Science.gov

Sample records for 111-lavatory oxygen systems

  1. 14 CFR 21.700 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 21.700 Section 21.700 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this chapter also apply to...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1801 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 25.1801 Section 25.1801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Regulations § 25.1801 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this...

  3. 14 CFR 129.201 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 129.201 Section 129.201 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Special Federal Aviation Regulations § 129.201 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements...

  4. 14 CFR 129.201 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 129.201 Section 129.201 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Special Federal Aviation Regulations § 129.201 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements...

  5. 14 CFR 121.1500 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) of this section and contrary provisions of 14 CFR part 21, and 14 CFR 25.1447, 119.51, 121.329, 121... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 121... § 121.1500 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. (a) Applicability. This SFAR applies to the...

  6. 14 CFR 21.700 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 21.700 Section 21.700 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this chapter also apply to...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1801 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 25.1801 Section 25.1801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Regulations § 25.1801 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1801 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 25.1801 Section 25.1801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Regulations § 25.1801 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this...

  9. 14 CFR 21.700 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 21.700 Section 21.700 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements of § 121.1500 of this chapter also apply to...

  10. 14 CFR 129.201 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems. 129.201 Section 129.201 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Special Federal Aviation Regulations § 129.201 SFAR No. 111—Lavatory Oxygen Systems. The requirements...

  11. 14 CFR 121.1500 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... under 14 CFR part 121; or (ii) Operate U.S.-registered airplanes with a maximum passenger capacity of 20 or greater under 14 CFR part 129. (2) Applicants for airworthiness certificates. (3) Holders of...) Regulatory Relief. Contrary provisions of 14 CFR part 21, and 14 CFR 25.1447, 119.51, 121.329, 121.333...

  12. 14 CFR 121.1500 - SFAR No. 111-Lavatory Oxygen Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... under 14 CFR part 121; or (ii) Operate U.S.-registered airplanes with a maximum passenger capacity of 20 or greater under 14 CFR part 129. (2) Applicants for airworthiness certificates. (3) Holders of...) Regulatory Relief. Contrary provisions of 14 CFR part 21, and 14 CFR 25.1447, 119.51, 121.329, 121.333...

  13. Aircrew oxygen system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, A. D.; Kiraly, R. J.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Closed-loop rebreather system which includes pilot provides oxygen for use in aircraft by safe, reliable method of low weight and size and reduces expense of ground equipment. Water electrolysis generated oxygen is fed into rebreather loop which allows nitrogen elimination and water and carbon dioxide removal.

  14. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. The results of the checkout, shakedown, and initial parametric tests are summarized.

  15. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. Technical progress achieved during the first two months of the program is summarized.

  16. Spacecraft oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrone, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    Recovery system is comprised of three integrated subsystems: electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator which removes carbon dioxide from atmosphere, Sabatier reactor in which carbon dioxide is reduced with hydrogen to form methane and water, and static-feed water electrolysis cell to recover oxygen from water.

  17. Spacecraft oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrone, P. D.

    1973-01-01

    A system which uses an electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator to remove carbon dioxide from the cabin atmosphere and a Sabatier reactor to reduce carbon dioxide with hydrogen to form methane and water is described. Oxygen is recovered from water by means of a static-feed water electrolysis system. The hydrogen thus generated is reused in the carbon dioxide concentrator. The methane is a system byproduct. The CO2 removal reactions and the implementation of the CO2 concentration concept are discussed, and test results are examined.

  18. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  19. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  20. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and preventing fire hazards is necessary when designing, maintaining, and operating oxygen systems. Ignition risks can be minimized by controlling heat sources and using materials that will not ignite or will not support burning in the end-use environment. Because certain materials are more susceptible to ignition in oxygen-enriched environments, a compatibility assessment should be performed before the component is introduced into an oxygen system. This document provides an overview of oxygen fire hazards and procedures that are consistent with the latest versions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards G63 (1999) and G94 (2005) to address fire hazards associated with oxygen systems. This document supersedes the previous edition, NASA Technical Memorandum 104823, Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems (1996). The step-by-step oxygen compatibility assessment method described herein (see Section 4) enables oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers to determine areas of concern with respect to oxygen compatibility and, ultimately, prevent damage to a system or injury to personnel.

  1. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation evaluating the compatibility of oxygen components and systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Application; 2) Gaining Wide Subscription; 3) Approach; 4) Establish Worst-Case Operating Conditions; 5) Assess Materials Flammability; 6) Evaluate Ignition Mechanisms; 7) Evaluate Kindling Chain; 8) Determine Reaction Affect; 9) Document Results; 10) Example of Documentation; and 11) Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Team.

  2. Oxygen Systems Cleaners for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Samuel E.; Lowery, Freida

    1997-01-01

    New environmental regulations have forced extensive evaluations of many different cleaning agents for use in oxygen systems. This is no simple process because pure oxygen is a very strong oxidizer, and when placed in contact with a foreign substance, the combination may be explosive. This foreign substance can easily be a cleaning agent residue left over in the oxygen system after cleaning. This paper focuses on the factors that must be considered when selecting a cleaning agent for oxygen systems, as well as the approval processes which are currently being utilized by NASA for oxygen compatibility of materials. This paper will provide a working description of how to begin selecting a cleaning agent for oxygen systems. The paper will present the following: Background information on the necessity of a stringent selection process for oxygen system cleaners; Specifications and regulations concerning cleaning for oxygen service; Changing oxygen cleaning specifications given current environmental concerns; Testing for cleanliness in oxygen systems, Cleaning agents that have been tested for oxygen systems, including an extensive list of some of the newer 'environmentally friendly' cleaning agents; and Test results and conclusions from the testing. The paper will also provide instructions on the proper procedures for obtaining NASA approval on a candidate oxygen systems cleaning agent.

  3. Solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; See, G. G.; Schubert, F. H.; Powell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A program to design, develop, fabricate and assemble a one-man, self-contained, solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system (SX-1) incorporating solid electrolyte electrolyzer drums was completed. The SX-1 is a preprototype engineering model designed to produce 0.952 kg (2.1 lb)/day of breathable oxygen (O2) from the electrolysis of metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor. The CO2 supply rate was established based on the metabolic CO2 generation rate for one man of 0.998 kg (2.2 lb)/day. The water supply rate (0.254 kg (0.56 lb)/day) was designed to be sufficient to make up the difference between the 0.952 kg (2.1 lb)/day O2 generation specification and the O2 available through CO2 electrolysis, 0.726 kg (1.6 lb)/day. The SX-1 was successfully designed, fabricated and assembled. Design verification tests (DVT) or the CO Disproportionators, H2 separators, control instrumentation, monitor instrumentation, water feed mechanism were successfully completed. The erratic occurrence of electrolyzer drum leakage prevented the completion of the CO2 electrolyzer module and water electrolyzer module DVT's and also prevented the performance of SX-1 integrated testing. Further development work is required to improve the solid electrolyte cell high temperature seals.

  4. Solar Energy Systems for Lunar Oxygen Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Heller, Richard S.; Wong, Wayne A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation of several solar concentrator-based systems for producing oxygen from lunar regolith was performed. The systems utilize a solar concentrator mirror to provide thermal energy for the oxygen production process. Thermal energy to power a Stirling heat engine and photovoltaics are compared for the production of electricity. The electricity produced is utilized to operate the equipment needed in the oxygen production process. The initial oxygen production method utilized in the analysis is hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. Utilizing this method of oxygen production a baseline system design was produced. This baseline system had an oxygen production rate of 0.6 kg/hr with a concentrator mirror size of 5 m. Variations were performed on the baseline design to show how changes in the system size and process (rate) affected the oxygen production rate. An evaluation of the power requirements for a carbothermal lunar regolith reduction reactor has also been conducted. The reactor had a total power requirement between 8,320 to 9,961 W when producing 1000 kg/year of oxygen. The solar concentrator used to provide the thermal power (over 82 percent of the total energy requirement) would have a diameter of less than 4 m.

  5. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  6. Safety Standard for Oxygen and Oxygen Systems: Guidelines for Oxygen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage, and Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's standard for oxygen system design, materials selection, operation, and transportation is presented. Minimum guidelines applicable to NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Installations are contained.

  7. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation. PMID:8590652

  8. Oxygen production System Models for Lunar ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) seeks to make human space exploration feasible; by using available resources from a planet or the moon to produce consumables, parts, and structures that otherwise would be brought from Earth. Producing these in situ reduces the mass of such that must be launched and doing so allows more payload mass' for each mission. The production of oxygen from lunar regolith, for life support and propellant, is one of the tasks being studied under ISRU. NASA is currently funding three processes that have shown technical merit for the production of oxygen from regolith: Molten Salt Electrolysis, Hydrogen Reduction of Ilmenite, and Carbothermal Reduction. The ISRU program is currently developing system models of, the , abovementioned processes to: (1) help NASA in the evaluation process to select the most cost-effective and efficient process for further prototype development, (2) identify key parameters, (3) optimize the oxygen production process, (4) provide estimates on energy and power requirements, mass and volume.of the system, oxygen production rate, mass of regolith required, mass of consumables, and other important parameters, and (5) integrate into the overall end-to-end ISRU system model, which could be integrated with mission architecture models. The oxygen production system model is divided into modules that represent unit operations (e.g., reactor, water electrolyzer, heat exchanger). Each module is modeled theoretically using Excel and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and will be validated using experimental data from on-going laboratory work. This modularity (plug-n-play) feature of each unit operation allows the use of the same model on different oxygen production systems simulations resulting in comparable results. In this presentation, preliminary results for mass, power, volume will be presented along with brief description of the oxygen production system model.

  9. Valve assemblies. [for oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Seals and sealing, especially relative to valve designs for O2 systems are investigated. Also considered are high pressure requirements, pressure and flow regulators, and check and relief valves. Valve failure as induced by overstress or abrasion, galling, and ignition of valve parts was detailed.

  10. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  11. Systemic oxygen delivery by peritoneal perfusion of oxygen microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Feshitan, Jameel A; Legband, Nathan D; Borden, Mark A; Terry, Benjamin S

    2014-03-01

    Severe hypoxemia refractory to pulmonary mechanical ventilation remains life-threatening in critically ill patients. Peritoneal ventilation has long been desired for extrapulmonary oxygenation owing to easy access of the peritoneal cavity for catheterization and the relative safety compared to an extracorporeal circuit. Unfortunately, prior attempts involving direct oxygen ventilation or aqueous perfusates of fluorocarbons or hemoglobin carriers have failed, leading many researchers to abandon the method. We attribute these prior failures to limited mass transfer of oxygen to the peritoneum and have designed an oxygen formulation that overcomes this limitation. Using phospholipid-coated oxygen microbubbles (OMBs), we demonstrate 100% survival for rats experiencing acute lung trauma to at least 2 h. In contrast, all untreated rats and rats treated with peritoneal oxygenated saline died within 30 min. For rats treated with OMBs, hemoglobin saturation and heart rate were at normal levels over the 2-h timeframe. Peritoneal oxygenation with OMBs was therefore shown to be safe and effective, and the method requires less equipment and technical expertise than initiating and maintaining an extracorporeal circuit. Further translation of peritoneal oxygenation with OMBs may provide therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome arising from trauma, sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, burns and other pulmonary diseases. PMID:24439406

  12. Cost analysis of oxygen recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Report is made of the cost analysis of four leading oxygen recovery subsystems which include two carbon dioxide reduction subsystems and two water electrolysis subsystems, namely, the solid polymer electrolyte and the circulating KOH electrolyte. The four oxygen recovery systems were quantitatively evaluated. System characteristics, including process flows, performance, and physical characteristics were also analyzed. Additionally, the status of development of each of the systems considered and the required advance technology efforts required to bring conceptual and/or pre-prototype hardware to an operational prototype status were defined. Intimate knowledge of the operations, development status, and capabilities of the systems to meet space mission requirements were found to be essential in establishing the cost estimating relationships for advanced life support systems.

  13. Oxygen Compatibility Assessment of Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel; Sparks, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Fire hazards are inherent in oxygen systems and a storied history of fires in rocket engine propulsion components exists. To detect and mitigate these fire hazards requires careful, detailed, and thorough analyses applied during the design process. The oxygen compatibility assessment (OCA) process designed by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) can be used to determine the presence of fire hazards in oxygen systems and the likelihood of a fire. This process may be used as both a design guide and during the approval process to ensure proper design features and material selection. The procedure for performing an OCA is a structured step-by-step process to determine the most severe operating conditions; assess the flammability of the system materials at the use conditions; evaluate the presence and efficacy of ignition mechanisms; assess the potential for a fire to breach the system; and determine the reaction effect (the potential loss of life, mission, and system functionality as the result of a fire). This process should be performed for each component in a system. The results of each component assessment, and the overall system assessment, should be recorded in a report that can be used in the short term to communicate hazards and their mitigation and to aid in system/component development and, in the long term, to solve anomalies that occur during engine testing and operation.

  14. Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Dees, Jesse; Poe, Robert F.

    1996-01-01

    Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite at lower temperatures in an oxygen-enriched environment than in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Many metals burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment when ignited. Lubricants, tapes, gaskets, fuels, and solvents can increase the possibility of ignition in oxygen systems. However, these hazards do not preclude the use of oxygen. Oxygen may be safely used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. These ignition and combustion hazards necessitate a proper oxygen hazards analysis before introducing a material or component into oxygen service. The objective of this test plan is to describe the White Sands Test Facility oxygen hazards analysis to be performed on components and systems before oxygen is introduced and is recommended before implementing the oxygen component qualification procedure. The plan describes the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility method consistent with the ASTM documents for analyzing the hazards of components and systems exposed to an oxygen-enriched environment. The oxygen hazards analysis is a useful tool for oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers. Problem areas can be pinpointed before oxygen is introduced into the system, preventing damage to hardware and possible injury or loss of life.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1445 - Oxygen distribution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oxygen distribution system. 23.1445 Section... Equipment § 23.1445 Oxygen distribution system. (a) Except for flexible lines from oxygen outlets to the... used for any oxygen line that is normally pressurized during flight. (b) Nonmetallic...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1445 - Oxygen distribution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oxygen distribution system. 23.1445 Section... Equipment § 23.1445 Oxygen distribution system. (a) Except for flexible lines from oxygen outlets to the... used for any oxygen line that is normally pressurized during flight. (b) Nonmetallic...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1445 - Oxygen distribution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oxygen distribution system. 23.1445 Section... Equipment § 23.1445 Oxygen distribution system. (a) Except for flexible lines from oxygen outlets to the... used for any oxygen line that is normally pressurized during flight. (b) Nonmetallic...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1445 - Oxygen distribution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Oxygen distribution system. 23.1445 Section... Equipment § 23.1445 Oxygen distribution system. (a) Except for flexible lines from oxygen outlets to the... used for any oxygen line that is normally pressurized during flight. (b) Nonmetallic...

  19. Fires in P-3 Aircraft Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Fires in three P3 aircraft oxygen systems have occurred: one in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in 1984 and two in the U.S. Navy in 1998 and 2003. All three fires started in the aluminum manifold and check valve (MCV) assembly and produced similar damages to the aircraft in which they occurred. This paper discusses a failure analysis conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Oxygen Hazards and Testing Team on the 2003 U.S. Navy VP62 fire. It was surmised that the fire started due to heat generated by an oxygen leak past a silicone check valve seal or possibly because of particle impact near the seat of one of the MCV assembly check valves. An additional analysis of fires in several check valve poppet seals from other aircraft is discussed. These burned poppet seals came from P3 oxygen systems that had been serviced at the Naval Air Station (NAS) in Jacksonville following standard fill procedures. It was concluded that these seal fires occurred due to the heat from compression heating, particle impact, or the heat generated by an oxygen leak past the silicone check valve seal. The fact that catastrophic fires did not occur in the case of each check valve seal fire was attributed to the protective nature of the aluminum oxide layer on the check valve poppets. To prevent future fires of this nature, the U.S. and Canadian fleets of P3 aircraft have been retrofitted with MCV assemblies with an upgraded design and more burn-resistant materials.

  20. Imaging of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    This review gives an overview on the state-of-the-art of oxygen imaging in microfluidics. Oxygen imaging using optical oxygen sensors based on luminescence is a versatile and powerful tool for obtaining profoundly space-resolved information of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems. We briefly introduce the principle of oxygen imaging and present techniques of oxygen imaging applied in microreactors and microfluidic devices, including selection criteria and demands of sensing material and basic set-up for a 2D oxygen sensing system. A detailed review of oxygen imaging in microreactors and microfluidic systems is given on different applications in oxygen gradient monitoring, cell culturing, single-cell analysis and chemical reactions. Finally, we discuss challenges and trends of oxygen imaging in microfluidic systems.

  1. Oxygen Transfer Characteristics of Miniaturized Bioreactor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Timothy V; Szita, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001 miniaturized bioreactor systems have made great advances in function and performance. In this article the dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer performance of submilliliter microbioreactors, and 1–10 mL minibioreactors was examined. Microbioreactors have reached kLa values of 460 h-1, and are offering instrumentation and some functionality comparable to production systems, but at high throughput screening volumes. Minibioreactors, aside from one 1,440 h-1 kLa system, have not offered as high rates of DO transfer, but have demonstrated superior integration with automated fluid handling systems. Microbioreactors have been typically limited to studies with E. coli, while minibioreactors have offered greater versatility in this regard. Further, mathematical relationships confirming the applicability of kLa measurements across all scales have been derived, and alternatives to fluorescence lifetime DO sensors have been evaluated. Finally, the influence on reactor performance of oxygen uptake rate (OUR), and the possibility of its real-time measurement have been explored. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 1005–1019. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23280578

  2. Environmental Control and Life Support System, Oxygen Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Group of the Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for designing and building the life support systems that will provide the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) a comfortable environment in which to live and work. This is a close-up view of ECLSS Oxygen Generation System (OGS) rack. The ECLSS Group at the MSFC oversees the development of the OGS, which produces oxygen for breathing air for the crew and laboratory animals, as well as for replacing oxygen lost due to experiment use, airlock depressurization, module leakage, and carbon dioxide venting. The OGS consists primarily of the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA), provided by the prime contractor, the Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems, International (HSSSI) in Windsor Locks, Cornecticut and a Power Supply Module (PSM), supplied by the MSFC. The OGA is comprised of a cell stack that electrolyzes (breaks apart the hydrogen and oxygen molecules) some of the clean water provided by the Water Recovery System and the separators that remove the gases from water after electrolysis. The PSM provides the high power to the OGA needed to electrolyze the water.

  3. 14 CFR 23.1445 - Oxygen distribution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Oxygen distribution system. 23.1445 Section... Equipment § 23.1445 Oxygen distribution system. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75762, December 2, 2011. (a) Except for flexible lines from oxygen outlets to the dispensing units, or where shown to...

  4. ASRDI Oxygen Technological Survey. Volume 9; Oxygen Systems Engineering Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, H. W.; Forney, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The design and safe operation of O2 systems at high pressures and temperatures are discussed. Data cover O2 reactivity with system materials, environmental limits, flow rate, contamination, and physical and chemical stresses of materials.

  5. Cost analysis of oxygen recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The design and development of equipment for flight use in earth-orbital programs, when optimally approached cost effectively, proceed through the following logical progression: (1) bench testing of breadboard designs, (2) the fabrication and evaluation of prototype equipment, (3) redesign to meet flight-imposed requirements, and (4) qualification and testing of a flight-ready system. Each of these steps is intended to produce the basic design information necessary to progress to the next step. The cost of each step is normally substantially less than that of the following step. An evaluation of the cost elements involved in each of the steps and their impact on total program cost are presented. Cost analyses of four leading oxygen recovery subsystems which include two carbon dioxide reduction subsystem, Sabatier and Bosch, and two water electrolysis subsystems, the solid polymer electrolyte and the circulating KOH electrolyte are described.

  6. SAFETY ASPECTS OF OXYGEN AERATION ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was carried out to assess the impact of the use of oxygen and oxygen-enriched air for aeration of activated sludge systems on the safety of municipal waste-water treatment plants and their personnel. The tasks included (1) determination of oxygen combustion hazards f...

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Oxygen in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Oxygen in the Solar System" contained the following reports: Oxygen Isotopes in Lunar Metal Grains: A Natural Genesis Experiment; Determining Possible Building Blocks of the Earth and Mars; and Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from Pigeonite/Melt Partitioning of Samarium.

  8. VASCULAR PLANTS AS ENGINEERS OF OXYGEN IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of organisms on oxygen is one of the most dramatic examples of ecosystem engineering on Earth. In aquatic systems, which have much lower oxygen concentrations than the atmosphere, vascular aquatic plants can affect oxygen concentrations significantly not only on long t...

  9. Testing metals and alloys for use in oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    1986-01-01

    When oxygen is present in high concentrations or large quantities, as in oxygen-based life-support systems, the likelihood of combustion and the probable intensity of a conflagration increase, together with the severity of the damage caused. Even stainless steel will burn vigorously when ignited in a 1000-psi oxygen environment. The hazards involved in the use of oxygen increase with system operation at the elevated temperatures typical of propulsion systems. Fires in oxygen systems are generally catastrophic, causing a threat to life in manned vehicles. When mechanical components of a mechanism generate friction heat in the presence of oxygen, many commonly used metal alloys ignite and burn. Attention is presently given to frictional heating, particle impact, and flame propagation tests conducted in oxygen environments.

  10. Elements of oxygen production systems using Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Huang, J.-K.; Johnson, P. B.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Hardware elements have been studied in terms of their applicability to Mars oxygen production systems. Various aspects of the system design are discussed and areas requiring further research are identified. Initial work on system reliability is discussed and a methodology for applying expert system technology to the oxygen processor is described.

  11. Comparison of airline passenger oxygen systems.

    PubMed

    Byrne, N J

    1995-08-01

    The principal sources of oxygen for inflight passenger use, scheduled and unscheduled, are examined. Present practices of assessment of the passenger's "fitness to fly" are described. Three partner airlines, British Airways, U.S. Air, and Qantas, catering for more than 8000 oxygen requests annually, are compared. Analysis of customer use suggests that medical oxygen requests are frequently not clinically justified. The growth in demand, for both scheduled and unscheduled use of an expensive resource, supports the need for a "recommended best practice" among carriers. Passengers with respiratory disorders who will most benefit from inflight oxygen are vulnerable either to hypoxia or asthma. PMID:7487813

  12. Visible light optical coherence tomography measures retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28 ± 0.08 μL min−1 (p < 0.001), and 0.20 ± 0.04 μL min−1 (p < 0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation. Results from an oxygen diffusion model based on previous oxygen electrode measurements corroborated our in vivo observations. We believe that vis-OCT has the potential to reveal the fundamental role of oxygen metabolism in various retinal diseases. PMID:26658555

  13. Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chen, Tony D.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.

    1991-01-01

    In order to ensure that there is a proper amount of oxygen necessary for sustaining test engine operation for hypersonic propulsion systems testing at the NASA Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel, a quickly responding real-time measurement system of test section oxygen concentration has been designed and tested at Langley. It is built around a zirconium oxide-based sensor which develops a voltage proportional to the oxygen partial pressure of the test gas. The voltage signal is used to control the amount of oxygen being injected into the combustor air. The physical operation of the oxygen sensor is described, as well as the sampling system used to extract the test gas from the tunnel test section. Results of laboratory tests conducted to verify sensor accuracy and response time performance are discussed, as well as the final configuration of the system to be installed in the tunnel.

  14. 76 FR 12550 - Lavatory Oxygen Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... lack of oxygen. The ARAC used these data in making recommendations to the FAA on future rulemaking. The... at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Copies may also be obtained by sending a...

  15. 78 FR 5707 - Lavatory Oxygen Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... Oxygen Generators Installed in a Lavatory (Docket No. FAA-2011-0157). 76 FR 12556, March 8, 2011. As... comments. See Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2012-11-09; 77 FR 38000, June 26, 2012. \\1\\ AD 2012-11-09, Airworthiness Directives; Various Transport Category Airplanes (Docket No. FAA-2012-0102), 77 FR 38000, June...

  16. Precision Cleaning of Oxygen Systems and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Russell

    2009-01-01

    Currently, NASA uses Dichloropentafluoropropane (HCFC-225), a Class II ozone depleting substance (ODs), to clean contaminated oxygen systems. Starting in 20 15, the Montreal Protocols and Clean Air Act prohibit the production and importation of all hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), except for limited use in refrigeration applications. Thus, a new non-ozone depleting solvent needs to be developed for use in cleaning. Optimally, such a solvent should also be environmentally benign or green to avoid needing to replace the new solvent with yet another solvent in the future due to other environmental concerns. Work for the first year consisted of two parts. The first part was developing a method of testing the cleaning efficiency of potential solvents. Stainless steel coupons were contaminated with a known weight of various contaminants and contaminant combinations and then immersed in solvent for ten minutes. The coupons were then removed and dried in an oven until all solvent had evaporated. Once dry, the coupons were weighed and the mass of the non-volatile residue (NVR) left on the coupon was determined. The cleaning efficiency of the solvents is reported as percent cleaning, with 100% cleaning being zero NVR left on the test coupon. The second half of the first goal was to use the develop method to perform baseline testing on current solvents. The second part of the work was to begin exploring alternative cleaning solvents. A variety of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were tested. Preliminary testing was also performed with ionic liquids and aqueous surfactant solutions. Once potential solvents were identified, an analysis of the performance and environmental characteristics of each was to be conducted. Four contaminants were specified for use in testing. These are Mil-Spec-H-5606 (5606), a hydraulic fluid, Mil-H-83282B (83282), another hydraulic fluid, diethylhexyl sebacate (Sebacate), and WD-40. The structures of these contaminants are all similar, with long aliphatic

  17. Oxygen liquefaction and zero-loss storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Bollo, T. R.; Peterson, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative concept that employs existing technologies and off-the-shelf components to liquefy gaseous oxygen from an in-situ propellant production (ISPP) unit and to store the liquid oxygen without boil-off loss. A primary goal is to minimize active components with a secondary goal of designing the active component in a protected or failure-free environment. The resulting design requires only one active component, a compressor operating in a closed and consequently more protected system. The design avoids pumps as active components by employing cryopumping for gaseous oxygen (GOX) and gravity transfer for liquid oxygen (LOX).

  18. Historic drawing. Oxygen Distribution Piping System, 1944. Photographic copy of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic drawing. Oxygen Distribution Piping System, 1944. Photographic copy of original. Boston National Historical Park. Charlestown Navy Yard. BOSTS 13520, #631-1 - Charlestown Navy Yard, Oxygen Plant, Midway along northern boundary of Charlestown Navy Yard, on Little Mystic Channel, near junction of Eighteenth Street & Fourth Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  20. Full system engineering design and operation of an oxygen plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James; Schallhorn, Paul; Ramonhalli, Kumar

    1992-01-01

    The production of oxygen from the indigenous resources on Mars is described. After discussing briefly the project's background and the experimental system design, specific experimental results of the electrolytic cell are presented. At the heart of the oxygen production system is a tubular solid zirconia electrolyte cell that will electrochemically separate oxygen from a high-temperature stream of Coleman grade carbon dioxide. Experimental results are discussed and certain system efficiencies are defined. The parameters varied include (1) the cell operating temperature; (2) the carbon dioxide flow rate; and (3) the voltage applied across the cell. The results confirm our theoretical expectations.

  1. Oxygen Compatibility of Brass-Filled PTFE Compared to Commonly Used Fluorinated Polymers for Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herald, Stephen D.; Frisby, Paul M.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Safe and reliable seal materials for high-pressure oxygen systems sometimes appear to be extinct species when sought out by oxygen systems designers. Materials that seal well are easy to find, but these materials are typically incompatible with oxygen, especially in cryogenic liquid form. This incompatibility can result in seals that leak, or much worse, seals that easily ignite and burn during use. Materials that are compatible with oxygen are easy to find, such as the long list of compatible metals, but these metallic materials are limiting as seal materials. A material that seals well and is oxygen compatible has been the big game in the designer's safari. Scientists at the Materials Combustion Research Facility (MCRF), part of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are constantly searching for better materials and processes to improve the safety of oxygen systems. One focus of this effort is improving the characteristics of polymers used in the presence of an oxygen enriched environment. Very few systems can be built which contain no polymeric materials; therefore, materials which have good impact resistance, low heat of combustion, high auto-ignition temperature and that maintain good mechanical properties are essential. The scientists and engineers at the Materials Combustion Research Facility, in cooperation with seal suppliers, are currently testing a new formulation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Brass filler. This Brass-filled PTFE is showing great promise as a seal and seat material for high pressure oxygen systems. Early research has demonstrated very encouraging results, which could rank this material as one of the best fluorinated polymers ever tested. This paper will compare the data obtained for Brass-filled PTFE with other fluorinated polymers, such as TFE-Teflon (PTFE) , Kel-F 81, Viton A, Viton A-500, Fluorel , and Algoflon . A similar metal filled fluorinated polymer, Salox-M , was tested in comparison to Brass-filled PTFE to

  2. Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    Staiger, Chad L.; Vaughn, Mark R.; Miller, A. Keith; Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2011-01-25

    A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

  3. Postflight Analysis of the Apollo 14 Cryogenic Oxygen System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 14 cryogenic oxygen system is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) methods of analysis, (2) stratification and heat transfer, (3) flight analysis, (4) postflight analysis, and (5) determination of model parameters.

  4. Evaluation of Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning of Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Biesinger, Paul; Delgado, Rafael; Antin, Neil

    1999-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in a joint program with the Naval Sea Systems Command has evaluated a number of solvents as alternatives to the use of chlorofluorocarbons currently utilized for cleaning of oxygen systems. Particular attention has been given to the cleaning of gauges and instrumentation used in oxygen service, since there have been no identified aqueous alternatives. The requirements identified as selection criteria, include toxicity, physical properties consistent with application, flammability, oxygen compatibility, and cleaning ability. This paper provides a summary of results and recommendations for solvents evaluated to date.

  5. Multidisciplinary approach to the design of high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Several examples of spacecraft systems fires are examined. Much of the design, manufacture, inspection, test, and operation of current high pressure oxygen components and systems has been driven by weight, cost, functional, and schedule requirements. As a result, little coordination has been expended on design for safe operation. While the number of oxygen related fires has not been large, their cost, including program losses and delays, has been very large. Most of these failures need not have occurred.

  6. Preclinical and clinical validation of a novel oxygenation imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Lee, Bernard T.; Cuccia, David J.; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Durr, Nicholas; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-02-01

    Introduction: Two major disadvantages of currently available oxygenation probes are the need for contact with the skin and long measurement stabilization times. A novel oxygenation imaging device based on spatial frequency domain and spectral principles has been designed, validated preclinically on pigs, and validated clinically on humans. Importantly, this imaging system has been designed to operate under the rigorous conditions of an operating room. Materials and Methods: Optical properties reconstruction and wavelength selection have been optimized to allow fast and reliable oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin imaging under realistic conditions. In vivo preclinical validation against commercially available contact oxygenation probes was performed on pigs undergoing arterial and venous occlusions. Finally, the device was used clinically to image skin flap oxygenation during a pilot study on women undergoing breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Results: A novel illumination head containing a spatial light modulator (SLM) and a novel fiber-coupled high power light source were constructed. Preclinical experiments showed similar values between local probes and the oxygenation imaging system, with measurement times of the new system being < 500 msec. During pilot clinical studies, the imaging system was able to provide near real-time oxyHb, deoxyHb, and saturation measurements over large fields of view (> 300 cm2). Conclusion: A novel optical-based oxygenation imaging system has the potential to replace contact probes during human surgery and to provide quantitative, wide-field measurements in near real-time.

  7. Oxygen Penalty for Waste Oxidation in an Advanced Life Support System: A Systems Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Fisher, John

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation is one of a number of technologies that are being considered for waste management and resource recovery from waste materials generated on board space missions. Oxidation processes are a very effective and efficient means of clean and complete conversion of waste materials to sterile products. However, because oxidation uses oxygen there is an "oxygen penalty" associated either with resupply of oxygen or with recycling oxygen from some other source. This paper is a systems approach to the issue of oxygen penalty in life support systems and presents findings on the oxygen penalty associated with an integrated oxidation-Sabatier-Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for waste management in an Advanced Life Support System. The findings reveal that such an integrated system can be operated to form a variety of useful products without a significant oxygen penalty.

  8. [The Status of Hemostasis System in Hypoxic Nitrogen-Oxygen and Argon-Oxygen Diving Gases].

    PubMed

    Kuzichkin, D S; Markin, A A; Juravlyova, O A; Morukov, B V; Zabolotskaya, I V; Vostrikova, L V

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effect of factors of hermetic chamber with modified gas medium on the hemostasis system is analyzed in order to estimate and to compare different diving breathing gases. The parameters characterizing pro-, anticoagulant as well as fibrinolytic components of hemostasis were determined using clotting, chromogenic and immunological methods. The applied exposure did not affect the activity and regulatory potential of hemostasis significantly; however, the nitrogen-oxygen and argon-oxygen diving gases have a different effect on the hemostasis functioning, especially in the recovery period. PMID:26485798

  9. Singlet molecular oxygen in photobiochemical systems: IR phosphorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Krasnovsky, A A

    1998-01-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) is one of the most active intermediates involved in photosensitized oxygenation reactions in chemical and biological systems. Deactivation of singlet oxygen is accompanied by infrared phosphorescence (1270 nm) which is widely employed for 1O2 detection and study. This review considers techniques for phosphorescence detection, phosphorescence spectra, quantum yields and kinetics under laser excitation, the radiative and real 1O2 lifetimes in organic solvents and water, 1O2 quenching by biomolecules, and estimation of singlet oxygen lifetimes, diffusion lengths and phosphorescence quantum yields in blood plasma, cell cytoplasm, erythrocyte ghosts, retinal rod outer segments and chloroplast thylakoids. The experiments devoted to 1O2 phosphorescence detection in photosensitizer-containing living cells are discussed in detail. Information reviewed is important for understanding the mechanisms of photodestruction in biological systems and various applied problems of photobiology and photomedicine. PMID:10379647

  10. Identification of oxygenated compounds in combustion systems.

    PubMed

    De Joannon, M; Ragucci, R; Cavaliere, A; Ciajolo, A

    2001-01-01

    An attempt for the spectroscopic identification of oxygenated compounds produced in combustion processes under different environmental conditions is reported in this paper. A deeper knowledge about presence and evolution of such species in dependence of the operating conditions of practical burner represents a fundamental hint to the objective of an advancement of the control of combustion process and reduction of pollutant emissions. This paper mainly focuses on species characterized by the presence of carbonyl functionality since aldehydes, ketones and diketones are among the principal intermediate species and products of hydrocarbon oxidation. They are by themselves to be considered atmospheric pollutants and are also indicators of actual pathways followed during the chemical reactions occurring in the combustion process. For these reasons they are most suitable for the exploitation of the above indicated objectives. In this paper, a classification of spectroscopic features and markers of these classes of carbonyl compounds is presented on the basis of both literature and spectra collected from sample species. This interpretative scheme is then used for the attribution of fluorescence signals collected from a tetradecane spray in different environmental conditions. PMID:11219711

  11. Fast-Response Oxygen-Monitoring and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen sensor is Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic disk maintained at 843 degrees C. Overall system response time reduced to about 0.2 second, equal to or less than 1 percent of tunnel run time. When test gas oxygen concentration differs from normal air concentration by 25 percent or more, alarm sounds, and emergency tunnel shutdown signal operates. New ZrO2 sensors intended for hypersonic-vehicle testing.

  12. Monitoring of brain and systemic oxygenation in neurocritical care patients.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Bösel, Julian

    2014-12-01

    Maintenance of adequate oxygenation is a mainstay of intensive care, however, recommendations on the safety, accuracy, and the potential clinical utility of invasive and non-invasive tools to monitor brain and systemic oxygenation in neurocritical care are lacking. A literature search was conducted for English language articles describing bedside brain and systemic oxygen monitoring in neurocritical care patients from 1980 to August 2013. Imaging techniques e.g., PET are not considered. A total of 281 studies were included, the majority described patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). All tools for oxygen monitoring are safe. Parenchymal brain oxygen (PbtO2) monitoring is accurate to detect brain hypoxia, and it is recommended to titrate individual targets of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), ventilator parameters (PaCO2, PaO2), and transfusion, and to manage intracranial hypertension, in combination with ICP monitoring. SjvO2 is less accurate than PbtO2. Given limited data, NIRS is not recommended at present for adult patients who require neurocritical care. Systemic monitoring of oxygen (PaO2, SaO2, SpO2) and CO2 (PaCO2, end-tidal CO2) is recommended in patients who require neurocritical care. PMID:25208670

  13. System Modeling of Lunar Oxygen Production: Mass and Power Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Linne, Diane L.; Faykus, Eric W.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Green, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    A systems analysis tool for estimating the mass and power requirements for a lunar oxygen production facility is introduced. The individual modeling components involve the chemical processing and cryogenic storage subsystems needed to process a beneficiated regolith stream into liquid oxygen via ilmenite reduction. The power can be supplied from one of six different fission reactor-converter systems. A baseline system analysis, capable of producing 15 metric tons of oxygen per annum, is presented. The influence of reactor-converter choice was seen to have a small but measurable impact on the system configuration and performance. Finally, the mission concept of operations can have a substantial impact upon individual component size and power requirements.

  14. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  15. JSC systems using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacites in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1981-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 KN/sq meter (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change of temperature. A thermogravimetric analysis system employing these techniques of redox control and measurement is also described. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  16. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  17. Current Status of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) to date and the current development status of the system. NORS is an element of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) used to resupply the ISS with Nitrogen and Oxygen following the impending retirement of the Space Shuttle. The paper will discuss why NASA is developing NORS, including a summary of other concepts considered, and other related concepts currently being developed by NASA. The current system architecture will be described, along with a summary of the current design of the NORS. The overall programmatic schedule of the NORS in the context of the upcoming shuttle retirement and future launch vehicle development will also be presented. Finally, the paper will examine the significant technical challenges encountered during the requirements and preliminary design phase of NORS development. A key challenge to the development of NORS is the international shipment - and associated regulations - of pressurized Oxygen, which is necessary due to the use of launch vehicles based in Japan and French Guiana to send NORS gasses to the ISS. The storage and use of relatively large quantities of high pressure (41,000 kPa) Oxygen and Nitrogen within the ISS, which is unprecedented both on the ISS and other space vehicles, has had a significant impact on the design and architecture of the system. The high pressure of the system also poses unique thermal considerations, which has led to the development of a heater system for thermal conditioning of high pressure gas to avoid thermal impacts on downstream hardware. The on-orbit envelope allocated to the NORS has changed (gotten smaller) and has impacted both the design and architecture of the system. Finally, the balance of safety considerations associated with these high pressure gasses, particularly high pressure Oxygen, with the functionality of the system has profoundly impacted the form

  18. 77 FR 11385 - Security Considerations for Lavatory Oxygen Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... (Amendment Nos. 21-94, 25-133, 121-354, 129-50; SFAR 111) on security considerations for lavatory oxygen systems (77 FR 12550). The interim final rule addresses a security vulnerability and is needed so the...-94, 25-133, 121-354, 129-50; SFAR 111] RIN 2120-AJ92 Security Considerations for Lavatory...

  19. Material Gradients in Oxygen System Components Improve Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen system components fabricated by Laser Engineered Net Shaping (TradeMark) (LENS(TradeMark)) could result in improved safety and performance. LENS(TradeMark) is a near-net shape manufacturing process fusing powdered materials injected into a laser beam. Parts can be fabricated with a variety of elemental metals, alloys, and nonmetallic materials without the use of a mold. The LENS(TradeMark) process allows the injected materials to be varied throughout a single workpiece. Hence, surfaces exposed to oxygen could be constructed of an oxygen-compatible material while the remainder of the part could be one chosen for strength or reduced weight. Unlike conventional coating applications, a compositional gradient would exist between the two materials, so no abrupt material boundary exists. Without an interface between dissimilar materials, there is less tendency for chipping or cracking associated with thermal-expansion mismatches.

  20. On the mean oxygen isotope composition of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Podosek, F. A.; Higuchi, T.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Yamada, A.

    2007-02-01

    Since the first discovery of extraordinary oxygen isotope compositions in carbonaceous meteorites by Clayton et al. [Clayton, R.N., Grossman, L., Mayeda, T.K., 1973. Science 182, 485-488], numerous studies have been done to explain the unusual mass-independent isotope fractionation, but the problem is still unresolved to this day. Clayton's latest interpretation [Clayton, R.N., 2002. Nature 415, 860-861] sheds new light on the problem, and possible hypotheses now seem to be fairly well defined. A key issue is to resolve whether the oxygen isotopes in the Solar System represented by the Sun (solar oxygen) are the same as oxygen isotopes in planetary objects such as bulk meteorites, Mars, Earth, and Moon, or whether the solar oxygen is more similar to the lightest oxygen isotopes observed in CAIs (Calcium Aluminum-rich Inclusions) in primitive meteorites. Here, we examined the problem using oxygen isotope analytical data of about 400 bulk meteorite samples of various classes or types (data compiled by K. Lodders). We used in our discussion exclusively the parameter Δ 17O, a direct measure of the degree of mass-independent isotope fractionation of oxygen isotopes. When Δ 17O is arranged according to a characteristic size of their host planetary object, it shows a systematic trend: (1) Δ 17O values scatter around zero; (2) the scatter from the mean (Δ 17O=0) decreases with increasing representative size of the respective host planetary object. This systematic trend is easily understood on the basis of a hierarchical scenario of planetary formation, that is, larger planetary objects have formed by progressive accretion of planetesimals by random sampling over a wide spectrum of proto-solar materials. If this progressive random sampling of planetesimals were the essential process of planetary formation, the isotopic composition of planetary oxygen should approach that of the solar oxygen. To test this random sampling hypothesis, we applied a multiscale, multistep

  1. Photothermal imaging bundle system for estimating tissue oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Yonat; Allon, Dror M.; Harrington, James; Bledt, Carlos; Gannot, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate a method for the measurement of tissue oxygen saturation level via a thermal imaging bundle in-vitro and in-vivo. The method consists of a thermal imaging system and an algorithm which estimates the compound concentration according to the temperature rise of the tissue. A temperature rise is obtained by illuminating the tissue in the NIR range and is measured using a thermal camera and a coherent thermal imaging bundle for non-invasive transendoscopic use. The system was validated using agar phantoms of varying concentrations of Methylene Blue and ICG as well as blood samples. The algorithm estimated the Methylene Blue relative amount and the results were compared to the real relative amount. The calculated RMS of the error was 5.12%, a satisfying value for this stage. In the blood samples, for oxygenation levels higher than 50% the RMS of the error was 5.79%. Once the system was verified a portable system was built for clinical use, this system was also evaluated on agar phantoms and the RMS of the error was 10.64%. As a result of the encouraging experiments in-vivo, animal trials were performed. The oxygenation levels of mice were decreased and were estimated respectively using our system. The system determined a small decrease in the tissue oxygen saturation of the mice. These results verify the algorithm's and bundle's suitability for the use in a non-invasive system. They provide motivation for performing more complex in-vitro experiments and moving on to clinical trials.

  2. ISRU System Model Tool: From Excavation to Oxygen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Linne, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    In the late 80's, conceptual designs for an in situ oxygen production plant were documented in a study by Eagle Engineering [1]. In the "Summary of Findings" of this study, it is clearly pointed out that: "reported process mass and power estimates lack a consistent basis to allow comparison." The study goes on to say: "A study to produce a set of process mass, power, and volume requirements on a consistent basis is recommended." Today, approximately twenty years later, as humans plan to return to the moon and venture beyond, the need for flexible up-to-date models of the oxygen extraction production process has become even more clear. Multiple processes for the production of oxygen from lunar regolith are being investigated by NASA, academia, and industry. Three processes that have shown technical merit are molten regolith electrolysis, hydrogen reduction, and carbothermal reduction. These processes have been selected by NASA as the basis for the development of the ISRU System Model Tool (ISMT). In working to develop up-to-date system models for these processes NASA hopes to accomplish the following: (1) help in the evaluation process to select the most cost-effective and efficient process for further prototype development, (2) identify key parameters, (3) optimize the excavation and oxygen production processes, and (4) provide estimates on energy and power requirements, mass and volume of the system, oxygen production rate, mass of regolith required, mass of consumables, and other important parameters. Also, as confidence and high fidelity is achieved with each component's model, new techniques and processes can be introduced and analyzed at a fraction of the cost of traditional hardware development and test approaches. A first generation ISRU System Model Tool has been used to provide inputs to the Lunar Architecture Team studies.

  3. Systemic oxygen extraction during exercise at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D. S.; Cobb, A.; Meale, P.; Mitchell, K.; Edsell, M.; Mythen, M. G.; Grocott, M. P. W.; Adams, Tom; Biseker, Lindsay; Booth, Adam; Burdall, Oliver; Cobb, Alexandra; Cumpstey, Andrew; Dauncey, Steve; Edsell, Mark; Farrant, James; Feelisch, Martin; Fernandez, Bernadette; Firth, Oliver; Gilbert, Edward; Grant, Daniel; Grocott, Michael; Hennis, Phil; Jackson, Laura; Jenner, Will; van der Kaaij, Jildou; Khosravi, Maryam; Kortekaas, Edith; Levett, Denny; Mahomed, Zeyn; Martin, Daniel; Meale, Paula; Milledge, Jim; Mitchell, Kay; Mole, Damian; Moses, Oliver; Mythen, Michael; Rigat, Fabio; O'Doherty, Alasdair; Salam, Alex; Sanborn, Matt; Sheperdigian, Adam; Shrubb, Fiona; Simpson, Jo; Talbot, Nick; Wandrag, Liesel; Wijesingha, Savini; Williamson, Wilby; Woolley, Tom; Yow, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Background Classic teaching suggests that diminished availability of oxygen leads to increased tissue oxygen extraction yet evidence to support this notion in the context of hypoxaemia, as opposed to anaemia or cardiac failure, is limited. Methods At 75 m above sea level, and after 7–8 days of acclimatization to 4559 m, systemic oxygen extraction [C(a−v)O2] was calculated in five participants at rest and at peak exercise. Absolute [C(a−v)O2] was calculated by subtracting central venous oxygen content (CcvO2) from arterial oxygen content (CaO2) in blood sampled from central venous and peripheral arterial catheters, respectively. Oxygen uptake (V˙O2) was determined from expired gas analysis during exercise. Results Ascent to altitude resulted in significant hypoxaemia; median (range) SpO2 87.1 (82.5–90.7)% and PaO2 6.6 (5.7–6.8) kPa. While absolute C(a−v)O2 was reduced at maximum exercise at 4559 m [83.9 (67.5–120.9) ml litre−1 vs 99.6 (88.0–151.3) ml litre−1 at 75 m, P=0.043], there was no change in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) [C(a−v)O2/CaO2] between the two altitudes [0.52 (0.48–0.71) at 4559 m and 0.53 (0.49–0.73) at 75 m, P=0.500]. Comparison of C(a−v)O2 at peak V˙O2 at 4559 m and the equivalent V˙O2 at sea level for each participant also revealed no significant difference [83.9 (67.5–120.9) ml litre1 vs 81.2 (73.0–120.7) ml litre−1, respectively, P=0.225]. Conclusion In acclimatized individuals at 4559 m, there was a decline in maximum absolute C(a−v)O2 during exercise but no alteration in OER calculated using central venous oxygen measurements. This suggests that oxygen extraction may have become limited after exposure to 7–8 days of hypoxaemia. PMID:25501722

  4. An Improved Approach for Analyzing the Oxygen Compatibility of Solvents and other Oxygen-Flammable Materials for Use in Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Susan A.; Juarez, Alfredo; Peralta, Stephen F.; Stoltzfus, Joel; Arpin, Christina Pina; Beeson, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Solvents used to clean oxygen system components must be assessed for oxygen compatibility, as incompatible residue or fluid inadvertently left behind within an oxygen system can pose a flammability risk. The most recent approach focused on solvent ignition susceptibility to assess the flammability risk associated with these materials. Previous evaluations included Ambient Pressure Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Mechanical Impact Testing (ASTM G86) and Autogenous Ignition Temperature (AIT) Testing (ASTM G72). The goal in this approach was to identify a solvent material that was not flammable in oxygen. As environmental policies restrict the available options of acceptable solvents, it has proven difficult to identify one that is not flammable in oxygen. A more rigorous oxygen compatibility approach is needed in an effort to select a new solvent for NASA applications. NASA White Sands Test Facility proposed an approach that acknowledges oxygen flammability, yet selects solvent materials based on their relative oxygen compatibility ranking, similar to that described in ASTM G63-99. Solvents are selected based on their ranking with respect to minimal ignition susceptibility, damage and propagation potential, as well as their relative ranking when compared with other solvent materials that are successfully used in oxygen systems. Test methods used in this approach included ASTM G86 (Ambient Pressure LOX Mechanical Impact Testing and Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Mechanical Impact Testing), ASTM G72 (AIT Testing), and ASTM D240 (Heat of Combustion (HOC) Testing). Only four solvents were tested through the full battery of tests for evaluation of oxygen compatibility: AK-225G as a baseline comparison, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA. Baseline solvent AK-225G exhibited the lowest HOC and highest AIT of solvents tested. Nonetheless, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA HOCs all fell well within the range of properties that are associated with proven oxygen system materials

  5. Dendritic Phosphorescent Probes for Oxygen Imaging in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Artem Y.; Cheprakov, Andrei V.; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David A.; Wilson, David F.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen levels in biological systems can be measured by the phosphorescence quenching method using probes with controllable quenching parameters and defined biodistributions. We describe a general approach to the construction of phosphorescent nanosensors with tunable spectral characteristics, variable degrees of quenching, and a high selectivity for oxygen. The probes are based on bright phosphorescent Pt and Pd complexes of porphyrins and symmetrically π-extended porphyrins (tetrabenzoporphyrins and tetranaphthoporphyrins). π-Extension of the core macrocycle allows tuning of the spectral parameters of the probes in order to meet the requirements of a particular imaging application (e.g., oxygen tomography versus planar microscopic imaging). Metalloporphyrins are encapsulated into poly(arylglycine) dendrimers, which fold in aqueous environments and create diffusion barriers for oxygen, making it possible to regulate the sensitivity and the dynamic range of the method. The periphery of the dendrimers is modified with poly(ethylene glycol) residues, which enhance the probe’s solubility, diminish toxicity, and help prevent interactions of the probes with the biological environment. The probe’s parameters were measured under physiological conditions and shown to be unaffected by the presence of biomacromolecules. The performance of the probes was demonstrated in applications, including in vivo microscopy of vascular pO2 in the rat brain. PMID:20072726

  6. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  7. Thermochemical Modeling of the Uranium-Cerium-Oxygen System

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the Fuel Cycle R&D Program, Advanced Fuels campaign is to provide the research and development necessary to develop low loss, high quality nuclear fuels for ultra-high burnup reactor operation. Primary work in this area will be focused on the ceramic and metallic fuel systems. The goal of the current work is to enhance the understanding of ceramic nuclear fuel thermochemistry to support fuel research and development efforts. The thermochemical behavior of oxide nuclear fuel under irradiation is dependent on the oxygen to metal ratio (O:M). In fluorite-structured fuel, the actinide metal cation is bonded with {approx}2 oxygen atoms on a crystal lattice and as the metal atoms fission, fission fragments and free oxygen are created. The resulting fission fragments will contain some oxide forming elements, however these are insufficient to bind to all the liberated oxygen and therefore, there is an average increase in O:M with fuel burnup. Some of the fission products also form species that will migrate to and react with the cladding surface in a phenomenon known as Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction (FCCI). Cladding corrosion is life-limiting so it is desirable to understand influencing factors, such as oxide thermochemistry, which can be used to guide the design and fabrication of higher burn up fuel. A phased oxide fuel thermochemical model development effort is underway within the Advanced Fuels Campaign. First models of binary oxide systems are developed. For nuclear fuel system this means U-O and transuranic systems such as Pu-O, Np-O and Am-O. Next, the binary systems will be combined to form pseudobinary systems such as U-Pu-O, etc. The model development effort requires the use of data to allow optimization based on known thermochemical parameters as a function of composition and temperature. Available data is mined from the literature and supplemented by experimental work as needed. Due to the difficulty of performing fuel fabrication development

  8. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, I, included the following reports:Oxygen in the Solar System: Origins of Isotopic and Redox Complexity; The Origin of Oxygen Isotope Variations in the Early Solar System; Solar and Solar-Wind Oxygen Isotopes and the Genesis Mission; Solar 18O/17O and the Setting for Solar Birth; Oxygen Isotopes in Early Solar System Materials: A Perspective Based on Microbeam Analyses of Chondrules from CV Carbonaceous Chondrites; Insight into Primordial Solar System Oxygen Reservoirs from Returned Cometary Samples; Tracing Meteorites to Their Sources Through Asteroid Spectroscopy; Redox Conditions Among the Terrestrial Planets; Redox Complexity in Martian Meteorites: Implications for Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets; Implications of Sulfur Isotopes for the Evolution of Atmospheric Oxygen; Oxygen in the Outer Solar System; and On the Oxidation States of the Galilean Satellites: Implications for Internal Structures.

  9. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  10. Extravehicular mobility unit subcritical liquid oxygen storage and supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John; Martin, Timothy; Hodgson, ED

    1992-01-01

    The storage of life support oxygen in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit in the liquid state offers some advantages over the current method of storing the oxygen as a high pressure gas. Storage volume is reduced because of the increased density associated with liquid. The lower storage and operating pressures also reduce the potential for leakage or bursting of the storage tank. The potential for combustion resulting from adiabatic combustion of the gas within lines and components is substantially reduced. Design constraints on components are also relaxed due to the lower system pressures. A design study was performed to determine the requirements for a liquid storage system and prepare a conceptual design. The study involved four tasks. The first was to identify system operating requirements that influence or direct the design of the system. The second was to define candidate storage system concepts that could possibly satisfy the requirements. An evaluation and comparison of the candidate concepts was conducted in the third task. The fourth task was devoted to preparing a conceptual design of the recommended storage system and to evaluate concerns with integration of the concept into the EMU. The results are presented.

  11. Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Dick, Brandon; Cook, Tony; Leonard, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) requires stores of Oxygen (O2) and Nitrogen (N2) to provide for atmosphere replenishment, direct crew member usage, and payload operations. Currently, supplies of N2/O2 are maintained by transfer from the Space Shuttle. Following Space Shuttle is retirement in 2010, an alternate means of resupplying N2/O2 to the ISS is needed. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has determined that the optimal method of supplying the ISS with O2/N2 is using tanks of high pressure N2/O2 carried to the station by a cargo vehicle capable of docking with the ISS. This paper will outline the architecture of the system selected by NASA and will discuss some of the design challenges associated with this use of high pressure oxygen and nitrogen in the human spaceflight environment.

  12. Recovery from central nervous system oxygen toxicity in the rat at oxygen pressures between 100 and 300 kPa.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Truman, Marianna; Abramovich, Amir

    2008-11-01

    No symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity have been reported when diving with oxygen rebreathers at depths shallower than 3 msw. We hypothesised that recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity will take place when the PO(2) is less than 130 kPa. We exposed rats to a high PO(2) (mainly 608 kPa) to produce CNS oxygen toxicity. The latency to the first electrical discharge (FED) preceding convulsions was determined as the animal's control latency. Thereafter, the rat was exposed to the same PO(2) for 60% of its latency, then to a lower PO(2) for 15 min (sufficient time for full recovery in normoxia), and finally to the high PO(2) again until appearance of the FED. If recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity takes place during the interim period, the latency for the final exposure to the high oxygen pressure should not be shorter than the control. The latencies to CNS oxygen toxicity for exposure to the high oxygen pressure after a 15-min interim period at 21, 101, 132, 203, 304, 405, and 456 kPa were 110, 110, 125, 94, 85, 54 and 38% of the control value, respectively. Only after the last two interim pressures were the latencies significantly shorter than control values. The remaining latencies were not significantly different from 100%. Recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity in the rat takes place at a PO(2) anywhere between 21 and 304 kPa. The present findings support our previous suggestion that recovery from CNS oxygen toxicity in humans will take place at a PO(2) below 130 kPa. If our findings are corroborated by further human studies, this will justify including recovery in the algorithm for CNS oxygen toxicity in closed-circuit oxygen divers. PMID:18670785

  13. 14 CFR 25.1445 - Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Equipment standards for the oxygen... Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1445 Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system. (a) When oxygen is... crew on duty. (b) Portable walk-around oxygen units of the continuous flow, diluter-demand,...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1445 - Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment standards for the oxygen... Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1445 Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system. (a) When oxygen is... crew on duty. (b) Portable walk-around oxygen units of the continuous flow, diluter-demand,...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1445 - Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Equipment standards for the oxygen... Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1445 Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system. (a) When oxygen is... crew on duty. (b) Portable walk-around oxygen units of the continuous flow, diluter-demand,...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1445 - Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Equipment standards for the oxygen... Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1445 Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system. (a) When oxygen is... crew on duty. (b) Portable walk-around oxygen units of the continuous flow, diluter-demand,...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1445 - Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Equipment standards for the oxygen... Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1445 Equipment standards for the oxygen distributing system. (a) When oxygen is... crew on duty. (b) Portable walk-around oxygen units of the continuous flow, diluter-demand,...

  18. Oxygen Generation System Laptop Bus Controller Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Chad; Panter, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Oxygen Generation System Laptop Bus Controller Flight Software was developed to allow the International Space Station (ISS) program to activate specific components of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) to perform a checkout of key hardware operation in a microgravity environment, as well as to perform preventative maintenance operations of system valves during a long period of what would otherwise be hardware dormancy. The software provides direct connectivity to the OGS Firmware Controller with pre-programmed tasks operated by on-orbit astronauts to exercise OGS valves and motors. The software is used to manipulate the pump, separator, and valves to alleviate the concerns of hardware problems due to long-term inactivity and to allow for operational verification of microgravity-sensitive components early enough so that, if problems are found, they can be addressed before the hardware is required for operation on-orbit. The decision was made to use existing on-orbit IBM ThinkPad A31p laptops and MIL-STD-1553B interface cards as the hardware configuration. The software at the time of this reporting was developed and tested for use under the Windows 2000 Professional operating system to ensure compatibility with the existing on-orbit computer systems.

  19. Techniques employed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility to ensure oxygen system component safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stradling, J. S.; Pippen, D. L.; Frye, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of ascertaining the safety and suitability of a variety of oxygen system components are discussed. Additionally, qualification and batch control requirements for soft goods in oxygen systems are presented. Current oxygen system component qualification test activities in progress at White Sands Test Facility are described.

  20. Integrated hydrogen/oxygen technology applied to auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhardt, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the Integrated Hydrogen/Oxygen Technology (IHOT) study was to determine if the vehicle/mission needs and technology of the 1990's support development of an all cryogenic H2/O2 system. In order to accomplish this, IHOT adopted the approach of designing Integrated Auxiliary Propulsion Systems (IAPS) for a representative manned vehicle; the advanced manned launch system. The primary objectives were to develop IAPS concepts which appeared to offer viable alternatives to state-of-the-art (i.e., hypergolic, or earth-storable) APS approaches. The IHOT study resulted in the definition of three APS concepts; two cryogenic IAPS, and a third concept utilizing hypergolic propellants.

  1. Technical Note: Some Issues Related to the Selection of Polymers for Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Beeson, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Materials intended for use in aerospace oxygen systems are commonly screened for oxygen compatibility following NASA STD 6001. This standard allows qualification of materials based on results provided by only one test method. Potential issues related to this practice are reviewed and recommendations are proposed that would lead to improved aerospace oxygen systems safety.

  2. [A simple anesthetic system with oxygen concentrator for war or disaster situation].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Asai, Sunao

    2003-06-01

    An oxygen concentrator is commonly used as an oxygen source in war or disaster situation. We examined the possibility of using the oxygen concentrator, capable of producing 7 l.min-1 of oxygen, for anesthetic circuit. When the oxygen concentrator is connected with an ordinary anesthetic vaporizer, the gas flow from the vaporizer is 6 l.min-1 and its vaporization is the same as when it is used with a high gas pressure. With this oxygen concentrator, it is possible to make a simple anesthetic system with an ordinary vaporizer, not a special vaporizer for draw over anesthetic system. PMID:12854486

  3. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2006-04-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  4. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank til1 levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  5. Total hydrocarbon content (THC) testing in liquid oxygen (LOX) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghelli, B. J.; Obregon, R. E.; Ross, H. R.; Hebert, B. J.; Sass, J. P.; Dirschka, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The measured Total Hydrocarbon Content (THC) levels in liquid oxygen (LOX) systems at Stennis Space Center (SSC) have shown wide variations. Examples of these variations include the following: 1) differences between vendor-supplied THC values and those obtained using standard SSC analysis procedures; and 2) increasing THC values over time at an active SSC test stand in both storage and run vessels. A detailed analysis of LOX sampling techniques, analytical instrumentation, and sampling procedures will be presented. Additional data obtained on LOX system operations and LOX delivery trailer THC values during the past 12-24 months will also be discussed. Field test results showing THC levels and the distribution of the THC's in the test stand run tank, modified for THC analysis via dip tubes, will be presented.

  6. Pressure and Quantity Thresholds for Ignition of Oil Contamination by Rapid Pressurization in Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, Susana; Smith, Sarah; Peralta, Steve; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the problem and solution of oil contamination and increased ignition hazard in oxygen systems. The experiments that were used are reviewed, and the contamination level threshold and the oxygen pressure threshold are reviewed.

  7. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary power system thruster investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, E. E.; Kusak, L.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and demonstration of a 111 newton (25 lb) thrust, integrated auxiliary propulsion system (IAPS) thruster for use with LH2/LO2 propellants is described. Hydrogen was supplied at a temperature range of 22 to 33 K (40 to 60 R), and oxygen from 89 to 122 K (160 to 220 R). The thruster was designed to operate in both pulse mode and steady-state modes for vehicle attitude control, space maneuvering, and as an abort backup in the event of failure of the main propulsion system. A dual-sleeve, tri-axial injection system was designed that utilizes a primary injector/combustor where 100 percent of the oxygen and 8 percent of the hydrogen is introduced; a secondary injector/combustor where 45 percent of the hydrogen is introduced to mix with the primary combustor gases; and a boundary layer injector that uses the remaining 45 percent of the hydrogen to cool the thrust throat/nozzle design. Hot-fire evaluation of this thruster with a BLC injection distance of 2.79 cm (1.10 in.) indicated that a specific impulse value of 390 sec can be attained using a coated molybdenum thrust chamber. Pulse mode tests indicated that a chamber pressure buildup to 90 percent thrust can be achieved in a time on the order of 48 msec. Some problems were encountered in achieving ignition of each pulse during pulse trains. This was interpreted to indicate that a higher delivered spark energy level ( 100 mJ) would be required to maintain ignition reliability of the plasma torch ignition system under the extra 'cold' conditions resulting during pulsing.

  8. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Howard; Lusby, Brian; Villemarette, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In support of NASA?s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, a liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed (IPSTB) was designed and advanced to the Critical Design Review (CDR) stage at the Johnson Space Center. The IPSTB?s primary objectives are to study LO2/LCH4 propulsion system steady state and transient performance, operational characteristics and to validate fluid and thermal models of a LO2/LCH4 propulsion system for use in future flight design work. Two phase thermal and dynamic fluid flow models of the IPSTB were built to predict the system performance characteristics under a variety of operating modes and to aid in the overall system design work. While at ambient temperature and simulated altitude conditions at the White Sands Test Facility, the IPSTB and its approximately 600 channels of system instrumentation would be operated to perform a variety of integrated main engine and reaction control engine hot fire tests. The pressure, temperature, and flow rate data collected during this testing would then be used to validate the analytical models of the IPSTB?s thermal and dynamic fluid flow performance. An overview of the IPSTB design and analytical model development will be presented.

  9. Oxygen-hydrogen thrusters for Space Station auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkman, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility and technology requirements of a low-thrust, high-performance, long-life, gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) thruster were examined. Candidate engine concepts for auxiliary propulsion systems for space station applications were identified. The low-thrust engine (5 to 100 lb sub f) requires significant departure from current applications of oxygen/hydrogen propulsion technology. Selection of the thrust chamber material and cooling method needed or long life poses a major challenge. The use of a chamber material requiring a minimum amount of cooling or the incorporation of regenerative cooling were the only choices available with the potential of achieving very high performance. The design selection for the injector/igniter, the design and fabrication of a regeneratively cooled copper chamber, and the design of a high-temperature rhenium chamber were documented and the performance and heat transfer results obtained from the test program conducted at JPL using the above engine components presented. Approximately 115 engine firings were conducted in the JPL vacuum test facility, using 100:1 expansion ratio nozzles. Engine mixture ratio and fuel-film cooling percentages were parametrically investigated for each test configuration.

  10. On Orbit ISS Oxygen Generation System Operation Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diderich, Greg S.; Polis, Pete; VanKeuren, Steven P.; Erickson, Robert; Mason, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) has accumulated almost a year of operation at varied oxygen production rates within the US Laboratory Module (LAB) since it was first activated in July 2007. It was operated intermittently through 2009 and 2010, due to filter clogging and acid accumulation in the recirculation loop. Since the installation of a deionizing bed in the recirculation loop in May of 2011 the OGA has been operated continuously. Filters in the recirculation loop have clogged and have been replaced. Hydrogen sensors have drifted apart, and a power failure may have condensed water on a hydrogen sensor. A pump delta pressure sensor failed, and a replacement new spare pump failed to start. Finally, the voltage across the cell stack increased out of tolerance due to cation contamination, and the cell stack was replaced. This paper will discuss the operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  11. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    PubMed

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics. PMID:17461557

  12. Evaluation of a Stirling Solar Dynamic System for Lunar Oxygen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2006-01-01

    An evaluation of a solar concentrator-based system for producing oxygen from the lunar regolith was performed. The system utilizes a solar concentrator mirror to provide thermal energy for the oxygen production process as well as thermal energy to power a Stirling heat engine for the production of electricity. The electricity produced is utilized to operate the equipment needed in the oxygen production process. The oxygen production method utilized in the analysis was the hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. Utilizing this method of oxygen production a baseline system design was produced. This baseline system had an oxygen production rate of 0.6 kg/hr with a concentrator mirror size of 5 m. Variations were performed on the baseline design to show how changes in the system size and process rate effected the oxygen production rate.

  13. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  14. Simplified thermochemistry of oxygen in lithium and sodium for liquid metal cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, L. K.

    1972-01-01

    Plots of oxygen chemical potential against composition of lithium-oxygen solutions and sodium-oxygen solutions for a range of temperature were constructed. For each liquid metal two such plots were prepared. For one plot ideal solution behavior was assumed. For the other plot, existing solubility limit data for oxygen in the liquid metal were used to determine a first-order term for departure from ideality. The use of the plots in evaluating the oxygen gettering capability of refractory metals in liquid metal cooling systems is illustrated by a simple example involving lithium, oxygen, and hafnium.

  15. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, II, included the following reports:Evolution of Oxygen Isotopes in the Solar Nebula; Disequilibrium Melting of Refractory Inclusions: A Mechanism for High-Temperature Oxygen; Isotope Exchange in the Solar Nebula; Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Al-rich Chondrules in the CR Carbonaceous Chondrites: Evidence for a Genetic Link to Ca-Al-rich Inclusions and for Oxygen Isotope Exchange During Chondrule Melting; Nebular Formation of Fayalitic Olivine: Ineffectiveness of Dust Enrichment; Water in Terrestrial Planets: Always an Oxidant?; Oxygen Barometry of Basaltic Glasses Based on Vanadium Valence Determination Using Synchrotron MicroXANES; A New Oxygen Barometer for Solar System Basaltic Glasses Based on Vanadium Valence; The Relationship Between Clinopyroxene Fe3+ Content and Oxygen Fugacity ; and Olivine-Silicate Melt Partitioning of Iridium.

  16. Biochemical oxygen demand measurement by mediator method in flow system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Bai, Lu; Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    Using mediator as electron acceptor for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) measurement was developed in the last decade (BODMed). However, until now, no BOD(Med) in a flow system has been reported. This work for the first time describes a flow system of BOD(Med) method (BOD(Med)-FS) by using potassium ferricyanide as mediator and carbon fiber felt as substrate material for microbial immobilization. The system can determine the BOD value within 30 min and possesses a wider analytical linear range for measuring glucose-glutamic acid (GGA) standard solution from 2 up to 200 mg L(-1) without the need of dilution. The analytical performance of the BOD(Med)-FS is comparable or better than that of the previously reported BOD(Med) method, especially its superior long-term stability up to 2 months under continuous operation. Moreover, the BOD(Med)-FS has same determination accuracy with the conventional BOD5 method by measuring real samples from a local wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). PMID:25863368

  17. Development of modified poly(perfluoropropyleneoxide) urethane systems for use in liquid oxygen and in enriched 100 percent oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    This program consisted of two separate though related phases. The initial phase was directed toward improving the mechanical and adhesive properties of the very highly fluorinated-polyurethane resin system derived from the hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropylene oxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate. Various new curing agents for this system were investigated, with the goal of providing a more thermally stable crosslink (cure) mechanism to provide wider applicability and fuller utilization of the outstanding oxygen resistance of the PFPO system. Complete resistance to liquid- and gaseous-oxygen impact at presures as high as 1035 N/sq cm were attained with the use of the PFPO resin castings. The second corollary phase was directed toward investigating the feasibility and optimization of the allophanate cured, urethane extended polymer derived from hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropyleneoxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate, as the adhesive system for use in a weld-bond configuration for liquid oxygen tankage. The synthesis and application procedures of the adhesive system to insure liquid oxygen compatibility (under 10 kg-m loading), and the development of procedures and techniques to provide high quality weld-bonded joint configurations were studied.

  18. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  19. Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Phase D report: Oxygen-hydrogen special RCS studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, T. L.; Pattern, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    Two alternate oxygen-hydrogen auxiliary propulsion system concepts for use with the space shuttle vehicle were evaluated. The two concepts considered were: (1) gaseous oxygen-hydrogen systems with electric or hydraulic motor driven pumps to provide system pressure and (2) liquid oxygen-hydrogen systems which delivered propellants to the engines in a liquid state without the need for pumps. The various means of implementing each of the concepts are compared on the basis of weight, technology requirements, and operational considerations. It was determined that the liquid oxygen-hydrogen system concepts have the potential to produce substantial weight reductions in the space shuttle orbiter total impulse range.

  20. Gloxy: an oxygen-sensitive coal for accurate measurement of low oxygen tensions in biological systems.

    PubMed

    James, P E; Grinberg, O Y; Goda, F; Panz, T; O'Hara, J A; Swartz, H M

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a new oxygen sensitive, paramagnetic material that has some significant advantages for measurements of tissue pO2 by in vivo EPR. This paramagnetic component of Welsh coal, termed "gloxy" was found to have valuable EPR features that allow accurate measurement of low oxygen tensions in vivo; these include large oxygen-dependent changes in linewidth, a high number of paramagnetic spin centers (resulting in high signal amplitude), and stability in tissue allowing repeated pO2 measurements to be made in vivo with high precision. Renal pO2 was measured deep in the medulla region of isolated perfused kidneys and found to be lower than that in the cortex (1.7 +/- 0.05 and 7.1 +/- 0.3 mm Hg, respectively). The quality of the EPR signal obtained from the renal outer medulla and also from tumors in mice was such that the pO2 measurements were obtained with a precision of +/-3% of the measured pO2 (Kidney: 1.7 +/- 0.05 mmHg; Tumor: 1.37 +/- 0.04 mmHg). In vitro tests on the viability of cells and in vivo studies using Gloxy demonstrate the stability and inertness of this oxygen-sensitive material. PMID:9211379

  1. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulent) Thermodynamic Venting System Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low gravity space environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on excessive tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leakage. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. The TVS consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted by the pump and passing it though the J-T valve, then through the heat exchanger, the bulk liquid and ullage are cooled, resulting in lower tank pressure. A series of TVS tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using liquid nitrogen as a liquid oxygen simulant. The tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% with gaseous nitrogen and helium pressurants, and with a tank pressure control band of 7 kPa. A transient one-dimensional model of the TVS is used to analyze the data. The code is comprised of four models for the heat exchanger, the spray manifold and injector tubes, the recirculation pump, and the tank. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature are compared with data. Details of predictions and comparisons with test data regarding pressure rise and collapse rates will be presented in the final paper.

  2. ASRDI oxygen technology survey, Volume 7: Characteristics of metals that influence system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey and analysis of the material and process factors affecting the safety of metals in oxygen systems is presented. In addition, the practices of those who specify, build, or use oxygen systems relative to the previous is summarized. Alloys based on iron, copper, nickel, and aluminum were investigated representing the bulk of metals found in oxygen systems. Safety-related characteristics of other miscellaneous metals are summarized. It was found that factors affecting the safety of metals in oxygen systems exit in all phases of the evolutionary process, from smelting and mill techniques through end-production fabrication. The safety of a given metal in an oxygen system was determined to be influenced by the particular service requirement. The metal characteristics should favorably influence fulfillment of these requirements. Thus, no singular metal or alloy could be classified as safest for all types of oxygen service.

  3. A Fermentor System for Regulating Oxygen at Low Concentrations in Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Patricia V.; Kwast, Kurt E.; Everts, Frank; Poyton, Robert O.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of yeast cells to high densities at low, but constant, oxygen concentrations is difficult because the cells themselves respire oxygen; hence, as cell mass increases, so does oxygen consumption. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system consisting of a computer-controlled gas flow train that adjusts oxygen concentration in the gas flow to match cellular demand. It does this by using a proportional-integral-differential algorithm in conjunction with a three-way valve to mix two gases, adjusting their proportions to maintain the desired oxygen concentration. By modeling yeast cell yields at intermediate to low oxygen concentrations, we have found that cellular respiration declines with oxygen concentration, most likely because of a decrease in the expression of genes for respiratory proteins. These lowered rates of oxygen consumption, together with the gas flow system described here, allow the growth of yeast cells to high densities at low oxygen concentrations. This system can also be used to grow cells at any desired oxygen concentration and for regulated shifts between oxygen concentrations. PMID:9501444

  4. Systemic Reprogramming of Translation Efficiencies on Oxygen Stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J David; Wang, Miling; Audas, Timothy E; Kwon, Deukwoo; Carlsson, Steven K; Timpano, Sara; Evagelou, Sonia L; Brothers, Shaun; Gonzalgo, Mark L; Krieger, Jonathan R; Chen, Steven; Uniacke, James; Lee, Stephen

    2016-02-16

    Protein concentrations evolve under greater evolutionary constraint than mRNA levels. Translation efficiency of mRNA represents the chief determinant of basal protein concentrations. This raises a fundamental question of how mRNA and protein levels are coordinated in dynamic systems responding to physiological stimuli. This report examines the contributions of mRNA abundance and translation efficiency to protein output in cells responding to oxygen stimulus. We show that changes in translation efficiencies, and not mRNA levels, represent the major mechanism governing cellular responses to [O2] perturbations. Two distinct cap-dependent protein synthesis machineries select mRNAs for translation: the normoxic eIF4F and the hypoxic eIF4F(H). O2-dependent remodeling of translation efficiencies enables cells to produce adaptive translatomes from preexisting mRNA pools. Differences in mRNA expression observed under different [O2] are likely neutral, given that they occur during evolution. We propose that mRNAs contain translation efficiency determinants for their triage by the translation apparatus on [O2] stimulus. PMID:26854219

  5. Singlet oxygen production in superoxide ion-halocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kanofsky, J.R.

    1986-05-28

    A search for singlet oxygen chemiluminescence at 1268 nm was made in a number of reactions of superoxide ion. Carbon tetrachloride and carbon tetrabromide reacted with suspended potassium superoxide to produce 1268-nm emission consistent with singlet oxygen. Chloroform was less reactive but produced 1268-nm emission when the concentration of superoxide ion in the halocarbon phase was increased with 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane (18-crown-6). The dismutation of superoxide ion in deuterium oxide was not accompanied by 1268-nm chemiluminescence. Less than 0.02 mol of singlet oxygen was produced per mole of superoxide ion between p/sup 2/H 6 and 9.

  6. Expert systems for automated maintenance of a Mars oxygen production system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Ho, Ming-Tsang

    1989-01-01

    A prototype expert system was developed for maintaining autonomous operation of a Mars oxygen production system. Normal operation conditions and failure modes according to certain desired criteria are tested and identified. Several schemes for failure detection and isolation using forward chaining, backward chaining, knowledge-based and rule-based are devised to perform several housekeeping functions. These functions include self-health checkout, an emergency shut down program, fault detection and conventional control activities. An effort was made to derive the dynamic model of the system using Bond-Graph technique in order to develop the model-based failure detection and isolation scheme by estimation method. Finally, computer simulations and experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the expert system and a preliminary reliability analysis for the oxygen production system is also provided.

  7. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments. PMID:27492338

  8. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  9. An Inexpensive Electrode and Cell for Measurement of Oxygen Uptake in Chemical and Biochemical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunet, Juan E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The continuous measurement of oxygen consumption in an enzymatic reaction is a frequent experimental fact and extremely important in the enzymatic activity of oxygenase. An electrochemical system, based on a polarographic method, has been developed to monitor the oxygen uptake. The system developed and electrode used are described. (JN)

  10. Development of a Solid Chlorate Backup Oxygen Delivery System for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Dunlap, Cameron; Haas, Jon; Weislogel, Mark; Lewis, John; Meyers, Karen; McKernan, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program requires that there always be a 45 calendar day contingency supply of breathing oxygen. In the early assembly stages, there is only one flight system, the Russian Solid Fuel Oxygen Generator (SFOG), that can meet that requirement. To better ensure the contingency oxygen supply, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division was directed to develop a flight hardware system that can meet all contingency oxygen requirements for ISS. Such a system, called the Backup Oxygen Candle System (BOCS), has been built and tested. The BOCS consists of 33 chlorate candles, a thermal containment apparatus, support equipment and packaging. The thermal containment apparatus utilizes the O2 produced by the candle as the motive stream in an ejector to passively cool the candle during operation.

  11. Status of the Node 3 Regenerative Environmental Cpntrol& Life Support System Water Recovery & Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn L.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is providing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for flight on the lnternational Space Station s (ISS) Node 3 element. The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems lnternational (HSSSI), while the UPA and PSM are being designed and manufactured in-house by MSFC. The assemblies are currently in the manufacturing and test phase and are to be completed and integrated into flight racks this year. This paper gives an overview of the technologies and system designs, technical challenges encountered and solved, and the current status.

  12. Evaluation of oxygen-enrichment system for alternative fuel vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Ng, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents results on the reduction in exhaust emissions achieved by using oxygen-enriched intake air on a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) that used Indolene and M85 as test fuels. The standard federal test procedure (FTP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) off-cycle (REP05) test were followed. The report also provides a review of literature on the oxygen membrane device and design considerations. It presents information on the sources and contributions of cold-phase emissions to the overall exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and on the various emission standards and present-day control technologies under consideration. The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FTP and off-cycle emissions are discussed on the basis of test results. Conclusions are drawn from the results and discussion, and different approaches for the practical application of this technology in LDVs are recommended.

  13. Nonintrusive fast response oxygen monitoring system for high temperature flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Daniel B.; Stanton, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for nonintrusive in situ measurement of oxygen concentration, gas temperature, and flow velocity of the test media in hypersonic wind tunnels. It is based on absorption of near-infrared radiation from inexpensive GaAlAs laser diodes used in optoelectronics industry. It is designed for simultaneous measurements along multiple lines of sight accessed by fiber optics. Molecular oxygen concentration is measured from the magnitude of absorption signals; rotational gas temperature is measured from the intensity ratio of two oxygen absorption lines; and the flow velocity is measured from the Doppler shift of the absorption line positions. This report describes the results of an extensive series of tests of the prototype instrument in laboratory flames emphasizing assessment of the instruments capabilities for quantitative measurement of O2 concentration (mole fraction) and gas temperature.

  14. Kinetics of gas phase oxygen control system (OCS) for stagnant and flowing Pb-Bi Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefhalm, C. H.; Knebel, J. U.; Mack, K. J.

    2001-07-01

    Pb and Pb-Bi are known to be very corrosive to structural materials at elevated temperatures. In recent studies, the necessity of measurement and control of the oxygen concentration in the liquid metal in order to safely operate a liquid Pb or Pb-Bi loop has been shown. The dynamic behaviour of the gas phase oxygen control system (OCS), which was developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), is investigated with respect to diffusion as the limiting process of oxygen exchange between the gas phase and the liquid metal. In this paper the development of a physical model for this diffusion process is described and compared to experimental results of a stagnant liquid Pb-Bi system. The experimental findings are in very good agreement with the theoretical equations describing the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of such a system. Recent investigations in a Pb-Bi loop at the Karlsruhe Lead Laboratory (KALLA) indicate that this gas phase OCS is a promising candidate system for an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS).

  15. Oxygen transport as a structure probe for amorphous polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richard Yufeng

    Although permeability of small molecules is often measured as an important performance property, deeper analysis of the transport characteristics provides insight into polymer structure, especially if used in combination with other characterization techniques. Transport of small gas molecules "senses" the permeable amorphous structure and probes the nature of free volume. This work focuses on oxygen transport, supplemented with other methods of physical analysis, as a probe for: (1) the nature of free volume in the oriented glassy state, (2) the role of amorphous phase orientation and strain-induced crystallization on oxygen barrier properties of polyester blends, and (3) the nature of interphase between immiscible amorphous polymers in forced-assemblies. In the first part, the mechanism of oxygen transport in oriented glassy polyesters is examined. PET, PETBB55, and PEN were oriented by cold-drawing. Densification of the glassy state correlates with conformational transformation of glycol linkages from gauche to trans. Orientation is seen as a process of decreasing the amount of excess-hole free volume and bringing the nonequilibrium polymer glass closer to the equilibrium condition. Further insights into the free volume structure are obtained by exploring the relationships between free volume structure and oxygen transport property using a simple lattice-hole model. In the second part, oxygen transport through polyester blends is investigated. It is found that cold-drawing the blocky PET/PETBB55 produces highly oriented PETBB55 frustrated LCP microfibrils, which prevent relaxation of the continuous PET phase. On the other hand, careful examination of oxygen barrier for the PET/PEI blends leads to a two-phase model from which the amount of crystallinity and the amorphous phase density are determined. In the third part, oxygen permeability is utilized as a powerful probe for interphase thickness between immiscible polymers, which is as thin as a few nanometers. We

  16. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design. PMID:26558344

  17. Stabilization of the yeast desaturase system by low levels of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmann, C. M.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The stability of particulate palmitoyl-CoA desaturase preparations from anaerobically grown yeast cells was increased by exposure to low levels of oxygen. The stabilizing effect of oxygen may be based upon the increased amounts of palmitoleic acid and ergosterol that become available to the cells. These results suggest the evolutinary appearance of this system at a time when atmospheric oxygen was at a low level.

  18. Analysis of Risks to Oxygen Systems from Particulate and Fiber Contaminants and Derivation of Cleanliness Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been well documented in the literature that contamination within oxygen systems can create significant fire hazards. Cleanliness limits for nonvolatile residues, ranging from 10 to 500 mg/sq m, have been established for various industries and types of oxygen systems to reduce the risk of ignition of flammable organic films. Particulate cleanliness limits used for oxygen systems vary considerably. Maximum allowed particle size, quantity limits, and allocations for fibers or metallic particles are all variables seen in aerospace cleanliness limits. Particles are known to have the potential to ignite within oxygen systems and must be limited to prevent fires. Particulate contamination may also pose risks to the performance of oxygen systems that are unrelated to ignition hazards. An extensive literature search was performed to better understand the relative importance of particle ignition mechanisms versus other deleterious effects of particles on oxygen systems and to identify rationale for derivation of particulate cleanliness limits for specific systems. The identified risks of different types and sizes of particles and fibers were analyzed. This paper summarizes the risks identified and rationale that may be used to derive particulate cleanliness limits for specific oxygen systems.

  19. Analysis of Risks to Oxygen Systems from Particulate and Fiber Contaminants and Derivation of Cleanliness Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been well documented in the literature that contamination within oxygen systems can create significant fire hazards. Cleanliness limits for nonvolatile residues, ranging from 10 to 500 milligrams per square meter, have been established for various industries and types of oxygen systems to reduce the risk of ignition of flammable organic films. Particulate cleanliness limits used for oxygen systems, however, vary considerably, notably within the aerospace industry. Maximum allowed particle size, quantity limits, and allocations for fibers or metallic particles are all variables seen in aerospace cleanliness limits. Particles are known to have the potential to ignite within oxygen systems and must be limited to prevent fires. Particulate contamination may also pose risks to the performance of oxygen systems that are unrelated to ignition hazards. An extensive literature search was performed to better understand the relative importance of particle ignition mechanisms versus other deleterious effects of particles on oxygen systems and to identify rationale for derivation of particulate cleanliness limits for specific systems. The identified risks of different types and sizes of particles and fibers were analyzed. This paper summarizes the risks identified and rationale that may be used to derive particulate cleanliness limits for specific oxygen systems.

  20. Oxygen transport as a structure probe for heterogeneous polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yushan

    Although permeability of small molecules is often measured as an important performance property, deeper analysis of the transport characteristics provides insight into polymer structure, especially if used in combination with other characterization techniques. Transport of small gas molecules senses the permeable amorphous structure and probes the nature of free volume. This work focuses on oxygen transport, supplemented with other methods of physical analysis, as a probe for: (1) the nature of free volume and crystalline morphology in the crystallized glassy state, (2) the nature of free volume and hierarchical structure in liquid crystalline polymers, and (3) the role of dispersed polyamide phase geometry on oxygen barrier properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/polyamide blends. In the first part, the improvement in oxygen-barrier properties of glassy polyesters by crystallization was examined. Examples included poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN), and a copolymer based on PET in which 55 mol% terephthalate was replaced with 4,4'-bibenzoate. Explanation of the unexpectedly high solubility of crystallized PEN required a two-phase transport model consisting of an impermeable crystalline phase of constant density and a permeable amorphous phase of variable density. The resulting relationship between oxygen solubility and amorphous phase density was consistent with free volume concepts of gas sorption. In the second part, oxygen barrier properties of liquid crystalline (LC) polyesters based on poly(diethylene glycol 4,4'-bibenzoate) (PDEGBB) were studied. This study extended the 2-phase transport model for oxygen transport of non-LC crystalline polymers to a smectic LCP. It was possible to systematically vary the solid state structure of (PDEGBB) from LC glass to crystallized LC glass. The results were consistent with a liquid crystalline state intermediate between the permeable amorphous glass and the impermeable 3-dimensional crystal. In this interpretation

  1. Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Metals for Use in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan; Cooper, Ken; Peralta, Stephen; Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Space Launch System, Commercial Resupply, and Commercial Crew programs have published intent to use additively manufactured (AM) components in propulsion systems and are likely to include various life support systems in the future. Parts produced by these types of additive manufacturing techniques have not been fully evaluated for use in oxygen systems and the inherent risks have not been fully identified. Some areas of primary concern in the SLS process with respect to oxygen compatibility may be the porosity of the printed parts, fundamental differences in microstructure of an AM part as compared to traditional materials, or increased risk of shed metal particulate into an oxygen system. If an ignition were to occur the printed material could be more flammable than components manufactured from a traditional billet of raw material and/or present a significant hazards if not identified and rigorously studied in advance of implementation into an oxygen system.

  2. Glutamate metabolism of astrocytes during hyperbaric oxygen exposure and its effects on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Li, Dan; Wang, Zhong-Zhuang; Xu, Wei-Gang; Li, Run-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2016-01-20

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used widely in many underwater missions and clinical work. However, exposure to extremely high oxygen pressure may cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The regulation of astrocyte glutamate metabolism is closely related to epilepsy. This study aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes and confirm the role of glutamate metabolism in CNS-OT. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 5 atmosphere absolute HBO for 80 min and microdialysis samples of brain interstitial fluid were continuously collected. Extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations were also detected. Freely moving rats were exposed to HBO of the same pressure for 20 min and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in brain tissues was measured. Finally, we observed the effects of different doses of drugs related to glutamate metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed that HBO exposure significantly increased glutamate content, whereas glutamine content was significantly reduced. Moreover, HBO exposure significantly reduced GS activity. Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) selective antagonist ceftriaxone prolonged CNS-OT latency, whereas GLT-1 selective inhibitor dihydrokainate shortened CNS-OT latency. In summary, HBO exposure improved glutamate concentration and reduced glutamine concentration by inhibition of GS activity. GLT-1 activation also participated in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. Our research will provide a potential new target to terminate or attenuate CNS-OT. PMID:26619231

  3. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of Protected Polymers Using Thermal Energy Plasma Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia M.

    1995-01-01

    The durability evaluation of protected polymers intended for use in low Earth orbit (LEO) has necessitated the use of large-area, high-fluence, atomic oxygen exposure systems. Two thermal energy atomic oxygen exposure systems which are frequently used for such evaluations are radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers and electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Plasma source testing practices such as ample preparation, effective fluence prediction, atomic oxygen flux determination, erosion measurement, operational considerations, and erosion yield measurements are presented. Issues which influence the prediction of in-space durability based on ground laboratory thermal energy plasma system testing are also addressed.

  4. Use of a micro programmable logic controller for oxygen monitoring and control in multiple tanks of a recirculating aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In intensive recirculating aquaculture systems the use of supplemental oxygen, specifically pure liquid oxygen, increases the mass of fish that can be supported and eliminates oxygen as a major limiting factor to a system’s carrying capacity. The use of pure oxygen in a recirculating aquaculture sys...

  5. NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Replacement Effort for Oxygen System Cleaner - Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 225

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt Burns, H.; Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.; Farner, Bruce R.; Ross, H. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous and liquid oxygen are extremely reactive materials used in bipropellant propulsion systems. Both flight and ground oxygen systems require a high level of cleanliness to support engine performance, testing, and prevent mishaps. Solvents used to clean and verify the cleanliness of oxygen systems and supporting test hardware must be compatible with the system's materials of construction and effective at removing or reducing expected contaminants to an acceptable level. This paper will define the philosophy and test approach used for evaluating replacement solvents for the current Marshall Space Flight Center/Stennis Space Center baseline HCFC-225 material that will no longer be available for purchase after 2014. MSFC/SSC applications in cleaning / sampling oxygen propulsion components, support equipment, and test system were reviewed then candidate replacement cleaners and test methods selected. All of these factors as well as testing results will be discussed.

  6. [Design of Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Respiration Rate Detection System Based on Smartphone of Android Operating System].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshan; Zeng, Bixin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we designed an oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate monitoring system based on smartphone of android operating system, physiological signal acquired by MSP430 microcontroller and transmitted by Bluetooth module. PMID:26524782

  7. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  8. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  9. Expert systems for automated maintenance of a Mars oxygen production system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Ho, Ming-Tsang; Ash, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Application of expert system concepts to a breadboard Mars oxygen processor unit have been studied and tested. The research was directed toward developing the methodology required to enable autonomous operation and control of these simple chemical processors at Mars. Failure detection and isolation was the key area of concern, and schemes using forward chaining, backward chaining, knowledge-based expert systems, and rule-based expert systems were examined. Tests and simulations were conducted that investigated self-health checkout, emergency shutdown, and fault detection, in addition to normal control activities. A dynamic system model was developed using the Bond-Graph technique. The dynamic model agreed well with tests involving sudden reductions in throughput. However, nonlinear effects were observed during tests that incorporated step function increases in flow variables. Computer simulations and experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of expert systems utilizing rule-based diagnosis and decision-making algorithms.

  10. Expert systems for automated maintenance of a Mars oxygen production system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Ho, Ming-Tsang; Ash, Robert L.

    1992-08-01

    Application of expert system concepts to a breadboard Mars oxygen processor unit have been studied and tested. The research was directed toward developing the methodology required to enable autonomous operation and control of these simple chemical processors at Mars. Failure detection and isolation was the key area of concern, and schemes using forward chaining, backward chaining, knowledge-based expert systems, and rule-based expert systems were examined. Tests and simulations were conducted that investigated self-health checkout, emergency shutdown, and fault detection, in addition to normal control activities. A dynamic system model was developed using the Bond-Graph technique. The dynamic model agreed well with tests involving sudden reductions in throughput. However, nonlinear effects were observed during tests that incorporated step function increases in flow variables. Computer simulations and experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of expert systems utilizing rule-based diagnosis and decision-making algorithms.

  11. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    To obtain a high degree of cleanliness without risk of corrosion or hazardous reactivity, hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-225 is used for cleaning and cleanliness verification of oxygen system components used on NASA fs bipropellant launch vehicles, associated test stands and support equipment. HCFC-225 is a Class II Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS ]II) that was introduced to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113, a Class I ODS solvent that is now banned. To meet environmental regulations to eliminate the use of ozone depleting substances, a replacement solvent is required for HCFC ]225 that is effective at removing oils, greases, and particulate from large oxygen system components, is compatible with materials used in the construction of these systems, and is nonflammable and non ]reactive in enriched oxygen environments. A solvent replacement is also required for aviator fs breathing oxygen systems and other related equipment currently cleaned and verified with HCFC ]225 and stockpiled CFC -113. Requirements and challenges in the search for nonflammable replacement solvents are discussed.

  12. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  13. Phase diagram of the Pr-Mn-O system in composition-temperature-oxygen pressure coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedmid', L. B.; Yankin, A. M.; Fedorova, O. M.; Kozin, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The phase relations in the Pr-Mn-O system were studied by the static method at lowered oxygen pressure in combination with thermal analysis and high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The equilibrium oxygen pressure in dissociation of PrMn2O5 and PrMnO3 was measured, and the thermodynamic characteristics of formation of these compounds from elements were calculated. The P- T- x phase diagram of the Pr-Mn-O system was constructed in the "composition-oxygen pressure-temperature" coordinates.

  14. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  15. Estimation of Biological Oxygen Demand and Chemical Oxygen Demand for Combined Sewer Systems Using Synchronous Fluorescence Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Lee, Tae-Hwan; Park, Dae-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of water quality for sewer system is required for efficient sewer network design because it provides information on the precise loading of pollutant to wastewater treatment facilities and the impact of loading on receiving water. In this study, synchronous fluorescence spectra and its first derivatives were investigated using a number of wastewater samples collected in sewer systems in urban and non-urban areas, and the optimum fluorescence feature was explored for the estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of sewer samples. The temporal variations in BOD and COD showed a regular pattern for urban areas whereas they were relatively irregular for non-urban areas. Irrespective of the sewer pipes and the types of the areas, two distinct peaks were identified from the synchronous fluorescence spectra, which correspond to protein-like fluorescence (PLF) and humic-like fluorescence (HLF), respectively. HLF in sewer samples appears to be associated with fluorescent whitening agents. Five fluorescence characteristics were selected from the synchronous spectra and the first-derivatives. Among the selected fluorescence indices, a peak in the PLF region (i.e., Index I) showed the highest correlation coefficient with both BOD and COD. A multiple regression approach based on suspended solid (SS) and Index I used to compensate for the contribution of SS to BOD and COD revealed an improvement in the estimation capability, showing good correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.94 for BOD and COD, respectively. PMID:22319257

  16. Estimation of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand for combined sewer systems using synchronous fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Lee, Tae-Hwan; Park, Dae-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of water quality for sewer system is required for efficient sewer network design because it provides information on the precise loading of pollutant to wastewater treatment facilities and the impact of loading on receiving water. In this study, synchronous fluorescence spectra and its first derivatives were investigated using a number of wastewater samples collected in sewer systems in urban and non-urban areas, and the optimum fluorescence feature was explored for the estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of sewer samples. The temporal variations in BOD and COD showed a regular pattern for urban areas whereas they were relatively irregular for non-urban areas. Irrespective of the sewer pipes and the types of the areas, two distinct peaks were identified from the synchronous fluorescence spectra, which correspond to protein-like fluorescence (PLF) and humic-like fluorescence (HLF), respectively. HLF in sewer samples appears to be associated with fluorescent whitening agents. Five fluorescence characteristics were selected from the synchronous spectra and the first-derivatives. Among the selected fluorescence indices, a peak in the PLF region (i.e., Index I) showed the highest correlation coefficient with both BOD and COD. A multiple regression approach based on suspended solid (SS) and Index I used to compensate for the contribution of SS to BOD and COD revealed an improvement in the estimation capability, showing good correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.94 for BOD and COD, respectively. PMID:22319257

  17. The Search for Nonflammable Solvent Alternatives for Cleaning Aerospace Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen systems are susceptible to fires caused by particle and nonvolatile residue (NVR) contaminants, therefore cleaning and verification is essential for system safety. . Cleaning solvents used on oxygen system components must be either nonflammable in pure oxygen or complete removal must be assured for system safety. . CFC -113 was the solvent of choice before 1996 because it was effective, least toxic, compatible with most materials of construction, and non ]reactive with oxygen. When CFC -113 was phased out in 1996, HCFC -225 was selected as an interim replacement for cleaning propulsion oxygen systems at NASA. HCFC-225 production phase-out date is 01/01/2015. HCFC ]225 (AK ]225G) is used extensively at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center for cleaning and NVR verification on large propulsion oxygen systems, and propulsion test stands and ground support equipment. . Many components are too large for ultrasonic agitation - necessary for effective aqueous cleaning and NVR sampling. . Test stand equipment must be cleaned prior to installation of test hardware. Many items must be cleaned by wipe or flush in situ where complete removal of a flammable solvent cannot be assured. The search for a replacement solvent for these applications is ongoing.

  18. Advances towards the qualification of an aircraft fuel tank inert environment fiber optic oxygen sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian; Susko, Kenneth; Goglia, John

    2011-06-01

    An all optical pressure and temperature compensated fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSenseTM) system is under qualification for use in the in-situ closed-loop-control of the inert atmosphere environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The all-optical oxygen environment control sensor is a passive, intrinsically safe, fiber-optic sensor device with no electrical connections leading to the sensors installed within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. To control the fuel tank environment, an array of multiple sensors is deployed throughout the fuel tanks of an aircraft, and a remote multi-channel optoelectronic system is used to monitor the status of all the sensors in real time to provide feedback oxygen environment information to the on-board inert gas generating system (OBIGS). Qualification testing of the all optical sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank environment in the oxygen range from 0% to 21% oxygen concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from sea level to 40,000 feet. Fiber optic oxygen sensors with built-in temperature compensation as well as the conduit fiber optic cables have passed DO-160E including acoustic noise and burn test.

  19. First-in-human pilot study of a spatial frequency domain oxygenation imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Lee, Bernard T.; Lin, Samuel J.; Tobias, Adam M.; Cuccia, David J.; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Kelly, Edward; Weinmann, Maxwell; Durr, Nicholas J.; Moffitt, Lorissa A.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygenation measurements are widely used in patient care. However, most clinically available instruments currently consist of contact probes that only provide global monitoring of the patient (e.g., pulse oximetry probes) or local monitoring of small areas (e.g., spectroscopy-based probes). Visualization of oxygenation over large areas of tissue, without a priori knowledge of the location of defects, has the potential to improve patient management in many surgical and critical care applications. In this study, we present a clinically compatible multispectral spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) system optimized for surgical oxygenation imaging. This system was used to image tissue oxygenation over a large area (16×12 cm) and was validated during preclinical studies by comparing results obtained with an FDA-approved clinical oxygenation probe. Skin flap, bowel, and liver vascular occlusion experiments were performed on Yorkshire pigs and demonstrated that over the course of the experiment, relative changes in oxygen saturation measured using SFDI had an accuracy within 10% of those made using the FDA-approved device. Finally, the new SFDI system was translated to the clinic in a first-in-human pilot study that imaged skin flap oxygenation during reconstructive breast surgery. Overall, this study lays the foundation for clinical translation of endogenous contrast imaging using SFDI. PMID:21895327

  20. First-in-human pilot study of a spatial frequency domain oxygenation imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Lee, Bernard T.; Lin, Samuel J.; Tobias, Adam M.; Cuccia, David J.; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Kelly, Edward; Weinmann, Maxwell; Durr, Nicholas J.; Moffitt, Lorissa A.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenation measurements are widely used in patient care. However, most clinically available instruments currently consist of contact probes that only provide global monitoring of the patient (e.g., pulse oximetry probes) or local monitoring of small areas (e.g., spectroscopy-based probes). Visualization of oxygenation over large areas of tissue, without a priori knowledge of the location of defects, has the potential to improve patient management in many surgical and critical care applications. In this study, we present a clinically compatible multispectral spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) system optimized for surgical oxygenation imaging. This system was used to image tissue oxygenation over a large area (16×12 cm) and was validated during preclinical studies by comparing results obtained with an FDA-approved clinical oxygenation probe. Skin flap, bowel, and liver vascular occlusion experiments were performed on Yorkshire pigs and demonstrated that over the course of the experiment, relative changes in oxygen saturation measured using SFDI had an accuracy within 10% of those made using the FDA-approved device. Finally, the new SFDI system was translated to the clinic in a first-in-human pilot study that imaged skin flap oxygenation during reconstructive breast surgery. Overall, this study lays the foundation for clinical translation of endogenous contrast imaging using SFDI.

  1. Neutralizer and sample chamber for the Atomic Oxygen Simulation System (AOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, Royal G.; Barnes, Alan V.; Tolk, Norman H.

    1992-01-01

    A neutralizer system capable of converting a beam of oxygen ions (O(+) or O2(+)) into a beam of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms (O) was developed. The neutralizer system is to be designed to be compatible with the Atomic Oxygen Simulation System (AOSS) located in the Physical Science Branch of MSFC. The Center for Molecular and Atomic Studies at Surfaces (CMASS) at Vanderbilt University has met these objectives by developing a system that neutralizes the ions through electron transfer during a grazing-incidence reflection of an ion beam from a smooth nickel surface. The purpose is to describe the system, provide schematic representations of the system, and to discuss the use of the system in relation to the AOSS at the Physical Science Branch of MSFC.

  2. Biradical vs singlet oxygen photogeneration in suprofen-cholesterol systems.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Fabrizio; Bosca, Francisco; Morera, Isabel Maria; Andreu, Inmaculada; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol (Ch) is an important lipidic building block and a target for oxidative degradation, which can be induced via free radicals or singlet oxygen ((1)O2). Suprofen (SP) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that contains the 2-benzoylthiophene (BZT) chromophore and has a π,π* lowest triplet excited state. In the present work, dyads (S)- and (R)-SP-α-Ch (1 and 2), as well as (S)-SP-β-Ch (3) have been prepared from β- or α-Ch and SP to investigate the possible competition between photogeneration of biradicals and (1)O2, the key mechanistic steps in Ch photooxidation. Steady-state irradiation of 1 and 2 was performed in dichloromethane, under nitrogen, through Pyrex, using a 400 W medium pressure mercury lamp. The spectral analysis of the separated fractions revealed formation of two photoproducts 4 and 5, respectively. By contrast, under the same conditions, 3 did not give rise to any isolable Ch-derived product. These results point to an intramolecular hydrogen abstraction in 1 and 2 from the C7 position of Ch and subsequent C-C coupling of the generated biradicals. Interestingly, 2 was significantly more photoreactive than 1 indicating a clear stereodifferentiation in the photochemical behavior. Transient absorption spectra obtained for 1-3 were very similar and matched that described for the SP triplet excited state (typical bands with maxima at ca. 350 nm and 600 nm). Direct kinetic analysis of the decay traces at 620 nm led to determination of triplet lifetimes that were ca. 4.1 μs for 1 and 2 and 5.8 μs for 3. From these data, the intramolecular quenching rate constants in 1 and 2 were determined as 0.78 × 10(5) s(-1). The capability of dyads 1-3 to photosensitize the production of singlet oxygen was assessed by time-resolved near infrared emission studies in dichloromethane using perinaphthenone as standard. The quantum yields (ΦΔ) were 0.52 for 1 and 2 and 0.56 for 3. In conclusion, SP-α-Ch dyads are unique in the sense that they can be

  3. Biradical vs singlet oxygen photogeneration in suprofen–cholesterol systems

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Fabrizio; Bosca, Francisco; Morera, Isabel Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cholesterol (Ch) is an important lipidic building block and a target for oxidative degradation, which can be induced via free radicals or singlet oxygen (1O2). Suprofen (SP) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that contains the 2-benzoylthiophene (BZT) chromophore and has a π,π* lowest triplet excited state. In the present work, dyads (S)- and (R)-SP-α-Ch (1 and 2), as well as (S)-SP-β-Ch (3) have been prepared from β- or α-Ch and SP to investigate the possible competition between photogeneration of biradicals and 1O2, the key mechanistic steps in Ch photooxidation. Steady-state irradiation of 1 and 2 was performed in dichloromethane, under nitrogen, through Pyrex, using a 400 W medium pressure mercury lamp. The spectral analysis of the separated fractions revealed formation of two photoproducts 4 and 5, respectively. By contrast, under the same conditions, 3 did not give rise to any isolable Ch-derived product. These results point to an intramolecular hydrogen abstraction in 1 and 2 from the C7 position of Ch and subsequent C–C coupling of the generated biradicals. Interestingly, 2 was significantly more photoreactive than 1 indicating a clear stereodifferentiation in the photochemical behavior. Transient absorption spectra obtained for 1–3 were very similar and matched that described for the SP triplet excited state (typical bands with maxima at ca. 350 nm and 600 nm). Direct kinetic analysis of the decay traces at 620 nm led to determination of triplet lifetimes that were ca. 4.1 μs for 1 and 2 and 5.8 μs for 3. From these data, the intramolecular quenching rate constants in 1 and 2 were determined as 0.78 × 105 s−1. The capability of dyads 1–3 to photosensitize the production of singlet oxygen was assessed by time-resolved near infrared emission studies in dichloromethane using perinaphthenone as standard. The quantum yields (ΦΔ) were 0.52 for 1 and 2 and 0.56 for 3. In conclusion, SP-α-Ch dyads are unique in the sense that they

  4. Molecular sieve generation of aviator's oxygen: Performance of a prototype system under simulated flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Ikels, K G; Lamb, M J; Boscola, E J; Ferguson, R H

    1980-07-01

    The molecular sieve method of generating an enriched-oxygen breathing gas is one of several candidate onboard oxygen generation (OBOG) systems under joint Army-Navy-Air Force development for application in tactical aircraft. The performance of a nominal two-man-capacity molecular sieve oxygen generation system was characterized under simulated flight conditions. Data are given on the composition of the molecular sieve-generated breathing gas (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and argon) as a function of inlet air pressure, altitude, breathing gas flow rate, and ambient temperature. The maximum oxygen concentration observed was 95%, with the balance argon. At low demand flow rates and certain conditions of pressure and altitude, the argon enrichment factor exceeded that of oxygen giving a maximum argon concentration of 6.6% with the balance oxygen. The structural integrity of the unit was verified by vibration and centrifuge testing. The performance of the molecular sieve unit is discussed in the context of aircraft operating envelopes using both diluter-demand and 100% delivery subsystems. PMID:6774707

  5. Oxygen enrichment and its application to life support systems for workers in high-altitude areas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongling; Liu, Yingshu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workers coming from lowland regions are at risk of developing acute mountain sickness (AMS) when working in low oxygen high-altitude areas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to improve the conditions that lead to hypoxia and ensure the safety of the high-altitude workers. We analyzed the influence of low atmospheric pressure on the oxygen enrichment process in high-altitude areas using an engineering method called low-pressure swing adsorption (LPSA). Methods: Fourteen male subjects were screened and divided into three groups by type of oxygen supply system used: (1) oxygen cylinder group; (2) LPSA oxygen dispersal group; and (3) control group. These tests included arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), breaths per minute (BPM), and blood pressure (BP). Results: The results showed that after supplying oxygen using the LPSA method at the tunnel face, the SaO2 of workers increased; the incidence of acute mountain sickness, PR, and BPM significantly decreased. Conclusions: The LPSA life support system was found to be a simple, convenient, efficient, reliable, and applicable approach to ensure proper working conditions at construction sites in high-altitude areas. PMID:25000108

  6. An evaluation of a micro programmable logic controller for oxygen monitoring and control in tanks of a recirculating aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of dissolved gases, especially oxygen is an essential component of recirculating aquaculture systems. The use of pure oxygen in a recirculating aquaculture system creates supersaturated concentrations of dissolved oxygen and can reduce fish production costs by supporting greater fish and fee...

  7. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE LINDE OXYGEN COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON THE EPA MOBILE INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE(r) Oxygen Combustion System (OCS) installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney F...

  8. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE LINDE OXYGEN COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON THE EPA MOBILE INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE Oxygen Combustion System installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney Farm site in sou...

  9. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on the quasi-ternary system Cr-Mn-Ti oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rosales, C.; Schulze, H.A.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H. . Research Centre Juelich)

    1993-11-01

    The quasi-ternary system Cr-Mn-Ti oxide was investigated at 1,000 C under oxygen partial pressures ranging from 0.21 bar to 10[sup [minus]21] bar (1 bar = 10[sup 5] Pa). X-ray diffraction analysis was used to identify phases and determine lattice parameters. The positions of phase boundaries as a function of oxygen partial pressure were measured using the emf method. The spinel MnCr[sub 2]O[sub 4] may be regarded as the most interesting compound in this system. Part of the chromium can be replaced by trivalent titanium at low oxygen partial pressures and by trivalent manganese at high pressures, and the formation of a limited solid solution with the spinel Mn[sub 2]TiO[sub 4] is possible in all cases. As a result, a coherent single-phase spinel region exists over the entire oxygen partial pressure range at 1,000 C.

  10. An upgraded camera-based imaging system for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao; Qiu, Lina; Leotta, Daniel F.

    2016-07-01

    A camera-based imaging system was previously developed for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin. However, several limitations were realized in later applications, which could lead to either significant bias in the estimated oxygen saturation value or poor spatial resolution in the map of the oxygen saturation. To overcome these issues, an upgraded system was developed using improved modeling and image processing algorithms. In the modeling, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to verify the effectiveness of the ratio-to-ratio method for semi-infinite and two-layer skin models, and then the relationship between the venous oxygen saturation and the ratio-to-ratio was determined. The improved image processing algorithms included surface curvature correction and motion compensation. The curvature correction is necessary when the imaged skin surface is uneven. The motion compensation is critical for the imaging system because surface motion is inevitable when the venous volume alteration is induced by cuff inflation. In addition to the modeling and image processing algorithms in the upgraded system, a ring light guide was used to achieve perpendicular and uniform incidence of light. Cross-polarization detection was also adopted to suppress surface specular reflection. The upgraded system was applied to mapping of venous oxygen saturation in the palm, opisthenar and forearm of human subjects. The spatial resolution of the oxygenation map achieved is much better than that of the original system. In addition, the mean values of the venous oxygen saturation for the three locations were verified with a commercial near-infrared spectroscopy system and were consistent with previously published data.

  11. Improved oxygen mass transfer modeling for diffused or subsurface aeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, J.R.; Hutter, J.C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    The mass transfer analysis of the oxygen transfer performance of diffused air or subsurface mechanical aeration systems has progressed very little over the past twenty years. The ASCE Standard Method for determination of the oxygen mass transfer performance as applied to a diffused or subsurface aeration systems is based on a greatly over-simplified mass transfer model. Although the ASCE Standard can be used to empirically evaluate point performance conditions, it is not suitable for prediction of the performance of diffused aeration systems under changing operating or environmental conditions. A new oxygen mass transfer model has been developed which is a fundamentally more rigorous description of the actual mass transfer process in diffused aeration systems. This model can be confidently used to predict aerator performance under changing operation and environmental conditions and is easily adapted to numerical solution on a computer for routing aeration system performance evaluation as well as process design. The model is presented in this book.

  12. Material Usage in High Pressure Oxygen Systems for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravchenko, Michael; Sievers, D. Elliott

    2014-01-01

    The Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) for the International Space Station (ISS) Program was required as part of the Space Shuttle retirement efforts to sustain the ISS life support systems. The system is designed around a 7000 psia Oxygen or Nitrogen Recharge Tank Assembly which is able to be utilized both internally and externally to the ISS. Material selection and usage were critical to ensure oxygen compatibility for the design, while taking into consideration toxicity, weldability, brazability and general fabrication and assembly techniques. The system uses unique hardware items such a composite overwrap pressure vessel (COPV), high pressure mechanical gauges, compact regulators and valves, quick disconnects, metal tubing and flexhoses. Numerous challenges and anomalies were encountered due to the exotic nature of this project which will be discussed in detail. The knowledge gained from these anomalies and failure resolutions can be applied to more than space applications, but can also be applicable to industry pressurized systems.

  13. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Modifications in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Bačić, Goran; Bridal, Lori; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.; Tavitian, Bertrand; Viel, Thomas; Utsumi, Hideo; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) may regulate signaling, ion channels, transcription factors, and biosynthetic processes. ROS-related diseases can be due to either a shortage or an excess of ROS. Recent Advances: Since the biological activity of ROS depends on not only concentration but also spatiotemporal distribution, real-time imaging of ROS, possibly in vivo, has become a need for scientists, with potential for clinical translation. New imaging techniques as well as new contrast agents in clinically established modalities were developed in the previous decade. Critical Issues: An ideal imaging technique should determine ROS changes with high spatio-temporal resolution, detect physiologically relevant variations in ROS concentration, and provide specificity toward different redox couples. Furthermore, for in vivo applications, bioavailability of sensors, tissue penetration, and a high signal-to-noise ratio are additional requirements to be satisfied. Future Directions: None of the presented techniques fulfill all requirements for clinical translation. The obvious way forward is to incorporate anatomical and functional imaging into a common hybrid-imaging platform. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 939–958. PMID:27139586

  14. Attrition Rate of Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilen, Harry Martin

    This project developed an evaluation methodology for determining, accurately and rapidly, the attrition resistance of oxygen carrier materials used in chemical looping technologies. Existing test protocols, to evaluate attrition resistance of granular materials, are conducted under non-reactive and ambient temperature conditions. They do not accurately reflect the actual behavior under the unique process conditions of chemical looping, including high temperatures and cyclic operation between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. This project developed a test method and equipment that represented a significant improvement over existing protocols. Experimental results obtained from this project have shown that hematite exhibits different modes of attrition, including both due to mechanical stresses and due to structural changes in the particles due to chemical reaction at high temperature. The test methodology has also proven effective in providing reactivity changes of the material with continued use, a property, which in addition to attrition, determines material life. Consumption/replacement cost due to attrition or loss of reactivity is a critical factor in the economic application of the chemical looping technology. This test method will allow rapid evaluation of a wide range of materials that are best suited for this technology. The most important anticipated public benefit of this project is the acceleration of the development of chemical looping technology for lowering greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

  15. Oxygen-hydrogen meter assembly for use in remote sodium sampling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.B.; Bohringer, A.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    An assembly of an electrolytic oxygen meter and a diffusion type hydrogen meter was designed to fit into the Multipurpose Sampler hardware already installed and operating on the four FFTF sodium systems. One of the key elements in this assembly is a ceramic-metal sealed oxygen sensor which allows use of a metal tube to extend the 51 cm (20 in.) between the sampler top and the flowing sodium region.

  16. Oxygen/hydrogen Space Station propulsion system concept definition for IOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.; Meisl, C. J.; Glass, J. F.; Tu, W.-H.; Ebert, S. J.; Evans, S. A.; Jones, L. W.; Campbell, H.

    1986-01-01

    The potential for the reduction in propulsion system life cycle costs through the use of on-board water electrolysis to generate oxygen and hydrogen propellants, as well as the potential advantages of improved system safety and contamination impact, led to a study to evaluate candidate oxygen-/hydrogen-based propulsion systems. In this study a representative set of propulsion system requirements were compiled and candidate oxygen/hydrogen-based propulsion systems synthesized. These candidate concepts were screened and a systems evaluation was performed on the remaining eight candidate concepts. Detailed system schematics were prepared. Operational design conditions were determined and system weight, volume, energy requirements, and costs were calculated. Evaluation results indicated that the oxygen/hydrogen propulsion systems can provide simple, low cost, and viable systems for the IOC Space Station. Based on these data, a relative concept evaluation was conducted using as selection criteria reliability, safety, cost, technical risk, contamination, operational utility, growth potential, and integration potential. Top ranked candidate systems were recommended to NASA/MSFC for consideration for the IOC Space Station.

  17. Platelet-derived microparticles generated by neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation systems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Andrew D; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Wiles, Andrew A; Freishtat, Robert J; Rais-Bahrami, Khoydar

    2015-01-01

    Current anticoagulation strategies do not eliminate thromboembolic stroke or limb loss during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a form of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In adults, CPB surgery generates prothrombotic platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs), submicron membrane vesicles released from activated platelets. However, information on PMP generation in neonatal ECMO systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare PMP generation in five different neonatal ECMO systems, using a simulated circuit with swine blood at 300 ml/min for 4 hours. Systems were composed of both newer components (centrifugal pump and hollow-fiber oxygenator) and traditional components (roller-head pump and silicone membrane oxygenator). Free plasma hemoglobin levels were measured as an indicator of hemolysis and flow cytometry-measured PMP. Hemolysis generated in all ECMO systems was similar to that observed in noncirculated static blood (p = 0.48). There was no difference in net PMP levels between different oxygenators with a given pump. In contrast, net PMP generation in ECMO systems with a centrifugal pump was at least 2.5 times greater than in roller-head pump systems. This was significant when using either a hollow-fiber (p < 0.005) or a silicone membrane (p < 0.05) oxygenator. Future studies are needed to define the relationship between pump-generated PMP and thrombosis. PMID:25303795

  18. Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kohata, Daisuke; Shao, Jun; Kudo, Nobuki; Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2000-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

  19. Modeling oxygenation of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Late Ordovician-Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the Earth's history, the redox state of surface environments, biogeochemical cycles, and biological innovation/extinction have been intimately related. Therefore, understanding the long-term (over millions of years) evolution of the redox state of an ocean-atmosphere system and its controlling factors is one of the fundamental topics of Earth Sciences. In particular, Early Paleozoic is marked by the prominent biological evolution/diversification events (Cambrian explosion and Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), implying the causal linkage between ocean oxygenation and biological innovation. On the other hand, multiple lines of evidence (such as black shale deposition, low C/S ratio of buried sediments, low molybdenum isotopic value, and iron speciation data) suggest that ocean interior had been kept in low oxygen condition until the Devonian. Dahl et al. (2010) PNAS found an increase in molybdenum isotopic value from ~1.4‰ to ~2.0‰ between ~440 Ma and ~390 Ma, implying the oceanic redox transition to a well-oxygenated condition. It was proposed that this ocean oxygenation event correlates with the diversification of vascular land plants; an enhanced burial of terrigenous organic matter increases the oxygen supply rate to an ocean-atmosphere system. Although this hypothesis for a causal linkage between the diversification of land plants and oxidation event of an ocean-atmosphere system is intriguing, it remains unclear whether the radiation of land plant is necessary to cause such redox transition. Because oxygen is most likely regulated by a combination of several feedbacks in the Earth system, it is essential to evaluate the impact of plant diversification on the oxygenation state of an ocean-atmosphere system by use of a numerical model in which C-N-P-O-S coupled biogeochemical cycles between ocean-atmosphere-sediment systems are take into account. In this study, the paleoredox history of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Paleozoic is

  20. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  1. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  2. Oxygen transport deficits in systemic disease and implications for physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Dean, E

    1997-02-01

    The purposes of this article are to discuss the effects of some common systemic diseases on cardiopulmonary function and oxygen transport and to describe the implications for physical therapists. Pathology of every major organ system can manifest secondary effects on cardiopulmonary function and oxygen transport. Such effects are of considerable clinical significance given that they can be life threatening and that physical therapy usually stresses the oxygen transport system. This article reviews the cardiopulmonary effects of hematologic, neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, collagen vascular and connective tissue, endocrine, and immunologic conditions. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of some common nutritional disorders (eg, obesity, anorexia nervosa) are also discussed. Physical therapists need to be able to anticipate, detect, and manage the cardiopulmonary manifestations of systemic disease given medical advances and the increasing number of patients with multisystem problems, the aging of the population, the expanding scope of physical therapy practice, and the increased professional and ethical responsibility associated with direct patient access. PMID:9037219

  3. Oxygen Consumption of Tilapia and Preliminary Mass Flows through a Prototype Closed Aquaculture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Matthew S.; Bauer, Clarence F.

    1994-01-01

    Performance of NASA's prototype CELSS Breadboard Project Closed Aquaculture System was evaluated by estimating gas exchange quantification and preliminary carbon and nitrogen balances. The total system oxygen consumption rate was 535 mg/hr kg/fish (cv = 30%) when stocked with Tilapia aurea populations (fresh weights of 97 +/- 19 to 147 +/- 36 g/fish for various trials). Oxygen consumption by T. aurea (260 mg/hr kg/fish) contributed to approximately one-half of total system demand. Continuous carbon dioxide quantification methods were analyzed using the,relation of carbon dioxide to oxygen consumption. Overall food conversion rates averaged 18.2 +/- 3.2%. Major pathways for nitrogen and carbon in the system were described with preliminary mass closure of 60-80% and 60% for nitrogen and carbon.

  4. The oxygen consuming systems of the liver of mice exposed to simulated high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, K.; Aguilar, R.; Burgos, C.; Alvarez, J.

    1981-12-01

    Altitude hypoxia does not induce any changes in the enzymatic systems related to oxygen consumption in guinea pigs native of the Peruvian high altitudes. The biochemical changes frequently found in high altitude animals are the result of exposure to the low temperature of this environment rather than to hypoxia. In the present work, mice were chronically exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and maintained at equal temperature as the sea level control group, and measurements of enzymatic activities of the three major oxygen consuming systems of the liver were carried out, i.e., mitochondria, microsomes and peroxisomes. The results obtained have confirmed that hypoxia has no apparent influence on these enzymatic systems.

  5. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-12-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system's design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  6. On the formation of ozone in oxygen-rich solar system ices via ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Courtney P; Bennett, Chris J; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2011-05-28

    The irradiation of pure molecular oxygen (O(2)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) ices with 5 keV H(+) and He(+) ions was investigated experimentally to simulate the chemical processing of oxygen rich planetary and interstellar surfaces by exposure to galactic cosmic ray (GCR), solar wind, and magnetospheric particles. Deposited at 12 K under ultra-high vacuum conditions (UHV), the irradiated condensates were monitored on-line and in situ in the solid-state by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), revealing the formation of ozone (O(3)) in irradiated oxygen ice; and ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and cyclic carbon trioxide (c-CO(3)) in irradiated carbon dioxide. In addition to these irradiation products, evolution of gas-phase molecular hydrogen (H(2)), atomic helium (He) and molecular oxygen (O(2)) were identified in the subliming oxygen and carbon dioxide condensates by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Temporal abundances of the oxygen and carbon dioxide precursors and the observed molecular products were compiled over the irradiation period to develop reaction schemes unfolding in the ices. These reactions were observed to be dependent on the generation of atomic oxygen (O) by the homolytic dissociation of molecular oxygen induced by electronic, S(e), and nuclear, S(n), interaction with the impinging ions. In addition, the destruction of the ozone and carbon trioxide products back to the molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide precursors was promoted over an extended period of ion bombardment. Finally, destruction and formation yields were calculated and compared between irradiation sources (including 5 keV electrons) which showed a surprising correlation between the molecular yields (∼10(-3)-10(-4) molecules eV(-1)) created by H(+) and He(+) impacts. However, energy transfer by isoenergetic, fast electrons typically generated ten times more product molecules per electron volt (∼10(-2)-10(-3) molecules eV(-1)) than exposure to the ions. Implications of these

  7. Potential and timescales for oxygen depletion in coastal upwelling systems: A box-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. S.; Hales, B.; Siedlecki, S.; Samelson, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    A simple box model is used to examine oxygen depletion in an idealized ocean-margin upwelling system. Near-bottom oxygen depletion is controlled by a competition between flushing with oxygenated offshore source waters and respiration of particulate organic matter produced near the surface and retained near the bottom. Upwelling-supplied nutrients are consumed in the surface box, and some surface particles sink to the bottom where they respire, consuming oxygen. Steady states characterize the potential for hypoxic near-bottom oxygen depletion; this potential is greatest for faster sinking rates, and largely independent of production timescales except in that faster production allows faster sinking. Timescales for oxygen depletion depend on upwelling and productivity differently, however, as oxygen depletion can only be reached in meaningfully short times when productivity is rapid. Hypoxia thus requires fast production, to capture upwelled nutrients, and fast sinking, to deliver the respiration potential to model bottom waters. Combining timescales allows generalizations about tendencies toward hypoxia. If timescales of sinking are comparable to or smaller than the sum of those for respiration and flushing, the steady state will generally be hypoxic, and results indicate optimal timescales and conditions exist to generate hypoxia. For example, the timescale for approach to hypoxia lengthens with stronger upwelling, since surface particle and nutrient are shunted off-shelf, in turn reducing subsurface respiration and oxygen depletion. This suggests that if upwelling winds intensify with climate change the increased forcing could offer mitigation of coastal hypoxia, even as the oxygen levels in upwelled source waters decline.

  8. Earth System Oxygenation: Toward an Integrated Theory of Earth Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The cause of the progressive oxygenation of Earth's biosphere remains poorly understood. The problem is bounded by the interplay of three irreversible, secular changes: the escape of H to space, which makes the planet more oxidized; the evolution of photoautotrophy - which converts solar energy into redox disequilbrium - and related metabolisms; and the cooling of the planet, which affects the exchange of material between Earth's reduced interior and relatively oxidized surface through a variety of processes. The first of these changes is quantitatively considered elsewhere, and is connected to the other two because H escape depends on atmospheric H2 and CH4 contents. The second of these changes is an area of vigorous research, particularly over the past decade. Important work included efforts to constrain the timing of key evolutionary events using organic geochemical and genomic records, and to understand the timing and tempo of environmental oxidation, particularly preceding the "Great Oxidation Event" (GOE) at ~2.4 Ga. As the community sorts through various debates, evidence is accumulating that the pre-GOE period was a dynamic era of transient "whiffs" of oxidation, most likely due to small amounts of biogenic O2 that appeared as early as ~3.0 Ga. The implication is that O2 sinks generally overwhelmed substantial O2 sources through the first half of Earth history, and that a decrease in sink strength and/or increase in source strength could have resulted in increasing instability of trace pO2 in the runup to the GOE. The most likely sinks are coupled to reductants in Earth's interior, which leads us to the third major change—secular cooling of the planet. It is almost certain that this cooling led to changes in mantle dynamics, rates of plate motion, and melting behaviors, which in turn affected volcanism, crust composition, hydrothermal and metamorphic alteration, ocean nutrient budgets, and recycling at subduction zones. These factors have all been

  9. Carbon and oxygen cycles: Sensitivity to changes in environmental forcing in a coastal upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, L.; Denman, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    Biogeochemical cycles in the coastal ocean are changing and will continue to change in response to a changing climate. Effects on the oxygen and carbon cycles are particularly important, as either episodic or permanent shifts toward lower oxygen and/or higher inorganic carbon conditions can impact coastal ecosystems negatively. Here we study the sensitivity of these cycles to changes that may occur in the coastal ocean, focusing on a summer wind-driven upwelling region off southern Vancouver Island shelf. We use a quasi 2-D configuration of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to perform six sensitivity experiments. Results indicate that carbon and oxygen cycles in this region may be significantly affected by an altered upwelling season, a shallower offshore Oxygen Minimum Zone, and a carbon-enriched environment. Combinations of these scenarios suggest a potentially increasing risk for the development of coastal hypoxia and corrosive conditions in the region.

  10. Influence of Finishing Systems on Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) in Beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effect of finishing systems (alfalfa, pearl millet, natural pasture and high concentrate diet) on hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants in beef sample using oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Finishing system had little impact on hydrophilic ORAC, but affected lipophilic OR...

  11. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  12. The Research of Membrane-sorption System with Increased Pressure Stream for Enriching Air with Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, M. V.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Kurchatov, I. M.

    Numerical study of single-hybrid membrane-sorption air separation system for enriching the air with oxygen were conducted. The effectiveness of such a system was analyzed, depending on selective sorbents and membranes under specified pressure ratio. A comparison of various modes membrane sorption system was done. The conclusion regarding the choice of the membrane and a sorbent for the system with a pressurized product stream was drawn.

  13. Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Dufore, C.; Smiley, N.; Jackson, C.; Halley, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 165.1 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1 μatm for pCO2. Average range of diurnal variation for system parameters in Tampa Bay was 73% to 93% of the seasonal range of variability for dissolved oxygen and pH. All system parameters measured in Florida Bay showed distinct variation over diurnal time-scales. However, clear diurnal trends were less evident. The average range of diurnal variability in Florida Bay was 62.8 μmol kg− 1 for total alkalinity, 130.4 μmol kg− 1 for total CO2, 0.13 for pH, 0.053 mmol L− 1 for dissolved oxygen, and 139.8 μatm for pCO2. The average range of diurnal variation was 14% to 102% of the seasonal ranges for these parameters. Diurnal variability in system parameters was most influenced by primary productivity and respiration of benthic communities in Tampa Bay, and by precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate in Florida Bay. Our data indicate that use of seasonal data sets without careful consideration of diurnal variability may impart significant error in calculations of annual carbon and oxygen budgets. These observations reinforce the need for higher temporal resolution measurements of oxygen and carbon system parameters in coastal ecosystems.

  14. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Revsbech, Niels-Peter; Glud, Ronnie N.; Canfield, Donald E.; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 μmol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized “sensing chemistry” that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded in a Hyflon AD 60 polymer matrix and has a KSV of 6.25 x 10-3 ppmv-1. The applicable measurement range is from 1000 nM down to a detection limit of 0.5 nM. A second sensor material based on the platinum(II) analogue of the porphyrin is spectrally compatible with the readout device and has a measurement range of 20 μM down to 10 nM. The LUMOS device is a dedicated system optimized for a high signal to noise ratio, but in principle any phase flourimeter can be adapted to act as a readout device for the highly sensitive and robust sensing chemistry. Vise versa, the LUMOS fluorimeter can be used for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used to measure nanomolar oxygen concentrations. Oxygen contamination in common sample containers has been investigated and microbial or enzymatic oxygen consumption at nanomolar concentrations is presented. PMID:26029920

  15. Detection of the oxygen consumption rate of migrating zebrafish by electrochemical equalization systems.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Koide, Masahiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Abe, Ryoko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Fumio; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-01-01

    A novel measurement system to determine oxygen consumption rates via respiration in migrating Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been developed. A signal equalization system was adapted to detect oxygen in a chamber with one fish, because typical electrochemical techniques cannot measure respiration activities for migrating organisms. A closed chamber was fabricated using a pipet tip attached to a Pt electrode, and a columnar Vycor glass tip was used as the salt bridge. Pt electrode, which was attached to the chamber with one zebrafish, and Ag electrode were immersed in 10 mM potassium iodide (KI), and both the electrodes were connected externally to form a galvanic cell. Pt and Ag electrodes act as the cathode and anode to reduce oxygen and oxidize silver, respectively, allowing the deposition of insoluble silver iodide (AgI). The AgI acts as the signal source accumulated on the Ag electrode by conversion of oxygen. The amount of AgI deposited on the Ag electrode was determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The presence of zebrafish or its embryo led to a decrease in the stripping currents generated by a 10 min conversion of oxygen to AgI. The conversion of oxygen to AgI is disturbed by the migration of the zebrafish and allows the detection of different equalized signals corresponding to respiration activity. The oxygen consumption rates of the zebrafish and its embryo were estimated and determined to be ∼4.1 and 2.4 pmol·s(-1), respectively. The deposited AgI almost completely disappeared with a single stripping process. The signal equalization system provides a method to determine the respiration activities for migrating zebrafish and could be used to estimate environmental risk and for effective drug screening. PMID:24328209

  16. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  17. Fiber optic oxygen sensor detection system for harsh environments of aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Mendoza, Edgar; Goswami, Kish; Kempen, Lothar

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the first successful fiber optic oxygen detection sensor systems developed for the Boeing Delta IV Launch Vehicle harsh environment of engine section. It illustrates a novel multi-point fiber optic microsensor (optrode) based on dynamic luminescence quenching that was developed for measuring oxygen leak detection for the space applications. The sensor optrodes employ the quenching by oxygen of the fluorescence from a ruthenium complex. These optrodes were fabricated using Ruthenium-based fluorescent indicator immobilized in a porous glass rod placed at the end of multimode fiber. The light from a blue LED is launched into the optrode via a fiber optic bundle and used as the excitation source. The optrode's fluorescent emission intensity in the range of 0% to 10% oxygen is measured as a function of time. The measuring system is based on high reliability and low cost. The system consists of four units: 1) temperature compensated oxygen optrodes combined with an optical setup, 2) multipoint sensor communication fiber optic network cable, 3) digital/analogue optoelectronic signal processing unit with built-in micro controller for control of data acquisition and processing, and 4) a laptop computer for data display and storage. In testing, the sensor exhibited excellent response time and reversibility. To qualify the sensors, performed detail investigation for thermal, humidity, temperature, vibration and accelerate testing for life expectancy of harsh environmental of engine section. Extensive networking using MatLab were carried out for lab and actual field demonstrations.

  18. Comparative analysis of cryogenic and PTSA technologies for systems of oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaszkiewicz, T.; Chorowski, M.; Gizicki, W.

    2014-01-01

    Development of oxy-combustion technology requires relatively lower purity oxygen production (90 - 95% O2). There are two known methods to produce oxygen in such purity level - cryogenic and sorption. Cryogenic air separation technology is currently well developed and widely used for oxygen production in large quantities (up to 5 000 tons per day from a single technology train). The second method is pressure swing adsorption (PSA), which is well suited for smaller quantities of oxygen (below 500 tons per day). To optimize overall energy consumption, the PSA method can be combined with swing of temperature by using waste heat from combined heat-power generation (cogeneration) processes, leading to pressure temperature swing adsorption (PTSA). In small and medium scale oxygen production systems for oxy-combustion, both PTSA and cryogenic method can be used. The paper shows calculations and experimental validation of the efficiency and economics for both processes. The limitations of applicability for each of these technologies are indicated. The possibility of coupling the technologies, including thermal power plants, in order to improve the efficiency of the oxygen separation is discussed.

  19. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  20. Oxygen isotopes as a tracer of phosphate sources and cycling in aquatic systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate can provide valuable information about sources and processes affecting phosphorus as it moves through hydrologic systems. Applications of this technique in soil and water have become more common in recent years due to improvements in extraction methods and instrument capabilities, and studies in multiple aquatic environments have demonstrated that some phosphorus sources may have distinct isotopic compositions within a given system. Under normal environmental conditions, the oxygen-phosphorus bonds in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) can only be broken by enzymatic activity. Biological cycling of DIP will bring the phosphate oxygen into a temperature-dependent equilibrium with the surrounding water, overprinting any existing isotopic source signals. However, studies conducted in a wide range of estuarine, freshwater, and groundwater systems have found that the phosphate oxygen is often out of biological equilibrium with the water, suggesting that it is common for at least a partial isotopic source signal to be retained in aquatic systems. Oxygen isotope analysis on various potential phosphate sources such as synthetic and organic fertilizers, animal waste, detergents, and septic/wastewater treatment plant effluents show that these sources span a wide range of isotopic compositions, and although there is considerable overlap between the source groups, sources may be isotopically distinct within a given study area. Recent soil studies have shown that isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen is also useful for understanding microbial cycling across different phosphorus pools, and may provide insights into controls on phosphorus leaching. Combining stable isotope information from soil and water studies will greatly improve our understanding of complex phosphate cycling, and the increasing use of this isotopic technique across different environments will provide new information regarding anthropogenic phosphate inputs and

  1. Oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yao; Jost, Carsten; Mumme, Jan; Wang, Kaijun; Linke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system, the effect of microaeration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of maize straw was investigated under batch conditions and in the UASS with AF system. Aeration intensities of 0-431mL O2/gvs were conducted as pretreatment under batch conditions. Aeration pretreatment obviously enhanced anaerobic digestion and an aeration intensity of 431mL O2/gvs increased the methane yield by 82.2%. Aeration intensities of 0-355mL O2/gvs were conducted in the process liquor circulation of the UASS with AF system. Dissolved oxygen (DO) of UASS and AF reactors kept around 1.39±0.27 and 0.99±0.38mg/L, respectively. pH was relatively stable around 7.11±0.04. Volatile fatty acids and soluble chemical oxygen demand concentration in UASS reactor were higher than those in AF reactor. Methane yield of the whole system was almost stable at 85±7mL/gvs as aeration intensity increased step by step. The UASS with AF system showed good oxygen tolerance capacity. PMID:27372134

  2. General overview of an integrated lunar oxygen production/brickmaking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    On the moon, various processing systems would compete for the same resources, most notably power, raw materials, and perhaps human attention. Therefore, it may be advantageous for two or more processes to be combined such that the integrated system would require fewer resources than separate systems working independently. The synergistic marriage of two such processes--lunar oxygen production and the manufacture of bricks from sintered lunar regolith--is considered.

  3. Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

  4. Systemic oxygen therapy versus oral enalapril for treatment of diabetic macular ischemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Razzaghi, Mohammadreza; Ramezani, Alireza; Azarmina, Mohsen; Yaseri, Mehdi; Soheilian, Roham; Soheilian, Masoud

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural and functional effects of systemic oxygen therapy and enalapril in patients with diabetic macular ischemia (DMI). This randomized clinical trial consisted of 105 eyes with DMI divided into three groups. Group I received systemic oxygen by face mask at a flow rate of 10 L/min; Group II received 5 mg enalapril daily; and Group III received placebo tablets for 3 months. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT), extent of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) on fluorescein angiograms, and electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Overall, 102 patients completed the study. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different among groups. Significant improvement in BCVA and decrease in CMT and FAZ occurred at months 3 and 6 in oxygen group compared to deterioration in enalapril and control groups (All P values <0.001). ERG parameters were significantly better in oxygen group compared to enalapril group at months 3 and 6 and better than those in control group at month 3. Normobaric oxygen therapy for 3 months in DMI decreased CMT and FAZ and improved BCVA and ERG parameters. Enalapril did not show any favorable effect. PMID:26292645

  5. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  6. [Russian oxygen generation system "Elektron-VM": hydrogen content in electrolytically produced oxygen for breathing by International Space Station crews].

    PubMed

    Proshkin, V Yu; Kurmazenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the particulars of hydrogen content in electrolysis oxygen produced aboard the ISS Russian segment by oxygen generator "Elektron-VM" (SGK) for crew breathing. Hydrogen content was estimated as in the course of SGK operation in the ISS RS, so during the ground life tests. According to the investigation of hydrogen sources, the primary path of H2 appearance in oxygen is its diffusion through the porous diaphragm separating the electrolytic-cell cathode and anode chambers. Effectiveness of hydrogen oxidation in the SGK reheating unit was evaluated. PMID:25035898

  7. Empirical model of variations in the IR Atmospheric system of molecular oxygen: 2. Emitting layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    The empirical regularities in the variations in the emitting layer parameters depending on the solar zenith angle have been obtained by analyzing and systematizing the data published on the vertical distribution of the volume emission rate of the 1.27 μm molecular oxygen Infrared Atmospheric system measured on rockets and satellites.

  8. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenough, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development of the hydrazine/water electrolysis process in a manned spacecraft to provide metabolic oxygen and both oxygen and nitrogen for cabin leakage makeup was studied. Electrode development efforts were directed to stability, achieved with catalyst additives and improved processing techniques, and a higher hydrazine conversion efficiency, achieved by reducing catalyst loading on the cathodes. Extensive testing of the one-man breadboard N2/02 system provided complete characterization of cabin atmosphere control aspects. A detailed design of a prototype modular N2/02 unit was conducted. The contact heat exchanger which is an integral component of this design was fabricated and sucessfully design-verification tested.

  9. Investigation of processes in system {open_quotes}uranium-water-oxygen-hydrogen{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V.N.; Laptev, N.N.; Akhlyustin, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The solutions of some kinetic equations of Uranium corrosion in Hydrogen, Oxygen and Water media are obtained. Corrosion processes on a surface of components made of uranium and its alloys depend not only by the surface state (degree of mechanical purity, chemical state, presence and nature of technological or hygienic covers, etc.) but also by presence and parameters of gaseous medium. A lot of interdependent reactions proceed in the system {open_quotes}uranium - hydrogen - water - oxygen{close_quotes}, and their depth and direction depend on initial gaseous medium, temperature, pressure, etc.

  10. Power System Mass Analysis for Hydrogen Reduction Oxygen Production on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    The production of oxygen from the lunar regolith requires both thermal and electrical power in roughly similar proportions. This unique power requirement is unlike most applications on the lunar surface. To efficiently meet these requirements, both solar PV array and solar concentrator systems were evaluated. The mass of various types of photovoltaic and concentrator based systems were calculated to determine the type of power system that provided the highest specific power. These were compared over a range of oxygen production rates. Also a hybrid type power system was also considered. This system utilized a photovoltaic array to produce the electrical power and a concentrator to provide the thermal power. For a single source system the three systems with the highest specific power were a flexible concentrator/Stirling engine system, a rigid concentrator/Stirling engine system and a tracking triple junction solar array system. These systems had specific power values of 43, 34, and 33 W/kg, respectively. The hybrid power system provided much higher specific power values then the single source systems. The best hybrid combinations were the triple junction solar array with the flexible concentrator and the rigid concentrator. These systems had a specific power of 81 and 68 W/kg, respectively.

  11. [Systemic and organ mechanisms of the organism oxygen supply in high altitude].

    PubMed

    Balykin, M V; Karkobatov, Kh D

    2012-01-01

    Organ and systemic mechanisms of organism oxygen supply in adaptation to high altitude of the Tien Shan (3200 m above sea level) were studied in the experiments on dogs. It is shown that in the first few days in the mountains (5-7th and 15th days) oxygen supply of the body is due to the increased delivery of O2 to organs and tissues; in the process of adaptation (30 days), the efficiency of tissue utilization of O2 increases. Changes of organ blood flow in visceral and somatic organs, features of compensation of the tissue hypoxia and oxygen supply of the heart, brain, skeletal muscle in different periods of adaptation to high altitude were established. PMID:22586935

  12. Bubble-free oxygenation of a bi-enzymatic system: effect on biocatalyst stability.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Wouter; Ludwig, Roland; Dewulf, Jo; Auly, Markus; Messiaen, Tom; Haltrich, Dietmar; Van Langenhove, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The effect of bubble-free oxygenation on the stability of a bi-enzymatic system with redox mediator regeneration for the conversion of lactose to lactobionic acid was investigated in a miniaturized reactor with bubbleless oxygenation. Earlier investigations of this biocatalytic oxidation have shown that the dispersive addition of oxygen can cause significant enzyme inactivation. In the process studied, the enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) oxidizes lactose at the C-1 position of the reducing sugar moiety to lactobionolactone, which spontaneously hydrolyzes to lactobionic acid. 2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt was used as electron acceptor for CDH and was continuously regenerated (reoxidized) by laccase, a blue multi-copper oxidase. Oxygen served as the terminal electron acceptor of the reaction and was fully reduced to water by laccase. The overall mass transfer coefficient of the miniaturized reactor was determined at 30 and 45 degrees C; conversions were conducted both in the reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regime to study catalyst inactivation. The bubbleless oxygenation was successful in avoiding gas/liquid interface inactivation. It was also shown that the oxidized redox mediator plays a key role in the inactivation mechanism of the biocatalysts unobserved during previous studies. PMID:18698649

  13. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Cole, Roger L.

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  14. Noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring: clinical test of multiwavelength optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Prough, D. S.; Petrova, I.; Patrikeev, I. A.; Cicenaite, I.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2007-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is critically important for treatment of patients with life-threatening conditions like severe brain injury or during cardiac surgery. We designed and built a novel multiwavelength optoacoustic system for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation. We use an Optical Parametric Oscillator as a light source. We successfully tested the system in vitro as well as in vivo in large animals (sheep) through thick tissues overlying blood vessels which drain venous blood out of the brain (e.g., superior sagittal sinus or jugular vein). Here we present the results of clinical tests of the system for continuous noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring in the internal jugular vein of healthy volunteers. We applied our custom-built optoacoustic probe (which incorporated a wide-band acoustic transducer and an optical fiber) to the neck area overlying the internal jugular vein. We performed measurements with volunteers at 18 wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. Despite a thick layer of overlying connective tissue and low energy used in the experiments, we recorded signals with high signal-to-noise ratios for all volunteers. We found that the temporal (independent of signal amplitude) parameters of recorded profiles for different levels of blood oxygenation correlated well with the spectrum of effective attenuation coefficients of blood.

  15. Operational feasibility of underwater Stirling engine systems using oxygen-seawater extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The exploration of the oceans whether for societal, commercial, scientific or military reasons requires efficient and cost effective underwater vehicles. In turn, these vessels require efficient means of producing on board power for the propulsion and hotel load requirements of long endurance missions. The Stirling engine, because of its inherent closed-cycle operation, has long been an attractive candidate for underwater use and now has proved its reliability and maintainability in the arduous environment of a naval submarine application. More recently the Stirling has been considered for use in small long endurance unmanned underwater vessels (UUVs). However, with these type of vehicles the need to carry an on board oxygen supply in a very confined space has presented a number of design problems. The concept of using multi-stage vehicles with disposable energy pods has been explored and appears attractive although a major change in submarine design philosophy will be required if such vehicles are to launched from submarines. Another approach is to use a more space efficient source of oxygen. As seawater contains dissolved oxygen then if this source could be utilized to meet all or at least part of the engine`s need than a major design problem could be overcome. In this paper the findings of an initial study into the use of membranes or artificial gill techniques to provide oxygen for a Stirling powered DARPA type vehicle are presented. It has been found that only in certain sea areas is the concept of oxygen extraction feasible for use with power systems. Even in situations where there are sufficient levels of dissolved oxygen the gill system approach appears to have limited utility for UUV applications and a number of practical problems still need to be addressed.

  16. Oxygen stress reduces zoospore survival of Phytophthora species in a simulated aquatic system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Phytophthora includes a group of agriculturally important pathogens and they are commonly regarded as water molds. They produce motile zoospores that can move via water currents and on their own locomotion in aquatic environments. However, zoosporic response to dissolved oxygen, an important water quality parameter, is not known. Like other water quality parameters, dissolved oxygen concentration in irrigation reservoirs fluctuates dramatically over time. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how zoospore survival may be affected by elevated and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen in water to better understand the aquatic biology of these pathogens in irrigation reservoirs. Results Zoospores of P. megasperma, P. nicotianae, P. pini and P. tropicalis were assessed for survival in 10% Hoagland’s solution at a range of dissolved concentrations from 0.9 to 20.1 mg L-1 for up to seven exposure times from 0 to 72 h. Zoospore survival was measured by resultant colony counts per ml. Zoospores of these species survived the best in control Hoagland’s solution at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 5.3 to 5.6 mg L-1. Zoospore survival rates decreased with increasing and decreasing concentration of dissolved oxygen, depending upon Phytophthora species and exposure time. Overall, P. megasperma and P. pini are less sensitive than P. nicotianae and P. tropicalis to hyperoxia and hypoxia conditions. Conclusion Zoospores in the control solution declined over time and this natural decline process was enhanced under hyperoxia and hypoxia conditions. These findings suggest that dramatic fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in irrigation reservoirs contribute to the population decline of Phytophthora species along the water path in the same reservoirs. These findings advanced our understanding of the aquatic ecology of these pathogens in irrigation reservoirs. They also provided a basis for pathogen risk mitigation by prolonging the turnover

  17. Hydrogen Purification and Recycling for an Integrated Oxygen Recovery System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Wall, Terry; Miller, Lee; Wheeler, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The United States Atmosphere Revitalization life support system on the International Space Station (ISS) performs several services for the crew including oxygen generation, trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal, and oxygen recovery. Oxygen recovery is performed using a Sabatier reactor developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, wherein CO2 is reduced with hydrogen in a catalytic reactor to produce methane and water. The water product is purified in the Water Purification Assembly and recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) to provide O2 to the crew. This architecture results in a theoretical maximum oxygen recovery from CO2 of approximately 54% due to the loss of reactant hydrogen in Sabatier-produced methane that is currently vented outside of ISS. Plasma Methane Pyrolysis technology (PPA), developed by Umpqua Research Company, provides the capability to further close the Atmosphere Revitalization oxygen loop by recovering hydrogen from Sabatier-produced methane. A key aspect of this technology approach is to purify the hydrogen from the PPA product stream which includes acetylene, unreacted methane and byproduct water and carbon monoxide. In 2015, four sub-scale hydrogen separation systems were delivered to NASA for evaluation. These included two electrolysis single-cell hydrogen purification cell stacks developed by Sustainable Innovations, LLC, a sorbent-based hydrogen purification unit using microwave power for sorbent regeneration developed by Umpqua Research Company, and a LaNi4.6Sn0.4 metal hydride produced by Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. Here we report the results of these evaluations, discuss potential architecture options, and propose future work.

  18. Hydrogen Purification and Recycling for an Integrated Oxygen Recovery System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Wall, Terry; Nur, Mononita; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Preston, Joshua; Molter, Trent

    2016-01-01

    The United States Atmosphere Revitalization life support system on the International Space Station (ISS) performs several services for the crew including oxygen generation, trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal, and oxygen recovery. Oxygen recovery is performed using a Sabatier reactor developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, wherein CO2 is reduced with hydrogen in a catalytic reactor to produce methane and water. The water product is purified in the Water Purification Assembly and recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) to provide O2 to the crew. This architecture results in a theoretical maximum oxygen recovery from CO2 of approx.54% due to the loss of reactant hydrogen in Sabatier-produced methane that is currently vented outside of ISS. Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) technology, developed by Umpqua Research Company, provides the capability to further close the Atmosphere Revitalization oxygen loop by recovering hydrogen from Sabatier-produced methane. A key aspect of this technology approach is the need to purify the hydrogen from the PPA product stream which includes acetylene, unreacted methane and byproduct water and carbon monoxide. In 2015, four sub-scale hydrogen separation systems were delivered to NASA for evaluation. These included two electrolysis single-cell hydrogen purification cell stacks developed by Sustainable Innovations, LLC, a sorbent-based hydrogen purification unit using microwave power for sorbent regeneration developed by Umpqua Research Company, and a LaNi4.6Sn0.4 metal hydride produced by Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. Here we report the results of these evaluations to-date, discuss potential architecture options, and propose future work.

  19. Central nervous system oxygen toxicity in closed circuit scuba divers II.

    PubMed

    Butler, F K; Thalmann, E D

    1986-06-01

    Central nervous system oxygen toxicity is currently the limiting factor in underwater swimming/diving operations using closed-circuit oxygen equipment. A dive series was conducted at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit in Panama City, FL, to determine whether these limits can be safely extended and also to evaluate the feasibility of making excursions to increased depth after a previous transit at a shallower depth for various lengths of time. A total of 465 man-dives were conducted on 14 different experimental profiles. In all, 33 episodes of oxygen toxicity were encountered, including 2 convulsions. Symptoms were classified as probable, definite, or convulsion. Findings were as follows: symptom classification is a useful tool in evaluating symptoms of oxygen toxicity; safe exposure limits should generally be adjusted only as a result of definite symptoms or convulsions; the following single-depth dive limits are proposed: 20 fsw (6.1 msw)--240 min, 25 fsw (7.6 msw)--240 min, 30 fsw (9.1 msw)--80 min, 35 fsw (10.7 msw)--25 min, 40 fsw (12.2 msw)--15 min, 50 fsw (15.2 msw)--10 min; a pre-exposure of up to 4 h at 20 fsw causes only a slight increase in the probability of an oxygen toxicity symptom on subsequent downward excursions; a pre-exposure depth of 25 fsw will have a more adverse effect on subsequent excursions than will 20 fsw; a return to 20 fsw for periods of 95-110 min seems to provide an adequate recovery period from an earlier excursion and enables a second excursion to be taken without additional hazard; nausea was the most commonly noted symptom of oxygen toxicity, followed by muscle twitching and dizziness; dives on which oxygen toxicity episodes were noted had a more rapid rate of core temperature cooling than dives without toxicity episodes; several divers who had passed the U.S. Navy Oxygen Tolerance Test were observed to be reproducibly more susceptible to oxygen toxicity than the other experimental divers. PMID:3727183

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Approaches to Understanding the Anomalous Distribution of Oxygen Isotopes in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Christensen, Elizabeth; Boyer, Charisa; Park, Manesseh; Benitez, Ezra; Nunn, Morgan; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Terri

    2016-06-01

    Decades of careful laboratory analysis of primitive meteorites have revealed an intriguing and unexplained pattern in the distribution of oxygen isotopes in the solar system. With the recent analysis of solar wind oxygen by NASA’s Genesis mission, it appears that the Sun has a distinct oxygen isotopic composition from the terrestrial planets, asteroids, and comets. These differences cannot be explained by mass-dependent diffusion and require a physical-chemical mechanism or mechanisms that separate oxygen isotopes in a non-mass dependent manner.Several hypothesis have been proposed to explain the anomalous distribution. Photochemical self-shielding of CO may explain the anomalous distribution, however, this mechanism has key weaknesses including the requirement of a very fine tuned timescale to explain the isotopic differences between the Sun and bulk of the terrestrial planets. Recently, attention has been directed at understanding specific chemical reactions that occur on interstellar dust grains due to their similarities with non-equilibrium photochemical reactions believed to be responsible for the mass-independent isotopic fractionation patterns observed in Earth’s atmosphere. A specific focus has been directed towards understanding the formation of H2O because some of its precursor (HO2, and O3) are well-known to acquire mass-independent isotopic signatures when formed in the gas-phase.In this presentation, I describe a series of laboratory astrophysical experiments whose goal is to understand the distribution of oxygen isotopes in the solar system and perhaps, by extension, the distribution in other planetary systems. Preliminary results for the isotopic composition of O3 formed at 5K will be presented as well as the first, to our knowledge, measurements of the isotopic composition of H2O (18O/16O, 17O/16O, D/H) formed at 32K. We find that H2O formed in the astrophysical conditions we simulated acquired an anomalous isotopic composition with a triple-oxygen

  1. Measurement of time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in photosynthetic systems by nitroxide-based EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Walczak, T; Sarna, T; Swartz, H M

    1990-09-01

    The application of recent developments of EPR oximetry to photosynthetic systems is described and used to study rapid processes in isolated thylakoid membranes from spinach and in intact photoautotrophic soybean cells. Using the peak heights of 15N perdeuterated Tempone and two microwave power levels oxygen evolution and consumption were measured. The method measured time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in the micromolar range. Oxygen evolution was linearly proportionate to the chlorophyl concentration of thylakoid membrane over the range studied (0-2 mg/ml). Oxygen evolution associated with single turnover light pulses was consistent with the four state model. The time (t1/2) to reach equilibrium of oxygen concentrations after a single turnover pulse was 0.4-0.5 ms, indicating that the evolution of oxygen coupled to the S4-S0 transition may be shorter than reported previously. The time for equilibrium of oxygen after single turnover pulses in soybean cells was relatively long (400 ms), which suggests that there are significant barriers to the free diffusion of oxygen in this system. The method also was used to study oxygen consumption by the electron transport chain of photosystem I and photosystem II. We conclude that EPR oximetry can provide quantitative and time-resolved data on oxygen concentrations with a sensitivity that is useful for studies of such systems. PMID:2168161

  2. Roles of renal erythropoietin-producing (REP) cells in the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietic induction is critical for enhancing the efficiency of oxygen delivery during the chronic phase of the systemic hypoxia response. The erythroid growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) triggers the erythropoietic induction through the activation of erythroid genes related to cell survival, differentiation, and iron metabolism. Because Epo is produced in renal Epo-producing (REP) cells in a hypoxia-inducible manner, REP cells serve as a control center for the systemic hypoxia response. In fact, the loss of Epo production in REP cells causes chronic severe anemia in genetically modified mice, and REP cell-specific inactivation of PHD2 (prolyl-hydroxylase domain enzyme 2) results in erythrocytosis via overexpression of the Epo gene due to the constitutive activation of HIF2α (hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 2α). REP cells are located in the interstitial spaces between renal tubules and capillaries, where the oxygen supply is low but oxygen consumption is high, for the highly sensitive detection of decreased oxygen supplies to the body. Under disease conditions, REP cells transform to myofibroblasts and lose their Epo-producing ability. Therefore, elucidation of Epo gene regulation and REP cell features directly contributes to understanding the pathology of chronic kidney disease. To further analyze REP cells, we introduce a newly established mouse line in which REP cells are efficiently labeled with fluorescent protein. PMID:26452589

  3. Status of the Node 3 Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Cloud, Dale; Bedard, Jake

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is providing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for flight on the International Space Station's (ISS) Node 3 element. The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), while the UPA and PSM are being designed and manufactured in-house by MSFC. The assemblies are completing the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of ORU and system level testing, to be followed by integration into the flight racks. This paper gives a current status, along with technical challenges encountered and lessons learned.

  4. Multiple electron transfer systems in oxygen reducing biocathodes revealed by different conditions of aeration/agitation.

    PubMed

    Rimboud, Mickaël; Bergel, Alain; Erable, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen reducing biocathodes were formed at -0.2V/SCE (+0.04V/SHE) from compost leachate. Depending on whether aeration was implemented or not, two different redox systems responsible for the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction were evidenced. System I was observed at low potential (-0.03V/SHE) on cyclic voltammetries (CVs). It appeared during the early formation of the biocathode (few hours) and resisted the hydrodynamic conditions induced by the aeration. System II was observed at higher potential on CV (+0.46V/SHE); it required a longer lag time (up to 10days) and quiescent conditions to produce an electrochemical signal. The hydrodynamic effects produced by the forced aeration led to its extinction. From their different behaviors and examples in the literature, system I was identified as being a membrane-bound cytochrome-related molecule, while system II was identified as a soluble redox mediator excreted by the biofilm. This study highlighted the importance of controlling the local hydrodynamics to design efficient oxygen reducing biocathodes able to operate at high potential. PMID:27035588

  5. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  6. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  7. Status of the International Space Station Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Cloud, Dale

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA and PSM are developed in- house by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The assemblies have completed the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of testing and integration into the flight racks. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2005 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  8. Advanced Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Oxygen Regulator Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    The advanced spacesuit portable life support system (PLSS) oxygen regulators represent an evolutionary approach to regulator development. Several technology development prototypes have been produced that borrow much of the mechanical regulator design from the well proven Shuttle/ISS Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Secondary Oxygen Regulator, but incorporate a motor-settable pressure set-point feature that facilitates significantly greater operational flexibility. For example, this technology would enable EVA to begin at a higher suit pressure, which would reduce pre-breathe time, and then slowly step down to a lower pressure to increase suit mobility for the duration of the EVA. Comprehensive testing of the prototypes was performed on the component level as well as part of the PLSS 1.0 system level testing. Results from these tests characterize individual prototype performance and demonstrate successful operation during multiple nominal and contingency EVA modes

  9. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Vogel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energy-efficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  10. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  11. Increased Oxygen Recovery from Sabatier Systems Using Plasma Pyrolysis Technology and Metal Hydride Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Miller, Lee A.; Dahl, Roger W.; Hadley, Neal M.; Wambolt, Spencer R.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art life support carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is based on the Sabatier reaction where less than 50% of the oxygen required for the crew is recovered from metabolic CO2. The reaction produces water as the primary product and methane as a byproduct. Oxygen recovery is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. This is further exacerbated when Sabatier methane (CH4) is vented as a waste product resulting in a continuous loss of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing methane with the Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) to recover hydrogen has the potential to dramatically increase oxygen recovery and thus drastically reduce the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane into predominantly hydrogen and acetylene. Due to the highly unstable nature of acetylene, a separation system is necessary to purify hydrogen before it is recycled back to the Sabatier reactor. Testing and evaluation of a full-scale Third Generation PPA is reported and investigations into metal hydride hydrogen separation technology is discussed.

  12. Investigation into the High Voltage Shutdown of the Oxygen Generator System in the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Joyce E.; Gentry, Gregory J.; Diderich, Greg S.; Roy, Robert J.; Golden, John L.; VanKeuren, Steve; Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony J.; Varsik, Jerome D.; Montefusco, Daniel J.; Wilson, Mark E.; Worthy, Erica S.

    2012-01-01

    The Oxygen Generation System (OGS) Hydrogen Dome Assembly Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) serial number 00001 suffered a cell stack high-voltage shutdown on July 5, 2010. The Hydrogen Dome Assembly ORU was removed and replaced with the on-board spare ORU serial number 00002 to maintain OGS operation. The Hydrogen Dome Assembly ORU was returned from ISS on STS-133/ULF-5 in March 2011 with test, teardown and evaluation (TT&E) and failure analysis to follow.

  13. Energy transfer enhancement by oxygen perturbation of spin-forbidden electronic transitions in aromatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguzzi, A.; Tubino, R.; Salamone, M. M.; Meinardi, F.

    2010-09-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in multicomponent organic systems is usually entirely ascribed to a Dexter-type mechanism involving only short-range donor/acceptor interactions. We demonstrate that the presence of molecular oxygen introduces a perturbation to the electronic structure of one of the involved moieties which can induce a large increase in the spin-forbidden transition oscillator strength so that the otherwise negligible Förster contribution dominates the overall energy transfer rate.

  14. Surface Measurements of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Using AN Automated Chamber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentabil, M. M.; Fazackerley, S.; Nichol, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    The various soil respiration measurements that are available depend on measuring the emitted CO2 flux as organic carbon is respired aerobically. Comparative studies among the four well known methods (the open-flow infra-red gas analyzer method; the closed chamber method; the dynamic closed chamber method; and the alkali absorption method) under field conditions and laboratory experiments show differences. The discrepancies observed in these methods under field conditions could be evaluated by incorporating O2 flux measurement in addition to CO2 flux measurement. However, this is hampered by the absence of suitable equipment for measuring oxygen influx at the soil surface. A system to measure O2 fluxes at the soil surface using chamber methods has been developed. A gas handling subsystem and O2 analyser has been incorporated into an existing non-steady state automated chamber system originally designed for CO2 and H2O flux monitoring. The system consists of four 60 L soil chambers connected to temperature-controlled datalogger housing. During a measurement cycle, the chamber lid closes and the system measures changes of CO2/H2O and depletion of O2in the chamber headspace. Samples for CO2 /H2O circulate in a closed path between the chamber and an IR gas analyser. An air sample for O2 analysis is sub-sampled from this circulating air stream. Air samples for O2 are first dried using a two-stage Nafion drier. Mass flows and pressures are balanced at the pascal level prior to the gas passing into a ppm level fuel-cell oxygen analyser (Sable Systems Oxzilla). The chamber sample airstream is measured against a reference gas identically handled in a parallel air stream. A makeup gas of dry N2 is injected back to the chamber to return equimolar amounts of gas to replace the wet air removed, and hence prevent pressure fluctuation in the headspace of the chamber. The implementation of automated control of gas drying and sampling, pressure balancing, flow regulation and self

  15. Quantitative photoacoustic blood oxygenation measurement of whole porcine blood samples using a multi-wavelength semiconductor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Claus-Stefan; Mienkina, Martin P.; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Jörger, Manfred; Strauß, Andreas; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2011-07-01

    We present a photoacoustic measurement system based on semiconductor lasers for blood oxygenation measurements. It permits to use four different optical wavelengths (650nm, 808nm, 850nm, 905nm) to generate photoacoustic signals. As the optical extinction coefficient of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin is different at specific wavelengths, a blood oxygenation measurement by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic laser system is feasible. Especially at 650nm, the clear difference between the extinction coefficients of the two hemoglobin derivates permits to determine the blood oxygenation in combination with other near infrared wavelengths. A linear model based on tabulated values of extinction coefficients for fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated hemoglobin is presented. We used heparin stabilized whole porcine blood samples to model the optical behavior of human blood, as the optical absorption behavior of porcine hemoglobin does not differ significantly from human hemoglobin. To determine the real oxygen saturation values of the blood samples, we measured the partial oxygen pressure with an IRMA Trupoint Blood Analysis System. The oxygen saturation values were calculated from a dissociation curve for porcine blood. The results of the photoacoustic measurement are in qualitatively good agreement with the predicted linear model. Further, we analyze the abilities and the limitations of quantitative oxygenation measurements.

  16. Heterotrophic nitrifying and oxygen tolerant denitrifying bacteria from greenwater system of coastal aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Kathiravan; Krishnani, Kishore Kumar

    2013-03-01

    In this work, herbivorous fish Mugil cephalus has been cultured to secrete protein rich green slime, which helps nitrifying and oxygen tolerant denitrifying bacteria to grow and colonize. Four strains representing Alcaligenaceae family have been isolated from greenwater system and characterized using biochemical test, fatty acid methyl ester (GC-FAME) analysis, 16S rRNA and functional gene approaches. They were tested for an ability to nitrify ammonia and nitrite aerobically. Two strains showed notable nitrification activity, when grown in a mineral salts medium containing ammonium sulfate and potassium nitrite. Functional gene analysis confirmed the presence of nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene showing that they have an oxygen-tolerant denitrification system. It has been proposed that Alcaligenes faecalis strains heterotrophically nitrify ammonia into nitrite via formation of hydroxyl amine, which is oxidized to nitrous oxide using oxygen or nitrite as electron acceptor. These results provide a possible advantage of having nitrification and denitrification capabilities in the same organism, which plays an important role in biological wastewater system. PMID:23354499

  17. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  18. Resonance tube hazards in oxygen systems. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ., 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program was carried out to determine whether fluid dynamic oscillations could create a hazard in gaseous oxygen flow systems. The particular fluid dynamic oscillation studied was the resonance tube phenomena as it was excited in a tee-shaped configuration characteristic of configurations found in many industrial high pressure gas flow systems. The types of hazards that could be caused by the oscillations were direct heating and ignition of the piping system by the gas, the greatly augmented heating that could occur if inert contaminants were present, and the ignition of metallic contaminants. Asbestos was used as the inert contaminant; titanium, aluminum, magnesium and steel were chosen as ignitable metallic contaminants. The oscillations in the tee-shaped configuration were compared to oscillations driven by choked convergent nozzles and were found to differ markedly. Temperature generated at the end or base of the resonance tube exceeded 1089 K for both gaseous oxygen and nitrogen and reached 1645 K when asbestos was added. Aluminum in both powder and fiber form was readily ignited within the resonance tube when the supply pressures were less than 8270 kPa whereas at higher supply pressures the mixture exploded with enough violence to destory the apparatus in less than 10 sec. In addition to aluminum, magnesium, and titanium, samples of 400 series stainless steels were also ignited within the resonance tube. The ignition occurred within a few seconds after the oxygen flow began.

  19. Measurement of the oxygen partial pressure and thermodynamic modeling of the U-Nd-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Knight, Travis W.; McMurray, Jacob W.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2016-05-01

    Fission products greatly impact the properties of fuel necessitating a thorough understanding of the thermochemical properties of oxide fuels with fission products. However, thermochemical data for the U-Nd-O system is insufficient even though neodymium is a major fission product. As neodymium will likely be present as a solute in UO2, this research focuses on the study of (U1-yNdy)O2±x. Experimental measurements and analyses of the oxygen partial pressure (pO2)-temperature-oxygen to metal ratio (O/M ratio) relationships were performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and an oxygen analyzer. Thermodynamic computational modeling was performed using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) method with the FactSage software. The Gibbs energy of the (U1-yNdy)O2±x solid solution was described by the compound energy formalism (CEF), which is based on earlier thermodynamic modeling data of the binary U-O system from Guéneau et al.. The thermodynamic and phase diagram data of the U-Nd-O system produced in this work show good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. ON THE FORMATION OF OZONE IN SOLAR SYSTEM OXYGEN ICES EXPOSED TO HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, Courtney; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2012-02-01

    Mimicking the bombardment of icy surfaces with heavy ions from solar system radiation fields, solid-phase molecular oxygen ({sup 32}O{sub 2}) and its isotope labeled analogue ({sup 36}O{sub 2}) were irradiated with monoenergetic carbon (C{sup +}), nitrogen (N{sup +}), and oxygen (O{sup +}) ions in laboratory experiments simulating the interaction of ions from the solar wind and those abundant in planetary magnetospheres. Online Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of the irradiated oxygen ices (12 K) showed that the yields of molecular ozone monomer (O{sub 3} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} molecules eV{sup -1} in {sup 32}O{sub 2}) were independent of the mass of the implanted C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and O{sup +} ions ({Phi}{sub max} = 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}). The production of oxygen atoms in the solid was observed in the mid-IR stabilized via the [O{sub 3}...O] van der Waals complex. We expand on this inference by comparing the ozone yields induced by light particles (e{sup -}, H{sup +}, and He{sup +}) to the heavy ions (C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and O{sup +}) to provide compelling evidence that the abundance of radiolytic products in an oxygen-bearing solid is primarily dependent on electronic stopping regimes, which supersedes the contribution of nuclear stopping processes irrespective of the mass of the particle irradiation in the kinetic energy regime of solar wind and magnetospheric particles.

  1. Use of an oxygen concentrator linked to a draw-over vaporizer (anesthesia delivery system for underdeveloped nations)

    PubMed

    Jarvis, D A; Brock-Utne, J G

    1991-06-01

    The use of an oxygen concentrator linked to a draw-over vaporizer was examined. The fractional oxygen concentration from this equipment was dependent on the minute ventilation, oxygen output of the concentrator (%), and the presence of an oxygen economizer tube (OET) (a 900-mL corrugated tube). Fractional oxygen concentrations were always higher with an OET than without an OET (other variables being constant). With the OET in place, the fractional oxygen concentration was only dependent on the minute volume and independent of the pattern of ventilation (i.e., varying inspiratory and expiratory ratios and inspiratory and expiratory pauses). Without an OET, the performance of the system was considerably impaired. In this setting, the final oxygen concentration depended not only on the added flow of oxygen and minute volume but also on the pattern of ventilation. In conclusion, when using a draw-over vaporizer linked to an oxygen concentrator, an OET is essential so as to provide consistent oxygen concentrations to the patient at any given minute volume. PMID:2035865

  2. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery system for the Japanese experiment module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, K.; Hirao, M.; Satoh, S.

    The Japanese Space Station Program is now under Phase B study by the National Space Development Agency of Japan in participation with the U.S. Space Station Program. A Japanese Space Station participation will be a dedicated pressurized module to be attached to the U.S. Space Station, and is called Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Astronaut scientists will conduct various experimental operations there. Thus an environment control and life support system is required. Regenerable carbon dioxide removal and collection technique as well as oxygen recovery technique has been studied and investigated for several years. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal subsystem using steam desorbed solid amine and an oxygen recovery subsystem using Sabatier methane cracking have a good possibility for the application to the Japanese Experiment Module. Basic performance characteristics of the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem are presented according to the results of a fundamental performance test program. The trace contaminant removal process is also investigated and discussed. The solvent recovery plant for the regeneration of various industrial solvents, such as hydrocarbons, alcohols and so on, utilizes the multi-bed solvent adsorption and steam desorption process, which is very similar to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. Therefore, to develop essential components including adsorption tank (bed), condensor, process controller and energy saving system, the technology obtained from the experience to construct solvent recovery plant can be easily and effectively applicable to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. The energy saving efficiency is evaluated for blower power reduction, steam reduction and waste heat utilization technique. According to the above background, the entire environment control and life support system for the Japanese Experiment Module including the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem is evaluated and proposed.

  3. Implementation and 8-year follow-up of an uninterrupted oxygen supply system in a hospital in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Light, J. D.; Ebonyi, A. O.; N'Jai, P. C.; Ideh, R. C.; Ebruke, B. E.; Nyassi, E.; Peel, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING: A 42-bed hospital operated by the Medical Research Council (MRC) Unit in The Gambia. OBJECTIVE: To devise, test and evaluate a cost-efficient uninterrupted oxygen system in the MRC Hospital. DESIGN: Oxygen cylinders were replaced with oxygen concentrators as the primary source of oxygen. An uninterruptable power supply (UPS) ensured continuity of power. Hospital staff were trained on the use of the new system. Eight years post-installation, an analysis of concentrator maintenance needs and costs was conducted and user feedback obtained to assess the success of the system. RESULTS: The new system saved at least 51% of oxygen supply costs compared to cylinders, with savings likely to have been far greater due to cylinder leakages. Users indicated that the system is easier to use and more reliable, although technical support and staff training are still needed. CONCLUSION: Oxygen concentrators offer long-term cost savings and an improved user experience compared to cylinders; however, some technical support and maintenance are needed to upkeep the system. A UPS dedicated to oxygen concentrators is an appropriate solution for settings where power interruptions are frequent but short in duration. This approach can be a model for health systems in settings with similar infrastructure. PMID:27393551

  4. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Rules for use of portable oxygen concentrator systems on board aircraft

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Independence Oxygen Concentrator, Respironics EverGo, and SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator medical... EverGo, and SeQual Eclipse Portable Oxygen Concentrator units. These units may be carried on and...

  5. Three Years of on Orbit ISS Oxygen Generation System Operation 2007-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diderich, Greg S.; Polis, Pete; VanKeuren, Steven P.; Erickson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) has accumulated 240 days of continuous operation at varied oxygen production rates within the US Laboratory Module (LAB) since it was first activated in July 2007. OGS relocated from the ISS LAB to Node 3 during 20A Flight (February 2010). The OGS rack delivery was accelerated for on-orbit checkout in the LAB, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006. During the on-orbit checkout interval within the LAB from July 2007 to October 2008, OGS operational times were limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Longer runtimes are now achievable due to the continuous feedwater availability after ULF2 delivery and activation of the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) racks. OGS is considered a critical function to maintaining six crew capability. There have been a number of failures which interrupted or threatened to interrupt oxygen production. Filters in the recirculation loop have clogged and have been replaced, Hydrogen sensors have fallen out of specifications, a pump delta pressure sensor failed, a pump failed to start, and the voltage on the cell stack increased out of tolerance. This paper will discuss the operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  6. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  7. SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS FOR CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF OXYGEN-BASED PC BOILER

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Andrew Seltzer

    2003-11-01

    The objective of the system design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 Mw plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.1% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 44% of the air-fired reference case. Compared to other CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies, the O{sub 2}-fired PC is substantially better than both natural gas combined cycles and post CO{sub 2} removal PCs and is slightly better than integrated gasification combined cycles.

  8. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David I.; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here we review the current literature regarding ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25634975

  9. An automated system for oxygen-18 water recovery and fluorine-18 delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, Michael J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.

    2005-12-01

    BNL has recently purchased an EBCO TR-19 cyclotron for routine isotope production. A system has been built to recover oxygen-18 enriched water from the fluorine-18 target, and then transport the F-18 a distance of 50 m to a shielded dose splitter. The remotized system provides the operator with feedback on flow rates and radiation levels during processing. Recovery of the 2.6 mL of enriched water and transport of the F-18 to the radiochemistry labs takes under 10 min, with more than 80% of the activity arriving in the chemistry lab.

  10. Technologies for protection of the Space Station power system surfaces in atomic oxygen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1988-01-01

    Technologies for protecting Space Station surfaces from degradation caused by atomic oxygen are discussed, stressing protection of the power system surfaces. The Space Station power system is described and research concerning the solar array surfaces and radiator surfaces is examined. The possibility of coating the solar array sufaces with a sputter deposited thin film of silicon oxide containing small concentrations of polytetrafluoroethylene is presented. Hexamethyldisiloxane coating for these surfaces is also considered. For the radiator surfaces, possible coatings include silver teflon thermal coating and zinc orthotitanate.

  11. Analytical investigation of two hydrogen oxygen rocket engine systems for low-thrust application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two hydrogen oxygen rocket engine system concepts were analyzed parametrically over a thrust range from 100 to 1000 pounds and a chamber pressure range from 175 to 1000 psia. Both concepts were regeneratively cooled with hydrogen and were pump fed by electric motor driven positive displacement pumps. Electric power was provided by either a turboalternator (turboalternator concept) or some means external to the engine system (auxiliary power concept). The turboalternator concept is discussed. The computer program used to conduct the analyses along with the design characteristics of the major engine system components is described. The feasible design range of the systems over the parametric range of thrust is discussed in terms of allowable chamber pressure. Engine system estimated performance, mass, and dimensional envelope parametric data within the feasible design range are presented.

  12. Development and Testing of a Methane/Oxygen Catalytic Microtube Ignition System for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Schneider, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a catalytic ignition advanced torch system with a unique catalyst microtube design that could serve as a low energy alternative or redundant system for the ignition of methane and oxygen rockets. Development and testing of iterations of hardware was carried out to create a system that could operate at altitude and produce a torch. A unique design was created that initiated ignition via the catalyst and then propagated into external staged ignition. This system was able to meet the goals of operating across a range of atmospheric and altitude conditions with power inputs on the order of 20 to 30 watts with chamber pressures and mass flow rates typical of comparable ignition systems for a 100 Ibf engine.

  13. Development and Testing of a Methane/Oxygen Catalytic Microtube Ignition System for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a catalytic ignition advanced torch system with a unique catalyst microtube design that could serve as a low energy alternative or redundant system for the ignition of methane and oxygen rockets. Development and testing of iterations of hardware was carried out to create a system that could operate at altitude and produce a torch. A unique design was created that initiated ignition via the catalyst and then propagated into external staged ignition. This system was able to meet the goals of operating across a range of atmospheric and altitude conditions with power inputs on the order of 20 to 30 watts with chamber pressures and mass flow rates typical of comparable ignition systems for a 100 lbf engine.

  14. First report of the successful operation of a side stream supersaturation hypolimnetic oxygenation system in a eutrophic, shallow reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Alexandra B; Browne, Richard G; Gantzer, Paul A; Mobley, Mark H; Little, John C; Carey, Cayelan C

    2014-12-15

    Controlling hypolimnetic hypoxia is a key goal of water quality management. Hypoxic conditions can trigger the release of reduced metals and nutrients from lake sediments, resulting in taste and odor problems as well as nuisance algal blooms. In deep lakes and reservoirs, hypolimnetic oxygenation has emerged as a viable solution for combating hypoxia. In shallow lakes, however, it is difficult to add oxygen into the hypolimnion efficiently, and a poorly designed hypolimnetic oxygenation system could potentially result in higher turbidity, weakened thermal stratification, and warming of the sediments. As a result, little is known about the viability of hypolimnetic oxygenation in shallow bodies of water. Here, we present the results from recent successful tests of side stream supersaturation (SSS), a type of hypolimnetic oxygenation system, in a shallow reservoir and compare it to previous side stream deployments. We investigated the sensitivity of Falling Creek Reservoir, a shallow (Zmax = 9.3 m) drinking water reservoir located in Vinton, Virginia, USA, to SSS operation. We found that the SSS system increased hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen concentrations at a rate of ∼1 mg/L/week without weakening stratification or warming the sediments. Moreover, the SSS system suppressed the release of reduced iron and manganese, and likely phosphorus, from the sediments. In summary, SSS systems hold great promise for controlling hypolimnetic oxygen conditions in shallow lakes and reservoirs. PMID:25265305

  15. Oxides of LANTHANUM(1-X) Strontium(x) COBALT(1 - Iron(y) OXYGEN(3) for Oxygen and Electrical Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Lone-Wen Frank

    Perovskite-type compounds in the system La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{1-y}Fe_{y}O_ {3-delta have been considered as potential cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural, electrical, thermochemical properties of these compositions. The first and second papers of this dissertation dealt with the material synthesis, crystal structure, thermal expansion, thermogravimetry, electrical conductivity, and thermoelectricity of La_{0.8 }Sr_{0.2}Co_{1-y}Fe _{y}O_3 (y = 0-1) and La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{0.2}Fe_{0.8}O_3 (x = 0-1) in air, respectively. Electrical conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients for these compositions were found to increase with Sr and Co contents. The unique temperature and composition dependence of the electrical conductivity observed in both systems were semi-empirically modeled by incorporating several mechanisms which include the hopping conduction of small polarons, a thermally activated charge disproportionation of Co^{3+ }, the ionic compensation by oxygen vacancy, and a preferential electronic compensation of acceptor by forming Fe^{4+} over Co^{4+}.. Phase stability, oxygen content, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of La_ {1-x}Sr_{x}Co_{0.2 }Fe_{0.8}O_{3-delta } (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) as function of temperature and oxygen activity were reported in the third paper. Both the oxygen deficiency and phase stability of compositions with y = 0.8 were found considerably high. It has been demonstrated that the degree of oxygen deficiency in these compositions significantly influences their structural and electrical properties, especially in the high temperature region.

  16. Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Captain, James G.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project has been developing technologies to produce oxygen from lunar regolith to provide consumables to a lunar outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloic and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, as halide minerals are also reduced at oxide reduction conditions. Because of the stringent water quality requirements for electrolysis, there is a need for a contaminant removal process. The Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems (CROPS) team has been developing a separation process to remove these contaminants in the gas and liquid phase that eliminates the need for consumables. CROPS has been using Nafion, a highly water selective polymeric proton exchange membrane, to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. Membrane thickness, product stream flow rate, and acid solution temperature and concentration were varied with the goal of maximizing water permeation and acid rejection. The results show that water permeation increases with increasing solution temperature and product stream flow rate, while acid rejection increases with decreasing solution temperature and concentration. Thinner membranes allowed for higher water flux and acid rejection than thicker ones. These results were used in the development of the hardware built for the most recent Mars ISRU demonstration project.

  17. Synthesis and Calibration of Phosphorescent Nanoprobes for Oxygen Imaging in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sinks, Louise E.; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen measurement by phosphorescence quenching [1, 2] consists of the following steps: 1) the probe is delivered into the medium of interest (e.g. blood or interstitial fluid); 2) the object is illuminated with light of appropriate wavelength in order to excite the probe into its triplet state; 3) the emitted phosphorescence is collected, and its time course is analyzed to yield the phosphorescence lifetime, which is converted into the oxygen concentration (or partial pressure, pO2). The probe must not interact with the biological environment and in some cases to be 4) excreted from the medium upon the measurement completion. Each of these steps imposes requirements on the molecular design of the phosphorescent probes, which constitute the only invasive component of the measurement protocol. Here we review the design of dendritic phosphorescent nanosensors for oxygen measurements in biological systems. The probes consist of Pt or Pd porphyrin-based polyarylglycine (AG) dendrimers, modified peripherally with polyethylene glycol (PEG's) residues. For effective two-photon excitation, termini of the dendrimers may be modified with two-photon antenna chromophores, which capture the excitation energy and channel it to the triplet cores of the probes via intramolecular FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). We describe the key photophysical properties of the probes and present detailed calibration protocols. PMID:20200497

  18. Synthesis and calibration of phosphorescent nanoprobes for oxygen imaging in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Sinks, Louise E; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen measurement by phosphorescence quenching [1, 2] consists of the following steps: 1) the probe is delivered into the medium of interest (e.g. blood or interstitial fluid); 2) the object is illuminated with light of appropriate wavelength in order to excite the probe into its triplet state; 3) the emitted phosphorescence is collected, and its time course is analyzed to yield the phosphorescence lifetime, which is converted into the oxygen concentration (or partial pressure, pO(2;)). The probe must not interact with the biological environment and in some cases to be 4) excreted from the medium upon the measurement completion. Each of these steps imposes requirements on the molecular design of the phosphorescent probes, which constitute the only invasive component of the measurement protocol. Here we review the design of dendritic phosphorescent nanosensors for oxygen measurements in biological systems. The probes consist of Pt or Pd porphyrin-based polyarylglycine (AG) dendrimers, modified peripherally with polyethylene glycol (PEG's) residues. For effective two-photon excitation, termini of the dendrimers may be modified with two-photon antenna chromophores, which capture the excitation energy and channel it to the triplet cores of the probes via intramolecular FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). We describe the key photophysical properties of the probes and present detailed calibration protocols. PMID:20200497

  19. Purification of liquid metal systems with sodium coolant from oxygen using getters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Konovalov, M. A.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    For increasing the safety and economic parameters of nuclear power stations (NPSs) with sodium coolant, it was decided to install all systems contacting radioactive sodium, including purification systems of circuit I, in the reactor vessel. The performance and capacity of cold traps (CTs) (conventional element of coolant purification systems) in these conditions are limited by their volume. It was proposed to use hot traps (HTs) in circuit I for coolant purification from oxygen. It was demonstrated that, at rated parameters of the installation when the temperature of the coolant streamlining the getter (gas absorber) is equal to 550°C, the hot trap can provide the required coolant purity. In shutdown modes at 250-300°C, the performance of the hot trap is reduced by four orders of magnitude. Possible HT operation regimes for shutdown modes and while reaching rated parameters were proposed and analyzed. Basic attention was paid to purification modes at power rise after commissioning and accidental contamination of the coolant when the initial oxygen concentration in it reached 25 mln-1. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of purification systems can be increased using HTs with the getter in the form of a foil or granules. The possibility of implementing the "fast purification" mode in which the coolant is purified simultaneously with passing over from the shutdown mode to the rated parameters was substantiated.

  20. Female rats are more susceptible to central nervous system oxygen toxicity than male rats

    PubMed Central

    Held, Heather E.; Pilla, Raffaele; Ciarlone, Geoffrey E.; Landon, Carol S.; Dean, Jay B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tonic–clonic seizures typify central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS‐OT) in humans and animals exposed to high levels of oxygen, as are encountered during scuba diving. We previously demonstrated that high doses of pseudoephedrine (PSE) decrease the latency to seizure (LS) for CNS‐OT in young male rats. This study investigated whether female rats respond similarly to PSE and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). We implanted 60 virgin stock (VS) and 54 former breeder (FB) female rats with radio‐telemetry devices that measured brain electrical activity. One week later, rats were gavaged with saline or PSE in saline (40, 80, 120, 160, or 320 mg/kg) before diving to five atmospheres absolute in 100% oxygen. The time between reaching maximum pressure and exhibiting seizure was LS. Vaginal smears identified estrus cycle phase. PSE did not decrease LS for VS or FB, primarily because they exhibited low LS for all conditions tested. VS had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (−42, −49, and −57%, respectively). FB also had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (−60, −86, and −73%, respectively). FB were older than VS (286 ± 10 days vs. 128 ± 5 days) and weighed more than VS (299 ± 2.7 g vs. 272 ± 2.1 g). Males tested were younger (88 ± 2 days), heavier (340 ± 4.5 g), and gained more weight postoperatively (7.2 ± 1.6 g) than either VS (−0.4 ± 1.5 g) or FB (−1.6 ± 1.5 g); however, LS correlated poorly with age, body mass, change in body mass, and estrus cycle phase. We hypothesize that differences in sex hormones underlie females' higher susceptibility to CNS‐OT than males. PMID:24771690

  1. Female rats are more susceptible to central nervous system oxygen toxicity than male rats.

    PubMed

    Held, Heather E; Pilla, Raffaele; Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Landon, Carol S; Dean, Jay B

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tonic-clonic seizures typify central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT) in humans and animals exposed to high levels of oxygen, as are encountered during scuba diving. We previously demonstrated that high doses of pseudoephedrine (PSE) decrease the latency to seizure (LS) for CNS-OT in young male rats. This study investigated whether female rats respond similarly to PSE and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). We implanted 60 virgin stock (VS) and 54 former breeder (FB) female rats with radio-telemetry devices that measured brain electrical activity. One week later, rats were gavaged with saline or PSE in saline (40, 80, 120, 160, or 320 mg/kg) before diving to five atmospheres absolute in 100% oxygen. The time between reaching maximum pressure and exhibiting seizure was LS. Vaginal smears identified estrus cycle phase. PSE did not decrease LS for VS or FB, primarily because they exhibited low LS for all conditions tested. VS had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-42, -49, and -57%, respectively). FB also had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-60, -86, and -73%, respectively). FB were older than VS (286 ± 10 days vs. 128 ± 5 days) and weighed more than VS (299 ± 2.7 g vs. 272 ± 2.1 g). Males tested were younger (88 ± 2 days), heavier (340 ± 4.5 g), and gained more weight postoperatively (7.2 ± 1.6 g) than either VS (-0.4 ± 1.5 g) or FB (-1.6 ± 1.5 g); however, LS correlated poorly with age, body mass, change in body mass, and estrus cycle phase. We hypothesize that differences in sex hormones underlie females' higher susceptibility to CNS-OT than males. PMID:24771690

  2. Oxygen Generator System Mars In-Situ Propellant Production Precursor Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Gottmann, M.; Baird, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    The 2001 Lander to Mars will carry the first ever ISRU payload to Mars. This payload, the Mars In-situ Propellant production Precursor (MIP), will demonstrate a variety of technologies that will be required for future ISRU Mars indigenous material processing plant designs. One of those technologies is that of extracting oxygen from the predominantly carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars, a prerequisite for future sample return and human missions to Mars. The Oxygen Generator Subsystem (OGS) portion of the MIP will demonstrate this and is the focus of this paper. The primary objective of the OGS is to demonstrate the production of oxygen from Mars atmospheric gases. Secondary objectives are to measure the performance and reliability of oxygen generation hardware in actual mission environments over an extended time. Major constraints on the OGS design came from several sources. The Lander provides power to the system from solar power that is harnessed by photovoltaic arrays. This limited OGS to daytime only operations (six to eight hours) and a maximum power of 15W. The reliance on solar power necessitated thermal cycling of the OGS between Mars ambient and OGS operating temperatures. The Lander also limited the total mass of the MIP payload to 7.5 kg with a correspondingly small volume, and the OGS was one of six experiments in the MIP. Mass and volume were to be minimized. Another constraint was cost. Mission funding, as always, was tight. Cost was to be minimized. In short the OGS design had to be low power (<15 Watts), low mass (1 kg), low volume, low cost, and be capable of cyclical operations for an extended stay on Mars. After extensive research, a zirconia based solid oxide electrolyzer design was selected.

  3. Oxygen Generator System Mars In-Situ Propellant Production Precursor Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Gottmann, M.; Baird, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    The 2001 Lander to Mars will carry the first ever In situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload to Mars. This payload, the Mars In-situ Propellant production Precursor (MIP), will demonstrate a variety of technologies that will be required for future ISRU Mars indigenous material processing plant designs. One of those technologies is that of extracting oxygen from the predominantly carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars, a prerequisite for future sample return and human missions to Mars. The Oxygen Generator Subsystem (OGS) portion of the MIP will demonstrate this and is the focus of this paper. The primary objective of the OGS is to demonstrate the production of oxygen from Mars atmospheric gases. Secondary objectives are to measure the performance and reliability of oxygen generation hardware in actual mission environments over an extended time. Major constraints on the OGS design came from several sources. The Lander provides power to the system from solar power that is harnessed by photovoltaic arrays. This limited OGS to daytime only operations (six to eight hours) and a maximum power of 15W. The reliance on solar power necessitated thermal cycling of the OGS between Mars ambient and OGS operating temperatures. The Lander also limited the total mass of the MIP payload to 7.5 kg with a correspondingly small volume, and the OGS was one of six experiments in the MIP Mass and volume were to be minimized. Another constraint was cost. Mission funding, as always, was tight. Cost was to be minimized. In short the OGS design had to be low power (<15 Watts), low mass (1 kg), low volume, low cost, and be capable of cyclical operations for an extended stay on Mars. After extensive research, a zirconia based solid oxide electrolyzer design was selected.

  4. Study of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary propulsion systems for the space tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Design concepts are considered that permit use of a liquid-liquid (as opposed to gas-gas) oxygen/hydrogen thrust chamber for attitude control and auxiliary propulsion thrusters on the space tug. The best of the auxiliary propulsion system concepts are defined and their principal characteristics, including cost as well as operational capabilities, are established. Design requirements for each of the major components of the systems, including thrusters, are developed at the conceptual level. The competitive concepts considered use both dedicated (separate tanks) and integrated (propellant from main propulsion tanks) propellant supply. The integrated concept is selected as best for the space tug after comparative evaluation against both cryogenic and storable propellant dedicated systems. A preliminary design of the selected system is established and recommendations for supporting research and technology to further the concept are presented.

  5. Oxygen therapy and intraocular oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Jampol, L M

    1987-01-01

    When delivered to the corneal surface of rabbits or monkeys, 100% oxygen can significantly increase the pO2 in the aqueous humor. Under hyperbaric conditions (two atmospheres), an observed rise in the aqueous pO2 in rabbits breathing room air can be increased further by exposing the rabbit cornea to 100% oxygen. The high oxygen levels under hyperbaric conditions are mediated by intravascular and transcorneal delivery of oxygen. The increase in the pO2 levels in the aqueous can prevent sickling of intracameral human erythrocytes containing sickle hemoglobin. Thus, oxygen therapy transcorneally or systemically could potentially be used to treat a sickle cell hyphema. The exposure of rabbit eyes to 100% oxygen at the corneal surface is followed by autoregulation (constriction) of the iris vasculature. We could demonstrate no constriction in the eyes of two normal human volunteers or of four patients with chronic stable rubeosis iridis. Preretinal vitreous pO2 levels can be significantly raised by exposing monkeys to hyperbaric 100% oxygen. This procedure may be of value in treating acute, reversible ischemic inner retinal diseases. Transcorneal or vascular delivery of oxygen to the eye under normobaric or hyperbaric conditions may be effective in treating ischemic diseases of the anterior segment, such as anterior segment necrosis or rubeosis iridis, or ischemic inner retinal diseases. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 6 PMID:3447339

  6. Influence factors for the oxidation of pyrite by oxygen and birnessite in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guohong; Luo, Yao; Chen, Cheng; Lv, Qiang; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Liu, Chengshuai

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of exposed pyrite causes acid mine drainage, soil acidification, and the release of toxic metal ions. As the important abiotic oxidants in supergene environments, oxygen and manganese oxides participate in the oxidation of pyrite. In this work, the oxidation processes of natural pyrite by oxygen and birnessite were studied in simulated systems, and the influence of pH, Fe(II) and Cr(III) on the intermediates and redox rate was investigated. SO4(2-) and elemental S were formed as the major and minor products, respectively, during the oxidation processes. Ferric (hydr) oxides including Fe(OH)3 and goethite were formed with low degree of crystallinity. Low pH and long-term reaction facilitated the formation of goethite and ferric hydroxide, respectively. The rate of pyrite oxidation by birnessite was enhanced in the presence of air (oxygen), and Fe(II) ions played a key role in the redox process. The addition of Fe(II) ions to the reaction system significantly enhanced the oxidation rate of pyrite; however, the presence of Cr(III) ions remarkably decreased the pyrite oxidation rate in aqueous systems. The introduction of Fe(II) ions to form a Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple facilitated the electron transfer and accelerated the oxidation rate of pyrite. The present work suggests that isolation from air and decreasing the concentration of Fe(II) ions in aqueous solutions might be effective strategies to reduce the oxidation rate of pyrite in mining soils. PMID:27372130

  7. A simplified CARS measurement system for rapid determination of temperature and oxygen concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Shoichi

    1987-01-01

    A new spectroscopic concept for the rapid determination of temperature and oxygen concentration by CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy) was described. The ratio of two spectral regions in the broadband Q-branch spectrum was detected by photomultipliers in a monochromator, which ratio depends on temperature and species concentration. The comparison of the measured data with theory was made using a flat flame burner and an electric furnace, with reasonable results. Various optical techniques for alignment were introduced including a highly efficient, stable dye oscillator. The combination of the spectroscopic concept and the optical techniques will make the CARS measurement system rapid in data processing and simple in optical parts.

  8. Development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system. [for spacecraft environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Modular components were refined or replaced to improve the performance of the electrolysis module in a system which generates both oxygen and hydrogen from hydrazine hydrate. Significant mechanical and electrical performance improvements were achieved in the cathode. Improvements were also made in the phase separation area but at considerable cost in time and money and to the detriment of other investigative areas. Only the pump/bubble separator failed in a manner necessitating redesign. Its failure was, however, due to its being operated above the temperature range for which it was designed. The basic electrolysis cell design was not changed.

  9. Carbon dioxide electrolysis with solid oxide electrolyte cells for oxygen recovery in life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The direct electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) is achieved without catalysts and at sufficiently high temperatures to avoid carbon formation. The tubular electrolysis cell consists of thin layers of anode, electrolyte, cathode and cell interconnection. The electrolyte is made from yttria-stabilized zirconia which is an oxygen ion conductor at elevated temperatures. Anode and cell interconnection materials are complex oxides and are electronic conductors. The cathode material is a composite metal-ceramic structure. Cell performance characteristics have been determined using varying feed gas compositions and degrees of electrochemical decomposition. Cell test data are used to project the performance of a three-person CO2-electrolysis breadboard system.

  10. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  11. Test System to Study the Ignition of Metals by Polymers in Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new test system that uses Laser energy to ignite a polymer promoter has been developed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. It will facilitate the study of the spread of fire from a burning polymer material to the metal surrounding it. The system can be used to answer questions regarding the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The data obtained from this test could also be used to develop mathematical models for analyzing the effects of configuration on ignition and combustion. The system features a 10,000-psi (69-MPa) test chamber with sight glass windows on either end and a 25-watt carbon dioxide Laser for an ignition source. The test system can be used with gaseous oxygen, nitrogen or any mixture of the two gases. To minimize the effect of preheating the metallic, the polymer is ignited with a minimal amount of Laser energy. Igniting the polymer in this fashion also simplifies the thermodynamic analysis of the ignition and propagation reactions. The system is very robust, versatile and straightforward to use. Depending on the test pressure and configuration, the test system operator can perform as many as 20 tests per day. Test results verify that ignition and combustion of the metallic sample is not only dependent on pressure, material type and temperature, but configuration of both the polymer promoter and metallic sample. Both 6061 aluminum and 316 stainless steel 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) diameter rods with a standard 0-ring groove were tested with Buna-N, Silicone, Teflon and Viton 0-rings. The system ignited all four types of 0-rings in oxygen at pressures ranging from ambient to 10,000 psi (69 MPa). However, neither the stainless steel nor the aluminum rods on which the O-rings were mounted ignited in any test conditions. Future testing may be done on the 0.25-inch (6.35-mm) rod and O-ring configuration to evaluate the lack of ignition in these tests. Future configurations may include a plug of polymer in the base of the sample and replicas

  12. A Preliminary Study on the Toxic Combustion Products Testing of Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2004-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative _ pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper reports the preliminary results of toxic combustion product testing of selected polymers in a pneumatic-impact test system. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Nylon 6/6, polychlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), fluoroelastomer (Viton(TradeMark) A), and nitrile rubber (Buna N), were tested in a pneumatic-impact test system at 2500- or 3500-psia oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned, then combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed by GC/MS/IRD, GC/FID, and GC/Methanizer/FID. The results of adiabatic-compression tests show that combustion of hydrocarbon polymers, nitrogen-containing polymers, and halogenated polymers in high-pressure oxygen systems are relatively complete. Toxicity of the combustion product gas is presumably much lower than the combustion product gas generated from ambient-pressure oxygen (or air) environments. The NASA-Lewis equilibrium code was used to determine the composition of combustion product gas generated from a simulated, adiabatic-compression test of nine polymers. The results are presented and discussed.

  13. Conceptual design of a lunar oxygen pilot plant Lunar Base Systems Study (LBSS) task 4.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective was to develop conceptual designs of two pilot plants to produce oxygen from lunar materials. A lunar pilot plant will be used to generate engineering data necessary to support an optimum design of a larger scale production plant. Lunar oxygen would be of primary value as spacecraft propellant oxidizer. In addition, lunar oxygen would be useful for servicing nonregenerative fuel cell power systems, providing requirements for life support, and to make up oxygen losses from leakage and airlock cycling. Thirteen different lunar oxygen production methods are described. Hydrogen reduction of ilmenite and extraction of solar-wind hydrogen from bulk lunar soil were selected for conceptual design studies. Trades and sensitivity analyses were performed with these models.

  14. Laboratory test and evaluation report of the essex model 60C-0037-2 molecular sieve oxygen generating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Brendan E.; Bruckart, James E.; Quattlebaum, Martin; Johnston, Leslie W.

    1993-06-01

    The Essex Model 60C-0037-2 Molecular Sieve Oxygen Generating System was tested for environmental and electromagnetic interference/compatibility under the U.S. Army Program for Testing and Evaluation of Equipment for Aeromedical Operations. The tests were conducted using current military and industrial standards and procedures for environmental tests and electromagnetic interference/compatibility and human factors. The Essex Model 60C-0037-2 performed properly in the test environments. The oxygen concentration produced by the unit depends on the compressed air pressure, oxygen flow, and vent pressure. A separate oxygen concentration analyzer would be required to determine the oxygen concentration for patient use. The unit produces a significant amount of noise while operating.

  15. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis system development. [to generate oxygen for manned space station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology used in a water electrolysis system (WES) to generate oxygen and hydrogen for manned space station applications was investigated. A four-man rated, low pressure breadboard water electrolysis system with the necessary instrumentation and controls was fabricated and tested. A six man rated, high pressure, high temperature, advanced preprototype WES was developed. This configuration included the design and development of an advanced water electrolysis module, capable of operation at 400 psig and 200 F, and a dynamic phase separator/pump in place of a passive phase separator design. Evaluation of this system demonstrated the goal of safe, unattended automated operation at high pressure and high temperature with an accumulated gas generation time of over 1000 hours.

  16. Astronomical Oxygen Isotopic Evidence for Supernova Enrichment of the Solar System Birth Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Edward; Gounelle, M.; Smith, R. L.; Morris, M. R.; Pontoppidan, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    Ratios among [C16O], [C17O] and [C18O] from young stellar objects (YSOs) obtained by high-resolution infrared spectroscopy (CRIRES, NIRSPEC) suggest that the solar system is indeed unusual in its 18O/17O compared with the present-day Galaxy at a variety of scales of observation. Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models suggest that 18O/17O is independent of time. A nearly constant Galactic 18O/17O with time is indicated by existing data showing a systematic variation in oxygen isotopologue ratios with distance from the Galactic center. In this context, we show that the disparity between present-day Galactic and solar 18O/17O is explained if the solar system was born in an environment enriched by type II supernovae from low-mass progenitors. Enrichment by ejecta from exploding B stars (not O stars) on the order of 1 % by mass can account for the enhancement in 18O/17O of the birth environment of the solar system compared with normal Galactic values. Analysis of the stochastic nature of star formation utilizing a well-known mass generation function shows that the parental molecular cloud complex that produced the solar system was proximal to a cluster composed of order 500 stars. Larger clusters produce SNe II with oxygen isotope ratios that are inconsistent with enhancement in 18O/17O. This cluster predated the solar system by approximately 10 to 30 Myrs. Enrichment by B star ejecta explains not only the anomalous 18O/17O of the solar system but also its anomalous Si isotopic composition and the former presence of extinct 60Fe.

  17. Development of a Portable Oxygen Monitoring System for Operations in the International Space Station Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John

    2009-01-01

    NASA is currently engaged in an activity to facilitate effective operations on the International Space Station (ISS) after the Space Shuttle retires. Currently, the Space Shuttle delivers crew and cargo to and from ISS. The Space Shuttle provides the only large scale method of hardware return from ISS to the ground. Hardware that needs to be periodically repaired, refurbished, or recalibrated must come back from ISS on the Shuttle. One example of NASA flight hardware that is used on ISS and refurbished on the ground is the Compound Specific Analyzer for Oxygen (CSA-O2). The CSA-O2 is an electrochemical sensor that is used on orbit for about 12 months (depending on Shuttle launch schedules), then returned to the ground for sensor replacement. The shuttle is scheduled to retire in 2010, and the ISS is scheduled to operate until 2016. NASA needs a hand held sensor that measures oxygen in the ISS environment and has a 5-10 year service life. After conducting a survey of oxygen sensor systems, NASA selected a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS) as the method of measurement that best addresses the needs for ISS. These systems are compact, meet ISS accuracy requirements, and because they use spectroscopic techniques, the sensors are not consumed or altered after making a measurement. TDLAS systems have service life ratings of 5-10 years, based on the lifetime of the laser. NASA is engaged in modifying a commercially available sensor, the Vaisala OMT 355, for the ISS application. The Vaisala OMT 355 requires three significant modifications to meet ISS needs. The commercial sensor uses a wall mount power supply, and the ISS sensor needs to use a rechargeable battery as its source of power. The commercial sensor has a pressure correction setpoint: the sensor can be adjusted to operate at reduced pressure conditions, but the sensor does not self correct dynamically and automatically. The ISS sensor needs to operate in the airlock, and make accurate

  18. Replacement of HCFC-225 Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both NASA and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This presentation summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned. It also demonstrates the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  19. Bus application of oxygen-enrichment technology and diesel-electric hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.

    1993-10-01

    The amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) mandate very strict limits on particulate, smoke, and other emissions from city buses. The use of alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or methanol, can help transit operators, such as the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), meet the mandated limits. However, the capital investment needed to convert the fueling infrastructure and buses is large, as is the expense of training personnel. If a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus can be implemented with the help of oxygen-enrichment technology or a diesel-electric hybrid system, this large investment could be postponed for many years. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) initiated this project to evaluate the possibility of applying these technologies to CTA buses. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a limited number of engine tests and computer analyses and concluded that both concepts are practical and will help in a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus that can meet the mandated limits of the CAA amendments. The oxygen enrichment of combustion air depends on the availability of a compact and economical membrane separator. Because the technology for this critical component is still under development, it is recommended that an actual bus demonstration be delayed until prototype membranes are available. The hybrid propulsion system is ready for the demonstration phase, and it is recommended that the CTA and RTA commence planning for a bus demonstration.

  20. Ammonium Removal by the Oxygen-Limited Autotrophic Nitrification-Denitrification System

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Linping; Verstraete, Willy

    1998-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the potential of implementation of an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) system with normal nitrifying sludge as the biocatalyst for the removal of nitrogen from nitrogen-rich wastewater in one step. In a sequential batch reactor, synthetic wastewater containing 1 g of NH4+-N liter−1 and minerals was treated. Oxygen supply to the reactor was double-controlled with a pH controller and a timer. At a volumetric loading rate (Bv) of 0.13 g of NH4+-N liter−1 day−1, about 22% of the fed NH4+-N was converted to NO2−-N or NO3−-N, 38% remained as NH4+-N, and the other 40% was removed mainly as N2. The specific removal rate of nitrogen was on the order of 50 mg of N liter−1 day−1, corresponding to 16 mg of N g of volatile suspended solids−1 day−1. The microorganisms which catalyzed the OLAND process are assumed to be normal nitrifiers dominated by ammonium oxidizers. The loss of nitrogen in the OLAND system is presumed to occur via the oxidation of NH4+ to N2 with NO2− as the electron acceptor. Hydroxylamine stimulated the removal of NH4+ and NO2−. Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) or an HAO-related enzyme might be responsible for the loss of nitrogen. PMID:9797314

  1. Phenotype-environment association of the oxygen transport system in trimorphic European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) populations.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melissa L; Praebel, Kim; Peruzzi, Stefano; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Bernatchez, Louis

    2014-08-01

    Replicated adaptive radiation events, typified by phenotypic divergence across resource axes, provide important insight into the eco-evolutionary dynamics that lead to the formation of new species. Here, we show that in trimorphic adaptive radiations of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), divergence of the oxygen transport system has occurred across the pelagic/littoral (shallow)-profundal (deep) resource axis, and at multiple biological scales. Profundal whitefish exhibited significantly larger red blood cells (RBCs), a greater proportion of cathodic hemoglobin protein components, and higher hemoglobin transcript abundance in kidney compared to littoral and pelagic morphs. Hemoglobin transcript abundance in brain and gill, but not kidney, and anodic hemoglobin protein component diversity in blood were also linked to variation at an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). As the whitefish morphs differ in population genetic structure at this SNP, hemoglobin transcript and protein divergence between profundal and pelagic/littoral morphs is likely being driven by genetic divergence. Our findings, along with our previous work on lake whitefish, highlight the importance of the oxygen transport system to the postglacial colonization of novel lacustrine environments by whitefish throughout the northern hemisphere. PMID:24766154

  2. Integrated Pressure-Fed Liquid Oxygen / Methane Propulsion Systems - Morpheus Experience, MARE, and Future Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric; Morehead, Robert; Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matt

    2016-01-01

    An integrated liquid oxygen (LOx) and methane propulsion system where common propellants are fed to the reaction control system and main engines offers advantages in performance, simplicity, reliability, and reusability. LOx/Methane provides new capabilities to use propellants that are manufactured on the Mars surface for ascent return and to integrate with power and life support systems. The clean burning, non-toxic, high vapor pressure propellants provide significant advantages for reliable ignition in a space vacuum, and for reliable safing or purging of a space-based vehicle. The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Morpheus lander demonstrated many of these key attributes as it completed over 65 tests including 15 flights through 2014. Morpheus is a prototype of LOx/Methane propellant lander vehicle with a fully integrated propulsion system. The Morpheus lander flight demonstrations led to the proposal to use LOx/Methane for a Discovery class mission, named Moon Aging Regolith Experiment (MARE) to land an in-situ science payload for Southwest Research Institute on the Lunar surface. Lox/Methane is extensible to human spacecraft for many transportation elements of a Mars architecture. This paper discusses LOx/Methane propulsion systems in regards to trade studies, the Morpheus project experience, the MARE NAVIS (NASA Autonomous Vehicle for In-situ Science) lander, and future possible applications. The paper also discusses technology research and development needs for Lox/Methane propulsion systems.

  3. Design and test status for life support applications of SPE oxygen generation systems. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titterington, W. A.; Erickson, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced six-man rated oxygen generation system has been fabricated and tested as part of a NASA/JSC technology development program for a long lived, manned spacecraft life support system. Details of the design and tests results are presented. The system is based on the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) water electrolysis technology and its nominal operating conditions are 2760 kN/sq m (400 psia) and 355 K (180 F) with an electrolysis module current density capability up to 350 mA/sq cm (326 ASF). The system is centered on a 13-cell SPE water electrolysis module having a single cell active area of 214 sq cm (33 sq in) and it incorporates instrumentation and controls for single pushbutton automatic startup/shutdown, component fault detection and isolation, and self-contained sensors and controls for automatic safe emergency shutdown. The system has been tested in both the orbital cyclic and continuous mode of operation. Various parametric tests have been completed to define the system capability for potential application in spacecraft environmental systems.

  4. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  5. Ultra-sensitive optical oxygen sensors for characterisation of nearly anoxic systems

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M.; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen quantification in trace amounts is essential in many fields of science and technology. Optical oxygen sensors proved invaluable tools for oxygen measurements in a broad concentration range but until now neither optical nor electrochemical oxygen sensors were able to quantify oxygen in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. Herein we present new optical oxygen sensing materials with unmatched sensitivity. They rely on the combination of ultra-long decaying (several hundred milliseconds lifetime) phosphorescent boron- and aluminium-chelates and highly oxygen-permeable and chemically stable perfluorinated polymers. The sensitivity of the new sensors is improved up to 20-fold compared to state-of-the-art analogues. The limits of detection are as low as 5 parts per billion, volume in gas phase under atmospheric pressure or 7 picomolar in solution. The sensors enable completely new applications for monitoring of oxygen in previously inaccessible concentration ranges. PMID:25042041

  6. Ultra-sensitive optical oxygen sensors for characterization of nearly anoxic systems.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen quantification in trace amounts is essential in many fields of science and technology. Optical oxygen sensors proved invaluable tools for oxygen measurements in a broad concentration range, but until now neither optical nor electrochemical oxygen sensors were able to quantify oxygen in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. Herein we present new optical oxygen-sensing materials with unmatched sensitivity. They rely on the combination of ultra-long decaying (several 100 ms lifetime) phosphorescent boron- and aluminium-chelates, and highly oxygen-permeable and chemically stable perfluorinated polymers. The sensitivity of the new sensors is improved up to 20-fold compared with state-of-the-art analogues. The limits of detection are as low as 5 p.p.b., volume in gas phase under atmospheric pressure or 7 pM in solution. The sensors enable completely new applications for monitoring of oxygen in previously inaccessible concentration ranges. PMID:25042041

  7. Estimating Oxygen Needs for Childhood Pneumonia in Developing Country Health Systems: A New Model for Expecting the Unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Beverly D.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Chan, Timothy C. Y.; Cheng, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Background Planning for the reliable and cost-effective supply of a health service commodity such as medical oxygen requires an understanding of the dynamic need or ‘demand’ for the commodity over time. In developing country health systems, however, collecting longitudinal clinical data for forecasting purposes is very difficult. Furthermore, approaches to estimating demand for supplies based on annual averages can underestimate demand some of the time by missing temporal variability. Methods A discrete event simulation model was developed to estimate variable demand for a health service commodity using the important example of medical oxygen for childhood pneumonia. The model is based on five key factors affecting oxygen demand: annual pneumonia admission rate, hypoxaemia prevalence, degree of seasonality, treatment duration, and oxygen flow rate. These parameters were varied over a wide range of values to generate simulation results for different settings. Total oxygen volume, peak patient load, and hours spent above average-based demand estimates were computed for both low and high seasons. Findings Oxygen demand estimates based on annual average values of demand factors can often severely underestimate actual demand. For scenarios with high hypoxaemia prevalence and degree of seasonality, demand can exceed average levels up to 68% of the time. Even for typical scenarios, demand may exceed three times the average level for several hours per day. Peak patient load is sensitive to hypoxaemia prevalence, whereas time spent at such peak loads is strongly influenced by degree of seasonality. Conclusion A theoretical study is presented whereby a simulation approach to estimating oxygen demand is used to better capture temporal variability compared to standard average-based approaches. This approach provides better grounds for health service planning, including decision-making around technologies for oxygen delivery. Beyond oxygen, this approach is widely

  8. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  9. Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are required for systemic acquired resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Wang, Caixia; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of broad-spectrum disease resistance that is induced in response to primary infection and that protects uninfected portions of the plant against secondary infections by related or unrelated pathogens. SAR is associated with an increase in chemical signals that operate in a collective manner to confer protection against secondary infections. These include, the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), azelaic acid (AzA) and more recently identified signals nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). NO, ROS, AzA and G3P function in the same branch of the SAR pathway, and in parallel to the SA-regulated branch. NO and ROS function upstream of AzA/G3P and different reactive oxygen species functions in an additive manner to mediate chemical cleavage of the C9 double bond on C18 unsaturated fatty acids to generate AzA. The parallel and additive functioning of various chemical signals provides important new insights in the overlapping pathways leading to SAR. PMID:26375184

  11. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema. PMID:24122190

  12. Estimating oxygen consumption from heart rate using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and analytical approaches.

    PubMed

    Kolus, Ahmet; Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Labib, Richard; Dubeau, Denise

    2014-11-01

    In new approaches based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy systems (ANFIS) and analytical method, heart rate (HR) measurements were used to estimate oxygen consumption (VO2). Thirty-five participants performed Meyer and Flenghi's step-test (eight of which performed regeneration release work), during which heart rate and oxygen consumption were measured. Two individualized models and a General ANFIS model that does not require individual calibration were developed. Results indicated the superior precision achieved with individualized ANFIS modelling (RMSE = 1.0 and 2.8 ml/kg min in laboratory and field, respectively). The analytical model outperformed the traditional linear calibration and Flex-HR methods with field data. The General ANFIS model's estimates of VO2 were not significantly different from actual field VO2 measurements (RMSE = 3.5 ml/kg min). With its ease of use and low implementation cost, the General ANFIS model shows potential to replace any of the traditional individualized methods for VO2 estimation from HR data collected in the field. PMID:24793823

  13. The Ketogenic Diet and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Prolong Survival in Mice with Systemic Metastatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, Angela M.; Ari, Csilla; Seyfried, Thomas N.; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor. The ketogenic diet (KD) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet which decreases blood glucose and elevates blood ketones and has been shown to slow cancer progression in animals and humans. Abnormal tumor vasculature creates hypoxic pockets which promote cancer progression and further increase the glycolytic-dependency of cancers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2T) saturates tumors with oxygen, reversing the cancer promoting effects of tumor hypoxia. Since these non-toxic therapies exploit overlapping metabolic deficiencies of cancer, we tested their combined effects on cancer progression in a natural model of metastatic disease. Methods We used the firefly luciferase-tagged VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer to compare tumor progression and survival in mice fed standard or KD ad libitum with or without HBO2T (2.5 ATM absolute, 90 min, 3x/week). Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Results KD alone significantly decreased blood glucose, slowed tumor growth, and increased mean survival time by 56.7% in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. While HBO2T alone did not influence cancer progression, combining the KD with HBO2T elicited a significant decrease in blood glucose, tumor growth rate, and 77.9% increase in mean survival time compared to controls. Conclusions KD and HBO2T produce significant anti-cancer effects when combined in a natural model of systemic metastatic cancer. Our evidence suggests that these therapies should be further investigated as potential non-toxic treatments or adjuvant therapies to standard care for patients with systemic metastatic disease. PMID:23755243

  14. CAN GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION EXPLAIN THE OXYGEN ISOTOPIC VARIATIONS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM?

    SciTech Connect

    Lugaro, Maria; Liffman, Kurt; Maddison, Sarah T.

    2012-11-01

    A number of objects in primitive meteorites have oxygen isotopic compositions that place them on a distinct, mass-independent fractionation line with a slope of one on a three-isotope plot. The most popular model for describing how this fractionation arose assumes that CO self-shielding produced {sup 16}O-rich CO and {sup 16}O-poor H{sub 2}O, where the H{sub 2}O subsequently combined with interstellar dust to form relatively {sup 16}O-poor solids within the solar nebula. Another model for creating the different reservoirs of {sup 16}O-rich gas and {sup 16}O-poor solids suggests that these reservoirs were produced by Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) if the solar system dust component was somewhat younger than the gas component and both components were lying on the line of slope one in the O three-isotope plot. We argue that GCE is not the cause of mass-independent fractionation of the oxygen isotopes in the solar system. The GCE scenario is in contradiction with observations of the {sup 18}O/{sup 17}O ratios in nearby molecular clouds and young stellar objects. It is very unlikely for GCE to produce a line of slope one when considering the effect of incomplete mixing of stellar ejecta in the interstellar medium. Furthermore, the assumption that the solar system dust was younger than the gas requires unusual timescales or the existence of an important stardust component that is not theoretically expected to occur nor has been identified to date.

  15. A comparative ESR study of some paramagnetic materials as probes for the noninvasive measurement of dissolved oxygen in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Utsumi, H; Kirino, Y

    1994-11-01

    The ESR properties of three types of paramagnetic material, active charcoal, fusinite and a stable nitroxide radical 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were examined in order to evaluate their suitability as probes to measure dissolved intra- and extra-cellular oxygen. Although, with changes in oxygen concentration, a greater change in the linewidth of ESR signals was observed with fusinite or active charcoal, it took a long time (15 min for active charcoal and more than 6 h for fusinite) for equilibrium to be achieved. On the other hand, equilibrium was reached very rapidly in the case of the TEMPONE spectra although the sensitivity to changes in oxygen concentration was only moderate. Furthermore, since lipid bilayers are permeable to TEMPONE, this compound can be used to measure intracellular oxygen concentration when employed in combination with membrane-impermeable spin-broadening reagents which act on ESR signals arising from extracellular probes. A perdeuterated derivative of TEMPONE is useful in that it gives a greater signal-to-noise ratio and greater sensitivity to changes in oxygen concentration. In conclusion, active charcoal is suitable as a probe for extracellular oxygen in a system where changes are slow, while nitroxide is a versatile probe for measuring rapidly changing intra- and extra-cellular oxygen concentrations. PMID:7859334

  16. Design, fabrication, and analysis of miniature reflective oxygen monitoring system for use in PDT of esophageal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premasiri, Amaranath; Happawana, Gemunu

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective and minimally invasive treatment modality with relatively less side effects, which is approved by FDA for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Maximum therapeutic outcome of the PDT protocol for each individual patient requires optimization of the components of PDT operating at their highest efficacy. Tumor necrosis, the method of malignant tissue destruction by PDT, is carried out by the toxic singlet oxygen molecules that are being formed from the molecular oxygen in the tumor. The availability of molecular oxygen, hence being the rate limiting step for PDT plays a key role in the treatment protocol. Currently the PDT of esophageal carcinoma is rather a blind process since there is no method to monitor the tumor oxygen level during the treatment. In this paper we present an optical technique to monitor molecular oxygen level in the PDT milieu. The technique described herein is a reflection oximetry technique designed with small semiconductor lasers and a silicon photodiode. The light used for monitoring system comes from two semiconductor diode lasers of 650 nm and 940 nm wavelengths. The two lasers and the photodiode are mounted onto a small package which is to be imprinted onto a balloon catheter containing the PDT light delivery system. Lasers and the photodiode are powered and controlled by a control box that is connected via a cable. Light sources and the respective photodiode output are controlled by the LabVIEW virtual instrumentation. The sequential on and off light source and the respective reflective signal are processed with MATLAB. The latter code integrates with LabVIEW to make an automatic calculation of the corresponding light absorption by each chromophore and to calculate the change in oxygen level as well as the amount of blood and oxygen present in the treatment area. The designed system is capable of monitoring the change in oxygen level and the blood flow in any part of the human body where the

  17. First experience with the ultra compact mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system Cardiohelp in interhospital transport.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Alois; Arlt, Matthias; Amann, Matthias; Lunz, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Graf, Bernhard; Schmid, Christof

    2011-06-01

    In patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure extracorporeal assist devices are to support patients during resuscitation, for transportation, until organ recovery, and as bridge to further therapeutic modalities. We report on our first experience with the new Cardiohelp system for interhospital transfer of cardiopulmonarily compromised patients. The Cardiohelp system was used for transportation and in-house treatment in six male patients with a mean age of 41±17 years. Five patients suffered respiratory failure; one patient with acute myocardial infarction was in profound cardiogenic shock. Accordingly, the Cardiohelp system was implanted as a venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in five patients and as a venoarterial system in one patient. The preECMO ventilation time was 0.5-4 days. The patients were transported to our institution by car (n=1) or helicopter (n=5) over a distance of 80-5850 km. The subsequent in-house ECMO support was continued with the Cardiohelp and lasted for 5-13 days. PostECMO ventilation was one to 25 days. A 100% survival was achieved. The portable Cardiohelp system allows location-independent stabilization of cardiopulmonary compromised patients with consecutive interhospital transfer and in-house treatment. The integrated sensors, which register arterial and venous line pressure, blood temperature, hemoglobin as well as SvO(2), greatly alleviate its management and considerably increase safety. PMID:21388980

  18. Liquid Methane/Liquid Oxygen Propellant Conditioning Feed System (PCFS) Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skaff, A.; Grasl, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hockenberry S.; Schubert, J.; Arrington, L.; Vasek, T.

    2008-01-01

    As part of their Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) program, NASA has embarked upon an effort to develop chemical rocket engines which utilize non-toxic, cryogenic propellants such as liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). This effort includes the development and testing of a 100 lbf Reaction Control Engine (RCE) that will be used to evaluate the performance of a LO2/LCH4 rocket engine over a broad range of propellant temperatures and pressures. This testing will take place at NASA-Glenn Research Center's (GRC) Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) test facility in Cleveland, OH, and is currently scheduled to begin in late 2008. While the initial tests will be performed at sea level, follow-on testing will be performed at NASA-GRC's Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) for altitude testing. In support of these tests, Sierra Lobo, Inc. (SLI) has designed, developed, and fabricated two separate portable propellant feed systems under the Propellant Conditioning and Feed System (PCFS) task: one system for LCH4, and one for LO2. These systems will be capable of supplying propellants over a large range of conditions from highly densified to several hundred pounds per square inch (psi) saturated. This paper presents the details of the PCFS design and explores the full capability of these propellant feed systems.

  19. Proposed fast-response oxygen monitoring and control system for the Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-response oxygen monitoring and control system, based on a Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 sensor, was developed and tested in the laboratory. The system is capable of maintaining oxygen concentration in the CH4-O2-air combustion product gases at 20.9 + or - 1.0 percent. If the oxygen concentration in the exhaust stream differs from that in normal air by 25 percent or more, an alarm signal is provided for automatic tunnel shutdown. The overall prototype system response time was reduced from about 1 sec in the original configuration to about 0.2 sec. The basis of operation and the results of laboratory tests of the system are described.

  20. Proposed fast-response oxygen monitoring and control system for the Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L.

    1983-11-01

    A fast-response oxygen monitoring and control system, based on a Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 sensor, was developed and tested in the laboratory. The system is capable of maintaining oxygen concentration in the CH4-O2-air combustion product gases at 20.9 + or - 1.0 percent. If the oxygen concentration in the exhaust stream differs from that in normal air by 25 percent or more, an alarm signal is provided for automatic tunnel shutdown. The overall prototype system response time was reduced from about 1 sec in the original configuration to about 0.2 sec. The basis of operation and the results of laboratory tests of the system are described.

  1. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  2. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  3. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  4. Structured back gates for high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems using oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, M.; Tiemann, L.; Dietsche, W.; Karl, H.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a reliable method to obtain patterned back gates compatible with high mobility molecular beam epitaxy via local oxygen ion implantation that suppresses the conductivity of an 80 nm thick silicon doped GaAs epilayer. Our technique was optimized to circumvent several constraints of other gating and implantation methods. The ion-implanted surface remains atomically flat which allows unperturbed epitaxial overgrowth. We demonstrate the practical application of this gating technique by using magneto-transport spectroscopy on a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) with a mobility exceeding 20 × 106 cm2/V s. The back gate was spatially separated from the Ohmic contacts of the 2DES, thus minimizing the probability for electrical shorts or leakage and permitting simple contacting schemes.

  5. Population synthesis of triple systems in the context of mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, A. S.; Pols, O. R.; Claeys, J. S. W.; Nelemans, G.

    2013-04-01

    Hierarchical triple systems are common among field stars yet their long-term evolution is poorly understood theoretically. In such systems Kozai cycles can be induced in the inner binary system during which the inner orbit eccentricity and the inclination between both binary orbits vary periodically. These cycles, combined with tidal friction and gravitational wave emission, can significantly affect the inner binary evolution. To investigate these effects quantitatively we perform a population synthesis study of triple systems and focus on evolutionary paths that lead to mergers of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs), which constitute an important candidate progenitor channel for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We approach this problem by Monte Carlo sampling from observation-based distributions of systems within the primary mass range 1.0-6.5 M⊙ and inner orbit semimajor axes a1 and eccentricities e1 satisfying a1(1 - e21) > 12 au, i.e. non-interacting in the absence of a tertiary component. We evolve these systems by means of a newly developed algorithm that couples secular triple dynamics with an existing binary population synthesis code. We find that the tertiary significantly alters the inner binary evolution in about 24 per cent of all sampled systems. In particular, we find several channels leading to CO WD mergers. Amongst these is a novel channel in which a collision occurs in wide inner binary systems as a result of extremely high eccentricities induced by Kozai cycles. With assumptions on which CO WD mergers lead to a SN Ia explosion we estimate the SNe Ia delay time distribution resulting from triples and compare to a binary population synthesis study and to observations. Although we find that our triple rate is low, we have determined a lower limit of the triple-induced SNe Ia rate and further study is needed that includes triples with initially tighter inner orbits.

  6. Blood oxygen flux estimation with a combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, an important indicator of tissue metabolism, can be expressed as the change of net blood oxygen flux into and out of a tissue region per 100 g of tissue. In this work, we propose a photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound method for imaging local blood oxygen flux of a single vessel. An imaging system for combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy is presented. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow speed can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or structural photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate oxygen saturation (sO2) and total concentration of haemoglobin (CHb), all of the parameters necessary for oxygen flux estimation can be provided. The accuracy of the flow speed and sO2 estimation has been investigated. In vitro sheep blood phantom experiments have been performed at different sO2 levels and mean flow speeds. Blood oxygen flux has been estimated, and the uncertainty of the measurement has been quantified.

  7. Measurement of Predation and Biofilm Formation under Different Ambient Oxygen Conditions Using a Simple Gasbag-Based System

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Aimy

    2013-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus are Gram-negative bacteria characterized by predatory behavior. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the predators to prey in different oxygen environments. When placed on an orbital shaker, a positive association between the rate of aeration and predation was observed. To further examine the effects of elevated ambient oxygen levels on predation, a simple gasbag system was developed. Using the system, we were able to conduct experiments at ambient oxygen levels of 3% to 86%. When placed in gasbags and inflated with air, 50% O2, and 100% O2, positive predation was seen on both planktonic and biofilm-grown prey cells. However, in low-oxygen environments, predatory bacteria were able to attack only prey cells grown as biofilms. To further evaluate the gasbag system, biofilm development of Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms was also measured. Although the gasbag system was found to be suitable for culturing bacteria that require a low-oxygen environment, it was not capable of supporting, with its current configuration, the growth of obligate anaerobes in liquid or agar medium. PMID:23811501

  8. A Brief Study on Toxic Combustion Products of the Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is the adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the NASA pneumatic-impact system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and determines the toxic combustion products produced from the burning of five selected polymers. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Zytel(Registered TradeMark) 42 (Nylon 6/6), Buna N (nitrile rubber), Witon(Registered TradeMark) A (copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene), Neoflon(Registered TradeMark) (polychlorotrifluoroethylene), and Teflon(Registered TradeMark) (polytetrafluoroethylene), were tested in the NASA pneumatic-impact test system at 17.2-MPa oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned; combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed using various methods. The results show that the NASA pneumatic-impact system is an appropriate test system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and to collect combustion products for further chemical analysis. The composition of the combustion product gas generated from burning the five selected polymers are presented and discussed.

  9. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  10. A new oxygen barometer for solar system basaltic glasses based on vanadium valence

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, J.M.; Sutton, S.R.; Papike, J.J.; Delaney, J.S.; Shearer, C.K.; Newville, M.; Eng, P.; Rivers, M.; Dyar, M.D.

    2004-05-10

    An oxybarometer based on vanadium valence and applicable to basaltic glasses covers eight orders of magnitude in oxygen fugacity. The determination of oxidation conditions for basaltic magmas derived by the melting of planetary mantles is critical to our understanding of the nature and evolution of planetary interiors. Yet, these determinations are compromised in terrestrial and especially extraterrestrial basalts by our analytical and computational methods for estimating oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}). For example, mineralogical barometers (1, 2) can be reduced in effectiveness by subsolidus re-equilibration of mineral assemblages, inversion of mineralogical data to melt characteristics, and deviations of the natural mineral compositions from ideal thermodynamic parameters. Likewise, techniques to estimate fO{sub 2} based on the valence state of Fe (i.e. Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+}) are ineffective for materials that crystallized at or below the IW buffer, and only contain Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 0} (3). For these reasons, we have developed an oxybarometer based on the valence state of vanadium in basaltic glasses. This oxybarometer has enormous potential because (1) V valence is measured in basaltic glasses that have been quenched at near liquidus temperatures, thereby recording magmatic fO{sub 2} conditions, and (2) V is a multivalent element, existing as V{sup 2+}, V{sup 3+}, V{sup 4+}, and V{sup 5+}, thus allowing for applicability over a range of redox conditions from the most reduced materials in the solar system, (e.g. calcium aluminum rich inclusions in chondritic meteorites [4]) to the most oxidized terrestrial magmas (this work).

  11. Therapeutic ketosis with ketone ester delays central nervous system oxygen toxicity seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Dominic P; Pilla, Raffaele; Held, Heather E; Landon, Carol S; Puchowicz, Michelle; Brunengraber, Henri; Ari, Csilla; Arnold, Patrick; Dean, Jay B

    2013-05-15

    Central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT) seizures occur with little or no warning, and no effective mitigation strategy has been identified. Ketogenic diets (KD) elevate blood ketones and have successfully treated drug-resistant epilepsy. We hypothesized that a ketone ester given orally as R,S-1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester (BD-AcAc(2)) would delay CNS-OT seizures in rats breathing hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)). Adult male rats (n = 60) were implanted with radiotelemetry units to measure electroencephalogram (EEG). One week postsurgery, rats were administered a single oral dose of BD-AcAc(2), 1,3-butanediol (BD), or water 30 min before being placed into a hyperbaric chamber and pressurized to 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) O2. Latency to seizure (LS) was measured from the time maximum pressure was reached until the onset of increased EEG activity and tonic-clonic contractions. Blood was drawn at room pressure from an arterial catheter in an additional 18 animals that were administered the same compounds, and levels of glucose, pH, Po(2), Pco(2), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetoacetate (AcAc), and acetone were analyzed. BD-AcAc(2) caused a rapid (30 min) and sustained (>4 h) elevation of BHB (>3 mM) and AcAc (>3 mM), which exceeded values reported with a KD or starvation. BD-AcAc(2) increased LS by 574 ± 116% compared with control (water) and was due to the effect of AcAc and acetone but not BHB. BD produced ketosis in rats by elevating BHB (>5 mM), but AcAc and acetone remained low or undetectable. BD did not increase LS. In conclusion, acute oral administration of BD-AcAc(2) produced sustained ketosis and significantly delayed CNS-OT seizures by elevating AcAc and acetone. PMID:23552496

  12. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-liang; Zhang, Ya-nan; Wang, Zhong-zhuang; Xu, Wei-gang; Li, Run-ping; Zhang, Jun-dong

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO's application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine's mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5 atm absolute HBO for 80 min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20 min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  13. Oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in an insect model system.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2015-06-01

    A mismatch between oxygen availability and metabolic demand may constrain thermal tolerance. While considerable support for this idea has been found in marine organisms, results from insects are equivocal and raise the possibility that mode of gas exchange, oxygen safety margins and the physico-chemical properties of the gas medium influence heat tolerance estimates. Here, we examined critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and aerobic scope under altered oxygen supply and in two life stages that varied in metabolic demand in Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). We also systematically examined the influence of changes in gas properties on CTmax. Larvae have a lower oxygen safety margin (higher critical oxygen partial pressure at which metabolism is suppressed relative to metabolic demand) and significantly higher CTmax under normoxia than pupae (53°C vs 50°C). Larvae, but not pupae, were oxygen limited with hypoxia (2.5 kPa) decreasing CTmax significantly from 53 to 51°C. Humidifying hypoxic air relieved the oxygen limitation effect on CTmax in larvae, whereas variation in other gas properties did not affect CTmax. Our data suggest that oxygen safety margins set thermal limits in air-breathing invertebrates and the magnitude of this effect potentially reconciles differences in oxygen limitation effects on thermal tolerance found among diverse taxa to date. PMID:26041031

  14. Regional and systemic oxygen delivery/uptake relations and lactate flux in hyperdynamic, endotoxin-treated dogs.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S E; Cain, S M

    1992-02-01

    Pathologic oxygen supply dependency (PO2SD) may be etiologic in multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and has been related to mortality in sepsis. Although elevated lactate levels are generally assumed to be a marker of anaerobiosis in these patients, endotoxin may increase serum lactate by inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), unrelated to tissue PO2. We hypothesized that regional lactate flux may correlate poorly with local oxygen delivery in sepsis. This study examined both the whole-body (WB) and regional (isolated hind limb L and gut G) responses to endotoxin infusion in terms of oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and lactate flux in 12 pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. To separate hypoxia-induced lactate production from that related to inactivation of PDH by endotoxin, half the dogs received dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDH activator. After endotoxin and volume resuscitation, each animal had low systemic vascular resistance with normal to high cardiac output. Despite adequate oxygen delivery to WB, L, and G, arterial lactate levels rose significantly. A 30-min hypoxic challenge (12% FIO2) did not increase lactate levels but did increase WB O2 uptake. DCA normalized lactate levels without influencing oxygen delivery and uptake relations. These data show that lactate levels in endotoxic states may be a poor marker of tissue hypoxia and may be more related to PDH activity. PMID:1736740

  15. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  16. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  17. Design and Testing of the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Regulators for the Flexible Portable Life Support System (FlexPLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Colin; Hepworth, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The next generation space suit requires additional capabilities for controlling and adjusting internal pressure compared to that of historical designs. Although the general configuration of the oxygen systems for the next generation space suit is similar or derived from the Apollo and Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) with Primary closed loop life support operation and Secondary sourced open loop life support operations, nearly everything else has evolved with new available technologies. For the case of the primary and secondary regulators, the design has gone away from purely mechanical systems actuated with pull-cords or "bicycle cables" to electro-mechanical hybrids that provide the best of both worlds with respect to power draw, reliability, and versatility. This paper discusses the development and testing of a Secondary Oxygen Regulator bench-top prototype along with comparisons of operation with the various prototypes for the Primary Oxygen Regulator.

  18. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  19. Parallel electrochemical treatment system and application for identifying acid-stable oxygen evolution electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan J R; Shinde, Aniketa; Guevarra, Dan; Xiang, Chengxiang; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-02-01

    Many energy technologies require electrochemical stability or preactivation of functional materials. Due to the long experiment duration required for either electrochemical preactivation or evaluation of operational stability, parallel screening is required to enable high throughput experimentation. Imposing operational electrochemical conditions to a library of materials in parallel creates several opportunities for experimental artifacts. We discuss the electrochemical engineering principles and operational parameters that mitigate artifacts in the parallel electrochemical treatment system. We also demonstrate the effects of resistive losses within the planar working electrode through a combination of finite element modeling and illustrative experiments. Operation of the parallel-plate, membrane-separated electrochemical treatment system is demonstrated by exposing a composition library of mixed-metal oxides to oxygen evolution conditions in 1 M sulfuric acid for 2 h. This application is particularly important because the electrolysis and photoelectrolysis of water are promising future energy technologies inhibited by the lack of highly active, acid-stable catalysts containing only earth abundant elements. PMID:25561243

  20. Applying the Ce-in-zircon oxygen geobarometer to diverse silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claiborne, L. L.; Miller, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    Zircon provides information on age, temperature, and composition of the magma from which it grew. In systems such as Mount St. Helens, where zircon is not coeval with the rest of the crystal cargo, it provides the only accessible record of the extended history of the magmatic system, including cycles of intrusion, crystallization and rejuvenation beneath an active volcano (Claiborne et al., 2010). The rare earth elements, which are present in measureable quantities in zircon, provide information about the composition of the magma from which zircon grew. Unique among the generally trivalent rare earth elements, cerium can exist as either trivalent or tetravalent, depending on the oxidation state of the magma. The tetravalent ion is highly compatible in zircon, in the site that usually hosts tetravalent zirconium, and so the amount of Cerium in zircon relative (relative to what would be expected of trivalent Ce) depends the oxidation state of the magma from which it grew. Trail et al. (2011) proposed a calibration based on experimental data that uses the Ce anomaly in zircon as a direct proxy for magma oxidation (fugacity), describing the relationship between Ce in zircon and magma oxygen fugacity as ln(Ce/Ce*)D = (0.1156±0.0050)xln(fO2)+(13860±708)/T-(6.125±0.484). For systems like Mount St. Helens, where the major minerals record only events in the hundreds to thousands of years leading to eruption, (including the Fe-Ti oxides traditionally relied upon for records of oxidation state of the magmas), this presents a novel approach for understanding more extended histories of oxidation of magmas in the tens and hundreds of thousands of years of magmatism at a volcanic center. This calibration also promises to help us better constrain conditions of crystallization in intrusive portions of volcanic systems, as well as plutonic bodes. We apply this new oxygen geobarometer to natural volcanic and plutonic zircons from a variety of tectonic settings, and compare to

  1. Atomic Oxygen Exposure of Power System and other Spacecraft Materials: Results of the EOIM-3 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1997-01-01

    In order to test their reactivity with Atomic Oxygen, twenty five materials were flown on the EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials) portion of the STS-46 Mission. These materials include refractory metals, candidate insulation materials, candidate radiator coatings, and a selection of miscellaneous materials. This report documents the results of the pre- and post-flight analysis of these materials.

  2. Dual role of vitamin C in an oxygen-sensitive system: discrepancy between DNA damage and cell death.

    PubMed

    Shi, Minyi; Xu, Baohui; Azakami, Kazuko; Morikawa, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Komatsu, Masaharu; Aoyama, Kohji; Takeuchi, Toru

    2005-02-01

    Although vitamin C is considered to act both as pro-oxidant and antioxidant, the mechanisms underlying these actions are still unclear. Using the oxygen-sensitive system of a strict anaerobe, Prevotella melaninogenica, we investigated both the pro-oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms of vitamin C. In the presence of vitamin C, the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG) formation induced by oxygen exposure was enhanced, probably due to the action of vitamin C on hydrogen peroxide generated during oxygen exposure: while catalase almost completely suppressed the enhancing effect of vitamin C, 8OHdG formation induced by hydrogen peroxide was enhanced by vitamin C. By contrast, the presence of vitamin C inhibited bacterial cell death, membrane damage, and lipid peroxidation induced by oxygen exposure. Sodium azide showed similar effects to vitamin C, thus the antioxidant action of vitamin C may be due to its quenching of the singlet oxygen generated in this system. Both the pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects of vitamin C were observed only in acidic conditions. PMID:15763969

  3. Periodical bubble formation and the oscillatory change in dissolved oxygen concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between the periodical bubble forming and the oscillatory change in the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system was studied. Photographs of the bubbles and the responses from the DO electrode indicated that large bubbles were generated periodically, and that the DO profile depended on the geometrical relationship between the electrode and the bubbles. PMID:16772694

  4. 75 FR 3141 - Airworthiness Directives; AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace Oxygen Cylinder Assemblies, as Installed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ...-16049 (74 FR 63063, December 2, 2009). That AD applies to certain AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace oxygen... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3....13 by removing amendment 39-16049 (74 FR 63063, December 2, 2009) and adding the following new...

  5. Characteristics of MCrAlY coatings sprayed by high velocity oxygen-fuel spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying system in open air has been established for producing the coatings that are extremely clean and dense. It is thought that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY (M is Fe, Ni and/or Co) coatings can be applied to provide resistance against oxidation and corrosion to the hot parts of gas turbines. Also, it is well known that the thicker coating can be sprayed in comparison with any other thermal spraying systems due to improved residual stresses. However, thermal and mechanical properties of HVOF coatings have not been clarified. Especially, the characteristics of residual stress, that are the most important property from the view point of production technique, have not been made clear. In this paper, the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings were measured in both the case of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in comparison with a vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings could be improved by a diffusion heat treatment to equate the vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. Also, the residual stress characteristics were analyzed using a deflection measurement technique and a X-ray technique. The residual stress of HVOF coating was reduced by the shot-peening effect comparable to that of a plasma spray system in open air. This phenomena could be explained by the reason that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coating was built up by poorly melted particles.

  6. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system. [using hydrazine/water electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenough, B. M.; Mahan, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrazine/water electrolysis process system module design was fabricated and tested to demonstrate component and module performance. This module is capable of providing both the metabolic oxygen for crew needs and the oxygen and nitrogen for spacecraft leak makeup. The component designs evolved through previous R and D efforts, and were fabricated and tested individually and then were assembled into a complete module which was successfully tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate integration of the individual components. A survey was made of hydrazine sensor technology and a cell math model was derived.

  7. Oxygen sensing glucose biosensors based on alginate nano-micro systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Rashmi; Joshi, Abhijeet; Srivastava, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Clinically glucose monitoring in diabetes management is done by point-measurement. However, an accurate, continuous glucose monitoring, and minimally invasive method is desirable. The research aims at developing fluorescence-mediated glucose detecting biosensors based on near-infrared radiation (NIR) oxygen sensitive dyes. Biosensors based on Glucose oxidase (GOx)-Rudpp loaded alginate microspheres (GRAM) and GOx-Platinum-octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP)-PLAalginate microsphere system (GPAM) were developed using air-driven atomization and characterized using optical microscopy, CLSM, fluorescence spectro-photometry etc. Biosensing studies were performed by exposing standard solutions of glucose. Uniform sized GRAM and GPAM with size 50+/-10μm were formed using atomization. CLSM imaging of biosensors suggests that Rudpp and PtOEP nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in alginate microspheres. The GRAM and GPAM showed a good regression constant of 0.974 and of 0.9648 over a range of 0-10 mM of glucose with a high sensitivity of 3.349%/mM (625 nm) and 2.38%/mM (645 nm) at 10 mM of glucose for GRAM and GPAM biosensor. GRAM and GPAM biosensors show great potential in development of an accurate and minimally invasive glucose biosensor. NIR dye based assays can aid sensitive, minimally-invasive and interference-free detection of glucose in diabetic patients.

  8. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. PMID:25624148

  9. Thermodynamic assessment of the oxygen rich U-Ce-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, J. W.; Hirooka, S.; Murakami, T.; Suzuki, K.; White, J. T.; Voit, S. L.; Nelson, A. T.; Slone, B. W.; Besmann, T. M.; McClellan, K. J.; Kato, M.

    2015-12-01

    A thermodynamic assessment of the U-Ce-O system was performed by combining the existing Calphad assessments of the U-O and Ce-O binaries. A compound energy formalism representation for the fluorite U1-yCeyO2±x and a partially ionic two-sublattice liquid model for U-Ce-O melt were developed to describe the ternary solutions. Oxygen potentials for U1-yCeyO2±x for 0.05, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.50 Ce metal fractions were measured from thermogravimetric analysis and used, along with other thermodynamic data reported in the literature, to optimize the adjustable parameters of the models for U1-yCeyO2±x and the U-Ce-O ternary liquid. In addition, the thermochemical behavior of U1-yCeyO2±x and U1-yPuyO2±x was compared in order to assess the suitability of using Ce as a surrogate for Pu in MOX fuel.

  10. High-temperature phase relations and thermodynamics in the iron-titanium-oxygen system

    SciTech Connect

    Pesl, J.; Eric, R.H.

    1999-08-01

    Phase equilibria and thermodynamics in the FeO-TiO{sub 2}-Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary system were studied at 1,500 C and 1,600 C. In particular, the liquid slag-phase region and its saturation boundary with respect to metallic iron, titania, and lower titanium oxides was investigated. The liquid slag-phase region extends substantially toward an anosovite (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5}) composition, and considerable concentrations of divalent iron coexist with trivalent titanium in the liquid-slag phase. This seems to be a consequence of the complete solid solution between ferrous pseudobrookite (FeTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and anosovite (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5}), which exists at subsolidus temperatures. The liquid-slag field is significantly enlarged toward the anosovite composition upon increasing the temperature from 1,500 to 1,600 C. Activities of the components FeO and TiO{sub 2} in the liquid-slag region were determined by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the measured oxygen partial pressures at 1,500 C. The FeO shows moderate negative deviation, while titania shows a slight negative deviation in FeO-rich slags and a positive deviation in high-titania slags. The experimentally measured activity values were modeled using regular and biregular solution models, and good agreement was obtained with the biregular solution model.

  11. Blood radicals: reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, transition metal ions, and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Darley-Usmar, V; Halliwell, B

    1996-05-01

    Free radicals, such as superoxide, hydroxyl and nitric oxide, and other "reactive species", such as hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite, are formed in vivo. Some of these molecules, e.g. superoxide and nitric oxide, can be physiologically useful, but they can also cause damage under certain circumstances. Excess production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), their production in inappropriate relative amounts (especially superoxide and NO) or deficiencies in antioxidant defences may result in pathological stress to cells and tissues. This oxidative stress can have multiple effects. It can induce defence systems, and render tissues more resistant to subsequent insult. If oxidative stress is excessive or if defence and repair responses are inadequate, cell injury can be caused by such mechanisms as oxidative damage to essential proteins, lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage and base modification, and rises in the concentration of intracellular "free" Ca(2+). Considerable evidence supports the view that oxidative damage involving both ROS and RNS is an important contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. Peroxynitrite (derived by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide) and transition metal ions (perhaps released by injury to the vessel wall) may contribute to lipid peroxidation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:8860419

  12. [Relationship between the oxidation-reduction system of astrocytes with production of active forms of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Semenkova, G N; Kvacheva, Z B; Obydennikova, S V; Cherenkevich, S N; Titov, L P

    1998-01-01

    Cells of neuroglia--the astrocytes are of interest from the point of view of their participation in phagocytosis. Phagocyte ability to generate active oxygen forms (AOF) as used as the basic criterion of the estimation of their functional activity. For the purpose to clear up molecular and cellular mechanisms of phagocytosis a study of astrocyte redox-systems, participating in production of AOF, was undertaken. Registration of AOF in astrocytes was carried out using a method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Primary culture of guinea pig astrocytes was used. Spontaneous chemiluminescence of low intensity was found for the astrocytes at the presence of luminol. The destruction of the cells was accompanied by a significant growth of the intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence. Suspension of endocutosis inductors, particle of latex and phytohemagglutinin, added to astrocytes did not result in formation of AOF, characteristic for other cells, possessing phagocytosis. It was established, that addition of hydrogen peroxide destroys astrocytes at the presence of luminol and gives rise to the emission. Chemiluminescence was not observed in similar experiments with intact cells. A conclusion was made that inside astrocytes there are structures, which show peroxidase-like activity. PMID:9848214

  13. Oxygen Isotopes in Early Solar System Materials: A Perspective Based on Microbeam Analyses of Chondrules from CV Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the biggest challenges to understanding the early history of the solar system include determining the distribution of oxygen isotopes amongst materials that existed in the solar nebula, and interpreting the processes that might have resulted in the observed isotopic distributions. Oxygen isotope ratios in any individual mineral grain from a chondritic meteorite may be the cumulative product of a variety of processes, including stellar nucleosynthetic events, gas/solid interactions in the molecular cloud, mixing of independent isotopic reservoirs in the nebula, mass-independent processing in the nebula, and mass-dependent fractionation effects in various environments. It is not possible to unravel this complex isotopic record unless the distribution of oxygen isotope ratios in chondritic materials is fully understood.

  14. Shock tube measurements of growth constants in the branched chain formaldehyde-carbon monoxide-oxygen system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Exponential free radical growth constants were measured for formaldehyde carbon monoxide-oxygen systems by monitoring the growth of oxygen atom concentration as manifested by CO flame band emission. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 1200 to 2000 K. The data were analyzed using a formaldehyde oxidation mechanism involving 12 elementary reaction steps. The computed growth constants are roughly in accord with experimental values, but are much more temperature dependent. The data was also analyzed assuming formaldehyde is rapidly decomposed to carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Growth constants computed for the resulting carbon monoxide hydrogen oxygen mixtures have a temperature dependence similar to experiments; however, for most mixtures, the computed growth constants were larger than experimental values.

  15. Probing Saltern Brines with an Oxygen Electrode: What Can We Learn about the Community Metabolism in Hypersaline Systems?

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the use of optical oxygen electrodes to study oxygenic photosynthesis and heterotrophic activities in crystallizer brines of the salterns in Eilat, Israel. Monitoring oxygen uptake rates in the dark enables the identification of organic substrates that are preferentially used by the community. Addition of glycerol (the osmotic solute synthesized by Dunaliella) or dihydroxyacetone (produced from glycerol by Salinibacter) enhanced respiration rates. Pyruvate, produced from glycerol or from some sugars by certain halophilic Archaea also stimulated community respiration. Fumarate had a sparing effect on respiration, possibly as many halophilic Archaea can use fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor in respiration. Calculating the photosynthetic activity of Dunaliella by monitoring oxygen concentration changes during light/dark incubations is not straightforward as light also affects respiration of some halophilic Archaea and Bacteria due to action of light-driven proton pumps. When illuminated, community respiration of brine samples in which oxygenic photosynthesis was inhibited by DCMU decreased by ~40%. This effect was interpreted as the result of competition between two energy yielding systems: the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump and the respiratory chain of the prokaryotes. These findings have important implications for the interpretation of other published data on photosynthetic and respiratory activities in hypersaline environments. PMID:27338478

  16. Comparison of simultaneous systemic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen treatment versus only steroid in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Callioglu, Elif; Tuzuner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Cengiz, Ceyhun; Caylan, Refik

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective chart review to assess the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in sudden sensorineural hearing loss. 44 patients aged between 17-67 years diagnosed with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss less than 30 days were admitted to our clinic Patients were treated with systemic steroid alone or systemic steroid plus hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In the comparison of two groups, there was no statistically significant difference of audiometric evaluation (P>0.0028) found in hearing improvement for each frequency on 5th day of the treatment and post treatment. Age (≤45 and >45) and initial hearing level (≤60 dB. And >60 dB.) does not seem to be an influential factor according to the results of the study (P>0.0007). The present study did not show more superior healing effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy added to systemic steroid therapy than steroid infusion alone. The results are consistent with those of some papers. However there are also conflicting data that support significant effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Routine administration of this therapy seems to be unnecessary in view of these results. PMID:26309671

  17. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6

  18. Oxygen deficiency hazards associated with liquefied gas systems development of a program of controls

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Mazur, P.O.

    1983-01-01

    The use of liquefied gases in industry and research has become commonplace. Release into the atmosphere of these gases, whether intentional or not, will result in a displacement of air and a reduction in the oxygen concentration. Exposure to reduced levels of oxygen levels may cause reduced abilities, unconsciousness, or death. This paper describes the derivation of a novel program of controls for oxygen deficiency hazards. The key to this approach is a quantitative assessment of risk for each planned operation and the application of control measures to reduce that risk to an acceptable level. Five risk levels evolve which are based on the probability of fatality. Controls such as training, oxygen monitoring equipment, self-rescue respirators, and medical surveillance are required when the probability of fatality exceeds 10/sup -7/ per hour. The quantitative nature of this program ensures an appropriate level of control without undue burden or expense. 11 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  19. CONTINUOUS, AUTOMATED AND SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF OXYGEN UPTAKE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial respirometers are capable of continuously and automatically measuring oxygen uptake in bioreactors. A method for continuously and automatically measuring carbon dioxide evolution can be retrofitted to commercial respirometers. Continuous and automatic measurements of...

  20. Oxygen isotopes and P cycle in the soil/plant system: where are we heading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Federica; Pfahler, Verena; von Sperber, Christian; Bernasconi, Stefano; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major nutrient for all living organisms. In the terrestrial environment, P is a double-edged sword. For this reason, a better understanding of P cycling in the soil/plant system and the processes influencing its transfers and transformations is needed to provide agricultural and environmental managers with better concepts for P use. In fact, whereas the effect of abiotic reactions on the P concentration in the soil solution are well understood, we still know too little about the forms of soil organic P, and about the importance of soil biological processes (e.g. on organic matter mineralization-immobilization, or on the role of microorganisms) in controlling P availability. Together with more traditional and routine analysis for P, in the last 20 years researchers have started using the ratio of stable oxygen isotopes in phosphate (δ18O-P) to investigate P cycle in the soil/plant system. The scientific community interested in using this isotopic tracer is expanding because δ18O-P has proven to provide important information on biological processes. A large part of the published studies has shown how δ18O-P can be used to track P in the environment, providing information on P transfer from one pool and/or sink to the other. The other part has used this tool as a tracer of biological activity, clarifying how P is cycled through the microbial biomass or by plants. Together with a short review of the most relevant published results, we will discuss whether, and under which conditions, the δ18O-P can be applied to study P cycling and transformations from the process to the ecosystem level.

  1. The diluter-demand oxygen system used during the international Himalayan expedition to Mount Everest.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, F. D.; Pace, N.

    1972-01-01

    The diluter-demand regulators are designed in such a way that as the individual inspires he simultaneously draws ambient air and pure oxygen from a tank into his mask. The size of the ambient air orifice is made directly proportional to the barometric pressure by use of a passive aneroid valve. As altitude increases the ambient air orifice is automatically made smaller and the individual inspires a greater proportion of oxygen.

  2. Investigation of oxygen vacancies in CeO2/Pt system with synchrotron light techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, L.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Lamberti, C.; Guda, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    A peculiar property of ceria is the ease to form oxygen vacancies, producing reactive sites or facilitating ionic diffusion. For these reasons ceria promotes catalytic activities for a number of important reactions when it is used as a support for transition metals. In our work we study the temporal evolution of oxygen vacancies formation by time-resolved XANES at Ce K- edge and XRD measurements on CeO2/Pt nanoparticles, successfully monitoring the reaction of CO oxidation.

  3. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of HCFC-225, a Class II ODS, was prohibited by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, leveraging resources from both the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program and the Defense Logistics Agency - Aviation Hazardous Minimization and Green Products Branch, test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a replacement for HCFC-225 that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. Candidate solvents were selected and a test plan was developed following the guidelines of ASTM G127, Standard Guide for the Selection of Cleaning Agents for Oxygen Systems. Solvents were evaluated for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Two solvents were determined to be acceptable for cleaning oxygen systems and one was chosen for implementation at NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities. The test program and results are summarized. This project also demonstrated the benefits of cross-agency collaboration in a time of limited resources.

  4. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  5. An in vitro characterization of a silicone tonometer system for synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension.

    PubMed

    Larsen, P N; Pedersen, I; Moesgaard, F

    1993-07-01

    A new tonometry system for continuous and synchronous measurement of tissue oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension is described and characterized in vitro. The tonometer system consists of an O2 and CO2 permeable silicone tube continuously flushed with isotonic saline by an injection pump. When the saline passes through the tonometer tube it equilibrates with O2 and CO2 outside the tube. The oxygen- and carbon dioxide tension of the flushing solution after passage of the tonometer tube are measured by a transcutaneous combined oxygen/carbon dioxide electrode (E5280 Radiometer A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark), connected to the tonometer tube via an airtight polycarbonate chamber. In order to characterize the tonometer system in vitro the tonometer tube was submerged in a test chamber containing isotonic saline, 33 degrees C to 41 degrees C, with varying partial pressures of O2 and CO2. For various lengths of the tonometer and flushing rates through the tonometer the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the flushing solution (pO2eq and pCO2eq), after passage through the tonometer were recorded and compared to the known partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the test chamber solution (pO2 test and pCO2test). PO2eq and pCO2eq approached pO2test and pCO2test, when the length of the tonometer was increased, and the flushing rate through the tonometer was decreased. The relative differences (D) between pO2eq and pCO2eq at the one hand and pO2test and pCO2test at the other hand were calculated, and equilibration curves were constructed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8378734

  6. Examining the Impacts of Oxygen and Carbon System Variability on Fossil Benthic Foraminiferal Shell Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. V.; Hill, T. M.; Moffitt, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Foraminiferal shell weight can be impacted by environmental factors both during initial shell formation and as the result of post mortem preservation. An improved understanding of what determines this relationship can lead to both an understanding of foraminiferal calcite production in modern oceans and proxy development for past environmental conditions. Significantly, foraminiferal shell weight has been linked to carbonate ion concentration in both laboratory culture (of both planktic and benthic species) and in the modern and fossil record (in planktic foraminifera). This study explores the relationship between shell weight and changes in oxygenation and carbonate saturation in fossil benthic foraminifera from a high-resolution sedimentary record (MV0811-15JC; 34°36.930' N, 119°12.920' W; 418m water depth; 16.1-3.4 ka; sedimentation rate 44-100 cm kyr-1) from Santa Barbara Basin, CA (SBB). Ongoing work in SBB has described rapid biotic reorganization through the recent deglaciation in response to changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations, which are used here to create a semi quantitative oxygenation history for site MV0811-15JC. In modern Oxygen Minimum Zones, decreases in oxygen closely covary with increases in Total Carbon (with a corresponding decrease in the carbonate saturation state). We interpret that records from SBB of the average size-normalized test weight of Uvigerinid and Bolivinid foraminifera show that shell weight responds to these changes in oxygenation and saturation state. Multiple metrics of 'size normalization' including by length, geometric estimation of surface area and volume, and tracing of individual silhouettes are tested. Regardless of method utilized, the size normalized shell weight of all species fluctuates with abrupt changes in oxygenation and saturation state. Although all species respond to large-scale environmental changes, the weight records of Bolivinids and Uvigerinids reveal distinct differences, indicating that

  7. Systemic oxygenation weakens the hypoxia and Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α-dependent and extracellular adenosine-mediated tumor protection

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Stephen M.; Kjaergaard, Jorgen; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Belikoff, Bryan; Schreiber, Taylor H.; Sethumadhavan, Shalini; Abbott, Robert; Philbrook, Phaethon; Thayer, Molly; Shujia, Dai; Rodig, Scott; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Ren, Jin; Ohta, Akio; Podack, Eckhard R.; Karger, Barry; Jackson, Edwin K.; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent CD39/CD73 ecto-enzymes may govern the accumulation of tumor-protecting extracellular adenosine and signaling through the A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR) in tumor microenvironments (TME). Here, we explored the conceptually novel motivation to use supplemental oxygen as a treatment to inhibit the hypoxia/HIF-1α-CD39/CD73-driven accumulation of extracellular adenosine in the TME in order to weaken the tumor protection. We report that hyperoxic breathing (60% O2) decreased the TME hypoxia, as well as levels of HIF-1α and downstream target proteins of HIF-1α in the TME according to proteomics studies in mice. Importantly, oxygenation also down-regulated the expression of adenosine-generating ecto-enzymes and significantly lowered levels of tumor-protecting extracellular adenosine in the TME. Using supplemental oxygen as a tool in studies of the TME, we also identified FHL-1 as a potentially useful marker for the conversion of hypoxic into normoxic TME. Hyperoxic breathing resulted in the up-regulation of antigen-presenting MHC-class I molecules on tumor cells and in the better recognition and increased susceptibility to killing by tumor-reactive cytotoxic T cells. Therapeutic breathing of 60% oxygen resulted in the significant inhibition of growth of established B16.F10 melanoma tumors and prolonged survival of mice. Taken together, the data presented here provide proof-of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic oxygenation to convert the hypoxic, adenosine-rich and tumor-protecting TME into a normoxic and extracellular adenosine-poor TME that, in turn, may facilitate tumor regression. We propose to explore the combination of supplemental oxygen with existing immunotherapies of cancer. PMID:25120128

  8. A comparison of factors involved in the development of central nervous system and pulmonary oxygen toxicity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Eynan, Mirit; Krinsky, Nitzan; Biram, Adi; Arieli, Yehuda; Arieli, Ran

    2014-07-29

    Central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT) can occur in humans at pressures above 2atmospheres absolute (ATA), and above 4.5ATA in the rat. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity appears at pressures above 0.5ATA. We hypothesized that exposure to mild HBO following extreme exposure might provide protection against CNS, but not pulmonary oxygen toxicity. We measured the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and nitrotyrosine and nNOS levels in the brain and lung in the following groups: (1) Sham rats, no pressure exposure (SHAM); (2) Exposure to 6ATA oxygen for 60% of latency to CNS-OT (60%LT); (3) Exposure to 6ATA for 60% of latency to CNS-OT, followed by 20min at 2.5ATA for recovery (REC); (4) Exposure to 6ATA for 60% of latency to CNS-OT, followed by 20min at 2.5ATA oxygen and a subsequent increase in pressure to 6ATA until the appearance of convulsions (CONV); (5) Control rats exposed to 6ATA until the appearance of convulsions (C). SOD and CAT activity were reduced in both brain and lung in the REC group. GPX activity was reduced in the hippocampus in the REC group, but not in the cortex or the lung. nNOS levels were reduced in the hippocampus in the REC group. Contrary to our hypothesis, no difference was observed between the brain and the lung for the factors investigated. We suggest that at 2.5ATA and above, CNS and pulmonary oxygen toxicity may share similar mechanisms. PMID:24928619

  9. Impact of reactive oxygen species on antioxidant capacity of male reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Mahmood, Zahed; Shahid, Muhammad; Saeed, M Usman Qamar; Tahir, Imtiaz Mahmood; Shah, Sm Ali; Munir, Naveed; El-Ghorab, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    The present research work was aimed to study the mutual interaction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and basal cells antioxidant capacity in the male reproductive system and to further establish the association between selected heavy metals and stress markers. Total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) of serum and seminal plasma were determined by automated photometric methods. The concentrations of Selenium (Se), Lead (Pb), and Cadmium (Cd) were determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The TOS was increased significantly (P <0.05) in seminal plasma as well as in the serum of the infertile group when compared with the fertile group. On the other hand, the TAS of the infertile group was found to be noticeably decreased (P <0.05) when compared with the TAS of the fertile group. Among the heavy metals, a noticeably lower concentration of Se was detected in the infertile group whereas markedly elevated levels of Cd and Pb were observed in the infertile group compared with the fertile group. Among the infertile group a significant inverse correlation (r = -0.521, P <0.05) was observed between Se and TOS and between Cd and Pb (r = -0.407, P <0.05). Contrarily among the infertile group a considerable positive relationship was established between Se and TAS (r = 0.507, P <0.05). It was concluded that the oxidant stress reduces the antioxidant activity in infertile men by elevating the production of ROS. A lower concentration of Se and elevated levels of Pb and Cd explain the individual's exposure to these heavy metals. The study also revealed that the heavy metal toxicity contributes significantly to male infertility. PMID:26684624

  10. Propylthiouracil prevents cutaneous and pulmonary fibrosis in the reactive oxygen species murine model of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent advances suggest that the cellular redox state may play a significant role in the progression of fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Another, and as yet poorly accounted for, feature of SSc is its overlap with thyroid abnormalities. Previous reports demonstrate that hypothyroidism reduces oxidant stress. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of propylthiouracil (PTU), and of the hypothyroidism induced by it, on the development of cutaneous and pulmonary fibrosis in the oxidant stress murine model of SSc. Methods Chronic oxidant stress SSc was induced in BALB/c mice by daily subcutaneous injections of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) for 6 weeks. Mice (n = 25) were randomized into three arms: HOCl (n = 10), HOCl plus PTU (n = 10) or vehicle alone (n = 5). PTU administration was initiated 30 minutes after HOCl subcutaneous injection and continued daily for 6 weeks. Skin and lung fibrosis were evaluated by histologic methods. Immunohistochemical staining for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in cutaneous and pulmonary tissues was performed to evaluate myofibroblast differentiation. Lung and skin concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), rat sarcoma protein (Ras), Ras homolog gene family (Rho), and transforming growth factor (TGF) β were analyzed by Western blot. Results Injections of HOCl induced cutaneous and lung fibrosis in BALB/c mice. PTU treatment prevented both dermal and pulmonary fibrosis. Myofibroblast differentiation was also inhibited by PTU in the skin and lung. The increase in cutaneous and pulmonary expression of VEGF, ERK, Ras, and Rho in mice treated with HOCl was significantly prevented in mice co-administered ////with PTU. Conclusions PTU, probably through its direct effect on reactive oxygen species or indirectly through thyroid function inhibition, prevents the development of cutaneous and pulmonary fibrosis by blocking the activation of the Ras

  11. The study of excited oxygen molecule gas species production and quenching on thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Fujimoto, Gordon T.; Greene, Frank T.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of excited oxygen and ozone molecules formed by surface catalyzed oxygen atom recombination and reaction was investigated by laser induced fluorescence (LIF), molecular beam mass spectrometric (MBMS), and field ionization (FI) techniques. The experiment used partially dissociated oxygen flows from a microwave discharge at pressures in the range from 60 to 400 Pa or from an inductively coupled RF discharge at atmospheric pressure. The catalyst materials investigated were nickel and the reaction cured glass coating used for Space Shuttle reusable surface insulation tiles. Nonradiative loss processes for the laser excited states makes LIF detection of O2 difficult such that formation of excited oxygen molecules could not be detected in the flow from the microwave discharge or in the gaseous products of atom loss on nickel. MBMS experiments showed that ozone was a product of heterogeneous O atom loss on nickel and tile surfaces at low temperatures and that ozone is lost on these materials at elevated temperatures. FI was separately investigated as a method by which excited oxygen molecules may be conveniently detected. Partial O2 dissociation decreases the current produced by FI of the gas.

  12. A sterilization system using ultraviolet photochemical reactions based on nitrous oxide and oxygen gases.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwamori, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Active oxygen species (AOS) generated under ultraviolet (UV) lamps can be applied for various industrial processes owing to extremely strong oxidative abilities. We have already reported on an application of the AOS for a sterilization process of microorganisms. Here, a sterilization method using active oxygen generated under ultraviolet (UV) lamps introducing nitrous oxide (N2O) and oxygen gases into a vacuum chamber was investigated. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas was readily produced from N2O by UV photochemical reactions under the low-pressure mercury lamp and then used to sterilize medical devices. We compared the ability of the N2O gas to sterilize Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with those of conventional methods. Successful sterilization of spores on various biological indicators was achieved within 60 min, not only in sterilization bags but also in a lumen device. PMID:26812575

  13. The system Fe-Si-O: Oxygen buffer calibrations to 1,500K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J.; Eugster, H. P.

    1983-03-01

    The five solid-phase oxygen buffers of the system Fe-Si-O, iron-wuestite (IW), wuestite-magnetite (WM), magnetite-hematite (MH), quartz-iron-fayalite (QIF) and fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) have been recalibrated at 1 atm pressure and temperatures from 800° 1,300° C, using a thermogravimetric gas mixing furnace. The oxygen fugacity, f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } was measured with a CaO-doped ZrO2 electrode. Measurements were made also for wuestite solid solutions in order to determine the redox behavior of wuestites with O/Fe ratios varying from 1.05 to 1.17. For FMQ, additional determinations were carried out at 1 kb over a temperature range of 600° to 800° C, using a modified Shaw membrane. Results agree reasonably well with published data and extrapolations. The reaction parameters K, Δ G {r/o}, Δ H {r/o}, and Δ S {r/o}were calculated from the following log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} }/ T relations (T in K): 410_2004_Article_BF00371177_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} {text{IW }}log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = - 26,834.7/T + 6.471left( { ± 0.058} right) \\ {text{ }}left( {{text{800}} - 1,260{text{ C}}} right), \\ {text{WM }}log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = - 36,951.3/T + 16.092left( { ± 0.045} right) \\ {text{ }}left( {{text{1,000}} - 1,300{text{ C}}} right), \\ {text{MH }}log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = - 23,847.6/T + 13.480left( { ± 0.055} right) \\ {text{ }}left( {{text{1,040}} - 1,270{text{ C}}} right), \\ {text{QIF }}log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = - 27,517.5/T + 6.396left( { ± 0.049} right) \\ {text{ }}left( {{text{960}} - 1,140{text{ C}}} right), \\ {text{FMQ }}log f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = - 24,441.9/T + 8.290left( { ± 0.167} right) \\ {text{ }}left( {{text{600}} - 1,140{text{ C}}} right). \\ These experimentally determined reaction parameters were combined with published 298 K data to determine the parameters Gf, Hf, and Sf for the phases wuestite, magnetite, hematite, and fayalite from 298 K to the temperatures of the experiments. The T

  14. Modeling evaluation of integrated strategies to meet proposed dissolved oxygen standards for the Chicago waterway system.

    PubMed

    Melching, Charles S; Ao, Yaping; Alp, Emre

    2013-02-15

    The Chicago Waterway System (CWS) is a 113.8 km branching network of navigable waterways controlled by hydraulic structures in which the majority of flow is treated sewage effluent and there are periods of substantial combined sewer overflow. The Illinois Pollution Control Board (IPCB) designated the majority of the CWS as Secondary Contact and Indigenous Aquatic Life Use waters in the 1970s and made small alterations to these designations in 1988. Between 1988 and 2002 substantial improvements in the pollution control and water-quality management facilities were made in the Chicago area. The results of a Use Attainability Analysis led the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to propose the division of the CWS into two new aquatic life use classes with appropriate dissolved oxygen (DO) standards. To aid the IPCB in their deliberations regarding the appropriate water use classifications and DO standards for the CWS, the DUFLOW model that is capable of simulating hydraulics and water-quality processes under unsteady-flow conditions was used to evaluate integrated strategies of water-quality improvement facilities that could meet the proposed DO standards during representative wet (2001) and dry (2003) years. A total of 28 new supplementary aeration stations with a maximum DO load of 80 or 100 g/s and aerated flow transfers at three locations in the CWS would be needed to achieve the IEPA proposed DO standards 100% of the time for both years. A much simpler and less costly (≈one tenth of the cost) system of facilities would be needed to meet the IEPA proposed DO standards 90% of the time. In theory, the combinations of flow augmentation and new supplemental aeration stations can achieve 100% compliance with the IEPA proposed DO standards, however, 100% compliance will be hard to achieve in practice because of-(1) difficulties in determining when to turn on the aeration stations and (2) localized heavy loads of pollutants during storms that may yield

  15. Development of a new near-IR laser system for clinical monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in the newborn infant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad; Hamza, Ahmad M.

    1998-04-01

    The provision of sufficient oxygen to the brain is a major goal for neonatologists to prevent major neuro-developmental handicaps and to improve the chances for intact survival of sick newborn infants. In this paper the authors present the theory and design of a new noninvasive device for transcutaneous monitoring of cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation using a differential absorption laser system. The new technique depends upon illuminating the head of the neonate with radiation from six near infrared laser diodes. The choice of the used laser wavelengths (775, 780, 810, 825, 830, 850 nanometers) follows the principles of near infrared spectroscopy for obtaining accurate measurements. Different constructions of fiber optic probes arranged around the head of the neonate along the biparietal diameter guide the transmitted and received laser signals for signal processing. The detailed description and operating characteristics of this system are presented.

  16. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance chlorofluorocarbon-113 was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center and Stennis Space Center have relied upon the solvent Asahiklin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  17. Sex differences in the cellular defence system against free radicals from oxygen or drug metabolites in rat.

    PubMed

    Julicher, R H; Sterrenberg, L; Haenen, G R; Bast, A; Noordhoek, J

    1984-12-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether sex-related differences in the protective mechanisms against oxygen radicals and free radical metabolites from drugs were present in rat liver, heart, and kidney. To that end, superoxide dismutase, catalase, the factors of the glutathione system and vitamin E were measured. In addition, NADPH-dependent cytochrome c-reductase activity was established, as this enzyme is involved in the formation of free radicals in the presence of many xenobiotics. The total capacity of the cellular systems that detoxify reactive oxygen species or free radical-drug metabolites seems to be higher in female liver as compared to male. No differences were found for heart and kidney tissue. It is hypothesized that female rats probably are less vulnerable for those drugs whose hepatotoxic action is induced by excessive formation of free radical species. PMID:6442559

  18. Technology of oxygen production in the membranecryogenic air separation system for a 600 MW oxy-type pulverized bed boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdowska, Sylwia; Skorek-Osikowska, Anna

    2012-09-01

    In this paper the results of the thermodynamic analysis of the oxy-combustion type pulverized bed boiler integrated with a hybrid, membrane- cryogenic oxygen separation installation are presented. For the calculations a 600 MW boiler with live steam parameters at 31.1 MPa /654.9 oC and reheated steam at 6.15 MPa/672.4 oC was chosen. In this paper the hybrid membrane-cryogenic technology as oxygen production unit for pulverized bed boiler was proposed. Such an installation consists of a membrane module and two cryogenic distillation columns. Models of these installations were built in the Aspen software. The energy intensity of the oxygen production process in the hybrid system was compared with the cryogenic technology. The analysis of the influence of membrane surface area on the energy intensity of the process of air separation as well as the influence of oxygen concentration at the inlet to the cryogenic installation on the energy intensity of a hybrid unit was performed.

  19. Organic carbon and dissolved oxygen budgets for a commerical-size, in-pond raceway system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive production of Ictalurid catfish in the United States has increased over the past several years and a better understanding of the amount of organic carbon (OC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) in these culture environments is needed. Budgets for OC and DO were estimated over a production season (M...

  20. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Rules for use of portable oxygen concentrator systems on board aircraft

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Concentrator: means the AirSep FreeStyle, AirSep LifeStyle, Delphi RS-00400, Inogen One, Invacare XPO2... oxygen concentrator device, except the AirSep FreeStyle, AirSep LifeStyle, Delphi RS-00400, Inogen One... electrical, navigation or communication equipment on the aircraft on which the device is to be used; (2)...

  1. The Campylobacter jejuni RacRS system regulates fumarate utilization in a low oxygen environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural environment of the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the gastrointestinal tract of warm blooded animals. In the gut, the availability of oxygen is limited; therefore, less efficient electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate are used by C. jejuni. C. jejuni has a highly branched...

  2. CONTROL OF TRANSIENT INCINERATOR EMISSIONS WITH AN OXYGEN BASED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subject of this paper is the experience with a novel and field-proven method for the enhanced control of transient emissions from rotary kiln incinerators using oxygen enrichment. hen high-BTU content wastes are fed into rotary kiln incinerators in an intermittent mode (typic...

  3. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Rules for use of portable oxygen concentrator systems on board aircraft

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... EverGo, Respironics SimplyGo, SeQual Eclipse and SeQual SAROS Portable Oxygen Concentrator medical..., Precision Medical EasyPulse, Respironics EverGo, Respironics SimplyGo, SeQual Eclipse and SeQual...

  4. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Rules for use of portable oxygen concentrator systems on board aircraft

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... EverGo, Respironics SimplyGo, SeQual Eclipse and SeQual SAROS Portable Oxygen Concentrator medical..., Precision Medical EasyPulse, Respironics EverGo, Respironics SimplyGo, SeQual Eclipse and SeQual...

  5. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Langan, Laura M; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Owen, Stewart F; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  6. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Laura M.; Dodd, Nicholas J. F.; Owen, Stewart F.; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  7. Investigation of structure and oxygen permeability of Ba-Ce-Co-Fe-O system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiming; State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 ; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yang, Weishen

    2010-09-15

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting perovskite oxides, BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 0.9-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, were synthesized with a combined citric acid and EDTA complexing method. The structure and oxygen permeability of BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 0.9-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} series was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and oxygen permeation operation. XRD characterization showed that pure cubic perovskite structure can be obtained only if the content of cobalt and cerium in B-site of Ba-Ce-Co-Fe-O series is no more than 40% and 15%, respectively. Lattice parameters of BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 0.9-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} gradually increase with cobalt and cerium content, iodine titration experiment revealed that the doping of cerium ions with big radius can keep B-site cobalt and iron ions in low valence state. Oxygen permeation operation showed that oxygen permeation flux of all BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 0.9-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} membranes gradually increases with testing time in the initial stage, and the time to reach steady state becomes longer with the increase of cobalt content. After reaching permeation steady state, BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3-{delta}} exhibits highest oxygen flux amongst BaCe{sub 0.1}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 0.9-x}O{sub 3-{delta}} series.

  8. Oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation in the system dolomite-water-CO2 to elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Juske

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation factors in the system dolomite-water-CO2 at 80-350 and 100-250 °C, respectively, by means of direct precipitation (80 °C) and dolomitization of CaCO3 (100-350 °C). The products are protodolomite with slight Ca-excess (80-100 °C) and well-ordered stoichiometric dolomite (150-350 °C). Several experimental artifacts (inheritance, premature reactions, and kinetic effects) were tested, although attainment of isotope equilibrium cannot be proven. 18O/16O fractionation factors of (proto)dolomite-water at 80-350 °C can be readily expressed with 1σ error: 103lnα=3.140(±0.022)·{106}/{T2}-3.14(±0.11). Our experimental study, which is generally consistent with a majority of experimental and theoretical studies in the literature, provides for the first time an accurate equation over a wide range of temperature. In combination of the calcite-water equation (O’Neil et al., 1969; Friedman and O’Neil, 1977), 18O/16O fractionation factors of (proto)dolomite-calcite at 80-350 °C can also be expressed with 1σ error: 103lnα=0.351(±0.028)·{106}/{T2}-0.25(±0.13). Dolomite is slightly (0.7-2.6‰) enriched in 18O relative to calcite in this temperature range. Given the very good linearity with a 1/T2 term, the above two equations may be extrapolated beyond the temperature range. Our experimental results of 13C/12C fractionation between CO2 and dolomite at 100-250 °C also show a linear function with a 1/T2 term with a cross-over temperature of 200 °C, which differs from results of theoretical calculations.

  9. Scaling laws for oxygen transport across the space-filling system of respiratory membranes in the human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chen

    Space-filling fractal surfaces play a fundamental role in how organisms function at various levels and in how structure determines function at different levels. In this thesis, we develop a quantitative theory of oxygen transport to and across the surface of the highly branched, space-filling system of alveoli, the fundamental gas exchange unit (acinar airways), in the human lung. Oxygen transport in the acinar airways is by diffusion, and we treat the two steps---diffusion through the branched airways, and transfer across the alveolar membranes---as a stationary diffusion-reaction problem, taking into account that there may be steep concentration gradients between the entrance and remote alveoli (screening). We develop a renormalization treatment of this screening effect and derive an analytic formula for the oxygen current across the cumulative alveolar membrane surface, modeled as a fractal, space-filling surface. The formula predicts the current from a minimum of morphological data of the acinus and appropriate values of the transport parameters, through a number of power laws (scaling laws). We find that the lung at rest operates near the borderline between partial screening and no screening; that it switches to no screening under exercise; and that the computed currents agree with measured values within experimental uncertainties. From an analysis of the computed current as a function of membrane permeability, we find that the space-filling structure of the gas exchanger is simultaneously optimal with respect to five criteria. The exchanger (i) generates a maximum oxygen current at minimum permeability; (ii) 'wastes' a minimum of surface area; (iii) maintains a minimum residence time of oxygen in the acinar airways; (iv) has a maximum fault tolerance to loss of permeability; and (v) generates a maximum current increase when switching from rest to exercise.

  10. Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.

    1983-07-01

    A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

  11. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  12. Post-Flight Microbial Analysis of Samples from the International Space Station Water Recovery System and Oxygen Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele N.

    2011-01-01

    The Regenerative, Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS) includes the the Water Recovery System (WRS) and the Oxygen Generation System (OGS). The WRS consists of a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) and Water Processor Assembly (WPA). This report describes microbial characterization of wastewater and surface samples collected from the WRS and OGS subsystems, returned to KSC, JSC, and MSFC on consecutive shuttle flights (STS-129 and STS-130) in 2009-10. STS-129 returned two filters that contained fluid samples from the WPA Waste Tank Orbital Recovery Unit (ORU), one from the waste tank and the other from the ISS humidity condensate. Direct count by microscopic enumeration revealed 8.38 x 104 cells per mL in the humidity condensate sample, but none of those cells were recoverable on solid agar media. In contrast, 3.32 x lOs cells per mL were measured from a surface swab of the WRS waste tank, including viable bacteria and fungi recovered after S12 days of incubation on solid agar media. Based on rDNA sequencing and phenotypic characterization, a fungus recovered from the filter was determined to be Lecythophora mutabilis. The bacterial isolate was identified by rDNA sequence data to be Methylobacterium radiotolerans. Additional UPA subsystem samples were returned on STS-130 for analysis. Both liquid and solid samples were collected from the Russian urine container (EDV), Distillation Assembly (DA) and Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (RFTA) for post-flight analysis. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fungus Chaetomium brasiliense were isolated from the EDV samples. No viable bacteria or fungi were recovered from RFTA brine samples (N= 6), but multiple samples (N = 11) from the DA and RFTA were found to contain fungal and bacterial cells. Many recovered cells have been identified to genus by rDNA sequencing and carbon source utilization profiling (BiOLOG Gen III). The presence of viable bacteria and fungi from WRS

  13. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  14. PMEA coating of pump circuit and oxygenator may attenuate the early systemic inflammatory response in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, K; Nishimura, K; Nishina, T; Nakamura, T; Ikeda, T; Komeda, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of coating a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit and oxygenator with poly-2-methoxy-ethyl acrylate (PMEA) on the systemic inflammatory response during and after CPB. Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were randomized into three groups (each group n = 10): noncoated (group N), heparin coated (group H), and PMEA coated circuit and oxygenator (group X). Bradykinin (BK), complement 3 activation (C3a) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured as early phase indicators of inflammatory response, as were maximum C reactive proteins (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) levels. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (A-a DO2) was measured as a parameter of respiratory function. IL-6 levels after CPB were significantly higher in group N than in groups H and X (p < 0.05). Serum BK and C3a levels showed similar patterns in all groups. A-a DO2 was lower at the end of and 3 hours after CPB in groups H and X than in group N (p < 0.05). Maximum CRP levels were lower in group X than in groups N (p < 0.05). This prospective study suggests that PMEA coated CPB may improve respiratory function and decrease systemic inflammatory response after cardiac surgery, possibly because this circuit is as biocompatible as heparin coated CPB circuit. PMID:15307550

  15. Adaptation of an electrochemical system for measurement and regulation of oxygen partial pressure to a symmetrical thermogravimetric analysis system developed using a Cahn 1000 electrobalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneiro, A.; Bavdaz, P.; Fouletier, J.; Abriata, J. P.

    1982-07-01

    We report equipment consisting of the coupling of an electrochemical system for measurement and regulation of oxygen partial pressure (PO2) to a symmetrical thermogravimetric analysis system built on the basis of a Cahn 1000 electrobalance. The electrochemical system allows the measurement and regulation of PO2 within a few percent, and has the additional advantage that it can be checked against systematic errors in an absolute way by means of the ''Faraday's law test.'' The performance of the whole experimental setup is demonstrated by the resolution of a narrow hysteresis loop shown by PO2 as a function of composition in the U3O8 phase of the uranium-oxygen system.

  16. Investigation of the Makeup, Source, and Removal Strategies for Total Organic Carbon in the Oxygen Generation System Recirculation Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Joyce; Roy, Robert J.; Van Keuren, Steve; Wilson, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has been producing oxygen for crew respiration via water electrolysis. As water is consumed in the OGS recirculating water loop, make-up water is furnished by the ISS potable water bus. A rise in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was observed beginning in February, 2011, which continues through the present date. Increasing TOC is of concern because the organic constituents responsible for the TOC were unknown and had not been identified; hence their impacts on the operation of the electrolytic cell stack components and on microorganism growth rates and types are unknown. Identification of the compounds responsible for the TOC increase, their sources, and estimates of their loadings in the OGA as well as possible mitigation strategies are presented.

  17. Evaluation of alternatives for trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113) to clean and verify liquid oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Michelle L.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) investigated several alternatives to the use of tri-chloro-tri-fluoroethane(CFC-113) in oxygen cleaning and verification. Alternatives investigated include several replacement solvents, Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analysis. Among the solvents, 1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC 141b) and di-chloro-penta-fluoro-propane (HCFC 225) are the most suitable alternatives for cleaning and verification. However, use of HCFC 141b is restricted, HCFC 225 introduces toxicity hazards, and the NDE and TOC methods of verification are not suitable for processes at LaRC. Therefore, the interim recommendation is to sparingly use CFC-113 for the very difficult cleaning tasks where safety is critical and to use HCFC 225 to clean components in a controlled laboratory environment. Meanwhile, evaluation must continue on now solvents and procedures to find one suited to LaRCs oxygen cleaning needs.

  18. [Intra-operative drop in sevoflurane and oxygen concentrations. Leakage of the ventilation system].

    PubMed

    Roiss, M; Bremer, K; Schmidt, G N

    2009-12-01

    After problem-free induction of narcosis in an 84-year-old female patient an intra-operative drop in sevoflurane and oxygen concentrations occurred during low-flow anesthesia. Although the concentrations of sevoflurane and oxygen in the fresh gas flow were increased no adequate elevation of the inspiratory concentrations could be achieved. Disconnection of the Dräger Primus IE manual bag-valve-mask could be identified as the cause of the drop in concentrations. Interestingly no error alarm function was initiated. This case demonstrates how important knowledge of the function, set-up and alarm conditions of respiratory machines is. This should be an important component of training in anesthesiology as well as securely established algorithms for difficult ventilation to ensure safe anesthesia despite technical failures. PMID:20012245

  19. Hypoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense system of juvenile jumbo squids in oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is a large oceanic squid endemic off the Eastern Tropical Pacific that undertakes diel vertical migrations into mesopelagic oxygen minimum zones. One of the expected physiological effects of such migration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the surface, promoted by the transition between hypoxia and reoxygenation states. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy expenditure rates and the antioxidant stress strategies of juvenile D. gigas under normoxia and hypoxia, namely by quantifying oxygen consumption rates, antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], heat shock protein expression (Hsp70/Hsc70), and lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. A high significant decrease (68%) in squid's metabolic rates was observed during hypoxia (p<0.05). This process of metabolic suppression was followed by a significant increase in Hsp70/Hsc70 expression (p<0.05), which may be interpreted as a strategy to prevent post-hypoxic oxidative damage during the squid's night upwards migration to the surface ocean. On the other hand, in normoxia, the higher SOD and CAT activities seemed to be a strategy to cope with the reoxygenation process, and may constitute an integrated stress response at shallower depths. GST activity and MDA concentrations did not change significantly from normoxia to hypoxia (p>0.05), with the latter indicating no enhancement of lipid peroxidation (i.e. cellular damage) at the warmer and normoxic surface waters. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how this species is quickly responding to the impacts of environmental stressors coupled with global climate change.

  20. Phenol degradation in heterogeneous system generating singlet oxygen employing light activated electropolymerized phenothiazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowar, Katarzyna; Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Bernas, Paulina; Zak, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Five selected amine-derivatives of phenothiazine were electropolymerized on an ITO/glass substrate and then used in the daylight-activated process to produce in situ singlet oxygen which degrades phenol in a solution. The phenothiazines were immobilized in a simple electrochemical procedure in an acidic solution which led to the formation of an ultrathin transparent polymeric film. All films obtained on the ITO substrate including azure A (AA), azure C (AC), methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TBO), and thionine (Th) had a comparable surface coverage at the level of picomoles/cm2. The activity of these materials was then compared and presented in terms of an efficiency of the phenol degradation process in an aqueous solution by photogenerated singlet oxygen. That efficiency was determined by the UV-vis spectroscopy employing a phenol/4-aminoantipyrine complex. All the phenothiazine ultrathin polymeric films were capable of generating the singlet oxygen in the aqueous solution under daylight activation, which was used in the consecutive process of phenol degradation. The highest efficiency at a level of 51.4% and 45.4% was found for the AC/ITO and MB/ITO layers, respectively.

  1. A modelling study of atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and its effect on the state of tissue oxygenation and systemic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Lammers, Astrid E; Haworth, Sheila G; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Derrick, Graham; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Francis, Darrel P

    2010-02-01

    Atrial septostomy is performed in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, and has been shown to improve symptoms, quality of life and survival. Despite recognized clinical benefits, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the effects of right-to-left shunting on arterial delivery of oxygen, mixed venous content of oxygen, and systemic cardiac output in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and a fixed flow of blood to the lungs. We formulated equations defining the mandatory relationship between physiologic variables and delivery of oxygen in patients with right-to-left shunting. Using calculus and computer modelling, we considered the simultaneous effects of right-to-left shunting on physiologies with different pulmonary flows, total metabolic rates, and capacities for carrying oxygen. Our study indicates that, when the flow of blood to the lungs is fixed, increasing right-to-left shunting improves systemic cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial delivery of oxygen. In contrast, the mixed venous content of oxygen, which mirrors the average state of tissue oxygenation, remains unchanged. Our model suggests that increasing the volume of right-to-left shunting cannot compensate for right ventricular failure. Atrial septostomy in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension, therefore, increases the arterial delivery of oxygen, but the mixed systemic saturation of oxygen, arguably the most important index of tissue oxygenation, stays constant. Our data suggest that the clinically observed beneficial effects of atrial septostomy are the result of improved flow of blood rather than augmented tissue oxygenation, provided that right ventricular function is adequate. PMID:20144254

  2. The effectiveness of circulating aeration in air and high purity oxygen systems for control of VOC emissions from aeration basins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Keener, T.C.; Bishop, P.L.; Orton, T.L.; Wang, M.; Siddiqui, K.F.

    1997-12-31

    A simple steady state circulating aeration system (CAS) model has been used to study the effects of volatility and degradability on the fate of VOCs in both air and high purity oxygen (HPO) systems. With increase of circulation ratio in an air CAS, air emissions by stripping can be significantly reduced for compounds of low degradabilities and high volatilities. Enhancement of biodegradation is more significant for compounds of high degradabilities and volatilities. A large portion of VOCs will remain in the wastewater when circulation ratio is high, especially for VOCs that are difficult to degrade. In HPO systems, emissions by stripping are much less than air systems. However, VOCs will remain in the wastewater if they have poor degradabilities. Volatilities of VOCs are not important in HPO systems. Due to their wide range and large uncertainties, degradation rate constants are a major factor determining the effectiveness of a CAS for VOC emission control

  3. Engineering Development Program of a Closed Aluminum-Oxygen Semi-cell System for an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Dane W.; Hall, Susan E.

    1996-01-01

    Most emerging unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) missions require significantly longer range and endurance than is achievable with existing battery technology. The Aluminum-Oxygen (Al-O2) semi-cell is a candidate technology capable of providing a significant improvement in endurance compared to the silver-zinc battery technology currently in use in UUVs and compares favorably to other proposed UUV power systems not only in performance, but also in safety and logistics. An Al-O2 semi-cell system is under development, consisting of a cell stack, gas management, oxygen storage, electrolyte management coolant and controller subsystems. It is designed to replace the existing silver-zinc battery and meet existing weight, volume, electrical and thermal requirements, therefore minimizing modification to the UUV. A detailed system design is complete. A component and material endurance test to evaluate compatibility and reliability of various materials and components is complete. Sub=scale (short stack) system testing is complete. A full-scale demonstration unit is now under construction for testing in the second half of 1995. The full scale demonstration test will simulate environmental conditions of the operational system. This paper summarizes the results of the extensive short stack and endurance test programs, describes the plan for full-scale testing, and concludes with a brief discussion of future directions for this technology.

  4. High reactive oxygen species in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bourji, Khalil; Meyer, Alain; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Joël; Pigatto, Erika; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Singh, François; Charlier, Corinne; Geny, Bernard; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Punzi, Leonardo; Cozzi, Franco; Sibilia, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystemic connective tissue disease characterized by progressive fibrosis affecting skin and internal organs. Despite serious efforts to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms of SSc, they are still unclear. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in affected patients have been shown, and ROS are suggested to play a role in fibrosis pathogenesis. In this study we evaluate ROS levels in nonfibrotic and fibrotic skin of patients with SSc and we compare them with those obtained from healthy controls. We enrolled nine SSc patients fulfilling the EULAR/ACR classification criteria and seven healthy controls. Patients included four men and five women with mean age of 46 ± 10 years. Controls were matched by sex and age. All patients were affected by the diffuse cutaneous form of SSc and the ANA pattern anti-Scl70. Mean disease duration was 7.5 ± 5 years. Skin involvement was evaluated by modified Rodnan skin score. Skin samples (4-mm punch biopsy) were taken from fibrotic skin and nonfibrotic skin of patients and from healthy controls as well. To detect ROS, specimens were analyzed immediately after sampling by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood samples were drawn from all patients and controls to assess oxidative stress biomarkers. ROS levels (expressed as median and range, in nmol/L/min/mg of dry weight) were 24.7 (10.9-47.0) in fibrotic skin, 18.7 (7.3-34.0) in nonfibrotic skin, and 7.7 (3.5-13.6) in healthy control skin. ROS levels in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of SSc patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.009, respectively). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were raised in comparison to nonfibrotic skin, when samples related to each patient were compared (p = 0.01). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were correlated with forced vital capacity (r = -0.75, p = 0.02) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.70, p = 0.04). All other clinical and lab parameters showed no

  5. Is the scatter in nitrogen/oxygen of metal-poor systems real? Do H II regions become significantly self-enriched in oxygen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Aida Hortensia

    In this dissertation, I addressed two independent problems. Problem 1 was to determine the extent of intrinsic scatter in the log(N/O) versus 12+log(O/H) diagram of dwarf emission-line galaxies with 12+log(O/H) <= 8.1 (hereafter, metal-poor systems), where O/H (oxygen to hydrogen) and N/O (nitrogen to oxygen) are number density ratios derived from the global HII region-like spectra of these systems. In order to assess the extent of intrinsic scatter among these systems, I computed 24 single-star HII region (H IIR) simulations with CLOUDY, using input stellar spectra modeled by D. Casebeer and D. Jevremovic with PHOENIX. The advantages of these simulations are: use of state- of-the-art stellar spectra, log(N/O) and log(C/O) fixed at -1.46 and -0.7 (which are published means of these systems, respectively), self-consistent stellar and nebular chemical compositions, and O/H as low as solar/50, i.e. , lower than any past work. The analysis of the 24 models shows that: (a) the uncertainties in the log(O/H) and log(N/O) derived from collisionally excited forbidden lines are reduced if the temperatures T e (N + ) and T e (O + ), used for deriving N + /H + and O + /H + respectively, are independent parameterizations of T e (O +2 ) [in general, T e (N + ) = T e (O + ) is assumed, but I show that T e (N + ) and T e (O + ) significantly diverge at low metallicity]; and (b) that the ionization correction factor (ICF) for obtaining N/O from N + /O + , is [left angle bracket]ICF[right angle bracket] = 1.08 ± 0.09 (in general, N/O=N + /O + is assumed). Adopting T e (N + ) != T e (O + ), the above ICF, and published de-reddened emission-line strengths, I re-derived the O/H and N/O ratios for a carefully selected sample of 68 metal-poor systems. For these systems: (1) the largest group of objects forms the well- known N/O plateau, with a value for the mean (and its statistical error) of - 1.43 (+.0084/-.0085); (2) the objects are distributed within a range in log(N/ O) of -1.54 to

  6. [Studies of the blood antioxidant system and oxygen-transporting properties of human erythrocytes during 105-day isolation].

    PubMed

    Brazhe, N A; Baĭzhumanov, A A; Parshina, E Iu; Iusipovich, A I; Akhalaia, M Ia; Iarlykova, Iu V; Labetskaia, O I; Ivanova, S M; Morukov, B V; Maksimov, G V

    2011-01-01

    Effects of strict 105-d isolation on blood antioxidant status, erythrocyte membrane processes and oxygen-binding properties of hemoglobin were studied in 6 male volunteers (25 to 40 y.o.) in ground-based simulation of a mission to Mars (experiment Mars-105). The parameters were measured using venous blood samples collected during BDC, on days 35, 70 and 105 of the experiment and on days 7 and 14-15 after its completion. Methods of biochemistry (determination of enzyme activity and thin-layer chromatography) and biophysical (laser interference microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) showed changes in relative content of lipid and phospholipid fractions suggesting growth of membrane microviscosity and increase in TBA-AP (active products of lipids peroxidation interacting with thiobarbituric acid). A significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase activities against reduction of catalase activity points to both reparative processes in erythrocytes and disbalance between the number of evolving active forms of oxygen and antioxidant protection mechanisms in cells. Hemoglobin sensitivity of oxygen and blood level of oxyhemoglobin were found to increase, too. It is presumed that adaptation of organism to stresses experienced during and after the experiment may destroy balance of the antioxidant protection systems which is conducive to oxidation of membrane phospholipids, alteration of their content, increase of membrane microviscosity and eventual failure of the gas-exchange function of erythrocytes. PMID:21675192

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanocarbon-Based Nanofluids by Using an Oxygen-Acetylene Flame Synthesis System.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Wang, Wei-Ping; Hsu, Yu-Chun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, an oxygen-acetylene flame synthesis system was developed to fabricate nanocarbon-based nanofluids (NCBNFs) through a one-step synthesis method. Measured in liters per minute (LPM), the flame's fuel flows combined oxygen and acetylene at four ratios: 1.5/2.5 (P1), 1.0/2.5 (P2), 0.5/2.5 (P3), and 0/2.5 (P4). The flow rate of cooling water (base fluid) was fixed at 1.2 LPM to produce different nanocarbon-based materials (NCBMs) and various concentrations of NCBNFs. Tests and analyses were conducted for determining the morphology of NCBMs, NCBM material, optical characteristics, the production rate, suspension performance, average particle size, zeta potential, and other relevant basic characteristics of NCBNFs to understand the characteristics and materials of NCBNFs produced through different process parameters (P1-P4). The results revealed that the NCBMs mainly had flaky and spherical morphologies and the diameters of the spherical NCBMs measured approximately 20-30 nm. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the NCBMs contained graphene oxide (GO) and amorphous carbon (AC) when the oxygen flow rate was lower than 1.0 LPM. In addition, the NCBMs contained reduced GO, crystalline graphite (graphite-2H), and AC when the oxygen flow rate was higher than 1.0 LPM. The process parameters of P1, P2, P3, and P4 resulted in NCBMs produced at concentrations of 0.010, 0.013, 0.040, and 0.023 wt%, respectively, in NCBNFs. All the NCBNFs exhibited non-Newtonian and shear-thinning rheological properties. The P4 ratio showed the highest enhancement rate of thermal conductivity for NCBNFs, at a rate 4.85 % higher than that of water. PMID:27295256

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanocarbon-Based Nanofluids by Using an Oxygen-Acetylene Flame Synthesis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Wang, Wei-Ping; Hsu, Yu-Chun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an oxygen-acetylene flame synthesis system was developed to fabricate nanocarbon-based nanofluids (NCBNFs) through a one-step synthesis method. Measured in liters per minute (LPM), the flame's fuel flows combined oxygen and acetylene at four ratios: 1.5/2.5 (P1), 1.0/2.5 (P2), 0.5/2.5 (P3), and 0/2.5 (P4). The flow rate of cooling water (base fluid) was fixed at 1.2 LPM to produce different nanocarbon-based materials (NCBMs) and various concentrations of NCBNFs. Tests and analyses were conducted for determining the morphology of NCBMs, NCBM material, optical characteristics, the production rate, suspension performance, average particle size, zeta potential, and other relevant basic characteristics of NCBNFs to understand the characteristics and materials of NCBNFs produced through different process parameters (P1-P4). The results revealed that the NCBMs mainly had flaky and spherical morphologies and the diameters of the spherical NCBMs measured approximately 20-30 nm. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the NCBMs contained graphene oxide (GO) and amorphous carbon (AC) when the oxygen flow rate was lower than 1.0 LPM. In addition, the NCBMs contained reduced GO, crystalline graphite (graphite-2H), and AC when the oxygen flow rate was higher than 1.0 LPM. The process parameters of P1, P2, P3, and P4 resulted in NCBMs produced at concentrations of 0.010, 0.013, 0.040, and 0.023 wt%, respectively, in NCBNFs. All the NCBNFs exhibited non-Newtonian and shear-thinning rheological properties. The P4 ratio showed the highest enhancement rate of thermal conductivity for NCBNFs, at a rate 4.85 % higher than that of water.

  9. A hybrid plasma technology life support system for the generation of oxygen on Mars: Considerations on materials and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2016-06-01

    As there is a growing interest in conducting human missions to Mars, the need for suitable life support systems becomes more and more important. The reliability of such systems has to increase with the duration of manned missions. Furthermore the maintenance requirements have to be low in order to ensure their efficient use over a long period of time. A proposal for a hybrid life support system that is based on plasma technology for the creation of oxygen from the dissociation of carbon dioxide is given in this paper. The main focus lies on geometrical considerations regarding the optimal shape of the main reactor chamber as well as on suitable materials, which are most promising for the construction of such a system.

  10. Spin-trapping of oxygen free radicals in chemical and biological systems: New traps, radicals and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačić, Goran; Spasojević, Ivan; Šećerov, Bojana; Mojović, Miloš

    2008-05-01

    The choice of the spin-trap that is to be applied in any EPR study represents the crossroad between a comprehensive investigation and an "ordinary" quantification of production of radicals. So, the scope of our study was to compare the performance of different spin-traps for qualitative analysis of radical-generating systems, and their ability to recognize previously unnoticed radicals. In addition, we present a brief account of the difficulties involved in the detection of oxygen-centered radicals in chemical and biological systems accompanied by the rationale for using the EPR spin-trapping technique in quantitative studies of such reactive species. Certain technical aspects of EPR experiments related to efficient trapping of free radicals in biochemical systems are also discussed. As an example we present here results obtained using EPR spectroscopy and the spin-trap DEPMPO, which show that the Fenton reaction, as well as various biological systems generate a previously unappreciated hydrogen ( rad H) atom.

  11. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  12. A New Oxygen Barometer for Solar System Basaltic Glasses Based on Vanadium Valence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Sutton, S. R.; Papike, S. R.; Delaney, J. S.; Shearer, C. K.; Newville, M.; Eng, P.; Rivers, M.; Dyar, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    The determination of oxidation conditions for basaltic magmas derived by the melting of planetary mantles is critical to our understanding of the nature and evolution of planetary interiors. Yet, these determinations are compromised in terrestrial and especially extraterrestrial basalts by our analytical and computational methods for estimating oxygen fugacity (fO2). For example, mineralogical barometers (1, 2) can be reduced in effectiveness by subsolidus re-equilibration of mineral assemblages, inversion of mineralogical data to melt characteristics, and deviations of the natural mineral compositions from ideal thermodynamic parameters.

  13. Effects on optical systems from interactions with oxygen atoms in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Swann, J. T.; Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications of material surface properties due to interactions with ambient atomic oxygen have been observed on surfaces facing the orbital direction in low earth orbits. Some effects are very damaging to surface optical properties while some are more subtle and even beneficial. Most combustible materials are heavily etched, and some coatings, such as silver and osmium, are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides. The growth of oxide films on metals and semiconductors considered stable in dry air was measured. Material removal, surface roughness, reflectance, and optical densities are reported. Effects of temperature, contamination, and overcoatings are noted.

  14. A System for Controlling the Oxygen Content of a Gas Produced by Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A mixture of air, CH4 and OH(2) is burned in a combustion chamber to produce a product gas in the test section. The OH(2) content of the product gas is compared with the OH(2) content of reference air in an OH(2) sensor. If there is a difference an error signal is produced at the output of a control circuit which by the means of a solenoid valve, regulates the flow of OH(2) into the combustion chamber to make the error signal zero. The product gas in the test section has the same oxygen content as air.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter oxygen partial pressure sensing and control system improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frampton, Robert F.; Hoy, Dennis M.; Kelly, Kevin J.; Walleshauser, James J.

    1992-01-01

    A program aimed at developing a new PPO2 oxygen sensor and a replacement amplifier for the Space Shuttle Orbiter is described. Experimental design methodologies used in the test and modeling process made it possible to enhance the effectiveness of the program and to reduce its cost. Significant cost savings are due to the increased lifetime of the basic sensor cell, the maximization of useful sensor life through an increased amplifier gain adjustment capability, the use of streamlined production processes for the manufacture of the assemblies, and the refurbishment capability of the replacement sensor.

  16. Molecular cloud origin for the oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2004-09-17

    Meteorites and their components have anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions characterized by large variations in 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios. On the basis of recent observations of star-forming regions and models of accreting protoplanetary disks, we suggest that these variations may originate in a parent molecular cloud by ultraviolet photodissociation processes. Materials with anomalous isotopic compositions were then transported into the solar nebula by icy dust grains during the collapse of the cloud. The icy dust grains drifted toward the Sun in the disk, and their subsequent evaporation resulted in the 17O- and 18O-enrichment of the inner disk gas. PMID:15375265

  17. Physiologic effects of transfusing red blood cells with high or low affinity for oxygen to passively hyperventilated, anemic baboons: systemic and cerebral oxygen extraction.

    PubMed Central

    Valeri, C R; Rorth, M; Zaroulis, C G; Jakubowski, M S; Vescera, S V

    1975-01-01

    Anemic, passively hyperventilated baboons were given preserved red blood cells either with increased or with slightly reduced affinity for oxygen to restore the red cell volume. In the high affinity group there was a 50% increase in cerebral blood flow immediately after the transfusion, but there was no significant change in the low affinity group. The cardiac output decreased slightly in the low affinity group, and increased slightly but insignificantly in the high affinity group. Two hours after transfusion the cerebral blood flow had returned to normal in the high affinity group. In both groups there was a decrease in arterial blood pH and an increase in Po2 in blood from the pulmonary artery and the jugular vein after transfusion. A 40% restoration of the 2,3 DPG level occurred within 4 hours of the transfusion of red cells with high affinity for oxygen, and this rapid increase was associated with increases in blood pH and inorganic phosphorus levels. Preserved red cells with high affinity for oxygen and low 2, 3 DPG levels significantly increased the cerebral circulation during the 2-hour posttransfusion period. These findings lend support to the recommendation that preserved red cells with normal or elevated 2,3 DPG levels be administered to patients in hemorrhagic or septic shock, and to patients subjected to extracorporeal circulation during cardiac surgery in order to lessen the demand for increased blood flow and to ensure adequate tissue oxygenation during the postoperative period. PMID:1119857

  18. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  19. A mesoporous catalytic membrane architecture for lithium-oxygen battery systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Schwab, Mark; Goh, Tenghooi; Taylor, André D

    2015-01-14

    Controlling the mesoscale geometric configuration of catalysts on the oxygen electrode is an effective strategy to achieve high reversibility and efficiency in Li-O2 batteries. Here we introduce a new Li-O2 cell architecture that employs a catalytic polymer-based membrane between the oxygen electrode and the separator. The catalytic membrane was prepared by immobilization of Pd nanoparticles on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membrane and is adjacent to a carbon nanotube electrode loaded with Ru nanoparticles. During oxide product formation, the insulating PAN polymer scaffold restricts direct electron transfer to the Pd catalyst particles and prevents the direct blockage of Pd catalytic sites. The modified Li-O2 battery with a catalytic membrane showed a stable cyclability for 60 cycles with a capacity of 1000 mAh/g and a reduced degree of polarization (∼ 0.3 V) compared to cells without a catalytic membrane. We demonstrate the effects of a catalytic membrane on the reaction characteristics associated with morphological and structural features of the discharge products via detailed ex situ characterization. PMID:25546408

  20. Evaluation of a textile-based near infrared spectroscopy system in calf muscle oxygenation measurements.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, Nassim; Zysset, Christoph; Büthe, Lars; Kleiser, Stefan; Tröster, Gerhard; Wolf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We recently introduced a novel textile-based NIRS sensor (TexNIRS). Here, we evaluate TexNIRS in ten subjects (16 legs, age 28.5 ± 2.32 years, adipose tissue thickness (ATT) 4.17 ± 1.71 mm). Three venous occlusions at 50 mmHg were performed on their calf muscle. After 3 min of occlusion, oxy/deoxy hemoglobin concentration ([O₂Hb], [HHb]) changes were 3.71 ± 1.89/1.79 ± 1.08 μM; venous oxygen saturation (SvO₂) was 75 ± 9.7 %, oxygen consumption (VO₂) was 0.02 ± 0.01 mL/100 g/min, hemoglobin flow (HF) was 0.93 ± 0.48 μmol/100 mL/min, and blood flow (BF) was 2.01 ± 1.04 mL/100 mL/min. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, but the TexNIRS enables a much higher level of comfort. PMID:24729254

  1. Qigong and L-1 straining maneuver oxygen system requirements with and without positive pressure breathing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S X; Guo, H Z; Zhu, J; Jing, B S

    1994-11-01

    Based on the characteristics of respiration and the intrathoracic pressure in Qigong (Q-G) maneuvering, it has been theorized that the Q-G maneuver may lessen the lack of coordination between aircraft oxygen apparatus and anti-G maneuvers and may be more compatible with positive pressure breathing (PPB). In an experiment intended to test this hypothesis, 5 male volunteers, trained in Q-G and L-1 maneuvers, performed the Q-G and the L-1 maneuvers without and with (PPB) at 4 and 6 kPa, respectively, with 14 respiratory parameters being measured. The results demonstrated that, when performing Q-G maneuver, the maximal expiratory flow rate averaged 1.175-1.645 L.s-1, the inspiratory peak flow, 1.003-1.297 L.s-1. Both these values were markedly lower than those of the L-1 maneuver, and matched well the performance of current aircraft oxygen apparatus. From the blood pressure and heart rate values, it is evident that PPB can further promote the blood pressure-raising effect of the Q-G maneuver, and alleviate pilots' fatigue. PMID:7840751

  2. Detecting, Visualizing and Quantitating the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in an Amoeba Model System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) comprise a range of reactive and short-lived, oxygen-containing molecules, which are dynamically interconverted or eliminated either catalytically or spontaneously. Due to the short life spans of most ROS and the diversity of their sources and subcellular localizations, a complete picture can be obtained only by careful measurements using a combination of protocols. Here, we present a set of three different protocols using OxyBurst Green (OBG)-coated beads, or dihydroethidium (DHE) and Amplex UltraRed (AUR), to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively various ROS in professional phagocytes such as Dictyostelium. We optimised the beads coating procedures and used OBG-coated beads and live microscopy to dynamically visualize intraphagosomal ROS generation at the single cell level. We identified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli as a potent stimulator for ROS generation in Dictyostelium. In addition, we developed real time, medium-throughput assays using DHE and AUR to quantitatively measure intracellular superoxide and extracellular H2O2 production, respectively. PMID:24300479

  3. Predictive Relationships for pH and Carbonate Saturation in the Southern California Current System Using Oxygen and Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alin, S. R.; Feely, R. A.; Dickson, A. G.; Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Juranek, L. W.; Ohman, M. D.; Goericke, R.

    2010-12-01

    The California Current System is expected to experience the ecological impacts of ocean acidification earlier than most other ocean regions because marine waters in the North Pacific are among the oldest in the global oceans and natural upwelling processes in this eastern boundary current system bring CO2-rich water masses to the surface in coastal oceans during late spring-early fall months. We used a multiple linear regression (MLR) approach to generate predictive models using oxygen and temperature as proxy variables to reconstruct pH and carbonate saturation states in the Southern California Bight. The calibration data set included high-quality measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, oxygen, temperature, salinity, and nutrients and was collected during a cruise from British Columbia to Baja California in May-June 2007. The resulting relationships predicting pH and aragonite and calcite saturation states (Ω) from oxygen and temperature data were robust, with r2 values >0.98 and root mean square errors of 0.020 (pH), 0.048 (Ωarag), and 0.075 (Ωcalc). Predicted vs. measured ocean acidification conditions (i.e. pH, Ωarag, and Ωcalc) matched very well for seven verification data sets collected between 2008 and 2010 during quarterly CalCOFI cruises in the Southern California Bight and during several sampling dates on an Ensenada transect occupied several times between 2006 and 2010. Over sub-decadal time scales, these predictive models provide a valuable tool for reconstructing historical time-series of ocean acidification conditions in the California Current Ecosystem where historical inorganic carbon measurements are scarce. Reconstructed pH and saturation state values based on CalCOFI oxygen and temperature data for all cruises between 2005 and 2010 reveal a seasonal cycle in the upper water column, with higher pH and Ω values present during the winter cruises, and stronger gradients including much lower pH and Ω values during spring through

  4. Benthic microbial fuel cell as direct power source for an acoustic modem and seawater oxygen/temperature sensor system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanming; Radachowsky, Sage E; Wolf, Michael; Nielsen, Mark E; Girguis, Peter R; Reimers, Clare E

    2011-06-01

    Supported by the natural potential difference between anoxic sediment and oxic seawater, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) promise to be ideal power sources for certain low-power marine sensors and communication devices. In this study a chambered BMFC with a 0.25 m(2) footprint was used to power an acoustic modem interfaced with an oceanographic sensor that measures dissolved oxygen and temperature. The experiment was conducted in Yaquina Bay, Oregon over 50 days. Several improvements were made in the BMFC design and power management system based on lessons learned from earlier prototypes. The energy was harvested by a dynamic gain charge pump circuit that maintains a desired point on the BMFC's power curve and stores the energy in a 200 F supercapacitor. The system also used an ultralow power microcontroller and quartz clock to read the oxygen/temperature sensor hourly, store data with a time stamp, and perform daily polarizations. Data records were transmitted to the surface by the acoustic modem every 1-5 days after receiving an acoustic prompt from a surface hydrophone. After jump-starting energy production with supplemental macroalgae placed in the BMFC's anode chamber, the average power density of the BMFC adjusted to 44 mW/m(2) of seafloor area which is better than past demonstrations at this site. The highest power density was 158 mW/m(2), and the useful energy produced and stored was ≥ 1.7 times the energy required to operate the system. PMID:21545151

  5. Microstructure and properties of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed with various high-velocity oxygen fuel spray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwetzke, R.; Kreye, H.

    1999-09-01

    This article reports on a series of experiments with various high-velocity oxygen fuel spray systems (Jet Kote, Top Gun, Diamond Jet (DJ) Standard, DJ 2600 and 2700, JP-5000, Top Gun-K) using different WC-Co and WC-Co-Cr powders. The microstructure and phase composition of powders and coatings were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Carbon and oxygen content of the coatings were determined to study the decarburization and oxidation of the material during the spray process. Coatings were also characterized by their hardness, bond strength, abrasive wear, and corrosion resistance. The results demonstrate that the powders exhibit various degrees of phase transformation during the spray process depending on type of powder, spray system, and spray parameters. Within a relatively wide range, the extent of phase transformation has only little effect on coating properties. Therefore, coatings of high hardness and wear resistance can be produced with all HVOF spray systems when the proper spray powder and process parameters are chosen.

  6. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  7. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  8. Engineering development program of a closed aluminum-oxygen semi-cell system for an unmanned underwater vehicle: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Dane W.; Hall, Susan E.

    1995-01-01

    Most emerging unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) missions require significantly longer range and endurance than is achievable with existing battery technology. The Aluminum-Oxygen (Al-O2) semi-cell is a candidate technology capable of providing a significant improvement in endurance compared to the silver-zinc battery technology currently used in UUVs and compares favorably to other proposed UUV power systems not only in performance, but also in safety and logistics. An Al-O2 semi-cell system is under development by Loral Defense Systems-Akron (Loral) for the ARPA/Navy 44 in. diameter UUV test vehicle. The power plant consists of a cell stack, gas management, oxygen storage, electrolyte management, coolant and controller subsystems, designed to replace the existing silver-zinc battery and meet existing weight, volume, electrical and thermal requirements, therefore minimizing modifications to the UUV. A detailed system design is complete. A component and material endurance test to evaluate compatibility and reliability of various material arid components is complete. Sub scale (Short stack) system testing is completed. A full-scale demonstration unit is now under construction in the second half of 1995. The full scale demonstration test will simulate environmental conditions of the operational system. This paper summarizes the results of the extensive short stack and endurance test programs, describes the plan for full-scale testing, and concludes with a brief discussions of future directions for this technology. This program is sponsored by ARPA Maritime Systems Technology Office under NASA contract NAS3-26715.

  9. Engineering development program of a closed aluminum-oxygen semi-cell system for an unmanned underwater vehicle: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Dane W.; Hall, Susan E.

    1995-04-01

    Most emerging unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) missions require significantly longer range and endurance than is achievable with existing battery technology. The Aluminum-Oxygen (Al-O2) semi-cell is a candidate technology capable of providing a significant improvement in endurance compared to the silver-zinc battery technology currently used in UUVs and compares favorably to other proposed UUV power systems not only in performance, but also in safety and logistics. An Al-O2 semi-cell system is under development by Loral Defense Systems-Akron (Loral) for the ARPA/Navy 44 in. diameter UUV test vehicle. The power plant consists of a cell stack, gas management, oxygen storage, electrolyte management, coolant and controller subsystems, designed to replace the existing silver-zinc battery and meet existing weight, volume, electrical and thermal requirements, therefore minimizing modifications to the UUV. A detailed system design is complete. A component and material endurance test to evaluate compatibility and reliability of various material arid components is complete. Sub scale (Short stack) system testing is completed. A full-scale demonstration unit is now under construction in the second half of 1995. The full scale demonstration test will simulate environmental conditions of the operational system. This paper summarizes the results of the extensive short stack and endurance test programs, describes the plan for full-scale testing, and concludes with a brief discussions of future directions for this technology. This program is sponsored by ARPA Maritime Systems Technology Office under NASA contract NAS3-26715.

  10. Oxygen transport in the Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} system.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, B.

    1999-01-04

    The mixed-conducting Sr-Fe-Co oxide has potential use as a gas separation membrane. Its superior oxygen transport reveals the feasibility of using oxide membranes in large-scale oxygen separation. Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} (with x = 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0) samples were made by solid state reaction. To understand the oxygen transport mechanism in this system, conductivity and thermogravimetry experiments were conducted at high temperature in various oxygen partial pressure environments. The oxygen diffusion coefficient was determined from the time relaxation transient behavior of the specimen after switching the surrounding atmosphere. Mobility of the charge carrier was derived from relative conductivity and weight changes. X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on these samples to determine their crystal structures.

  11. The evaluation of oxygen and carbon dioxide transfer associated with airlifts in recirculating aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlifts in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) provide aeration, degasification, and water circulation. They allow the simplification of systems, and if designed properly, can reduce the capital costs and minimize operation and maintenance associated with alternative pumping systems. In order t...

  12. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qing; Qin, Da-Nian; Wang, Fu-Xin; Ren, Jun; Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Qing; Miao, Yu-Wang; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jie; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Aims: To explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger (tempol) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and proinflammatory cytokines (PICs), and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Methods and results: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused intravenously with ANG II (10 ng/kg per min) or normal saline (NS) for 4 weeks. These rats were treated with bilateral PVN infusion of oxygen free radical scavenger tempol (TEMP, 20 μg/h) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). These ANG II-infused rats also had higher levels of gp91{sup phox} (a subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the PVN than the control animals. Treatment with PVN infusion of TEMP attenuated the overexpression of gp91{sup phox}, ACE and IL-1β within the PVN, and decreased sympathetic activity and MAP in ANG II-infused rats. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces elevated PICs and oxidative stress in the PVN, which contribute to the sympathoexcitation in hypertension. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in ANG II-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • The effect of chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide on hypertension was investigated. • ANG II infusion induced increased proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in PVN. • ANG II infusion resulted in oxidative stress, sympathoexcitation and hypertension. • Chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide attenuates RAS and cytokines in hypertension.

  13. Thermochemical and Kinetics of Hydrazine Dehydrogenation by an Oxygen Atom in Hydrazine-Rich Systems: A Dimer Model.

    PubMed

    Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Lischka, Hans; Machado, Francisco B C

    2015-12-24

    The kinetics of the reaction of N2H4 with oxygen depends sensitively on the initial conditions used. In oxygen-rich systems, the rate constant shows a conventional positive temperature dependence, while in hydrazine-rich setups the dependence is negative in certain temperature ranges. In this study, a theoretical model is presented that adequately reproduces the experimental results trend and values for hydrazine-rich environment, consisting of the hydrogen abstraction from the hydrazine (N2H4) dimer by an oxygen atom. The thermochemical properties of the reaction were computed using two quantum chemical approaches, the coupled cluster theory with single, double, and noniterative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and the M06-2X DFT approach with the aug-cc-pVTZ and the maug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, respectively. The kinetic data were calculated with the improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) using a dual-level methodology to build the reaction path. The tunneling effects were considered by means of the small curvature tunneling (SCT) approximation. Potential wells on both sides of the reaction ((N2H4)2 + O → N2H4···N2H3 + OH) were determined. A reaction path with a negative activation energy was found leading, in the temperature range of 250-423 K, to a negative dependence of the rate constant on the temperature, which is in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Therefore, the consideration of the hydrazine dimer model provides significantly improved agreement with the experimental data and should be included in the mechanism of the global N2H4 combustion process, as it can be particularly important in hydrazine-rich systems. PMID:26592088

  14. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  15. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  16. Oxygen scavenging with enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzman, D.O.

    1983-11-08

    An effective method of reducing the amount of oxygen present in an aqueous fluid is described, which protects materials otherwise susceptible to oxidative degradation in the presence of free (dissolved) oxygen. The method comprises reacting the oxygen with an alcohol selected from the group consisting of methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol, in the further presence of alcohol oxidase. An oxygen containing aqueous fluid is a fluid comprising water and free oxygen. The fluid containing free oxygen can be, for example, oil field fluids, recycle water, foodstuffs, etc. The method is applicable to oil field aqueous fluid systems in order to protect oil field equipment to avoid molecular degradation of polymeric viscosifiers used in floods, etc., and to treat foodstuffs. 17 claims.

  17. A feasibility study of singlet oxygen explicit dosmietry (SOED) of PDT by intercomparison with a singlet oxygen luminescence dosimetry (SOLD) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Gemmell, Nathan R.; Veilleux, Israel; McCarthy, Aongus; Buller, Gerald; Hadfield, Robert H.; Wilson, Brian C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    An explicit dosimetry model has been developed to calculate the apparent reacted 1O2 concentration ([1O2]rx) in an in-vivo model. In the model, a macroscopic quantity, g, is introduced to account for oxygen perfusion to the medium during PDT. In this study, the SOED model is extended for PDT treatment in phantom conditions where vasculature is not present; the oxygen perfusion is achieved through the air-phantom interface instead. The solution of the SOED model is obtained by solving the coupled photochemical rate equations incorporating oxygen perfusion through the air-liquid interface. Experiments were performed for two photosensitizers (PS), Rose Bengal (RB) and Photofrin, in solution, using SOED and SOLD measurements to determine both the instantaneous [1O2] as well as cumulative [1O2]rx concentrations, where [1O2=(1/τ▵)•∫[1O2]dt. The PS concentrations varied between 10 and 100 mM for RB and ~200 mM for Photofrin. The resulting magnitudes of [1O2] were compared between SOED and SOLD.

  18. A feasibility study of singlet oxygen explicit dosmietry (SOED) of PDT by intercomparison with a singlet oxygen luminescence dosimetry (SOLD) system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Gemmell, Nathan R.; Veilleux, Israel; McCarthy, Aongus; Buller, Gerald; Hadfield, Robert H.; Wilson, Brian C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    An explicit dosimetry model has been developed to calculate the apparent reacted 1O2 concentration ([1O2]rx) in an in-vivo model. In the model, a macroscopic quantity, g, is introduced to account for oxygen perfusion to the medium during PDT. In this study, the SOED model is extended for PDT treatment in phantom conditions where vasculature is not present; the oxygen perfusion is achieved through the air-phantom interface instead. The solution of the SOED model is obtained by solving the coupled photochemical rate equations incorporating oxygen perfusion through the air-liquid interface. Experiments were performed for two photosensitizers (PS), Rose Bengal (RB) and Photofrin (PH), in solution, using SOED and SOLD measurements to determine both the instantaneous [1O2] as well as cumulative [1O2]rx concentrations, where [1O2]rx = (1/τΔ) · ∫[1O2]dt. The PS concentrations varied between 10 and 100 mM for RB and ~200 mM for Photofrin. The resulting magnitudes of [1O2] were compared between SOED and SOLD. PMID:27064489

  19. Results of the Test Program for Replacement of AK-225G Solvent for Cleaning NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990's, when the Class I Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) chlorofluorocarbon-113 (CFC-113) was banned, NASA's propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have relied upon the solvent AsahiKlin AK-225 (hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225ca/cb or HCFC-225ca/cb) and, more recently AK-225G (the single isomer form, HCFC-225cb) to safely clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems. Effective January 1, 2015, the production, import, export, and new use of Class II Ozone Depleting Substances, including AK-225G, was prohibited in the United States by the Clean Air Act. In 2012 through 2014, NASA test labs at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify a solvent replacement for AK-225G that is both an effective cleaner and safe for use with oxygen systems. This paper summarizes the tests performed, results, and lessons learned.

  20. Nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system for improving sleep-related hypoventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sleep-related hypoventilation should be considered in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, because appropriate respiratory management during sleep is important for preventing elevation of PaCO2 levels. A nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system using a special nasal cannula can deliver suitably heated and humidified oxygen at up to 60 L/min. Since the oxygen concentration remains a constant independent of minute ventilation, this system is particularly useful in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who have hypercapnia. This is the first report of sleep-related hypoventilation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease improving using a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese female who started noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CO2 narcosis due to respiratory infection. Since she became agitated as her level of consciousness improved, she was switched to a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system. When a repeat polysomnography was performed while using the nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system, the Apnea Hypopnea Index was 3.7 times/h, her mean SpO2 had increased from 89 to 93%, percentage time with SpO2 ≤ 90% had decreased dramatically from 30.8 to 2.5%, and sleep stage 4 was now detected for 38.5 minutes. As these findings indicated marked improvements in sleep-related hypoventilation, nasal high-flow oxygen therapy was continued at home. She has since experienced no recurrences of CO2 narcosis and has been able to continue home treatment. Conclusions Use of a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system proved effective in delivering a prescribed concentration of oxygen from the time of acute exacerbation until returning home in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia and sleep-related hypoventilation. The nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system is currently used as a

  1. How Does Oxygen Therapy Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Oxygen Therapy Work? Oxygen therapy provides you with ... pass through your nose or mouth like it does with the other delivery systems. A humidifier adds ...

  2. Establishment of a total liquid ventilation system using saline-based oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Kenta; Matsuda, Kenichi; Harii, Norikazu; Sou, Keitaro; Aoki, Junko; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Micro/nano-bubbles are practical nanomaterials designed to increase the gas content in liquids. We attempted to use oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersions as an oxygen-rich liquid as a means for total liquid ventilation. To determine the oxygen content in the bubble dispersion, a new method based on a spectrophotometric change between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin was established. The oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was supplied to an experimental total ventilation liquid in anesthetic rats. Though the amount of dissolving oxygen was as low as 6 mg/L in physiological saline, the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion was increased to 45 mg/L. The positive correlation between the oxygen content and the life-saving time under liquid ventilation clearly indicates that the life-saving time is prolonged by increasing the oxygen content in the oxygen micro/nano-bubble dispersion. This is the first report indicating that the oxygen micro/nano-bubbles containing a sufficient amount of oxygen are useful in producing oxygen-rich liquid for the process of liquid ventilation. PMID:25854604

  3. Type III secretion system expression in oxygen-limited Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures is stimulated by isocitrate lyase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jade C. S.; Rzhepishevska, Olena; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Welch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and a common cause of chronic infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Oxygen limitation was recently reported to regulate the expression of a major virulence determinant in P. aeruginosa, the type III secretion system (T3SS). Here, we show that expression of the T3SS in oxygen-limited growth conditions is strongly dependent on the glyoxylate shunt enzyme, isocitrate lyase (ICL; encoded by aceA), which was previously shown to be highly expressed in CF isolates. ICL-dependent regulation of the T3SS did not alter the expression level of the master transcriptional regulator, ExsA, but did affect expression of the T3 structural proteins, effectors and regulators (ExsC, ExsD and ExsE). An aceA mutant displayed enhanced biofilm formation during anaerobic growth, which suggested that AceA-dependent modulation of type III secretion might impinge upon the RetS/LadS signalling pathways. Indeed, our data suggest that RetS is able to mediate some of its effects through AceA, as expression of aceA in trans partially restored T3SS expression in a retS mutant. Our findings indicate that AceA is a key player in the metabolic regulation of T3SS expression during oxygen-limited growth of P. aeruginosa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the T3SS can be regulated by factors that do not affect ExsA expression levels. PMID:23363478

  4. Integrated testing of an electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator /EDC/ and a Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem /BRS/. [in spaceborne oxygen reclamation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Clark, D. C.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1976-01-01

    An oxygen reclamation system (ORS) in a spacecraft has the task to revitalize the spacecraft atmosphere by recovering the elementary oxygen from metabolically produced carbon dioxide and water vapor. Life support subsystems which can form such an ORS are an electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator (EDC), a Bosch carbon dioxide reduction subsystem (BRS), and an oxygen generation subsystem (OGS). A total recovery of the oxygen from metabolically generated carbon dioxide can be obtained with the aid of system composed of the considered three subsystems. Attention is given to the control concept which assures an integrated operation of the EDC, BRS, and OGS. A description is presented of the test results obtained during 86 days of testing.

  5. Replacement of Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) -225 Solvent for Cleaning and Verification Sampling of NASA Propulsion Oxygen Systems Hardware, Ground Support Equipment, and Associated Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, H. D.; Mitchell, M. A.; McMillian, J. H.; Farner, B. R.; Harper, S. A.; Peralta, S. F.; Lowrey, N. M.; Ross, H. R.; Juarez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990's, NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC) have used hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), a Class II ozone-depleting substance, to safety clean and verify the cleanliness of large scale propulsion oxygen systems and associated test facilities. In 2012 through 2014, test laboratories at MSFC, SSC, and Johnson Space Center-White Sands Test Facility collaborated to seek out, test, and qualify an environmentally preferred replacement for HCFC-225. Candidate solvents were selected, a test plan was developed, and the products were tested for materials compatibility, oxygen compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and suitability for use in cleanliness verification and field cleaning operations. Honewell Soltice (TradeMark) Performance Fluid (trans-1-chloro-3,3, 3-trifluoropropene) was selected to replace HCFC-225 at NASA's MSFC and SSC rocket propulsion test facilities.

  6. Degradation of methyl and ethyl mercury into inorganic mercury by oxygen free radical-producing systems: involvement of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Suda, I; Totoki, S; Takahashi, H

    1991-01-01

    Degradation of methyl mercury (MeHg) and ethyl Hg (EtHg) with oxygen free radicals was studied in vitro by using three well-known hydroxyl radical (.OH)-producing systems, namely Cu2(+)-ascorbate, xanthine oxidase (XOD)-hypoxanthine (HPX)-Fe(III)EDTA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-ultraviolet light B. For this purpose, the direct determination method for inorganic Hg was employed. MeHg and EtHg were readily degraded by these three systems, though the amounts of inorganic Hg generated from MeHg were one half to one third those from EtHg. Degradation activity of XOD-HPX-Fe(III)EDTA system was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase and the .OH scavengers and stimulated by H2O2. Deletion of the .OH formation promoter Fe(III)EDTA from XOD-HPX-Fe(III)EDTA system resulted in the decreased degradation of MeHg and EtHg, which was enhanced by further addition of the iron chelator diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. In all these cases, a good correlation was observed between alkyl Hg degradation and deoxyribose oxidation determining .OH. By contrast, their degradation appeared to be unrelated to either superoxide anion (O2-) production or H2O2 production alone. We further confirmed that H2O2 (below 2 mM) itself did not cause significant degradation of MeHg and EtHg. These results suggested that .OH, but not O2- and H2O2, might be the oxygen free radical mainly responsible for the degradation of MeHg and EtHg. PMID:1647758

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis identifies a tyrosine radical involved in the photosynthesized oxygen-evolving system

    SciTech Connect

    Debus, R.J.; Barry, B.A.; Babcock, G.T.; McIntosh, L.

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic oxygen evolution takes place in the thylakoid protein complex known as photosystem II. The reaction center core of this photosystem, where photochemistry occurs, is a heterodimer of homologous polypeptides called D1 and D2. Besides chlorophyll and quinone, photosystem II contains other organic cofactors, including two known as Z and D. Z transfers electrons from the site of water oxidation to the oxidized reaction center primary donor, P/sub 680//sup +/, while D /center dot//sup +/ gives rise to the dark-stable EPR spectrum known as signal II. D/center dot//sup +/ has recently been shown to be a tyrosine radical. Z is probably a second tyrosine located in a similar environment. Indirect evidence indicates that Z and D are associated with the D1 and E2 polypeptides, respectively. To identify the specific tyrosine residue corresponding to D, the authors have changed Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide to phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis of a psbD gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The resulting mutant grows photosynthetically, but it lacks the EPR signal of D/center dot//sup +/. The authors conclude that D is Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide. They suggest that the C/sub 2/ symmetry in photosystem II extends beyond P/sub 680/ to its immediate electron donor and conclude that Z is Try-161 of the D1 polypeptide.

  8. Silver phosphate/graphitic carbon nitride as an efficient photocatalytic tandem system for oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofei; Tang, Hua; Xu, Jingsan; Antonietti, Markus; Shalom, Menny

    2015-04-24

    Herein, we show the facile synthesis of an efficient silver phosphate/graphitic carbon nitride (Ag3 PO4 /g-C3 N4 ) photocatalyst for oxygen production and pollutant degradation by using electrostatically driven assembly and ion-exchange processes. The composite materials demonstrate a sheet-like C3 N4 structure, decorated with different Ag3 PO4 particles sizes. Detailed analysis of the reactions mechanism by electron-spin resonance and radical-capture agents strongly imply the formation of an in situ Z-scheme by the evolution of small silver nanoparticles in the interface of the materials under illumination. The Ag nanoparticles improve charge separation within the composite material by acting as a storage and recombination center for electrons and holes from Ag3 PO4 and C3 N4 , respectively. In addition, the photostability of Ag3 PO4 is enhanced relative to that of the bulk materials, which results in a stabilized heterojunction. We believe that this work provides new insight into the operation mechanism of composite photocatalysts for water splitting and opens the possibility for advanced photocatalysis based on the higher oxidation power of Ag3 PO4 . PMID:25693743

  9. Noncontact Monitoring of Blood Oxygen Saturation Using Camera and Dual-Wavelength Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dangdang; Liu, Chenbin; Tsow, Francis; Yang, Yuting; Du, Zijian; Iriya, Rafael; Yu, Hui; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-06-01

    We present a noncontact method to monitor blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The method uses a CMOS camera with a trigger control to allow recording of photoplethysmography (PPG) signals alternatively at two particular wavelengths, and determines the SpO2 from the measured ratios of the pulsatile to the nonpulsatile components of the PPG signals at these wavelengths. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the SpO2 value depends on the choice of the wavelengths. We found that the combination of orange (λ = 611 nm) and near infrared (λ = 880 nm) provides the best SNR for the noncontact video-based detection method. This combination is different from that used in traditional contact-based SpO 2 measurement since the PPG signal strengths and camera quantum efficiencies at these wavelengths are more amenable to SpO2 measurement using a noncontact method. We also conducted a small pilot study to validate the noncontact method over an SpO2 range of 83%-98%. This study results are consistent with those measured using a reference contact SpO2 device ( r = 0.936, ). The presented method is particularly suitable for tracking one's health and wellness at home under free-living conditions, and for those who cannot use traditional contact-based PPG devices. PMID:26415199

  10. A Novel Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Sensor System for In-Situ Measurement and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Frank Uwe; Messerschmid, Ernst; Rogg, Markus

    2010-10-01

    In 1993 the oxygen partial pressure was firstly measured inside a plasma wind tunnel using conventional λ-probes. Since then, a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained in using these sensors in ground test facilities and space. However, these commercially available sensors were too large in scale and weight. Consequently, a new development of solid electrolyte sensors called FIPEX more feasible for space was initiated. Due to space driven benefits, interest arose to use FIPEX technique in terrestrial applications e.g. to monitor sputter plants for float glass coating. Therefore, the VacuSen® sensor was developed. The characterization of VacuSen® at nominal sensor temperature TS = 680° C resulted in a sensor current according to IS = bṡpO20ṡ8±0ṡ05 I[μA] in the operation range between ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 5 Pa. From pulse width modulation (PWM) temperature control, additional information allows to measure ptot according to ptot = aṡRPWM0ṡ107±0ṡ005 thus enlarging the operation range to ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 1ṡ105Pa. A one point calibration routine with air, ideally at ptot = 5 Pa in order to determine both calibration parameters a and b simultaneously, is proposed.

  11. Meteoric water in normal fault systems: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic phases in brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. H.; Anderson, R.; Mulch, A.; Solum, J. G.; Valley, J. W.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of fluid circulation systems in normal fault systems is fundamental to understanding the nature of fluid movement within the upper crust, and has important implications for the on-going controversy about the strength of faults. Authigenic phases in clay gouges and fault breccias record the isotopic signature of the fluids they formed in equilibrium with, and can be used to understand the ‘plumbing system’ of brittle fault environments. We obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic illite and/or smectite in clay gouge from normal faults in two geologic environments, 1.) low-angle normal faults (Ruby Mountains detachment, NV; Badwater Turtleback, CA; Panamint range-front detachment; CA; Amargosa detachment; CA; Waterman Hills detachment, CA), and 2.) An intracratonic high-angle normal fault (Moab Fault, UT). All authigenic phases in these clay gouges are moderately light isotopically with respect to oxygen (illite δ18O -2.0 - + 11.5 ‰ SMOW, smectite δ18O +3.6 and 17.9 ‰) and very light isotopically with respect to hydrogen (illite δD -148 to -98 ‰ SMOW, smectite δD -147 to -92 ‰). Fluid compositions calculated from the authigenic clays at temperatures of 50 - 130 ○C (as indicated by clay mineralogy) indicate that both illite and smectite in normal fault clay gouge formed in the presence of near-pristine to moderately-evolved meteoric fluids and that igneous or metamorphic fluids are not involved in clay gouge formation in these normal fault settings. We also obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on chlorites derived from footwall chlorite breccias in 4 low-angle normal fault detachment systems (Badwater and Mormon Point Turtlebacks, CA, the Chemehuevi detachment, CA, and the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment, AZ). All chlorites are isotopically light to moderately light with respect to oxygen (δ18O +0.29 to +8.1 ‰ SMOW) and very light with respect to hydrogen (δD -97 to -113 ‰) and indicate

  12. Modeling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using two different adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)-based neuro-fuzzy models applied for modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. The two models are developed using experimental data collected from the bottom (USGS station no: 420615121533601) and top (USGS station no: 420615121533600) stations at Klamath River at site KRS12a nr Rock Quarry, Oregon, USA. The input variables used for the ANFIS models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. Two ANFIS-based neuro-fuzzy systems are presented. The two neuro-fuzzy systems are: (1) grid partition-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_GRID, and (2) subtractive-clustering-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_SUB. In both models, 60 % of the data set was randomly assigned to the training set, 20 % to the validation set, and 20 % to the test set. The ANFIS results are compared with multiple linear regression models. The system proposed in this paper shows a novelty approach with regard to the usage of ANFIS models for DO concentration modeling. PMID:24057665

  13. Quenching of singlet molecular oxygen ( sup 1. Delta. sub g O sub 2 ) in silica gel/cyclohexane heterogeneous systems. A direct time-resolved study

    SciTech Connect

    Iu, Kaikong; Thomas, J.K. )

    1990-04-25

    Direct time-resolved studies of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) phosphorescence ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup {minus}}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0) {l arrow} {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2} ({nu} = 0); 1,270 nm) in heterogeneous silica gel/cyclohexane systems are presented. Singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) is created through a photosensitization process on silica gel surfaces. The experimental results show that the lifetimes of singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}) in both porous and compressed fumed silica/gel cyclohexane systems are significantly less than that in liquid cyclohexane. The shortened singlet molecular oxygen lifetime is due mainly to quenching by adsorbed water and silanol groups on the silica gel surface. In addition, monoamines coadsorbed on the silica gel surface do not quench singlet molecular oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}O{sub 2}); however, diamines such as DABCO or piperazine maintain their quenching activity, but the quenching kinetics are not of the Stern-Volmer type. The singlet molecular oxygen lifetime increases on loading the porous silica gel/cyclohexane system with monoamine. Coadsorption of piperazine increases quenching of {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} O{sub 2} by DABCO.

  14. Determination of singlet oxygen quenching and protection of biological systems by various extracts from seed of Rumex crispus L.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hwa-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Seong-Ryul; Shin, Myoung-Ho; Park, Sanggyu; Park, Shin

    2011-02-01

    The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging effect and total phenolic contents were evaluated for the screening of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quenching efficacy of various seed extracts from Rumex crispus L. The butanol and ethyl-acetate extracts displayed remarkable effect of DPPH as compared to positive control ascorbic acid. The concentrations (QC(50)) of butanol and ethyl-acetate extracts required to exert 50% reducing effect on (1)O(2) were found to be 116 and 82 μg mL(-1), respectively. Both extracts were also found to protect the in vitro biological system from the detrimental effect of (1)O(2) on type II photosensitization in Escherichia coli, red blood cell, lactate dehydrogenase and histidine. Among all the tested extracts, the ethyl-acetate and butanol extracts contained higher amount of total phenolic contents. The results suggest that our study may contribute to the development of new bioactive products with potential applications to reduce photo-produced oxidative stress involving reactive oxygen species in living organisms. PMID:21185197

  15. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  16. Scavenging capacity of marine carotenoids against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in a membrane-mimicking system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eliseu; Mariutti, Lilian R B; Mercadante, Adriana Z

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoid intake has been associated with the decrease of the incidence of some chronic diseases by minimizing the in vivo oxidative damages induced by reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS). The carotenoids are well-known singlet oxygen quenchers; however, their capacity to scavenge other reactive species, such as peroxyl radical (ROO•, hydroxyl radical (HO•), hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and anion peroxynitrite (ONOO⁻), still needs to be more extensively studied, especially using membrane-mimicking systems, such as liposomes. Moreover, the identification of carotenoids possessing high antioxidant capacity can lead to new alternatives of drugs or nutritional supplements for prophylaxis or therapy of pathological conditions related to oxidative damages, such as cardiovascular diseases. The capacity to scavenge ROO•, HO•, HOCl and ONOO⁻ of seven carotenoids found in marine organisms was determined in liposomes based on the fluorescence loss of a fluorescent lipid (C₁₁-BODIPY⁵⁸¹/⁵⁹¹) due to its oxidation by these reactive species. The carotenoid-bearing hydroxyl groups were generally more potent ROS scavengers than the carotenes, whilst β-carotene was the most efficient ONOO⁻ scavenger. The role of astaxanthin as an antioxidant should be highlighted, since it was a more potent scavenger of ROO•, HOCl and ONOO⁻ than α-tocopherol. PMID:23015774

  17. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Employing Heteropolyacids as Redox Mediators for Oxygen Reduction Reactions: Pt-Free Cathode Systems.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiaki; Morikawa, Eri; Nakada, Shintaro; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-07-20

    In this study, the heteropolyacids of H3+xPVxMO12-xO40 (x = 0, 2, and 3) were applied as redox mediators for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, of which the cathode is free from the usage of noble metals such as Pt/C. In this system, the electrochemical reduction of heteropolyacid over the carbon cathode and the subsequent reoxidation of the partially reduced heteropolyacid by exposure to the dissolved oxygen in the regenerator are important processes for continuous power generation. Thus, the redox properties of catholytes containing these heteropolyacids were investigated in detail. The substitution quantity of V in the heteropolyacid affected the onset reduction potential as well as the reduction current density, resulting in a difference in cell performance. The chemical composition of heteropolyacid also had a significant impact on the reoxidation property. Among the three compounds, H6PV3Mo9O40 was the most suitable redox mediator. Furthermore, the pH of the catholyte was found to be the crucial factor in determining the reoxidation rate of partially reduced heteropolyacid as well as cell performance. PMID:27348019

  18. Oxygen ordering and strain-related morphology in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3- x O sub 7 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Zhi-Xiong; Zhu, Yimei; Welch, D.O.

    1992-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed on an anisotropic lattice gas model which represent well the interactions between oxygen atoms in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} systems doped with trivalent impurity atoms M such as Fe or Al. Concentration wave amplitudes obtained from these simulations were used to calculate the diffuse X-ray scattering intensity caused by the resulting displacement field using a concentration wave/displacement wave approach, and the results are compared with X-ray and electron diffraction data. The results suggest that the small orthorhombic domains associated with the oxygen cross-links'' around impurity atoms M cause the diffuse scattering intensity to fall off with the scattering wave vector difference q from a Bragg peak as 1/q{sup 2} for small q and as 1/q{sup 4} for larger q. We show that the average size of such domains can be obtained from diffuse X-ray scattering data.

  19. Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

    1998-09-01

    This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

  20. Improvement of tumor response to photodynamic therapy by manipulation of tumor oxygenation in an in-vivo model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Huang, Zheng; Chen, Hua; Shapiro, Howard; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2002-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires molecular oxygen during light irradiation in order to generate reactive oxygen species. Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or induced by PDT, can severely hamper the effectiveness of PDT treatment. Lowering the light irradiation dose rate or fractionating a light dose may improve cell kill of PDT induced hypoxic cells, but will have no effect on pre-existing hypoxic cells. In this study, hyper-oxygenation technique was used during PDT to overcome hypoxia. C3H mice with transplanted mammary carcinoma tumors were injected with 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin and irradiated with 630 nm laser light 24 hours later. Tumor oxygenation was manipulated by subjecting the animals to 3 atp hyperbaric oxygen or normobaric oxygen during PDT light irradiation. The results show a significant improvement in tumor response when PDT was delivered during hyper-oxygenation. With hyper-oxygenation, up to 80% of treated tumors showed no re-growth after 60 days. In comparison, only 20% of tumors treated while animals breathed room air did not re-grow. To explore the effect of hyper-oxygenation on tumor oxygenation, tumor pO2 was measured with microelectrodes positioned in pre-existing hypoxic regions before and during the PDT. The results show that hyper-oxygenation may oxygenate pre-existing hypoxic cells and compensate for oxygen depletion induced by PDT light irradiation. In conclusion, hyper-oxygenation may provide effective ways to improve PDT treatment efficiency by oxygenating both pre-existing and treatment induced cell hypoxia.

  1. A Novel Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Sensor System for In-Situ Measurement and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, Frank Uwe; Messerschmid, Ernst; Rogg, Markus

    2010-10-13

    In 1993 the oxygen partial pressure was firstly measured inside a plasma wind tunnel using conventional {lambda}-probes. Since then, a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained in using these sensors in ground test facilities and space. However, these commercially available sensors were too large in scale and weight. Consequently, a new development of solid electrolyte sensors called FIPEX more feasible for space was initiated. Due to space driven benefits, interest arose to use FIPEX technique in terrestrial applications e.g. to monitor sputter plants for float glass coating. Therefore, the VacuSen registered sensor was developed. The characterization of VacuSen registered at nominal sensor temperature T{sub S} = 680 deg. C resulted in a sensor current according to I{sub S} = b{center_dot}p{sub O2}{sup 0{center_dot}8{+-}0{center_dot}05} I[{mu}A] in the operation range between p{sub tot} = 1{center_dot}10{sup -3} to 5 Pa. From pulse width modulation (PWM) temperature control, additional information allows to measure ptot according to p{sub tot} = a{center_dot}RPWM{sup 0{center_dot}107{+-}0{center_dot}005} thus enlarging the operation range to p{sub tot} = 1{center_dot}10{sup -3} to 1{center_dot}10{sup 5} Pa. A one point calibration routine with air, ideally at p{sub tot} = 5 Pa in order to determine both calibration parameters a and b simultaneously, is proposed.

  2. The effect of oxygen inhibition on an unfilled/filled composite system.

    PubMed

    Rueggeberg, F A; Margeson, D H

    1990-10-01

    Oxygen is known to inhibit vinyl polymerization in resins used for restorative dentistry. This research examined the effects of unfilled resin being blown into a thin layer on etched bovine enamel in atmospheres of room air, argon, or a combination of the two. Onto this thin, cured resin surface, filled resin was added and cured under atmospheric conditions similar to those of the initial polymerization of the unfilled resin. Comparison of the effects of the different testing atmospheres was made by measurement of the shear bond strength of the resin/composite disc to the etched bovine enamel. Monomer conversion values of the unfilled resin were calculated from the infrared spectra of the simulated tooth/disc assembly. Blowing unfilled resin with compressed room air prior to curing caused poor monomer conversion values and resulted in low shear bond strength to etched enamel. Both high monomer conversion and shear strength values resulted when specimens were cured under all-argon conditions. A clinically practical method of maintenance of the tooth under a continuous stream of argon while being cured in room air was shown to provide greater monomer conversion than curing under room-air conditions alone. SEM evaluation showed that the inhibited layer present in room-air curing was both physically displaced by and absorbed into the overlying filled composite. Specimens cured in argon showed an intact, uniformly thick layer of bonding resin next to the etched enamel, with no displacement by or absorption into the composite addition. Unfilled resin cured in room air had a significantly greater thickness of polymerization-inhibited material than did resin cured in an argon atmosphere. PMID:2212209

  3. Tyrosine radicals are involved in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving system

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, B.A.; Babcock, G.T.

    1987-10-01

    In addition to the reaction-center chlorophyll, at least two other organic cofactors are involved in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolution process. One of these cofactors, called Z, transfers electrons from the site of water oxidation to the reaction center of photosystem II. The other species, D, has an uncertain function but gives rise to the stable EPR signal known as signal II. Z./sup +/ and D./sup +/ have identical EPR spectra and are generally assumed to arise from species with the same chemical structure. Results from a variety of experiments have suggested that Z and D are plastoquinones or plastoquinone derivatives. In general, however, the evidence to support this assignment is indirect. To address this situation, the authors have developed more direct methods to assign the structure of the Z./sup +//D./sup +/ radicals. By selective in vivo deuteration of the methyl groups of plastoquinone in the cyanobacteria, they show that hyperfine couplings from the methyl protons cannot be responsible for the partially resolved structure seen in the D./sup +/ EPR spectrum. That is, they verify by extraction and mass spectrometry that quinones are labeled in algae fed deuterated methionine, but no change is observed in the line shape of signal II. In a second series of experiments, they found that deuteration of tyrosine does indeed narrow the D./sup +/ signal. Extraction and mass spectral analysis of the quinones in these cultures show that they are not labeled by tyrosine. These results eliminate a plastoquinone origin for D./sup +/; they conclude instead that D./sup +/, and most likely Z./sup +/, are tyrosine radicals.

  4. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. PMID:26647775

  5. Phase equilibria, crystal structure and oxygen content of intermediate phases in the Y–Ba–Co–O system

    SciTech Connect

    Urusova, A.S.; Cherepanov, V.A. Aksenova, T.V.; Gavrilova, L.Ya.; Kiselev, E.A.

    2013-06-01

    The phase equilibria in the Y–Ba–Co–O system were systematically studied at 1373 K in air. The intermediate phases formed in the Y–Ba–Co–O system at 1373 K in air were: YBaCo₂O5+δ, YBaCo₄O₇ and BaCo1–yYyO3–δ (0.09≤y≤0.42). It was shown that YBaCo₂O5+δ possesses tetragonal structure with the 3aₚ×3aₚ×2aₚ superstructure (sp. gr. P4/mmm). High-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis of the YBaCo₂O5+δ in the temperature range from 298 K up to 1073 K under Po₂=0.21 atm has not shown any phase transformations. The value of oxygen content for the YBaCo₂O5+δ at room temperature was estimated as 5.40 and at 1323 K it was equal to 5.04. Thermal expansion of sample shows a linear characteristics and the average thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) is about 13.8×10⁻⁶, K⁻¹ in the temperature range 298–1273 K. The homogeneity range and crystal structure of the BaCo1–yYyO3–δ (0.09≤y≤0.42) solid solutions were determined by X-ray diffraction of quenched samples. All BaCo1–yYyO3–δ solid solutions were found to have cubic structure (sp. gr. Pm3m). The unit cell parameters were refined using Rietveld full-profile analysis. Oxygen nonstoichiometry of BaCo1–yYyO3–δ solid solutions with 0.1≤y≤0.4 was measured by means of thermogravimetric technique within the temperature range 298–1373 K in air. Thermal expansion of BaCo1–yYyO3–δ (y=0.0; 0.1; 0.2; 0.3) samples was studied within the temperature range 298–1200 K in air. The projection of isothermal–isobaric phase diagram for the Y–Ba–Co–O system to the compositional triangle of metallic components was presented. - Graphical abstract: A projection of isobaric isothermal phase diagram of the Y–Ba–Co–O system to the metallic components

  6. Design and demonstration of a system for the deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power system concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A system for the vacuum deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power systems (SDPS) concentrators was designed and demonstrated. The design issues pertinent to SDPS were developed by the Government Aerospace Systems Division of the Harris Corporation and are described in NASA-CR-179489. Both design and demonstration phases have been completed. At the time of this report the deposition system was ready for coating of facets for SDPS concentrators. The materials issue relevant to the coating work were not entirely resolved. These issues can only be resolved when substrates which are comparable to those which will be used in flight hardware are available. The substrates available during the contract period were deficient in the areas of surface roughness and contamination. These issues are discussed more thoroughly in the body of the report.

  7. Determination of oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head and overlying artery and vein using a snapshot multi-spectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoobehi, Bahram; Eaton, Alexander; Wafapoor, Hussein; Fournier, Paul; Firn, Kim; Peters, Matt; Rodebeck, Ellie; Templet, Brian

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a snapshot optical imaging system capable of taking multiple images simultaneously and sending them to a CCD detector. Using an innovative lens array design, the beam obtained from the fundus camera is segmented into several different images passed through several different bandpass filters. Each bandpass filter defines a unique spectral region of imaging. The images are taken simultaneously into a large silicone chip with a dynamic range of 16 bits (highly sensitive) and are integrated with a single optical connection to a digital fundus camera. Our algorithm maps blood oxygen saturation of the retina using several wavelengths. These wavelengths are capable of approximating the whole hemoglobin spectrum and have been found from a previously developed hyperspectral algorithm. They include four isosbestic points (522, 548, 569, and 586 nm) and three oxygen-sensitive points (542, 560, and 586 nm) where the difference between fully oxygenated and deoxygenated blood is at a maximum. Using MatLab code, color maps of oxygen saturation are produced. The average value taken from all vein areas was 60.53%, assuming that the artery oxygen saturation value is 98%. Oxygen saturation of the tissue was 75.78%. Oxygen saturations of the temporal/inferior/nasal veins ranged from 61.86% to 63.37%; the superior vein was significantly lower (54.19%). Tissue oxygen saturations in different quadrants of the eye ranged from 74.17% to 76.74%. Our algorithm has been developed for measuring oxygen saturation of the retina clinically. This was done for one subject only; further work can extend the measurements to different pigments.

  8. Design considerations for a 10-kW integrated hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Miller, T. B.; Rieker, L. L.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1984-01-01

    Integration of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem with an alkaline electrolysis subsystem to form a regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system for low earth orbit (LEO) applications characterized by relatively high overall round trip electrical efficiency, long life, and high reliability is possible with present state of the art technology. A hypothetical 10 kW system computer modeled and studied based on data from ongoing contractual efforts in both the alkaline fuel cell and alkaline water electrolysis areas. The alkaline fuel cell technology is under development utilizing advanced cell components and standard Shuttle Orbiter system hardware. The alkaline electrolysis technology uses a static water vapor feed technique and scaled up cell hardware is developed. The computer aided study of the performance, operating, and design parameters of the hypothetical system is addressed.

  9. Flavin-sensitized electrode system for oxygen evolution using photo-electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Rupam; Sloan, Madison J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2016-07-01

    Fabrication of bio-electrode systems decorated with redox active biomolecules, flavins, is demonstrated. Exploiting the photochemistry and electrochemistry of flavins, we explored the photo-electrochemical activity of flavin-functionalized electrode systems to assess their potential utility for sustainable energy production. As model systems, lumiflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide were immobilized on carbon electrodes by dropcasting and covalent grafting techniques. Activity of these bio-electrodes towards generation of O2 from H2O in 0.5 M potassium phosphate buffer at pH 7.1 was demonstrated. Irradiation of the electrode system with visible light led to increased activity of the electrodes with a 3-fold enhancement of oxidation of H2O. PMID:27346375

  10. An evaluation of oxygen-hydrogen propulsion systems for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemetson, R. W.; Garrison, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual designs for O2/H2 chemical and resistojet propulsion systems for the space station was developed and evaluated. The evolution of propulsion requirements was considered as the space station configuration and its utilization as a space transportation node change over the first decade of operation. The characteristics of candidate O2/H2 auxiliary propulsion systems are determined, and opportunities for integration with the OTV tank farm and the space station life support, power and thermal control subsystems are investigated. OTV tank farm boiloff can provide a major portion of the growth station impulse requirements and CO2 from the life support system can be a significant propellant resource, provided it is not denied by closure of that subsystem. Waste heat from the thermal control system is sufficient for many propellant conditioning requirements. It is concluded that the optimum level of subsystem integration must be based on higher level space station studies.

  11. A multiplexing fiber optic microsensor system for monitoring oxygen concentration in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, P.; Hauser, B. A.; Allen, L. H.; Boote, K. J.; Karplus, E.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and rapid measurement of physiological O2 transport is vital for understanding spatially and temporally dynamic metabolism and stress signalling in plant cells and tissues. Single channel luminescent O2- quenched optrodes have been available for use in laboratory and field experiments since the early 2000's. However, to collect the large datasets needed to understand O2 transport in complex systems, many experiments require a multiple channel O2 sensor system. This research reports the development of a multiplexing fiber optic O2 microsensor system designed to conduct high temporal resolution experiments for field studies of plant physiology. The 10 channel system was demonstrated for measuring O2 concentration in developing soybean seeds (Glycine max L. Merr.) within a climate controlled greenhouse.

  12. Effects of dissolved oxygen on microbial community of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal system treating simulating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiale; Qing, Xiaoxia; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of four identical sequencing biofilm batch reactors (SBBR) for autotrophic nitrogen removal was investigated with 2000mg/L ammonia-containing mature landfill leachate at 30°C. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance and microbial community of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) system. At an applied load of 0.5kgNm(-3)d(-1), average total nitrogen removal efficiency (TNRE) above 90% was long-term achieved with an optimal DO concentration of 2.7mg/L. The microelectrode-measured profiles showed the microenvironments inside the biofilms. 16S ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid (rRNA) amplicon pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used to analyze the microbial variations of different DO concentrations and different positions inside one reactor. PMID:27450126

  13. Novel use of the AngioVac® system to remove thrombus during simultaneous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation life support.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kevin E; Jenkins, Eric; Copenhaver, William; Williams, David M

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was introduced to clinical medicine over 40 years ago. While initially used as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in infants, the use of ECMO has grown to include respiratory and circulatory failure in both children and adults, cardiogenic shock, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, trauma, malignancy, pulmonary hemorrhage and as a treatment for hypothermic drowning.(1) Recent technological improvements in ECMO circuitry make it possible to minimize anticoagulation of the ECMO patient, decreasing the incidence of bleeding. Thrombus deposition within the ECMO circuit can be a life-threating complication. ECMO circuit thrombus can be contained in the circuit, adherent to cannula and deposited within the patient. The ability to remove thrombus while the patient remains on ECMO support could be a life-saving measure for some patients. The present case report outlines use of the AngioVac(®) thrombus removal system in concert with ECMO to remove a large thrombus adherent to an ECMO cannula. PMID:26034197

  14. [Effects of exogenous silicon on active oxygen scavenging systems in chloroplasts of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings under salt stress].

    PubMed

    Qian, Qiong-Qiu; Zai, Wen-San; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2006-02-01

    With K(2)SiO(4) (1.0 mmol/L) treatment, the effects of Si on the distribution of Na(+), K(+) to chloroplasts and antioxidant system of cucumber leaves under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress were studied. The results showed that there was a selective transport of K(+) into the chloroplasts so that Na(+) content of chloroplasts was lower under Si treatment (Table 1); H(2)O(2) and MDA contents in chloroplasts were significantly decreased (Fig.1), and the activities of SOD, APX, GR and DHAR were increased simultaneity (Fig.2), and AsA, GSH contents were also increased in chloroplasts of salt-stressed cucumber by additional Si treatment (Fig.3). It may be concluded that Si could decrease absorption of Na(+) and increase ability of active oxygen scavenging in chloroplasts, therefore the injury of chloroplast membrane under salinity stress in cucumber was alleviated. PMID:16477139

  15. Massive Systemic Air Embolism during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support of a Neonate with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Timpa, Joseph G.; O’Meara, Carlisle; McILwain, R. Britt; Dabal, Robert J.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is universally accepted as a potential lifesaving therapy for neonates suffering severe cardiorespiratory failure, with survival reported as 81% weaning off ECMO and 69% to hospital discharge in this population. Although ECMO may reduce mortality in certain neonatal patients, it is associated with significant complications. Air in the circuit complicates 4.9% of neonatal ECMO runs, and it is crucial that all ECMO caregivers are trained in the prevention of air embolism and possess the knowledge necessary to efficiently identify and remove air from the ECMO circuit to prevent life threatening consequences. We present a fatal case of neonatal systemic air embolism leading to massive entrainment of air into the ECMO venous return cannula of a neonatal patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome following repair of obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. We describe the pathophysiology and presentation of this rare condition and the importance of early recognition, due to its high mortality rate. PMID:21848179

  16. Direct visualization of surface phase of oxygen molecules physisorbed on Ag(111) surface: A two-dimensional quantum spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Imada, Hiroshi; Kim, Yousoo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    We report on the real-space observation of the two-dimensional distorted triangular lattice of physisorbed oxygen (O2) molecules on an Ag(111) surface by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The physisorbed state of the O2 monolayers was confirmed by measuring their thermal stability, which showed good agreement with previous thermal desorption spectroscopy. The distortion of the observed lattice was reproduced quantitatively by considering the intermolecular exchange interaction in Monte Carlo calculations, indicating a critical role of antiferromagnetic ordering of O2 spins. In tunneling spectra, the Kondo resonance was not observed on the O2 layer at 4.7 K unlike the case of physisorbed O2 on Ag(110). These results indicate that an intrinsic S =1 spin of the O2 molecules was preserved to form a two-dimensional antiferromagnetic quantum spin system on the surface.

  17. Antioxidant defence systems and generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma cells with defective mitochondria: effect of selenium.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, Marta; Duszyński, Jerzy; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases originate from mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial proteome. Neurogenic muscle weakness, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) syndrome is associated with the T8993G transversion in ATP6 gene which results in substitution at the very conservative site in the subunit 6 of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the ATPase are considered to be accompanied by changes in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed to elucidate effects of selenium on ROS and antioxidant system of NARP cybrid cells with 98% of T8993G mutation load. We found that selenium decreased ROS generation and increased the level and activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Therefore, we propose selenium to be a promising therapeutic agent not only in the case of NARP syndrome but also other diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress. PMID:20138159

  18. Practical use of chemical probes for reactive oxygen species produced in biological systems by γ-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Hee; Moon, Yu Ran; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kang-Soo; Cho, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2009-05-01

    Application of chemical probes, for detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was tested during γ-irradiation. The ethanol/α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) were structurally stable enough to detect rad OH and H 2O 2, increasingly generated by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy. Interestingly, the production rate of H 2O 2, but not rad OH, during γ-irradiation, was significantly different between in vitro systems of lettuce and spinach. These results suggest that 4-POBN and DAB could be utilized as a semi-quantitative probe to quantify rad OH and H 2O 2, produced by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy.

  19. Cratos: A Simple Low Power Excavation and Hauling System for Lunar Oxygen Production and General Excavation Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, John J.; Greer, Lawrence C.; John, Wentworth T.; Spina, Dan C.; Krasowski, Mike J.; Abel, Phillip B.; Prokop, Norman F.; Flatico, Joseph M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a robust excavating and hauling system for lunar and planetary excavation is critical to the NASA mission to the Moon and Mars. Cratos was developed as a low center of gravity, small (.75m x .75m x 0.3m), low power tracked test vehicle. The vehicle was modified to excavate and haul because it demonstrated good performance capabilities in a laboratory and field testing. Tested on loose sand in the SLOPE facility, the vehicle was able to pick up, carry, and dump sand, allowing it to accomplish the standard requirements delivery of material to a lunar oxygen production site. Cratos can pick up and deliver raw material to a production plant, as well as deliver spent tailings to a disposal site. The vehicle can complete many other In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) excavation chores and in conjunction with another vehicle or with additional attachments may be able to accomplish all needed ISRU tasks.

  20. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  1. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch out for splattering grease. It can catch fire. Keep children with oxygen away from the stove top and oven. Cooking ... under the bed. Keep liquids that may catch fire away from your oxygen. This includes cleaning products that contain oil, grease, ...

  2. Elements of a decision support system for real-time management ofdissolved oxygen in the San Joaquin River deep water ship channel

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Jacobs, Karl; Chen, Carl W.; Stringfellow, WilliamT.

    2004-07-15

    A decision support system (DSS) has been designed and will be implemented over the next three years to assist in the control and management of episodes of low dissolved oxygen (DO) in a Deep Water Ship Channel (DWSC), located near Stockton, California. The DSS integrates three information technology functions. The first part is the collection and management of data on flow, pollution loads and water quality. The second part is the simulation model which can forecast the dissolved oxygen sag in the DWSC and determine management actions necessary to improve dissolved oxygen concentrations. The third part is the graphical user interface, which facilitates the computer simulations and posting of the forecasted dissolved oxygen and remedial measures to a stakeholder group for implementations.

  3. A biological loss of endosulfan and related chlorinated organic compounds from aqueous systems in the presence and absence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Guerin, T F

    2001-01-01

    Endosulfan is a cyclodiene organochlorine currently widely used as an insecticide throughout the world. This study reports that the endosulfan isomers can be readily dissipated from aqueous systems at neutral pH in the absence of biological material or chemical catalysts, in the presence or absence of oxygen. The study showed that aldrin, dieldrin, and endosulfan exhibit bi-phasic loss from water in unsealed and butyl rubber sealed vessels. Half-lives are substantially increased for endosulfan I when oxygen is removed from the incubation vessel. The study conditions, where PTFE was used, were such that loss due to volatilization and alkaline chemical hydrolysis was eliminated. Half-lives determined from these data indicate that the parent isomers are much less persistent than the related cyclodienes, aldrin and dieldrin, confirming the findings of previous studies. The major oxidation product of endosulfans I and II, endosulfan sulfate, is less volatile and can persist longer than either of the parent isomers. Endosulfan sulfate was not formed in any of the treatments suggesting that it would not be formed in aerated waters in the absence of microbial activity or strong chemical oxidants. Since endosulfan sulfate is formed in many environments through biological oxidation, and is only slowly degraded (both chemically in sterile media and biologically), it represents a predominant residue of technical grade endosulfan, which finds its way into aerobic and anaerobic aquatic environments. The data obtained contributes to and confirms the existing body of half-life data on endosulfan I and II and its major oxidation product, endosulfan sulfate. The half-life data generated from the current study can be used in models for predicting the loss of chlorinated cyclodiene compounds from aqueous systems. The findings also highlight the importance of critically reviewing half-life data, to determine what the predominant processes are that are acting on the compounds under

  4. A comparative study of the triple oxygen analyses of dissolved oxygen in a fresh water system (Feitsui reservoir) and South China Sea at SEATS station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurikova, H.; Guha, T.; Liang, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first insight into the stable isotopic composition of dissolved O2 from the Feitsui Reservoir, which supplies drinking water for millions of people living in Taipei, Taiwan. In addition, first observations on 17Δ from a cruise to South China Sea (the long-term station SEATS) in 2013 were also included for comparison. A regular sampling effort for collection of water samples from the Feitsui Reservoir was initiated in May 2014. The 17Δ of dissolved O2 from water samples was assessed to examine its spatial variations, variability over time and to estimate the gross oxygen production rates (GOP). Primary productivity estimated from the dissolved O2 will be compared to that from 14C. Results and implications will be presented and discussed.

  5. Design considerations for a 10-KW integrated hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoberecht, M.A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.D.; Miller, T.B.; Rieker, L.L.

    1984-08-01

    Integration of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem with an alkaline electrolysis subsystem to form a regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system for low-earth-orbit (LEO) applications characterized by relatively high overall round-trip electrical efficiency, long life, and high reliability is possible with present state-of-the-art technology. A hypothetical 10-kW system is being computer modeled and studied based on data from ongoing contractual efforts in both the alkaline fuel cell and alkaline water electrolysis areas. The alkaline fuel cell technology is being developed under an NASA-LeRC program with United Technologies Corporation (UTC), utilizing advanced cell components and standard Shuttle-Orbiter system hardware. The alkaline electrolysis technology is that of Life Systems, Inc. (LSI), which uses a static water vapor feed technique and scaled-up cell hardware being developed under an NASA-LeRC program. This paper addresses the computeraided study of the performance, operating, and design parameters of the hypothetical system.

  6. Component and System Sensitivity Considerations for Design of a Lunar ISRU Oxygen Production Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Hegde, Uday G.; Balasubramaniam, Ramaswamy; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2009-01-01

    Component and system sensitivities of some design parameters of ISRU system components are analyzed. The differences between terrestrial and lunar excavation are discussed, and a qualitative comparison of large and small excavators is started. The effect of excavator size on the size of the ISRU plant's regolith hoppers is presented. Optimum operating conditions of both hydrogen and carbothermal reduction reactors are explored using recently developed analytical models. Design parameters such as batch size, conversion fraction, and maximum particle size are considered for a hydrogen reduction reactor while batch size, conversion fraction, number of melt zones, and methane flow rate are considered for a carbothermal reduction reactor. For both reactor types the effect of reactor operation on system energy and regolith delivery requirements is presented.

  7. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Oxygen-Tolerant Cyanobacterial System (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Smith, H. O.; Maness, P.-C.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this report is to develop an O{sub 2}-tolerant cyanobacterial system for continuous light-driven H{sub 2} production from water. The overall goal is to produce a cyanobacterial recombinant to produce H{sub 2} continuously.

  8. A TRANSIENT CURRENT MONITORING AND ELECTRODE CHARACTERIZATION SYSTEM FOR A PULSED OXYGEN ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-steady state voltammetry has been applied to membrane electrodes to provide improved sensitivity as well as independence of stirring. This paper describes a new instrumentation system based on complementary metal oxide-silicon technology for the characterization of a pulsed o...

  9. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  10. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants.

    PubMed

    Flint, Jeremy J; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges--the most evident of which are spatial limitations--to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and--being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies--seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker's series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig's continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development. PMID:26666980

  11. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development.

  12. Temporal-Spatial Interaction between Reactive Oxygen Species and Abscisic Acid Regulates Rapid Systemic Acclimation in Plants[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Miller, Gad; Salazar, Carolina; Mondal, Hossain A.; Shulaev, Elena; Cortes, Diego F.; Shuman, Joel L.; Luo, Xiaozhong; Shah, Jyoti; Schlauch, Karen; Shulaev, Vladimir; Mittler, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Being sessile organisms, plants evolved sophisticated acclimation mechanisms to cope with abiotic challenges in their environment. These are activated at the initial site of exposure to stress, as well as in systemic tissues that have not been subjected to stress (termed systemic acquired acclimation [SAA]). Although SAA is thought to play a key role in plant survival during stress, little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying it. Here, we report that SAA in plants requires at least two different signals: an autopropagating wave of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that rapidly spreads from the initial site of exposure to the entire plant and a stress-specific signal that conveys abiotic stress specificity. We further demonstrate that SAA is stress specific and that a temporal–spatial interaction between ROS and abscisic acid regulates rapid SAA to heat stress in plants. In addition, we demonstrate that the rapid ROS signal is associated with the propagation of electric signals in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings unravel some of the basic signaling mechanisms underlying SAA in plants and reveal that signaling events and transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming of systemic tissues in response to abiotic stress occur at a much faster rate than previously envisioned. PMID:24038652

  13. A Microperfusion and In-Bore Oxygenator System Designed for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Studies on Living Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Menon, Kannan; Hansen, Brian; Forder, John; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Spectrometers now offer the field strengths necessary to visualize mammalian cells but were not designed to accommodate imaging of live tissues. As such, spectrometers pose significant challenges—the most evident of which are spatial limitations—to conducting experiments in living tissue. This limitation becomes problematic upon trying to employ commercial perfusion equipment which is bulky and—being designed almost exclusively for light microscopy or electrophysiology studies—seldom includes MR-compatibility as a design criterion. To overcome problems exclusive to ultra-high magnetic field environments with limited spatial access, we have designed microperfusion and in-bore oxygenation systems capable of interfacing with Bruker’s series of micro surface-coils. These devices are designed for supporting cellular resolution imaging in MR studies of excised, living tissue. The combined system allows for precise control of both dissolved gas and pH levels in the perfusate thus demonstrating applicability for a wide range of tissue types. Its compactness, linear architecture, and MR-compatible material content are key design features intended to provide a versatile hardware interface compatible with any NMR spectrometer. Such attributes will ensure the microperfusion rig’s continued utility as it may be used with a multitude of contemporary NMR systems in addition to those which are currently in development. PMID:26666980

  14. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  15. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen (1O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the 1O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of 1O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of 1O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent 1O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  16. A system for the disposal of large volumes of air containing oxygen-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. M.; Quaglia, L.; del Fiore, G.; Hannay, J.; Fissore, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described which permits large volumes of air containing the radionuclide 15O to be vented into the atmosphere. The short half-life of this isotope (124 s) enables use to be made of a large number of small vessels connected in series. Such a device has the effect of increasing the mean transit time. The system as installed results in a reduction of the radioactive concentration in the vented air to levels below the maximum permitted values.

  17. Photocytotoxic activity of a nitrosyl phthalocyanine ruthenium complex--a system capable of producing nitric oxide and singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Zumira Aparecida; de Moraes, Juliana Cristina Biazzotto; Rodrigues, Fernando Postalli; de Lima, Renata Galvão; Curti, Carlos; da Rocha, Zênis Novaes; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; Formiga, André Luiz Barboza; da Silva, Roberto Santana

    2011-08-01

    The synthesis, structural aspects, pharmacological assays, and in vitro photoinduced cytotoxic properties of [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] (pc=phthalocyanine) are described. Its biological effect on the B16F10 cell line was studied in the presence and absence of visible light irradiation. At comparable irradiation levels, [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] was more effective than [Ru(pc)] at inhibiting cell growth, suggesting that occurrence of nitric oxide release following singlet oxygen production upon light irradiation may be an important mechanism by which the nitrosyl ruthenium complex exhibits enhanced biological activity in cells. Following visible light activation, the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex displayed increased potency in B16F10 cells upon modifications to the photoinduced dose; indeed, enhanced potency was detected when the nitrosyl ruthenium complex was encapsulated in a drug delivery system. The liposome containing the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex was over 25% more active than the corresponding ruthenium complex in phosphate buffer solution. The activity of the complex was directly proportional to the ruthenium amount present inside the cell, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the photocytotoxic activity was mainly due to apoptosis. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation induced by [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)], proposed as NO carrier, was studied in rat isolated aorta. The observed vasodilation was concentration-dependent. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex induces vascular relaxation and could be a potent anti-tumor agent. Nitric oxide release following singlet oxygen production upon visible light irradiation on a nitrosyl ruthenium complex produces two radicals and may elicit phototoxic responses that may find useful applications in photodynamic therapy. PMID:21726765

  18. Effects of oxygen and weak magnetic field on Fe(0)/bisulfite system: performance and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xinmei; Gan, Jinhong; Zhan, Wei; Sun, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The performance and mechanisms of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) degradation by the Fe(0)/bisulfite system were systematically investigated for the first time. The evidences presented in this study verified that O2 was a crucial factor that affected the mechanism of Fe(0)/bisulfite-driven 4-NP degradation. In the Fe(0)/bisulfite/O2 system, Fe(0) acted as a supplier of Fe(2+) to catalyze bisulfite oxidation that induced a chain reaction to produce reactive radicals for 4-NP degradation. While under N2 purging condition, bisulfite worked as a specified reductant that facilitated the transformation of Fe(3+) to nascent Fe(2+) ions, which principally accounted for the reductive removal of 4-NP. The application of a weak magnetic field (WMF) efficiently improved the removal rate of 4-NP and did not alter the mechanisms in both Fe(0)/bisulfite/O2 and Fe(0)/bisulfite/N2 processes. The secondary radicals, HO(·), SO4 (·-), and SO5 (·-), were considered as the most possible active oxidants contributing to the oxidative removal of 4-NP and even partial mineralization under an oxic condition. Compared with anoxic conditions, the performance removal of 4-NP by the WMF-Fe(0)/bisulfite/O2 system showed less pHini dependence. To facilitate the application of WMF-Fe(0)/bisulfite/O2 technology in real practice, premagnetization of Fe(0) was employed to combine with bisulfite/O2 and proved to be an effective and applicable method for 4-NP removal. PMID:27184150

  19. Response characteristics of a dual transcutaneous oxygen/carbon dioxide monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kesten, S; Chapman, K R; Rebuck, A S

    1991-05-01

    We tested the response characteristics of a dual transcutaneous (tc) PO2/PCO2 monitoring system in healthy subjects who breathed various gas mixtures, and we compared steady-state tc readings to simultaneous arterial blood gas analysis in 20 stable respiratory outpatients. The electrodes were simple to apply, required very little skin preparation, and had trivial signal drift. In healthy subjects, tcPCO2 lag time during CO2 rebreathing was 16.8 seconds, with a 90 percent response time of 77.9 seconds after CO2 breathing was discontinued. The 90 percent response times of the O2 electrode when subjects breathed a hypoxic mixture was 257 seconds after a lag of 31 seconds. When inhaled gas mixtures were changed from hypoxia to room air, the lag time was shorter (12.5 seconds), but 90 percent response time exceeded 5 minutes. In stable patients with respiratory disease, tcPCO2 and tcPO2 were linearly related to PaCO2 (range, 19 to 53 mm Hg) and PaO2 (range, 45 to 99 mm Hg), respectively (tcPCO2 = 1.4 PaCO2-9.44, with r = 0.90 and SEE = 5.35 mm Hg; tcPO2 = 0.56 PaO2 + 20.4, with r = 0.53 and SEE = 11.7 mm Hg). We conclude that the response of the dual transcutaneous monitoring system is more rapid for the CO2 than the O2 electrode and may be rapid enough to be useful in some clinical settings; however, the O2 system fails to offer the response characteristics and accuracy that would allow it to be substituted for arterial gas tensions in unstable clinical situations. PMID:2019180

  20. Regenerative Hydrogen-oxygen Fuel Cell-electrolyzer Systems for Orbital Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cells have found application in space since Gemini. Over the years technology advances have been factored into the mainstream hardware programs. Performance levels and service lives have been gradually improving. More recently, the storage application for fuel cell-electrolyzer combinations are receiving considerable emphasis. The regenerative system application described here is part of a NASA Fuel Cell Program which was developed to advance the fuel cell and electrolyzer technology required to satisfy the identified power generation and energy storage need of the Agency for space transportation and orbital applications to the year 2000.

  1. Phase equilibria, crystal structure and oxygen content of intermediate phases in the Y-Ba-Co-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusova, A. S.; Cherepanov, V. A.; Aksenova, T. V.; Gavrilova, L. Ya.; Kiselev, E. A.

    2013-06-01

    The phase equilibria in the Y-Ba-Co-O system were systematically studied at 1373 K in air. The intermediate phases formed in the Y-Ba-Co-O system at 1373 K in air were: YBaCo2O5+δ, YBaCo4O7 and BaCo1-yYyO3-δ (0.09≤y≤0.42). It was shown that YBaCo2O5+δ possesses tetragonal structure with the 3ap×3ap×2ap superstructure (sp. gr. P4/mmm). High-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis of the YBaCo2O5+δ in the temperature range from 298 K up to 1073 K under Po2=0.21 аtm has not shown any phase transformations. The value of oxygen content for the YBaCo2O5+δ at room temperature was estimated as 5.40 and at 1323 K it was equal to 5.04. Thermal expansion of sample shows a linear characteristics and the average thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) is about 13.8×10-6, K-1 in the temperature range 298-1273 K. The homogeneity range and crystal structure of the BaCo1-yYyO3-δ (0.09≤y≤0.42) solid solutions were determined by X-ray diffraction of quenched samples. All BaCo1-yYyO3-δ solid solutions were found to have cubic structure (sp. gr. Pm3m). The unit cell parameters were refined using Rietveld full-profile analysis. Oxygen nonstoichiometry of BaCo1-yYyO3-δ solid solutions with 0.1≤y≤0.4 was measured by means of thermogravimetric technique within the temperature range 298-1373 K in air. Thermal expansion of BaCo1-yYyO3-δ (у=0.0; 0.1; 0.2; 0.3) samples was studied within the temperature range 298-1200 K in air. The projection of isothermal-isobaric phase diagram for the Y-Ba-Co-O system to the compositional triangle of metallic components was presented.

  2. Liquid Oxygen Rotating Friction Ignition Testing of Aluminum and Titanium with Monel and Inconel for Rocket Engine Propulsion System Contamination Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, S.; Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic contaminant was found in the liquid oxygen (LOX) pre-valve screen of the shuttle main engine propulsion system on two orbiter vehicles. To investigate the potential for an ignition, NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility performed (modified) rotating friction ignition testing in LOX. This testing simulated a contaminant particle in the low-pressure oxygen turbo pump (LPOTP) and the high-pressure oxygen turbo pump (HPOTP) of the shuttle main propulsion system. Monel(R) K-500 and Inconel(R) 718 samples represented the LPOTP and HPOTP materials. Aluminum foil tape and titanium foil represented the contaminant particles. In both the Monel(R) and Inconel(R) material configurations, the aluminum foil tape samples did not ignite after 30 s of rubbing. In contrast, all of the titanium foil samples ignited regardless of the rubbing duration or material configuration. However, the titanium foil ignitions did not propagate to the Monel and Inconel materials.

  3. Efficacy of oxygen-supplying capacity of Azolla in a controlled life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Deng, Sufang; Yang, Youquan; Huang, Yibing; Liu, Chongchu

    2012-02-01

    Azolla shows high growth and propagation rates, strong photosynthetic O2-releasing ability and high nutritional value. It is suitable as a salad vegetable and can be cultured on a multi-layered wet bed. Hence, it possesses potential as a fresh vegetable, and to release O2 and absorb CO2 in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System in space. In this study, we investigated the O2-providing characteristics of Azolla in a closed chamber under manned, controlled conditions to lay a foundation for use of Azolla as a biological component in ground simulation experiments for space applications. A closed test chamber, representing a Controlled Ecological Life Support System including an Azolla wet-culture device, was built to measure the changes in atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentrations inside the chamber in the presence of coexisting Azolla, fish and men. The amount of O2 consumed by fish was 0.0805-0.0831 L kg-1 h-1 and the level of CO2 emission was 0.0705-0.0736 L kg-1 h-1; O2 consumption by the two trial volunteers was 19.71 L h-1 and the volume of respiration-released CO2 was 18.90 L h-1. Under 7000-8000 Lx artificial light and Azolla wet-culture conditions, human and fish respiration and Azolla photosynthesis were complementary, thus the atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentrations inside chamber were maintained in equilibrium. The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration in the closed chamber enhanced the net photosynthesis efficiency of the Azolla colony. This study showed that Azolla has strong photosynthetic O2-releasing ability, which equilibrates the O2 and CO2 concentrations inside the chamber in favor of human survival and verifies the potential of Azolla for space applications.

  4. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun; Wang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Jingtang; Wu, Mingbo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO4(-) and OH, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO6(2-) can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant. PMID:26610099

  5. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  6. Insight into Primordial Solar System Oxygen Reservoirs from Returned Cometary Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Messenger, S.

    2004-01-01

    The recent successful rendezvous of the Stardust spacecraft with comet Wild-2 will be followed by its return of cometary dust to Earth in January 2006. Results from two separate dust impact detectors suggest that the spacecraft collected approximately the nominal fluence of at least 1,000 particles larger than 15 micrometers in size. While constituting only about one microgram total, these samples will be sufficient to answer many outstanding questions about the nature of cometary materials. More than two decades of laboratory studies of stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of similar size have established the necessary microparticle handling and analytical techniques necessary to study them. It is likely that some IDPs are in fact derived from comets, although complex orbital histories of individual particles have made these assignments difficult to prove. Analysis of bona fide cometary samples will be essential for answering some fundamental outstanding questions in cosmochemistry, such as (1) the proportion of interstellar and processed materials that comprise comets and (2) whether the Solar System had a O-16-rich reservoir. Abundant silicate stardust grains have recently been discovered in anhydrous IDPs, in far greater abundances (200 5,500 ppm) than those in meteorites (25 ppm). Insight into the more subtle O isotopic variations among chondrites and refractory phases will require significantly higher precision isotopic measurements on micrometer-sized samples than are currently available.

  7. Simvastatin prevents vascular complications in the chronic reactive oxygen species murine model of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Bagnato, Gian Luca; Pizzino, Gabriele; Roberts, William Neal; Irrera, Natasha; Minutoli, Letteria; Russo, Giuseppina; Squadrito, Francesco; Saitta, Antonino; Bagnato, Gian Filippo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-05-01

    Aims Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by vasculopathy and organ fibrosis. Although microvascular alterations are very well characterized, structural and functional abnormalities of large vessels are not well defined. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of simvastatin administration on aortic and small renal arteries thickening, and on myofibroblasts differentiation in a murine model of SSc. Methods and results SSc was induced in BALB/c mice by daily subcutaneous injections of hypochlorous acid (HOCl, 100 μl) for 6 weeks. Mice (n = 23) were randomized to receive: HOCl (n = 10); HOCl plus simvastatin (40 mg/kg; n = 8); or vehicle (n = 5). Simvastatin administration started 30 min after HOCl injection, and up to week 6. Aortic and small renal arteries intima-media thickness was evaluated by histological analysis. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and CD31 in aortic tissues was performed to evaluate myofibroblast differentiation and endothelial markers.In HOCl-treated mice, intima-media thickening with reduced lumen diameter was observed in the aorta and in small renal arteries and simvastatin administration prevented this increase. Aortic and renal myofibroblasts count, as expressed by α-SMA + density, was lower in the group of mice treated with simvastatin compared to HOCl-treated mice. Simvastatin prevented the reduction in VEGFR2 and CD31 expression induced by HOCl. Conclusions The administration of simvastatin regulates collagen deposition in the aortic tissues and in the small renal arteries by modulating myofibroblasts differentiation and vascular markers. Further studies are needed to better address the effect of statins in the macrovascular component of SSc. PMID:26846205

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Cellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Timothy P; Pan, Yi; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms activate adaptive transcriptional programs to help them cope with decreased oxygen levels, or hypoxia, in their environment. These responses are triggered by various oxygen sensing systems in bacteria, yeast and metazoans. In metazoans, the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia by upregulating genes involved in maintaining bioenergetic homeostasis. The HIFs in turn are regulated by HIF-specific prolyl hydroxlase activity, which is sensitive to cellular oxygen levels and other factors such as tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Establishing a role for ROS in cellular oxygen sensing has been challenging since ROS are intrinsically unstable and difficult to measure. However, recent advances in fluorescence energy transfer resonance (FRET)-based methods for measuring ROS are alleviating some of the previous difficulties associated with dyes and luminescent chemicals. In addition, new genetic models have demonstrated that functional mitochondrial electron transport and associated ROS production during hypoxia are required for HIF stabilization in mammalian cells. Current efforts are directed at how ROS mediate prolyl hydroxylase activity and hypoxic HIF stabilization. Progress in understanding this process has been enhanced by the development of the FRET-based ROS probe, an vivo prolyl hydroxylase reporter and various genetic models harboring mutations in components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:17893032

  9. Effects of erythropoietin on systemic hematocrit and oxygen transport in the splenectomized horse.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Kenneth H; McNally, Beth A; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Lehnhard, Robert A; Poole, David C

    2016-05-01

    To test the hypotheses that erythropoietin (rhuEPO) treatment increases systemic hematocrit, maximal O2 uptake (VO2max, by elevated perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances) and performance five female horses (4-13 years) received 15 IU/kg rhuEPO (erythropoietin) three times per week for three weeks. These horses had been splenectomized over 1 year previously to avoid confounding effects from the mobilization of splenic red blood cell reserves. Each horse performed three maximal exercise tests (one per month) on an inclined (4°) treadmill to the limit of tolerance; two control trials and one following EPO treatment. Measurements of hemoglobin concentration ([Hb] and hematocrit), plasma and blood volume, VO2, cardiac output as well as arterial and mixed venous blood gases were made at rest and during maximal exercise. EPO increased resting [Hb] by 18% from 13.3 ± 0.6 to 15.7 ± 0.8 g/dL (mean ± SD) corresponding to an increased hematocrit from 36 ± 2 to 46 ± 2% concurrent with 23 and 10% reductions in plasma and blood volume, respectively (all P<0.05). EPO elevated VO2max by 20% from 25.7 ± 1.7 to 30.9 ± 3.4 L/min (P<0.05) via a 17% increase in arterial O2 content and 18% greater arteriovenous O2 difference in the face of an unchanged cardiac output. To achieve the greater VO2max after EPO, diffusive O2 conductance increased ∼ 30% (from 580 ± 76 to 752 ± 166 mL O2/mmHg/min, P<0.05) which was substantially greater than the elevation of perfusive O2 conductance. These effects of EPO were associated with an increased exercise performance (total running time: control, 216 ± 72; EPO, 264 ± 48 s, P<0.05). We conclude that EPO substantially increases VO2max and performance in the splenectomized horse via improved perfusive and diffusive O2 transport. PMID:26853328

  10. Technical Update: Johnson Space Center system using a solid electrolytic cell in a remote location to measure oxygen fugacities in CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Williams, R. J.; Le, L.; Wagstaff, J.; Lofgren, G.; Lanier, A.; Carter, W.; Roshko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Details are given for the design and application of a (one atmosphere) redox-control system. This system differs from that given in NASA Technical Memorandum 58234 in that it uses a single solid-electrolytic cell in a remote location to measure the oxygen fugacities of multiple CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces. This remote measurement extends the range of sample-furnace conditions that can be measured using a solid-electrolytic cell, and cuts costs by extending the life of the sensors and by minimizing the number of sensors in use. The system consists of a reference furnace and an exhaust-gas manifold. The reference furnace is designed according to the redox control system of NASA Technical Memorandum 58234, and any number of CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnaces can be attached to the exhaust-gas manifold. Using the manifold, the exhaust gas from individual CO/CO2 controlled atmosphere furnaces can be diverted through the reference furnace, where a solid-electrolyte cell is used to read the ambient oxygen fugacity. The oxygen fugacity measured in the reference furnace can then be used to calculate the oxygen fugacity in the individual CO/CO2 controlled-atmosphere furnace. A BASIC computer program was developed to expedite this calculation.

  11. Pushing Single-Oxygen-Atom-Bridged Bimetallic Systems to the Right: A Cryptand-Encapsulated Co-O-Co Unit.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Julia M; Bloch, Eric D; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Hadt, Ryan G; Hayes, Dugan; Chen, Lin X; Gagliardi, Laura; Nocera, Daniel G; Cummins, Christopher C

    2015-12-16

    A dicobalt(II) complex, [Co2(mBDCA-5t)](2-) (1), demonstrates a cofacial arrangement of trigonal monopyramidal Co(II) ions with an inter-metal separation of 6.2710(6) Å. Reaction of 1 with potassium superoxide generates an encapsulated Co-O-Co core in the dianionic complex, [Co2O(mBDCA-5t)](2-) (2); to form the linear Co-O-Co core, the inter-metal distance has diminished to 3.994(3) Å. Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy data are consistent with a +2 oxidation state assignment for Co in both 1 and 2. Multireference complete active space calculations followed by second-order perturbation theory support this assignment, with hole equivalents residing on the bridging O-atom and on the cryptand ligand for the case of 2. Complex 2 acts as a 2-e(-) oxidant toward substrates including CO and H2, in both cases efficiently regenerating 1 in what represent net oxygen-atom-transfer reactions. This dicobalt system also functions as a catalase upon treatment with H2O2. PMID:26559923

  12. Evaluation of ASD systems for electric arc furnace and argon oxygen decarburization refiner baghouse fans. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) control of the baghouse fans for Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) and Argon Oxygen Decarburization Vessel (AOD) can improve operations, reduce the degree of dust generation, and provide significant energy savings. The purpose of the project was to quantify the benefits, both in energy savings and other process improvements and to demonstrate the methodology of applying adjustable speed drives, to two baghouse fans from a system perspective. The report describes the approach to accomplishing the ASD equipment installation, the test procedure and methodology and provides the test results and economic return. The test results indicated that by using ASDs to control the extraction fan air flow for the EAF and AOD, the following benefits would be achieved on an annual basis: EAF annual energy savings, 267,929 kWh valued at $11,575; EAF dust reduction, overall, 2--3%; EAF dust reduction, during the flatbath period, 35%; and AOD annual energy savings, 1,443,078 kWh valued at $62,341.

  13. PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  14. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  15. Estimating oxygen diffusive conductances of gas-exchange systems: A stereological approach illustrated with the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Terry M

    2014-01-01

    For many organisms, respiratory gas exchange is a vital activity and different types of gas-exchange apparatus have evolved to meet individual needs. They include not only skin, gills, tracheal systems and lungs but also transient structures such as the chorioallantois of avian eggs and the placenta of eutherian mammals. The ability of these structures to allow passage of oxygen by passive diffusion can be expressed as a diffusive conductance (units: cm(3) O2 min(-1) kPa(-1)). Occasionally, the ability to estimate diffusive conductance by physiological techniques is compromised by the difficulty of obtaining O2 partial pressures on opposite sides of the tissue interface between the delivery medium (air, water, blood) and uptake medium (usually blood). An alternative strategy is to estimate a morphometric diffusive conductance by combining stereological estimates of key structural quantities (volumes, surface areas, membrane thicknesses) with complementary physicochemical data (O2-haemoglobin chemical reaction rates and Krogh's permeability coefficients). This approach has proved valuable in a variety of comparative studies on respiratory organs from diverse species. The underlying principles were formulated in pioneering studies on the pulmonary lung but are illustrated here by taking the human placenta as the gas exchanger. PMID:23069190

  16. Materials selection for long life in LEO: A critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Kuminecz, J.; Leger, L.; Nordine, P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined to be in thermal atom environments are compared to those observed in LEO and in high quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-hundredth to one-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of 8 in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain specific thermal test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools. Using thermal atom methods to predict material lifetime in LEO requires direct calibration of the method against LEO data or high quality simulation data for each material.

  17. Programmable flow system for automation of oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay using pyrogallol red for estimation of antioxidant reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inês I; Gregório, Bruno J R; Barreiros, Luísa; Magalhães, Luís M; Tóth, Ildikó V; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C; Segundo, Marcela A

    2016-04-01

    An automated oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method based on programmable flow injection analysis was developed for the assessment of antioxidant reactivity. The method relies on real time spectrophotometric monitoring (540 nm) of pyrogallol red (PGR) bleaching mediated by peroxyl radicals in the presence of antioxidant compounds within the first minute of reaction, providing information about their initial reactivity against this type of radicals. The ORAC-PGR assay under programmable flow format affords a strict control of reaction conditions namely reagent mixing, temperature and reaction timing, which are critical parameters for in situ generation of peroxyl radical from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The influence of reagent concentrations and programmable flow conditions on reaction development was studied, with application of 37.5 µM of PGR and 125 mM of AAPH in the flow cell, guaranteeing first order kinetics towards peroxyl radicals and pseudo-zero order towards PGR. Peroxyl-scavenging reactivity of antioxidants, bioactive compounds and phenolic-rich beverages was estimated employing the proposed methodology. Recovery assays using synthetic saliva provided values of 90 ± 5% for reduced glutathione. Detection limit calculated using the standard antioxidant compound Trolox was 8 μM. RSD values were <3.4 and <4.9%, for intra and inter-assay precision, respectively. Compared to previous batch automated ORAC assays, the developed system also accounted for high sampling frequency (29 h(-1)), low operating costs and low generation of waste. PMID:26838448

  18. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes. PMID:15791341

  19. Phase diagram in the (Bi,Pb)SrCaCuO system: influence of partial constraint oxygen pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansori, M.; Satre, P.; Roubin, M.; Vacquier, G.; Strobel, P.; Sebaoun, A.

    1994-12-01

    DTA-DTG, X ray diffraction and metallographic measurements at different temperatures and partial oxygen pressure in the isoplethic cut “(Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2CuO xCaCuO 2”, were carried out to analyze the influence of partial constraint oxygen pressure on phase transformations. An isobaric invariant equilibrium has been found in the P o2 range 0.5-1. Supplementary phase appearing at invariant equilibrium is (Sr,Ca) 3Cu 5O y. That phase fixes oxygen and then the weight loss is stopped.

  20. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.