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  1. Sealpox Virus in Marine Mammal Rehabilitation Facilities, North America, 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    Roess, Amira A.; Levine, Rebecca S.; Barth, Laura; Monroe, Benjamin P.; Carroll, Darin S.; Damon, Inger K.

    2011-01-01

    Sealpox, a zoonotic disease affecting pinnipeds (seals and sea lions), can occur among captive and convalescing animals. We surveyed 1 worker each from 11 marine mammal centers and interviewed 31 other marine mammal workers to ascertain their knowledge of and experience with sealpox virus and to identify factors associated with sealpox virus outbreaks among pinnipeds in marine rehabilitation facilities. Demographic and health data were obtained for 1,423 pinnipeds at the 11 facilities. Among the 23 animals in which sealpox was clinically diagnosed, 4 arrived at the facility ill, 11 became ill <5 weeks after arrival, and 2 became ill >5 weeks after arrival; the timing of illness onset was unknown for 6 animals. Most infections occurred in pinnipeds <1 year of age. Nine affected animals were malnourished; 4 had additional illnesses. Sealpox had also occurred among workers at 2 facilities. Sealpox is a noteworthy zoonosis of rehabilitating convalescing pinnipeds; workplace education can help to minimize risks for human infection. PMID:22172454

  2. Sealpox virus in marine mammal rehabilitation facilities, North America, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Roess, Amira A; Levine, Rebecca S; Barth, Laura; Monroe, Benjamin P; Carroll, Darin S; Damon, Inger K; Reynolds, Mary G

    2011-12-01

    Sealpox, a zoonotic disease affecting pinnipeds (seals and sea lions), can occur among captive and convalescing animals. We surveyed 1 worker each from 11 marine mammal centers and interviewed 31 other marine mammal workers to ascertain their knowledge of and experience with sealpox virus and to identify factors associated with sealpox virus outbreaks among pinnipeds in marine rehabilitation facilities. Demographic and health data were obtained for 1,423 pinnipeds at the 11 facilities. Among the 23 animals in which sealpox was clinically diagnosed, 4 arrived at the facility ill, 11 became ill <5 weeks after arrival, and 2 became ill ≥5 weeks after arrival; the timing of illness onset was unknown for 6 animals. Most infections occurred in pinnipeds <1 year of age. Nine affected animals were malnourished; 4 had additional illnesses. Sealpox had also occurred among workers at 2 facilities. Sealpox is a noteworthy zoonosis of rehabilitating convalescing pinnipeds; workplace education can help to minimize risks for human infection.

  3. Sealpox virus in marine mammal rehabilitation facilities, North America, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Roess, Amira A; Levine, Rebecca S; Barth, Laura; Monroe, Benjamin P; Carroll, Darin S; Damon, Inger K; Reynolds, Mary G

    2011-12-01

    Sealpox, a zoonotic disease affecting pinnipeds (seals and sea lions), can occur among captive and convalescing animals. We surveyed 1 worker each from 11 marine mammal centers and interviewed 31 other marine mammal workers to ascertain their knowledge of and experience with sealpox virus and to identify factors associated with sealpox virus outbreaks among pinnipeds in marine rehabilitation facilities. Demographic and health data were obtained for 1,423 pinnipeds at the 11 facilities. Among the 23 animals in which sealpox was clinically diagnosed, 4 arrived at the facility ill, 11 became ill <5 weeks after arrival, and 2 became ill ≥5 weeks after arrival; the timing of illness onset was unknown for 6 animals. Most infections occurred in pinnipeds <1 year of age. Nine affected animals were malnourished; 4 had additional illnesses. Sealpox had also occurred among workers at 2 facilities. Sealpox is a noteworthy zoonosis of rehabilitating convalescing pinnipeds; workplace education can help to minimize risks for human infection. PMID:22172454

  4. Pleural effusion associated with acute and chronic pleuropneumonia and pleuritis secondary to thoracic wounds in horses: 43 cases (1982-1992).

    PubMed

    Collins, M B; Hodgson, D R; Hutchins, D R

    1994-12-15

    Case records of 43 horses with pleural effusion associated with acute pleuropneumonia, chronic pleuropneumonia, or pleuritis secondary to a penetrating thoracic wound were reviewed to determine the predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. Acute pleuropneumonia was diagnosed in 36 horses, the majority of which were Thoroughbreds (89%). Of 22 (61%) horses that were in race training at the onset of illness, 11 (31%) had been recently transported a long distance and 4 (11%) had evidence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. Physical examination findings and hematologic data were nonspecific. The most consistent abnormality was hyperfibrino-genemia. Affected horses were treated with antibiotics, thoracic drainage, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and supportive care. Twenty-two (61%) horses were discharged from the hospital, with the mean duration of hospitalization for those discharged being 23 days. Nine (25%) horses were euthanatized and 5 (14%) died. Bacterial culturing of thoracic fluid resulted in growth in 30 of the 36 (83%) horses. The finding of anaerobic bacteria in thoracic fluid was not associated with a lower survival rate (62%) than the overall survival rate (61%). Four horses with chronic pleuropneumonia had a history of lethargy and inappetence for > 2 weeks. Actinobacillus equuli was isolated, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, from thoracic fluid of these 4 horses. Each horse was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and made a rapid recovery. Three horses with acute pleuritis secondary to penetrating thoracic wounds also had nonspecific clinical signs, apart from the wound and a large volume of pleural effusion. Bacteriologic isolates from these horses differed slightly from those of horses with acute pleuropneumonia. PMID:7744650

  5. The Determinants of Traditional Medicine Use in Northern Tanzania: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanifer, John W.; Patel, Uptal D.; Karia, Francis; Thielman, Nathan; Maro, Venance; Shimbi, Dionis; Kilaweh, Humphrey; Lazaro, Matayo; Matemu, Oliver; Omolo, Justin; Boyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traditional medicines are an important part of healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa, and building successful disease treatment programs that are sensitive to traditional medicine practices will require an understanding of their current use and roles, including from a biomedical perspective. Therefore, we conducted a mixed-method study in Northern Tanzania in order to characterize the extent of and reasons for the use of traditional medicines among the general population so that we can better inform public health efforts in the region. Methods Between December 2013 and June 2014 in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, we conducted 5 focus group discussions and 27 in-depth interviews of key informants. The data from these sessions were analyzed using an inductive framework method with cultural insider-outsider coding. From these results, we developed a structured survey designed to test different aspects of traditional medicine use and administered it to a random sample of 655 adults from the community. The results were triangulated to explore converging and diverging themes. Results Most structured survey participants (68%) reported knowing someone who frequently used traditional medicines, and the majority (56%) reported using them themselves in the previous year. The most common uses were for symptomatic ailments (42%), chronic diseases (15%), reproductive problems (11%), and malaria/febrile illnesses (11%). We identified five major determinants for traditional medicine use in Northern Tanzania: biomedical healthcare delivery, credibility of traditional practices, strong cultural identities, individual health status, and disease understanding. Conclusions In order to better formulate effective local disease management programs that are sensitive to TM practices, we described the determinants of TM use. Additionally, we found TM use to be high in Northern Tanzania and that its use is not limited to lower-income areas or rural settings. After symptomatic ailments

  6. Widespread pain in older Germans is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and lifetime employment status--results of a cross-sectional survey with a representative population sample.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Winfried; Glaesmer, Heide; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar

    2012-12-01

    Whether self-reported lifetime civilian and war-related potential traumatic events are associated with widespread pain (WP) and if so, whether the association is attributable to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression has not been studied in a representative sample of the general population. In a randomly selected sample of the German general population, persons aged 60-85 years answered validated self-rating instruments: Regional Pain Scale, trauma list of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire 2. Participants with WP were compared with participants with no or local or regional pain (controls). Stepwise hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed with WP as the dependent variable and demographic data, potential traumatic events, PTSD, and depressive disorder as independent variables. Of 773 respondents, 147 (19.0%) reported WP. Participants with WP reported rape (4.1% vs 1.0%, P=0.01), life-threatening illness (11.6% vs 6.1%, P=0.02), witnessing trauma (19.2% vs 8.4%, P=0.001), and cumulative potential traumatic events (24.5% vs. 16.5%, P=0.004) more frequently than the 626 controls. The prevalence of full PTSD (10.9% vs 2.2%; P<0.0001) and of potential depressive disorder (13.7% vs 6.6%, P=0.02) was higher in participants with WP than in controls. The significant association between some potential traumatic events and WP was completely abrogated after adjusting for demographic variables and PTSD. In the final model, PTSD (odds ratio 3.43, 95% confidence interval 1.88-6.26) and lifetime employment status as a worker (odds ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.31) predicted WP. Prospective studies are necessary to understand the temporal association of PTSD and WP.