state energy transfer.

  11. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD. PMID:27990367

  12. Jovian chromophore characteristics from multispectral HST images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strycker, Paul D.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Banfield, Don; Gierasch, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    The chromophores responsible for coloring the jovian atmosphere are embedded within Jupiter's vertical aerosol structure. Sunlight propagates through this vertical distribution of aerosol particles, whose colors are defined by ϖ0( λ), and we remotely observe the culmination of the radiative transfer as I/ F( λ). In this study, we employed a radiative transfer code to retrieve ϖ0( λ) for particles in Jupiter's tropospheric haze at seven wavelengths in the near-UV and visible regimes. The data consisted of images of the 2008 passage of Oval BA to the south of the Great Red Spot obtained by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. We present derived particle colors for locations that were selected from 14 weather regions, which spanned a large range of observed colors. All ϖ0( λ) curves were absorbing in the blue, and ϖ0( λ) increased monotonically to approximately unity as wavelength increased. We found accurate fits to all ϖ0( λ) curves using an empirically derived functional form: ϖ0( λ) = 1 - A exp(- Bλ). The best-fit parameters for the mean ϖ0( λ) curve were A = 25.4 and B = 0.0149 for λ in units of nm. We performed a principal component analysis (PCA) on our ϖ0( λ) results and found that one or two independent chromophores were sufficient to produce the variations in ϖ0( λ). A PCA of I/ F( λ) for the same jovian locations resulted in principal components (PCs) with roughly the same variances as the ϖ0( λ) PCA, but they did not result in a one-to-one mapping of PC amplitudes between the ϖ0( λ) PCA and I/ F( λ) PCA. We suggest that statistical analyses performed on I/ F( λ) image cubes have limited applicability to the characterization of chromophores in the jovian atmosphere due to the sensitivity of I/ F( λ) to horizontal variations in the vertical aerosol distribution.

  13. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Reinhardt, B. A., Chern.Mater. 1990,2,660. 15. Larson, E . J.; Friesen , L. A.; Johnson, C. K., Chern.Phys. Lett. 1997,265, 161. 16. Albota, M.; Beljonee...PROJECT NUMBER 4348 5e. TASK NUMBER RG 6. AUTHOR(S) Joy E . Rogers (UES) Jonathan E . Slagle (AT&T Government Solutions) Douglas M. Krein (General...Chromophores 1,2Joy E . Rogers, 1,3Jonathan E . Slagle, 1,4Douglas M Krein, lAaron R. Burke, 1,5Benjamin C. Hal!, /.6Albert Fratini, 1,7Daniel G. McLean and

  14. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    L.; Pierce, B. M. Science 1994, 265, 632. (14) Prasad, P. N.; Reinhardt, B. A. Chem. Mater. 1990, 2, 660. (15) Larson, E . J.; Friesen , L. A.; Johnson...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4348 5e. TASK NUMBER RG 6. AUTHOR(S) Joy E . Rogers (UES) Jonathan E . Slagle (AT&T Government...afford T1. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores Joy E . Rogers,†,‡ Jonathan E . Slagle,†,§ Douglas M. Krein,†,| Aaron R. Burke,†,| Benjamin C. Hall

  15. Interfacial photochemistry of retinal proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Felix T.

    1999-09-01

    Retinal proteins are membrane-bound protein pigments that contain vitamin A aldehyde (retinal) as the chromophore. They include the visual pigment rhodopsin and four additional ones in the plasma membrane of Halobacterium salinarium (formerly Halobacterium halobium). These proteins maintain a fixed and asymmetric orientation in the membranes, and respond to a light stimulus by generating vectorial charge movement, which can be detected as an electric potential across the membrane or an electric current through the membrane. These phenomena are collectively called the photoelectric effects, which defy a rigorous quantitative treatment by means of either conventional (solution phase) photochemistry or conventional electrophysiology. As an alternative to the mainstream approach, we utilize the analytic tools of electrochemical surface science and electrophysiology to analyze two molecular models of light-induced charge separation and recombination. Being tutorial in nature, this article demands no prior knowledge about the subject. A parsimonious equivalent circuit model is developed. Data obtained from reconstituted bacteriorhodopsin membranes are used to validate the theoretical model and the analytical approach. Data generated and used by critics to refute our approach is shown to actually support it. The present analysis is sufficiently general to be applicable to other pigment-containing membranes, such as the visual photoreceptor membrane and the chlorophyll-based photosynthetic membranes. It provides a coherent description of a wide range of light-induced phenomena associated with various pigment-containing membranes. In contrast, the mainstream approach has been plagued with self-contradictions and paradoxes. Last, but not least, the alternative bioelectrochemical approach also exhibits a predictive power that has hitherto been generally lacking. Comparison of the photoelectric effects is made with regard to bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin, and the chlorophyll

  16. Azulenic Chromophores For Optical Limiting and Other Nonlinear Optical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    µ and Linear Polarizabilities α for Guaiazulenic Azo -Bridged Donor- Acceptor Chromophores by Stark Spectroscopy in PMMA………………………………….7 Azulenic......Dipole Moments ∆µ and Linear Polarizabilities α for Guaiazulenic Azo -Bridged Donor- Acceptor Chromophores by Stark Spectroscopy in PMMA. In collaboration

  17. Jovian Chromophore Characteristics from Multispectral HST Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strycker, Paul D.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Banfield, Don; Gierasch, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The chromophores responsible for coloring the jovian atmosphere are embedded within Jupiter's vertical aerosol structure. Sunlight propagates through this vertical distribution of aerosol particles, whose colors are defined by omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda), and we remotely observe the culmination of the radiative transfer as I/F(lambda). In this study, we employed a radiative transfer code to retrieve omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) for particles in Jupiter's tropospheric haze at seven wavelengths in the near-UV and visible regimes. The data consisted of images of the 2008 passage of Oval BA to the south of the Great Red Spot obtained by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. We present derived particle colors for locations that were selected from 14 weather regions, which spanned a large range of observed colors. All omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) curves were absorbing in the blue, and omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) increased monotonically to approximately unity as wavelength increased. We found accurate fits to all omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) curves using an empirically derived functional form: omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) = 1 A exp(-B lambda). The best-fit parameters for the mean omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) curve were A = 25.4 and B = 0.0149 for lambda in units of nm. We performed a principal component analysis (PCA) on our omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) results and found that one or two independent chromophores were sufficient to produce the variations in omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda). A PCA of I/F(lambda) for the same jovian locations resulted in principal components (PCs) with roughly the same variances as the omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) PCA, but they did not result in a one-to-one mapping of PC amplitudes between the omega-bar (sub 0)(lambda) PCA and I/F(lambda) PCA. We suggest that statistical analyses performed on I/ F(lambda) image cubes have limited applicability to the characterization of chromophores in the jovian atmosphere due to the sensitivity of 1/ F

  18. Cleavage of β-Carotene to Retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, Adrian; von Lintig, Johannes

    Elucidating the physiological roles played by vitamins has always been a major goal of nutritionists and biochemists. In humans, vitamin A deficiency disorder (VADD) in milder forms leads to night blindness, whilst more severe progression can lead to corneal malformations, e.g. xerophthalmia (See Volume 5, Chapters 8 and 9). This deficiency also affects the immune system, leads to infertility and causes malformations during embryogenesis. The molecular basis for these diverse effects lies in the dual role of vitamin A (retinol, 1) derivatives. In all visual systems, retinal (2), or a closely related compound such as 3-hydroxyretinal (3), is the chromophore of the visual pigments (e.g. rhodopsin) [1,2]. In vertebrates, the derivative retinoic acid (RA, 4) is a major signalling molecule that controls a wide range of processes. Retinoic acid is the ligand of the nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) [3-6] (see Chapter 15).

  19. Lake and sea populations of Mysis relicta (Crustacea, Mysida) with different visual-pigment absorbance spectra use the same A1 chromophore.

    PubMed

    Belikov, Nikolai; Yakovleva, Marina; Feldman, Tatiana; Demina, Olga; Khodonov, Andrei; Lindström, Magnus; Donner, Kristian; Ostrovsky, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Glacial-relict species of the genus Mysis (opossum shrimps) inhabiting both fresh-water lakes and brackish sea waters in northern Europe show a consistent lake/sea dichotomy in eye spectral sensitivity. The absorbance peak (λmax) recorded by microspectrophotometry in isolated rhabdoms is invariably 20-30 nm red-shifted in "lake" compared with "sea" populations. The dichotomy holds across species, major opsin lineages and light environments. Chromophore exchange from A1 to A2 (retinal → 3,4-didehydroretinal) is a well-known mechanism for red-shifting visual pigments depending on environmental conditions or stages of life history, present not only in fishes and amphibians, but in some crustaceans as well. We tested the hypothesis that the lake/sea dichotomy in Mysis is due to the use of different chromophores, focussing on two populations of M. relicta from, respectively, a Finnish lake and the Baltic Sea. They are genetically very similar, having been separated for less than 10 kyr, and their rhabdoms show a typical lake/sea difference in λmax (554 nm vs. 529 nm). Gene sequencing has revealed no differences translating into amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane parts of their opsins. We determined the chromophore identity (A1 or A2) in the eyes of these two populations by HPLC, using as standards pure chromophores A1 and A2 as well as extracts from bovine (A1) and goldfish (A2) retinas. We found that the visual-pigment chromophore in both populations is A1 exclusively. Thus the spectral difference between these two populations of M. relicta is not due to the use of different chromophores. We argue that this conclusion is likely to hold for all populations of M. relicta as well as its European sibling species.

  20. EUV sensitive photo-acid generator sans chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, K. Subramanya; Kang, Yool; Yasue, Takahiro; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Choi, Seong-Woon; Park, Chan-Hoon

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances in EUVL lithography is mainly centered on improving the RLS trade-off by employing new resist platforms, bulkier PAGs, EUV sensitizers etc. Among the several new kinds of PAGs proposed till date, the focus of development was mainly on the acid strength, compatibility with resin etc., whilst always retaining the mono, Di or tri phenyl chromophore of the PAG. Herein we report on the use of chromophore-less PAG for the patterning of EUVL resists. Resist performance using model acrylate and PHS based resist was studied. The patterned resists were characterized using SEM. Thermal stability of the PAG was compared with model chromophore containing PAG.

  1. Investigation into chromophore excited-state coupling in allophycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiguang; Zhao, Fuli; Wang, He Z.; Gao, Zhaolan; Yu, Zhenxin; Zhu, Jinchang; Xia, Andong; Jiang, Lijin

    1994-08-01

    Both theoretical and experimental studies are presented on chromophore excited-state coupling in linker-free allophycocyanin (APC), one of the antenna phycobiliproteins in algal photosynthesis. A three-site-coupling model has been introduced to describe the exciton interaction mechanism amoung the excited (beta) chromophore in APC, and the exciton energy splitting is estimated. Picosecond polarized fluorescence experiments both on monomeric and trimeric APC isolated from alga Spirulina platensis have been performed. The experimental results show that APC monomer and trimer exhibit remarkedly different spectropic characteristics, and satisfy the suggestion of strong excited- state coupling among chromophores in APC.

  2. Determination of chromophore distribution in skin by spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Lange, Marta; Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis

    2012-10-01

    Possibilities to determine chromophore distribution in skin by spectral imaging were explored. Simple RGB sensor devices were used for image acquisition. Totally 200 images of 40 different bruises of 20 people were obtained in order to map chromophores bilirubin and haemoglobin. Possibilities to detect water in vitro and in vivo were estimated by using silicon photodetectors and narrow band LEDs. The results show that it is possible to obtain bilirubin and haemoglobin distribution maps and observe changes of chromophore parameter values over time by using a simple RGB imaging device. Water in vitro was detected by using differences in absorption at 450 nm and 950 nm, and 650 nm and 950 nm.

  3. Tuning the Electronic Absorption of Protein-Embedded All-trans-Retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjing; Nossoni, Zahra; Berbasova, Tetyana; Watson, Camille T.; Yapici, Ipek; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-10-02

    Protein-chromophore interactions are a central component of a wide variety of critical biological processes such as color vision and photosynthesis. To understand the fundamental elements that contribute to spectral tuning of a chromophore inside the protein cavity, we redesigned human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) to fully encapsulate all-trans-retinal and form a covalent bond as a protonated Schiff base. The system, using rational mutagenesis designed to alter the electrostatic environment within the binding pocket of the host protein, enabled regulation of the absorption maximum of the pigment in the range of 425 to 644 nanometers. Moreover, with only nine point mutations, the hCRBPII mutants induced a systematic shift in the absorption profile of all-trans-retinal of more than 200 nanometers across the visible spectrum.

  4. Photoinduced electric currents in carotenoid-deficient Chlamydomonas mutants reconstituted with retinal and its analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sineshchekov, O A; Govorunova, E G; Dér, A; Keszthelyi, L; Nultsch, W

    1994-01-01

    Reconstitution of the photoelectric responses involved in photosensory transduction in "blind" cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii carotenoid-deficient mutants was studied by means of a recently developed population method. Both the photoreceptor current and the regenerative response can be restored by addition of all-trans-retinal, 9-demethyl-retinal, or dimethyl-octatrienal, while the retinal analogs prevented from 13-cis/trans isomerization, 13-demethyl-retinal and citral, are not effective. Fluence dependence, spectral sensitivity, and effect of hydroxylamine treatment on retinal-induced photoelectric responses are similar to those found earlier in green strains of Chlamydomonas, although an alternative mechanism of antenna directivity in white cells of reconstituted "blind" mutants (likely based on the focusing effect of the transparent cell bodies) leads to the reversed sign of phototaxis in mutant cells under the same conditions. The results obtained indicate that both photoreceptor current and regenerative response are initiated by the same or similar rhodopsins with arhaebacterial-like chromophore(s) and prove directly the earlier suggested identity of the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved in photomotile and photoelectric responses in flagellated algae. PMID:8075341

  5. Retinol Dehydrogenases Regulate Vitamin A Metabolism for Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The visual system produces visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal from dietary vitamin A, all-trans-retinol making this vitamin essential for retinal health and function. These metabolic events are mediated by a sequential biochemical process called the visual cycle. Retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) are responsible for two reactions in the visual cycle performed in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, photoreceptor cells and Müller cells in the retina. RDHs in the RPE function as 11-cis-RDHs, which oxidize 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal in vivo. RDHs in rod photoreceptor cells in the retina work as all-trans-RDHs, which reduce all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol. Dysfunction of RDHs can cause inherited retinal diseases in humans. To facilitate further understanding of human diseases, mouse models of RDHs-related diseases have been carefully examined and have revealed the physiological contribution of specific RDHs to visual cycle function and overall retinal health. Herein we describe the function of RDHs in the RPE and the retina, particularly in rod photoreceptor cells, their regulatory properties for retinoid homeostasis and future therapeutic strategy for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:27879662

  6. In-Planta Expression: Searching for the Genuine Chromophores of Cryptochrome-3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Göbel et al. present in this issue an exemplary study of identification of chromophores from Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-3. Usually taken for granted, proteins and cofactors, respective chromophores, from heterologous expression are considered identical to material isolated from their genuine host. Cryptochromes carry two chromophores, an antenna cofactor and a functional flavin chromophore, both noncovalently embedded into the protein. In particular the antenna chromophore is loosely bound and often lost during protein purification. The authors identify from plant-extracted Cry3 unambiguously N(5) ,N(10) -methenyltetrahydrofolate as antenna chromophore and flavin adenine dinucleotide as the functional chromophore.

  7. Raman spectroscopy reveals direct chromophore interactions in the Leu/Gln105 spectral tuning switch of proteorhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Joel M; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2008-09-18

    Proteorhodopsins are an extensive family of photoactive membrane proteins found in proteobacteria distributed throughout the world's oceans which are often classified as green- or blue-absorbing (GPR and BPR, respectively) on the basis of their visible absorption maxima. GPR and BPR have significantly different properties including photocycle lifetimes and wavelength dependence on pH. Previous studies revealed that these different properties are correlated with a single residue, Leu105 in GPR and Gln105 in BPR, although the molecular basis for the different properties of GPR and BPR has not yet been elucidated. We have studied the unexcited states of GPR and BPR using resonance Raman spectroscopy which enhances almost exclusively chromophore vibrations. We find that both spectra are remarkably similar, indicating that the retinylidene structure of GPR and BPR are almost identical. However, the frequency of a band assigned to the retinal C13-methyl-rock vibration is shifted from 1006 cm (-1) in GPR to 1012 cm (-1) in BPR. A similar shift is observed in the GPR mutant L105Q indicating Leu and Gln residues interact differently with the retinal C13-methyl group. The environment of the Schiff base of GPR and BPR differ as indicated by differences in the H/D induced down-shift of the Schiff base vibration. Residues located in transmembrane helices (D-G) do not contribute to the observed differences in the protein-chromophore interaction between BPR and GPR based on the Raman spectra of chimeras. These results support a model whereby the substitution of the hydrophilic Gln105 in BPR with the smaller hydrophobic Leu105 in GPR directly alters the environment of both the retinal C13 group and the Schiff base.

  8. Retinal Attachment Instability Is Diversified among Mammalian Melanopsins*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Farrens, David L.; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa; Furutani, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsins play a key role in non-visual photoreception in mammals. Their close phylogenetic relationship to the photopigments in invertebrate visual cells suggests they have evolved to acquire molecular characteristics that are more suited for their non-visual functions. Here we set out to identify such characteristics by comparing the molecular properties of mammalian melanopsin to those of invertebrate melanopsin and visual pigment. Our data show that the Schiff base linking the chromophore retinal to the protein is more susceptive to spontaneous cleavage in mammalian melanopsins. We also find this stability is highly diversified between mammalian species, being particularly unstable for human melanopsin. Through mutagenesis analyses, we find that this diversified stability is mainly due to parallel amino acid substitutions in extracellular regions. We propose that the different stability of the retinal attachment in melanopsins may contribute to functional tuning of non-visual photoreception in mammals. PMID:26416885

  9. Retinal Attachment Instability Is Diversified among Mammalian Melanopsins.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Farrens, David L; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa; Furutani, Yuji

    2015-11-06

    Melanopsins play a key role in non-visual photoreception in mammals. Their close phylogenetic relationship to the photopigments in invertebrate visual cells suggests they have evolved to acquire molecular characteristics that are more suited for their non-visual functions. Here we set out to identify such characteristics by comparing the molecular properties of mammalian melanopsin to those of invertebrate melanopsin and visual pigment. Our data show that the Schiff base linking the chromophore retinal to the protein is more susceptive to spontaneous cleavage in mammalian melanopsins. We also find this stability is highly diversified between mammalian species, being particularly unstable for human melanopsin. Through mutagenesis analyses, we find that this diversified stability is mainly due to parallel amino acid substitutions in extracellular regions. We propose that the different stability of the retinal attachment in melanopsins may contribute to functional tuning of non-visual photoreception in mammals.

  10. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  11. Highly transparent and birefringent chromophores for organic photorefractive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, R.; Glania, C.; Krämer, P.; Lukaszuk, K.; Matschiner, R.; Twieg, R. J.; You, F.

    1999-07-01

    A series of chromophores for application in organic photorefractive (PR) materials is investigated by electro-optical absorption measurements (EOAM). This experimental technique yields information on the transition dipole moment μag, the ground-state dipole moment μg, and the change of the dipole moment upon optical excitation Δ μ within the intense charge transfer (CT) band of the dyes. It is shown that the results of the EOAM experiment allow us to estimate the PR figures-of-merits (FOMs) of the chromophores by either perturbational two-level equations or Kramers-Kronig transformation. In particular, chromophores based on the heterocyclic dihydropyran and dihydropyridine groups in combination with dicyano and cyanocarboxy acceptor units were investigated. These donor-acceptor pairs yield chromophores close to the `cyanine limit' that is characterized by a small dipole difference, but a large ground-state dipole moment and a large polarizability anisotropy. This leads to very high PR FOMs of the new PR chromophores that are demonstrated to be superior to conventional second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores in situations where the medium has a low glass transition.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinitis pigmentosa retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of related eye disorders that ...

  13. [Physiology of the visual retinal signal: From phototransduction to the visual cycle].

    PubMed

    Salesse, C

    2017-03-01

    The retinal photoreceptors (rods and cones) are responsible for light absorption and transduction of the signal, which is transmitted to the other retinal nerve cells and then to the brain. The chromophore of visual pigments of rods and cones is a particular isomer of a vitamin A derivative. Light absorption by this chromophore leads to its isomerization and to a phototransduction cascade, which results in photoreceptor hyperpolarization and cessation of glutamate secretion at their synaptic terminals. Phototransduction of cones and rods differs in their signal amplification and inactivation, which is consistent with their respective functions. The rods serve for dim light vision, whereas color and detailed vision is provided by cones. The rods are thus much more sensitive than cones, but the time course of cones' photoresponse is ∼10 times faster than that of rods. The orientation of cone visual pigments in the retina is optimized to achieve their function. The isomerized chromophore of visual pigments is regenerated by a mechanism known as the visual cycle. This process takes place mainly in the retinal pigment epithelium for the rods and the glial Müller cells for the cones. Mutations of a large number of proteins involved in visual phototransduction and in the retinoid visual cycle are responsible for hereditary diseases leading to photoreceptor degeneration. However, gene therapy offers quite a bit of hope for treatment.

  14. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  15. Factors affecting the estimation of the relative amount of chromophore and chromophore area by the two-wavelength method of Patau and Ornstein.

    PubMed

    Van Oostveldt, P; Boeken, G

    1976-05-28

    Factors influencing the calculation of the relative amount of chromophore and the chromophore area by the two-wavelength method are examined. The study was carried out with the help of models and further tested on Feulgen stained preparations. Except for certain restrictions the difference between the chromophore area as calculated from the two transmissions measurements and the chromophore area obtained by planimetry can be used as a guide for determining the proper measuring conditions, including the choise of the two wavelengths.

  16. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  17. Spectral diffusion and drift: single chromophore and en masse.

    PubMed

    Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Silbey, Robert J

    2007-02-14

    We develop a systematic description of spectral diffusion of ideal chromophores interacting with incoherently relaxing two-state, localized environmental degrees of freedom ("spins") for general initial environment configurations. We remedy the existing, incomplete treatments by formulating the problem in terms of the proper correlation function and by obtaining an accurate solution for generic aperiodic arrangements of environmental spins, nearly free of the customary simplifying assumptions on the multiparticle spin coordinate distribution. We report and estimate, for the first time, the effects of the drift and distortion of a narrow spectral line that arise when the line is not in the center of the inhomogeneous band. While the drift turns out to be modest in most ensemble measurements, accounting for its effects is imperative in analyzing single chromophore spectral jumps, to which end the authors propose a novel experiment. Further, we argue that by employing a sufficiently large chromophore one can decouple the concentration of the fluctuating centers from the strength of their interaction with the chromophore. Finally, the additional line broadening, owing to a distribution of the central chromophore frequencies, is evaluated. Upper estimates for an analogous broadening stemming from a nonequilibrium environment are made.

  18. Bimetallic sandwichlike complexes as novel NLO chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Juergen; Brussard, Hugo C.; Dabek, Sven; Meyer-Friedrichsen, Timo; Wong, Hans

    1997-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear sesquifulvalene-type complexes [{LnM(l5C5H4)}Z{17C7H6)MLtn}mXm+i (m =0, 1 ; X = BF4, PF6) have been synthesized, particularly with regards to their nonlinear optical properties. Z =-: LM = CpFe, M'L' = -, la; LM = CpFe; M'L' = Cr(CO)3, ib; LM = CpFe, ML',, = RuCp, ic; LM = CpFe, L'M' = RUCP*, id; LM = CpRu; M'L' = -, le; LM =CpRu, M'L' RuCp, if, LM = CpRu, M'L' = RuCp*, ig - Z = C2: LM = CpFe, M'L' = Cr(CO)3, 2 - Z = C2H2:LM = CpFe, ML' = -, 3a; LM = CpFe, M'L' = Cr(CO)3, 3b; LM = CpFe, L'M' = RuCp, 3c; LM = Cp*Fe, M'L' = Cr(CO)3, 3d; LM = (Ph4C4)Co, M'L' = - 5; Z = thiophene-1,5-diyl (C4H2S): LM = CpFe, M'L' = -, 4a; LM = CpFe, M'L' = RuCp) (Cp = C5H5, Cp* C5Me5, Ph = C6H5). The ferrocenyl containing complexes reveal UV/vis spectra, showing long wave absorption bands beyond 550 nm which are assigned to a charge transfer (CT) transition between the cyclo-C5 and cyclo-C-, moieties. The corresponding transitions for the ruthenocenyl compounds if and ig are found below 500 nm. The CT transitions exhibit pronounced negative solvatochromism. Cyclic voltammetry studies and structural data of some of these compounds confirm the strong electronic coupling between the cyclo-C5 and the cyclo-C7 moieties. Hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) investigations of these mono- and dinuclear sesquifulvalene derivaties to determine the first hyperpolarizability 13 show several different important features: i) the measured 13 values of compounds with an additional spacer Z are the highest ever obtained for sandwich-type NLO chromophores; ii) the B values of the dinuclear sequifulvalene complexes surpass the 13 values of the mononuclear derivatives markedly; iii) the exchange of a monocationic electron accepting group (Cr(CO)3), with a dicationic one (RuCp) enhances 13 considerably, iv) the use of the (cyclobutadiene)(cyclopentadienyl)Co unit reveals a surprisingly large B value although this compound is mononuclear. The large experimental 13 values are in part assigned

  19. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, R. D.; Arango, C. A.; Reyes, A.

    2016-07-01

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  20. P23H opsin knock-in mice reveal a novel step in retinal rod disc morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Retinal rod photoreceptor cells have double membrane discs located in their outer segments (ROS) that are continuously formed proximally from connecting cilia (CC) and phagocytized distally by the retinal pigmented epithelium. The major component of these rod discs, the light-sensitive visual pigment rhodopsin (Rho), consists of an opsin protein linked to 11-cis-retinal. The P23H mutation of rod opsin (P23H opsin) is the most common cause of human blinding autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). A mouse model of adRP with this mutation (RhoP23H/+) shows low levels of P23H opsin protein, partial misalignment of discs and progressive retinal degeneration. However, the impact of mutant P23H opsin on the formation of abnormal discs is unclear and it is still unknown whether this mutant pigment can mediate phototransduction. Using transretinal ERG recordings, we demonstrate that P23H mutant Rho can trigger phototransduction but RhoP23H/P23H rods are ∼17 000-fold less sensitive to light than Rho+/+ rods and produce abnormally fast photo-responses. By analyzing homozygous RhoP23H/P23H knock-in mice, we show that P23H opsin is transported to ciliary protrusions where it forms sagittally elongated discs. Transmission electron microscopy of postnatal day (PND) 14 RhoP23H/+ mouse retina revealed disordered sagittally oriented discs before the onset of retinal degeneration. Surprisingly, we also observed smaller, immature sagittally oriented discs in PND14 Rho+/− and Rho+/+ mice that were not seen in older animals. These findings provide fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of the P23H mutant opsin and reveal a novel early sagittally aligned disc formation step in normal ROS disc expansion. PMID:24214395

  1. Study of smartphone suitability for mapping of skin chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, Ilona; Lacis, Matiss; Spigulis, Janis; Berzina, Anna; Valeine, Lauma

    2015-09-01

    RGB (red-green-blue) technique for mapping skin chromophores by smartphones is proposed and studied. Three smartphones of different manufacturers were tested on skin phantoms and in vivo on benign skin lesions using a specially designed light source for illumination. Hemoglobin and melanin indices obtained by these smartphones showed differences in both tests. In vitro tests showed an increment of hemoglobin and melanin indices with the concentration of chromophores in phantoms. In vivo tests indicated higher hemoglobin index in hemangiomas than in nevi and healthy skin, and nevi showed higher melanin index compared to the healthy skin. Smartphones that allow switching off the automatic camera settings provided useful data, while those with "embedded" automatic settings appear to be useless for distant skin chromophore mapping.

  2. Modern fluorescent proteins: from chromophore formation to novel intracellular applications

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    The diverse biochemical and photophysical properties of fluorescent proteins (FPs) have enabled the generation of a growing palette of colors, providing unique opportunities for their use in a variety of modern biology applications. Modulation of these FP characteristics is achieved through diversity in both the structure of the chromophore as well as the contacts between the chromophore and the surrounding protein barrel. Here we review our current knowledge of blue, green, and red chromophore formation in permanently emitting FPs, photoactivatable FPs, and fluorescent timers. Progress in understanding the interplay between FP structure and function has allowed the engineering of FPs with many desirable features, and enabled recent advances in microscopy techniques such as super-resolution imaging of single molecules, imaging of protein dynamics, photochromic FRET, deep-tissue imaging, and multicolor two-photon microscopy in live animals. PMID:22054544

  3. Supramolecular clippers for controlling photophysical processes through preorganized chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Ushie, Onumashi Afi; George, Subi J

    2014-04-22

    A novel supramolecular clipping design for influencing the photophysical properties of functional molecular assemblies, by the preorganization (clipping) of chromophores, is described. Several chromophores end functionalized with molecular recognition units were designed. These molecular recognition units serve as handles to appropriately position these systems upon noncovalent interactions with multivalent guest molecules (supramolecular clippers). Towards this goal, we have synthesized 1,5-dialkoxynaphthalene (DAN) and naphthalenediimide (NDI) functionalized with dipicolylethylenediamine (DPA) motifs. These molecules could preorganize upon noncovalent clipping with adenosine di- or triphosphates, which resulted in preassociated excimers and mixed (cofacial) charge-transfer (CT) assemblies. Chiral guest binding could also induce supramolecular chirality, not only into the individual chromophoric assembly but also into the heteromeric CT organization, as seen from the strong circular dichroism (CD) signal of the CT transition. The unique ability of this design to influence the intermolecular interactions by changing the binding strength of the clippers furthermore makes it very attractive for controlling the bimolecular photophysical processes.

  4. Synthesis of Polymers Containing Covalently Bonded NLO Chromophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denga, Xiao-Hua; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Walton, Connie; Penn, Benjamin B.; Amai, Robert L. S.; Clark, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Polymers containing covalently bonded nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores are expected to possess special properties such as greater stability, better mechanical processing, and easier film formation than their non-polymeric equivalent. For the present work, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was selected as the basic polymer unit on which to incorporate different NLO chromophores. The NLO components were variations of DIVA {[2-methoxyphenyl methylidene]-propanedinitrile} which we prepared from vanillin derivatives and malononitrile. These were esterified with methacrylic acid and polymerized either directly or with methyl methacrylate to form homopolymers or copolymers respectively. Characterization of the polymers and NLO property studies are underway.

  5. Retinal vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Friedlander, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potential use of stem cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in the treatment of retinal diseases. We demonstrate that the clinical utility of these EPC may be not limited in the treatment of ischemic retinal diseases but may also have application for the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders and for a form of cell-based gene therapy. One of the greatest potential benefits of bone marrow derived EPC therapy is the possible use of autologous grafts. Nonetheless, potential toxicities and unregulated cell growth will need to be carefully evaluated before this approach is brought to the clinics.

  6. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

  7. Probing ultrafast photochemistry of retinal proteins in the near-IR: bacteriorhodopsin and anabaena sensory rhodopsin vs retinal protonated Schiff base in solution.

    PubMed

    Wand, Amir; Loevsky, Boris; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2013-04-25

    Photochemistry of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), and all-trans retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) in ethanol is followed with femtosecond pump-hyperspectral near-IR (NIR) probe spectroscopy. This is the first systematic probing of retinal protein photochemistry in this spectral range. Stimulated emission of the proteins is demonstrated to extend deep into the NIR, and to decay on the same characteristic time scales previously determined by visible probing. No signs of a transient NIR absorption band above λpr > 1.3 μm, which was recently reported and is verified here for the RPSB in solution, is observed in either protein. This discrepancy demonstrates that the protein surroundings change photochemical traits of the chromophore significantly, inducing changes either in the energies or couplings of photochemically relevant electronic excited states. In addition, low-frequency and heavily damped spectral modulations are observed in the NIR signals of all three systems up to 1.4 μm. By background subtraction and Fourier analysis they are shown to resemble wave packet signatures in the visible, stemming from multiple vibrational modes and by analogy are assigned to torsional wave packets in the excited state of the retinal chromophore. Differences in the vibrational frequencies between the three samples and the said discrepancy in transient spectra are discussed in terms of opsin effects on the RPSB electronic structure.

  8. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  9. Retinal dysplasia of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Ian R; Layer, Noelle; de Alba Campomanes, Alejandra G

    2014-03-04

    Retinal dysplasia occurs in the setting of sporadic and syndromic holoprosencephaly, which often has associated ocular malformations. The pathology of this dysplasia, which includes rosettes, has been previously described. However, its funduscopic findings have not been well documented. The authors present the fundus images of a patient with severe holoprosencephaly with retinal dysplasia and bilateral optic nerve colobomas that resulted in death 2 weeks after birth.

  10. Leber's congenital amaurosis and the role of gene therapy in congenital retinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Walid; Sharif, Zuhair

    2017-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) and recent gene therapy advancement for treating inherited retinopathies were extensive literature reviewed using MEDLINE, PubMed and EMBASE. Adeno-associated viral vectors were the most utilised vectors for ocular gene therapy. Cone photoreceptor cells might use an alternate pathway which was not reliant of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived retinoid isomerohydrolase (RPE65) to access the 11-cis retinal dehydechromophore. Research efforts dedicated on the progression of a gene-based therapy for the treatment of LCA2. Such gene therapy approaches were extremely successful in canine, porcine and rodent LCA2 models. The recombinant AAV2.hRPE65v2 adeno-associated vector contained the RPE65 cDNA and was replication deficient. Its in vitro injection in target cells induced RPE65 protein production. The gene therapy trials that were so far conducted for inherited retinopathies have generated promising results. Phase I clinical trials to cure LCA and choroideremia demonstrated that adeno-associated viral vectors containing RPE genes and photoreceptors respectively, could be successfully administered to inherited retinopathy patients. A phase III trial is presently ongoing and if successful, it will lead the way to additional gene therapy attempts to cure monogenic, inherited retinopathies. PMID:28393043

  11. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  12. Redox chromophore compounds and electrodes of metal containing substituted bipyridines

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Cecil M.; Redepenning, Jody G.

    1986-01-01

    Chromophoric compounds, each having a wide range of distinct color changes in response to changes in the oxidation states thereof, are provided in the form of polymerizable monomers, and polymers thereof, of certain metal containing, and electron group substituted, 2,2'-bipyridine compounds.

  13. Unraveling the chromophoric disorder of poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    PubMed Central

    Thiessen, Alexander; Vogelsang, Jan; Adachi, Takuji; Steiner, Florian; Vanden Bout, David; Lupton, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The spectral breadth of conjugated polymers gives these materials a clear advantage over other molecular compounds for organic photovoltaic applications and is a key factor in recent efficiencies topping 10%. However, why do excitonic transitions, which are inherently narrow, lead to absorption over such a broad range of wavelengths in the first place? Using single-molecule spectroscopy, we address this fundamental question in a model material, poly(3-hexylthiophene). Narrow zero-phonon lines from single chromophores are found to scatter over 200 nm, an unprecedented inhomogeneous broadening that maps the ensemble. The giant red shift between solution and bulk films arises from energy transfer to the lowest-energy chromophores in collapsed polymer chains that adopt a highly ordered morphology. We propose that the extreme energetic disorder of chromophores is structural in origin. This structural disorder on the single-chromophore level may actually enable the high degree of polymer chain ordering found in bulk films: both structural order and disorder are crucial to materials physics in devices. PMID:24003119

  14. Unraveling the chromophoric disorder of poly(3-hexylthiophene).

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Alexander; Vogelsang, Jan; Adachi, Takuji; Steiner, Florian; Vanden Bout, David; Lupton, John M

    2013-09-17

    The spectral breadth of conjugated polymers gives these materials a clear advantage over other molecular compounds for organic photovoltaic applications and is a key factor in recent efficiencies topping 10%. However, why do excitonic transitions, which are inherently narrow, lead to absorption over such a broad range of wavelengths in the first place? Using single-molecule spectroscopy, we address this fundamental question in a model material, poly(3-hexylthiophene). Narrow zero-phonon lines from single chromophores are found to scatter over 200 nm, an unprecedented inhomogeneous broadening that maps the ensemble. The giant red shift between solution and bulk films arises from energy transfer to the lowest-energy chromophores in collapsed polymer chains that adopt a highly ordered morphology. We propose that the extreme energetic disorder of chromophores is structural in origin. This structural disorder on the single-chromophore level may actually enable the high degree of polymer chain ordering found in bulk films: both structural order and disorder are crucial to materials physics in devices.

  15. Chromophore Deprotonation State Alters the Optical Properties of Blue Chromoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheng-Yi; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lo, Shin-Yi; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Chromoproteins (CPs) have unique colors and can be used in biological applications. In this work, a novel blue CP with a maximum absorption peak (λmax) at 608 nm was identified from the carpet anemone Stichodactyla gigantea (sgBP). In vivo expression of sgBP in zebrafish would change the appearance of the fishes to have a blue color, indicating the potential biomarker function. To enhance the color properties, the crystal structure of sgBP at 2.25 Å resolution was determined to allow structure-based protein engineering. Among the mutations conducted in the Gln-Tyr-Gly chromophore and chromophore environment, a S157C mutation shifted the λmax to 604 nm with an extinction coefficient (ε) of 58,029 M-1·cm-1 and darkened the blue color expression. The S157C mutation in the sgBP chromophore environment could affect the color expression by altering the deprotonation state of the phenolic group in the chromophore. Our results provide a structural basis for the blue color enhancement of the biomarker development. PMID:26218063

  16. Ultraviolet light absorbers having two different chromophors in the same molecule

    DOEpatents

    Vogl, Otto; Li, Shanjun

    1988-05-17

    Ultraviolet light absorbing compounds having two different chromophors in the same molecule, particularly the benzotriazole chromophor and either the dihydroxybenzophenone or dihydroxyacetophenone chromophor; specifically, the two compounds 3,5-[di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl)]-2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone and 3,5-[di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl)]2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone.

  17. The Structure of the Chromophore within a Red Fluorescent Protein from Zoanthus sp.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    chromophore interacts with a protein environment. In the denatured state chromophore interactions with aminoacid side chains do not contribute...of aminoacid sequence of the chromopeptide The zFP576 chromophore-bearing peptide derived from extensive chymotryptic digestion was subjected to

  18. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  19. Synthetic control of retinal photochemistry and photophysics in solution.

    PubMed

    Bassolino, Giovanni; Sovdat, Tina; Liebel, Matz; Schnedermann, Christoph; Odell, Barbara; Claridge, Timothy D W; Kukura, Philipp; Fletcher, Stephen P

    2014-02-12

    Understanding how molecular structure and environment control energy flow in molecules is a requirement for the efficient design of tailor-made photochemistry. Here, we investigate the tunability of the photochemical and photophysical properties of the retinal-protonated Schiff base chromophore in solution. Replacing the n-butylamine Schiff base normally chosen to mimic the saturated linkage found in nature by aromatic amines results in the reproduction of the opsin shift and complete suppression of all isomerization channels. Modification of retinal by directed addition or removal of backbone substituents tunes the overall photoisomerization yield from 0 to 0.55 and the excited state lifetime from 0.4 to 7 ps and activates previously inaccessible reaction channels to form 7-cis and 13-cis products. We observed a clear correlation between the presence of polarizable backbone substituents and photochemical reactivity. Structural changes that increase reaction speed were found to decrease quantum yields, and vice versa, so that excited state lifetime and efficiency are inversely correlated in contrast to the trends observed when comparing retinal photochemistry in protein and solution environments. Our results suggest a simple model where backbone modifications and Schiff base substituents control barrier heights on the excited-state potential energy surface and therefore determine speed, product distribution, and overall yield of the photochemical process.

  20. Differential Light-induced Responses in Sectorial Inherited Retinal Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Eva; Cordomí, Arnau; Aguilà, Mònica; Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Dong, Xiaoyun; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Garriga, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited degenerative retinopathies caused by abnormalities of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium in the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor located in the vertebrate retina and is responsible for dim light vision. Here, novel M39R and N55K variants were identified as causing an intriguing sector phenotype of RP in affected patients, with selective degeneration in the inferior retina. To gain insights into the molecular aspects associated with this sector RP phenotype, whose molecular mechanism remains elusive, the mutations were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in heterologous systems, and studied by biochemical, spectroscopic, and functional assays. M39R and N55K opsins had variable degrees of chromophore regeneration when compared with WT opsin but showed no gross structural misfolding or altered trafficking. M39R showed a faster rate for transducin activation than WT rhodopsin with a faster metarhodopsinII decay, whereas N55K presented a reduced activation rate and an altered photobleaching pattern. N55K also showed an altered retinal release from the opsin binding pocket upon light exposure, affecting its optimal functional response. Our data suggest that these sector RP mutations cause different protein phenotypes that may be related to their different clinical progression. Overall, these findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms of sector RP associated with rhodopsin mutations. PMID:25359768

  1. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  2. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  3. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  4. Blue organic light-emitting diodes based on terpyridine-substituted triphenylamine chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Congbin; Wang, Xiaomei; Luo, Jianfang

    2017-02-01

    Two terpyridine-substituted triphenylamine chromophores, namely 4-[4-(2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridinyl)]phenyltriphenylamine (chromophore I) and 4-[4-(2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridinyl)] styryltriphenylamine (chromophore II), have been designed and applied as emitters in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Chromophore I and II exhibit high thermal stability with decomposition temperatures higher than 334 °C. And these chromophores show significantly different luminescent performance due to the role of different rigid phenyl/flexible styryl unit interlinking terpyridine and triphenylamine units which have different lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. The fluorescence lifetime of chromophore I is 3-fold longer than that of chromophore II and the maximum brightness of device used chromophore I as an emitting-layer in OLED is 28-fold larger than that of chromophore II in OLED. Chromophore I as an emitter in OLED exhibits blue electroluminescence peak at 460 nm (Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) x = 0.19, y = 0.22). By using chromophore I as an emitter in a four layers device, an efficient blue emission with the maximum brightness 3000 cd/m2 and maximum luminescence efficiency 3.6 cd/A is obtained.

  5. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  6. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  7. Retinoids and Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in molecular understanding of the retinoid cycle in mammalian retina stems from painstaking biochemical reconstitution studies supported by natural or engineered animal models with known genetic lesions and studies of humans with specific genetic blinding diseases. Structural and membrane biology have been used to detect critical retinal enzymes and proteins and their substrates and ligands, placing them in a cellular context. These studies have been supplemented by analytical chemistry methods that have identified small molecules by their spectral characteristics, often in conjunction with the evaluation of models of animal retinal disease. It is from this background that rational therapeutic interventions to correct genetic defects or environmental insults are identified. Thus, most presently accepted modulators of the retinoid cycle already have demonstrated promising results in animal models of retinal degeneration. These encouraging signs indicate that some human blinding diseases can be alleviated by pharmacological interventions. PMID:27917399

  8. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  9. Automatic Retinal Oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, G. H.; Karlsson, R. A.; Hardarson, S. H.; Mura, M. Dalla; Eysteinsson, T.; Beach, J. M.; Stefansson, E.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automating the evaluation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the retina. This method should prove useful for monitoring ischemic retinal diseases and the effect of treatment. In order to obtain saturation values automatically, spectral images must be registered in pairs, the vessels of the retina located and measurement points must be selected. The registration algorithm is based on a data driven approach that circumvents many of the problems that have plagued previous methods. The vessels are extracted using an algorithm based on morphological profiles and supervised classifiers. Measurement points on retinal arterioles and venules as well as reference points on the adjacent fundus are automatically selected. Oxygen saturation values along vessels are averaged to arrive at a more accurate estimate of the retinal vessel oxygen saturation. The system yields reproducible results as well as being sensitive to changes in oxygen saturation.

  10. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes.

  11. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  12. Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Thomas C

    2016-12-30

    As our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited retinal disease has expanded, gene therapy has advanced into clinical development. When the gene mutations associated with inherited retinal dystrophies were identified, it became possible to create animal models in which individual gene were altered to match the human mutations. The retina of these animals were then characterized to assess whether the mutated genes produced retinal phenotypes characteristic of disease-affected patients. Following the identification of a subpopulation of patients with the affected gene and the development of techniques for the viral gene transduction of retinal cells, it has become possible to deliver a copy of the normal gene into the retinal sites of the mutated genes. When this was performed in animal models of monogenic diseases, at an early stage of retinal degeneration when the affected cells remained viable, successful gene augmentation corrected the structural and functional lesions characteristic of the specific diseases in the areas of the retina that were successfully transduced. These studies provided the essential proof-of-concept needed to advance monogenic gene therapies into clinic development; these therapies include treatments for: Leber's congenital amaurosis type 2, caused by mutations to RPE65, retinoid isomerohydrolase; choroideremia, caused by mutations to REP1, Rab escort protein 1; autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, caused by mutations to ABCA4, the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding transporter; Usher 1B disease caused by mutations to MYO7A, myosin heavy chain 7; X-linked juvenile retinoschisis caused by mutations to RS1, retinoschisin; autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations to MERTK, the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase MER; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by mutations to ND4, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) subunit 4 and achromatopsia, caused by

  13. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Beach, James

    2014-09-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry.

  14. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  15. Singlet Oxygen Photosensitization by EGFP and its Chromophore HBDI

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Banzo, Ana; Nonell, Santi; Hofkens, Johan; Flors, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The photosensitization of reactive oxygen species and, in particular, singlet oxygen by proteins from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family influences important processes such as photobleaching and genetically targeted chromophore-assisted light inactivation. In this article, we report an investigation of singlet oxygen photoproduction by GFPs using time-resolved detection of the NIR phosphorescence of singlet oxygen at 1275 nm. We have detected singlet oxygen generated by enhanced (E)GFP, and measured a lifetime of 4 μs in deuterated solution. By comparison with the model compound of the EGFP fluorophore 4-hydroxybenzylidene-1,2-dimethylimidazoline (HBDI), our results confirm that the β-can of EGFP provides shielding of the fluorophore and reduces the production of this reactive oxygen species. In addition, our results yield new information about the triplet state of these proteins. The quantum yield for singlet oxygen photosensitization by the model chromophore HBDI is 0.004. PMID:17766345

  16. Influence of chromophore solubility on optical absorption and two-beam coupling gain in guest-host photorefractive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlen, C. R.; McGee, D. J.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed photorefractive materials such as PVK:TNF:ECZ:DMNPAA are based on polymers doped with nonlinear optical chromophores. The high chromophore concentration necessary for macroscopic nonlinear optical effects necessitates investigation of methods to enhance chromophore solubility in the host polymer. We have modified the chromophore DMNPAA producing two new chromophores DMNPAPOE and DMNPAPBE with different solubilities in the polymer. Two-wave mixing experiments indicate that composites containing these two chromophores are photorefractive. Absorption measurements indicate that polymer composites doped with DMNPAPBE exhibit a significantly different rate of opacity development than composites doped with DMNPAPOE, demonstrating the role of chromophore solubility in the development of enhanced lifetime photorefractive polymer composite materials.

  17. Cilio-retinal arterial circulation in central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that an occlusion of the central retinal artery is an essential prerequisite for haemorrhage formation after central retinal vein obstruction has been investigated by examining the fundus changes in patients with a cilio-retinal arterial circulation; the findings are at variance with the 'combined occlusion hypothesis'. Comparisons were made between the pathological features in two retinal capillary beds with independent sources of arterial supply--namely, the central retinal and cilio-retinal arteries--but with an obstructed venous drainage channel common to both--namely, the central retinal vein. The importance of intraluminal pressure changes (as distinct from perfusion changes) in the causation of haemorrhages and oedema after venous occlusion is stressed, and the role of arterial disease in the pathogenesis of venous occlusions is distinguished from its role in determining the sequelae of such occlusions. Images PMID:1203235

  18. Pyrene chromophores for the photoreversal of psoralen interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jens M; Stafforst, Thorsten

    2014-07-28

    Applying psoralen interstrand crosslinks for the photoactivation of nucleic acids is a new concept. To find chromophores that can efficiently stimulate crosslink repair we screened several pyrenes and appended them to peptide nucleic acids for their site-selective addressing. Even though pyrenes conjugated to uracil revealed desirable spectroscopic properties they were not effective in crosslink reversal. In contrast, bare pyrenes are well suitable for crosslink repair with 350 nm light showing an uncaging efficiency similar to classical photocaging groups.

  19. Development of Novel Two-Photon Absorbing Chromophores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    M. Urbas, Paul A. Fleitz, Joy E . Rogers, Jonathan E . Slagle, Daniel G. McLean, Richard L. Sutherland, Mark Brant , Douglas M. Krein, and...A. Fleitz (Exploratory Development, Hardened Materials Branch) Joy E . Rogers (UES) Jonathan E . Slagle (AT&T Government Solutions) Daniel G. McLean...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Invited Paper Development of novel two-photon absorbing chromophores Joy E . ~ o ~ e r s * " ’ ~ , Jonathan E . Slagle

  20. Alternative chromophores for use in light-activated surgical adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Brian D.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2003-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using alternative chromophores in light-activated surgical adhesives. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green (ICG), and methylene blue (MB) were investigated, as well as three different food colorings: red #40, blue #1, and green food coloring consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1. The study consisted of three components. First, the absorption profiles of the five chromophores, both diluted in deionized water and bound to protein, were recorded with a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. Second, the effect of accumulated thermal dosages on the stability of the absorption profiles was investigated. Third, the stability of the absorption profiles of the chromophore solutions when exposed to ambient light for an extended period of time was investigated. The peak absorption wavelengths of ICG, MB, red #40, and blue #1, were found to be 780 nm, 665 nm, 500 nm, and 630 nm respectively. The green food coloring had two absorption peaks at 417 nm and 630 nm, corresponding to the two dye components comprising this color. The peak absorption wavelength of the ICG shifted to 805 nm when bound to protein. ICG and MB showed a significant decrease in absorbance units with increased time and temperature when heated to temperatures up to 100 degrees C. Negligible change in absorption with accumulated thermal dose was observed for any of the three food colorings investigated. Photobleaching was observed in both ICG and MB solutions with exposure to a white light source. An 88% decrease in absorption was seen in ICG deionized water solution after 7 days of exposure with a corresponding 33% decrease in absorption seen in the MB deionized water solution. A negligible drop in absorption was observed from exposure to ambient light for a 12-week period with the three food colorings investigated.

  1. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C; Makino, Clint L

    2011-11-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light.

  2. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  3. Method Of Signal Amplification In Multi-Chromophore Luminescence Sensors

    DOEpatents

    Levitsky, Igor A.; Krivoshlykov, Sergei G.

    2004-02-03

    A fluorescence-based method for highly sensitive and selective detection of analyte molecules is proposed. The method employs the energy transfer between two or more fluorescent chromophores in a carefully selected polymer matrix. In one preferred embodiment, signal amplification has been achieved in the fluorescent sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) using two dyes, 3-aminofluoranthene (AM) and Nile Red (NR), in a hydrogen bond acidic polymer matrix. The selected polymer matrix quenches the fluorescence of both dyes and shifts dye emission and absorption spectra relative to more inert matrices. Upon DMMP sorption, the AM fluorescence shifts to the red at the same time the NR absorption shifts to the blue, resulting in better band overlap and increased energy transfer between chromophores. In another preferred embodiment, the sensitive material is incorporated into an optical fiber system enabling efficient excitation of the dye and collecting the fluorescent signal form the sensitive material on the remote end of the system. The proposed method can be applied to multichromophore luminescence sensor systems incorporating N-chromophores leading to N-fold signal amplification and improved selectivity. The method can be used in all applications where highly sensitive detection of basic gases, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), Sarin, Soman and other chemical warfare agents having basic properties, is required, including environmental monitoring, chemical industry and medicine.

  4. Nonplanar push-pull chromophores for opto-electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Breiten, Benjamin; Biaggio, Ivan; Diederich, François

    2010-01-01

    Donor-substituted cyanoethynylethenes (CEEs) are planar push-pull chromophores featuring intense intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) interactions and high third-order optical nonlinearities. Their thermal stability allows for the formation of crystalline thin films by vapor-phase deposition. On the other hand, high-quality amorphous thin films are preferred for opto-electronic applications and such films can be prepared using nonplanar push-pull chromophores with a less pronounced propensity to crystallize. By taking advantage of a versatile, atom-economic 'click-chemistry'-type transformation, involving a formal [2 + 2] cycloaddition of tetracyanoethene (TCNE) to electron-rich alkynes, followed by cycloreversion, stable donor-substituted 1,1,4,4-tetracyanobuta-1,3-dienes (TCBDs) are obtained in high yield and large quantities. These nonplanar push-pull chromophores also feature intense intramolecular CT and, in many cases, high third-order optical nonlinearities. Some of these compounds form high-optical-quality amorphous thin films by vapor-phase deposition, and first applications in next-generation opto-electronic devices have already been demonstrated. Chiral derivatives display high helical twisting power and are efficient dopants to translate molecular into macroscopic chirality, by switching nematic into cholesteric liquid crystalline phases.

  5. The Biochemical Basis of Vitamin A3 Production in Arthropod Vision.

    PubMed

    Babino, Darwin; Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D; Wyss, Adrian; Palczewski, Krzysztof; von Lintig, Johannes

    2016-04-15

    Metazoan photochemistry involves cis-trans isomerization of a retinylidene chromophore bound to G protein coupled receptors. Successful production of chromophores is critical for photoreceptor function and survival. For chromophore production, animals have to choose from more than 600 naturally occurring carotenoids and process them by oxidative cleavage and geometric isomerization of double bonds. Vertebrates employ three carotenoid cleavage oxygenases to tailor the carotenoid precursor in the synthesis of 11-cis-retinal (vitamin A1). Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) possess only one such enzyme, NinaB, which faces the challenge to catalyze these reactions in unison to produce 11-cis-3-hydroxy-retinal (vitamin A3). We here showed that key to this multitasking is a bipartite substrate recognition site that conveys regio- and stereoselectivity for double bond processing. One side performed the specific C11, C12 cis-isomerization and preferentially binds 3-OH-β-ionone rings sites. The other side maintained a trans configuration in the resulting product and preferentially binds noncanonical ionone ring sites. Concurrent binding of carotenoids containing two cyclohexyl rings to both domains is required for specific oxidative cleavage at position C15, C15' of the substrate. The unique reaction sequence follows a dioxygenase mechanism with a carbocation/radical intermediate. This ingenious quality control system guarantees 11-cis-3-hydroxy-retinal production, the essential retinoid for insect (vitamin A3) vision.

  6. Impacts of two point mutations of RPE65 from Leber's congenital amaurosis on the stability, subcellular localization and isomerohydrolase activity of RPE65.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2006-07-24

    RPE65, a membrane-associated protein in the retinal pigment epithelium, is the isomerohydrolase essential for regenerating 11-cis retinal, the chromophore for visual pigments. RPE65 mutations are associated with inherited retinal dystrophies. Here we report that single point mutations of RPE65, Y144D and P363T, identified in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), significantly decreased the stability of RPE65. Moreover, these mutations altered subcellular localization of RPE65 and abolished its isomerohydrolase activity. These observations suggest that the decreased protein stability and altered subcellular localization of RPE65 may represent a mechanism for these mutations to lead to vision loss in LCA patients.

  7. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  8. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  9. Retinal Photoisomerization in Rhodopsin: Electrostatic and Steric Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasello, Gaia; Altoe, Piero; Stenta, Marco; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Garavelli, Marco; Orlandi, Giorgio

    2007-12-26

    Excited state QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM(GAFF) calculations, by our recently developed code COBRAMM (Computations at Bologna Relating Ab-initio and Molecular Mechanic Methods), were carried out in rhodopsin to investigate on the steric and electrostatic effects in retinal photoisomerization catalysis due to the {beta}-ionone ring and glutammate 181 (GLU 181), respectively. The excited state photoisomerization channel has been mapped and a new christallographyc structure (2.2 Aa resolution) has been used for this purpose. Two different set-ups have been used to evaluate the electrostatic effects of GLU 181 (which is very close to the central double bond of the chromophore): the first with a neutral GLU 181 (as commonly accepted), the second with a negatively charged (i.e. deprotonated) GLU 181 (as very recent experimental findings seem to suggest). On the other hand, {beta}-ionone ring steric effects were evaluated by calculating the photoisomerization path of a modified chromophore, where the ring double bond has been saturated. Spectroscopic properties were calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  10. Quantum-classical model of retinal photoisomerization reaction in visual pigment rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Shigaev, A S; Feldman, T B; Nadtochenko, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2016-11-01

    A quantum-classical model of photoisomerization of the visual pigment rhodopsin chromophore is proposed. At certain (and more realistic) parameter value combinations, the model is shown to accurately reproduce a number of independent experimental data on the photoreaction dynamics: the quantum yield, the time to reach the point of conical intersection of potential energy surfaces, the termination time of the evolution of quantum subsystem, as well as the characteristic low frequencies of retinal molecular lattice fluctuations during photoisomerization. In addition, the model behavior is in good accordance with experimental data about coherence and local character of quantum transition.

  11. A semiempirical study of the optimized ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of retinal and its protonated Schiff base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parusel, A. B.; Pohorille, A.

    2001-01-01

    The electronic ground and first excited states of retinal and its Schiff base are optimized for the first time using the semiempirical AM1 Hamiltonian. The barrier for rotation about the C(11)-C(12) double bond is characterized by variation of both the twist angle delta(C(10)-C(11)-C(12)-C(13)) and the bond length d(C(11)-C(12)). The potential energy surface is obtained by varying these two parameters. The calculated ground state rotational barrier is equal to 15.6 kcal/mol for retinal and 20.5 kcal/mol for its Schiff base. The all-trans conformation is more stable by 3.7 kcal/mol than the 11-cis geometry. For the first excited state, S(1,) the 90 degrees twisted geometry represents a saddle point for retinal with the rotational barrier of 14.6 kcal/mol. In contrast, this conformation is an energy minimum for the Schiff base. It can be easily reached at room temperature from the planar minima since it is separated from them by a barrier of only 0.6 kcal/mol. The 90 degrees minimum conformation is more stable than the all-trans by 8.6 kcal/mol. We are thus able to present a reaction path on the S(1) surface of the retinal Schiff base with an almost barrier-less geometrical relaxation into a twisted minimum geometry, as observed experimentally. The character of the ground and first excited singlet states underscores the need for the inclusion of double excitations in the calculations.

  12. LDRD final report : energy conversion using chromophore-functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Zifer, Thomas; Zhou, Xinjian; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Kane, Alexander; Katzenmeyer, Aaron Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2010-09-01

    With the goal of studying the conversion of optical energy to electrical energy at the nanoscale, we developed and tested devices based on single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with azobenzene chromophores, where the chromophores serve as photoabsorbers and the nanotube as the electronic read-out. By synthesizing chromophores with specific absorption windows in the visible spectrum and anchoring them to the nanotube surface, we demonstrated the controlled detection of visible light of low intensity in narrow ranges of wavelengths. Our measurements suggested that upon photoabsorption, the chromophores isomerize to give a large change in dipole moment, changing the electrostatic environment of the nanotube. All-electron ab initio calculations were used to study the chromophore-nanotube hybrids, and show that the chromophores bind strongly to the nanotubes without disturbing the electronic structure of either species. Calculated values of the dipole moments supported the notion of dipole changes as the optical detection mechanism.

  13. Retinal isomer ratio in dark-adapted purple membrane and bacteriorhodopsin monomers.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, P; Mathew, M K; Sperling, W; Stoeckenius, W

    1989-01-24

    On the basis of data obtained by spectroscopic analysis and chromatography of retinal extracts, a consensus has been adopted that dark-adapted purple membrane (pm) contains 13-cis- and all-trans-retinal in equal amounts, whereas the light-adapted membrane contains all-trans-retinal only. We have developed an improved extraction technique which extracts up to 70% of the retinal in pm within 4 min. In the extracts from dark-adapted pm at room temperature, we consistently find 66-67% 13-cis-retinal and 33-34% all-trans-retinal, and more than 98.5% all-trans isomer in light-adapted samples. The spectrum obtained by reconstitution of bacterioopsin with 13-cis-retinal at 2 degrees C (to minimize isomerization) shows an absorbance maximum at 554 nm and agrees well with the spectrum for the 13-cis component calculated from the dark-adapted and light-adapted bR spectra with our extraction data. The ratio of 13-cis:all-trans isomer in dark-adapted pm is 2:1 and nearly constant between 0 and 38 degrees C but begins to decrease distinctly above 40 degrees C, and more rapidly near 70 degrees C, reaching 0.75 at 90 degrees C. The van't Hoff plot of the isomer ratio shows a nonlinear temperature dependence above 40 degrees C, indicating a more complex system than a simple thermal 13-cis/all-trans isomer equilibrium. We attribute the broadening, absorbance decrease, and blut shift of the visible absorption band with increasing temperature to the appearance of at least one and possibly two or three new chromophores which contain, mainly or exclusively, the all-trans isomer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The Roles of Molecular Structure and Effective Optical Symmetry in Evolving Dipolar Chromophoric Building Blocks to Potent Octopolar NLO Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tomoya; Sinks, Louise E.; Song, Kai; Hung, Sheng-Ting; Nayak, Animesh; Clays, Koen; Therien, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of mono-, bis-, tris-, and tetrakis-(porphinato)zinc(II) (PZn)-elaborated ruthenium(II) bis(terpyridine) (Ru) complexes has been synthesized in which an ethyne unit connects the macrocycle meso carbon atom to terpyridyl (tpy) 4-, 4′-, and 4″- positions. These supermolecular chromophores, based on the ruthenium(II) [5-(4′-ethynyl-(2,2′;6′,2″-terpyridinyl))-10,20-bis(2′,6′-bis(3,3-dimethyl-1-butyloxy)phenyl)porphinato]zinc(II)-(2,2′;6′,2″-terpyridine)2+ bis-hexafluorophosphate (RuPZn) archetype, evince strong mixing of the PZn-based oscillator strength with ruthenium terpyridyl charge resonance bands. Potentiometric and linear absorption spectroscopic data indicate that for structures in which multiple PZn moieties are linked via ethynes to a [Ru(tpy)2]2+ core, little electronic coupling is manifest between PZn units, regardless of whether they are located on the same or opposite tpy ligand. Congruent with these experiments, pump-probe transient absorption studies suggest that the individual RuPZn fragments of these structures exhibit, at best, only modest excited-state electronic interactions that derive from factors other than the dipole-dipole interactions of these strong oscillators; this approximate independent character of the component RuPZn oscillators enables fabrication of NLO multipoles with extraordinary hyperpolarizabilities. Dynamic hyperpolarizability (βλ) values and depolarization ratios (ρ) were determined from hyper-Rayleigh light scattering (HRS) measurements carried out at an incident irradiation wavelength (λinc) of 1300 nm. The depolarization ratio data provide an experimental measure of chromophore optical symmetry; appropriate coupling of multiple charge-transfer oscillators produces structures having enormous averaged hyperpolarizabilities (βHRS values), while evolving the effective chromophore symmetry from purely dipolar (e.g., Ru(tpy)[4-(Znporphyrin)ethynyl-tpy](PF6)2, βHRS = 1280 × 10−30 esu, ρ = 3

  15. Absorption Spectrum of the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Anion In Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Lapierre, A.; Andersen, J. U.; Pedersen, U. V.; Tomita, S.; Andersen, L. H.

    2001-11-01

    A sensitive photoabsorption technique for studies of gas-phase biomolecules has been used at the ELISA electrostatic heavy-ion storage ring. We show that the anion form of the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein in vacuo has an absorption maximum at 479 nm, which coincides with one of the two absorption peaks of the protein. Its absorption characteristics are therefore ascribed to intrinsic chemical properties of the chromophore. Evidently, the special β-can structure of the protein provides shielding of the chromophore from the surroundings without significantly changing the electronic structure of the chromophore through interactions with amino acid side chains.

  16. Microring resonators fabricated by electron beam bleaching of chromophore doped polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haishan; Chen Antao; Olbricht, Benjamin C.; Davies, Joshua A.; Sullivan, Philip A.; Liao Yi; Dalton, Larry R.

    2008-05-12

    Decomposition of chromophore molecules under direct electron beam irradiation reduces the refractive index of chromophore containing polymers. The induced refractive index contrast between the exposed and unexposed regions is high enough for waveguide bends of small radius and thus microring resonator devices. This electron beam bleaching of chromophore-containing polymers provides a fabrication approach for nonlinear polymer optical waveguide devices. Fabrication of high quality microring resonators with critical feature size on the order of 100 nm was demonstrated with this technique in an electro-optic polymer that contains YL124 chromophores.

  17. H- and J-aggregation of fluorene-based chromophores.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yonghong; Yuan, Wen; Jia, Zhe; Liu, Gao

    2014-12-11

    Understanding of H- and J-aggregation behaviors in fluorene-based polymers is significant both for determining the origin of various red-shifted emissions occurring in blue-emitting polyfluorenes and for developing polyfluorene-based device performance. In this contribution, we demonstrate a new theory of the H- and J-aggregation of polyfluorenes and oligofluorenes, and understand the influence of chromosphere aggregation on their photoluminescent properties. H- and J-aggregates are induced by a continuous increasing concentration of the oligofluorene or polyfluorene solution. A relaxed molecular configuration is simulated to illustrate the spatial arrangement of the bonding of fluorenes. It is indicated that the relaxed state adopts a 21 helical backbone conformation with a torsion angle of 18° between two connected repeat units. This configuration makes the formation of H- and J-aggregates through the strong π-π interaction between the backbone rings. A critical aggregation concentration is observed to form H- and J-aggregates for both polyfluorenes and oligofluorenes. These aggregates show large spectral shifts and distinct shape changes in photoluminescent excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. Compared with "isolated" chromophores, H-aggregates induce absorption spectral blue-shift and fluorescence spectral red-shift but largely reduce fluorescence efficiency. "Isolated" chromophores not only refer to "isolated molecules" but also include those associated molecules if their conjugated backbones are not compact enough to exhibit perturbed absorption and emission. J-aggregates induce absorption spectral red-shift and fluorescence spectral red-shift but largely enhance fluorescence efficiency. The PLE and PL spectra also show that J-aggregates dominate in concentrated solutions. Different from the excimers, the H- and J-aggregate formation changes the ground-state absorption of fluorene-based chromophores. H- and J-aggregates show changeable

  18. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  19. Photoinduced charge separation by polymer-bound chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1991-09-01

    This project has examined the photodynamic behavior of water-soluble polymers that have covalently linked hydrophobic chromophores spaced along the chains. These polymeric systems have been examined for photoinduced charge separation with electron-accepting ions having different total charge. Focus has been on the excited singlet (S{sub 1}) state formed by laser flash absorption. The effects of pH and ionic strength -- factors that govern the conformational nature of the polymer in solution -- have been studied. A second major effort has been to study photoinduced redox processes involving excited states of water-soluble variants of anthracene and acridine. 27 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Silver cluster chromophores for absorption enhancement of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland; Bonacić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2009-04-23

    We present a theoretical study of the structural and optical properties of tripeptide-silver cluster hybrid systems which shows that silver clusters induce significant absorption enhancement in the spectral region between 225 and 350 nm with respect to the pure peptide. This allows the use of clusters as chromophores for absorption enhancement of peptides and proteins and offers a potential for different applications in biosensing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cluster binding can change the conformational preference for the secondary structure type leading possibly to new functional properties.

  1. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  2. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  3. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  4. Intraocular retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, M S

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An electronic implant that can bypass the damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulate the remaining retinal neurons to restore useful vision has been proposed. A number of key questions remain to make this approach feasible. The goal of this thesis is to address the following 2 specific null hypotheses: (1) Stimulus parameters make no difference in the electrically elicited retinal responses. (2) Just as we have millions of photoreceptors, so it will take a device that can generate millions of pixels/light points to create useful vision. METHODS: For electrophysiologic experiments, 2 different setups were used. In the first setup, charge-balanced pulses were delivered to the retinal surface via electrodes inserted through an open sky approach in normal or blind retinal degenerate (rd) mice. In the second setup, the rabbit retina was removed under red light conditions from an enucleated eye and then maintained in a chamber while being superfused with oxygenated, heated Ames media. In both setups, stimulating electrodes and recording electrodes were positioned on the retinal surface to evaluate the effect of varying stimulation parameters on the orthodromic retinal responses (i.e., recording electrode placed between stimulating electrodes and optic nerve head). For psychophysical experiments, visual images were divided into pixels of light that could be projected in a pattern on the retina in up to 8 sighted volunteers. Subjects were asked to perform various tasks ranging from reading and face recognition to various activities of daily living. RESULTS: Electrophysiologic experiments: In a normal mouse, a single cycle of a 1-kHz sine wave was significantly more efficient than a 1-kHz square wave (P < .05), but no such difference was noted in either of the 8- or 16-week-old rd mouse groups (8-week-old, P = .426; 16-week-old, P = .078). Charge threshold was significantly higher in 16-week-old rd mouse versus both 8-week-old rd and normal mouse for every

  5. Skin image illumination modeling and chromophore identification for melanoma diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Zerubia, Josiane

    2015-05-01

    The presence of illumination variation in dermatological images has a negative impact on the automatic detection and analysis of cutaneous lesions. This paper proposes a new illumination modeling and chromophore identification method to correct lighting variation in skin lesion images, as well as to extract melanin and hemoglobin concentrations of human skin, based on an adaptive bilateral decomposition and a weighted polynomial curve fitting, with the knowledge of a multi-layered skin model. Different from state-of-the-art approaches based on the Lambert law, the proposed method, considering both specular reflection and diffuse reflection of the skin, enables us to address highlight and strong shading effects usually existing in skin color images captured in an uncontrolled environment. The derived melanin and hemoglobin indices, directly relating to the pathological tissue conditions, tend to be less influenced by external imaging factors and are more efficient in describing pigmentation distributions. Experiments show that the proposed method gave better visual results and superior lesion segmentation, when compared to two other illumination correction algorithms, both designed specifically for dermatological images. For computer-aided diagnosis of melanoma, sensitivity achieves 85.52% when using our chromophore descriptors, which is 8~20% higher than those derived from other color descriptors. This demonstrates the benefit of the proposed method for automatic skin disease analysis.

  6. The role of chromophore coupling in singlet fission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Nozik, Arthur J; Michl, Josef

    2013-06-18

    Certain organic materials can generate more than one electron-hole pair per absorbed photon, a property that could revolutionize the prospects for solar energy. This process, called singlet fission, is one possible "exciton multiplication" scheme that could be useful in a variety of photovoltaic device designs from dye-sensitized solar cells to solar cell bilayers to bulk heterojunctions. For such applications to be possible, however, singlet fission must occur with near perfect efficiency in compounds that also have other requisite properties such as strong visible light absorption and photostability. Many recent investigations of singlet fission have focused on crystalline polyacenes, which have been known for some time to undergo singlet fission. While these materials have promise, limitations in stability, cost, and performance may hinder practical application of polyacene solar cells, while their complex photophysics may limit our fundamental understanding of singlet fission in crystalline polyacenes. In this Account, we describe rationally designed singlet fission chromophores whose excited state dynamics should be fairly simple and whose coupling can be well controlled through the formation of covalent dimers, aggregates, or polycrystalline films. In principle, investigations of these chromophores should provide the clearest connection to theoretical concepts explaining how an excited state evolves from a singlet (S1) into two triplets (TT). Realizing the promise of efficient singlet fission rests with two tasks: (i) producing an ideal molecular energy level structure and (ii) inducing the correct type and strength of chromophore coupling. In this Account, we offer theoretical guidance for achieving (i) and consider more extensively recent results aimed at (ii). For (i), theoretical guidance suggests that, in addition to alternant hydrocarbons like tetracene and pentacene, biradicals (i.e., molecules with two independent radical centers) may also be used as

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid phospholipid differentially modulates the conformation of G90V and N55K rhodopsin mutants associated with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Herrera-Hernández, María Guadalupe; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2017-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual photoreceptor of the retinal rod cells that mediates dim light vision and a prototypical member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The structural stability and functional performance of rhodopsin are modulated by membrane lipids. Docosahexaenoic acid has been shown to interact with native rhodopsin but no direct evidence has been established on the effect of such lipid on the stability and regeneration of rhodopsin mutants associated with retinal diseases. The stability and regeneration of two thermosensitive mutants G90V and N55K, associated with the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa, have been analyzed in docosohexaenoic phospholipid (1,2-didocosa-hexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DDHA-PC) liposomes. G90V mutant reconstituted in DDHA-PC liposomes significantly increased its thermal stability, but N55K mutant showed similar thermal sensitivity both in dodecyl maltoside detergent solution and in DDHA-PC liposomes. The retinal release process, measured by fluorescence spectroscopy, became faster in the lipid system for the two mutants. The opsin conformation was stabilized for the G90V mutant allowing improved retinal uptake whereas no chromophore binding could be detected for N55K opsin after photoactivation. The results emphasize the distinct role of DHA on different phenotypic rhodopsin mutations associated with classical (G90V) and sector (N55K) retinitis pigmentosa.

  8. Efficient femtosecond energy transfer from carotenoid to retinal in gloeobacter rhodopsin-salinixanthin complex.

    PubMed

    Iyer, E Siva Subramaniam; Gdor, Itay; Eliash, Tamar; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2015-02-12

    The retinal proton pump xanthorhodopsin (XR) was recently found to function with an attached carotenoid light harvesting antenna, salinixanthin (SX). It is intriguing to discover if this departure from single chromophore architecture is singular or if it has been adopted by other microbial rhodopsins. In search of other cases, retinal protein encoding genes in numerous bacteria have been identified containing sequences corresponding to carotenoid binding sites like that in XR. Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR), exhibiting particularly close homology to XR, has been shown to attach SX, and fluorescence measurements suggest SX can function as a light harvesting (LH) antenna in GR as well. In this study, we test this suggestion in real time using ultrafast transient absorption. Results show that energy transfer indeed occurs from S2 of SX to retinal in the GR-SX composite with an efficiency of ∼40%, even higher than that in XR. This validates the earlier fluorescence study, and supports the notion that many microbial retinal proteins use carotenoid antennae to harvest light.

  9. Synthesis and photochemistry of pH-sensitive GFP chromophore analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nobel GFP chromophore analogues containing 2-thienyl-, 5-methyl-2-furyl-, 2-pyrryl, and 6-methyl-2-pyridyl-groups were synthesized, and their fluorescence spectra were recorded across pH range of 1 to 7. The GFP chromophores prevent photoisomerizaiton in acidic media and increase their fluorescent a...

  10. High T(g) photorefractive polymers: influence of the chromophores' beta tensor.

    PubMed

    Acebal, P; Blaya, S; Carretero, L

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we study the effect of the chromophores' beta tensor active components on the diffraction efficiency of a high T(g) photorefractive polymer. In particular, we study the two simplest structures with nonvanishing dipole moment, the one-dimension push-pull systems, and the Lambda-shaped chromophores. We have developed a model that relate the diffraction efficiency expression with experimental conditions and microscopic properties of the molecules used. Using this model we determine the optimum experimental conditions for both kinds of chromophores and the criteria for the design of chromophores with improved microscopic properties. The model was also used to evaluate the diffraction efficiency of the chromophore Disperse Red 1 (DR1) with a good agreement with experimental data present in bibliography, and of other chromophores selected with the criteria derived from the model, using quantum mechanical calculations to obtain the microscopic properties. Using the designed chromophores diffraction efficiencies more than one order of magnitude higher than that calculated for DR1 with the experimental conditions has been obtained in simulations. These chromophores also exhibit a low dependency of eta on the electric field polarization in contrast to the DR1 or the low T(g) photoreactive materials.

  11. The nature of the chromophore responsible for naturally occurring fluorescence in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Weagle, G; Paterson, P E; Kennedy, J; Pottier, R

    1988-11-01

    Normal mouse skin has a prominent fluorescence peak at 674 nm. Fluorescence emission and fluorescence excitation spectroscopy, carried out both in vitro and in vivo, led to the conclusion that the chromophore(s) responsible for this naturally occurring fluorescence is/are pheophorbide a and/or pheophytin a, degradation products of chlorophyll a that are derived from the mouse food.

  12. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  13. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  14. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  15. Low Level Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    18 Related Projects ........................ . . ....... 20 References . . . . .......................... 22 2 INTRODUCTION The objectives of...fluorescein is a potent phototoxic agent in the retina.26 The damage threshold for blue light retinal damage is lowered by a factor of ten after an... Related to the Probiem of Retinal Light Damage 1. Corneal Holography 2. Hematoporphyrin Studies 3. Fluorescein Fluorescence Measurements 7 EQUIPMENT

  16. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  17. A synthetic GFP-like chromophore undergoes base-catalyzed autoxidation into acylimine red form.

    PubMed

    Ivashkin, Pavel E; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Lukyanov, Sergey; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2011-04-15

    Fluorescent proteins are widely used in modern experimental biology, but much controversy exists regarding details of maturation of different types of their chromophores. Here we studied possible mechanisms of DsRed-type red chromophore formation using synthetic biomimetic GFP-like chromophores, bearing an acylamino substituent, corresponding to an amino acid residue at position 65. We have shown these model compounds to readily react with molecular oxygen to produce a highly unstable DsRed-like acylimine, isolated in the form of stable derivatives. Under the same aerobic conditions an unusual red-shifted imide chromophore--a product of 4-electron oxidation of Gly65 residue--is formed. Our data showed that GFP chromophore is prone to autoxidation at position 65 Cα by its chemical nature with basic conditions being the only key factor required.

  18. Chromophoric signatures of microbial by-products in the dark ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalá, Teresa S.; Reche, Isabel; Ramón, Cintia L.; López-Sanz, Àngel; Álvarez, Marta; Calvo, Eva; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé A.

    2016-07-01

    Detailed examination of the absorption spectra from dark ocean samples allowed us to identify and deconvolve two distinct chromophores centered at 302 nm (UV) and 415 nm (visible) from the exponential decay curve characteristic of humic substances. The UV chromophore was ubiquitous in intermediate and deep waters, and it has been proposed as the secondary absorption peak of nitrate. The visible chromophore was prominent at the central and intermediate water masses of the North Pacific, and it has been proposed as cytochrome c. Subtraction of the modeled absorption spectra of the two chromophores from the measured absorption spectrum of the samples leads to a spectral slope overestimation by 13.3 ± 6.0% for S275-295 and 14.8 ± 10.6% for S350-400. To only consider the chromophoric fraction of DOM, the absorption spectra of nitrate should be subtracted in samples with a [NO3-]:a302 ratio > 70 µM m.

  19. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  20. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  1. Peptide-Modulated Self-Assembly of Chromophores toward Biomimetic Light-Harvesting Nanoarchitectonics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qianli; Liu, Kai; Abbas, Manzar; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-02-10

    Elegant self-assembling complexes by the combination of proteins/peptides with functional chromophores are decisively responsible for highly efficient light-harvesting and energy transfer in natural photosynthetic systems. Mimicking natural light-harvesting complexes through synthetic peptides is attractive due to their advantanges of programmable primary structure, tunable self-assembly architecture and easy availability in comparison to naturally occuring proteins. Here, an overview of recent progresses in the area of biomimetic light-harvesting nanoarchitectonics based on peptide-modulated self-assembly of chromophores is provided. Adjusting the organization of chromophores, either by creating peptide-chromophore conjugates or by the non-covalent assembly of peptides and chromophores are highlighted. The light-harvesting properties, especially the energy transfer of the biomimetic complexes are critically discussed. The applications of such complexes in the mineralization of inorganic nanoparticles, generation of molecular hydrogen and oxygen, and photosynthesis of bioactive molecules are also included.

  2. Vibronic coupling effect on circular dichroism spectrum: Carotenoid-retinal interaction in xanthorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.; Balashov, Sergei P.

    2017-03-01

    The role of vibronic coupling of antenna carotenoid and retinal in xanthorhodopsin (XR) in its circular dichroism (CD) spectrum is examined computationally. A vibronic exciton model combined with a transition-density-fragment interaction (TDFI) method is developed, and applied to absorption and CD spectral calculations of XR. The TDFI method is based on the electronic Coulomb and exchange interactions between transition densities for individual chromophores [K. J. Fujimoto, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034101 (2012)], which provides a quantitative description of electronic coupling energy. The TDFI calculation reveals a dominant contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electronic coupling energy and a negligible contribution of the exchange interaction, indicating that the antenna function of carotenoid results from the Förster type of excitation-energy transfer, not from the Dexter one. The calculated absorption and CD spectra successfully reproduce the main features of the experimental results, which allow us to investigate the mechanism of biphasic CD spectrum observed in XR. The results indicate that vibronic coupling between carotenoid and retinal plays a significant role in the shape of the CD spectrum. Further analysis reveals that the negative value of electronic coupling directly contributes to the biphasic shape of CD spectrum. This study also reveals that the C6—C7 bond rotation of salinixanthin is not the main factor for the biphasic CD spectrum although it gives a non-negligible contribution to the spectral shift. The present method is useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying the chromophore-chromophore interactions in biological systems.

  3. Photon upconversion sensitized by a Ru(II)-pyrenyl chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fan; Lazorski, Megan S.; Castellano, Felix N.

    2015-01-01

    The near-visible-to-blue singlet fluorescence of anthracene sensitized by a ruthenium chromophore with a long-lived triplet-excited state, [Ru(5-pyrenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)3](PF6)2, in acetonitrile was investigated. Low intensity non-coherent green light was used to selectively excite the sensitizer in the presence of micromolar concentrations of anthracene generating anti-Stokes, singlet fluorescence in the latter, even with incident power densities below 500 μW cm−2. The resultant data are consistent with photon upconversion proceeding from sensitized triplet–triplet annihilation (TTA) of the anthracene acceptor molecules, confirmed through transient absorption spectroscopy as well as static and dynamic photoluminescence experiments. Additionally, quadratic-to-linear incident power regimes for the upconversion process were identified for this composition under monochromatic 488 nm excitation, consistent with a sensitized TTA mechanism ultimately producing the anti-Stokes emission characteristic of anthracene singlet fluorescence. PMID:25987571

  4. Photochromic gratings in sol gel films containing diazo sulfonamide chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Stanisław; Janik, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    The photochromic sol-gel hybrid materials were prepared by incorporation of an azo chromophore containing sulfonamide fragment into polysiloxane cross-linked network. The materials were used to form transparent films on glass by spin-coating and/or casting. The reversible change of refraction index of the films on illumination with white light was observed by ellipsometry. The experiments with two beam coupling (TBC) and four wave mixing (4 WM) arrangement with green or blue laser beams as writing beams showed formation of a diffraction grating. The diffraction efficiency of the first order was 0.025-0.038 which yielded refraction index modulation in the range of up to 0.0066.

  5. Photodissociation of S atom containing amino acid chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Lee, Yuan T.; Lin, S. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2007-08-01

    Photodissociation of 3-(methylthio)propylamine and cysteamine, the chromophores of S atom containing amino acid methionine and cysteine, respectively, was studied separately in a molecular beam at 193 nm using multimass ion imaging techniques. Four dissociation channels were observed for 3-(methylthio)propylamine, including (1) CH3SCH2CH2CH2NH2-->CH3SCH2CH2CH2NH+H, (2) CH3SCH2CH2CH2NH2-->CH3+SCH2CH2CH2NH2, (3) CH3SCH2CH2CH2NH2-->CH3S+CH2CH2CH2NH2, and (4) CH3SCH2CH2CH2NH2-->CH3SCH2+CH2CH2NH2. Two dissociation channels were observed from cysteamine, including (5) HSCH2CH2NH2-->HS+CH2CH2NH2 and (6) HSCH2CH2NH2-->HSCH2+CH2NH2. The photofragment translational energy distributions suggest that reaction (1) and parts of the reactions (2), (3), (5) occur on the repulsive excited states. However, reaction (4), (6) occur only after the internal conversion to the electronic ground state. Since the dissociation from an excited state with a repulsive potential energy surface is very fast, it would not be quenched completely even in the condensed phase. Our results indicate that reactions following dissociation may play an important role in the UV photochemistry of S atom containing amino acid chromophores in the condensed phase. A comparison with the potential energy surface from ab initio calculations and branching ratios from RRKM calculations was made.

  6. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  7. Retinal pseudoangiitis after intravitreal triamcinolone

    PubMed Central

    García-Campos, Jose Manuel; García-Basterra, Ignacio; Kamal-Salah, Radua; Baquero-Aranda, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a fundus image similar to frosted retinal angiitis after undergoing pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal triamcinolone injection. The patient with diabetic retinopathy was referred to our hospital with vision loss in her right eye secondary to vitreous haemorrhage. After pars plana vitrectomy and injection of triamcinolone acetonide a funduscopy examination revealed deposits of triamcinolone along the retinal vessels simulating a frosted retinal angiitis. Triamcinolone deposits along blood vessels could be the result of the reabsorption process of these crystals by the perivascular macrophages. Further studies are needed. PMID:25678611

  8. Misfolded Proteins and Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan H.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations associated with retinal degeneration lead to the production of misfolded proteins by cells of the retina. Emerging evidence suggests that these abnormal proteins cause cell death by activating the Unfolded Protein Response, a set of conserved intracellular signaling pathways that detect protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum and control protective and proapoptotic signal transduction pathways. Here, we review the misfolded proteins associated with select types of retinitis pigmentosa, Stargadt-like macular degeneration, and Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy and discuss the role that endoplasmic reticulum stress and UPR signaling play in their pathogenesis. Last, we review new therapies for these diseases based on preventing protein misfolding in the retina. PMID:20238009

  9. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  10. Advances in understanding the molecular basis of the first steps in color vision

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Serving as one of our primary environmental inputs, vision is the most sophisticated sensory system in humans. Here, we present recent findings derived from energetics, genetics and physiology that provide a more advanced understanding of color perception in mammals. Energetics of cis–trans isomerization of 11-cis-retinal accounts for color perception in the narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum and how human eyes can absorb light in the near infrared (IR) range. Structural homology models of visual pigments reveal complex interactions of the protein moieties with the light sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal and that certain color blinding mutations impair secondary structural elements of these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Finally, we identify unsolved critical aspects of color tuning that require future investigation. PMID:26187035

  11. Advances in understanding the molecular basis of the first steps in color vision.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Serving as one of our primary environmental inputs, vision is the most sophisticated sensory system in humans. Here, we present recent findings derived from energetics, genetics and physiology that provide a more advanced understanding of color perception in mammals. Energetics of cis-trans isomerization of 11-cis-retinal accounts for color perception in the narrow region of the electromagnetic spectrum and how human eyes can absorb light in the near infrared (IR) range. Structural homology models of visual pigments reveal complex interactions of the protein moieties with the light sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal and that certain color blinding mutations impair secondary structural elements of these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Finally, we identify unsolved critical aspects of color tuning that require future investigation.

  12. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  13. Enhanced microscopic nonlinear optical properties of novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang; Pan, Lin; Jia, Kun; Tang, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups, containing either styryl or azobenzene based π-conjugated bridge structures, were synthesized and their chemical structures, molecular configuration, microscopic optical properties as well as thermal properties were systematically characterized. The experimental results indicated that eight times increasing of second-order molecular hyperpolarizability as well as 50-100 nm blue shift of maximum absorption band for azobenzene based chromophore were observed by introducing Y-type dual electron donor groups, which was derived from the highly efficient 'total charge transfer' in this kind of chromophore as confirmed by the density functional theory calculation.

  14. Tuning the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of organic chromophores for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Daniel P; Marinado, Tannia; Karlsson, Karl Martin; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Qin, Peng; Boschloo, Gerrit; Brinck, Tore; Hagfeldt, Anders; Sun, Licheng

    2007-12-07

    A series of organic chromophores have been synthesized in order to approach optimal energy level composition in the TiO2-dye-iodide/triiodide system in the dye-sensitized solar cells. HOMO and LUMO energy level tuning is achieved by varying the conjugation between the triphenylamine donor and the cyanoacetic acid acceptor. This is supported by spectral and electrochemical experiments and TDDFT calculations. These results show that energetic tuning of the chromophores was successful and fulfilled the thermodynamic criteria for dye-sensitized solar cells, electrical losses depending on the size and orientation of the chromophores were observed.

  15. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  16. Protein Misfolding and Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Stein, Linda; Kaushal, Shalesh

    2011-01-01

    The retina is a highly complex and specialized organ that performs preliminary analysis of visual information. Composed of highly metabolically active tissue, the retina requires a precise and well-balanced means of maintaining its functional activity during extended periods of time. Maintenance and regulation of a vast array of different structural and functional proteins is required for normal function of the retina. This process is referred to as protein homeostasis and involves a variety of activities, including protein synthesis, folding, transport, degradation, elimination, and recycling. Deregulation of any of these activities can lead to malfunctioning of the retina, from subtle subclinical signs to severe retinal degenerative diseases leading to blindness. Examples of retinal degenerative diseases caused by disruption of protein homeostasis include retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt’s disease. A detailed discussion of the role of disruption in protein homeostasis in these and other retinal diseases is presented, followed by examples of some existing and potential treatments. PMID:21825021

  17. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  18. General Pathophysiology in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration, including that seen in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common form of neural degenerative disease in the world. There is great genetic and allelic heterogeneity of the various retinal dystrophies. Classifications of these diseases can be ambiguous, as there are similar clinical presentations in retinal degenerations arising from different genetic mechanisms. As would be expected, alterations in the activity of the phototransduction cascade, such as changes affecting the renewal and shedding of the photoreceptor OS, visual transduction, and/ or retinol metabolism have a great impact on the health of the retina. Mutations within any of the molecules responsible for these visual processes cause several types of retinal and retinal pigment epithelium degenerative diseases. Apoptosis has been implicated in the rod cell loss seen in a mouse model of RP, but the precise mechanisms that connect the activation of these pathways to the loss of phosphodiesterase (PDE6β) function has yet to be defined. Additionally, the activation of apoptosis by CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), after activation of the unfolded protein response pathway, may be responsible for cell death, although the mechanism remains unknown. However, the mechanisms of cell death after loss of function of PDE6, which is a commonly studied mammalian model in research, may be generalizable to loss of function of different key proteins involved in the phototransduction cascade. PMID:24732759

  19. Filling in the retinal image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  20. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  1. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  3. Photodissociation of S atom containing amino acid chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Lee, Yuan T.; Lin, S. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2007-08-14

    Photodissociation of 3-(methylthio)propylamine and cysteamine, the chromophores of S atom containing amino acid methionine and cysteine, respectively, was studied separately in a molecular beam at 193 nm using multimass ion imaging techniques. Four dissociation channels were observed for 3-(methylthio)propylamine, including (1) CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH+H, (2) CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}+SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}, (3) CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}S+CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}, and (4) CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 2}+CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}. Two dissociation channels were observed from cysteamine, including (5) HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}HS+CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2} and (6) HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}{yields}HSCH{sub 2}+CH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}. The photofragment translational energy distributions suggest that reaction (1) and parts of the reactions (2), (3), (5) occur on the repulsive excited states. However, reaction (4), (6) occur only after the internal conversion to the electronic ground state. Since the dissociation from an excited state with a repulsive potential energy surface is very fast, it would not be quenched completely even in the condensed phase. Our results indicate that reactions following dissociation may play an important role in the UV photochemistry of S atom containing amino acid chromophores in the condensed phase. A comparison with the potential energy surface from ab initio calculations and branching ratios from RRKM calculations was made.

  4. Vibronic Dynamics of the Ultrafast all-trans to 13-cis Photoisomerization of Retinal in Channelrhodopsin-1.

    PubMed

    Schnedermann, Christoph; Muders, Vera; Ehrenberg, David; Schlesinger, Ramona; Kukura, Philipp; Heberle, Joachim

    2016-04-13

    Channelrhodopsins are light-gated ion channels with extensive applications in optogenetics. Channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) exhibits a red-shifted absorption spectrum as compared to Channelrhodopsin-2, which is highly beneficial for optogenetic application. The primary event in the photocycle of CaChR1 involves an isomerization of the protein-bound retinal chromophore. Here, we apply highly time-resolved vibronic spectroscopy to reveal the electronic and structural dynamics associated with the first step of the photocycle of CaChR1. We observe vibrationally coherent formation of the P1 intermediate exhibiting a twisted 13-cis retinal with a 110 ± 7 fs time constant. Comparison with low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy of the corresponding trapped photoproduct demonstrates that this rapidly formed P1 intermediate is stable for several hundreds of nanoseconds.

  5. CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION IN THE LOUISIANA BIGHT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Mississippi plume region may have several distinct sources: riverine (terrestrial soils), wetland (terrestrial plants), biological production (phytoplankton, zooplankton, microbial), and sediments. Complex mixing, photodegradati...

  6. Mechanisms of Formation and Structure of Chromophores of Fluorescent Proteins from Anthoza Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    chromophore structure……………………....……………20 Task 6. Isolation of chromophore-bearing peptides from cgCP and gtCP…………………..20 Task 7. Aminoacid ...22 Concluding remarks on gtCP chromophore structure……………………………………………24 Task 7. Aminoacid sequence determination of cgCP chromophore-bearing...side chain by A65G substitution………………....26 The nature of the side chain of aminoacid 65 determines the extent of fragmentation…….........27 Task 9

  7. Interpreting diffuse reflectance for in vivo skin reactions in terms of chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Nikiforos; Seo, InSeok; Bargo, Paulo R

    2010-01-01

    The measurement and quantification of skin reactions to insults involves certain assumptions about the relation between intensity of color appearance of the skin and the concentration of endogenous chromophores. The underlying assumption is that the Beer-Lambert law is obeyed, i.e., that a linear relation exists between the absorbance and the concentration of each chromophore and that the total absorbance is the linear superposition of the contributions of each chromophore. In this paper the authors compiled the results from a number of interventions on human skin that result in changes in its appearance and small deviations from the homeostatic state, where the results may be accounted for by a single or multiple chromophores. The validity of the assumptions is found to hold for a limited range of responses. The biological constraints need to be considered in certain cases because as we move away from the homeostatic state, complex biological processes are induced.

  8. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  9. Organic chromophore with enhanced optical nonlinearity and thermal stability by introducing julolidine as donor group.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Changjin; Kim, Dong Wook

    2009-12-01

    We prepared a nonlinear optical chromophore (Ju-TCF) with julolidine moiety as a donor and compared it with the chromophore (St-TCF) with the dialkyl-attached aminobenzene as a donor. The MOPAC calculations showed that the figure of merit (microbeta0) of Ju-TCF was estimated 70% larger than St-TCF. Based on the TGA result, Ju-TCF displayed on-set of degradation at 261 degrees C, which was about 30 degrees C higher than St-TCF (234 degrees C). The julolidine chromophore blended in the polymer exhibited 32 pm/V of electro-optic coefficient, which was 30% larger than St-TCF at the same molar chromophore content.

  10. THE ROLE OF NITROGEN IN CHROMOPHORIC AND FLUORESCENT DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial and photochemical processes affect chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean. Some evidence suggests that dissolved nitrogen plays a role in CDOM formation, although this has received little systematic attention in marine ecosystems. Coastal sea...

  11. Preparation of chromophoric dipolar dendrons as second-order nonlinear optical material

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, S.; Mashiko, S.

    1998-07-01

    Dendritic macromolecules, called dendrons, having a branching structure modified with an electron donor/acceptor functionalized azobenzene chromophore have been synthesized. The structurally different dendrons possess different numbers, 1, 3, 7, and 15, of chromophore units. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of dendrons was measured in the molecular oriented thin films prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett film transfer technique. In such structurally organized thin films, individual chromophores coherently contribute to the increase in the molecular hyperpolarizability of dendrons. The SHG activity became large as the numbers of branching units of dendrons increased. The highest molecular hyperpolarizability was found to be >8,000 x 10{sup {minus}}30 esu for dendron containing 15 chromophoric units. The SHG results suggest that the structure of dendrons synthesized is uniaxially dipolar, and that there is a particular merit in this structure for the generation of SHG.

  12. Chemical structure of the hexapeptide chromophore of the Aequorea green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Cody, C W; Prasher, D C; Westler, W M; Prendergast, F G; Ward, W W

    1993-02-09

    The green-fluorescent proteins (GFP) are a unique class of proteins involved in bioluminescence of many cnidaria. The GFPs serve as energy-transfer acceptors, receiving energy from either a luciferase-oxyluciferin complex or a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein, depending on the organism. Upon mechanical stimulation of the organism, GFP emits green light spectrally identical to its fluorescence emission. These highly fluorescent proteins are unique due to the nature of the covalently attached chromophore, which is composed of modified amino acid residues within the polypeptide. This report describes the characterization of the Aequorea victoria GFP chromophore which is released as a hexapeptide upon digestion of the protein with papain. The chromophore is formed upon cyclization of the residues Ser-dehydroTyr-Gly within the polypeptide. The chromophore structure proposed here differs from that described by Shimomura [(1979) FEBS Lett. 104, 220] in a number of ways.

  13. Photobleaching Kinetics of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Derived from Mangrove Leaf Litter and Floating Sargassum Colonies

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the photoreactivity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) derived from Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) leaf litter and floating Sargassum colonies as these marine plants can be important contributors to coastal and open ocean CDOM pools, respectively. Mangr...

  14. CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic (CDOM) in aquatic environments is derived from the microbial decomposition of terrestrial and microbial organic matter. Here we present results of studies of the spectral properties and photoreactivity of the CDOM derived from several organic matter...

  15. Ruptured retinal arterial macroaneurysm: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Speilburg, Ashley M; Klemencic, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Retinal arterial macroaneurysm is an acquired, focal dilation of a retinal artery, typically occurring within the first three bifurcations of the central retinal artery. The clinical presentation of a retinal arterial macroaneurysm is highly variable, making initial diagnosis difficult and differentials many. Identification of retinal arterial macroaneurysms is crucial to appropriately co-manage with the primary care physician for hypertension control. Prognosis is generally good and observation is often an adequate treatment. However, in cases of macular threat or involvement, some treatment options are available and referral to a retinal specialist is indicated.

  16. Conformational study of the chromophore of C-phycocyanin by resonance raman and electronic absorption spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, L.; Toporowicz, M.

    1988-05-01

    The conformation of the chromophore of C-phycocyanin (PC) was investigated by using electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. Using an A-dihydrobilindione as model compound, the syn, syn, syn conformation was established for the isolated chromophore in solution. For the native PC, the best results were obtained by considering the syn, syn, anti conformation, although the possibility of having a syn, anti, anti conformation could not be excluded.

  17. Synthesis and Properties of Zwitterionic Chromophores Containing Substituents for Shape Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, D. J.; Middleton, A.; Teshome, A.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Ashraf, M.; Gainsford, G. J.; Asselberghs, I.; Clays, K.; Smith, G. J.; Kay, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    The synthesis of a series of new chromophores for nonlinear optics are described. Some of the compounds contain "bulky" groups designed to reduce aggregation between the molecules. While this may not impact on the electro-optic response of the compounds, both X-ray crystallographic and uv-vis spectroscopic studies indicate that such modifications will likely reduce aggregation once the chromophores are incorporated into polymer matrices.

  18. pH dependence of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin: retinal isomer composition, rate of dark adaptation, and photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Rinat; Wand, Amir; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Ruhman, Sanford; Sheves, Mordechai

    2014-07-31

    Microbial rhodopsins are photoactive proteins, and their binding site can accommodate either all-trans or 13-cis retinal chromophore. The pH dependence of isomeric composition, dark-adaptation rate, and primary events of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), a microbial rhodopsin discovered a decade ago, are presented. The main findings are: (a) Two pKa values of 6.5 and 4.0 assigned to two different protein residues are observed using spectroscopic titration experiments for both ground-state retinal isomers: all-trans, 15-anti (AT) and 13-cis, 15-syn (13C). The protonation states of these protein residues affect the absorption spectrum of the pigment and most probably the isomerization process of the retinal chromophore. An additional pKa value of 8.5 is observed only for 13C-ASR. (b) The isomeric composition of ASR is determined over a wide pH range and found to be almost pH-independent in the dark (>96% AT isomer) but highly pH-dependent in the light-adapted form. (c) The kinetics of dark adaptation is recorded over a wide pH range, showing that the thermal isomerization from 13C to AT retinal occurs much faster at high pH rather than under acidic conditions. (d) Primary photochemical events of ASR at pH 5 are recorded using VIS hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy with <100 fs resolution and compared with the previously recorded results at pH 7.5. For AT-ASR, these are shown to be almost pH-independent. However, photochemistry of 13C-ASR is pH-dependent and slowed down in acidic environments.

  19. The LOV domain: a chromophore module servicing multiple photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Winslow R

    2007-07-01

    Three different families of blue-light receptors have been characterized from higher plants: three cryptochromes, two phototropins, and the three members of the ZTL/ADO family. Phototropins and the ZTL/ADO proteins have chromophore modules, designated LOV domains, that bind flavin mononucleotide and undergo formation of a C(4a) flavin-cysteinyl adduct. All contain the highly conserved amino acid motif GXNCRFLQ. Over 90 prokaryote proteins also contain LOV domains with this motif upstream from one of several different functional groups. All of these that have been investigated to date act as photoreceptors in vitro and form the adduct upon irradiation. Four members of the class LOV-histidine kinase, one from a plant pathogen (Pseudomonas syringae), one from an animal pathogen Brucella melitensis), and two from a marine bacterium (Erythrobacter litoralis) respectively, mediate light-activated histidine phosphorylation. Decay of the adduct in darkness after a blue light pulse coincides with loss of the capacity for phosphorylation upon addition of ATP. At present, the biological role(s) of these light-sensitive proteins is under investigation.

  20. Contaminant-mediated photobleaching of wetland chromophoric dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Maureen C; Weavers, Linda K; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2014-09-20

    Photolytic transformation of organic contaminants in wetlands can be mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which in turn can lose its reactivity from photobleaching. We collected water from a small agricultural wetland (Ohio), Kawai Nui Marsh (Hawaii), the Everglades (Florida), and Okefenokee Swamp (Georgia) to assess the effect of photobleaching on the photofate of two herbicides, acetochlor and isoproturon. Analyte-spiked water samples were irradiated using a solar simulator and monitored for changes in CDOM light absorbance and dissolved oxygen. Photobleaching did not significantly impact the indirect photolysis rates of either herbicide over 24 hours of irradiation. Surprisingly, the opposite effect was observed with isoproturon, which accelerated DOM photobleaching. This phenomenon was more pronounced in higher-CDOM waters, and we believe that the redox pathway between triplet-state CDOM and isoproturon may be responsible for our observations. By contrast, acetochlor indirect photolysis was dependent on reaction with the hydroxyl radical and did not accelerate photobleaching of wetland water as much as isoproturon. Finally, herbicide indirect photolysis rate constants did not correlate strongly to any one chemical or optical property of the sampled waters.

  1. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p < 0.001). Calculated CDOM yields are also correlated to watershed percent wetland (e.g. a350; r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) providing a method for the estimation of CDOM export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  2. Helix movement is coupled to displacement of the second extracellular loop in rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shivani; Hornak, Viktor; Yan, Elsa C Y; Syrett, Natalie; Goncalves, Joseph A; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Ziliox, Martine; Sakmar, Thomas P; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O; Eilers, Markus

    2009-02-01

    The second extracellular loop (EL2) of rhodopsin forms a cap over the binding site of its photoreactive 11-cis retinylidene chromophore. A crucial question has been whether EL2 forms a reversible gate that opens upon activation or acts as a rigid barrier. Distance measurements using solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy between the retinal chromophore and the beta4 strand of EL2 show that the loop is displaced from the retinal binding site upon activation, and there is a rearrangement in the hydrogen-bonding networks connecting EL2 with the extracellular ends of transmembrane helices H4, H5 and H6. NMR measurements further reveal that structural changes in EL2 are coupled to the motion of helix H5 and breaking of the ionic lock that regulates activation. These results provide a comprehensive view of how retinal isomerization triggers helix motion and activation in this prototypical G protein-coupled receptor.

  3. Mutation of key residues of RPE65 abolishes its enzymatic role as isomerohydrolase in the visual cycle.

    PubMed

    Redmond, T Michael; Poliakov, Eugenia; Yu, Shirley; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Lu, Zhongjian; Gentleman, Susan

    2005-09-20

    RPE65 is essential for isomerization of vitamin A to the visual chromophore. Mutations in RPE65 cause early-onset blindness, and Rpe65-deficient mice lack 11-cis-retinal but overaccumulate alltrans-retinyl esters in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). RPE65 is proposed to be a substrate chaperone but may have an enzymatic role because it is closely related to carotenoid oxygenases. We hypothesize that, by analogy with other carotenoid oxygenases, the predicted iron-coordinating residues of RPE65 are essential for retinoid isomerization. To clarify RPE65's role in isomerization, we reconstituted a robust minimal visual cycle in 293-F cells. Only cells transfected with RPE65 constructs produced 11-cis-retinoids, but coexpression with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase was needed for high-level production. Accumulation was significant, amounting to >2 nmol of 11-cis-retinol per culture. Transfection with constructs harboring mutations in residues of RPE65 homologous to those required for interlinked enzymatic activity and iron coordination in related enzymes abolish this isomerization. Iron chelation also abolished isomerization activity. Mutating cysteines implicated in palmitoylation of RPE65 had generally little effect on isomerization activity. Mutations associated with Leber congenital amaurosis/early-onset blindness cause partial to total loss of isomerization activity in direct relation to their clinical effects. These findings establish a catalytic role, in conjunction with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase, for RPE65 in synthesis of 11-cis-retinol, and its identity as the isomerohydrolase.

  4. Synergistic "ping-pong" energy transfer for efficient light activation in a chromophore-catalyst dyad.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Annamaria; Charalambidis, Georgios; Herrero, Christian; Margiola, Sofia; Leibl, Winfried; Coutsolelos, Athanassios; Aukauloo, Ally

    2015-10-07

    The synthesis of a porphyrin-Ru(II) polypyridine complex where the porphyrin acts as a photoactive unit and the Ru(II) polypyridine as a catalytic precursor is described. Comparatively, the free base porphyrin was found to outperform the ruthenium based chromophore in the yield of light induced electron transfer. Mechanistic insights indicate the occurrence of a ping-pong energy transfer from the (1)LC excited state of the porphyrin chromophore to the (3)MCLT state of the catalyst and back to the (3)LC excited state of the porphyrin unit. The latter, triplet-triplet energy transfer back to the chromophore, efficiently competes with fast radiationless deactivation of the excited state at the catalyst site. The energy thus recovered by the chromophore allows improved yield of formation of the oxidized form of the chromophore and concomitantly of the oxidation of the catalytic unit by intramolecular charge transfer. The presented results are among the rare examples where a porphyrin chromophore is successfully used to drive an oxidative activation process where reductive processes prevail in the literature.

  5. Understanding GFP chromophore biosynthesis: controlling backbone cyclization and modifying post-translational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Barondeau, David P; Kassmann, Carey J; Tainer, John A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2005-02-15

    The Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) undergoes a remarkable post-translational modification to create a chromophore out of its component amino acids S65, Y66, and G67. Here, we describe mutational experiments in GFP designed to convert this chromophore into a 4-methylidene-imidazole-5-one (MIO) moiety similar to the post-translational active-site electrophile of histidine ammonia lyase (HAL). Crystallographic structures of GFP variant S65A Y66S (GFPhal) and of four additional related site-directed mutants reveal an aromatic MIO moiety and mechanistic details of GFP chromophore formation and MIO biosynthesis. Specifically, the GFP scaffold promotes backbone cyclization by (1) favoring nucleophilic attack by close proximity alignment of the G67 amide lone pair with the pi orbital of the residue 65 carbonyl and (2) removing enthalpic barriers by eliminating inhibitory main-chain hydrogen bonds in the precursor state. GFP R96 appears to induce structural rearrangements important in aligning the molecular orbitals for ring cyclization, favor G67 nitrogen deprotonation through electrostatic interactions with the Y66 carbonyl, and stabilize the reduced enolate intermediate. Our structures and analysis also highlight negative design features of the wild-type GFP architecture, which favor chromophore formation by destabilizing alternative conformations of the chromophore tripeptide. By providing a molecular basis for understanding and controlling the driving force and protein chemistry of chromophore creation, this research has implications for expansion of the genetic code through engineering of modified amino acids.

  6. The assessment of chromophores in bleached cellulosic pulps employing UV-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Pedro E G; Fernandes, António J S; Carvalho, M Graça V S; Evtuguin, Dmitry V

    2010-07-02

    UV-Resonance Raman (UV-RR) coupled with UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance (UV-vis DR) spectroscopy was applied to a solid-state study of chromophores in Eucalyptus globulus kraft cellulosic pulps bleached by chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide. The UV-RR spectra were acquired at 325nm laser beam excitation, which was shown to be appropriate for selective analysis of chromophore structures in polysaccharides. The proposed approach allowed the monitoring of chromophores in pulps and to track the extent of polysaccharide oxidation. However, precaution was suggested while performing a quantitative analysis of chromophores at the characteristic band of approximately 1600cm(-1) because of charge transfer complexes (CTCs) that exist in the pulp. These CTCs can affect the intensity of the aforementioned band by diminishing the conjugate state in the chromophore moieties. The amount of carbonyl and carboxyl groups in polysaccharides correlated with the intensity of the band at 1093cm(-1). The analysis of UV-RR spectra revealed xylan as an important source of chromophores in eucalypt kraft pulp.

  7. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Becker, Erin A; Yao, Andrew I; Seitzer, Phillip M; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S Y; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade.

  8. A Large and Phylogenetically Diverse Class of Type 1 Opsins Lacking a Canonical Retinal Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Erin A.; Yao, Andrew I.; Seitzer, Phillip M.; Kind, Tobias; Wang, Ting; Eigenheer, Rich; Shao, Katie S. Y.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2016-01-01

    Opsins are photosensitive proteins catalyzing light-dependent processes across the tree of life. For both microbial (type 1) and metazoan (type 2) opsins, photosensing depends upon covalent interaction between a retinal chromophore and a conserved lysine residue. Despite recent discoveries of potential opsin homologs lacking this residue, phylogenetic dispersal and functional significance of these abnormal sequences have not yet been investigated. We report discovery of a large group of putatively non-retinal binding opsins, present in a number of fungal and microbial genomes and comprising nearly 30% of opsins in the Halobacteriacea, a model clade for opsin photobiology. We report phylogenetic analyses, structural modeling, genomic context analysis and biochemistry, to describe the evolutionary relationship of these recently described proteins with other opsins, show that they are expressed and do not bind retinal in a canonical manner. Given these data, we propose a hypothesis that these abnormal opsin homologs may represent a novel family of sensory opsins which may be involved in taxis response to one or more non-light stimuli. If true, this finding would challenge our current understanding of microbial opsins as a light-specific sensory family, and provides a potential analogy with the highly diverse signaling capabilities of the eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), of which metazoan type 2 opsins are a light-specific sub-clade. PMID:27327432

  9. Role of the retinal detector array in perceiving the superposition effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2006-08-01

    The perception of light in nature comes through the photopigment molecules of our retina. The objective of this paper is to relate our modern understanding of the quantum mechanical chemical processes in the retinal molecules with our observation of superposition ("interference") fringes due to multiple light beams. The issue of "interference" is important for two subtle reasons. First, we do not perceive light except though the response of the light detecting molecules. Second, EM fields do not operate on each other to create the "interference" (superposition) effects. When the intrinsic molecular properties of a detector allows it to respond simultaneously to all the superposed light beams on them, they sum the effects and report the corresponding "fringes" of superposition. In the human eye the "seeing" (or perception) is initiated by photo-isomerization of retinal, the chromophore of the opsin molecule. There exists several orders of magnitude difference between the characteristic times for the molecular processes of light absorption and the visual signal generation through the photochemical cascade. This allows us to function in the daily chores of walking and visual identification of objects and enjoy the beauty of the natural sceneries even though the retinal layer is bombarded simultaneously by innumerable beams of light with same and different frequencies, which will normally produce a flood of electronic "white noise" over a very wide range of temporal frequencies, namely the heterodyne beat signal. How do the eyes completely suppress this wide range of heterodyne beat signal?

  10. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  11. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    García-Arumí, J; Martínez-Castillo, V; Boixadera, A; Blasco, H; Marticorena, J; Zapata, M Á; Macià, C; Badal, J; Distéfano, L; Rafart, J M; Berrocal, M; Zambrano, A; Ruíz-Moreno, J M; Figueroa, M S

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines general guidelines following the initial diagnosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. These include preoperative evaluation, treatment, possible intra- and post-operative complications, retinal re-detachment, and all therapeutic options available for each case. Treatment of the traumatic retinal detachment is also described, due to its importance and peculiarities. Treatment or prophylactic guidelines are suggested for the different types of retinal detachment described. These are based on both the experience of the ophthalmologists that have participated in preparing the guidelines, and also on evidence-based grading linked to bibliographical sources. However, these guidelines should not be interpreted as being mandatory. Given that there is a wide spectrum of options for treatment of retinal detachment, the surgeons' experience with one or other surgical technique will be of utmost importance in obtaining the best surgical result. As guidelines, they are intended as an additional aid to the surgeon during the decision-making process, with the expectation that the final choice will still be left to the surgeon's judgment and past experience.

  12. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  13. [Unusual retinal abnormality: retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Dupas, B; Man, H; Gualino, V; Gaudric, A; Massin, P

    2011-03-01

    A diet restricted to rice and boiled fruit and vegetables leads to vitamin C deficiency. We describe the third case, to our knowledge, of retinal hemorrhages related to scurvy. Reduced bilateral visual acuity in a 50-year-old patient was associated with macrocytic anemia, denutrition, and cutaneous ecchymoses. Oral vitamin C treatment provided subjective clinical improvement and regression of the retinal hemorrhages on fundus examination, with no side effects. Vitamin C plays an important role in collagen stability in vascular and bone walls.

  14. Tracing water ice and chromophores across Saturn's moons and rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Hedman, M. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    The radial distribution of surface water ice and chromophores across Saturn's rings, regular and minor satellites is traced using Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) data. Reflectance spectra of these different objects are analyzed and clustered in spectral classes using specific VIS-IR indicators applied to VIMS datasets (Filacchione et al., 2012). Specifically, we report about the results retrieved from the analysis of about 3,000 disk-integrated observations of the icy satellites and ten ring's radial mosaics. Surface compositions and regolith properties are inferred through the comparison with laboratory and synthetic spectra of analogue icy materials. For each target it is essential to process as many observations taken at different illumination conditions as possible, in order to decouple the phase response from spectral analysis for both spectral slopes and band depth: we have observed infact a significant reduction in band depth at low phases caused by multiple scattering, which dominates single scattering on the continuum wings. Rings spectra appear more red than the icy satellites in the visible range but show more intense 1.5-2.0 micron band depths (Cuzzi et al., 2009, 2010). Chromophores mixed in ice are constrained thanks to their characteristic reddening shown at visible wavelengths (Nicholson et al., 2008). With the exclusion of Phoebe and the dark material coating Iapetus' leading hemisphere (Clark et al., 2012), VIMS data display that the water ice radial distribution, traced using the 1.5-2.0 micron band depths, is almost constant across the entire saturnian system and reaches maximum abundances on A-B rings and Calypso. The maximum visual reddening is measured across the A-B rings and on Rhea and Hyperion. Moreover our analysis allows us to recognize several other specific effects characterizing the saturnian population, like: 1) the dichotomy between regular satellites leading and trailing hemispheres caused by the

  15. Studies on nonlinear optical polyurethanes containing heterocyclic chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariduraganavar, M. Y.; Tambe, S. M.; Tasaganva, R. G.; Kittur, A. A.; Kulkarni, S. S.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of highly stable nitro-substituted thiazole, benzothiazole and thiadiazole chromophores. With these, a series of second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) responsive polyurethanes were successfully synthesized from tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and 4,4'-methylenedi(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI). Molecular structural characterization of these polyurethanes was achieved by 1H NMR, FT-IR, GPC and analytical data. The weight-average molecular weights ( Mw) of the resulting polyurethanes were determined by GPC and ranged between 22,100 and 26,700. All the polyurethanes were highly soluble in aprotic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, cyclohexanone, N, N-dimethylformamide, N, N-dimethylacetamide, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl-2-pyrolidinone, etc. The thermal behaviour of these polyurethanes was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Their glass transition temperatures were in the range 140-165 °C and most of the polymers showed high thermal stability. With an in situ poling and temperature ramping technique, the optimal temperatures ( Topts) for corona poling were determined for the largest second-order NLO response. The second harmonic generation (SHG) coefficients ( d33) of the poled polyurethane films range from 62.21 to 103.11 pm/V at 1064 nm. All the poled films showed outstanding orientational stability up to 120 °C without any measurable decay in the SHG signal. Of these, the polyurethane with nitro-substituted benzothiazole moiety ( IIb) showed the best dynamical thermal stability of the poling-induced dipole alignment up to ˜150 °C.

  16. Diseases Caused by Defects in the Visual Cycle: Retinoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Gabriel H.; Golczak, Marcin; Moise, Alexander R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment causes isomerization of the chromophore from 11-cis-retinaldehyde to all-trans-retinaldehyde. Regeneration of visual chromophore following light exposure is dependent on an enzyme pathway called the retinoid or visual cycle. Our understanding of this pathway has been greatly facilitated by the identification of disease-causing mutations in the genes coding for visual cycle enzymes. Defects in nearly every step of this pathway are responsible for human-inherited retinal dystrophies. These retinal dystrophies can be divided into two etiologic groups. One involves the impaired synthesis of visual chromophore. The second involves accumulation of cytotoxic products derived from all-trans-retinaldehyde. Gene therapy has been successfully used in animal models of these diseases to rescue the function of enzymes involved in chromophore regeneration, restoring vision. Dystrophies resulting from impaired chromophore synthesis can also be treated by supplementation with a chromophore analog. Dystrophies resulting from the accumulation of toxic pigments can be treated pharmacologically by inhibiting the visual cycle, or limiting the supply of vitamin A to the eyes. Recent progress in both areas provides hope that multiple inherited retinal diseases will soon be treated by pharmaceutical intervention. PMID:16968212

  17. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma.

    PubMed

    Shields, J A; Joffe, L; Guibor, P

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  18. Transcorneal Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Retinal Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa; Macula Off; Primary Open Angle Glaucoma; Hereditary Macular Degeneration; Treated Retina Detachment; Retinal Artery Occlusion; Retinal Vein Occlusion; Non-Arthritic-Anterior-Ischemic Optic-Neuropathy; Hereditary Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration; Ischemic Macula Edema

  19. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  20. Exploring the retinal connectome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  1. Microwave Assisted Synthesis, Physicochemical, Photophysical, Single Crystal X-ray and DFT Studies of Novel Push-Pull Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman A; Asiri, Abdullah M; Basisi, Hadi Mussa; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Sharma, Kamlesh

    2015-11-01

    Two push-pull chromophores were synthesized by knoevenagel condensation under microwave irradiation. The structure of synthesized chromophores were established by spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, EI-MS) and elemental analysis. Structure of the chromophores was further conformed by X-ray crystallographic. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements provided that chromophores were good absorbent and fluorescent properties. Fluorescence polarity studies demonstrated that chromophores were sensitive to the polarity of the microenvironment provided by different solvents. Physicochemical parameters, including singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, stokes shift, oscillator strength, dipole moment and flurescence quantum yield were investigated in order to explore the analytical potential of the synthesized chromophores. In addition, the total energy, frontier molecular orbitals, hardness, electron affinity, ionization energy, electrostatic potential map were also studied computationally by using density functional theoretical method.

  2. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  3. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  4. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  5. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  6. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  7. Retinitis pigmentosa in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J; Bartmann, L; Ramesar, R; Beighton, P

    1993-11-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders which are a common cause of genetic blindness. The relative frequencies of the different forms of RP in South Africa, as determined from the register at the DNA banking centre for RP at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, are presented and discussed. Of the 125 families analysed, 29 (23%) showed autosomal dominant, 33 (27%) autosomal recessive and 3 (3%) X-linked inheritance. In 10 families the pedigree data were insufficient to allow accurate genetic subtyping and a further 50 patients were sporadic without a family history of RP or other syndromic features which would allow categorization.

  8. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  9. Contribution of ferric iron to the absorption by chromophoric dissolved matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. H.; Sara-aho, T.; Vähätalo, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a major absorber of ultraviolet and visible radiation in surface waters. CDOM consists primarily of humic substances (HS), which can adsorb inorganic cations such as ferric iron. Often more than 99% of dissolved iron is complexed by CDOM in natural waters. Our study assessed the contribution of ferric iron to the absorption of CDOM by mixing dissolved humic substance (HS) standards with iron(III) in acidic conditions and later adjusting the pH to 8. The maximum iron-binding capacities for Suwannee River humic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid were 13.0, 13.5 and 7.64 μmol iron [mg C]-1, respectively, suggesting higher iron-binding capacity for terrestrial- than microbial-derived CDOM. Iron(III) associated with HS increased the absorption coefficient by CDOM by 1.73-5.33 times (λ=254-550 nm). Inorganic iron, thus, contributed up to 4/5 of the absorption by CDOM (λ=550 nm). In other words, only less than 1/5 of the absorption by CDOM-iron mixture was generated by organic chromophores. The associated iron decreased spectral slope coefficients of HS. This finding indicates that changes of the spectral slope by CDOM can be solely caused by inorganic interference (e.g. iron). The increase of absorption by associated iron(III) was always spectrally similar among different HS standards. We calculated a specific absorption spectrum for iron associated with dissolved HS standards. This spectrum allows estimates for the absorption by iron associated with HS in circum neutral natural waters. For Löytynlähde spring water, iron contributed over 1/10 (ca. 0.108, λ=400 nm) to the total absorption. The contribution of iron to total absorption increased with wavelength. In typical CDOM absorption measurement, water samples are filtered for the removal of particulate constituents but no attempts are implemented for separating the organic chromophores from inorganic chromophores. Our findings show that

  10. Synergy in the spectral tuning of retinal pigments: complete accounting of the opsin shift in bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J; Griffin, R G; Herzfeld, J

    1994-01-01

    UV-visible and solid-state NMR studies of a series of 6-s-trans protonated Schiff bases of retinal with aniline show that the bathochromic shift induced by weakening the imine counterion is significantly greater in the 6-s-trans conformation than in the 6-s-cis conformation. Based on the observed magnitude of this coupling between the electronic effects of 6-s isomerization and imine counterion strength in the model compounds, the large opsin shift and unusual chemical shifts in light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin can be fully explained. These phenomena therefore do not require a negative point charge or polarizability effects in the chromophore binding pocket. The results are consistent with an effective center-to-center distance between the Schiff base and its counterion of about 4 A in light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:8090738

  11. Total Synthesis of Chlorofusin, its Seven Chromophore Diastereomers, and Key Partial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ryan C.; Lee, Sang Yeul; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorofusin is a recently isolated, naturally occurring inhibitor of p53−MDM2 complex formation whose structure is composed of a densely functionalized azaphilone-derived chromophore linked through the terminal amine of ornithine to a nine residue cyclic peptide. Herein we report the full details of the total synthesis of chlorofusin, resulting in the assignment of the absolute stereochemistry and reassignment of the relative stereochemistry of the complex chromophore. Condensation of each enantiomer of an azaphilone chromophore precursor with the Nδ-amine of a protected ornithinethreonine dipeptide, followed by a one-step oxidation/spirocyclization of the most reactive olefin provided all eight diastereomers of the fully elaborated chromophore−dipeptide conjugate. Comparison of the spectroscopic properties for these eight compounds and those of simpler models with that reported for the natural product allowed the full assignment of the (4R,8S,9R)-stereochemistry of the chlorofusin chromophore. The natural, but stereochemically reassigned, diastereomer of the dipeptide conjugate was incorporated in a convergent total synthesis of chlorofusin confirming the stereochemical reassignment and establishing its absolute stereochemistry. Similarly and enlisting the late stage convergent point in the total synthesis, the remaining seven diastereomers of the chromophore−dipeptide conjugates were individually incorporated into the 9-residue cyclic peptide of chlorofusin (4 steps each) providing all seven remaining possible chromophore diastereomers of the natural product. PMID:18712872

  12. Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer: Coupling between Chromophore Molecules and Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Xie, Tao; Qian, Ruo-Can; Long, Yi-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from a single metallic nanoparticle to the molecules adsorbed on its surface has attracted more and more attentions in recent years. Here, a molecular beacon (MB)-regulated PRET coupling system composed of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and chromophore molecules has been designed to study the influence of PRET effect on the scattering spectra of GNPs. In this system, the chromophore molecules are tagged to the 5'-end of MB, which can form a hairpin structure and modified on the surface of GNPs by its thiol-labeled 3'-end. Therefore, the distance between GNPs and chromophore molecules can be adjusted through the open and close of the MB loop. From the peak shift, the PRET interactions of different GNPs-chromophore molecules coupling pairs have been calculated by discrete dipole approximation and the fitting results match well with the experimental data. Therefore, the proposed system has been successfully applied for the analysis of PRET situation between various metallic nanoparticles and chromophore molecules, and provides a useful tool for the potential application in screening the PRET-based nanoplasmonic sensors.

  13. Revealing Brown Carbon Chromophores Produced in Reactions of Methylglyoxal with Ammonium Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is an important contributor to light absorption and climate forcing by aerosols. Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyls and ammonia or amines have been identified as one of the potential pathways of BrC formation. However, detailed chemical characterization of BrC chromophores has been challenging and their formation mechanisms are still poorly understood. Understanding BrC formation is impeded by the lack of suitable methods which can unravel the variability and complexity of BrC mixtures. This study applies high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to photodiode array (PDA) detector and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to investigate optical properties and chemical composition of individual BrC components produced through reactions of methylglyoxal (MG) and ammonium sulfate (AS), both of which are abundant in the atmospheric environment. A direct relationship between optical properties and chemical composition of 30 major BrC chromophores was established. Nearly all of these chromophores are nitrogen-containing compounds that account for >70% of the overall light absorption by the MG+AS system in the 300-500 nm range. These results suggest that reduced-nitrogen organic compounds formed in reactions between atmospheric carbonyls and ammonia/amines are important BrC chromophores. It is also demonstrated that improved separation of BrC chromophores by HPLC will significantly advance understanding of BrC chemistry.

  14. Structural and spectral response of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins to chromophore fluorination.

    PubMed

    Pal, Prajna P; Bae, Jae Hyun; Azim, M Kamran; Hess, Petra; Friedrich, Rainer; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis; Budisa, Nediljko

    2005-03-15

    Global replacements of tyrosine by 2- and 3-fluorotyrosine in "enhanced green" and "enhanced yellow" mutants of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins (avGFPs) provided protein variants with novel biophysical properties. While crystallographic and modeled structures of these proteins are indistinguishable from those of their native counterparts (i.e., they are perfectly isomorphous), there are considerable differences in their spectroscopic properties. The fluorine being an integral part of the avGFP chromophore induces changes in the titration curves, variations in the intensity of the absorbance and fluorescence, and spectral shifts in the emission maxima. Furthermore, targeted fluorination in close proximity to the fluorinated chromophore yielded additional variants with considerably enhanced spectral changes. These unique spectral properties are intrinsic features of the fluorinated avGFPs, in the context of the rigid chromophore-microenvironment interactions. The availability of the isomorpohous crystal structures of fluorinated avGFPs allowed mapping of novel, unusual interaction distances created by the presence of fluorine atoms. In addition, fluorine atoms in the ortho position of the chromophore tyrosyl moiety exhibit a single conformation, while in the meta position two conformer states were observed in the crystalline state. Such global replacements in chromophores of avGFPs and similar proteins result in "atomic mutations" (i.e., H --> F replacements) in the structures, offering unprecedented opportunities to understand and manipulate the relationships between protein structure and spectroscopic properties.

  15. Structure and reactivity of the chromophore of a GFP-like chromoprotein from Condylactis gigantea.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Alexey A; Pletneva, Nadezhda V; Balashova, Tamara A; Martynov, Vladimir I

    2006-06-13

    Here we present the study of the chromophore structure of the purple chromoprotein from Condylactis gigantea. Tandem mass spectrometry and 1H and 13C NMR of the chromopeptide reveal that the protein contains a chromophore with a chemical structure identical to that of the red fluorescent protein from Discosoma sp. A single A63G substitution demonstrates that the nature of the first amino acid of the XYG chromophore-forming sequence is dispensable for the chromoprotein red shift development. It has been recently proposed that post-translational reactions at the acylimine, a chemical group that accounts for the red fluorescence, might be an additional source of spectral diversity of proteins homologous to the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have examined the reactivity of the chromophore acylimine group within the C. gigantea purple chromoprotein. Like other proteins with the acylimine-modified chromophore, the purple chromoprotein suffers a hypsochromic spectral shift to the GFP-like absorbance (386 nm) upon mild denaturation. NMR analysis of the chromopeptide suggests this hypsochromic spectral shift is due to H2O addition across the C=N bond of the acylimine. However, unlike the red fluorescent protein from Discosoma sp., denatured under harsh conditions, the wild-type chromoprotein exhibits only slight fragmentation, which is induced by complete hydrolysis of the acylimine. A model suggesting the influence of the amino acid X side chain on protein fragmentation is presented.

  16. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of white wine chromophoric colloidal matter.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Parot, Jérémie; Gonsior, Michael; Nikolantonaki, Maria; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parlanti, Edith; Gougeon, Régis D

    2017-04-01

    Two analytical separation methods-size-exclusion chromatography and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-were implemented to evaluate the integrity of the colloidal composition of Chardonnay white wine and the impact of pressing and fermentations on the final macromolecular composition. Wine chromophoric colloidal matter, representing UV-visible-absorbing wine macromolecules, was evaluated by optical and structural measurements combined with the description of elution profiles obtained by both separative techniques. The objective of this study was to apply these two types of fractionation on a typical Chardonnay white wine produced in Burgundy and to evaluate how each of them impacted the determination of the macromolecular chromophoric content of wine. UV-visible and fluorescence measurements of collected fractions were successfully applied. An additional proteomic study revealed that grape and microorganism proteins largely impacted the composition of chromophoric colloidal matter of Chardonnay wines. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation appeared to be more reliable and less invasive with respect to the native chemical environment of chromophoric wine macromolecules, and hence is recommended as a tool to fractionate chromophoric colloidal matter in white wines. Graphical Abstract An innovative macromolecular separation method based on Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation was developed to better control colloidal dynamics across Chardonnay white winemaking.

  17. Tissue coloring with exogenous chromophores to extend surgical use of 808-nm diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio; Melato, Mauro

    2000-06-01

    Lasers with a wavelength between 351-1064nm, preset fluence and pulse duration induce a selective thermolysis of tissue chromophores. Specific exogenous chromophores, such as indocyanine green, are used in ophthalmology, in photodynamic therapy, in welding, and more recently for epilation. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of a wavelength of 808nm on tissues stained with different exogenous chromophores whose absorption curves we studied by spectrophotometer. Out of five chromophores, methylene blue proved to be effective at 808nm. We tested the diode laser 808nm, at focused powers of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 W in cw, for 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 sec on skin specimens stained with 1 percent methylene blue in a small- spot sequence. At low powers the destructive effect was highly concentrated, both in depth and laterally, while greater intensities result in marked destruction even after a short irradiation time. The use of exogeneous chromophores increases absorption and reduces laser energy transmission and scatter. This study confirms that the selectivity of 808nm lasers can be 'tricked' since thermolysis is confined to the stained areas and there is less risk of damaging surrounding areas in the event of abrupt movements by either the surgeon or the patient, especially in the case of emotionally unstable or very young patients.

  18. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High-resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using 2D blood vessel templates. An overview of the robotic laser system design is followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept and, finally, specifications for a real-time system are provided.

  19. Photocatalytic Water Splitting with the Acridine Chromophore: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Karsili, Tolga N V; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-08-20

    The hydrogen-bonded acridine-water complex is considered as a model system for the exploration of photochemical reactions which can lead to the splitting of water into H(•) and OH(•) radicals. The vertical excitation energies of the lowest singlet and triplet excited states of the complex were calculated with the CASSCF/CASPT2 and ADC(2) ab initio electronic-structure methods. In addition to the well-known excited states of the acridine chromophore, excited states of charge-transfer character were identified, in which an electron is transferred from the p orbital of the H2O molecule to the π* orbital of acridine. The low-energy barriers which separate these reactive charge-transfer states from the spectroscopic states of the acridine-water complex have been characterized by the calculation of two-dimensional relaxed potential-energy surfaces as functions of the H atom-transfer coordinate and the donor (O)-acceptor (N) distance. When populated, these charge-transfer states drive the transfer of a proton from the water molecule to acridine, which results in the acridinyl-hydroxyl biradical. The same computational methods were employed to explore the photochemistry of the (N-hydrogenated) acridinyl radical. The latter possesses low-lying (about 3.0 eV) ππ* excited states with appreciable oscillator strengths in addition to a low-lying dark ππ* excited state. The bound potential-energy functions of the ππ* excited states are predissociated by the potential-energy function of an excited state of πσ* character which is repulsive with respect to the NH stretching coordinate. The dissociation threshold of the πσ* state is about 2.7 eV and thus below the excitation energies of the bright ππ* states. The conical intersections of the πσ* state with the ππ* excited states and with the electronic ground state provide a mechanism for the direct and fast photodetachment of the H atom from the acridinyl radical. These computational results indicate that the H2

  20. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  2. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol(-1) and A=3 x 10(44) s(-1). Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162 ± 34 μm and 189 ± 34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  3. The synthesis of new double-donor chromophores with excellent electro-optic activity by introducing modified bridges.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Haoran; Liu, Fenggang; Yang, Dan; Bo, Shuhui; Qiu, Ling; Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xinhou

    2015-02-28

    A series of chromophores y1–y3 based on the same bis(N,N-diethyl)aniline donor and the tricyanofuran acceptor (TCF) linked together via the modified thiophene π-conjugation with different isolated groups have been synthesized and systematically investigated in this paper. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate the HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and first-order hyperpolarizability (β) of these chromophores. Besides, to determine the redox properties of these chromophores, cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments were performed. After introducing the isolation group into the thiophene, reduced energy gaps of 1.03 and 1.02 eV were obtained for chromophores y2 and y3, respectively, much lower compared to chromophore y1 (ΔE = 1.13 eV). These chromophores showed better thermal stability with their decomposition temperatures all above 220 °C. Besides, compared with results obtained from the chromophore (y1) without the isolated group, these new chromophores show better intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) absorption. Most importantly, the high molecular hyperpolarizability (β) of these chromophores can be effectively translated into large electro-optic (EO) coefficients (r33) in poled polymers. The electro-optic coefficient of poled films containing 25% wt of these new chromophores doped in amorphous polycarbonate (APC) afforded values of 149, 139 and 125 pm V(−1) at 1310 nm for chromophores y1–y3, respectively. Besides, when the concentration was increased, the film containing chromophores y1 and y3 showed obvious phase separation, while the film with chromophore y2 showed the maximum r33 value of 146 pm V(−1). Moreover, the electro-optic film prepared with these new chromophores showed greater stability. High r33 values indicated that the double donors of the bis(N,N-diethyl)aniline unit can efficiently improve the electron-donating ability and the isolated groups on the thiophene bridge can reduce intermolecular electrostatic interactions, thus

  4. Real-Time In Vivo Hepatotoxicity Monitoring through Chromophore-Conjugated Photon-Upconverting Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juanjuan; Samanta, Animesh; Zeng, Xiao; Han, Sanyang; Wang, Lu; Su, Dongdong; Loong, Daniel Teh Boon; Kang, Nam-Young; Park, Sung-Jin; All, Angelo Homayoun; Jiang, Wenxuan; Yuan, Lin; Liu, Xiaogang; Chang, Young-Tae

    2017-04-03

    Drug toxicity is a long-standing concern of modern medicine. A typical anti-pain/fever drug paracetamol often causes hepatotoxicity due to peroxynitrite ONOO(-) . Conventional blood tests fail to offer real-time unambiguous visualization of such hepatotoxicity in vivo. Here we report a luminescent approach to evaluate acute hepatotoxicity in vivo by chromophore-conjugated upconversion nanoparticles. Upon injection, these nanoprobes mainly accumulate in the liver and the luminescence of nanoparticles remains suppressed owing to energy transfer to the chromophore. ONOO(-) can readily bleach the chromophore and thus recover the luminescence, the presence of ONOO(-) in the liver leads to fast restoring of the near-infrared emission. Taking advantages of the high tissue-penetration capability of near-infrared excitation/emission, these nanoprobes achieve real-time monitoring of hepatotoxicity in living animals, thereby providing a convenient screening strategy for assessing hepatotoxicity of synthetic drugs.

  5. Measurement of chromophores density using high Q-factor silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandas, Ishac; Shehata, Nader; Daengngam, Chalongrat; Ashry, Islam; Xu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the relationship between the Q factor of a silica microsphere coated with nonlinear optical molecules and the surface density of the nonlinear molecules. Two types of nonlinear molecules are studied: poly{1-[p-(3‧-carboxy-4‧-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethandiyl} (PCBS), and Procion Brown MX-GRN (PB). In our experiments, we coat silica microspheres with ionic self-assembled multilayer films with different thicknesses as well as with different PCBS/PB chromophores densities. The Q factors of the coated microspheres are measured to be within the range of 106 to 107, which can be attributed to the optical absorption of the coated chromophores. This work can be used to experimentally determine the effective density of chromophores assembled on the silica microsphere. It may also find applications in chemical/biological sensing.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Valence Photoemission Spectra and Quasiparticle Excitations at Chromophore-Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2012-09-01

    Investigating quasiparticle excitations of molecules on surfaces through photoemission spectroscopy forms a major part of nanotechnology research. Resolving spectral features at these interfaces requires a comprehensive theory of electron removal and addition processes in molecules and solids which captures the complex interplay of image charges, thermal effects, and configurational disorder. Here, we develop such a theory and calculate the quasiparticle energy-level alignment and the valence photoemission spectrum for the prototype biomimetic solar cell interface between anatase TiO2 and the N3 chromophore. By directly matching our calculated photoemission spectrum to experimental data, we clarify the atomistic origin of the chromophore peak at low binding energy. This case study sets a new standard in the interpretation of photoemission spectroscopy at complex chromophore-semiconductor interfaces.

  7. The effects of oxygen concentration and light intensity on the photostability of zwitterionic chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, S. G.; Williams, G. V. M.; Lochocki, B.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Kay, A. J.; Quilty, J. W.

    2009-06-01

    Photostability measurements at different oxygen partial pressures and light intensities have been made on host-guest films containing amorphous polycarbonate and an organic chromophore with a high second order nonlinear optical figure of merit. We find that the photodegradation quantum efficiency dramatically increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure. At very low oxygen partial pressures (8x10{sup -6} bar) the average number of photons required to photodegrade a chromophore is as high as 2x10{sup 8} at 655 nm. The photodegradation quantum efficiency in air is observed to decrease with increasing optical intensity. We show that this is due to a reduced oxygen content in the film caused by chromophore photodegradation rather than ground state bleaching. There is an anomalous increase and then decrease in the photoluminescence intensity that cannot easily be explained.

  8. Electro-optic tunable Bragg gratings in chromophore doped polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunovic, D.; Raymond, S. G.; Swanson, A.; Simpson, M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tunable waveguide Bragg gratings were demonstrated in PYR-3 chromophore doped polymers. We report on the fabrication and the performance of the device. Polycarbonate thin films were doped with PYR-3 (2-{3- Cyano-4- [3-(1-decyl-1 H-pyridin-4-ylidene)-propenyl]-5,5-dimethyi-5 H-furan-2-ylidene}-malononitrile) chromophore, consisting of a dihydropyridinylidene donor and three carbon atoms in the conjugated linker between donor and acceptor. Ridge waveguides were laser micro-machined into the polycarbonate film with a JPSA micromachining system equipped with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. Bragg gratings were inscribed into the waveguide by permanently photobleaching the PYR-3 chromophores using a phase mask to achieve narrowband reflections at wavelengths around 1550 nm. Electro-optic properties were introduced by contact poling. Applying a static external electric field leads to the shift of the reflection peak.

  9. Thermal effect on Aequorea green fluorescent protein anionic and neutral chromophore forms fluorescence.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Andrea Martins

    2012-01-01

    The emission behaviour of Aequorea green fluorescent protein (A-GFP) chromophore, in both neutral (N) and anionic (A) form, was studied in the temperature range from 20 °C to 75 °C and at pH = 7. Excitation wavelengths of 399 nm and 476 nm were applied to probe the N and A forms environment, respectively. Both forms exhibit distinct fluorescence patterns at high temperature values. The emission quenching rate, following a temperature increase, is higher for the chromophore N form as a result of the hydrogen bond network weakening. The chromophore anionic form emission maximum is red shifted, upon temperature increase, due to a charge transfer process occurring after A form excitation.

  10. Retinal detachment in a patient with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muh-Shy; Ho, Tzyy-Chang; Chang, Ching-Chung; Hou, Ping-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We report extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers in a 42-year-old patient with retinal detachment. Fundus examination revealed a horseshoe-shaped tear near the temporal edge. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed and firm vitreo-retinal adhesion was noticed in the area of extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Following vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade, the retina was reattached successfully. In conclusion, retinal detachment may develop in patients with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Vitrectomy may be performed to treat this condition.

  11. Photostationary state compositions of retinal and related compounds included in beta-lactoglobulin. Effects of protein host on isomer distribution of polyene substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, R S

    1995-08-01

    The UV-visible absorption spectra and photostationary state compositions of retinal (or the related C-18 ketone, 3-dehydroretinal and the C-22 aldehyde) imbedded in the binding cavity of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) are consistent with the view that the carbonyl group of these polyenes are hydrogen-bonded with the protein host, most likely with the lone protonated lysine residue in the binding pocket. Patterns of variation in photochemical behavior of the imbedded chromophore versus that in solution are discussed in terms of possible specific protein-substrate interactions. The results are also compared with that of the methyl ether of retinol where similar hydrogen bonding is not possible.

  12. Correlation Between Chromophore Impurity Content and Fired Colour Data of Kaolin Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parvesh; Misra, S. N.; Sharma, T.

    Different kaolin clay specimen exhibit varying colours after firing depending upon the relative presence of different mineral impurities, physical state of mineral constituents etc. Spectrophotometers used for determining colour values generate many sets of colour data. Interpretation of such colour values is a subjective matter. Increase in darkness, yellowness etc as a consequence of increase in chromophore impurity content in kaolin clay have been shown. However, the inverse of above ie; gradual change in colour values along with gradual change in chromophore impurity content over a realistic range has not been studied. Whether the colour data of kaolin clay after firing can be taken up as a function of impurity content needs to be investigated. Thus, to identify the correlation between kaolin clay impurity content and it's fired colour data the present investigation examined the hypotheses i) The colour development after firing of kaolin clay is an indicator of chromophore impurity content present therein and ii) All the colour variables (L, a, b, ISO2470, redness) constituting a colour data set of pressed kaolin clay specimen after firing will vary in similar manner such that to represent variation in impurity content. The study indicated that the colour values obtained by spectrophotometry of clay specimens after firing represent the chromophore impurity present therein in a less reliable manner. To relatively estimate the quantity of chromophore impurity present in a clay sample from its fired colour, the sample should be mixed with 50% by weight of potash feldspar, pressed in to tablet suitable for colour measurement and fired at or above 1220°C to vitrify. After that the ‘L’, ‘a’ and ‘ISO2470’ values obtained truly represent the chromophore present therein.

  13. Photochemical stability of nonlinear optical chromophores in polymeric and crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Daniele; Kwon, Seong-Ji; Figi, Harry; Kwon, O-Pil; Jazbinsek, Mojca; Günter, Peter

    2008-03-28

    We compare the photochemical stability of the nonlinear optical chromophore configurationally locked polyene 2-{3-[2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)vinyl]-5,5-dimethylcyclohex-2-enylidene} malononitrile (DAT2) embedded in a polymeric matrix and in a single-crystalline configuration. The results show that, under resonant light excitations, the polymeric compound degrades through an indirect process, while the DAT2 crystal follows a slow direct process. We show that chromophores in a crystalline environment exhibit three orders of magnitude better photostability as compared to guest-host polymer composites.

  14. Second-Order Active NLO Chromophores for DNA Based Electro-Optics Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-21

    8 was obtained by a click reaction between the diazidopyrrolidine carboxylate 26 and 27 using copper iodide and diisopropyl ethylamine in THF. The...IHex2N 22 Hex2NTMS TMS TMSA PdCl2(PPh3)2 CuI, Et3N, THF 40 °C, 48h 91% K2CO3, MeOH 4h 98% Hex2N 17 23 Chromophore 6 was obtained by a click ... reaction between 18 and 17 using sodium ascorbate and copper sulphate. The product was purified by column chromatography to afford chromophore 5 in

  15. Chromopeptides from phytochrome. The structure and linkage of the PR form of the phytochrome chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, J. Clark; Rapoport, Henry

    1980-07-01

    The isolation and chromatographic purification of chromophore-containing peptides from the PR form of phytochrome treated with pepsin and thermolysin are described. From the amino acid sequence and 1H NMR spectral analysis of phytochromobiliundeca peptide (2), the structure of the PR phytochrome chromophore and the nature of the thioether linkage joining pigment to peptide have been established. Furthermore, confirmatory evidence was obtained from similar analysis of phytochromobilioctapeptide (3). The implications of this structural assignment with respect to the mechanism of the PR to PFR phototransformation are considered.

  16. Computational prediction of absorbance maxima for a structurally diverse series of engineered green fluorescent protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Timerghazin, Qadir K; Carlson, Haley J; Liang, Chen; Campbell, Robert E; Brown, Alex

    2008-02-28

    By virtue of its self-sufficiency to form a visible wavelength chromophore within the confines of its tertiary structure, the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) is single-handedly responsible for the ever-growing popularity of fluorescence imaging of recombinant fusion proteins in biological research. Engineered variants of GFP with altered excitation or emission wavelength maxima have helped to expand the range of applications of GFP. The engineering of the GFP variants is usually done empirically by genetic modifications of the chromophore structure and/or its environment in order to find variants with new photophysical properties. The process of identifying improved variants could be greatly facilitated if augmented or guided by computational studies of the chromophore ground and excited-state properties and dynamics. In pursuit of this goal, we now report a thorough investigation of computational methods for prediction of the absorbance maxima for an experimentally validated series of engineered GFP chromophore analogues. The experimental dataset is composed of absorption maxima for 10 chemically distinct GFP chromophore analogues, including a previously unreported Y66D variant, measured under identical denaturing conditions. For each chromophore analogue, excitation energies and oscillator strengths were calculated using configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS), CIS with perturbative correction for double substitutions [CIS(D)], and time-dependent density functional theory (TD DFT) using several density functionals with solvent effects included using a polarizable continuum model. Comparison of the experimental and computational results show generally poor quantitative agreement with all methods attempted. However, good linear correlations between the calculated and experimental excitation energies (R2>0.9) could be obtained. Oscillator strengths obtained with TD DFT using pure density functionals also correlate well with the

  17. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  18. Unfolding of C-phycocyanin followed by loss of non-covalent chromophore-protein interactions 1. Equilibrium experiments.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Michaela; Scheer, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Optical spectroscopic properties of the covalently linked chromophores of biliproteins are profoundly influenced by the state of the protein. This has been used to monitor the urea-induced denaturation of C-phycocyanin (CPC) from Mastigocladus laminosus and its subunits. Under equilibrium conditions, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism of the chromophores were monitored, as well as the circular dichroism of the polypeptide. Treatment of CPC trimers (alphabeta)3 resulted first in monomerization (alphabeta), which was followed by a complex unfolding process of the protein. Loss of chromophore fluorescence is the next process at increasing urea concentrations; it indicates increased flexibility of the chromophore while maintaining the native, extended conformation, and a less compact but still native-like packing of the protein in the regions sampled by the chromophores. This was followed by relaxation of the chromophores from the energetically unfavorable extended to a cyclic-helical conformation, as reported by absorption and CD in the visible range, indicating local loss of protein structure. Only then is the protein secondary structure lost, as reported by the far-UV CD. Sequential processes were also seen in the subunits, where again the chromophore-protein interactions were reduced before the unfolding of the protein. It is concluded that the bilin chromophores are intrinsic probes suitable to differentiate among different processes involved in protein denaturation.

  19. Investigation of chromophore-chromophore interaction by electro-optic measurements, linear dichroism, x-ray scattering, and density-functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Apitz, D.; Bertram, R.P.; Benter, N.; Buse, K.; Hieringer, W.; Andreasen, J.W.; Nielsen, M.M.; Johansen, P.M.

    2005-09-01

    Free-beam interferometry and angle-resolved absorption spectra are used to investigate the linear electro-optic coefficients and the linear dichroism in photoaddressable bis-azo copolymer thin films. From the first- and second order parameters deduced, the chromophore orientation distribution is calculated and displayed for several poling temperatures and chromophore concentrations. The influence of dipole-dipole interaction on the overall polymer dynamics is discussed. The first order parameter, and therefore the Pockels effect, peaks for a poling temperature of around 10 deg. C above the glass transition. The decrease of the Pockels effect above this temperature region is triggered by a head-to-tail chromophore orientation, i.e., a transition to a microcrystalline phase, increasing the second order parameter. Comparison of the experimentally observed absorption spectra and those obtained by density-functional calculations support the picture of differently aligned bis-azo dye molecules in a trans,trans configuration. Complementary wide-angle x-ray scattering is recorded to confirm the various kinds of ordering in samples poled at different temperatures.

  20. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Other Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Mrejen, Sarah; Audo, Isabelle; Bonnel, Sébastien; Sahel, José-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations characterized by progressive degeneration of rod and cone cells that affects predominantly peripheral visual fields. Macular edema may cause additional central visual acuity decrease. Cystoid macular edema (CME) is one of the few treatable causes of visual loss in RP. The prevalence of CME in RP has been found to be between 10 and 20% on fluorescein angiography-based studies, and as high as 49% on reports based on optical coherence tomography. Macular edema can manifest at any stage of the disease and may be unilateral or bilateral. It can be found in any genetic form, but is more often associated with RP caused by CRB1 mutations. The origin of macular edema in RP patients still remains poorly understood. Some mechanisms have been suggested, including antiretinal antibodies (retinal, carbonic anhydrase, and enolase antibodies), vitreous traction, retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction, and Müller cell edema. There is no gold standard therapeutic strategy. Drug therapy is the primary treatment. Systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as oral acetazolamide or topical dorzolamide, are still the mainstays of initial therapy. If CME is refractory to acetazolamide, intravitreal corticosteroid injections may be a therapeutic option. However, antivascular endothelium growth factor injections have limited effect and should be avoided. Vitrectomy has also been evaluated, but its exact role remains to be determined. The benefits of these therapies are variable among patients. The establishment of therapeutic approaches is limited by our poor understanding of the pathophysiology of CME in patients with RP. Autoimmune retinopathies (AIRs) are a group of rare diseases characterized by acute or subacute progressive vision loss and are thought to be mediated by autoantibodies specific to retinal antigens. The AIRs encompass paraneoplastic syndromes, such as cancer-associated retinopathy and

  1. [Vitreo-retinal surgery for complicated retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Wang, J Z

    1993-07-01

    93 eyes (93 patients) of complicated retinal detachment were treated with vitreo-retinal surgery. Among the series, 75 eyes were rhegmatogenous with PVR C3-D3 in 66 eyes (88.0%), while the remaining 18 eyes were traction induced. None of the cases had giant tears or complicating diabetes. On discharge from the hospital, the operation was effective in 62 cases (66.7%), in whom the retina was totally reattached or only a small amount of subretinal fluid remained. In a group of 40 eyes where the inert gas SF6 was used, the operation was effective in 30 cases (75.0%). 41 cases were followed up postoperatively for over 3 months, averaging 13.7 months, to find the operative results stable in 33 eyes (80.5%), with the visual acuity improved in 22 cases (66.7%), unchanged in 9 cases (27.3%), and decreased in 2 cases (6.0%). The operative procedures, the peeling of pre-retinal membrane, the effect of PVR severity on the operative results, and the promotion of operative efficacy by application of wide encircling buckle and inert gas tamponade were discussed.

  2. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  3. Retinal blood vessels extraction using probabilistic modelling.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Djibril; Wang, Chuang; Li, Yongmin; Salazar-Gonzalez, Ana; Liu, Xiaohui; Serag, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of retinal blood vessels plays an important role in detecting and treating retinal diseases. In this review, we present an automated method to segment blood vessels of fundus retinal image. The proposed method could be used to support a non-intrusive diagnosis in modern ophthalmology for early detection of retinal diseases, treatment evaluation or clinical study. This study combines the bias correction and an adaptive histogram equalisation to enhance the appearance of the blood vessels. Then the blood vessels are extracted using probabilistic modelling that is optimised by the expectation maximisation algorithm. The method is evaluated on fundus retinal images of STARE and DRIVE datasets. The experimental results are compared with some recently published methods of retinal blood vessels segmentation. The experimental results show that our method achieved the best overall performance and it is comparable to the performance of human experts.

  4. Retinal complications after bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Filipe, J A; Pinto, A M; Rosas, V; Castro-Correia, J

    Bungee jumping is becoming a popular sport in the Western world with some cases of ophthalmic complications being reported in recent literature. The authors reported a case of a 23-year-old healthy female who presented retinal complications following a bungee jumping. Her fundi showed superficial retinal hemorrhages in the right eye and a sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage affecting the left eye. A general examination, including a full neurological examination, was normal and laboratorial investigations were all within normal values. More studies are necessary to identify risk factors and the true incidence of related ocular lesions, but until then, we think this sport activity should be desencouraged, especially to those that are not psychological and physically fit.

  5. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  6. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    particular, signaling cascades are initiated via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). These signal transduction pathways in turn lead to increased cell proliferation and migration (particularly by fibroblasts), modulation in levels of cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and increases in anti-apoptotic proteins. The results of these biochemical and cellular changes in animals and patients include such benefits as increased healing in chronic wounds, improvements in sports injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome, pain reduction in arthritis and neuropathies, and amelioration of damage after heart attacks, stroke, nerve injury and retinal toxicity.

  7. Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration are the leading causes of blindness in the developing world...53featured research 2005 NRL Review Microelectronic Array for Stimulation of Retinal Tissue D. Scribner,1 L. Johnson,4 P. Skeath,4 R. Klein,4...GOALS The development of a high-resolution retinal prosthesis device at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) was first discussed in the late 1990s

  8. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    visual impairment usually ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other...linica l trial in the NEER network for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , and the ProgSTAR studies for Stargardt disease) . As new interventions b... retinitis pigmentosa continues at six sites- the CTEC site at University of Utah and five additional recruitment sites- the Retina Foundation of the

  9. The roles of molecular structure and effective optical symmetry in evolving dipolar chromophoric building blocks to potent octopolar nonlinear optical chromophores.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoya; Sinks, Louise E; Song, Kai; Hung, Sheng-Ting; Nayak, Animesh; Clays, Koen; Therien, Michael J

    2011-03-09

    A series of mono-, bis-, tris-, and tetrakis(porphinato)zinc(II) (PZn)-elaborated ruthenium(II) bis(terpyridine) (Ru) complexes have been synthesized in which an ethyne unit connects the macrocycle meso carbon atom to terpyridyl (tpy) 4-, 4'-, and 4''-positions. These supermolecular chromophores, based on the ruthenium(II) [5-(4'-ethynyl-(2,2';6',2''-terpyridinyl))-10,20-bis(2',6'-bis(3,3-dimethyl-1-butyloxy)phenyl)porphinato]zinc(II)-(2,2';6',2''-terpyridine)(2+) bis-hexafluorophosphate (RuPZn) archetype, evince strong mixing of the PZn-based oscillator strength with ruthenium terpyridyl charge resonance bands. Potentiometric and linear absorption spectroscopic data indicate that for structures in which multiple PZn moieties are linked via ethynes to a [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+) core, little electronic coupling is manifest between PZn units, regardless of whether they are located on the same or opposite tpy ligand. Congruent with these experiments, pump-probe transient absorption studies suggest that the individual RuPZn fragments of these structures exhibit, at best, only modest excited-state electronic interactions that derive from factors other than the dipole-dipole interactions of these strong oscillators; this approximate independent character of the component RuPZn oscillators enables fabrication of nonlinear optical (NLO) multipoles with extraordinary hyperpolarizabilities. Dynamic hyperpolarizability (β(λ)) values and depolarization ratios (ρ) were determined from hyper-Rayleigh light scattering (HRS) measurements carried out at an incident irradiation wavelength (λ(inc)) of 1300 nm. The depolarization ratio data provide an experimental measure of chromophore optical symmetry; appropriate coupling of multiple charge-transfer oscillators produces structures having enormous averaged hyperpolarizabilities (β(HRS) values), while evolving the effective chromophore symmetry from purely dipolar (e.g., Ru(tpy)[4-(Zn-porphyrin)ethynyl-tpy](PF(6))(2), β(HRS) = 1280

  10. Contrasting the Excited-State Dynamics of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Chromophore: Protein versus Solvent Environments

    PubMed Central

    Vengris, Mikas; van der Horst, Michael A.; Zgrablić, Goran; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Haacke, Stefan; Chergui, Majed; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2004-01-01

    Wavelength- and time-resolved fluorescence experiments have been performed on the photoactive yellow protein, the E46Q mutant, the hybrids of these proteins containing a nonisomerizing “locked” chromophore, and the native and locked chromophores in aqueous solution. The ultrafast dynamics of these six systems is compared and spectral signatures of isomerization and solvation are discussed. We find that the ultrafast red-shifting of fluorescence is associated mostly with solvation dynamics, whereas isomerization manifests itself as quenching of fluorescence. The observed multiexponential quenching of the protein samples differs from the single-exponential lifetimes of the chromophores in solution. The locked chromophore in the protein environment decays faster than in solution. This is due to additional channels of excited-state energy dissipation via the covalent and hydrogen bonds with the protein environment. The observed large dispersion of quenching timescales observed in the protein samples that contain the native pigment favors both an inhomogeneous model and an excited-state barrier for isomerization. PMID:15345563

  11. Color Detection Using Chromophore-Nanotube Hybrid Devices (PReSS/PD2P Talk)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xinjian

    2009-06-11

    A new solid-state light detection scheme will be discussed in this talk. In our work, single-walled carbon nanotubes transduce the light-induced conformational changes in nearby chromophores into electrical signals. This scheme mimics the way our eyes see the world. Potential applications of such nano-scale light detectors will also be discussed.

  12. Experimental studies with selected light sources for NIRS of brain tissue: quantifying tissue chromophore concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Korhonen, Vesa; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) based techniques are utilised in quantifying changes of chromophore concentrations in tissue. Particularly, non-invasive in vivo measurements of tissue oxygenation in the cerebral cortex are of interest. The measurement method is based on illuminating tissue and measuring the back-scattered light at wavelengths of interest. Tissue illumination can be realised using different techniques and various light sources. Commonly, lasers and laser diodes (LD) are utilised, but also high-power light emitting diodes (HPLED) are becoming more common. At the moment, a wide range of available narrow-band light sources exists, covering basically the entire spectrum of interest in brain tissue NIRS measurements. In this paper, in the centre of our interest are LDs and HPLEDs, because of their affordability, efficiency in terms of radiant flux versus size and easiness to adopt in in vivo medical applications. We compare characteristics of LDs and HPLEDs at specific wavelengths and their suitability for in vivo quantifying of different tissue chromophore concentration, particularly in cerebral blood flow (CBF). A special focus is on shape and width of the wavelength bands of interest, generated by the LDs and HPLEDs. Moreover, we experimentally study such effects as, spectroscopy cross talk, separability and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when quantifying tissue chromophore concentration. Chromophores of our interest are cytochrome, haemoglobin and water. Various LDs and HPLEDs, producing narrow-band wavelengths in the range from 500 nm to 1000 nm are tested.

  13. Structure-reactivity relationships between fluorescent chromophores and antioxidant activity of grain and sweet sorghum seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenolic structures, such as tannins, are the putative cause of a variety of seed functions including bird/insect resistance and antioxidant activity. Structure-reactivity relationships are necessary to understand the influence of polyphenolic chromophore structures on the tannin content and fr...

  14. Spontaneous activation of visual pigments in relation to openness/closedness of chromophore-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wendy Wing Sze; Frederiksen, Rikard; Ren, Xiaozhi; Luo, Dong-Gen; Yamashita, Takahiro; Shichida, Yoshinori; Cornwall, M Carter; Yau, King-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Visual pigments can be spontaneously activated by internal thermal energy, generating noise that interferes with real-light detection. Recently, we developed a physicochemical theory that successfully predicts the rate of spontaneous activity of representative rod and cone pigments from their peak-absorption wavelength (λmax), with pigments having longer λmax being noisier. Interestingly, cone pigments may generally be ~25 fold noisier than rod pigments of the same λmax, possibly ascribed to an ‘open’ chromophore-binding pocket in cone pigments defined by the capability of chromophore-exchange in darkness. Here, we show in mice that the λmax-dependence of pigment noise could be extended even to a mutant pigment, E122Q-rhodopsin. Moreover, although E122Q-rhodopsin shows some cone-pigment-like characteristics, its noise remained quantitatively predictable by the ‘non-open’ nature of its chromophore-binding pocket as in wild-type rhodopsin. The openness/closedness of the chromophore-binding pocket is potentially a useful indicator of whether a pigment is intended for detecting dim or bright light. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18492.001 PMID:28186874

  15. Organoplatinum chromophores for application in high-performance nonlinear absorption materials.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Shelton, Abigail H; Kim, Kye-Young; Schanze, Kirk S

    2011-09-01

    Chromophores and materials that exhibit nonlinear absorption over a broad spectrum and with high temporal dynamic range are of interest for application in materials engineering and biology. Recent work by a number of research groups has led to the development of a new family of organometallic chromophores and materials featuring interesting and useful nonlinear absorption properties. These systems contain the platinum acetylide moiety as a fundamental molecular unit, combined with delocalized, π-conjugated electron systems. These organometallic chromophores provide a unique combination of properties, such as negligible ground state absorption in the visible region, large spin-orbit coupling giving rise to high triplet excited state yield, triplet lifetime in the microsecond domain, high two-photon cross-section in the visible and near-infrared regions, and high triplet-triplet absorption cross-section in the visible and near-infrared region. This Spotlight on Application highlights recent developments in this area, combining background and review on nonlinear absorption in platinum acetylide chromophores and describing significant recent results from our own laboratory.

  16. Soluble chromophores in marine snow, seawater, sea ice and frost flowers near Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beine, Harry; Anastasio, Cort; Domine, Florent; Douglas, Thomas; Barret, Manuel; France, James; King, Martin; Hall, Sam; Ullmann, Kirk

    2012-07-01

    We measured light absorption in 42 marine snow, sea ice, seawater, brine, and frost flower samples collected during the OASIS field campaign between February 27 and April 15, 2009. Samples represented multiple sites between landfast ice and open pack ice in coastal areas approximately 5 km west of Barrow, Alaska. The chromophores that are most commonly measured in snow, H2O2, NO3-, and NO2-, on average account for less than 1% of sunlight absorption in our samples. Instead, light absorption is dominated by unidentified "residual" species, likely organic compounds. Light absorption coefficients for the frost flowers on first-year sea ice are, on average, 40 times larger than values for terrestrial snow samples at Barrow, suggesting very large rates of photochemical reactions in frost flowers. For our marine samples the calculated rates of sunlight absorption and OH production from known chromophores are (0.1-1.4) × 1014 (photons cm-3 s-1) and (5-70) × 10-12 (mol L-1 s-1), respectively. Our residual spectra are similar to spectra of marine chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), suggesting that CDOM is the dominant chromophore in our samples. Based on our light absorption measurements we estimate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in Barrow seawater and frost flowers as approximately 130 and 360 μM C, respectively. We expect that CDOM is a major source of OH in our marine samples, and it is likely to have other significant photochemistry as well.

  17. Two-dimensional two-photon absorbing chromophores and solvent effects on their cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lixin; Jen, Alex K.

    2003-02-01

    A series of 2-dimensional two-photon absorbing chromophores and their 1-dimensional analogs were studied. The influence of the solvents on the linear absorption, photoluminescence and two-photon absorption cross-sections were also examined for these chromophores. The stoke's shift increase with increasing solvent polarity, that can be adequately described by Lippert equation. Two-photon absorption cross sections were measured with femtosecond pulses by the two-photon-induced fluorescence technique. It was observed that two-photon cross-sections were also strongly dependent on the solvents, however no simple correlation with solvent polarity was found in this study. Interestingly, a linear relationship was observed in these chromophores between the molar extinction coefficient and the two-photon cross section when plotted in log-log formats. Understanding of the relationship may provide a better insight of the two-photon absorption processes, and potentially will contribute to the design of highly efficient two-photon absorbing chromophores.

  18. VCD spectroscopy as an excellent probe of chiral metal complexes containing a carbon monoxide vibrational chromophore.

    PubMed

    Fusè, Marco; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Zerla, Daniele; Rimoldi, Isabella; Contini, Alessandro; Cesarotti, Edoardo

    2015-06-07

    Vibrational circular dichroism, VCD, gives evidence that the carbon monoxide chromophore in a heteroleptic cyclopentadienyl Ru(ii)-carbonyl complex is very sensitive to the chirality of the metal centre and becomes an excellent probe to define the configuration of chiral metal complexes.

  19. Multiple and configurable optical logic systems based on layered double hydroxides and chromophore assemblies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; Fu, Yi; Li, Zhixiong; Wei, Min

    2015-01-14

    Multiple and configurable fluorescence logic gates were fabricated via self-assembly of layered double hydroxides and various chromophores. These logic gates were operated by observation of different emissions with the same excitation wavelength, which achieve YES, NOT, AND, INH and INHIBIT logic operations, respectively.

  20. Production of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter from Mangrove Leaf Litter and Floating Sargassum Colonies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) strongly absorbs solar radiation in the blue-green and serves as the primary attenuator of water column ultraviolet radiation (UV-R). CDOM interferes with remote sensing of ocean chlorophyll and can control UV-R-induced damage to light...

  1. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Ganter, U M; Longstaff, C; Pajares, M A; Rando, R R; Siebert, F

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  2. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ganter, U.M.; Longstaff, C.; Pajares, M.A.; Rando, R.R.; Siebert, F. )

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  3. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Gallego, Beatriz I.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia) provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies. PMID:27294114

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  5. Design, synthesis and characterization of novel nonlinear optical chromophores for electro-optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng

    This dissertation involves the design, synthesis and characterization of second order nonlinear optical chromophores for electro-optic applications. The design concept, that poling efficiency and macroscopic nonlinearities can be improved by modifying a chromophore's shape, has been explored. Chapter 1 gives an introduction into theoretical background of nonlinear optics and electro-optic phenomenon in organic molecules and poled polymers. Chapter 2 involves the design and synthesis of GLD-2 and GLD-3 chromophores, both with bulky substituents on the ring-fused bridge. The optical studies and HRS measurement show that the two alkyl groups on the bridge blueshift the lambdamax in chloroform by 20 nm and decrease the beta values. DSC and TGA thermal analysis show Td of GLD-2 and GLD-3 over 240°C. The maximum achievable r33 of GLD-2/PMMA is 61 pm/V, compared to the 92.4 pm/V of GLD-1/PMMA. But GLD-2/APC shows r33 of 45.2pm/V, higher than GLD-1/APC due to the improved compatibility with APC. The optical loss of 13 wt% GLD-2/PMMA at 1.55mum is 1.4 dB compared to the 2.3 dB of 17 wt% GLD-1/PMMA. Optical loss studies prove that adding two bulky substituents on bridge help attenuate electrostatic interactions. GLD-3 show deteriorated solubility in common used organic solvents, probably due to the combination of two TBDMS and two lengthy alkyl groups. Chapter 3 presents synthesis of thiophene-based chromophores with variously positioned TBDMS groups. The optical studies of these chromophores show one TBDMSO substitution on the thiophene bridge yields little influence on the lambda max in chloroform. FTCDS chromophore with two TBDMS groups, one on donor and one on thiophene bridge, shows to be the best structure with regards the thermal stability and achievable maximum EO coefficient value, 65.9 pm/V, at only 24 wt% loading density at 1.3 mum. Chapter 4 deals with three novel bridges for NLO chromophores. Synthetic methodologies of the diketone precursor of rigidified

  6. Design, synthesis, characterization and applications of multi-photon absorbing chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingdong

    Recent development in multi-photon based applications including optical power limiting, frequency up-conversion lasing, three-dimensional data storage, two-photon fluorescence microscopy and two-photon photodynamic therapy has benefited a lot from a number of chromophores with large multi-photon absorption. This thesis was focused on the development of novel two- and three-photon active chromophores and their applications. Chapter 1 describes a theoretical background of multi-photon absorption, and recent development of multi-photon based applications. Some molecular design strategies were proposed after a literature review of chromophores with large two-photon absorption. In Chapter 2, a series of stilbazolium salts with varying electron donors and anions were synthesized and characterized. The two-photon absorption and two-photon pumped cavity lasing properties for these dyes were studied by using 1064 nm nano-second laser beam. By using tunable femto-second laser, three-photon pumped cavity-less lasing properties of these dyes have also been comprehensively studied. Four-photon pumped stimulated emission was achieved in some of these stilbazolium dyes. Unsymmetrical emission behaviors under 3- and 4-photon pump conditions for all these stilbazolium dyes were observed, explained and verified. In Chapter 3, DNA was successfully used as a matrix for one-, two-, and three-photon pumped stimulated emission or lasing by intercalating a multi-photon active chromophore. In Chapter 4, it is experimentally shown that both two- and three-photon absorption in a highly concentrated chromophore system can be more efficiently utilized to accomplish optical power limiting and stabilization at laser wavelengths of 1.064 mum and ˜1.3 mum, respectively. In Chapter 5, three novel 1,10-phenanthroline containing pi-conjugated chromophores with varied electron donors were synthesized and characterized together with their corresponding nickel(II) chelated complexes. Large two

  7. Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase Type-1 Synthesizes Retinyl Esters in the Retina and Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kaylor, Joanna J.; Radu, Roxana A.; Bischoff, Nicholas; Makshanoff, Jacob; Hu, Jane; Lloyd, Marcia; Eddington, Shannan; Bianconi, Tran; Bok, Dean; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2015-01-01

    Retinyl esters represent an insoluble storage form of vitamin A and are substrates for the retinoid isomerase (Rpe65) in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The major retinyl-ester synthase in RPE cells is lecithin:retinol acyl-transferase (LRAT). A second palmitoyl coenzyme A-dependent retinyl-ester synthase activity has been observed in RPE homogenates but the protein responsible has not been identified. Here we show that diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1) is expressed in multiple cells of the retina including RPE and Müller glial cells. DGAT1 catalyzes the synthesis of retinyl esters from multiple retinol isomers with similar catalytic efficiencies. Loss of DGAT1 in dgat1 -/- mice has no effect on retinal anatomy or the ultrastructure of photoreceptor outer-segments (OS) and RPE cells. Levels of visual chromophore in dgat1 -/- mice were also normal. However, the normal build-up of all-trans-retinyl esters (all-trans-RE’s) in the RPE during the first hour after a deep photobleach of visual pigments in the retina was not seen in dgat1 -/- mice. Further, total retinyl-ester synthase activity was reduced in both dgat1 -/- retina and RPE. PMID:25974161

  8. Quantum coherence effects in natural light-induced processes: cis-trans photoisomerization of model retinal under incoherent excitation.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, Timur V; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-14

    We present a theoretical study of quantum coherence effects in the primary cis-trans photoisomerization of retinal in rhodopsin induced by incoherent solar light. Using the partial secular Bloch-Redfield quantum master equation approach based on a two-state two-mode linear vibronic coupling model of the retinal chromophore [S. Hahn and G. Stock, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2000, 104, 1146-1149], we show that a sudden turn-on of incoherent pumping can generate substantial Fano coherences among the excited states of retinal. These coherences are the most pronounced in the regime where the matrix elements of the transition dipole moment between the ground and excited eigenstates are parallel to one another. We show that even when the transition dipole moments are perpendicular (implying the absence of light-induced Fano coherence) a small amount of excited-state coherence is still generated due to the coupling to intramolecular vibrational modes and the protein environment, causing depopulation of the excited eigenstates. The overall effect of the coherences on the steady-state population and on the photoproduct quantum yield is shown to be small; however we observe a significant transient effect on the formation of the trans photoproduct, enhancing the photoreaction quantum yield by ∼11% at 200 fs. These calculations suggest that coupling to intramolecular vibrational modes and the protein environment play an important role in photoreaction dynamics, suppressing oscillations in the quantum yield associated with Fano interference.

  9. A Dominant Mutation in Rpe65, D477G, Delays Dark Adaptation and Disturbs the Visual Cycle in the Mutant Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghwa; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Chakraborty, Dibyendu; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2017-03-01

    RPE65 is an indispensable component of the retinoid visual cycle in vertebrates, through which the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal (11-cis-RAL) is generated to maintain normal vision. Various blinding conditions in humans, such as Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are attributed to either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65. Herein, we investigated D477G missense mutation, an unprecedented dominant-acting mutation of RPE65 identified in patients with autosomal dominant RP. We generated a D477G knock-in (KI) mouse and characterized its phenotypes. Although RPE65 protein levels were decreased in heterozygous KI mice, their scotopic, maximal, and photopic electroretinography responses were comparable to those of wild-type (WT) mice in stationary condition. As shown by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, levels of 11-cis-RAL in fully dark-adapted heterozygous KI mice were similar to that in WT mice. However, kinetics of 11-cis-RAL regeneration after light exposure were significantly slower in heterozygous KI mice compared with WT and RPE65 heterozygous knockout mice. Furthermore, heterozygous KI mice exhibited lower A-wave recovery compared with WT mice after photobleaching, suggesting a delayed dark adaptation. Taken together, these observations suggest that D477G acts as a dominant-negative mutant of RPE65 that delays chromophore regeneration. The KI mice provide a useful model for further understanding of the pathogenesis of RP associated with this RPE65 mutant and for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  10. Synthesis and electro-optic properties of the chromophore-containing NLO polyarylate polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haohui; Peng, Chengcheng; Bo, Shuhui; Fan, Guofang; Xu, Guangming; Zhao, Hui; Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xinhou

    2014-03-01

    Base on the same two monomers, diphenolic acid (DPA) and isophthaloyl chloride (IPC), three chromophore-containing nonlinear optical (NLO) polyarylate polymers were prepared. A tricyanofuran (TCF)-acceptor type chromophore group was in main-chain (mPAR-chr1), side-chain (sPAR-chr1) and side-chain with a 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-2,2,2-trifluoroethane (BPAPF) group (sPAR-F-chr1), respectively. The obtained polymers were characterized and evaluated by UV-Vis, 1H NMR, DSC and TGA. All the polymers exhibited good electro-optic (EO) activity. The relationship between EO coefficients (r33) and the chromophore concentration of the three polymers were also characterized and discussed. There were no obvious differences found in EO activity between mPAR-chr1 and sPAR-chr1 polyarylates with the same chromophore. The fluorinated block polyarylate sPAR-F-chr1 has the largest r33 value in these three polyarylates which is 52 pm/V at the wavelength of 1310 nm (which is almost twice the r33 value of normal polymers contained the same chormophore at the same content), when the concentration of chromophore 1 is 18wt.%. 85% of the r33 value was retained in the sPAR-F-chr1 after being heated at 85°C for 600 hours. The polymer sPAR-F-chr1, with good solubility, high Tg (above 200 °C) and side functional group at the same time, may probably be a practical NLO material. These properties make the new polyarylates have potential applications in EO devices such as EO modulators and switches.

  11. Simultaneous control of emission localization and two-photon absorption efficiency in dissymmetrical chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that combined spectral tuning of fluorescence and two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of multipolar chromophores can be achieved by introduction of slight electronic chemical dissymmetry. In that perspective, two novel series of structurally related chromophores have been designed and studied: a first series based on rod-like quadrupolar chromophores bearing different electron-donating (D) end groups and a second series based on three-branched octupolar chromophores built from a trigonal donating moiety and bearing various acceptor (A) peripheral groups. The influence of the electronic dissymmetry is investigated by combined experimental and theoretical studies of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of dissymmetric chromophores compared to their symmetrical counterparts. In both types of systems (i.e. quadrupoles and octupoles) experiments and theory reveal that excitation is essentially delocalized and that excitation involves synchronized charge redistribution between the different D and A moieties within the multipolar structure (i.e. concerted intramolecular charge transfer). In contrast, the emission stems only from a particular dipolar subunit bearing the strongest D or A moieties due to fast excitation localization after excitation prior to emission. Hence control of emission characteristics (polarization and emission spectrum) in addition to localization can be achieved by controlled introduction of electronic dissymmetry (i.e. replacement of one of the D or A end-groups by a slightly stronger D{prime} or A{prime} units). Interestingly dissymmetrical functionalization of both quadrupolar and octupolar compounds does not lead to significant loss in TPA responses and can even be beneficial due to the spectral broadening and peak position tuning that it allows. This study thus reveals an original molecular engineering route strategy allowing major TPA enhancement in multipolar structures due to concerted

  12. Effects of Potent Inhibitors of the Retinoid Cycle on Visual Function and Photoreceptor Protection from Light Damage in MiceS

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Maeda, Tadao; Golczak, Marcin; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Leahy, Patrick; Kubota, Ryo; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of the chromophore 11-cis-retinal is essential for the generation of light-sensitive visual pigments in the vertebrate retina. A deficiency in 11-cis-retinal production leads to congenital blindness in humans; however, a buildup of the photoisomerized chromophore can also be detrimental. Such is the case when the photoisomerized all-trans-retinal is produced but cannot be efficiently cleared from the internal membrane of the outer segment discs. Sustained increase of all-trans-retinal can lead to the formation of toxic condensation products in the eye. Thus, there is a need for potent, selective inhibitors that can regulate the flux of retinoids through the metabolism pathway termed the visual (retinoid) cycle. Here we systematically study the effects of the most potent inhibitor of this cycle, retinylamine (Ret-NH2), on visual function in mice. Prolonged, sustainable, but reversible suppression of the visual function was observed by Ret-NH2 as a result of its storage in a prodrug form, N-retinylamides. Direct comparison of other inhibitors such as fenretinide and 13-cis-retinoic acid showed multiple advantages of Ret-NH2 and its amides, including a higher potency, specificity, and lower transcription activation. Our results also revealed that mice treated with Ret-NH2 were completely resistant to the light-induced retina damage. As an experimental tool, Ret-NH2 allows the replacement of the native chromophore with synthetic analogs in wild-type mice to better understand the function of the chromophore in the activation of rhodopsin and its metabolism through the retinoid cycle. PMID:16837623

  13. Enhanced light-harvesting capacity by micellar assembly of free accessory chromophores and LH1-like antennas.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michelle A; Sahin, Tuba; Jiang, Jianbing; Vairaprakash, Pothiappan; Parkes-Loach, Pamela S; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Kirmaier, Christine; Loach, Paul A; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Biohybrid light-harvesting antennas are an emerging platform technology with versatile tailorability for solar-energy conversion. These systems combine the proven peptide scaffold unit utilized for light harvesting by purple photosynthetic bacteria with attached synthetic chromophores to extend solar coverage beyond that of the natural systems. Herein, synthetic unattached chromophores are employed that partition into the organized milieu (e.g. detergent micelles) that house the LH1-like biohybrid architectures. The synthetic chromophores include a hydrophobic boron-dipyrrin dye (A1) and an amphiphilic bacteriochlorin (A2), which transfer energy with reasonable efficiency to the bacteriochlorophyll acceptor array (B875) of the LH1-like cyclic oligomers. The energy-transfer efficiencies are markedly increased upon covalent attachment of a bacteriochlorin (B1 or B2) to the peptide scaffold, where the latter likely acts as an energy-transfer relay site for the (potentially diffusing) free chromophores. The efficiencies are consistent with a Förster (through-space) mechanism for energy transfer. The overall energy-transfer efficiency from the free chromophores via the relay to the target site can approach those obtained previously by relay-assisted energy transfer from chromophores attached at distant sites on the peptides. Thus, the use of free accessory chromophores affords a simple design to enhance the overall light-harvesting capacity of biohybrid LH1-like architectures.

  14. Development and Experimental Study of Phantoms for Mapping Skin Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silapetere, A.; Spigulis, J.; Saknite, I.

    2014-06-01

    Skin chromophore phantoms are widely used for better understanding of the light interaction with tissue and for calibration of skin diagnostic imaging techniques. In this work, different phantoms were examined and compared in order to find biologically equivalent substances that are the most promising for this purpose. For mimicking the skin medium and layered structure, a fibrin matrix with epidermal and dermal cell inclusion was used. Synthesized bilirubin, red blood cells and nigrosin were taken as absorbers. For spectral analysis of the developed phantoms a computer-aided multispectral imaging system Nuance 2.4 (Cambridge Research & Instrumentation, Inc., USA) was used. In this study, skin phantoms were created using such substances as bilirubin, melanin, haemoglobin and nigrosin Mūsdienās multispektrālās attēlošanas iekārtas izmanto ādas parametru un fizioloģisko procesu aprakstīšanai gan pētniecības, gan diagnostikas nolūkiem. Iekārtu darbības uzlabošanai ir nepieciešams labāk saprast gaismas mijiedarbību ar audiem, kā arī veikt šo iekārtu kalibrēšanu ar ādas maketu. Redzamā un tuvā infrasarkanā optiskā diapazona spektroskopijā ir svarīgi ādas maketi, kas simulē audu slāņaino struktūru un ķīmiskās īpašības, kā arī maketi, kas ir bioloģiski līdzvērtīgi. Šajā pētījumā tika izveidots ādas makets no bioloģiskām un ķīmiski sintezētām struktūrām. Ādas maketa izveidei tika izmantota fibrīna matrica ar dermālo un epidermālo šūnu piejaukumu, lai imitētu ādas slāņaino struktūru. Fibrīna matrica tiek veidota no 0,47 ml asins plazmas, 0,4 ml fizioloģiskā šķīduma, 0,8 μl treneksāmskābes un 89,4 μl kalcija glukanāta. Izveidoto matricu ievieto šūnu inkubatorā, lai tā polimerizētos. Nākošais slānis tiek veidots ar dermālo šūnu piejaukumu (180-270 šūnas), un pēdējais fibrīna matriksa slānis tiek veidots ar epidermālo šūnu piejaukumu (270 šūnas) un šūnu aug

  15. Retinal fundus imaging in mouse models of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anne F; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The development of in vivo retinal fundus imaging in mice has opened a new research horizon, not only in ophthalmic research. The ability to monitor the dynamics of vascular and cellular changes in pathological conditions, such as neovascularization or degeneration, longitudinally without the need to sacrifice the mouse, permits longer observation periods in the same animal. With the application of the high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in experimental mouse models, access to a large spectrum of imaging modalities in vivo is provided.

  16. The bacterial toxin CNF1 as a tool to induce retinal degeneration reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guadagni, Viviana; Cerri, Chiara; Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Fiorentini, Carla; Caleo, Matteo; Strettoi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of inherited pathologies characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. In rodent models of RP, expression of defective genes and retinal degeneration usually manifest during the first weeks of postnatal life, making it difficult to distinguish consequences of primary genetic defects from abnormalities in retinal development. Moreover, mouse eyes are small and not always adequate to test pharmacological and surgical treatments. An inducible paradigm of retinal degeneration potentially extensible to large animals is therefore desirable. Starting from the serendipitous observation that intraocular injections of a Rho GTPase activator, the bacterial toxin Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), lead to retinal degeneration, we implemented an inducible model recapitulating most of the key features of Retinitis Pigmentosa. The model also unmasks an intrinsic vulnerability of photoreceptors to the mechanism of CNF1 action, indicating still unexplored molecular pathways potentially leading to the death of these cells in inherited forms of retinal degeneration. PMID:27775019

  17. Structural Properties and UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy of Retinal-pyridyl-CN Re(I) Carbonyl Bipyridine Complex: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Eng, Julien; Daniel, Chantal

    2015-10-29

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of the all-trans and five cis conformers of [Re(CO)3(bpy)(ret-pyr-CN)](+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; ret-pyr-CN = pyridyl-CN-3,7-dimethyl-9-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-2-n)-none-(2,4,6,8-tetraen) were studied in solvent by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. The isolated retinal-like chromophore ret-pyr-CN was investigated as well for comparison. By coordination to the complex the two lowest intraligand (IL) states localized on the retinal group are slightly red-shifted from 627 to 690 nm and from 415 to 450 nm, respectively. Several isomerization pathways are open upon irradiation of the Re(I) complex by visible light (400-450 nm), especially to two cis conformers corresponding to the isomerization of the two double bonds of the retinal-like ligand close to the pyridyl group linked to the Re(I) fragment. The metal-to-ligand charge transfer states localized either on the retinal group or on the bpy ligand should play a minor role in the isomerization process itself but could improve its efficiency via ultra-fast intersystem crossing.

  18. Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; de Bruin, J

    1981-11-01

    Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer in rabbit eyes is studied by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that retinal striations noted ophthalmoscopically in these eyes represent individual fiber bundles, Axon bundles are compartmentalized within tissue tunnels comprised of elongated processes of glial cell origin.

  19. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  20. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications.

  1. Bestrophin 1 and retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adiv A; Guziewicz, Karina E; Lee, C Justin; Kalathur, Ravi C; Pulido, Jose S; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2017-01-30

    Mutations in the gene BEST1 are causally associated with as many as five clinically distinct retinal degenerative diseases, which are collectively referred to as the "bestrophinopathies". These five associated diseases are: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy, adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy, autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. The most common of these is Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Bestrophin 1 (Best1), the protein encoded by the gene BEST1, has been the subject of a great deal of research since it was first identified nearly two decades ago. Today we know that Best1 functions as both a pentameric anion channel and a regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Best1 is an integral membrane protein which, within the eye, is uniquely expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium where it predominantly localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane. Within the brain, Best1 expression has been documented in both glial cells and astrocytes where it functions in both tonic GABA release and glutamate transport. The crystal structure of Best1 has revealed critical information about how Best1 functions as an ion channel and how Ca(2+) regulates that function. Studies using animal models have led to critical insights into the physiological roles of Best1 and advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the development of patient-derived, "disease in a dish" models. In this article we review our knowledge of Best1 and discuss prospects for near-term clinical trials to test therapies for the bestrophinopathies, a currently incurable and untreatable set of diseases.

  2. Neural reprogramming in retinal degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Robert E.; Jones, Bryan W.; Anderson, James R.; Kinard, Krista; Marshak, David W.; Wilson, John H.; Wensel, Theodore; Lucas, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Early visual defects in degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) may arise from phased remodeling of the neural retina. We sought to explore the functional expression of ionotropic (iGluR) and group III, type 6 metabotropic (mGluR6) glutamate receptors in late-stage photoreceptor degenerations. Methods Excitation mapping with organic cations and computational molecular phenotyping were used to determine whether retinal neurons displayed functional glutamate receptor signaling in rodent models of retinal degenerations and a sample of human RP. Results After photoreceptor loss in rodent models of RP, bipolar cells lose mGluR6 and iGluR glutamate-activated currents, while amacrine and ganglion cells retain iGluR-mediated responsivity. Paradoxically, amacrine and ganglion cells show spontaneous iGluR signals in vivo even though bipolar cells lack glutamate-coupled depolarization mechanisms. Cone survival can rescue iGluR expression by OFF bipolar cells. In a case of human RP with cone sparing, iGluR signaling appeared intact, but the numbers of bipolar cells expressing functional iGluRs was double that of normal retina. Conclusions RP triggers permanent loss of bipolar cell glutamate receptor expression, though spontaneous iGluR-mediated signaling by amacrine and ganglion cells implies that such truncated bipolar cells still release glutamate in response to some non-glutamatergic depolarization. Focal cone-sparing can preserve iGluR display by nearby bipolar cells, which may facilitate late-RP photoreceptor transplant attempts. An instance of human RP provides evidence that rod bipolar cell dendrite switching likely triggers new gene expression patterns and may impair cone pathway function. PMID:17591910

  3. [Viral retinitis following intravitreal triamcinolone injection].

    PubMed

    Zghal, I; Malek, I; Amel, C; Soumaya, O; Bouguila, H; Nacef, L

    2013-09-01

    Necrotizing viral retinitis is associated with infection by the Herpes family of viruses, especially herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and occasionally cytomegalovirus (CMV). When the diagnosis is suspected clinically, antiviral therapy must be instituted immediately. We report the case of a patient presenting with necrotizing viral retinitis 3 months following intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide for diabetic macular edema. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated a superior temporal occlusive vasculitis. A diagnostic anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to obtain deoxyribo-nucleic acid (DNA) for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for viral retinitis. PCR was positive for CMV. The patient was placed on intravenous ganciclovir. CMV retinitis is exceedingly rare in immunocompetent patients; however, it remains the most common cause of posterior uveitis in immunocompromised patients. The incidence of this entity remains unknown. Local immunosuppression, the dose and the frequency of injections may explain the occurrence of this severe retinitis.

  4. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  5. Oximetry of retinal capillaries by multicomponent analysis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Shirai, Tomohiro; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-08-01

    Retinal oximetry of capillaries was performed for early detection of retinal vascular abnormalities, which are caused predominantly by complications of systemic circulatory diseases. As the conventional method for determining absorbance is not applicable to capillaries, multicomponent analysis was used to estimate the absorbance spectra of the retinal blood vessels. In this analysis, the capillary spectrum was classified as intermediate between those of the retinal arteries and veins, enabling relative estimation of oxygen saturation in the capillaries. This method could be useful for early recognition of disturbances in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, a spectroscopic ophthalmoscope system based on the proposed method was developed to examine the human retina. A clinical trial of this system demonstrated that oximetry of the retinal capillaries may be an improvement over the present diagnosis for patients of malignant hypertension.

  6. Chromophore Structure in the Photocycle of the Cyanobacterial Phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Mackeen, Mukram; Kuprov, Ilya; Dwek, Raymond A.; Wormald, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The chromophore conformations of the red and far red light induced product states “Pfr” and “Pr” of the N-terminal photoreceptor domain Cph1-N515 from Synechocystis 6803 have been investigated by NMR spectroscopy, using specific 13C isotope substitutions in the chromophore. 13C-NMR spectroscopy in the Pfr and Pr states indicated reversible chemical shift differences predominantly of the C4 carbon in ring A of the phycocyanobilin chromophore, in contrast to differences of C15 and C5, which were much less pronounced. Ab initio calculations of the isotropic shielding and optical transition energies identify a region for C4-C5-C6-N2 dihedral angle changes where deshielding of C4 is correlated with red-shifted absorption. These could occur during thermal reactions on microsecond and millisecond timescales after excitation of Pr which are associated with red-shifted absorption. A reaction pathway involving a hula-twist at C5 could satisfy the observed NMR and visible absorption changes. Alternatively, C15 Z-E photoisomerization, although expected to lead to a small change of the chemical shift of C15, in addition to changes of the C4-C5-C6-N2 dihedral angle could be consistent with visible absorption changes and the chemical shift difference at C4. NMR spectroscopy of a 13C-labeled chromopeptide provided indication for broadening due to conformational exchange reactions in the intact photoreceptor domain, which is more pronounced for the C- and D-rings of the chromophore. This broadening was also evident in the F2 hydrogen dimension from heteronuclear 1H-13C HSQC spectroscopy, which did not detect resonances for the 13C5-H, 13C10-H, and 13C15-H hydrogen atoms whereas strong signals were detected for the 13C-labeled chromopeptide. The most pronounced 13C-chemical shift difference between chromopeptide and intact receptor domain was that of the 13C4-resonance, which could be consistent with an increased conformational energy of the C4-C5-C6-N2 dihedral angle in the

  7. Interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration for preventing retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration are visible lesions that are risk factors for later retinal detachment. Retinal detachments occur when fluid in the vitreous cavity passes through tears or holes in the retina and separates the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. Creation of an adhesion surrounding retinal breaks and lattice degeneration, with laser photocoagulation or cryotherapy, has been recommended as an effective means of preventing retinal detachment. This therapy is of value in the management of retinal tears associated with the symptoms of flashes and floaters and persistent vitreous traction upon the retina in the region of the retinal break, because such symptomatic retinal tears are associated with a high rate of progression to retinal detachment. Retinal tears and holes unassociated with acute symptoms and lattice degeneration are significantly less likely to be the sites of retinal breaks that are responsible for later retinal detachment. Nevertheless, treatment of these problems is frequently recommended, in spite of the fact that the effectiveness of this therapy is unproven. Objectives The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 28 January 2012. Textbooks regarding retinal detachment and the reference lists of relevant reports were reviewed for additional

  8. Fixation strategies for retinal immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons.

  9. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  10. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  11. Regeneration of Light-Harvesting Complexes via Dynamic Replacement of Photodegraded Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Ghimire, Srijana; Bork, Matthew A; Riccitelli, Molly M; McMillin, David R; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-04-22

    All-synthetic molecular donor-acceptor complexes are designed, which are capable of counteracting the effect of photoinduced degradation of donor chromophores. Anionic gallium protoporphyrin IX (GaPP) and semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) are used as a model donor-acceptor complex, which is assembled using DNA oligonucleotides. The GaPP-DNA-CNT complex produces an anodic photocurrent in a photoelectrochemical cell, which steadily decays due to photo-oxidation. By modulating the chemical environment, we showed that the photodegraded chromophores may be dissociated from the complex, whereas the DNA-coated carbon nanotube acceptors are kept intact. Reassociation with fresh porphyrins leads to the full recovery of GaPP absorption and photocurrents. This strategy could form a basis for improving the light-harvesting performance of molecular donor-acceptor complexes and extending their operation lifetime.

  12. Solvent effects on two-photon absorption of dialkylamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ke; Ferrighi, Lara; Frediani, Luca; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Luo, Yi

    2007-05-01

    Solvent effects on the two-photon absorption of a symmetrical diamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophore have been studied using the density functional response theory in combination with the polarizable continuum model. It is shown that the dielectric medium has a rather small effect both on the bond length alternation and on the one-photon absorption spectrum, but it affects significantly the two-photon absorption cross section. It is found that both one- and two-photon absorptions are extremely sensitive to the planarity of the molecule, and the absorption intensity can be dramatically reduced by the conformation distortion. It has led to the conclusion that the experimentally observed anomalous solvent effect on the two-photon absorption of dialkylamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophores cannot be attributed to the intrinsic properties of a single molecule and its interaction with solvents.

  13. Blue-Coloured Highly Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells by Implementing the Diketopyrrolopyrrole Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Jun-Ho; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Kim, Yongjoo; Rakstys, Kasparas; Moehl, Thomas; Teuscher, Joel; Delcamp, Jared H.; Nazeeruddin, Mohammed K.; Grätzel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The paradigm shift in dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) – towards donor- π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) dyes – increases the performances of DSCs and challenges established design principles. Framed by this shifting landscape, a series of four diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based sensitizers utilizing the donor-chromophore-anchor (D-C-A) motif were investigated computationally, spectroscopically, and fabricated by systematic evaluation of finished photovoltaic cells. In all cases, the [Co(bpy)3]3+/2+ redox-shuttle afforded superior performance compared to I3−/I−. Aesthetically, careful molecular engineering of the DPP chromophore yielded the first example of a high-performance blue DSC – a challenge unmet since the inception of this photovoltaic technology: DPP17 yields over 10% power conversion efficiency (PCE) with the [Co(bpy)3]3+/2+ electrolyte at full AM 1.5 G simulated sun light. PMID:23945746

  14. PDE-constrained multispectral imaging of tissue chromophores with the equation of radiative transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a transport-theory-based PDE-constrained multispectral model for direct imaging of the spatial distributions of chromophores concentrations in biological tissue. The method solves the forward problem (boundary radiance at each wavelength) and the inverse problem (spatial distribution of chromophores concentrations), in an all-at-once manner in the framework of a reduced Hessian sequential quadratic programming method. To illustrate the code’s performance, we present numerical and experimental studies involving tumor bearing mice. It is shown that the PDE-constrained multispectral method accelerates the reconstruction process by up to 15 times compared to unconstrained reconstruction algorithms and provides more accurate results as compared to the so-called two-step approach to multi-wavelength imaging. PMID:21258511

  15. Selective destruction of protein function by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, D.G.

    1988-08-01

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation of protein function has been achieved. After a protein binds a specific ligand or antibody conjugated with malachite green (C.I. 42,000), it is selectively inactivated by laser irradiation at a wavelength of light absorbed by the dye but not significantly absorbed by cellular components. Ligand-bound proteins in solution and on the surfaces of cells can be denatured without other proteins in the same samples being affected. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation can be used to study cell surface phenomena by inactivating the functions of single proteins on living cells, a molecular extension of cellular laser ablation. It has an advantage over genetics and the use of specific inhibitors in that the protein function of a single cell within the organism can be inactivated by focusing the laser beam.

  16. Depth determination of chromophores in human skin by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, T.E. |; Smithies, D.J.; Goodman, D.M.; Nelson, J.S. |; Goodman, D.M.; Lau, A.

    1996-07-01

    We report on the application of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) to determine the depth of {ital in}-{ital vitro} and {ital in}-{ital vivo} subsurface chromophores in biological materials. Measurements provided by PPTR in combination with a nonnegative constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm are used to determine the initial temperature distribution in a biological material immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. Within the experimental error, chromophore depths (50{endash}450 {mu}m) in 55 {ital in}-{ital vitro} collagen phantoms determined by PPTR and optical low-coherence reflectometry are equivalent. The depths of port-wine-stain blood vessels determined by PPTR correlate very well with their locations found by computer-assisted microscopic observation of histologic sections. The mean blood-vessel depth deduced from PPTR and histologic observation is statistically indistinguishable ({ital p}{lt}0.94). {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  17. Histidine-tag-directed chromophores for tracer analyses in the analytical ultracentrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, Lance M.; Zhao, Chunxia; Melikishvili, Manana; Tao, Xiaorong; Hopper, James E.; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Fried, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Many recombinant proteins carry an oligohistidine (HisX)-tag that allows their purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). This tag can be exploited for the site-specific attachment of chromophores and fluorophores, using the same metal ion–nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) coordination chemistry that forms the basis of popular versions of IMAC. Labeling proteins in this way can allow their detection at wavelengths outside of the absorption envelopes of un-modified proteins and nucleic acids. Here we describe use of this technology in tracer sedimentation experiments that can be performed in a standard analytical ultracentrifuge equipped with absorbance or fluorescence optics. Examples include sedimentation velocity in the presence of low molecular weight chromophoric solutes, sedimentation equilibrium in the presence of high concentrations of background protein and selective labeling to simplify the assignment of species in a complex interacting mixture. PMID:21187151

  18. Precise Actuation of Bilayer Photomechanical Films Coated with Molecular Azobenzene Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyi; Tang, Rong; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Jian; Yu, Haifeng

    2015-06-01

    Bilayer photomechanical films are fabricated by depositing one layer of molecular azobenzene chromophores onto flexible low-density polyethylene substrates. The photoinduced bending and unbending behavior of five azobenzene derivatives including azobenzene, 4-hydroxy-azobenzene, 4-((4-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl)bezoitrile, 4-((4-methoxyph-enyl)diazenyl)phenol, and 4-(phenyldiazenyl)phenol is systematically studied by considering the incident light intensity and the thickness of the coated chromophore layers. Precise control of photoinduced curling of the bilayer film is successfully achieved upon irradiation with two beams of UV light, and the curled films can be recovered by thermal relaxation in the dark. The easily fabricated bilayer films show fast photomechanical response, strong photoinduced stress, and stability similar to crosslinked polymeric films.

  19. Multispectral imaging in the extended near-infrared window based on endogenous chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qian; Zhegalova, Natalia G.; Wang, Steven T.; Akers, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. To minimize the problem with scattering in deep tissues while increasing the penetration depth, we explored the feasibility of imaging in the relatively unexplored extended near infrared (exNIR) spectral region at 900 to 1400 nm with endogenous chromophores. This region, also known as the second NIR window, is weakly dominated by absorption from water and lipids and is free from other endogenous chromophores with virtually no autofluorescence. To demonstrate the applicability of the exNIR for bioimaging, we analyzed the optical properties of individual components and biological tissues using an InGaAs spectrophotometer and a multispectral InGaAs scanning imager featuring transmission geometry. Based on the differences in spectral properties of tissues, we utilized ratiometric approaches to extract spectral characteristics from the acquired three-dimensional “datacube”. The obtained images of an exNIR transmission through a mouse head revealed sufficient details consistent with anatomical structures. PMID:23933967

  20. Circular dichroism of a finite number of identical chromophores in a helical arrangement.

    PubMed

    Dick, Bernhard

    2011-06-06

    Compact expressions to calculate the transition energies, absorption line strengths, and rotational line strengths of circular dichroism for the excitonic states in a helical arrangement of N identical chromophores are presented. The absorption spectrum A(ν) and the CD spectrum C(ν) are given in terms of the same function G(ν,α) as A(ν) = a(1)G(ν,0) + a(2)G(ν,α), C(ν) = (s(1) - s(2))G(ν,α) + s(3)(d/dα)G(ν,α). The function G(ν,α) depends only on the helical angle α and the number N of interacting chromophores. An analytical expression can be given when only next-neighbor interactions are considered. All other structural parameters of the system (e.g. orientation of transition dipoles and the translation vector of the helix) enter only into the prefactors a(j) and s(j).

  1. PDE-constrained multispectral imaging of tissue chromophores with the equation of radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Kandel, Jessica J; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2010-09-08

    We introduce a transport-theory-based PDE-constrained multispectral model for direct imaging of the spatial distributions of chromophores concentrations in biological tissue. The method solves the forward problem (boundary radiance at each wavelength) and the inverse problem (spatial distribution of chromophores concentrations), in an all-at-once manner in the framework of a reduced Hessian sequential quadratic programming method. To illustrate the code's performance, we present numerical and experimental studies involving tumor bearing mice. It is shown that the PDE-constrained multispectral method accelerates the reconstruction process by up to 15 times compared to unconstrained reconstruction algorithms and provides more accurate results as compared to the so-called two-step approach to multi-wavelength imaging.

  2. Non-adiabatic dynamics of isolated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Li E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Gao, Ai-Hua E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Zhou, Pan-Wang E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Bin E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Han, Ke-Li

    2014-12-21

    On-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to investigate the relaxation mechanism of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion under vacuum. The CASSCF surface hopping simulation method based on Zhu-Nakamura theory is applied to present the real-time conformational changes of the target molecule. The static calculations and dynamics simulation results suggest that not only the twisting motion around bridging bonds between imidazolinone and phenoxy groups but the strength mode of C=O and pyramidalization character of bridging atom are major factors on the ultrafast fluorescence quenching process of the isolated chromophore anion. The abovementioned factors bring the molecule to the vicinity of conical intersections on its potential energy surface and to finish the internal conversion process. A Hula-like twisting pattern is displayed during the relaxation process and the entire decay process disfavors a photoswitching pattern which corresponds to cis-trans photoisomerization.

  3. Photoacid Behaviour in a Fluorinated Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore: Ultrafast Formation of Anion and Zwitterion States.(†).

    PubMed

    Laptenok, S P; Conyard, J; Page, P C Bulman; Chan, Y; You, M; Jaffrey, S R; Meech, S R

    2016-01-01

    The photophysics of the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein in Aequorea victoria (avGFP) are dominated by an excited state proton transfer reaction. In contrast the photophysics of the same chromophore in solution are dominated by radiationless decay, and photoacid behaviour is not observed. Here we show that modification of the pKa of the chromophore by fluorination leads to an excited state proton transfer on an extremely fast (50 fs) time scale. Such a fast rate suggests a barrierless proton transfer and the existence of a pre-formed acceptor site in the aqueous solution, which is supported by solvent and deuterium isotope effects. In addition, at lower pH, photochemical formation of the elusive zwitterion of the GFP chromophore is observed by means of an equally fast excited state proton transfer from the cation. The significance of these results for understanding and modifying the properties of fluorescent proteins are discussed.

  4. PHOTOREACTIVITY OF CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in aquatic environments is derived from the microbial decomposition of terrestrial and microbial organic matter. Here we present results of studies of the spectral properties and photoreactivity of the CDOM derived from several organi...

  5. A DNA-Fullerene Conjugate as a Template for Supramolecular Chromophore Assemblies: Towards DNA-Based Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ensslen, Philipp; Gärtner, Stefan; Glaser, Konstantin; Colsmann, Alexander; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2016-01-26

    A fullerene was covalently attached to a (dA)20 template that serves as structural scaffold to self-assemble an ordered and mixed array of ethynyl-pyrene- and ethynyl-Nile-red-nucleoside conjugates. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed evidence for energy transfer between the two different chromophores. Moreover, fluorescence quenching is significantly enhanced by the attached fullerene in mixed assemblies of different chromophore ratios. This indicates exciton dissociation by electron transfer from the photo-generated exciton on the chromophore stack to the fullerene. The fullerene-DNA-conjugate was integrated as a photo-active layer in solar cells that showed charge-carrier generation in the spectral regime of all three components of the conjugate. This work clearly demonstrates that DNA is suitable as structural element for chromophore assemblies in future organic optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells.

  6. Imaging the static dielectric constant in vitro and in living cells by a bioconjugable GFP chromophore analog.

    PubMed

    Signore, Giovanni; Abbandonato, Gerardo; Storti, Barbara; Stöckl, Martin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bizzarri, Ranieri

    2013-02-28

    A fluorescent probe structurally similar to the GFP chromophore is demonstrated to report the local static dielectric constant. This probe can be chemically functionalized for selective targeting at the intracellular level.

  7. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  8. Photoactivation-Induced Instability of Rhodopsin Mutants T4K and T17M in Rod Outer Segments Underlies Retinal Degeneration in X. laevis Transgenic Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Beatrice M.; Noorwez, Syed M.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. PMID:25274813

  9. ABAB Phthalocyanines: Scaffolds for Building Unprecedented Donor–π–Acceptor Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Ettore; Jaramillo‐García, Javier; Medel, María; Urbani, Maxence; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Unique donor–π–acceptor phthalocyanines have been synthesized through the asymmetric functionalization of an ABAB phthalocyanine, crosswise functionalized with two iodine atoms through Pd‐catalyzed cross‐coupling reactions with adequate electron‐donor and electron‐acceptor moieties. These push–pull molecules have been optically and electrochemically characterized, and their ability to perform as chromophores for dye‐sensitized solar cells has been tested. PMID:28168157

  10. Ultraviolet light absorbers having two different chromophors in the same molecule

    DOEpatents

    Vogl, O.; Li, S.

    1983-10-06

    This invention relates to novel ultraviolet light absorbers having two chromophors in the same molecule, and more particularly to benzotriazole substituted dihydroxybenzophenones and acetophenones. More particularly, this invention relates to 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone which are particularly useful as an ultraviolet light absorbers.

  11. ABAB Phthalocyanines: Scaffolds for Building Unprecedented Donor-π-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Ettore; Jaramillo-García, Javier; Medel, María; Urbani, Maxence; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeerudin, Mohammad K; de la Torre, Gema; Torres, Tomas

    2017-02-01

    Unique donor-π-acceptor phthalocyanines have been synthesized through the asymmetric functionalization of an ABAB phthalocyanine, crosswise functionalized with two iodine atoms through Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with adequate electron-donor and electron-acceptor moieties. These push-pull molecules have been optically and electrochemically characterized, and their ability to perform as chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cells has been tested.

  12. Combined Nonlinear Effects in Two-Photon Absorption Chromophores at High Intensities (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    solutions in THF(cic1es). The solid lines are a Voigt function fit to the data. We seek a simple analytical model that can adequately explain and reliably...photophysical measurements on a system of AFX chromophores and calculate the nonlinear transmission based on an effective three-level model. A numerical... calculate the nonlinear transmission based on an effective three-level model. A numerical model that in- cludes far wing linear absorption has been

  13. Optical Ground-Based Spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: An Exploration of Giant Planet Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Hudson, R. L.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present and interpret ground-based optical spectra of Jupiter and Saturn recently acquired in an effort to characterize candidate coloring agents, or chromophores, in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets of our solar system. Surprisingly, despite hundreds of years of observations, we still do not know the identity of the trace chemical compounds that color the atmospheres of the giant planets. Previous analyses have attempted to identify a specific chemical that is responsible for the colors, but none has yet been conclusively proven. We acquired spatially resolved optical spectra of various regions in the atmospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013 using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The spectra cover the range of 300-1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of R ~ 1200. For the observations of both Jupiter and Saturn, we used DIS with the 6 arcminute long slit aligned with the planets' latitudinal bands and stepped the slit north-south to build up a spectral image cube with spectra at all locations on the planet. This enables the extraction of subapertures within the slit corresponding to specific locations, e.g. the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, during the data reduction process. We compare the optical spectra of various colored regions in the giant planet atmospheres to laboratory data of candidate chromophores. The characterization of chromophore materials will provide insight into the upper tropospheric dynamics and circulation patterns on Jupiter and Saturn that provide a stable environment for the creation and/or sustenance of chromophores. This will help further our understanding of the different evolutionary pathways of the gas giant planets of our solar system, providing a process-oriented view of their variations in cloud colors.

  14. Excited-State Proton-Transfer-Induced Trapping Enhances the Fluorescence Emission of a Locked GFP Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Chang, Xue-Ping; Xia, Shu-Hua; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2016-02-09

    The chemical locking of the central single bond in core chromophores of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) influences their excited-state behavior in a distinct manner. Experimentally, it significantly enhances the fluorescence quantum yield of GFP chromophores with an ortho-hydroxyl group, while it has almost no effect on the photophysics of GFP chromophores with a para-hydroxyl group. To unravel the underlying physical reasons for this different behavior, we report static electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, cis-trans isomerization, and excited-state deactivation in a locked ortho-substituted GFP model chromophore (o-LHBI). On the basis of our previous and present results, we find that the S1 keto species is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the unlocked o-HBI and the locked o-LHBI species. Chemical locking does not change the parts of the S1 and S0 potential energy surfaces relevant to enol-keto tautomerization; hence, in both chromophores, there is an ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer that takes only 35 fs on average. However, the locking effectively hinders the S1 keto species from approaching the keto S1/S0 conical intersections so that most of trajectories are trapped in the S1 keto region for the entire 2 ps simulation time. Therefore, the fluorescence quantum yield of o-LHBI is enhanced compared with that of unlocked o-HBI, in which the S1 excited-state decay is efficient and ultrafast. In the case of the para-substituted GFP model chromophores p-HBI and p-LHBI, chemical locking hardly affects their efficient excited-state deactivation via cis-trans isomerization; thus, the fluorescence quantum yields in these chromophores remain very low. The insights gained from the present work may help to guide the design of new GFP chromophores with improved fluorescence emission and brightness.

  15. Excited-State Proton-Transfer-Induced Trapping Enhances the Fluorescence Emission of a Locked GFP Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The chemical locking of the central single bond in core chromophores of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) influences their excited-state behavior in a distinct manner. Experimentally, it significantly enhances the fluorescence quantum yield of GFP chromophores with an ortho-hydroxyl group, while it has almost no effect on the photophysics of GFP chromophores with a para-hydroxyl group. To unravel the underlying physical reasons for this different behavior, we report static electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, cis–trans isomerization, and excited-state deactivation in a locked ortho-substituted GFP model chromophore (o-LHBI). On the basis of our previous and present results, we find that the S1 keto species is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the unlocked o-HBI and the locked o-LHBI species. Chemical locking does not change the parts of the S1 and S0 potential energy surfaces relevant to enol–keto tautomerization; hence, in both chromophores, there is an ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer that takes only 35 fs on average. However, the locking effectively hinders the S1 keto species from approaching the keto S1/S0 conical intersections so that most of trajectories are trapped in the S1 keto region for the entire 2 ps simulation time. Therefore, the fluorescence quantum yield of o-LHBI is enhanced compared with that of unlocked o-HBI, in which the S1 excited-state decay is efficient and ultrafast. In the case of the para-substituted GFP model chromophores p-HBI and p-LHBI, chemical locking hardly affects their efficient excited-state deactivation via cis–trans isomerization; thus, the fluorescence quantum yields in these chromophores remain very low. The insights gained from the present work may help to guide the design of new GFP chromophores with improved fluorescence emission and brightness. PMID:26744782

  16. Self-assembled bilayers on indium-tin oxide (SAB-ITO) electrodes: a design for chromophore-catalyst photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Glasson, Christopher R K; Song, Wenjing; Ashford, Dennis L; Vannucci, Aaron; Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J; Holland, Patrick L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-08-20

    A novel approach for creating assemblies on metal oxide surfaces via the addition of a catalyst overlayer on a chomophore monolayer derivatized surface is described. It is based on the sequential self-assembly of a chromophore, [Ru(bpy)(4,4'-(PO(3)H(2)bpy)(2))](2+), and oxidation catalyst, [Ru(bpy)(P(2)Mebim(2)py)OH(2)](2+), pair, resulting in a spatially separated chromophore-catalyst assembly.

  17. Automated retinal image analysis over the internet.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ling; Madore, Benjamin; Leotta, Matthew J; Sofka, Michal; Yang, Gehua; Majerovics, Anna; Tanenbaum, Howard L; Stewart, Charles V; Roysam, Badrinath

    2008-07-01

    Retinal clinicians and researchers make extensive use of images, and the current emphasis is on digital imaging of the retinal fundus. The goal of this paper is to introduce a system, known as retinal image vessel extraction and registration system, which provides the community of retinal clinicians, researchers, and study directors an integrated suite of advanced digital retinal image analysis tools over the Internet. The capabilities include vasculature tracing and morphometry, joint (simultaneous) montaging of multiple retinal fields, cross-modality registration (color/red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms), and generation of flicker animations for visualization of changes from longitudinal image sequences. Each capability has been carefully validated in our previous research work. The integrated Internet-based system can enable significant advances in retina-related clinical diagnosis, visualization of the complete fundus at full resolution from multiple low-angle views, analysis of longitudinal changes, research on the retinal vasculature, and objective, quantitative computer-assisted scoring of clinical trials imagery. It could pave the way for future screening services from optometry facilities.

  18. Lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and retinal arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Javadzadeh, Alireza; Argani, Hassan; Nezami, Nariman; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Rafeey, Mandana; Rohbaninoubar, Mohammad; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and homocysteine (Hcy) have been implicated as risk factors for vascular diseases. The study was performed to explore the possible relationship between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels. Methods Study subjects consisted of 80 nonsmoking male patients with retinal arteriosclerosis and 54 healthy nonsmoker males as controls. Retinal arteriosclerosis was graded according to the Scheie classification. Serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, Lp(a), and Hcy were measured by standard methods. Results The serum level of Hcy was higher in patients (24.2±8.1 μmol/l) than controls (10.5±4.1 μmol/l); p<0.01. Serum levels of Lp(a) in patients (47.9±33.1 mg/dl) was also higher than controls (11.7±7.6 mg/dl); p<0.01. There was a significant direct linear correlation between the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Lp(a) level (r=0.61, p<0.01), the degree of retinal arteriosclerosis and Hcy level (r=0.72, p<0.01), and also between Lp(a) and Hcy levels (r=0.67, p<0.01). Conclusions The association between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels suggests that Lp(a) as well as Hcy could play a role in the development of retinal arteriosclerosis. PMID:18806883

  19. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-06-01

    Laser induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using two-dimensional blood vessel templates. The frame grabber is hosted on a 486 PC. The PC performs correction signal calculations using an exhaustive search on selected image portions. An X and Y laser correction signal is derived from the landmark tracking information and provided to a pair of galvanometer steered mirrors via a data acquisition and control subsystem. This subsystem also responds to patient inputs and the system monitoring lesion growth. This paper begins with an overview of the robotic laser system design followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept. The paper concludes with specifications for a real time system.

  20. Eumelanin broadband absorption develops from aggregation-modulated chromophore interactions under structural and redox control

    PubMed Central

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Iacomino, Mariagrazia; Prampolini, Giacomo; Cacelli, Ivo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Koike, Kenzo; Napolitano, Alessandra; d’Ischia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Eumelanins, the chief photoprotective pigments in man and mammals, owe their black color to an unusual broadband absorption spectrum whose origin is still a conundrum. Excitonic effects from the interplay of geometric order and disorder in 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI)-based oligomeric/polymeric structures play a central role, however the contributions of structural (scaffold-controlled) and redox (π-electron-controlled) disorder have remained uncharted. Herein, we report an integrated experimental-theoretical entry to eumelanin chromophore dynamics based on poly(vinyl alcohol)-controlled polymerization of a large set of 5,6-dihydroxyindoles and related dimers. The results a) uncover the impact of the structural scaffold on eumelanin optical properties, disproving the widespread assumption of a universal monotonic chromophore; b) delineate eumelanin chromophore buildup as a three-step dynamic process involving the rapid generation of oxidized oligomers, termed melanochromes (phase I), followed by a slow oxidant-independent band broadening (phase II) leading eventually to scattering (phase III); c) point to a slow reorganization-stabilization of melanochromes via intermolecular redox interactions as the main determinant of visible broadband absorption. PMID:28150707

  1. Fiber optic-based fluorescence detection system for in vivo studies of exogenous chromophore pharmacokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Daniel R.; Dunn, J. B.; Mitchell, W. L.; Dalton, Brian K.; Garbo, Greta M.; Warner, Jon A.

    1995-05-01

    The detection and quantification of the concentration of exogenous chromophores in-vivo by their fluorescence is complicated by many physical and geometrical parameters. Measurement of such signals is advantageous in determining the pharmacokinetics of photosensitizers such as those used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) or to assist in the diagnosis of tissue histological state. To overcome these difficulties a ratio based fiber optic contact fluorometer has been developed. This fluorescence detection system (FDS) uses the ratio of the fluorescence emission peak of the exogenous chromophore to that of endogenous chromophores, i.e. autofluorescence, to correct for a variety of parameters affecting the magnitude of the measured signals. By doing so it also minimizes the range of baseline measurements prior to exogenous drug injection, for various tissue types. Design of the FDS and results of its testing in animals and patients using the second generation photosensitizer Tin ethyletiopurpurin (SnET2) are presented. These results support the feasibility and usefulness of the Ratio FDS system.

  2. Photoswitching and Thermoresponsive Properties of Conjugated Multi-chromophore Nanostructured Materials.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Santanu; Jana, Bikash; Sain, Sumanta; Barman, Monoj Kumar; Pradhan, Swapan Kumar; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-16

    Conjugated multi-chromophore organic nanostructured materials have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials for developing efficient light-harvesting, photosensitization, photocatalysis, and sensor devices because of their unique photophysical and photochemical properties. Here, we demonstrate the formation of various nanostructures (fibers and flakes) related to the molecular arrangement (H-aggregation) of quaterthiophene (QTH) molecules and their influence on the photophysical properties. XRD studies confirm that the fiber structure consists of >95% crystalline material, whereas the flake structure is almost completely amorphous and the microstrain in flake-shaped QTH is significantly higher than that of QTH in solution. The influence of the aggregation of the QTH molecules on their photoswitching and thermoresponsive photoluminescence properties is revealed. Time-resolved anisotropic studies further unveil the relaxation dynamics and restricted chromophore properties of the self-assembled nano/microstructured morphologies. Further investigations should pave the way for the future development of organic electronics, photovoltaics, and light-harvesting systems based on π-conjugated multi-chromophore organic nanostructured materials.

  3. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes.

  4. Crystal structure of phototoxic orange fluorescent proteins with α tryptophan-based chromophore

    DOE PAGES

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    Phototoxic fluorescent proteins represent a sparse group of genetically encoded photosensitizers that could be used for precise light-induced inactivation of target proteins, DNA damage, and cell killing. Only two such GFP-based fluorescent proteins (FPs), KillerRed and its monomeric variant SuperNova, were described up to date. We present a crystallographic study of their two orange successors, dimeric KillerOrange and monomeric mKiller-Orange, at 1.81 and 1.57 Å resolution, respectively. They are the first orange-emitting protein photosensitizers with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Gln65-Trp66-Gly67). Same as their red progenitors, both orange photosensitizers have a water-filled channel connecting the chromophore to the β-barrel exterior and enablingmore » transport of ROS. In both proteins, Trp66 of the chromophore adopts an unusual trans-cis conformation stabilized by H-bond with the nearby Gln159. This trans-cis conformation along with the water channel was shown to be a key structural feature providing bright orange emission and phototoxicity of both examined orange photosensitizers.« less

  5. Crystal structure of phototoxic orange fluorescent proteins with α tryptophan-based chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-12-23

    Phototoxic fluorescent proteins represent a sparse group of genetically encoded photosensitizers that could be used for precise light-induced inactivation of target proteins, DNA damage, and cell killing. Only two such GFP-based fluorescent proteins (FPs), KillerRed and its monomeric variant SuperNova, were described up to date. We present a crystallographic study of their two orange successors, dimeric KillerOrange and monomeric mKiller-Orange, at 1.81 and 1.57 Å resolution, respectively. They are the first orange-emitting protein photosensitizers with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Gln65-Trp66-Gly67). Same as their red progenitors, both orange photosensitizers have a water-filled channel connecting the chromophore to the β-barrel exterior and enabling transport of ROS. In both proteins, Trp66 of the chromophore adopts an unusual trans-cis conformation stabilized by H-bond with the nearby Gln159. This trans-cis conformation along with the water channel was shown to be a key structural feature providing bright orange emission and phototoxicity of both examined orange photosensitizers.

  6. Modeling trans-cis chromophore isomerization for the asFP595 kindling protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2007-02-01

    We present the results of modeling properties of the chromophore, 2-acetyl-4-(p-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-methyl-5- imidazolone (AHBMI), from the newly discovered fluorescent protein asFP595 inside the protein environment by using the combined quantum mechanical - molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. In this approach, the chromophore unit and the side chains of the nearest amino acid residues are assigned to the quantum subsystem. The starting coordinates of heavy atoms were taken from the relevant crystal structures of the protein. Hydrogen atoms were added manually, and the structure of the model protein system was optimized by using QM/MM energy minimization for the trans-form of the chromophore. The Hartree-Fock/6-31G quantum chemical approximation and the AMBER force field parameters were employed in geometry optimization. The points on potential energy surfaces of the ground and first and second excited electronic states were computed with the complete active space self-consistent field approximation in the quantum subsystem under different choices of the QM/MM partitioning. Possible pathways for the trans-cis photo isomerization presumably responsible for the kindling properties of asFP595 as well as other mechanisms of photo excitation are discussed.

  7. Characterizing the NLO chromophore orientation of polymeric film by electroabsorption spectroscopy[Nonlinear Optical

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Wang, X.; Kim, W.; Jain, A.; Li, L.; Kumar, J.; Tripathy, S.

    1998-07-01

    The dispersion of third-order nonlinear coefficients {chi}{sub 1133}{sup (3)} and {chi}{sub 3333}{sup (3)} of three different NLO (nonlinear optical) polymer films were determined by electroabsorption spectroscopy. The first material investigated is an epoxy-based polymer BP-2A-NT, with azobenzene NLO chromophore 4-[((4-nitrophenyl)(azo)phenyl)azo]aniline in its side chain. The other materials are two polydiacetylenes, poly(BPOD) and poly(4-BCMU), in which the delocalized polymer chains contribute to the third-order nonlinearity. The complex spectrum of {chi}{sub 3333}{sup (3)} of each material is very similar in shape to corresponding {chi}{sub 1133}{sup (3)} spectrum. The ratio of {chi}{sub 3333}{sup (3)} to {chi}{sub 1133}{sup (3)} is 3.2 for BP-2A-NT, 1.5 for both poly(BPOD) and poly(4-BCMU). These ratios indicate that the distribution of the side-chain NLO chromophores of BP-2A-NT is very close to three-dimensional isotropy, and the distribution of the main-chain chromophores of poly(BPOD) and poly(4-BCMU) is concentrated on the film plane.

  8. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiters Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Robert W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3 ) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2 ). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  9. Chromophores from photolyzed ammonia reacting with acetylene: Application to Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Baines, K. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Filacchione, G.; Simon, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high altitude of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) may enhance the upward flux of gaseous ammonia (NH3) into the high troposphere, where NH3 molecules can be photodissociated and initiate a chain of chemical reactions with downwelling acetylene molecules (C2H2). These reactions, experimentally studied earlier by (Ferris and Ishikawa [1987] Nature 326, 777-778) and (Ferris and Ishikawa [1988] J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 110, 4306-4312), produce chromophores that absorb in the visible and ultraviolet regions. In this work we photolyzed mixtures of NH3 and C2H2 using ultraviolet radiation with a wavelength of 214 nm and measured the spectral transmission of the deposited films in the visible region (400-740 nm). From these transmission data we estimated the imaginary indices of refraction. Assuming that ammonia grains at the top of the GRS clouds are coated with this material, we performed layered sphere and radiative transfer calculations to predict GRS reflection spectra. Comparison of those results with observed and previously unreported Cassini visible spectra and with true-color images of the GRS show that the unknown GRS chromophore is spectrally consistent with the coupled NH3-C2H2 photochemical products produced in our laboratory experiments. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy we infer that the chromophore-containing residue is composed of aliphatic azine, azo, and diazo compounds.

  10. Temperature dependence and the dispersion of nonlinear optical properties of chromophore-containing polyimide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gorkovenko, A. I.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Simanchuk, A. E.; Yakimanskiy, A. V.; Nosova, G. I.; Solovskaya, N. A.; Smirnov, N. N.

    2014-12-14

    Detailed investigations of the quadratic nonlinear response of a series of new polyimides with covalently attached chromophore DR13 are performed by the Maker fringes method in the range of fundamental wavelength from 850 to 1450 nm. Polymer films with thickness of 100–400 nm were spin-coated on glass substrates and corona poled. For these materials, the maximum values of the second harmonic generation coefficients d{sub 33} are 80–120 pm/V. A red shift of the nonlinear response dispersion with respect to the linear absorption spectrum was observed for the DR13 chromophore. The temperature dependences of linear absorption and nonlinear coefficients d{sub 33} for studied structures are observed. It was found that the temperature changes of the absorption spectra lead to appreciable contribution to the value of the nonlinear coefficient d{sub 33}. The demonstrated high temperature stability (up to 120 °C) of chromophore-containing polyimide thin films makes it possible to eliminate the degradation of their nonlinear optical properties in the future applications of such structures.

  11. Eumelanin broadband absorption develops from aggregation-modulated chromophore interactions under structural and redox control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Iacomino, Mariagrazia; Prampolini, Giacomo; Cacelli, Ivo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Crescenzi, Orlando; Koike, Kenzo; Napolitano, Alessandra; D’Ischia, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Eumelanins, the chief photoprotective pigments in man and mammals, owe their black color to an unusual broadband absorption spectrum whose origin is still a conundrum. Excitonic effects from the interplay of geometric order and disorder in 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI)-based oligomeric/polymeric structures play a central role, however the contributions of structural (scaffold-controlled) and redox (π-electron-controlled) disorder have remained uncharted. Herein, we report an integrated experimental-theoretical entry to eumelanin chromophore dynamics based on poly(vinyl alcohol)-controlled polymerization of a large set of 5,6-dihydroxyindoles and related dimers. The results a) uncover the impact of the structural scaffold on eumelanin optical properties, disproving the widespread assumption of a universal monotonic chromophore; b) delineate eumelanin chromophore buildup as a three-step dynamic process involving the rapid generation of oxidized oligomers, termed melanochromes (phase I), followed by a slow oxidant-independent band broadening (phase II) leading eventually to scattering (phase III); c) point to a slow reorganization-stabilization of melanochromes via intermolecular redox interactions as the main determinant of visible broadband absorption.

  12. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes. PMID:26679720

  13. Aging Changes in Retinal Microglia and their Relevance to Age-related Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenxin; Wong, Wai T

    2016-01-01

    Age-related retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, contain features of chronic retinal inflammation that may promote disease progression. However, the relationship between aging and neuroinflammation is unclear. Microglia are long-lived, resident immune cells of the retina, and mediate local neuroinflammatory reactions. We hypothesize that aging changes in microglia may be causally linked to neuroinflammatory changes underlying age-dependent retinal diseases. Here, we review the evidence for (1) how the retinal microglial phenotype changes with aging, (2) the factors that drive microglial aging in the retina, and (3) aging-related changes in microglial gene expression. We examine how these aspects of microglial aging changes may relate to pathogenic mechanisms of immune dysregulation driving the progression of age-related retinal disease. These relationships can highlight microglial aging as a novel target for the prevention and treatment of retinal disease.

  14. Stimuli-responsive color films of poly(4-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) complexed with cyano-capped chromophores.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Wei; Li, Chien-Lin; Li, Ming-Chia; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2013-07-16

    Here, we develop a method to fabricate stimuli-responsive color films using block copolymer, poly(4-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (P4VP-PCL), as a template complexed with functionalized chromophores. The P4VP block in the P4VP-PCL can be associated with a cyano end-capped chromophore via charge transfer, which is a noncovalent interaction that can be conveniently manipulated by external stimuli, giving a specific color. The color of the film can be switched by tuning the charge transfer interaction between the chromophore and P4VP with controlled environmental conditions, such as pH, temperature, and moisture, while maintaining high transmittance for visible light due to the formation of the nanostructure of chromophore/P4VP-PCL complex. However, the association/dissociation process between chromophore and P4VP is diffusion-dominated, which may limit the kinetic response time for color change. A way to create quick and reversible color switching can be achieved by a combination of stimuli. The contrasting color change of the responsive chromophore/P4VP-PCL thin films which exhibit RGB primary colors can provide a sensor film that is flexible, fast-responsive, and convenient.

  15. Photostability studies of {pi}-conjugated chromophores with resonant and nonresonant light excitation for long-life polymeric telecommunication devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rezzonico, Daniele; Jazbinsek, Mojca; Guenter, Peter; Bosshard, Christian; Bale, Denise H.; Liao Yi; Dalton, Larry R.; Reid, Philip J.

    2007-09-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies of molecular photodegradation in {pi}-conjugated chromophores with resonant and nonresonant excitation relative to the lowest-energy electronic transition of the chromophore are performed. The limitations of previous photodegradation models are discussed, and new models that overcome these limitations and provide more accurate estimates of chromophore photostability are presented. In particular, the necessity of considering multiple degradation pathways in the analysis of photobleaching studies is shown. Photostability studies of a dihydrofuran thiophene-bridged dicyanomethylene based chromophore (FTC) employing 1.55-{mu}m excitation reveal that the photoinitiated decay kinetics are biphasic. We present what we believe to be a new, double-pathway photodegradation model capable of describing this behavior. Through investigations employing the singlet-oxygen quencher bis(dithiobenzil)nickel, photooxidation is shown to be one of the photodegradation pathways, and the ability of a quencher to inhibit chromophore photooxidation is quantified. The studies presented here provide insight into the mechanism of photochemical degradation of {pi}-conjugated chromophores for devices operating in the visible and at telecommunication wavelengths.

  16. Retinoids for treatment of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge about retinal photoreceptor signal transduction and the visual cycle required for normal eyesight has increased exponentially over the past decade. Substantial progress in human genetics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes and complex networks underlying inherited retinal diseases. Natural mutations in animal models that mimic human diseases have been characterized and advanced genetic manipulation can now be used to generate small mammalian models of human retinal diseases. Pharmacological repair of defective visual processes in animal models not only validates their involvement in vision, but also provides great promise for the development of improved therapies for millions who are progressing towards blindness or are almost completely robbed of their eyesight.

  17. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Gopal, L

    1996-12-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  18. Retinoids for Treatment of Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about retinal photoreceptor signal transduction and the visual cycle required for normal eyesight has expanded exponentially over the past decade. Substantial progress in human genetics has allowed identification of candidate genes and complex networks underlying inherited retinal diseases. Natural mutations in animal models that mimic human diseases have been characterized and advanced genetic manipulation now permits generation of small mammalian models of human retinal diseases. Pharmacological repair of defective visual processes in animal models not only validates their involvement in vision but also provides great promise for developing improved therapies for the millions that are progressing towards blindness or are almost completely robbed of eyesight. PMID:20435355

  19. Large Hyperpolarizabilities at Telecommunication-Relevant Wavelengths in Donor–Acceptor–Donor Nonlinear Optical Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Octopolar D2-symmetric chromophores, based on the MPZnM supermolecular motif in which (porphinato)zinc(II) (PZn) and ruthenium(II) polypyridyl (M) structural units are connected via ethyne linkages, were synthesized. These structures take advantage of electron-rich meso-arylporphyrin or electron-poor meso-(perfluoroalkyl)porphyrin macrocycles, unsubstituted terpyridyl and 4′-pyrrolidinyl-2,2′;6′,2″-terpyridyl ligands, and modulation of metal(II) polypyridyl-to-(porphinato)zinc connectivity, to probe how electronic and geometric factors impact the measured hyperpolarizability. Transient absorption spectra obtained at early time delays (tdelay < 400 fs) demonstrate fast excited-state relaxation, and formation of a highly polarized T1 excited state; the T1 states of these chromophores display expansive, intense T1 → Tn absorption manifolds that dominate the 800–1200 nm region of the NIR, long (μs) triplet-state lifetimes, and unusually large NIR excited absorptive extinction coefficients [ε(T1 → Tn) ∼ 105 M–1 cm–1]. Dynamic hyperpolarizability (βλ) values were determined from hyper-Rayleigh light scattering (HRS) measurements, carried out at multiple incident irradiation wavelengths spanning the 800–1500 nm spectral domain. The measured βHRS value (4600 ± 1200 × 10–30 esu) for one of these complexes, RuPZnRu, is the largest yet reported for any chromophore at a 1500 nm irradiation wavelength, highlighting that appropriate engineering of strong electronic coupling between multiple charge-transfer oscillators provides a critical design strategy to realize octopolar NLO chromophores exhibiting large βHRS values at telecom-relevant wavelengths. Generalized Thomas–Kuhn sum (TKS) rules were utilized to compute the effective excited-state-to-excited-state transition dipole moments from experimental linear-absorption spectra; these data were then utilized to compute hyperpolarizabilities as a function of frequency, that include two- and three

  20. Outer retinal abnormalities associated with inner retinal pathology in nonglaucomatous and glaucomatous optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Werner, J S; Keltner, J L; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S

    2011-01-01

    Inner and outer retinal morphology were quantified in vivo for 6 nonglaucomatous and 10 glaucomatous optic neuropathy patients. Custom, ultrahigh-resolution imaging modalities were used to evaluate segmented retinal layer thickness in 3D volumes (Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography), cone photoreceptor density (adaptive optics fundus camera), and the length of inner and outer segments of cone photoreceptors (adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography). Quantitative comparisons were made with age-matched controls, or by comparing affected and nonaffected retinal areas defined by changes in visual fields. The integrity of outer retinal layers on optical coherence tomography B-scans and density of cone photoreceptors were correlated with visual field sensitivity at corresponding retinal locations following reductions in inner retinal thickness. The photoreceptor outer segments were shorter and exhibited greater variability in retinal areas associated with visual field losses compared with normal or less affected areas of the same patient's visual field. These results demonstrate that nonglaucomatous and glaucomatous optic neuropathies are associated with outer retinal changes following long-term inner retinal pathology. PMID:21293495

  1. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  2. Nanoparticles for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber’s congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. PMID:20452457

  3. Integration of retinal image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  4. Photodiode circuits for retinal prostheses.

    PubMed

    Loudin, J D; Cogan, S F; Mathieson, K; Sher, A; Palanker, D V

    2011-10-01

    Photodiode circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution retinal prostheses. While several of these systems have been constructed and some even implanted in humans, existing descriptions of the complex optoelectronic interaction between light, photodiode, and the electrode/electrolyte load are limited. This study examines this interaction in depth with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Actively biased photoconductive and passive photovoltaic circuits are investigated, with the photovoltaic circuits consisting of one or more diodes connected in series, and the photoconductive circuits consisting of a single diode in series with a pulsed bias voltage. Circuit behavior and charge injection levels were markedly different for platinum and sputtered iridium-oxide film (SIROF) electrodes. Photovoltaic circuits were able to deliver 0.038 mC/cm(2) (0.75 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50- μm platinum electrodes, and 0.54-mC/cm(2) (11 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50-μ m SIROF electrodes driven with 0.5-ms pulses of light at 25 Hz. The same pulses applied to photoconductive circuits with the same electrodes were able to deliver charge injections as high as 0.38 and 7.6 mC/cm(2) (7.5 and 150 nC/phase), respectively. We demonstrate photovoltaic stimulation of rabbit retina in-vitro, with 0.5-ms pulses of 905-nm light using peak irradiance of 1 mW/mm(2). Based on the experimental data, we derive electrochemical and optical safety limits for pixel density and charge injection in various circuits. While photoconductive circuits offer smaller pixels, photovoltaic systems do not require an external bias voltage. Both classes of circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prostheses.

  5. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  6. Photoreceptor waveguides and effective retinal image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnsen, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Individual photoreceptor waveguiding suggests that the entire retina can be considered as a composite fiber-optic element relating a retinal image to a corresponding waveguided image. In such a scheme, a visual sensation is produced only when the latter interacts with the pigments of the outer photoreceptor segments. Here the possible consequences of photoreceptor waveguiding on vision are studied with important implications for the pupil-apodization method commonly used to incorporate directional effects of the retina. In the absence of aberrations, it is found that the two approaches give identical predictions for an effective retinal image only when the pupil apodization is chosen twice as narrow as suggested by the traditional Stiles-Crawford effect. In addition, phase variations in the retinal field due to ocular aberrations can delicately alter a waveguided image, and this may provide plausible justification for an improved visual sensation as compared with what should be expected on the grounds of a retinal image only.

  7. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs.

  8. Screening Diabetic Retinopathy Through Color Retinal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xue-Min; Gao, Quan-Xue; You, Jane; Bhattacharya, Prabir

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes that damages the eye's retina. Recognition DR as early as possible is very important to protect patients' vision. We propose a method for screening DR and distin-guishing Prolifetive Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR) from Non-Prolifetive Retino-pathy (NPDR) automatatically through color retinal images. This method evaluates the severity of DR by analyzing the appearnce of bright lesions and retinal vessel patterns. The bright lesions are extracted through morphlogical re-consturction. After that, the retinal vessels are automatically extracted using multiscale matched filters. Then the vessel patterns are analyzed by extracting the vessel net density. The experimental results domonstrate that it is a effective solution to screen DR and distinguish PDR from NPDR by only using color retinal images.

  9. [Retinal vein occlusion in a young patient].

    PubMed

    Zemba, Mihail; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Sarbu, Laura; Avram, Corina; Camburu, Raluca; Stamate, Alina

    2013-01-01

    We present a case report of a 27 years old pacient with central retinal vein occlussion and macular edema. The pacient has a significant reduction of the macular aedema with complete recovery of vision after the treatment.

  10. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  11. Digital Tracking and Control of Retinal Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Diseases .............. 18 2.2.1 Diabetic Retinopathy ....... ...................... 18 2.2.2 Macular Degeneration ............................ 20 2.2.3...retinal diseases includ- ing diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration , and retinal breaks and tears. During treatment for these diseases an argon...photocoagulated [211. 2.2.2 Macular Degeneration Macular degeneration is also called senile macular degeneration because it is most common in the elderly

  12. Retinal vascular caliber and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, F.J.; Schrijvers, E.M.C.; Ikram, M.K.; Koudstaal, P.J.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Retinal vessels provide a unique opportunity to study both systemic and cerebrovascular disease. Smaller retinal arteriolar calibers are strongly related to hypertension, whereas larger retinal venular calibers are more related to inflammation, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebrovascular disease. Whether retinal vessel calibers are related to dementia remains unclear. Methods: We investigated whether retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are associated with risk of dementia, and its subtypes Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia, in the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. Digitized retinal images were available in 5,553 participants aged 55 years or over and dementia-free at baseline (1990–1993). Participants were re-examined in 1993–1994, 1997–1999, and 2002–2004 and were continuously monitored for development of dementia. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.6 years, 655 participants developed dementia. AD was diagnosed in 519 and vascular dementia in 73 participants. Larger venular calibers were associated with an increased risk of dementia, in particular vascular dementia (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio per SD increase: 1.31; 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.64), but not AD. The association remained significant after adjustment for stroke and cardiovascular risk factors. Smaller arteriolar calibers were also associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia, yet only when adjusted for venular calibers. Conclusions: Retinal venular widening is associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia. Our findings are in line with previous observations in stroke and cerebral small-vessel disease and suggest that the association between larger retinal venular calibers and dementia may reflect cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent ischemia. PMID:21288987

  13. Notch Signaling Functions in Retinal Pericyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F.; Primo, Vincent; Graham, Mark; James, Alexandra; Manent, Jan; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pericytes, the vascular cells that constitute the outer layer of capillaries, have been shown to have a crucial role in vascular development and stability. Loss of pericytes precedes endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular degeneration in small-vessel diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Despite their clinical relevance, the cellular pathways controlling survival of retinal pericytes remain largely uncharacterized. Therefore, we investigated the role of Notch signaling, a master regulator of cell fate decisions, in retinal pericyte survival. Methods. A coculture system of ligand-dependent Notch signaling was developed using primary cultured retinal pericytes and a mesenchymal cell line derived from an inducible mouse model expressing the Delta-like 1 Notch ligand. This model was used to examine the effect of Notch activity on pericyte survival using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a light-induced cell death assay. The effect of Notch gain- and loss-of-function was analyzed in monocultures of retinal pericytes using antibody arrays to interrogate the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Results. Primary cultured retinal pericytes differentially expressed key molecules of the Notch pathway and displayed strong expression of canonical Notch/RBPJK (recombination signal-binding protein 1 for J-kappa) downstream targets. A gene expression screen using gain- and loss-of-function approaches identified genes relevant to cell survival as downstream targets of Notch activity in retinal pericytes. Ligand-mediated Notch activity protected retinal pericytes from light-induced cell death. Conclusions. Our results have identified signature genes downstream of Notch activity in retinal pericytes and suggest that tight regulation of Notch signaling is crucial for pericyte survival. PMID:25015359

  14. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA -seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA -seq., transcription factors, and...1 Keywords: 1. Cone photoreceptor 2. Retina 3. Retinal stem cell 4. Otx2 5. Onecut1 6. Blimp1 7. RNA -seq. 8. Transcription factors 9

  15. Transillumination enhances photographs of retinal hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B

    1997-09-01

    Light stand photography with direct illumination of the retina is a common method of demonstrating retinal hemorrhages. The lack of contrast between dark hemorrhages and surrounding dark retina, and the difficulty of photographing into the concavity of an eye limit this technique. Transillumination of a bivalved globe with a bright external light source such as a colonoscope or microscope light yields high contrast superior photographs. This technique is useful to document retinal hemorrhages, and provides quality photographs for courtroom demonstrations.

  16. Retinal vessel oximetry: toward absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Lompado, Arthur; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2000-06-01

    Accurately measuring the oxygen saturation of blood within retinal arteries and veins has proven to be a deceptively difficult task. Despite the excellent optical accessibility of the vessels and a wide range of reported instrumentation, we are unaware of any measurement technique that has proven to be calibrated across wide ranges of vessel diameter and fundus pigmentation. We present an overview of our retinal oximetry technique, present the results of an in vitro calibration experiment, and present preliminary human data.

  17. Stem cell-based therapeutic applications in retinal degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yiming; Enzmann, Volker; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases that target photoreceptors or the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration (RD) is found in many different forms of retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma. Effective treatment for retinal degeneration has been widely investigated. Gene-replacement therapy has been shown to improve visual function in inherited retinal disease. However, this treatment was less effective with advanced disease. Stem cell-based therapy is being pursued as a potential alternative approach in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. In this review, we will focus on stem cell-based therapies in the pipeline and summarize progress in treatment of retinal degenerative disease. PMID:20859770

  18. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  19. Computer simulation of ultrafast processes of energy migration between C-phycocyanin chromophores of the blue-green algae Agmenellum quadruplicatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Andrey A.; Borisov, A. Y.

    1993-06-01

    Our work is devoted to the investigation of some problems of energy migration among C- phycocyanin (C-PC) chromophores: (a) determination of energy migration rates between chromophores at various aggregation states of C-PC; (b) determination of the main routes of energy transfer in the rods consisting of 2 - 4 C-PC hexamers; (c) whether the position and orientation of C-PC chromophores are optimal for energy migration; and (d) disclosing of the probability function of statistic of exciton jumping times between chromophores. We developed two approaches, both being based on the statistical analysis of consecutive exciton interchromophore jumps (microscopic level) during its 'life'. The macroscopic parameters are obtained via statistical averaging. The first is the Monte-Carlo method and the second one implies direct calculation of energy migration rates. The latter method has yielded detailed information about the rates of energy migration among chromophores of C-phycocyanin at various aggregation states and conditions of chromophore orientations.

  20. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology☆

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started. PMID:24843304

  1. Retinal remodeling triggered by photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang; Chen, Ching-Kang; Levine, Edward M; Milam, Ann H; Lavail, Matthew M; Marc, Robert E

    2003-09-08

    Many photoreceptor degenerations initially affect rods, secondarily leading to cone death. It has long been assumed that the surviving neural retina is largely resistant to this sensory deafferentation. New evidence from fast retinal degenerations reveals that subtle plasticities in neuronal form and connectivity emerge early in disease. By screening mature natural, transgenic, and knockout retinal degeneration models with computational molecular phenotyping, we have found an extended late phase of negative remodeling that radically changes retinal structure. Three major transformations emerge: 1) Müller cell hypertrophy and elaboration of a distal glial seal between retina and the choroid/retinal pigmented epithelium; 2) apparent neuronal migration along glial surfaces to ectopic sites; and 3) rewiring through evolution of complex neurite fascicles, new synaptic foci in the remnant inner nuclear layer, and new connections throughout the retina. Although some neurons die, survivors express molecular signatures characteristic of normal bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas is independent of the initial molecular targets of retinal degenerations, including defects in the retinal pigmented epithelium, rhodopsin, or downstream phototransduction elements. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, it suggests that the neural retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  2. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Delu; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich's ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD. PMID:23825457

  3. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  4. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started.

  5. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  6. Robotic Assisted Cannulation of Occluded Retinal Veins

    PubMed Central

    Meenink, Thijs C. M.; Janssens, Tom; Vanheukelom, Valerie; Naus, Gerrit J. L.; Beelen, Maarten J.; Meers, Caroline; Jonckx, Bart; Stassen, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a methodology for cannulating porcine retinal venules using a robotic assistive arm after inducing a retinal vein occlusion using the photosensitizer rose bengal. Methodology Retinal vein occlusions proximal to the first vascular branch point were induced following intravenous injection of rose bengal by exposure to 532nm laser light delivered by slit-lamp or endolaser probe. Retinal veins were cannulated by positioning a glass catheter tip using a robotically controlled micromanipulator above venules with an outer diameter of 80μm or more and performing a preset piercing maneuver, controlled robotically. The ability of a balanced salt (BSS) solution to remove an occlusion by repeat distention of the retinal vein was also assessed. Results Cannulation using the preset piercing program was successful in 9 of 9 eyes. Piercing using the micromanipulator under manual control was successful in only 24 of 52 attempts, with several attempts leading to double piercing. The best location for cannulation was directly proximal to the occlusion. Infusion of BSS did not result in the resolution of the occlusion. Conclusion Cannulation of venules using a robotic microassistive arm can be achieved with consistency, provided the piercing is robotically driven. The model appears robust enough to allow testing of therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating a retinal vein thrombus and its evolution over time. PMID:27676261

  7. Diagnostic imaging in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Katome, Takashi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive inherited retinal disease, and patients with RP have reduced visual function caused by a degeneration of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). At the end stage of RP, the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the fovea reduces central vision, and RP is one of the main causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. Therefore, morphological and functional assessments of the photoreceptors in the macula area can be useful in estimating the residual retinal function in RP patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well-established method of examining the retinal architecture in situ. The photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction is observed as a distinct, highly reflective line by OCT. The presence of the IS/OS junction in the OCT images is essential for normal visual function. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) results from the accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE cells and has been used to investigate RPE and retinal function. More than one-half of RP patients have an abnormally high density parafoveal FAF ring (AF ring). The AF ring represents the border between functional and dysfunctional retina. In this review, we shall summarize recent progress on diagnostic imaging in eyes with RP.

  8. Electroretinographic effects of retinal dragging and retinal folds in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Yukari; Katagiri, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yoko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Nishina, Sachiko; Kondo, Mineo; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the retinal function of retinal dragging (Rdrag) and radial retinal folds (Rfolds) in eyes with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) using full-field electroretinography (ERG). Seventeen eyes of nine patients with FEVR who had Rdrag or Rfolds were retrospectively studied. Eyes were classified into four groups according to the severity of the retinal alterations: Group 1, without Rdrag or Rfolds (5 eyes); Group 2, with Rdrag (4 eyes); Group 3, with Rfolds (6 eyes); and Group 4, with Rfolds in which all major retinal vessels were involved (2 eyes). The amplitudes of all ERG components and the implicit times of the photopic a- and b-waves and 30-Hz flicker responses were decreased or prolonged as the severity of the retinal alterations increased (P < 0.01). The photopic negative response was most severely affected and nearly undetectable in all eyes in Groups 3 and 4, although the other ERG components were detectable in all eyes in Group 3 and one eye in Group 4. These results suggest the decrease of retinal functions was correlated with the degree of severity of Rdrag and Rfolds in eyes with FEVR. In addition, the function of the retinal ganglion cells appears to be more severely affected compared with the others. PMID:27456314

  9. Increased aqueous flare is associated with thickening of inner retinal layers in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaka, Yosuke; Ito, Yasuki; Ueno, Shinji; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa(RP) is a hereditary retinal disease that causes photoreceptor, outer retinal, degeneration. Although the pathogenesis is still unclear, there have been numerous reports regarding inner retinal changes in RP eyes. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the changes in the thicknesses of different retinal layers of RP eyes, and its association with aqueous flare, which is used for measuring the intensity of intraocular inflammation. A total of 125 eyes of 64 patients with RP and 13 normal eyes were studied. The thicknesses of total neural retina,nerve fiber layer(NFL),ganglion cell layer(GCL),inner plexiform layer(IPL),inner nuclear layer(INL),outer layers and foveal thickness were measured in the optical coherence tomographic images. Aqueous flare was measured with a laser flare-cell meter. The associations between those parameters, visual acuity and visual field were determined in RP eyes using multivariate analysis. The results of this study showed the significant thickening of NFL, GCL and INL, the significant thinning of outer layers and the association of them with increased aqueous flare, whereas NFL and INL thickening associated with outer retinal thinning. These results can suggest the involvement of intraocular inflammation in the pathogenesis of inner retinal thickening as a secondary change following outer retinal degeneration. PMID:27653207

  10. Relationship Between Retinal Perfusion and Retinal Thickness in Healthy Subjects: An Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian; Gu, Ruiping; Zong, Yuan; Xu, Huan; Wang, Xiaolei; Sun, Xinghuai; Jiang, Chunhui; Xie, Bing; Jia, Yali; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between retinal perfusion and retinal thickness in the peripapillary and macular areas of healthy subjects. Methods Using spectral-domain optic coherence tomography and split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm, retinal perfusion and retinal thicknesses in the macular and peripapillary areas were measured in healthy volunteers, and correlations among these variables were analyzed. Results Overall, 64 subjects (121 eyes) including 28 males and 36 females with a mean ± SD age of 38 ± 13 years participated. Linear mixed-models showed that vessel area density was significantly correlated with the inner retinal thickness (from the inner limiting membrane to the outer border of the inner nucleus layer; P < 0.05), but not with the thickness of the full retina (P > 0.05) in the parafoveal area. The area of the foveal capillary-free zone was negatively correlated with the inner and full foveal thicknesses (all P < 0.001). In the peripapillary area, the vessel area density was positively correlated with the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (P < 0.001). Conclusions In healthy subjects, retinal perfusion in small vessels was closely correlated with the thickness of the inner retinal layers in both the macular and peripapillary areas. PMID:27409474

  11. [Photoreceptors and visual pigments in three species of newts].

    PubMed

    Koremiak, D A; Govardovskiĭ, V I

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor complement and retinal visual pigments in three newt (Caudata, Salamandridae, Pleurodelinae) species (Pleurodeles waltl, Lissotriton (Triturus) vulgaris and Cynops orientalis) were studied by light mucroscopy and microspectrophotometry. Retinas of all three species contain "red" (rhodopsin/porphyropsin) rods, large and small single cones, and double cones. Large single cones and both components of double cones contain red-sensitive (presumably LWS) visual pigment whose absorbance spectrum peaks between 593 and 611 nm. Small single cones are either blue- (SWS2, maximum absorbance between 470 and 489 nm) or UV-sensitive (SWS1, maximum absorbance between 340 and 359 nm). Chromophore composition of visual pigments (A1 vs. A2) was assessed both from template fitting of absorption spectra and by the method of selective bleaching. All pigments contained a mixture of A1 (11-cis retinal) and A2 (11-cis-3,4-dehydroretinal) chromophore in the proportion depending on the species and cell type. In all cases, A2 was dominant. However, in C. orientalis rods the fraction of A1 could reach 45%, while in P. waltl and L. vulgaris cones it did not exceed 5%. Remarkably, the absorbance of the newt blue-sensitive visual pigment was shifted by up to 45 nm toward the longer wavelength, as compared with all other amphibian SWS2-pigments. We found no "green" rods typical of retinas of Anura and some Caudata (ambystomas) in the three newt species studied.

  12. Base catalysis of chromophore formation in Arg96 and Glu222 variants of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sniegowski, Jennifer A; Lappe, Jason W; Patel, Hetal N; Huffman, Holly A; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2005-07-15

    In green fluorescent protein (GFP), chromophore biosynthesis is initiated by a spontaneous main-chain condensation reaction. Nucleophilic addition of the Gly67 amide nitrogen to the Ser65 carbonyl carbon is catalyzed by the protein fold and leads to a heterocyclic intermediate. To investigate this mechanism, we substituted the highly conserved residues Arg96 and Glu222 in enhanced GFP (EGFP). In the R96M variant, the rate of chromophore formation is greatly reduced (time constant = 7.5 x 10(3) h, pH 7) and exhibits pH dependence. In the E222Q variant, the rate is also attenuated at physiological pH (32 h, pH 7) but is accelerated severalfold beyond that of EGFP at pH 9-10. In contrast, EGFP maturation is pH-independent and proceeds with a time constant of 1 h (pH 7-10). Mass spectrometric results for R96M and E222Q indicate accumulation of the pre-cyclization state, consistent with rate-limiting backbone condensation. The pH-rate profile implies that the Glu222 carboxylate titrates with an apparent pK(a) of 6.5 in R96M and that the Gly67 amide nitrogen titrates with an apparent pK(a) of 9.2 in E222Q. These data suggest a model for GFP chromophore synthesis in which the carboxylate of Glu222 plays the role of a general base, facilitating proton abstraction from the Gly67 amide nitrogen or the Tyr66 alpha-carbon. Arg96 fulfills the role of an electrophile by lowering the respective pK values and stabilizing the alpha-enolate. Modulating the base strength of the proton-abstracting group may aid in the design of fast-maturing GFPs with improved characteristics for real-time monitoring of cellular events.

  13. Modulating the electronic structure of chromophores by chemical substituents for efficient energy transfer: application to fluorone.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrew M; Liu, Claire; Valentine, Andrew J S; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-08-07

    Strong electron correlation within a quasi-spin model of chromophores was recently shown to enhance exciton energy transfer significantly. Here we investigate how the modulation of the electronic structure of the chromophores by chemical substitution can enhance energy-transfer efficiency. Unlike previous work that does not consider the direct effect of the electronic structure on exciton dynamics, we add chemical substituents to the fluorone dimer to study the effect of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on exciton energy transfer. The exciton dynamics are studied from the solution of a quantum Liouville equation for an open system whose model Hamiltonian is derived from excited-state electronic structure calculations. Both van der Waals energies and coupling energies, arising from the Hellmann-Feynman force generated upon transferring the dimers from infinity to a finite separation, are built into the model Hamiltonian. Though these two effects are implicitly treated in dipole-based models, their explicit and separate treatment as discussed here is critical to forging the correct connection with the electronic structure calculations. We find that the addition of electron-donating substituents to the fluorone system results in an increase in exciton-transfer rates by factors ranging from 1.3-1.9. The computed oscillator strength is consistent with the recent experimental results on a larger heterodimer system containing fluorone. The oscillator strength increases with the addition of electron-donating substituents. Our results indicate that the study of chromophore networks via electronic structure will help in the future design of efficient synthetic light-harvesting systems.

  14. Photophysical diversity of two novel cyanobacteriochromes with phycocyanobilin chromophores: photochemistry and dark reversion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Luo, Juan; Tu, Jun-Ming; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Xie, Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are phytochrome homologues in cyanobacteria that act as sensory photoreceptors. We compare two cyanobacteriochromes, RGS (coded by slr1393) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and AphC (coded by all2699) from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Both contain three GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA protein) domains (GAF1, GAF2 and GAF3). The respective full-length, truncated and cysteine point-mutated genes were expressed in Escherichia coli together with genes for chromophore biosynthesis. The resulting chromoproteins were analyzed by UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry. RGS shows a red-green photochromism (λ(max) = 650 and 535 nm) that is assigned to the reversible 15Z/E isomerization of a single phycocyanobilin-chromophore (PCB) binding to Cys528 of GAF3. Of the three GAF domains, only GAF3 binds a chromophore and the binding is autocatalytic. RGS autophosphorylates in vitro; this reaction is photoregulated: the 535 nm state containing E-PCB was more active than the 650 nm state containing Z-PCB. AphC from Nostoc could be chromophorylated at two GAF domains, namely GAF1 and GAF3. PCB-GAF1 is photochromic, with the proposed 15E state (λ(max) = 685 nm) reverting slowly thermally to the thermostable 15Z state (λ(max)  = 635 nm). PCB-GAF3 showed a novel red-orange photochromism; the unstable state (putative 15E, λ(max) = 595 nm) reverts very rapidly (τ ~ 20 s) back to the thermostable Z state (λ(max) = 645 nm). The photochemistry of doubly chromophorylated AphC is accordingly complex, as is the autophosphorylation: E-GAF1/E-GAF3 shows the highest rate of autophosphorylation activity, while E-GAF1/Z-GAF3 has intermediate activity, and Z-GAF1/Z-GAF3 is the least active state.

  15. Characterization of the degradation products of a color-changed monoclonal antibody: tryptophan-derived chromophores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Polozova, Alla; Gruia, Flaviu; Feng, Jinhua

    2014-07-15

    We describe the characterization of degradation products responsible for color change in near UV-visible light-irradiated and heat-stressed monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug product in liquid formulation. The treated samples were characterized using reversed-phase HPLC and size-exclusion HPLC with absorption spectroscopy. Both methods showed color change was due to chromophores formed on the mAb but not associated with the formulation excipients in both light-irradiated and heat-stressed mAb samples. These chromophores were further located by a new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry identified the major tryptophan oxidation products as kynurenine (Kyn), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), and hydroxytryptophan (OH-Trp). The absorption spectra showed that each of the tryptophan oxidation products exhibited a distinct absorption band above 280 nm shifted to the longer wavelengths in the order of OH-Trp < NFK < Kyn. The Kyn-containing peptide was detected by absorption at 420 nm. No new absorption bands were observed for either methionine or histidine oxidation products. This confirmed that tryptophan oxidation products, but not methionine and histidine oxidation products, were responsible for the color change. It is worth noting that a new oxidation product with the loss of hydrogen (2 Da mass decrease) for Trp-107 of the heavy chain was identified in the heat-stressed mAb sample. This oxidized tryptophan residue exhibited a distinct absorption band at the maximum absorbance wavelength 335 nm, which is responsible for the color change to yellow. This study showed that the new peptide mapping methodology with a combination of mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy is useful to identify tryptophan oxidation products as chromophores responsible for color change in stressed mAb drug product.

  16. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  17. Wavelength optimization for rapid chromophore mapping using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Dell, Steven; Cuccia, David J.; Gioux, Sylvain; Durkin, Anthony J.; Frangioni, John V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes multiple-frequency structured illumination and model-based computation to generate two-dimensional maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties. SFDI absorption data are measured at multiple wavelengths and used to fit for the tissue concentration of intrinsic chromophores in each pixel. This is done with a priori knowledge of the basis spectra of common tissue chromophores, such as oxyhemoglobin (ctO2Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (ctHHb), water (ctH2O), and bulk lipid. The quality of in vivo SFDI fits for the hemoglobin parameters ctO2Hb and ctHHb is dependent on wavelength selection, fitting parameters, and acquisition rate. The latter is critical because SFDI acquisition time is up to six times longer than planar two-wavelength multispectral imaging due to projection of multiple-frequency spatial patterns. Thus, motion artifact during in vivo measurements compromises the quality of the reconstruction. Optimal wavelength selection is examined through matrix decomposition of basis spectra, simulation of data, and dynamic in vivo measurements of a human forearm during cuff occlusion. Fitting parameters that minimize cross-talk from additional tissue chromophores, such as water and lipid, are determined. On the basis of this work, a wavelength pair of 670 nm∕850 nm is determined to be the optimal two-wavelength combination for in vivo hemodynamic tissue measurements provided that assumptions for water and lipid fractions are made in the fitting process. In our SFDI case study, wavelength optimization reduces acquisition time over 30-fold to 1.5s compared to 50s for a full 34-wavelength acquisition. The wavelength optimization enables dynamic imaging of arterial occlusions with improved spatial resolution due to reduction of motion artifacts. PMID:21198164

  18. Structural and evolutionary aspects of antenna chromophore usage by class II photolyases.

    PubMed

    Kiontke, Stephan; Gnau, Petra; Haselsberger, Reinhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2014-07-11

    Light-harvesting and resonance energy transfer to the catalytic FAD cofactor are key roles for the antenna chromophores of light-driven DNA photolyases, which remove UV-induced DNA lesions. So far, five chemically diverse chromophores have been described for several photolyases and related cryptochromes, but no correlation between phylogeny and used antenna has been found. Despite a common protein topology, structural analysis of the distantly related class II photolyase from the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei (MmCPDII) as well as plantal orthologues indicated several differences in terms of DNA and FAD binding and electron transfer pathways. For MmCPDII we identify 8-hydroxydeazaflavin (8-HDF) as cognate antenna by in vitro and in vivo reconstitution, whereas the higher plant class II photolyase from Arabidopsis thaliana fails to bind any of the known chromophores. According to the 1.9 Å structure of the MmCPDII·8-HDF complex, its antenna binding site differs from other members of the photolyase-cryptochrome superfamily by an antenna loop that changes its conformation by 12 Å upon 8-HDF binding. Additionally, so-called N- and C-motifs contribute as conserved elements to the binding of deprotonated 8-HDF and allow predicting 8-HDF binding for most of the class II photolyases in the whole phylome. The 8-HDF antenna is used throughout the viridiplantae ranging from green microalgae to bryophyta and pteridophyta, i.e. mosses and ferns, but interestingly not in higher plants. Overall, we suggest that 8-hydroxydeazaflavin is a crucial factor for the survival of most higher eukaryotes which depend on class II photolyases to struggle with the genotoxic effects of solar UV exposure.

  19. Twisted Thiophene-Based Chromophores with Enhanced Intramolecular Charge Transfer for Cooperative Amplification of Third-Order Optical Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Teran, Natasha B; He, Guang S; Baev, Alexander; Shi, Yanrong; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N; Marks, Tobin J; Reynolds, John R

    2016-06-08

    Exploiting synergistic cooperation between multiple sources of optical nonlinearity, we report the design, synthesis, and nonlinear optical properties of a series of electron-rich thiophene-containing donor-acceptor chromophores with condensed π-systems and sterically regulated inter-aryl twist angles. These structures couple two key mechanisms underlying optical nonlinearity, namely, (i) intramolecular charge transfer, greatly enhanced by increased electron density and reduced aromaticity at chromophore thiophene rings and (ii) a twisted chromophore geometry, producing a manifold of close-lying excited states and dipole moment changes between ground and excited states that are nearly twice that of untwisted systems. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and nonlinear Z-scan measurements, combined with quantum chemical calculations, illuminate relationships between molecular structure and mechanisms of enhancement of the nonlinear refractive index. Experiment and calculations together reveal ground-state structures that are strongly responsive to the solvent polarity, leading to substantial negative solvatochromism (Δλ ≈ 10(2) nm) and prevailing zwitterionic/aromatic structures in the solid state and in polar solvents. Ground-to-excited-state energy gaps below 2.0 eV are obtained in condensed π-systems, with lower energy gaps for twisted versus untwisted systems. The real part of the second hyperpolarizability in the twisted structures is much greater than the imaginary part, with the highest twist angle chromophore giving |Re(γ)/Im(γ)| ≈ 100, making such chromophores very promising for all-optical-switching applications.

  20. Electric field poled polymeric nonlinear optical systems: molecular dynamics simulations of poly(methyl methacrylate) doped with disperse red chromophores.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yaoquan; Zhang, Qiong; Agren, Hans

    2007-04-12

    We demonstrate a complete procedure for simulations of electric field poled polymeric nonlinear optical systems with the purpose to evaluate the macroscopic electro-optic coefficients. The simulations cover the electric field poling effects on the chromophore order at the liquid state, the cooling procedure from the liquid to the solid state in the presence of the poling field, and the back-relaxation of the system after the removal of the field. We use Disperse Red chromophore molecules doped in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix for a numerical demonstration of the total procedure. On the basis of the simulation results, the polymer mobility and the static properties of the dopant chromophores are derived. In the liquid state, the chromophore molecules are closer to the side chains than to the backbones of the polymer matrix, and after the simulated annealing, the polymer matrix tends to be closely packed, leading to a significant change in the polymer structure around the chromophore molecules. Besides predicting the absolute macroscopic electro-optic coefficient values, the results are used to derive the microscopic origin of these values in terms of geometric and electronic structure, loading, poling, and back-relaxation effects, thereby aiding to establish design principles for optimum guest-host configurations.

  1. Decoupling Electronic versus Nuclear Photoresponse of Isolated Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophores Using Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Hjalte V.; Pedersen, Henrik B.; Bochenkova, Anastasia V.; Andersen, Lars H.

    2016-12-01

    The photophysics of a deprotonated model chromophore for the green fluorescent protein is studied by femtosecond laser pulses in an electrostatic ion-storage ring. The laser-pulse duration is much shorter than the time for internal conversion, and, hence, contributions from sequential multiphoton absorption, typically encountered with ns-laser pulses, are avoided. Following single-photon excitation, the action-absorption maximum is shown to be shifted within the S0 to S1 band from its origin at about 490 to 450 nm, which is explained by the different photophysics involved in the detected action.

  2. Optical and Near-IR Spectral Comparison with Chromophore Candidates in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Alexander; Chanover, Nancy; Miller, Charles; Loeffler, Mark; Hudson, Reggie; Simon, Amy

    2014-11-01

    Large atmospheric features, such as the belts, zones, and storms that make up Jupiter’s atmosphere remain colored by an unidentified chemical compound (or set of compounds). Optical reflectance spectra of Jupiter’s atmosphere in the literature show few spectral features in the blue (shortwards of 500 nm), unlike the red portion of the spectrum which is dominated by the methane absorption spectrum. The prevailing spectral slope and dearth of molecular absorption features in the blue are attributed to absorption by coloring compounds, or chromophores, in the upper Jovian atmosphere. While both organic and inorganic candidate compounds have been proposed, few laboratory studies have been conducted at temperatures and pressures appropriate for local Jupiter conditions to determine the identity of the chromophores responsible for coloring these large atmospheric features such as Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. In this study, we analyzed ground-based optical spectra and near-IR spectral image cubes of Jupiter for comparison with laboratory data of a potential chromophore compound. Optical spectra 330-450 nm in the blue, ~570-690 nm in the red) were obtained between December 2013 and February 2014 with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph, mounted on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Near-infrared (1.25-2.5 μm) spectra of various locations in Jupiter’s atmosphere were obtained from spectral image cubes taken with the New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array during the early 2007 Jupiter flyby. The combination of these two data sets allowed us to identify specific regions in the Jovian atmosphere with distinct coloration. We compare these ground- and space-based observations to laboratory spectra from the Cosmic Ice Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Thin films of NH4SH were exposed to varying amounts of ionizing radiation at Jovian temperature conditions, thereby enabling us to evaluate NH4SH as a

  3. A novel colorimetric fluoride sensor based on a semi-rigid chromophore controlled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiling; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Xusheng; Li, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A novel semi-rigid latent chromophore E1, containing an amide subunit activated by an adjacent semi-rigid intramolecular hydrogen-bonding (IHB) unit, was designed for the detection of fluoride ion by the 'naked-eye' in CH3CN. Comparative studies on structural analogs (E2, E3, and E4) provided significant insight into the structural and functional role of the amide N-H and IHB segment in the selective recognition of fluoride ions. The deprotonation of the amide N-H followed by the enhancement of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) induced the colorimetric detection of E1 for fluoride ion.

  4. Insight into the Nonlinear Absorbance of Two Related Series of Two-Photon Absorbing Chromophores (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Reinhardt, B. A. Opt. Lett. 1995, 20, 1524. (f) Larson, E . J.; Friesen , L. A.; Johnson, C. K. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1997, 265, 161. (g) Albota, M.; Beljonne, D...62102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4348 5e. TASK NUMBER RG 6. AUTHOR(S) Joy E . Rogers (UES, Inc.) Jonathan E . Slagle (AT&T Government Solutions) Daniel G...Insight into the Nonlinear Absorbance of Two Related Series of Two-Photon Absorbing Chromophores Joy E . Rogers,*,†,‡ Jonathan E . Slagle,†,§ Daniel G

  5. A Miniaturized Therapeutic Chromophore for Multiple Metal Pollutant Sensing, Pathological Metal Diagnosis and Logical Computing.

    PubMed

    Rout, Bhimsen

    2016-06-07

    The efficacy of a miniaturized unimolecular analytic system is illustrated. The easily accessible therapeutic chromophore "temoporfin", which responds differentially to bound metals at multiple wavelengths of Q-band absorption using chemometric analysis, expeditiously detects and discriminates a wide range of metals regarded as priority pollutants in water and hence may also be used for diagnosis of medically relevant metals in human urine. The molecule was further investigated as an electronic logic device, e.g. keypad lock device, to authorize multiple highly secure chemical passwords for information protection.

  6. Synthesis, photophysical properties, and application of o- and p-amino green fluorescence protein synthetic chromophores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hui; Lo, Wei-Jen; Sung, Kuangsen

    2013-01-18

    The o- and p-amino green-fluorescence-protein synthetic chromophores (GFPSCs) were synthesized from the corresponding o- and p-nitro protecting group. Among the four protecting groups of the o-amino group, the o-nitro protecting group is the only choice to synthesize the o-amino GFPSCs. The first singlet excited states of o- and p-amino GFPSCs carry significant charge-transfer character through the mechanism of photoinduced charge transfer (PCT). The o-amino GFPSCs can serve as wavelength-ratiometric fluorescence sensors that selectively recognize Cr(3+) in aqueous medium through a PCT mechanism.

  7. Torsional Motion of the Chromophore Catechol following the Absorption of Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. D.; Staniforth, M.; Paterson, M. J.; Stavros, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    The ability to probe energy flow in molecules, following the absorption of ultraviolet light, is crucial to unraveling photophysical phenomena. Here we excite a coherent superposition of vibrational states in the first excited electronic state (S1 ) in catechol, resulting in a vibrational wave packet. The observed quantum beats, assigned to superpositions of the low-frequency, and strongly mixed, O-H torsional mode τ2 , elegantly demonstrate how changes in geometry upon photoionization from the S1 state to the ground state of the cation (D0 ) enables one to probe energy flow at the very early stages of photoexcitation in this biological chromophore.

  8. A Miniaturized Therapeutic Chromophore for Multiple Metal Pollutant Sensing, Pathological Metal Diagnosis and Logical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Bhimsen

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy of a miniaturized unimolecular analytic system is illustrated. The easily accessible therapeutic chromophore “temoporfin”, which responds differentially to bound metals at multiple wavelengths of Q-band absorption using chemometric analysis, expeditiously detects and discriminates a wide range of metals regarded as priority pollutants in water and hence may also be used for diagnosis of medically relevant metals in human urine. The molecule was further investigated as an electronic logic device, e.g. keypad lock device, to authorize multiple highly secure chemical passwords for information protection.

  9. Excited-state symmetry breaking of linear quadrupolar chromophores: A transient absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozova, Nadia; Ventelon, Lionel; Clermont, Guillaume; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Plaza, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    The photophysical properties of two highly symmetrical quadrupolar chromophores were studied by both steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy. Their excited-state behavior is dominated by the solvent-induced Stokes shift of the stimulated-emission band. The origin of this shift is attributed to symmetry breaking that confers a non-vanishing dipole moment to the excited state of both compounds. This dipole moment is large and constant in DMSO, whereas symmetry breaking appears significantly slower and leading to smaller excited-state dipole in toluene. Time-dependant increase of the excited-state dipole moment induced by weak solvation is proposed to explain the results in toluene.

  10. Chromophore Structure in Lumirhodopsin and Metarhodopsin I by Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Microchip Spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Duohai; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman microchip flow experiments have been performed on the lumirhodopsin (Lumi) and metarhodopsin I (Meta I) photointermediates of rhodopsin at room temperature to elucidate the structure of the chromophore in each species as well as changes in protein-chromophore interactions. Transient Raman spectra of Lumi and Meta I with delay times of 16 μs and 1 ms, respectively, are obtained by using a microprobe system to focus displaced pump and probe laser beams in a microfabricated flow channel and to detect the scattering. The fingerprint modes of both species are very similar and characteristic of an all-trans chromophore. Lumi exhibits a relatively normal hydrogen-outof-plane (HOOP) doublet at 951/959 cm-1, while Meta I has a single HOOP band at 957 cm-1. These results suggest that the transitions from bathorhodopsin to Lumi and Meta I involve a relaxation of the chromophore to a more planar all-trans conformation and the elimination of the structural perturbation that uncouples the 11H and 12H wags in bathorhodopsin. Surprisingly, the protonated Schiff base C=N stretching mode in Lumi (1638 cm-1) is unusually low compared to those in rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin, and the C=ND stretching mode shifts down by only 7 cm-1 in D2O buffer. This indicates that the Schiff base hydrogen bonding is dramatically weakened in the bathorhodopsin to Lumi transition. However, the C=ND stretching mode in Meta I is found at 1654 cm-1 and exhibits a normal deuteration-induced downshift of 24 cm-1, identical to that of the all-trans protonated Schiff base. The structural relaxation of the chromophore—protein complex in the bathorhodopsin to Lumi transition thus appears to drive the Schiff base group out of its hydrogen-bonded environment near Glu113, and the hydrogen bonding recovers to a normal solvated PSB value but presumably a different hydrogen bond acceptor with the formation of Meta I. PMID:11425321

  11. A Miniaturized Therapeutic Chromophore for Multiple Metal Pollutant Sensing, Pathological Metal Diagnosis and Logical Computing

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Bhimsen

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of a miniaturized unimolecular analytic system is illustrated. The easily accessible therapeutic chromophore “temoporfin”, which responds differentially to bound metals at multiple wavelengths of Q-band absorption using chemometric analysis, expeditiously detects and discriminates a wide range of metals regarded as priority pollutants in water and hence may also be used for diagnosis of medically relevant metals in human urine. The molecule was further investigated as an electronic logic device, e.g. keypad lock device, to authorize multiple highly secure chemical passwords for information protection. PMID:27271817

  12. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  13. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  14. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  15. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  16. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that causes a variety ...

  17. Retinal remodeling in inherited photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W

    2003-10-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations initiated in rods or the retinal pigmented epithelium usually evoke secondary cone death and sensory deafferentation of the surviving neural retina. In the mature central nervous system, deafferentation evokes atrophy and connective re-patterning. It has been assumed that the neural retina does not remodel, and that it is a passive survivor. Screening of advanced stages of human and rodent retinal degenerations with computational molecular phenotyping has exposed a prolonged period of aggressive negative remodeling in which neurons migrate along aberrant glial columns and seals, restructuring the adult neural retina (1). Many neurons die, but survivors rewire the remnant inner plexiform layer (IPL), forming thousands of novel ectopic microneuromas in the remnant inner nuclear layer (INL). Bipolar and amacrine cells engage in new circuits that are most likely corruptive. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas emerges regardless of the molecular defects that initially trigger retinal degenerations. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, the exposure of intrinsic retinal remodeling by the removal of sensory control in retinal degenerations suggests that neuronal organization in the normal retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  18. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Megan E.; Hammer, Sandra S.; McCollum, Gary W.; Penn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27966642

  19. Protocadherin-17 Function in Zebrafish Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Londraville, Richard; Brickner, Sarah; El-Shaar, Lana; Fankhauser, Kelsee; Dearth, Cassandra; Fulton, Leah; Sochacka, Alicja; Bhattarai, Sunil; Marrs, James A.; Liu, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play crucial roles in vertebrate development including the development of the retina. Most studies have focused on examining functions of classic cadherins (e.g. N-cadherin) in retinal development. There is little information on the function of protocadherins in the development of the vertebrate visual system. We previously showed that protocadherin-17 mRNA was expressed in developing zebrafish retina during critical stages of the retinal development. To gain insight into protocadherin-17 function in the formation of the retina, we analyzed eye development and differentiation of retinal cells in zebrafish embryos injected with protocadherin-17 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs). Protocadherin-17 knockdown embryos (pcdh17 morphants) had significantly reduced eyes due mainly to decreased cell proliferation. Differentiation of several retinal cell types (e.g. retinal ganglion cells) was also disrupted in the pcdh17 morphants. Phenotypic rescue was achieved by injection of protocadherin-17 mRNA. Injection of a vivo-protocadherin-17 MO into one eye of embryonic zebrafish resulted in similar eye defects. Our results suggest that protocadherin-17 plays an important role in the normal formation of the zebrafish retina. PMID:22927092

  20. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  1. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature and then crossing the blood-retinal barrier; and through the choroidal blood supply, crossing the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The blood-retinal barrier is functionally similar to the blood-brain barrier, normally restricting transport of larger sized materials, but particles in the lower nanomaterial size range can be expected to transit. The blood flow to the retinal choroid is, on a tissue mass basis, one of the highest in the body raising the potential for rapid delivery of nanomaterials to the RPE. In vitro, RPE cells rapidly uptake nano particles, transport and agglomerate them in the perinuclear cytoplasm. In vivo studies have shown that the eye can uptake nanomaterials and retain them longer than many other tissues after cessation of exposure. Toxicity from nanomaterials to the neural retina or the RPE would be expected to follow common mechanisms identified for other tissues including generation of reactive oxygen species, alteration of cellular redox status, altered intracellular signaling, and release of toxic metal ions from soluble metallic particles. The retina and other ocular tissues, however, have potential for additional phototoxic mechanism

  2. Clinical applications of retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Thake, Miriam; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Many currently incurable forms of blindness affecting the retina have a genetic etiology and several others, such as those resulting from retinal vascular disturbances, respond to repeated, potentially indefinite administration of molecular based treatments. The recent clinical advances in retinal gene therapy have shown that viral vectors can deliver genes safely to the retina and the promising initial results from a number of clinical trials suggest that certain diseases may potentially be treatable. Gene therapy provides a means of expressing proteins within directly transduced cells with far greater efficacy than might be achieved by traditional systemic pharmacological approaches. Recent developments have demonstrated how vector gene expression may be regulated and further improvements to vector design have limited side effects and improved safety profiles. These recent steps have been most significant in bringing gene therapy into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Nevertheless translating retinal gene therapy from animal research into clinical trials is still a lengthy process, including complexities in human retinal diseases that have been difficult to model in the laboratory. The focus of this review is to summarize the genetic background of the most common retinal diseases, highlight current concepts of gene delivery technology, and relate those technologies to pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies.

  3. Retinal injury thresholds for blue wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Lund, David J; Stuck, Bruce E; Edsall, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The interaction mechanism leading to laser-induced retinal alteration can be thermal or non-thermal, depending upon the wavelength of the laser radiation and the duration of the exposure. To investigate the effect of exposure duration on the interaction mechanism, retinal injury thresholds in the rhesus monkey were experimentally measured for exposure to laser radiation at wavelengths of 441.6, 457.9, 476.5, and 496.5 nm. Exposure durations were 0.1, 1, 5, 16, and 100 s; and 1/e retinal irradiance diameters were 50, 125, and 327 microm. Tissue response was observed via ophthalmoscope 1 h and 48 h post exposure. Thermal and non-thermal damage thresholds were obtained depending upon the exposure duration. These threshold data are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature for 100-s duration exposures, but differences were noted for shorter exposures. The current study yielded an estimated injury threshold for 1-s duration, 327-microm retinal irradiance diameter exposures at 441.6 nm, which is an order of magnitude higher than that previously reported. This study provides evidence that laser-induced retinal damage is primarily induced via thermal mechanisms for exposures shorter than 5 s in duration. Arguments are presented that support an amendment of the thermal hazard function, R(lambda).

  4. Advances in retinal ganglion cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Balendra, S I; Normando, E M; Bloom, P A; Cordeiro, M F

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide and will affect 79.6 million people worldwide by 2020. It is caused by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), predominantly via apoptosis, within the retinal nerve fibre layer and the corresponding loss of axons of the optic nerve head. One of its most devastating features is its late diagnosis and the resulting irreversible visual loss that is often predictable. Current diagnostic tools require significant RGC or functional visual field loss before the threshold for detection of glaucoma may be reached. To propel the efficacy of therapeutics in glaucoma, an earlier diagnostic tool is required. Recent advances in retinal imaging, including optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and adaptive optics, have propelled both glaucoma research and clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. However, an ideal imaging technique to diagnose and monitor glaucoma would image RGCs non-invasively with high specificity and sensitivity in vivo. It may confirm the presence of healthy RGCs, such as in transgenic models or retrograde labelling, or detect subtle changes in the number of unhealthy or apoptotic RGCs, such as detection of apoptosing retinal cells (DARC). Although many of these advances have not yet been introduced to the clinical arena, their successes in animal studies are enthralling. This review will illustrate the challenges of imaging RGCs, the main retinal imaging modalities, the in vivo techniques to augment these as specific RGC-imaging tools and their potential for translation to the glaucoma clinic. PMID:26293138

  5. Morphological properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J; van der List, D; Wang, G-Y; Chalupa, L M

    2006-06-19

    The mouse retina offers an increasingly valuable model for vision research given the possibilities for genetic manipulation. Here we assess how the structural properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells relate to the stratification pattern of the dendrites of these neurons within the inner plexiform layer. For this purpose, we used 14 morphological measures to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells parametrically into different clusters. Retinal ganglion cells were labeled in one of three ways: Lucifer Yellow injection, 'DiOlistics' or transgenic expression of yellow fluorescent protein. The resulting analysis of 182 cells revealed 10 clusters of monostratified cells, with dendrites confined to either On or Off sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer, and four clusters of bistratified cells, dendrites spanning the On and Off sublaminae. We also sought to establish how these parametrically identified retinal ganglion cell clusters relate to cell types identified previously on the basis of immunocytochemical staining and the expression of yellow fluorescent protein. Cells labeled with an antibody against melanopsin were found to be located within a single cluster, while those labeled with the SMI-32 antibody were in four different clusters. Yellow fluorescent protein expressing cells were distributed within 13 of the 14 clusters identified here, which demonstrates that yellow fluorescent protein expression is a useful method for labeling virtually the entire population of mouse retinal ganglion cells. Collectively, these findings provide a valuable baseline for future studies dealing with the effects of genetic mutations on the morphological development of these neurons.

  6. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Aakriti; Yang, Jin; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable. PMID:28157165

  7. Cadherin-6 Function in Zebrafish Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Londraville, Richard; Marrs, James A.; Wilson, Amy L.; Mbimba, Thomas; Murakami, Tohru; Kubota, Fumitaka; Zheng, Weiping; Fatkins, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play crucial roles in vertebrate development including the development of the visual system. Most studies have focused on examining functions of classical type I cadherins (e.g. cadherin-2) in visual system development. There is little information on the function of classical type II cadherins (e.g. cadherin-6) in the development of the vertebrate visual system. To gain insight into cadherin-6 role in the formation of the retina, we analyzed differentiation of retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors in zebrafish embryos injected with cadherin-6 specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides. Differentiation of the retinal neurons in cadherin-6 knockdown embryos (cdh6 morphants) was analyzed using multiple markers. We found that expression of transcription factors important for retinal development was greatly reduced, and expression of Notch-Delta genes and proneural gene ath5 was altered in the cdh6 morphant retina. The retinal lamination was present in the morphants, although the morphant eyes were significantly smaller than control embryos due mainly to decreased cell proliferation. Differentiation of the retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptors was severely disrupted in the cdh6 morphants due to a significant delay in neuronal differentiation. Our results suggest that cadherin-6 plays an important role in the normal formation of the zebrafish retina. PMID:18506771

  8. Recent Advancements in Retinal Vessel Segmentation.

    PubMed

    L Srinidhi, Chetan; Aparna, P; Rajan, Jeny

    2017-04-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation is a key step towards the accurate visualization, diagnosis, early treatment and surgery planning of ocular diseases. For the last two decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated in developing automated methods for segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images. Despite the fact, segmentation of retinal vessels still remains a challenging task due to the presence of abnormalities, varying size and shape of the vessels, non-uniform illumination and anatomical variability between subjects. In this paper, we carry out a systematic review of the most recent advancements in retinal vessel segmentation methods published in last five years. The objectives of this study are as follows: first, we discuss the most crucial preprocessing steps that are involved in accurate segmentation of vessels. Second, we review most recent state-of-the-art retinal vessel segmentation techniques which are classified into different categories based on their main principle. Third, we quantitatively analyse these methods in terms of its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under the curve and discuss newly introduced performance metrics in current literature. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the existing segmentation techniques. Finally, we provide an insight into active problems and possible future directions towards building successful computer-aided diagnostic system.

  9. Chromophore based analyses of steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: current status and perspectives for clinical adoption.

    PubMed

    Bydlon, Torre M; Nachabé, Rami; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Hendriks, Benno H W

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a rapidly growing technology in the biophotonics community where it has shown promise in its ability to classify different tissues. In the steady-state domain a wide spectrum of clinical applications is supported with this technology ranging from diagnostic to guided interventions. Diffuse reflectance spectra provide a wealth of information about tissue composition; however, extracting biologically relevant information from the spectra in terms of chromophores may be more useful to gain acceptance into the clinical community. The chromophores that absorb light in the visible and near infrared wavelengths can provide information about tissue composition. The key characteristics of these chromophores and their relevance in different organs and clinical applications is the focus of this review, along with translating their use to the clinic.

  10. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable...34Preservation of the inner retina in retinitis pigmentosa . A morphometric analysis," Arch Ophthalmol, vol. 115, no. 4, pp. 511-515, Apr.1997...Towards a completely implantable, light-sensitive intraocular retinal prosthesis. M.S. Humayun, J.D. Weiland, B. Justus1, C. Merrit1, J. Whalen, D

  11. Functional and Behavioral Metrics for Evaluating Laser Retinal Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    pigmentosa , and retinal detachment10. mfERG response characteristics have been shown to vary depending on the part of the retina that is affected by a...DoD Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). 20100715258 Functional and behavioral metrics for evaluating laser retinal damage Cheryl...potential for and severity of laser eye injury and retinal damage is increasing . Sensitive and accurate methods to evaluate and follow laser retinal

  12. In vivo skin chromophore mapping using a multimode imaging dermoscope (SkinSpec)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Nicholas; Vasefi, Fartash; Gussakovsky, Eugene; Bearman, Gregory; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a multimode dermoscope (SkinSpectTM) we developed for early detection of melanoma by combining fluorescence, polarization and hyperspectral imaging. Acquired reflection image datacubes were input to a wavelength-dependent linear model to extract the relative contributions of skin chromophores at every pixel. The oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy hemoglobin, melanin concentrations, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation by the single step linear least square fitting and Kubelka-Munk tissue model using cross polarization data cubes were presented. The comprehensive data obtained by SkinSpect can be utilized to improve the accuracy of skin chromophore decomposition algorithm with less computation cost. As an example in this work, the deoxy-hemoglobin over-estimation error in highly pigmented lesion due to melanin and deoxy hemoglobin spectral cross talk were analyzed and corrected using two-step linear least square fitting procedure at different wavelength ranges. The proposed method also tested in skin with underlying vein area for validating the proof of concept.

  13. Low (Sub-1-volt) halfwave voltage polymeric electro-optic modulators achieved by controlling chromophore shape

    PubMed

    Shi; Zhang; Zhang; Bechtel; Dalton; Robinson; Steier

    2000-04-07

    Electro-optic (EO) modulators encode electrical signals onto fiber optic transmissions. High drive voltages limit gain and noise levels. Typical polymeric and lithium niobate modulators operate with halfwave voltages of 5 volts. Sterically modified organic chromophores have been used to reduce the attenuation of electric field poling-induced electro-optic activity caused by strong intermolecular electrostatic interactions. Such modified chromophores, incorporated into polymer hosts, were used to fabricate EO modulators with halfwave voltages of 0.8 volts (at a telecommunications wavelength of 1318 nanometers) and to achieve a halfwave voltage-interaction length product of 2.2 volt-centimeters. Optical push-pull poling and driving were also used to reduce halfwave voltage. This study, together with recent demonstrations of exceptional bandwidths (more than 110 gigahertz) and ease of integration (with very large scale integration semiconductor circuitry and ultra-low-loss passive optical circuitry) demonstrates the potential of polymeric materials for next generation telecommunications, information processing, and radio frequency distribution.

  14. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins.

  15. Self-assembled chromophores within mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2: towards biomimetic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Marek, Peter L; Sieger, Hermann; Scherer, Torsten; Hahn, Horst; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2009-06-01

    Artificial light-harvesting antennas consisting of self-assembled chromophores that mimic the natural pigments of photosynthetic bacteria have been inserted into voids induced in porous titania (TiO2, anatase) in order to investigate their suitability for hybrid solar cells. Mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 with additional uniform macropores was treated with precursor solutions of the pigment which was then induced to self-assemble within the voids. The chromophores were tailored to combine the self-assembly characteristics of the natural bacteriochlorophylls with the robustness of artificial Zn-porphyrins being stable for prolonged periods even upon heating to over 200 degrees C. They assemble on the TiO2 surface to form nano- to micro-crystalline structures with lengths from tens of nm up to several microm and show a photosensitization effect which is supposed to be dependent on the assembly size. The natural examples of these antennas are found in green sulfur bacteria which are able to use photosynthesis in deep water regions with minute light intensities. The implementation of biomimetic antennas for light harvesting and a better photon management may lead to a rise in efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells also under low light illumination conditions.

  16. Unmixing chromophores in human skin with a 3D multispectral optoacoustic mesoscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mathias; Aguirre, Juan; Soliman, Dominik; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    The absorption of visible light by human skin is governed by a number of natural chromophores: Eumelanin, pheomelanin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin are the major absorbers in the visible range in cutaneous tissue. Label-free quantification of these tissue chromophores is an important step of optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging towards clinical application, since it provides relevant information in diseases. In tumor cells, for instance, there are metabolic changes (Warburg effect) compared to healthy cells, leading to changes in oxygenation in the environment of tumors. In malignant melanoma changes in the absorption spectrum have been observed compared to the spectrum of nonmalignant nevi. So far, optoacoustic imaging has been applied to human skin mostly in single-wavelength mode, providing anatomical information but no functional information. In this work, we excited the tissue by a tunable laser source in the spectral range from 413-680 nm with a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The laser was operated in wavelengthsweep mode emitting consecutive pulses at various wavelengths that allowed for automatic co-registration of the multispectral datasets. The multispectral raster-scan optoacoustic mesoscopy (MSOM) system provides a lateral resolution of <60 μm independent of wavelength. Based on the known absorption spectra of melanin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, three-dimensional absorption maps of all three absorbers were calculated from the multispectral dataset.

  17. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; la Grone, Marcus; Wald, Lara; Aker, Craig; Dock, Matt; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Paul, Kateri

    2004-08-01

    A new sensor for highly toxic species including chemical warfare (CW) agents has been developed. This sensor is based on a unique CW indicating chromophore (CWIC) developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The CWIC was designed to be sensitive to the reactivity that makes these chemicals so toxic. Since it requires the reactivity of the agent to be detected, the CWIC technology has shown remarkable selectivity for nerve agent surrogates and some other highly toxic species, thereby demonstrating the potential to provide low false alarm rate detection. Since the chromophore has mini-mal fluorescence prior to reaction with an electrophilic and toxic chemical, the sensor acts in a dark field fluorescence mode. This provides the sensor with exceptional sensitivity and a potential to detect priority analytes well below levels detected by current hand held sensors. Finally, it is based on a simple optical detection scheme that enables small and rugged sensors to be developed and produced at a low enough cost so they can be widely utilized.

  18. From gold nanoparticles to luminescent nano-objects: experimental aspects for better gold-chromophore interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Julien R. G.; Lerouge, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been the center of interest for scientists since many decades. Within the last 20 years, the research in that field has soared with the possibility to design and study nanoparticles with controlled shapes. From spheres to more complex shapes such as stars, or anisotropic architectures like rods or bipyramids, these new systems feature plasmonic properties making them the tools of choice for studies on light-matter interactions. In that context, fluorescence quenching and enhancement by gold nanostructures is a growing field of research. In this review, we report a non-exhaustive summary of the synthetic modes for various shapes and sizes of isotropic and anisotropic nanoparticles. We then focus on fluorescent studies of these gold nano-objects, either considering "bare" particles (without modifications) or hybrid particles (surface interaction with a chromophore). In the latter case, the well-known metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) is more particularly developed; the mechanisms of MEF are discussed in terms of the additional radiative and non-radiative decay rates caused by several parameters such as the vicinity of the chromophore to the metal or the size and shape of the nanostructures.

  19. From gold nanoparticles to luminescent nano-objects: experimental aspects for better gold-chromophore interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Julien R. G.; Lerouge, Frederic

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been the center of interest for scientists since many decades. Within the last 20 years, the research in that field has soared with the possibility to design and study nanoparticles with controlled shapes. From spheres to more complex shapes such as stars, or anisotropic architectures like rods or bipyramids, these new systems feature plasmonic properties making them the tools of choice for studies on light-matter interactions. In that context, fluorescence quenching and enhancement by gold nanostructures is a growing field of research. In this review, we report a non-exhaustive summary of the synthetic modes for various shapes and sizes of isotropic and anisotropic nanoparticles. We then focus on fluorescent studies of these gold nano-objects, either considering "bare" particles (without modifications) or hybrid particles (surface interaction with a chromophore). In the latter case, the well-known metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) is more particularly developed; the mechanisms of MEF are discussed in terms of the additional radiative and non-radiative decay rates caused by several parameters such as the vicinity of the chromophore to the metal or the size and shape of the nanostructures.

  20. Modeling the Excited States of Biological Chromophores within Many-Body Green's Function Theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuchen; Rohlfing, Michael; Molteni, Carla

    2010-01-12

    First-principle many-body Green's function theory (MBGFT) has been successfully used to describe electronic excitations in many materials, from bulk crystals to nanoparticles. Here we assess its performance for the calculations of the excited states of biological chromophores. MBGFT is based on a set of Green's function equations, whose key ingredients are the electron's self-energy Σ, which is obtained by Hedin's GW approach, and the electron-hole interaction, which is described by the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). The GW approach and the BSE predict orbital energies and excitation energies with high accuracy, respectively. We have calculated the low-lying excited states of a series of model biological chromophores, related to the photoactive yellow protein (PYP), rhodopsin, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), obtaining a very good agreement with the available experimental and accurate theoretical data; the order of the excited states is also correctly predicted. MBGFT bridges the gap between time-dependent density functional theory and high-level quantum chemistry methods, combining the efficiency of the former with the accuracy of the latter: this makes MBGFT a promising method for studying excitations in complex biological systems.

  1. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER ICE AND CHROMOPHORES ACROSS SATURN'S SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Hedman, M. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Flamini, E.

    2013-04-01

    Over the past eight years, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini orbiter has returned hyperspectral images in the 0.35-5.1 {mu}m range of the icy satellites and rings of Saturn. These very different objects show significant variations in surface composition, roughness, and regolith grain size as a result of their evolutionary histories, endogenic processes, and interactions with exogenic particles. The distributions of surface water ice and chromophores, i.e., organic and non-icy materials, across the Saturnian system, are traced using specific spectral indicators (spectral slopes and absorption band depths) obtained from rings mosaics and disk-integrated satellites observations by VIMS. Moving from the inner C ring to Iapetus, we found a marking uniformity in the distribution of abundance of water ice. On the other hand, the distribution of chromophores is much more concentrated in the rings particles and on the outermost satellites (Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus). A reduction of red material is observed on the satellites' surfaces orbiting within the E ring environment likely due to fine particles from Enceladus' plumes. Once the exogenous dark material covering the Iapetus' leading hemisphere is removed, the texture of the water ice-rich surfaces, inferred through the 2 {mu}m band depth, appears remarkably uniform across the entire system.

  2. High performance p-type molecular electron donors for OPV applications via alkylthiophene catenation chromophore extension

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Paul B; Lee, Calvin; Subbiah, Jegadesan; Wong, Wallace W H; Banal, James L; Jameel, Mohammed A; Smith, Trevor A

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of key 4-alkyl-substituted 5-(trimethylsilyl)thiophene-2-boronic acid pinacol esters 3 allowed a simplified alkylthiophene catenation process to access bis-, ter-, quater-, and quinquethiophene π-bridges for the synthesis of acceptor–π-bridge-donor– π-bridge-acceptor (A–π-D–π-A) electron donor molecules. Based on the known benzodithiophene-terthiophene-rhodanine (BTR) material, the BXR series of materials, BMR (X = M, monothiophene), BBR (X = B, bithiophene), known BTR (X = T, terthiophene), BQR (X = Q, quaterthiophene), and BPR (X = P(penta), quinquethiophene) were synthesised to examine the influence of chromophore extension on the device performance and stability for OPV applications. The BT x R (x = 4, butyl, and x = 8, octyl) series of materials were synthesised by varying the oligothiophene π-bridge alkyl substituent to examine structure–property relationships in OPV device performance. The devices assembled using electron donors with an extended chromophore (BQR and BPR) are shown to be more thermally stable than the BTR containing devices, with un-optimized efficiencies up to 9.0% PCE. BQR has been incorporated as a secondary donor in ternary blend devices with PTB7-Th resulting in high-performance OPV devices with up to 10.7% PCE. PMID:28144297

  3. The lineshape of the electronic spectrum of the green fluorescent protein chromophore, part I: gas phase.

    PubMed

    Davari, Mehdi D; Ferrer, Francisco J Avila; Morozov, Dmitry; Santoro, Fabrizio; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-10-20

    In this work we present the vibrationally resolved optical absorption spectrum of p-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI), the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore, computed at several levels of theory, including time-dependent DFT with various functionals and basis sets, CASSCF, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2. We also investigated what happens to the spectrum if the ground- and excited-state geometries are optimized at different levels of theory (mixed approach), as has been used previously. The vibrationally resolved absorption spectra obtained by DFT, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2 are very similar and consist of a main absorption peak and a shoulder that is ∼1500 cm(-1) higher in energy. The vibrational progression increases moderately with temperature. These spectra are in qualitative agreement with experimental action spectra, but much narrower and lack the long tail in the blue, even at high temperatures. Because our calculated emission spectra, which are equally narrow, are in good agreement with the emission of green fluorescent protein at 253 K, we argue that the action spectrum are too broad to be considered as the absorption spectrum. The CASSCF method and the mixed approaches overestimate the vibrational progressions with respect to CAM-B3LYP, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2, due to inaccuracies in the geometric S0 →S1 displacements. Finally, we computed the vibronic spectra of four chromophore analogues with different substitutions on the rings and found that these substitutions hardly affect the lineshape in vacuum.

  4. Multiple grating formation in photorefractive polymers with azo-dye chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark A.; King, Nick R.; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.; O'Leary, Sean V.

    1996-10-01

    Photorefractive polymers which incorporate azo-dyes as the nonlinear chromophore element, can be used not only for generating gratings by the photorefractive effect, but also by photoisomerization of the azo-dye. In the latter mechanism, repeated trans-cis isomerization causes the chromophore molecules to become aligned at right angles to the laser polarization direction, thereby making the material birefringent. These two phenomena are to a large degree independent, and can be studied separately, by appropriate choice of polarization direction of the interacting beams. Furthermore, the diffraction efficiency of the photorefractive gratings is a very sensitive function of the poling field strength, while that of the photoisomerization gratings is less so. In this work, we investigate the components diffracted from each of these gratings formed in a hybrid photorefractive polymer material PVK:TNF:DEACST:disperse red 1. We then explore the possibility of performing some simple optical processing applications, exploiting the flexibility provided by this multiple grating process. A scheme for producing a novelty filter, which displays only the moving parts of a scene is considered. The limitations of these films for such processing applications are discussed.

  5. Using NIR spatial illumination for detection and mapping chromophore changes during cerebral edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Mathews, Marlon S.; Owen, Christopher M.; Binder, Devin K.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2008-02-01

    We used spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) light to detect and map chromophore changes during cerebral edema in the rat neocortex. Cerebral edema was induced by intraperitoneal injections of free water (35% of body weight). Intracranial pressure (ICP) was measured with an optical fiber based Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor inserted into the parenchyma of the right frontal lobe during water administration. Increase in ICP from a baseline value of 10 cm-water to 145 cm-water was observed. Following induction of cerebral edema, there was a 26+/-1.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 47+/-4.7%, 17+/-3% and 37+/-3.7% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of NIR spatial modulation of light for detecting and mapping changes in tissue concentrations of physiologic chromophores over time in response to cerebral edema.

  6. New chromophores based on combination of ethylenedioxythiophene and carbazole fragments: synthesis and optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakiev, A. N.; Mayorova, O. A.; Gorbunov, A. A.; Lunegov, I. V.; Shklyaeva, E. V.; Abashev, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    Two new D-π-A chromophores composed of an electron-donating carbazole unit linked through π- bridges, bearing 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) moiety, with an electron withdrawing dicyanovinyl group (DCV) were successfully synthesized involving Suzuki or Heck cross-coupling and Knöevenagel reactions as the key steps. The obtained compounds absorb light over a broad spectral range, including the visible spectrum. The HOMO/LUMO energies and band gap energy values (Eg) were calculated on the basis of the experimental optical and electrochemical data: HOMO, LUMO, Eg (eV), -5.51, -3.14, 2.37 (4), -5.34, -3.14, 2.20 (7). The presence of the HC=CH unit in compound 7 resulted in the increase of the HOMO energy level, the decrease of a band gap value and red shifts of the absorption and emission bands in comparison with those of 4. Large Stokes shifts and broadband luminescence inherent to both chromophores suggest their use as materials for luminescent solar collectors (LSCs). The obtained compounds demonstrated good solubility and suitable thin-film forming properties. For this reason, they may be suitable for solution-processable photovoltaic applications.

  7. Multichromic Bis-Axially Extended Perylene Chromophore with Schiff Bases: Synthesis, Characterization and Electrochemical Studies.

    PubMed

    Shabir, Ghulam; Saeed, Aamer; Arshad, Muhammad; Zahid, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper a novel way of symmetric conjugation extension along molecular axes of perylene dianhydride chromophore has been devised to achieve lengthy delocalized electronic species exhibiting red shifted absorption and emission of UV-Visible radiations. During synthetic pathway free amino Schiff bases of novel aldehydes with 4-amino acetanilide have been condensed with perylene dianhydride in quinoline at high temperature. Bis perylene diimide Schiff bases (5a-e) have been synthesized which showed absorption λmax at 461-526 nm and emission at 525-550 nm. Structures of newly obtained compounds have been confirmed by (1)H and (13)C-NMR studies. Cyclic voltammetric analysis of these dyes exhibited oxidation and reduction peaks which provide indirect evidence for their potential utility as n-type material for sensitization of semiconductors in solar cells. LUMO and HOMO energy levels were found in the range of -4.21 to -5.20 and -6.75 to -7.57 eV, respectively. Graphical Abstract Multi chromic bis-axially extended perylene chromophore with Schiff bases, synthesis characterization and electrochemical studies. Ghulam Shabir, Aamer Saeed, Muhammad Arshad and Muhammad Zahid.

  8. Mutual orientation of absorbing chromophores and long wavelength pigments in photosystem I particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Velitchkova, Maya

    1998-04-01

    The fluorescence anisotropy of photosystem I particles, isolated from spinach chloroplasts and containing approximately 200 chlorophyll molecules per reaction center, has been investigated at low temperatures. Fluorescence anisotropy has been measured upon excitation with laser lines at 476.5 and 632.8 nm. Using our data for the fluorescence anisotropy at these conditions and the new `practical' formula for the degree of polarization of a triple-chromophore complex under steady-state excitation, derived recently by Demidov, we estimate the mutual orientation of absorbing chromophores and long wavelength pigments—chlorophyll a molecules, that absorb at wavelengths longer than the corresponding reaction center, in Photosystem I particles. The angle between the transition dipole moments of chlorophyll a, belonging to the light-harvesting complex of PS I and absorbing the excitation at 632.8 nm, and the emitting long wavelength pigment at 735 nm is estimated to be 40°, whereas the angle between the transition dipole moments of chlorophyll b, belonging to the light-harvesting complex of PS I and absorbing the excitation at 476.5 nm, and the emitting long wavelength pigment at 735 nm—60°.

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography to Estimate Retinal Blood Flow in Eyes with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Masako; Miyata, Manabu; Ishihara, Kenji; Gotoh, Norimoto; Morooka, Satoshi; Ogino, Ken; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Hirashima, Takako; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Hata, Masayuki; Muraoka, Yuki; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-04-13

    Ophthalmologists sometimes face difficulties in identifying the origin of visual acuity (VA) loss in a retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patient, particularly before cataract surgery: cataract or the retinal disease state. Therefore, it is important to identify the significant factors correlating with VA. Nowadays, retinal blood flow in superficial and deep layers can be estimated non-invasively using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). We estimated blood flow per retinal layer by using OCTA; investigated the correlation between VA and other parameters including blood flow and retinal thickness; and identified the most associated factor with VA in patients with RP. OCTA images in 68 of consecutive 110 Japanese RP patients were analysable (analysable RP group). Thirty-two age- and axial length-matched healthy eyes (control group) were studied. In the analysable RP group, the parafoveal flow density in superficial and deep layers was 47.0 ± 4.9% and 52.4 ± 5.5%, respectively, which was significantly lower than that in controls. Using multivariate analysis, we found that the parafoveal flow density in the deep layer and superficial foveal avascular area were the factors associated with VA. Non-invasive estimation of retinal blood flow per retinal layer using OCTA is useful for predicting VA in RP patients.

  10. Orientational changes of the absorbing dipole or retinal upon the conversion of rhodopsin to bathorhodopsin, lumirhodopsin, and isorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Villaz, M; Roche, C; Chabre, M

    1982-01-01

    The orientational change of the absorbing dipole of the retinal chromophore in vertebrate rhodopsin (rhodo) upon photo-excitation to bathorhodopsin (batho), lumirhodopsin (lumi) and isorhodopsin (iso), has been studied by polarized absorption and linear dichroism measurements on magnetically oriented frog rod suspensions that were blocked at liquid nitrogen temperature. Both the azimuthal component delta theta and the polar component delta theta of the total angular change were studied in separate experiments. Delta theta was estimated from polarized absorption measurements on rods oriented transversally with respect to the analyzing beam. The data show unequivocally that upon the rhodo leads to batho transition, the dipole shifts out of the membrane plane by only few degrees; delta theta congruent to -3 degree. This azimuthal shift was nearly exactly reversed upon the batho leads to lumi decay. A very small shift (delta theta less than or equal to 1 degree) toward the membrane plane was observed upon a rhodo leads to iso conversion. The polar component delta theta of the angular shift was estimated by studying the photoreversion of linear dichroism induced by photo-excitation with polarized light in rods oriented parallel to the analyzing beam. Upon the rhodo leads to batho transition, ther was a shift delta theta = 11 +/- 3 degrees. The overall angular shift upon this first photo-exciting step, which corresponded to the isomerisation of retinal, was only delta omega = 11 +/- 3 degrees. This is smaller than what may be expected for a cis-trans isomerization of a retinal molecule with one end fixed, and different from what has been previously estimated by another group. These discrepancies are discussed. PMID:6978738

  11. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  12. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  13. Optimal management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CMV retinitis afflicted 25% to 42% of AIDS patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, with most vision loss due to macula-involving retinitis or retinal detachment. The introduction of HAART significantly decreased the incidence and severity of CMV retinitis. Optimal treatment of CMV retinitis requires a thorough evaluation of the patient’s immune status and an accurate classification of the retinal lesions. When retinitis is diagnosed, HAART therapy should be started or improved, and anti-CMV therapy with oral valganciclovir, intravenous ganciclovir, foscarnet, or cidofovir should be administered. Selected patients, especially those with zone 1 retinitis, may receive intravitreal drug injections or surgical implantation of a sustained-release ganciclovir reservoir. Effective anti-CMV therapy coupled with HAART significantly decreases the incidence of vision loss and improves patient survival. Immune recovery uveitis and retinal detachments are important causes of moderate to severe loss of vision. Compared with the early years of the AIDS epidemic, the treatment emphasis in the post- HAART era has changed from short-term control of retinitis to long-term preservation of vision. Developing countries face shortages of health care professionals and inadequate supplies of anti-CMV and anti-HIV medications. Intravitreal ganciclovir injections may be the most cost effective strategy to treat CMV retinitis in these areas. PMID:20463796

  14. Low Vision Rehabilitation of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Practice Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundquist, John

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a rod-cone dystrophy, commonly genetic in nature. Approximately 60-80% of those with retinitis pigmentosa inherit it by an autosomal recessive transmission (Brilliant, 1999). There have been some reported cases with no known family history. The symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa are decreased acuity, photophobia, night…

  15. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  16. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  17. Shedding new light on retinal protein photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wand, Amir; Gdor, Itay; Zhu, Jingyi; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2013-01-01

    The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation of novel retinal proteins challenges existing notions concerning the course of primary events in these natural photoreceptors. We review two illustrations here. The first demonstrates that changes in the initial retinal configuration can alter the duration of photochemistry by nearly an order of magnitude in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, making it as rapid as the ballistic photoisomerization in visual pigments. This prompted a reinvestigation of the much studied bacteriorhodopsin, leading to a similar trend as well, contrary to earlier reports. The second involves the study of xanthorhodopsin, an archaeal proton pump that includes an attached light-harvesting carotenoid. Pump-probe experiments demonstrate the efficient transfer of energy from carotenoid to retinal, providing a first glimpse at a cooperative multichromophore function, which is probably characteristic of many other proteins as well. Finally, we discuss measures required to advance our knowledge from kinetics to mode-specific dynamics concerning this expanding family of biological photoreceptors.

  18. Integrated computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-05-01

    Successful retinal tracking subsystem testing results in vivo on rhesus monkeys using an argon continuous wave laser and an ultra-short pulse laser are presented. Progress on developing an integrated robotic retinal laser surgery system is also presented. Several interesting areas of study have developed: (1) 'doughnut' shaped lesions that occur under certain combinations of laser power, spot size, and irradiation time complicating measurements of central lesion reflectance, (2) the optimal retinal field of view to achieve simultaneous tracking and lesion parameter control, and (3) a fully digital versus a hybrid analog/digital tracker using confocal reflectometry integrated system implementation. These areas are investigated in detail in this paper. The hybrid system warrants a separate presentation and appears in another paper at this conference.

  19. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  20. Cooperative robot assistant for retinal microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ioana; Balicki, Marcin; Koo, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Mitchell, Ben; Handa, James; Hager, Gregory; Taylor, Russell

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and results of initial testing of a cooperative robot assistant for retinal microsurgery. In the cooperative control paradigm, the surgeon and the robot share control of a tool attached to the robot through a force sensor. The system senses forces exerted by the operator on the tool and uses this information in various control modes to provide smooth, tremor-free, precise positional control and force scaling. The robot manipulator is specifically designed with retinal microsurgery in mind, having high efficacy, flexibility and ergonomics while meeting the accuracy and safety requirements of microsurgery. We have tested this robot on a biological model and we report the results for reliably cannulating approximately 80 microm diameter veins (equivalent in size to human retinal veins). We also describe improvements to the robot and the experimental setup facilitating more advanced set of experiments.