Science.gov

Sample records for 111in implanted zno

  1. PAC investigations of radiation damage annealing in 111In implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, R.; Byrne, A. P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2009-08-01

    The structural and electronic environment about implanted radioactive 111In(→ 111Cd) probe atoms as a function of annealing temperature in a single crystal of ZnO(0 0 0 1) has been monitored on an atomic scale using perturbed angular correlation technique, a nuclear hyperfine method. This technique is based upon the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear electric quadrupole moment or magnetic moment of the probes, respectively, with the electric field gradient or magnetic hyperfine field arising from the extra-nuclear electronic charges and spin distributions. The probe atoms 111In were recoil-implanted at room temperature following heavy-ion nuclear reactions. The electric quadrupole interaction was measured at room temperature for as-implanted and annealed samples. The thermal annealing in ambient nitrogen up to 1000 °C showed a progressive reduction of disorder around the probe atom as evidenced via continual decrease in width of the distribution of quadrupole interaction frequencies. Present measurements suggested that annealing at 800 °C for 30 min in flowing nitrogen is enough to produce an optimum recovery of crystallinity. After annealing of radiation damage at 1000 °C we observed an axially symmetric electric field gradient which is characterized by the unique quadrupole interaction frequency of 30.6(3) MHz and a frequency distribution of width nearly zero. The observed electric field gradient was attributed to substitutional incorporation of probe atoms at cation-sites of ZnO. In contrast to annealing in ambient nitrogen at 1000 °C, air annealing of 111In implanted ZnO samples revealed change in local stoichiometry about probe atoms which is attributed to the internal oxidation of the indium probes. The measured electric field gradient and asymmetry parameter at cation-sites of ZnO have been compared with theoretical calculations using a simple point charge model.

  2. Continuous and Localized Mn Implantation of ZnO

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We present results derived from continuous and localized 35 keV55Mn+ion implantations into ZnO. Localized implantations were carried out by using self-ordered alumina membranes as masks leading to ordered arrays of implanted volumes on the substrate surfaces. Defects and vacancies in the small implantation volumes of ZnO were generated due to the implantation processes besides the creation of new phases. Rapid thermal annealing was applied in the case of continuous implantation. The samples were characterized by HRSEM, GIXRD, Raman spectroscopy and RBS/C. Magnetic characterization of the samples pointed out appreciable differences among the samples obtained by the different implantation methods. This fact was mainly attributed to the different volume/surface ratios present in the implanted zones as well as to the increase of Mn atom concentrations along the grain frontiers in the nanostructured surfaces. The samples also showed a ferromagnetic transition phase at temperature value higher than room temperature. PMID:20596285

  3. Crystallographically oriented Zn nanocrystals formed in ZnO by Mn{sup +}-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. J.; Zhang, B.; Lu, W.; Wang, Y.; Zou, J.

    2008-09-29

    The nanostructural characteristics of ZnO implanted with Mn{sup +} to doses ranging from 1x10{sup 15} to 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} are systematically studied for both as-implanted and postannealed cases. The detailed structural characterizations confirmed that the Mn{sup +} implantation and postannealing result in (1) the formation of crystallographically orientated Zn nanocrystals in the ZnO matrix and (2) Mn atoms occupy the Zn sites in ZnO.

  4. Conductivity fluctuations in proton-implanted ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Dolgin, B; Lorite, I; Kumar, Y; Esquinazi, P; Jung, G; Straube, B; Heluani, S Perez de

    2016-07-29

    Electric noise can be an important limitation for applications of conducting elements in the nanometer size range. The intrinsic electrical noise of prospective materials for opto-spintronics applications like ZnO has not yet been characterized. In this study, we have investigated the conductivity fluctuations in 10 nm thick current paths produced by proton implantation of ZnO microwires at room temperature. The voltage noise under a constant dc current bias in undoped, as well as in Li-doped microwires, is characterized by [Formula: see text] power spectra with [Formula: see text]. The noise intensity scales with the square of the bias current pointing to bias-independent resistivity fluctuations as a source of the observed noise. The normalized power spectral density appears inversely proportional to the number of carriers in the probed sample volume, in agreement with the phenomenological Hooge law. For the proton-implanted ZnO microwire and at 1 Hz we obtain a normalized power spectral density as low as [Formula: see text] Hz(-1). PMID:27306486

  5. Conductivity fluctuations in proton-implanted ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgin, B.; Lorite, I.; Kumar, Y.; Esquinazi, P.; Jung, G.; Straube, B.; Perez de Heluani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Electric noise can be an important limitation for applications of conducting elements in the nanometer size range. The intrinsic electrical noise of prospective materials for opto-spintronics applications like ZnO has not yet been characterized. In this study, we have investigated the conductivity fluctuations in 10 nm thick current paths produced by proton implantation of ZnO microwires at room temperature. The voltage noise under a constant dc current bias in undoped, as well as in Li-doped microwires, is characterized by 1/{f}a power spectra with a∼ 1. The noise intensity scales with the square of the bias current pointing to bias-independent resistivity fluctuations as a source of the observed noise. The normalized power spectral density appears inversely proportional to the number of carriers in the probed sample volume, in agreement with the phenomenological Hooge law. For the proton-implanted ZnO microwire and at 1 Hz we obtain a normalized power spectral density as low as ∼ {10}-11 Hz‑1.

  6. Conductivity fluctuations in proton-implanted ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgin, B.; Lorite, I.; Kumar, Y.; Esquinazi, P.; Jung, G.; Straube, B.; Perez de Heluani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Electric noise can be an important limitation for applications of conducting elements in the nanometer size range. The intrinsic electrical noise of prospective materials for opto-spintronics applications like ZnO has not yet been characterized. In this study, we have investigated the conductivity fluctuations in 10 nm thick current paths produced by proton implantation of ZnO microwires at room temperature. The voltage noise under a constant dc current bias in undoped, as well as in Li-doped microwires, is characterized by 1/{f}a power spectra with a˜ 1. The noise intensity scales with the square of the bias current pointing to bias-independent resistivity fluctuations as a source of the observed noise. The normalized power spectral density appears inversely proportional to the number of carriers in the probed sample volume, in agreement with the phenomenological Hooge law. For the proton-implanted ZnO microwire and at 1 Hz we obtain a normalized power spectral density as low as ˜ {10}-11 Hz-1.

  7. Amorphous clusters in Co implanted ZnO induced by boron pre-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Potzger, K.; Shalimov, A.; Zhou, S.; Schmidt, H.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2009-02-09

    We demonstrate the formation of superparamagnetic/ferromagnetic regions within ZnO(0001) single crystals sequently implanted with B and Co. While the pre-implantation with B plays a minor role for the electrical transport properties, its presence leads to the formation of amorphous phases. Moreover, B acts strongly reducing on the implanted Co. Thus, the origin of the ferromagnetic ordering in local clusters with large Co concentration is itinerant d-electrons as in the case of metallic Co. The metallic amorphous phases are non-detectable by common X-ray diffraction.

  8. Effects of P implantation and post-implantation annealing on defect formation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. J.; Chen, W. M.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S.; Buyanova, I. A.

    2012-02-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) techniques are utilized to examine the effects of P implantation and post-implantation annealing on defect formation in ZnO single crystals. From ODMR, the main defects created by ion implantation include oxygen and zinc vacancies as a well as a deep donor labeled as PD. The formation of the PD defect is likely promoted by the presence of P as it could only be detected in the P-containing ZnO. The VO and PD centers are found to exhibit low thermal stability and can be annealed out at 800 °C. On the other hand, a new set of defects, such as Z, T, and D* centers, is detected after annealing. Based on measured spectral dependences of the ODMR signals, the VO, VZn, and PD centers are shown to participate in spin-dependent recombination processes related to red emissions, whereas the Z, T, and D* centers are involved in radiative recombination over a wide spectral range of 1.55-2.5 eV. From the PL measurements, combined effects of implantation and annealing also lead to appearance of a new PL band peaking at ˜3.156 eV, likely due to donor-acceptor-pair recombination. The formation of the involved deep acceptor is concluded to be facilitated by the presence of P.

  9. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ˜150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2, close to the depth ˜250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  10. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, P. P.; Kennedy, J.; Ruck, B. J.; Leveneur, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted and annealed ZnO thin films. The effect of annealing in oxygen-deficient and oxygen-rich conditions was investigated. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results revealed that the Er atoms are located at the implantation depth of around 13 nm, and annealing conditions had no adverse effect on the Er concentration in the layer. Raman spectroscopy results showed peak related to E2(high) mode of ZnO indicating enhanced crystalline quality of the Er implanted and annealed ZnO films. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results demonstrated pre-edge features in O K-edge which are attributed to the structural defects in the films. Room temperature magnetic ordering was observed in Er implanted and annealed films, and is mainly assigned to the intrinsic defects in ZnO.

  11. Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Characteristics of Phosphorus-Implanted ZnO Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2014-07-01

    A P-doped ZnO surface layer on undoped ZnO wafers was prepared by phosphorus (P) ion implantation. Hall effect measurement revealed p-type conduction in such layers annealed at 800°C. This indicates that acceptor levels are present in P-doped ZnO, even though the ZnO is still n-type. Micro-Raman scattering in - z( xy) z geometry was conducted on P-implanted ZnO. The E {2/high} mode shift observed toward the high-energy region was related to compressive stress as a result of P-ion implantation. This compressive stress led to the appearance of an A 1(LO) peak, which is an inactive mode. This A 1(LO) peak relaxed during thermal annealing in ambient oxygen at temperatures higher than 700°C. The P2p3/2 peak observed at 135.6 eV by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is associated with chemical bond formation leading to 2(P2O5) molecules. This indicates that implanted P ions substituted Zn sites in the ZnO layer. In photoluminescence spectroscopy, the P-related peaks observed at energies ranging between 3.1 and 3.5 eV originated from (A0, X) emission, because of PZn-2VZn complexes acting as shallow acceptors. The acceptor level was observed to be 126.9 meV above the valence band edge. Observation of this P-related emission indicates that ion implantation results in acceptor levels in the P-doped ZnO layer. This suggests that the P2O5 bonds are responsible for the p-type activity of P-implanted ZnO.

  12. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-09-27

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  13. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-09-01

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 μA mM-1 cm-2 and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  14. Properties of nitrogen implanted and electron beam annealed bulk ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.; Carder, D. A.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R. J.

    2010-05-15

    The optical properties of bulk ZnO ion implanted with nitrogen ions, at an energy of 23 keV have been studied as a function of implantation fluence and electron beam (EB) annealing conditions. Nuclear reaction analysis and Raman results have revealed the implanted N concentration and its structural changes with respect to various nitrogen ion fluences. The optical properties of nitrogen implanted bulk ZnO were investigated by low temperature photoluminescence measurements. An enhanced peak at 3.235 eV has been attributed to donor-accepter pair (DAP) emission involving the implanted N acceptor in ZnO. The emission near 3.3085 eV is attributed to a free electron to acceptor transition. We also report a broad band emission feature at {approx}3.09 eV in the nitrogen implanted with 1-2x10{sup 15} ions cm{sup -2} and EB annealed at 800-900 deg. C. This is assigned to a thermally activated nitrogen acceptor transition as it is unique only to nitrogen implanted samples. An ionization energy of 377 meV indicates that this line may correspond to a significantly less shallow acceptor level. In addition an increase in the intensity and dominance of this DAP line in nitrogen implanted samples over the other acceptor transitions was observed with increasing annealing time and temperatures. It is shown that EB annealing offers a method of enhanced nitrogen activation when compared to a more conventional furnace approach.

  15. Ionoluminescence study of Zn- and O- implanted ZnO crystals: An additional perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation into the role of native point defects on the optical properties of ZnO using ion implantation, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and ionoluminescence (IL) is presented. Low-energy (60 keV) fixed-fluence (8 × 1015 cm-2) Zn- and O- implantation has been used to directly introduce native point defects into ZnO single crystals. It is shown that annealing of implanted samples in Ar at T = 1000 °C for 2 min amplifies the deep band emission (DBE) peak centered around 2.4 eV while at the same time revealing subtle differences not clearly resolved in similar implanted samples treated under prolonged annealing. Particularly, a relative shift in the DBE peak maxima of the O and Zn doped samples subjected to RTA is observed. Gaussian decomposition of the IL spectra show distinct enhancements of the red (1.62 eV) and yellow (2.15 eV) emission bands in the O- implanted sample and the green (2.36 eV) emission band in the Zn- implanted sample. Based on these results, and recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have proposed a possible energy level scheme for some common ZnO native point defects.

  16. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-03-18

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface.

  17. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  18. Quenching of surface-exciton emission from ZnO nanocombs by plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Tay, B. K.; Sun, X. W.; Sze, J. Y.; Han, Z. J.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, X. H.; Li, Y. B.; Zhang, S.

    2007-08-13

    Surface modification of ZnO nanocombs was performed through a Ti plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) with low bias voltages ranging from 0 to 5 kV to quench surface-originated exciton emission. The ion energy dependent surface modification on ZnO was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The surface exciton (SX) was clearly identified for the as-grown sample at 4.5 K, and complete quenching was observed for sample treated with 5 kV PIII due to surface state passivation. The SX related surface states were located within 5 nm in depth from the surface corresponding to the implantation depth of 5 kV PIII. Room-temperature PL enhancement of these surface-modified ZnO nanocombs was observed and discussed. The results show that PIII can become a viable technique for nanostructure surface passivation.

  19. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  20. Towards p-type doping of ZnO by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, V; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C; Kucheyev, S; Phillips, M; Zou, J

    2005-01-18

    Zinc oxide is a very attractive material for a range of optoelectronic devices including blue light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. Though n-type doping has been successfully achieved, p-type doing of ZnO is still a challenge that must be overcome before p-n junction devices can be realized. Ion implantation is widely used in the microelectronics industry for selective area doping and device isolation. Understanding damage accumulation and recrystallization processes is important for achieving selective area doping. In this study, As (potential p-type dopant) ion implantation and annealing studies were carried out. ZnO samples were implanted with high dose (1.4 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}) 300 keV As ions at room temperature. Furnace annealing of samples in the range of 900 C to 1200 C was employed to achieve recrystallization of amorphous layers and electrical activation of the dopant. Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and cathodolumiescence spectroscopy were used to monitor damage accumulation and annihilation behavior in ZnO. Results of this study have significant implications for p-type doing of ZnO by ion implantation.

  1. Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Vines, L.; Li, L.; Jagadish, C.; Svensson, B. G.; Wong-Leung, J.

    2016-07-01

    Ion implantation of Zn substituting elements in ZnO has been shown to result in a dramatic Li depletion of several microns in hydrothermally grown ZnO. This has been ascribed to a burst of mobile Zn interstials. In this study, we seek to understand the reason behind this interstitial mediated transient enhanced diffusion in Li-containing ZnO samples after Zn implantation. ZnO wafers were implanted with Zn to two doses, 5 × 1015 cm-2 and 1 × 1017 cm-2. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was carried out to profile the Li depletion depth for different annealing temperatures between 600 and 800 °C. The 800 °C annealing had the most significant Li depletion of close to 60 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was carried out in selected samples to identify the reason behind the Li depletion. In particular, TEM investigations of samples annealed at 750 °C show significant Zn precipitation just below the depth of the projected range of the implanted ions. We propose that the Zn precipitation is indicative of Zn supersaturation. Both the Li depletion and Zn precipitation are competing synchronous processes aimed at reducing the excess Zn interstitials.

  2. Optical Properties of p-type ZnO Doped by As Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, T.S.; Youn, C.J.; Han, M.S.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, W.S.

    2005-06-30

    As-doped p-type ZnO has been achieved by ion implantation. The As-related optical properties were analyzed by using secondary ion mass spectrometry, the Raman scattering, and the photoluminescence experiments. From the I-V measurement, the behavior of rectifying on these samples is confirmed.

  3. Decrease in work function of transparent conducting ZnO tin films by phosphorus ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Heo, Gi-Seok; Hong, Sang-Jin; Park, Jong-Woon; Choi, Bum-Ho; Lee, Jong-Ho; Shin, Dong-Chan

    2008-09-01

    To confirm the possibility of engineering the work function of ZnO thin films, we have implanted phosphorus ions into ZnO thin films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The fabricated films show n-type characteristics. It is shown that the electrical and optical properties of those thin films vary depending sensitively on the ion dose and rapid thermal annealing time. Compared to as-deposited ZnO films, the work-function of phosphorus ion-implanted ZnO thin films is observed to be lower and decreases with increasing ion doses. It is likely that the zinc or oxygen vacancies are firstly filled with the implanted phosphorus ions. With further increased ions, free electrons are generated as Zn2+ sites are replaced by those ions or interstitial phosphorus ions increase at the lattice sites, the fermi level by which approaches the conduction band and thus the work function decreases. Those films exhibit the optical transmittance higher than 85% within the visible wavelength range (up to 800 nm).

  4. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Minggang; Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli; Zheng, Minrui; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Thong, John T. L.; Li, Baowen

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} to 1.22 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  5. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and vacuum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, C.; Franco, N.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.; Alves, E.; Safran, G.; McHargue, C. J.

    2007-04-01

    The synthesis of embedded ZnO nanoparticles in m-cut sapphire was achieved through high fluence Zn ion implantation, 0.9 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1000 °C in vacuum. In c-cut samples subjected to similar annealing conditions only buried precipitates of Zn form. TEM results in these samples show a high concentration of faceted precipitates distributed along the c-plane and the presence of Kirkendall voids distributed along the entire implanted region. In both cases a strong loss of Zn is observed upon annealing, which depends on the sapphire host orientation.

  6. Dynamic hyperfine interactions in 111In(111Cd)-doped ZnO semiconductor: PAC results supported by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Emiliano L.; Mercurio, Marcio E.; Cordeiro, Moacir R.; Pereira, Luciano F. D.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Rentería, Mario

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we present results of Time-Differential γ-γ Perturbed-Angular-Correlations (PAC) experiments performed in 111Cd-doped ZnO semiconductor. The PAC technique has been applied in order to characterize the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at (111In (EC)→) 111Cd nuclei located, as was later demonstrated, at defect-free cation sites of the ZnO host structure. The PAC experiments were performed in the temperature range of 77-1075 K. At first glance, the unexpected presence of low-intensity dynamic hyperfine interactions was observed, which were analyzed with a perturbation factor based on the Bäverstam and Othaz model. The experimental EFG results were compared with ab initio calculations performed with the Full-Potential Augmented Plane Wave plus local orbital (FP-APW+lo) method, in the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT), using the Wien2K code. The presence of the dynamic hyperfine interactions has been analyzed enlightened by the FP-APW+lo calculations of the EFG performed as a function of the charge state of the cell. We could correlate the large strength of the dynamic hyperfine interaction with the strong variation of the EFG due to changes in the electronic charge distribution in the Cd vicinity during the time-window of the PAC measurement. It was also revealed that the Cd impurity decays to a final stable neutral charge state (Cd2+) fast enough (in few ns) to produce the nearly undamped observed PAC spectra.

  7. Silver migration and trapping in ion implanted ZnO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Alexander; Vines, Lasse; Rauwel, Protima; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2016-05-01

    Potentially, group-Ib elements (Cu, Ag, and Au) incorporated on Zn sites can be used for p-type doping of ZnO, and in the present paper, we use ion implantation to introduce Ag atoms in wurtzite ZnO single crystals. Monitoring the Li behavior, being a residual impurity in the crystals, as a tracer, we demonstrate that Zn interstitials assist the Ag diffusion and lead to Ag pile-up behind the implanted region after annealing above 800 °C. At even higher temperatures, a pronounced Ag loss from the sample surface occurs and concurrently the Ag atoms exhibit a trap-limited diffusion into the crystal bulk with an activation energy of ˜2.6 eV. The dominant traps are most likely Zn vacancies and substitutional Li atoms, yielding substitutional Ag atoms. In addition, formation of an anomalous multipeak Ag distribution in the implanted near-surface region after annealing can be attributed to local implantation-induced stoichiometry disturbances leading to trapping of the Ag atoms by O and Zn vacancies in the vicinity of the surface and in the end-of-range region, respectively.

  8. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-23

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550 deg. C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  9. Lattice location and thermal stability of implanted Fe in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, E.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Alves, E.; Soares, J.C.

    2004-11-22

    The emission channeling technique was applied to evaluate the lattice location of implanted {sup 59}Fe in single-crystalline ZnO. The angular distribution of {beta}{sup -} particles emitted by {sup 59}Fe was monitored with a position-sensitive electron detector, following 60 keV low dose (2.0x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) room-temperature implantation of the precursor isotope {sup 59}Mn. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102],[1101], and [2113] directions revealed that following annealing at 800 deg. C, 95(8)% of the Fe atoms occupy ideal substitutional Zn sites with rms displacements of 0.06-0.09 A.

  10. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.

    2014-02-21

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ∼500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  11. Magnetic Properties of Fe-Implanted ZnO Nanotips Grown by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,P.; Saraf, G.; Lu, Y.; Hill, D.; Arena, D.; Bartynski, R.; Cosandey, F.; Al-Sharab, J.; Wielunski, L.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Fe ions were implanted into well-aligned single-crystal ZnO nanotips grown on SiO{sub 2}/quartz substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The Fe ion concentration distribution within a single nanotip is mapped by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and the nanotips imaged by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) identified the presence of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions in both as-implanted and annealed samples. However, Fe{sup 3+} ion concentration increased during postannealing. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements show that the as-implanted and postannealed ZnO nanotips are ferromagnetic at room temperature. The observed ferromagnetism in the as-implanted nanotips is primarily attributed to the near surface 10-nm region that has high Fe concentration. The saturation magnetization reduces after annealing.

  12. Tunable transport properties of n-type ZnO nanowires by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L.; Zhang, Z.; Yan, B.; Li, G. P.; Wu, T.; Shen, Z. X.; Yu, T.; Yang, Y.; Cao, H. T.; Chen, L. L.; Tay, B. K.; Sun, X. W.

    2008-10-01

    Single-crystalline, transparent conducting ZnO nanowires were obtained simply by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Electrical transport characterizations demonstrate that the n-type conduction of ZnO nanowire could be tuned by appropriate Ti-PIII. When the energy of PIII is increased, the resistivity of ZnO decreases from 4x10{sup 2} to 3.3x10{sup -3} {omega} cm, indicating a semiconductor-metal transition. The failure-current densities of the metallic ZnO could be up to 2.75x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Therefore, this facile method may provide an inexpensive alternative to tin doped indium oxide as transparent conducting oxide materials.

  13. Single phase formation of Co-implanted ZnO thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation: Optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Fouran; Angadi, Basavaraj; Choi, Ji-Won; Choi, Won-Kook; Jeong, Kwangho; Song, Jong-Han; Khan, M. Wasi; Srivastava, J. P.; Kumar, Ajay; Tandon, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption studies on 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films were studied. The Co clusters present in as implanted samples were observed to be dissolved using 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation with a fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The photoluminescence spectrum of pure ZnO thin film was characterized by the I{sub 4} peak due to the neutral donor bound excitons and the broad green emission. The Co-doped ZnO films show three sharp levels and two shoulders corresponding to 3t{sub 2g} and 2e{sub g} levels of crystal field splitted Co d orbitals, respectively. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy also shows the systematic variation of band gap after 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation.

  14. Crucial role of implanted atoms on dynamic defect annealing in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Wendler, E.

    2014-02-03

    Processes of defect formation in radiation hard semiconductors exhibiting efficient dynamic annealing are different from those in amorphizible ones, and the latter are generally more well-studied. In the present work, we investigate structural disorder in wurtzite ZnO, which is a radiation hard material, implanted with different ions at room temperature and 15 K. The sample analysis was undertaken by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry performed in-situ without changing the sample temperature. The fluence dependence of bulk disorder exhibits the so-called IV-stage evolution, where the high fluence regime is characterized by both a strong influence on the damage build-up by the ion type and a reverse temperature effect. A straightforward methodology is demonstrated to differentiate between the contributions of pure ballistic and ion-defect reaction processes in the damage formation.

  15. Characteristic properties of Raman scattering and photoluminescence on ZnO crystals doped through phosphorous-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.

    2014-02-01

    P-doped ZnO was fabricated by means of the ion-implantation method. At the Raman measurement, the blue shift of the E2high mode and A1(LO) phonon of the inactive mode were observed after the P-ion implantation. It suggested to be caused by the compressive stress. Thus, Hall effect measurement indicates that the acceptor levels exists in P-doped ZnO while still maintaining n-type ZnO. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical bond formation of the P2p3/2 spectrum consisted of 2(P2O5) molecules. Therefore, the implanted P ions were substituted to the Zn site in ZnO. From the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, P-related PL peaks were observed in the energy ranges of 3.1 and 3.5 eV, and its origin was analyzed at PZn-2VZn complexes, acting as a shallow acceptor. With increasing temperatures, the neutral-acceptor bound-exciton emission, (A0, X), shows a tendency to quench the intensity and extend the emission linewidth. From the relations of the intensity and the linewidth as a function of temperature, the broadening of linewidth was believed to the result that the vibration mode of E2high participates in the broadening process of (A0, X) and the change of luminescent intensity was attributed to the partial dissociation of (A0, X). Consequently, these facts indicate that the acceptor levels existed in P-doped ZnO layer by the ion implantation.

  16. Characteristic properties of Raman scattering and photoluminescence on ZnO crystals doped through phosphorous-ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.

    2014-02-07

    P-doped ZnO was fabricated by means of the ion-implantation method. At the Raman measurement, the blue shift of the E{sub 2}{sup high} mode and A{sub 1}(LO) phonon of the inactive mode were observed after the P-ion implantation. It suggested to be caused by the compressive stress. Thus, Hall effect measurement indicates that the acceptor levels exists in P-doped ZnO while still maintaining n-type ZnO. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical bond formation of the P2p{sub 3/2} spectrum consisted of 2(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) molecules. Therefore, the implanted P ions were substituted to the Zn site in ZnO. From the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, P-related PL peaks were observed in the energy ranges of 3.1 and 3.5 eV, and its origin was analyzed at P{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complexes, acting as a shallow acceptor. With increasing temperatures, the neutral-acceptor bound-exciton emission, (A{sup 0}, X), shows a tendency to quench the intensity and extend the emission linewidth. From the relations of the intensity and the linewidth as a function of temperature, the broadening of linewidth was believed to the result that the vibration mode of E{sub 2}{sup high} participates in the broadening process of (A{sup 0}, X) and the change of luminescent intensity was attributed to the partial dissociation of (A{sup 0}, X). Consequently, these facts indicate that the acceptor levels existed in P-doped ZnO layer by the ion implantation.

  17. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.; Hallén, Anders

    2015-09-28

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  18. P-type ZnO films by phosphorus doping using plasma immersion ion-implantation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-03-01

    ZnO has been a subject of intense research in the optoelectronics community owing to its wide bandgap (3.3eV) and large exciton binding energy (60meV). However, difficulty in doping it p-type posts a hindrance in fabricating ZnO-based devices. In order to make p-type ZnO films, phosphorus implantation, using plasma immersion ion-implantation technique (2kV, 900W, 10μs pulse width) for 30 seconds, was performed on ZnO thin film deposited by RF Magnetron Sputtering (Sample A). The implanted samples were subsequently rapid thermal annealed at 700°C and 1000°C (Samples B and C) in oxygen environment for 30 seconds. Low temperature (8K) photoluminescence spectra reveal dominant donor-bound exciton (D°X) peak at 3.36eV for samples A and B. However, for Sample B the peaks around 3.31eV and 3.22eV corresponding to the free electron-acceptor (FA) and donor to acceptor pair peaks (DAP) are also observed. A dominant peak around 3.35eV, corresponding to acceptor bound exciton (A°X) peak, is detected for Sample C along with the presence of FA and DAP peaks around 3.31eV and 3.22eV. Moreover, the deep level peak around 2.5eV is higher for Sample B which may be due to implantation and acceptor related defects. However, for Sample C, the deep level peaks are very weak compared to the near band edge peaks confirming that these peaks are mainly due to intrinsic defects and not related to acceptors. These results clearly show us a promising way to achieve p-type ZnO films using phosphorus doping.

  19. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  20. Ferromagnetism in 200-MeV Ag{sup +15}-ion-irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Angadi, Basavaraj; Jung, Y.S.; Choi, Won-Kook; Kumar, Ravi; Jeong, K.; Shin, S.W.; Lee, J.H.; Song, J.H.; Wasi Khan, M.; Srivastava, J.P.

    2006-04-03

    Structural, electrical resistivity, and magnetization properties of 200-MeV Ag{sup +15}-ion-irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films are presented. The structural studies show the presence of Co clusters whose size is found to increase with increase of Co implantation. The implanted films were irradiated with 200-MeV Ag{sup +15} ions to fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The Co clusters on irradiation dissolve in the ZnO matrix. The electrical resistivity of the irradiated samples is lowered to half. The magnetization hysteresis measurements show ferromagnetic behavior at 300 K, and the coercive field increases with the Co implantation. The ferromagnetism at room temperature is confirmed by magnetic force microscopy measurements. The results are explained on the basis of the close interplay between the electrical and the magnetic properties.

  1. Up conversion from visible to ultraviolet in bulk ZnO implanted with Tm ions

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, T.; Neves, A. J.; Soares, M. J.; Carmo, M.C.; Peres, M.; Alves, E.; Rita, E.

    2005-11-07

    We report on the up-converted ultraviolet near-band edge emission of bulk ZnO generated by visible and ultraviolet photons with energies below the band gap. This up-converted photoluminescence was observed in samples intentionally doped with Tm ions, suggesting that the energy levels introduced by the rare earth ion in the ZnO band gap are responsible for this process.

  2. Characteristics of ZnO Wafers Implanted with 60 keV Sn{sup +} Ions at Room Temperature and at 110 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Giang T.; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Takashi; Nitta, Noriko

    2011-01-07

    ZnO wafers implanted with 60 keV Sn{sup +} ions at room temperature (RT) and at 110 K are investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The effect of implantation temperature is evident in the XRD and PL data. A yellow-orange (YO) band near 600 nm appears in the PL spectra of the ZnO wafers implanted to the doses of 4x10{sup 14} and 8x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} at RT. The intensity of this band increases and the peak position blue-shifts after illumination of the samples with the 325 nm line of a He-Cd laser. The PL data suggests that the CB (conduction band){yields}V{sub O}{sup +} and Zn{sub i}{sup +{yields}}V{sub Zn}{sup -} transitions contribute to the photoemission of the YO band.

  3. Structural and optical characterization of indium-antimony complexes in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türker, M.; Deicher, M.; Johnston, K.; Wolf, H.; Wichert, Th.

    2015-04-01

    One of the main obstacles to the technical application of the wide-gap semiconductor ZnO represents the difficulty to achieve reliable p-type doping of ZnO with group V elements (N, P, As, Sb) acting as acceptors located on O lattice sites. The theoretically proposed concepts of cluster-doping or codoping may lead to an enhanced and stable p-type conductivity of ZnO. We report on PAC results obtained by codoping experiments of ZnO by ion implantation using the donor 111In and the group-V acceptor Sb. The formation of In-Sb pairs has been observed. Based on these PAC results, there is no evidence for the formation of In-acceptor complexes involving more than one Sb acceptor. These results has been complemented by photoluminescence measurements.

  4. Microstrip structures of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates of millimetric length formed by selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekura, H.; Wang, H.-S.; Hishita, S.; Pan, J.; Kishimoto, N.; Buchal, Ch; Mantl, S.

    2009-02-01

    Regularly arrayed microstrip regions of width ~1.4 µm and length extending up to ~5 mm, consisting of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) of diameter ~50 nm, were fabricated on silica substrates by a two-step process: i.e., selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation. The implantation of 60 keV Zn ions in periodic microstrip regions via a resist mask generated periodic grooves with large wings on the surface of silica glass, which can be ascribed to the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica and sputtering loss. This is the lowest record of the electronic energy loss (Se) value to induce the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica, while no or very low threshold energy has been predicted from a recent study. After thermal oxidation at 700 °C for 1 h, the groove structures with the wings disappeared, and periodic microstrips of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates up to 5 mm long appeared on the surface of the substrate. A clear free-exciton peak due to ZnO NPs is observed from these microstrip structures both in optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra.

  5. Study of non-linear Hall effect in nitrogen-grown ZnO microstructure and the effect of H{sup +}-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yogesh Bern, Francis; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose; Lorite, Israel; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2015-07-13

    We report magnetotransport studies on microstructured ZnO film grown by pulsed laser deposition in N{sub 2} atmosphere on a-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates and the effect of low energy H{sup +}-implantation. Non-linearity has been found in the magnetic field dependent Hall resistance, which decreases with temperature. We explain this effect with a two-band model assuming the conduction through two different parallel channels having different types of charge carriers. Reduced non-linearity after H{sup +}-implantation in the grown film is due to the shallow-donor effect of hydrogen giving rise to an increment in the electron density, reducing the effect of the other channel.

  6. XPS and DFT study of Sn incorporation into ZnO and TiO2host matrices by pulsed ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Kim, S. S.; Cui, L.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-08-01

    Bulk and thin films ZnO and TiO2 samples were doped with Sn by pulsed ion implantation and studied by means of X-ray photoelectron core-level and valence band spectroscopy as well as density functional theory calculations for comprehensive study of the incorporation of Sn. XPS spectral analysis showed that isovalent Sn cation substitution occurs in both zinc oxide (Sn2+ -> Zn2+) and titanium dioxide (Sn4+ -> Ti4+) for bulk and film morphologies. For TiO2 films, the implantation also led to occupation of interstitials by doped ions, which induced the clustering of substituted and embedded Sn atoms; this did not occur in ZnO:Sn film samples. Density functional theory (DFT) formation energies were calculated of various incorporation processes, explaining the prevalence of substitutional defects in both matrices. Possible mechanisms and reasons for the observed trends in Sn incorporation into the ZnO and TiO2 matrices are discussed.

  7. Growth of a Novel Nanostructured ZnO Urchin: Control of Cytotoxicity and Dissolution of the ZnO Urchin.

    PubMed

    Imani, Roghayeh; Drašler, Barbara; Kononenko, Veno; Romih, Tea; Eleršič, Kristina; Jelenc, Janez; Junkar, Ita; Remškar, Maja; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-12-01

    The applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) in implantable wireless devices, such as diagnostic nanobiosensors and nanobiogenerators, have recently attracted enormous attention due to their unique properties. However, for these implantable nanodevices, the biocompatibility and the ability to control the behaviour of cells in contact with ZnO NWs are demanded for the success of these implantable devices, but to date, only a few contrasting results from their biocompatibility can be found. There is a need for more research about the biocompatibility of ZnO nanostructures and the adhesion and viability of cells on the surface of ZnO nanostructures. Here, we introduce synthesis of a new nature-inspired nanostructured ZnO urchin, with the dimensions of the ZnO urchin's acicula being controllable. To examine the biocompatibility and behaviour of cells in contact with the ZnO urchin, the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell line was chosen as an in vitro experimental model. The results of the viability assay indicated that, compared to control, the number of viable cells attached to the surface of the ZnO urchin and its surrounding area were reduced. The measurements of the Zn contents of cell media confirmed ZnO dissolution, which suggests that the ZnO dissolution in cell culture medium could lead to cytotoxicity. A purposeful reduction of ZnO cytotoxicity was achieved by surface coating of the ZnO urchin with poly(vinylidene fluorid-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP), which changed the material matrix to slow the Zn ion release and consequently reduce the cytotoxicity of the ZnO urchin without reducing its functionality.

  8. Growth of a Novel Nanostructured ZnO Urchin: Control of Cytotoxicity and Dissolution of the ZnO Urchin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Roghayeh; Drašler, Barbara; Kononenko, Veno; Romih, Tea; Eleršič, Kristina; Jelenc, Janez; Junkar, Ita; Remškar, Maja; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-11-01

    The applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) in implantable wireless devices, such as diagnostic nanobiosensors and nanobiogenerators, have recently attracted enormous attention due to their unique properties. However, for these implantable nanodevices, the biocompatibility and the ability to control the behaviour of cells in contact with ZnO NWs are demanded for the success of these implantable devices, but to date, only a few contrasting results from their biocompatibility can be found. There is a need for more research about the biocompatibility of ZnO nanostructures and the adhesion and viability of cells on the surface of ZnO nanostructures. Here, we introduce synthesis of a new nature-inspired nanostructured ZnO urchin, with the dimensions of the ZnO urchin's acicula being controllable. To examine the biocompatibility and behaviour of cells in contact with the ZnO urchin, the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell line was chosen as an in vitro experimental model. The results of the viability assay indicated that, compared to control, the number of viable cells attached to the surface of the ZnO urchin and its surrounding area were reduced. The measurements of the Zn contents of cell media confirmed ZnO dissolution, which suggests that the ZnO dissolution in cell culture medium could lead to cytotoxicity. A purposeful reduction of ZnO cytotoxicity was achieved by surface coating of the ZnO urchin with poly(vinylidene fluorid-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP), which changed the material matrix to slow the Zn ion release and consequently reduce the cytotoxicity of the ZnO urchin without reducing its functionality.

  9. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  10. Effect of laser annealing using high repetition rate pulsed laser on optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, Tetsuya; Ofuji, Taihei; Tetsuyama, Norihiro; Okazaki, Kota; Higashihata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Daisuke; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa; Okada, Tatsuo

    2013-03-01

    The effect of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing with a KrF excimer laser on the optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods has been investigated. The recovery levels of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods have been measured by photoluminescence spectra and cathode luminescence images. Cathode luminescence disappeared over 300 nm below the surface due to the damage caused by ion implantation with an acceleration voltage of 25 kV. When the annealing was performed at a low repetition rate of the KrF excimer laser, cathode luminescence was recovered only in a shallow area below the surface. The depth of the annealed area was increased along with the repetition rate of the annealing laser. By optimizing the annealing conditions such as the repetition rate, the irradiation fluence and so on, we have succeeded in annealing the whole damaged area of over 300 nm in depth and in observing cathode luminescence. Thus, the effectiveness of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing on phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods was demonstrated.

  11. Effect of laser annealing using high repetition rate pulsed laser on optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, Tetsuya; Ofuji, Taihei; Tetsuyama, Norihiro; Okazaki, Kota; Higashihata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Daisuke; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa; Okada, Tatsuo

    2014-02-01

    The effect of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing with a KrF excimer laser on the optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods has been investigated. The recovery levels of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods have been measured by photoluminescence spectra and cathode luminescence images. Cathode luminescence disappeared over 300 nm below the surface due to the damage caused by ion implantation with an acceleration voltage of 25 kV. When the annealing was performed at a low repetition rate of the KrF excimer laser, cathode luminescence was recovered only in a shallow area below the surface. The depth of the annealed area was increased along with the repetition rate of the annealing laser. By optimizing the annealing conditions such as the repetition rate, the irradiation fluence and so on, we have succeeded in annealing the whole damaged area of over 300 nm in depth and in observing cathode luminescence. Thus, the effectiveness of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing on phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods was demonstrated.

  12. ZnO quantum dots-decorated ZnO nanowires for the enhancement of antibacterial and photocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jyh Ming; Tsay, Li-Yi

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate highly antibacterial activities for killing off Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli using ZnO nanowires decorated with ZnO quantum dots (so-called ZnO QDs/NWs) under visible-light irradiation and dark conditions. The average size of the ZnO QDs is in the range of 3-5 nm; these were uniformly dispersed on the ZnO nanowires’ surface to form the ZnO QDs/NWs. A significant blue-shift effect was observed using photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The size of the ZnO QDs is strongly dependent on the material’s synthesis time. The ZnO QDs/NWs exhibited an excellent photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. The ZnO QDs’ active sites (i.e. the O-H bond and Zn2+) accelerate the photogenerated-carrier migration from the QDs to the NWs. As a consequence, the electrons reacted with the dissolved oxygen to form oxygen ions and produced hydroperoxyl radicals to enhance photocatalytic activity. The antibacterial activities (as indicated by R-factor-inhibiting activity) of the ZnO QDs/NWs for killing off Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli is around 4.9 and 5.5 under visible-light irradiation and dark conditions, respectively. The hydroxyl radicals served as an efficient oxidized agent for decomposing the organic dye and microorganism species. The antibacterial activities of the ZnO QDs/NWs in the dark may be attributed to the Zn2+ ions that were released from the ZnO QDs and infused into the microbial solution against the growth of bacteria thus disrupting the microorganism. The highly antibacterial and photocatalytic activity of the ZnO QDs/NWs can be well implanted on a screen window, thus offering a promising solution to inhibit the spread of germs under visible-light and dark conditions.

  13. Green emission in carbon doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, L. T.; Yi, J. B. Zhang, X. Y.; Xing, G. Z.; Luo, X.; Li, S.; Fan, H. M.; Herng, T. S.; Ding, J.; Ionescu, M.

    2014-06-15

    The emission behavior of C-doped ZnO films, which were prepared by implantation of carbon into ZnO films, is investigated. Orange/red emission is observed for the films with the thickness of 60–100 nm. However, the film with thickness of 200 nm shows strong green emission. Further investigations by annealing bulk ZnO single crystals under different environments, i.e. Ar, Zn or C vapor, indicated that the complex defects based on Zn interstitials are responsible for the strong green emission. The existence of complex defects was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement.

  14. Ferromagnetism in Co- and Mn-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulou, N. A.; Hebard, A. F.; Norton, D. P.; Budai, J. D.; Boatner, L. A.; Lee, J. S.; Khim, Z. G.; Park, Y. D.; Overberg, M. E.; Pearton, S. J.; Wilson, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    Bulk single crystals of Sn-doped ZnO were implanted with Co or Mn at doses designed to produce transition metal concentrations of 3-5 at.% in the near-surface (˜2000 Å) region. The implantation was performed at ˜350 °C to promote dynamic annealing of ion-induced damage. Following annealing at 700 °C, temperature-dependent magnetization measurements showed ordering temperatures of ˜300 K for Co- and ˜250 K for Mn-implanted ZnO. Clear hysteresis loops were obtained at these temperatures. The coercive fields were ⩽100 Oe for all measurement temperatures. X-ray diffraction showed no detectable second phases in the Mn-implanted material. One plausible origin for the ferromagnetism in this case is a carrier-induced mechanism. By sharp contrast, the Co-implanted material showed evidence for the presence of Co precipitates with hexagonal symmetry, which is the cause of the room temperature ferromagnetism. Our results are consistent with the stabilization of ferromagnetic states by electron doping in transition metal-doped ZnO predicted by Sato and Katayama-Yoshida [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40 (2001) L334]. This work shows the excellent promise of Mn-doped ZnO for potential room temperature spintronic applications.

  15. Immunoscintigraphy with 111In antimyosin Fab.

    PubMed

    Morguet, A J; Munz, D L; Kreuzer, H; Emrich, D

    1990-11-01

    Monoclonal 111In antimyosin Fab is a marker for myocytes which have lost their membrane integrity. Because of the slow blood pool clearance of the radiopharmaceutical, imaging is usually started 24-48 h after intravenous injection of 74 MBq of the tracer. This long postinjection interval restricts its utilization in the primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. However, antimyosin may help to differentiate between necrotic and viable myocardium in the subacute stage of incomplete myocardial infarction. Serial endomyocardial biopsy for early detection of transplant rejection after heart transplantation may be partially replaced or supplemented by antimyosin scintigraphy. The compound may facilitate the diagnosis of myocarditis. Other potential indications may be prognostic assessment of dilated cardiomyopathy, monitoring cardiotoxic side-effects of chemotherapeutics, recognition of cardiac contusion as well as diagnosis of rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma. In specific clinical situations 111In antimyosin Fab immunoscintigraphy may provide valuable diagnostic information. PMID:2277688

  16. Control of optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanocrystals by nanosecond-laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, T.; Ofuji, T.; Tetsuyama, N.; Kawahara, H.; Higashihata, M.; Ikenoue, H.; Nakamura, D.; Okada, T.

    2014-03-01

    Effects of laser annealing on electrical and optical properties of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals, which are expected as building blocks for optoelectronic devices, have been investigated in this study. In the case of fabricating p-n junction in single one-dimensional ZnO nanocrystal, phosphorus-ions implanted p-type ZnO nanocrystals were recrystallized and recovered in the optical properties by nanosecond-laser annealing using a KrF excimer laser. Antimony-doped p-type ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by irradiating laminated structure which antimony thin film were deposited on ZnO nanocrystals with the laser beam. Additionally, it is possible to control the growth rate of ZnO nanowires by using laser annealing. Irradiating with pulsed laser a part of ZnO buffer layer deposited on the a-cut sapphire substrate, then ZnO nanowires were grown on the ZnO buffer layer by the nanoparticle assisted pulsed laser deposition method. As a result, the clear boundary of the laser annealed and non-laser annealed area was appeared. It was observed that ZnO nanowires were grown densely at non-laser annealed area, on the other hand, sparse ones were grown at the laser-annealed region. In this report, the possibility of laser annealing techniques to establish the stable and reliable fabrication process of ZnO nanowires-based LD and LED are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  17. Characteristic interactions of 111Cd probes with nonradioactive In impurities doped in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Local structures produced in 0.5 at.% In-doped ZnO were investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation method using the 111Cd probe nuclei generated in the disintegration of different parents, 111In and 111mCd. From distinct perturbation patterns obtained with the probes descended from the different parents, it was ascertained that the doped In atoms locally form a unique structure dispersed in ZnO matrix without forming macroscopic agglomerates of their own.

  18. Killing of human lung cancer cells using a new ( sup 111 In)bleomycin complex ( sup 111 In)BLMC

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D.Y.; Hamburger, A.W.; Beach, J.L.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of a ({sup 111}In)bleomycin complex (({sup 111}In)BLMC) to kill five cell lines of human lung cancer (small cell lung cancer) was investigated. Cells were exposed to either 0.9% NaCl, ({sup 111}In)Cl3, BLM, ({sup 111}In)BLMC, nonradioactive InCl3, or In-BLMC for 60 minutes, plated in soft agarose, and assessed for colony formation. ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40-200 microCi carried by 15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) was more cytotoxic than BLM (15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) by a factor of 1.6-5.3 for five cell lines. The percent survival of N417 cells was 28.4 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40 microCi/15 micrograms BLM/ml) and 54.3 for BLM (15 micrograms/ml); 1.9 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (200 microCi/25 micrograms BLM/ml), and 10.0 for BLM (25 micrograms/ml). {sup 111}InCl3 (200 microCi/ml) and nonradioactive InCl3 failed to inhibit colony formation. The new ({sup 111}In)BLMC may be useful for therapy of some lung cancer patients.

  19. Characterization of ZnO and Zn0.95Co0.05O prepared by sol-gel method using PAC spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M. E.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cordeiro, M. R.; Saxena, R. N.

    The measurement of the electric field gradient (efg) with PAC spectroscopy was used to follow the heat treatment during the preparation of ZnO samples using sol-gel method. In particular, the investigation was carried out on samples of intrinsically n-type II-VI wurtzite semiconductor ZnO and Co-doped Zn0.95Co0.05O samples prepared by sol-gel methodology from pure metallic Zn(99.9999%). Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced in the samples by thermal diffusion. 111In solution was added to the precursor sol-gel solution prior to the formation of gel material. PAC measurements were carried out to follow the formation of the ZnO. Two undoped ZnO samples, which were heated in air and argon atmosphere, show different results. PAC measurements were also used to follow the 111In diffusion in a commercially purchased ZnO (99.99%) sample as well as to compare the results with the measurements taken with sol-gel prepared samples. The results show that samples prepared by sol-gel process followed by heating in argon produce better quality ZnO samples. The results also show that the Co atoms in Zn0.95Co0.05O are in substitutional sites.

  20. Characterization of ZnO and Zn0.95Co0.05O prepared by sol-gel method using PAC spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M. E.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cordeiro, M. R.; Saxena, R. N.

    2007-07-01

    The measurement of the electric field gradient (efg) with PAC spectroscopy was used to follow the heat treatment during the preparation of ZnO samples using sol-gel method. In particular, the investigation was carried out on samples of intrinsically n-type II-VI wurtzite semiconductor ZnO and Co-doped Zn0.95Co0.05O samples prepared by sol-gel methodology from pure metallic Zn(99.9999%). Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced in the samples by thermal diffusion. 111In solution was added to the precursor sol-gel solution prior to the formation of gel material. PAC measurements were carried out to follow the formation of the ZnO. Two undoped ZnO samples, which were heated in air and argon atmosphere, show different results. PAC measurements were also used to follow the 111In diffusion in a commercially purchased ZnO (99.99%) sample as well as to compare the results with the measurements taken with sol-gel prepared samples. The results show that samples prepared by sol-gel process followed by heating in argon produce better quality ZnO samples. The results also show that the Co atoms in Zn0.95Co0.05O are in substitutional sites.

  1. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  2. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  3. Osteomyelitis complicating fracture: pitfalls of /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Gobuty, A.H.; Traina, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging has shown greater accuracy and specificity than alternative noninvasive methods in the detection of uncomplicated osteomyelitis. Forty patients with suspected osteomyelitis complicating fractures (with and without surgical intervention) were evaluated with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes. All five patients with intense focal uptake, but only one of 13 with no uptake, had active osteomyelitis. However, mild to moderate /sup 111/In leukocyte uptake, observed in 22 cases, indicated the presence of osteomyelitis in only four of these; the other false-positive results were observed in noninfected callus formation, heterotopic bone formation, myositis ossificans, and sickle-cell disease. These results suggest that /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating fracture but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid false-positive results.

  4. Applications of nanosecond laser annealing to fabricating p-n homo junction on ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, T.; Ofuji, T.; Tetsuyama, N.; Okazaki, K.; Higashihata, M.; Nakamura, D.; Ikenoue, H.; Asano, T.; Okada, T.

    2013-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has attracted considerable attension due to its wide applications in particular ultra violet light emitting diode (UV-LED). In addition, the one-dimensional ZnO crystals are quite attractive as building blocks for light emitting devices like laser and LED, because of their high crystallinity and light confinement properties. However, a method for the realization of the stable p-type ZnO has not been well established. In our study, we have investigated the effect of the nanosecond laser irradiation to the ZnO nanorods as an ultrafast melting and recrystallizing process for realization of the p-type ZnO. Fabrication of the p-n homo junction along ZnO nanorods has been demonstrated using phosphorus ion implantation and ns-laser annealing by a KrF excimer laser. Rectifying I-V characteristics attributed to p-n junction were observed from the measurement of electrical properties. In addition, the penetration depth of laser annealed layer was measured by observing cathode luminescence images. Then, it was turned out that high repetition rate laser annealing can anneal ZnO nanorods over the optical-absorption length. In this report, optical, structural, and electrical characteristics of the phosphorus ion-implanted ZnO nanorods annealed by the KrF excimer laser are discussed.

  5. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  6. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  7. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  8. Lattice sites of Na dopants in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Amorim, L.; Decoster, S.; da Silva, M. R.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-09-01

    The angular distribution of β ‑ particles emitted by the radioactive isotope 24Na was monitored following implantation into ZnO single crystals at fluences above 5 × 1012 cm‑2 at CERN’s ISOLDE facility. We identified sodium on two distinct sites: on substitutional Zn sites and on interstitial sites that are close to the so-called octahedral site. The interstitial Na was to a large extent already converted to substitutional Na for annealing at 200 °C, from which an activation energy of 0.8–1.3 eV, most likely around 1.2 eV, is estimated for the migration of interstitial Na in ZnO.

  9. Lattice sites of Na dopants in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Amorim, L.; Decoster, S.; da Silva, M. R.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-09-01

    The angular distribution of β - particles emitted by the radioactive isotope 24Na was monitored following implantation into ZnO single crystals at fluences above 5 × 1012 cm-2 at CERN’s ISOLDE facility. We identified sodium on two distinct sites: on substitutional Zn sites and on interstitial sites that are close to the so-called octahedral site. The interstitial Na was to a large extent already converted to substitutional Na for annealing at 200 °C, from which an activation energy of 0.8-1.3 eV, most likely around 1.2 eV, is estimated for the migration of interstitial Na in ZnO.

  10. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  11. Increased osteoblast and decreased Staphylococcus epidermidis functions on nanophase ZnO and TiO2.

    PubMed

    Colon, Gabriel; Ward, Brian C; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-09-01

    Many engineers and surgeons trace implant failure to poor osseointegration (or the bonding of an orthopedic implant to juxtaposed bone) and/or bacteria infection. By using novel nanotopographies, researchers have shown that nanostructured ceramics, carbon fibers, polymers, metals, and composites enhance osteoblast adhesion and calcium/phosphate mineral deposition. However, the function of bacteria on materials with nanostructured surfaces remains largely uninvestigated. This is despite the fact that during normal surgical insertion of an orthopedic implant, bacteria from the patient's own skin and/or mucosa enters the wound site. These bacteria (namely, Staphylococcus epidermidis) irreversibly adhere to an implant surface while various physiological stresses induce alterations in the bacterial growth rate leading to biofilm formation. Because of their integral role in determining the success of orthopedic implants, the objective of this in vitro study was to examine the functions of (i) S. epidermidis and (ii) osteoblasts (or bone-forming cells) on ZnO and titania (TiO(2)), which possess nanostructured compared to microstructured surface features. ZnO is a well-known antimicrobial agent and TiO(2) readily forms on titanium once implanted. Results of this study provided the first evidence of decreased S. epidermidis adhesion on ZnO and TiO(2) with nanostructured when compared with microstructured surface features. Moreover, compared with microphase formulations, results of this study showed increased osteoblast adhesion, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium mineral deposition on nanophase ZnO and TiO(2). In this manner, this study suggests that nanophase ZnO and TiO(2) may reduce S. epidermidis adhesion and increase osteoblast functions necessary to promote the efficacy of orthopedic implants.

  12. ZnO nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; van Vugt, Lambert K

    2011-07-01

    The pathway towards the realization of optical solid-state lasers was gradual and slow. After Einstein's paper on absorption and stimulated emission of light in 1917 it took until 1960 for the first solid state laser device to see the light. Not much later, the first semiconductor laser was demonstrated and lasing in the near UV spectral range from ZnO was reported as early as 1966. The research on the optical properties of ZnO showed a remarkable revival since 1995 with the demonstration of room temperature lasing, which was further enhanced by the first report of lasing by a single nanowire in 2001. Since then, the research focussed increasingly on one-dimensional nanowires of ZnO. We start this review with a brief description of the opto-electronic properties of ZnO that are related to the wurtzite crystal structure. How these properties are modified by the nanowire geometry is discussed in the subsequent sections, in which we present the confined photon and/or polariton modes and how these can be investigated experimentally. Next, we review experimental studies of laser emission from single ZnO nanowires under different experimental conditions. We emphasize the special features resulting from the sub-wavelength dimensions by presenting our results on single ZnO nanowires lying on a substrate. At present, the mechanism of lasing in ZnO (nanowires) is the subject of a strong debate that is considered at the end of this review. PMID:21552596

  13. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  14. Standardisation and half-life measurements of (111)In.

    PubMed

    Dziel, Tomasz; Listkowska, Anna; Tymiński, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The standardisation of (111)In by 4π(LS)-γ coincidence and anticoincidence counting is presented. Absolute measurements were performed for samples with different concentrations of carrier solution and for different window settings in the gamma channel. The radioactive concentration of the master solution determined on the same reference date was consistent for all measurements performed. The evaluated typical uncertainty was 0.43%. The half-life of (111)In was determined using a time series of measurements performed with an ionisation chamber. A least squares fit of the measured data resulted in a half-life of 2.8067 (34) days consistent with Decay Data Evaluation Project recommended value (0.064% higher than the DDEP value). PMID:26651174

  15. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  16. Nonlinear optical absorption of ZnO doped with copper nanoparticles in the picosecond and nanosecond pulse laser field.

    PubMed

    Ryasnyansky, Aleksandr; Palpant, Bruno; Debrus, Solange; Ganeev, Rashid; Stepanov, Andrey; Can, Nurdogan; Buchal, Christoph; Uysal, Sibel

    2005-05-10

    The nonlinear absorption of nanocomposite layers based on ZnO implanted with Cu+ ions with an energy of 160 keV in implantation doses of 10(16) and 10(17) ions/cm2 was investigated. The values of the nonlinear absorption coefficient were measured by the Z-scan method at a wavelength of 532 nm by use of nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. Possible optical applications of these materials are discussed.

  17. Investigation on structural aspects of ZnO nano-crystal using radio-active ion beam and PAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Bichitra Nandi; Dutta, Sreetama; Roy, Soma; Röder, Jens; Johnston, Karl; Martin, Manfred

    2015-11-01

    Nano-crystalline ZnO has been studied with perturbed angular correlation using 111mCd, implanted at ISOLDE/CERN and X-ray diffraction using Rietveld analysis. The data show a gradual increase in the crystal size and stress for a sample annealed at 600 °C, and reaching nearly properties of standard ZnO with tempering at 1000 °C. The perturbed angular correlation data show a broad frequency distribution at low annealing temperatures and small particle sizes, whereas at high annealing temperature and larger crystal sizes, results similar to bulk ZnO have been obtained. The ZnO nano-crystalline samples were initially prepared through a wet chemical route, have been examined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and chemical purity has been confirmed with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  18. Determination of secondary ion mass spectrometry relative sensitivity factors for polar and non-polar ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Laufer, Andreas; Volbers, Niklas; Eisermann, Sebastian; Meyer, Bruno K.; Potzger, Kay; Geburt, Sebastian; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is regarded as a promising material for optoelectronic devices, due to its electronic properties. Solely, the difficulty in obtaining p-type ZnO impedes further progress. In this connection, the identification and quantification of impurities is a major demand. For quantitative information using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), so-called relative sensitivity factors (RSF) are mandatory. Such conversion factors did not yet exist for ZnO. In this work, we present the determined RSF values for ZnO using primary (ion implanted) as well as secondary (bulk doped) standards. These RSFs have been applied to commercially available ZnO substrates of different surface termination (a-plane, Zn-face, and O-face) to quantify the contained impurities. Although these ZnO substrates originate from the same single-crystal, we observe discrepancies in the impurity concentrations. These results cannot be attributed to surface termination dependent RSF values for ZnO.

  19. [Pharmacokinetic substantiation of the use of 111In-citrate in bone marrow studies].

    PubMed

    Korsunskiĭ, V N; Tarasenko, Iu I; Koval'chuk, N D; Kosheleva, I Iu; Popov, V I

    1986-07-01

    Soviet radiopharmaceutical 111In-citrin has been studied to define its possible application for marrow visualization. 111In-citrin has been shown to accumulate in the red marrow, parenchymal organs and to be excreted from animal organism by urinary system predominately. 111In-citrin has advantages in defining the nuclide concentrations in marrow blood and serum as compared with colloid preparations and 111In-chloride. 111In-citrin is supposed to be an adequate radiopharmaceutical preparation for visualization of the red marrow. PMID:3736386

  20. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  1. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  2. 16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. IN 1952, BUILDINGS 11 (111), 12 (121), 21 (221), 22 (122), 23 (123), AND 42 (442) WERE OCCUPIED. BUILDINGS 91 (991) AND 81 (881) WERE OPERATIONAL. BUILDINGS 44 (444) AND 71 (771) WERE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. THE TOTAL COST FOR CONSTRUCTION BY 1952 WAS $2.5 MILLION. BY SEPTEMBER OF 1953, AUSTIN COMPANY HAD COMPLETED 21 BUILDINGS FOR AN APPROXIMATE COST OF $43.3 MILLION (1952). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. In situ 111In-doping for achieving biocompatible and non-leachable 111In-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Jia, Bing; Qiao, Ruirui; Wang, Chao; Jing, Lihong; Wang, Fan; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-28

    The present study reports a new approach for synthesizing (111)In-radiolabeled biocompatible Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Radioactive (111)In is doped in situ into the lattice of Fe3O4 nanoparticles to achieve robust radiolabeling for accurately tracing PEGylated Fe3O4 particles in vivo. PMID:24430864

  4. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  5. Defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.; Jokela, S. J.

    2009-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor with potential applications in optoelectronics, transparent electronics, and spintronics. The high efficiency of UV emission in this material could be harnessed in solid-state white lighting devices. The problem of defects, in particular, acceptor dopants, remains a key challenge. In this review, defects in ZnO are discussed, with an emphasis on the physical properties of point defects in bulk crystals. As grown, ZnO is usually n-type, a property that was historically ascribed to native defects. However, experiments and theory have shown that O vacancies are deep donors, while Zn interstitials are too mobile to be stable at room temperature. Group-III (B, Al, Ga, and In) and H impurities account for most of the n-type conductivity in ZnO samples. Interstitial H donors have been observed with IR spectroscopy, while substitutional H donors have been predicted from first-principles calculations but not observed directly. Despite numerous reports, reliable p-type conductivity has not been achieved. Ferromagnetism is complicated by the presence of secondary phases, grain boundaries, and native defects. The famous green luminescence has several possible origins, including Cu impurities and Zn vacancies. The properties of group-I (Cu, Li, and Na) and group-V (N, P, As, and Sb) acceptors, and their complexes with H, are discussed. In the future, doping of ZnO nanocrystals will rely on an understanding of these fundamental properties.

  6. Electrical properties of ZnO single nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Markus; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Zoraghi, Mahsa; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the electrical resistance R(T) of ZnO nanowires of ≈ 400 nm diameter as a function of temperature, between 30 K and 300 K, and frequency in the range 40 Hz to 30 MHz. The measurements were done on the as-prepared and after low-energy proton implantation at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the resistance of the wire, before proton implantation, can be well described by two processes in parallel. One process is the fluctuation induced tunneling conductance (FITC) and the other the usual thermally activated process. The existence of a tunneling conductance was also observed in the current-voltage (I-V) results, and can be well described by the FITC model. Impedance spectroscopy measurements in the as-prepared state and at room temperature, indicate and support the idea of two contributions of these two transport processes in the nanowires. Electron backscatter diffraction confirms the existence of different crystalline regions. After the implantation of H+ a third thermally activated process is found that can be explained by taking into account the impurity band splitting due to proton implantation.

  7. Transient, biocompatible electronics and energy harvesters based on ZnO.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Hwang, Suk-Won; Su, Yewang; Kim, Stanley; Cheng, Huanyu; Gur, Onur; Haney, Ryan; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2013-10-25

    The combined use of ZnO, Mg, MgO, and silk provides routes to classes of thin-film transistors and mechanical energy harvesters that are soluble in water and biofluids. Experimental and theoretical studies of the operational aspects and dissolution properties of this type of transient electronics technology illustrate its various capabilities. Application opportunities range from resorbable biomedical implants, to environmentally dissolvable sensors, and degradable consumer electronics.

  8. A Comparison of ZnO and ZnO(-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are performed to support and to help interpret the experimental work reported in the proceeding manuscript. The CCSD(T) approach, in conjunction with a large basis set, is used to compute spectroscopic constants for the X(exp 1)Epsilon(+) and (3)II states of ZnO and the X(exp 2)Epsilon(+) state of ZnO(-). The spectroscopic constants, including the electron affinity, are in good agreement with experiment. The ZnO EA is significantly larger than that of O, thus relative to the atomic ground state asymptotes, ZnO(-) has a larger D(sub o) than the (1)Epsilon(+) state, despite the fact that the extra electron goes into an antibonding orbital. The changes in spectroscopic constants can be understood in terms of the X(exp 1)Epsilon(+) formally dissociating to Zn (1)S + O (1)D while the (3)II and (2)Epsilon(+) states dissociate to Zn (1)S + O (3)P and Zn (1) and O(-) (2)P, respectively.

  9. Nonstoichiometric zinc oxide and indium-doped zinc oxide: Electrical conductivity and {sup 111}In-TDPAC studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Sleight, A.W.; Platzer, R.; Gardner, J.A.

    1996-02-15

    Indium-doped zinc oxide powders have been prepared which show room-temperature electrical conductivities as high as 30 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The indium doping apparently occurs as Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O,Zn{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 1+y/2}, or a combination of these. Optimum conductivity occurs for Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O where the maximum value of x obtained was about 0.5 at%. The degrees of sample reduction were determined by iodimetric titration. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy on indium doped zinc oxide is consistent with indium substituting at normal zinc sites in the ZnO lattice. TDPAC studies on zinc oxide annealed under zinc vapors show a second environment for the {sup 111}In probe. In this case, there is an unusually high temperature dependence of the electric field gradient which may be caused by a nearby zinc interstitial. An important conclusion of this work is that zinc interstitials are not ionized and do not therefore contribute significantly to the increased conductivity of reduced zinc oxide.

  10. Flexible, transparent and exceptionally high power output nanogenerators based on ultrathin ZnO nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ngoc, Huynh; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-02-01

    Novel nanogenerator structures composed of ZnO nanoflakes of less than 10 nm thickness were fabricated using a novel method involving a facile synthetic route and a rational design. The fabricated nanogenerators exhibited a short-circuit current density of 67 μA cm-2, a peak-to-peak open-circuit voltage of 110 V, and an overall output power density exceeding 1.2 mW cm-2, and to the best of our knowledge, these are the best values that have been reported so far in the literature on ZnO-based nanogenerators. We demonstrated that our nanogenerator design could instantaneously power 20 commercial green light-emitting diodes without any additional energy storage processes. Both the facile synthetic route for the ZnO nanoflakes and the straightforward device fabrication process present great scaling potential in order to power mobile and personal electronics that can be used in smart wearable systems, transparent and flexible devices, implantable telemetric energy receivers, electronic emergency equipment, and other self-powered nano/micro devices.Novel nanogenerator structures composed of ZnO nanoflakes of less than 10 nm thickness were fabricated using a novel method involving a facile synthetic route and a rational design. The fabricated nanogenerators exhibited a short-circuit current density of 67 μA cm-2, a peak-to-peak open-circuit voltage of 110 V, and an overall output power density exceeding 1.2 mW cm-2, and to the best of our knowledge, these are the best values that have been reported so far in the literature on ZnO-based nanogenerators. We demonstrated that our nanogenerator design could instantaneously power 20 commercial green light-emitting diodes without any additional energy storage processes. Both the facile synthetic route for the ZnO nanoflakes and the straightforward device fabrication process present great scaling potential in order to power mobile and personal electronics that can be used in smart wearable systems, transparent and flexible

  11. /sup 111/In-oxine platelet survivals in thrombocytopenic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, V.; Coates, G.; Kelton, J.G.; Andrew, M.

    1987-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence (20%) in sick neonates, but the causes have not been well studied. In this report we demonstrate that thrombocytopenia in the neonate is characterized by increased platelet destruction as shown by shortened homologous /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelet life spans. Thirty-one prospectively studied thrombocytopenic neonates were investigated by measuring the /sup 111/In-labeled platelet life span, platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG), and coagulation screening tests. In every infant, the thrombocytopenia was shown to have a destructive component since the mean platelet life span was significantly shortened to 65 +/- 6 (mean +/- SEM) hours with a range of one to 128 hours compared with adult values (212 +/- 8; range, 140 to 260; gamma function analysis). The platelet survival was directly related to the lowest platelet count and inversely related to both the highest mean platelet volume and duration of the thrombocytopenia. In 22 infants the percent recovery of the radiolabeled platelets was less than 50%, which suggested that increased sequestration also contributed to the thrombocytopenia. Infants with laboratory evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (n = 8) or immune platelet destruction evidenced by elevated levels of PAIgG (n = 13) had even shorter platelet survivals and a more severe thrombocytopenia compared with the ten infants in whom an underlying cause for the thrombocytopenia was not apparent. Full-body scintigraphic images obtained in 11 infants showed an increased uptake in the spleen and liver, with a spleen-to-liver ratio of 3:1. This study indicates that thrombocytopenia in sick neonates is primarily destructive, with a subgroup having evidence of increased platelet sequestration.

  12. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  13. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  14. Homoepitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C-H; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; McCarty, P.; George, M. A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    ZnO films have high potential for many applications, such as surface acoustic wave filters, UV detectors, and light emitting devices due to its structural, electrical, and optical properties. High quality epitaxial films are required for these applications. The Al2O3 substrate is commonly used for ZnO heteroepitaxial growth. Recently, high quality ZnO single crystals are available for grow homoepitaxial films. Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films were also deposited on (0001) Al2O3 substrates. It was found that the two polar ZnO surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which strongly influence the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of homoepitaxial films grown on the ZnO substrates were different from heteroepitaxial films grown on the Al2O3. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  16. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  17. Preparation of new morphological ZnO and Ce-doped ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Chelouche, A.; Djouadi, D.; Aksas, A.

    2013-12-16

    ZnO micro-tori and cerium doped hexangulars ZnO have been prepared by the sol-gel method under methanol hypercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement has revealed the high crystalline quality and the nanometric size of the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has shown that the ZnO powder has a torus-like shape while that of ZnO:Ce has a hexangular-like shape, either standing free or inserted into the cores of ZnO tori. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has revealed that the ZnO particles have sizes between 25 and 30 nm while Ce-doped ZnO grains have diameters ranging from 75 nm to 100 nm. Photoluminescence spectra at room temperature of the samples have revealed that the introduction of cerium in ZnO reduces the emission intensity lines, particularly the ZnO red and green ones.

  18. Biodistribution of 111In-labelled IgG and IgM in experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Oyen, W J; Boerman, O C; Subramanian, R; Koenders, E B; Claessens, R A; van der Meer, J W; Corstens, F H

    1996-07-01

    Both the protein used and the conjugation method are factors which may be relevant for targeting infection with 111In-labelled proteins. In this study, human immunoglobulin G (IgG), conjugated to either DTPA or LiLo, and LiLo conjugated human immunoglobulin M (IgM) were evaluated. In rats with Staphylococcus aureus calf muscle infection, biodistribution was determined 6, 24 and 48 h after the injection of 111In-DTPA-IgG, 111InLiLo-IgG or 111In-LiLo-IgM. Absolute abscess uptake of 111In-LiLo-IgG was significantly higher than that of 111In-DTPA-IgG (P < 0.05). Since blood clearance of 111In-LiLo-IgG was initially significantly slower (P < 0.01), the higher abscess uptake did not result in higher abscess-to-background ratios. 111In-LiLo-IgG accumulated to a greater extent in the liver (P < 0.001). 111In-DTPA-IgG showed higher uptake in the kidneys and bone marrow (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). Although decreasing over time, 111In-LiLo-IgM showed reasonable abscess uptake and rapid blood clearance, resulting in higher abscess-to-background ratios compared with 111In-LiLo-IgG (P < 0.01). However, liver and spleen uptake were three- to four-fold higher than that of 111In-LiLo-IgG (P < 0.001). Compared with DTPA-conjugation, chelation with LiLo has a minor influence on abscess targeting of 111In-labelled IgG. However, differences in blood clearance and organ uptake do occur. 111In-LiLo-IgM shows high relative accumulation in abscesses as well as high liver and spleen uptake. 111In-LiLo-IgM appears promising for imaging infection outside the trunk region.

  19. Effect of ZnO morphology on affecting bactericidal property of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infection of implants can be controlled by selective trapping of bacteria, followed with consequent killing by targeted antibacterial agents. Herein, the role of various ZnO morphologies, viz. micro-rods (R), nanoparticles (NP), and micro-disks (D) on antibacterial efficacy of ZnO via release of Zn(2+) and H2O2 is assessed, both as isolated powders and via incorporating them in cytocompatible ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though ZnO is antibacterial, interestingly, all ZnO morphologies elicited a supportive growth of gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) in culture medium (until 28-35 μg/ml). But, all ZnO morphologies did elicit bactericidal effect on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis) both in culture medium (for 0-2.5 μg/ml) or when incorporated (5-20 wt.%) into UHMWPE. The bactericidal mechanisms were quantified for various ZnO morphologies via: (i) H2O2 production, (ii) Zn(2+) release, and (iii) the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. On one hand, where only ZnO(NP) elicited release of H2O2 in the absence of light, maximum Zn(2+) release was elicited by ZnO(D). Interestingly, when ZnO is incorporated as reinforcement (5-20 wt.%), its antibacterial action against E. coli was vividly observed due to selective proliferation of bacteria only on friendly UHMWPE matrix. Hence, luring bacteria on affable UHMWPE surface can be complemented with their targeted killing by ZnO present in composite.

  20. Effect of ZnO morphology on affecting bactericidal property of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infection of implants can be controlled by selective trapping of bacteria, followed with consequent killing by targeted antibacterial agents. Herein, the role of various ZnO morphologies, viz. micro-rods (R), nanoparticles (NP), and micro-disks (D) on antibacterial efficacy of ZnO via release of Zn(2+) and H2O2 is assessed, both as isolated powders and via incorporating them in cytocompatible ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though ZnO is antibacterial, interestingly, all ZnO morphologies elicited a supportive growth of gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) in culture medium (until 28-35 μg/ml). But, all ZnO morphologies did elicit bactericidal effect on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis) both in culture medium (for 0-2.5 μg/ml) or when incorporated (5-20 wt.%) into UHMWPE. The bactericidal mechanisms were quantified for various ZnO morphologies via: (i) H2O2 production, (ii) Zn(2+) release, and (iii) the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. On one hand, where only ZnO(NP) elicited release of H2O2 in the absence of light, maximum Zn(2+) release was elicited by ZnO(D). Interestingly, when ZnO is incorporated as reinforcement (5-20 wt.%), its antibacterial action against E. coli was vividly observed due to selective proliferation of bacteria only on friendly UHMWPE matrix. Hence, luring bacteria on affable UHMWPE surface can be complemented with their targeted killing by ZnO present in composite. PMID:26952491

  1. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  2. Uptake of /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes by tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, A.; Datz, F.L.; Taylor, A. Jr.; Alazraki, N.

    1986-03-01

    The 111In-labeled leukocyte scan is a sensitive and specific technique for the detection and localization of abscesses. However, in reviewing an unselected series of 249 scans, six (2.3%) were false-positive cases in which leukocyte uptake by tumor mimicked an abscess. This represented 12% (6/51) with known tumor at the time of imaging. Five of the cases were primary or metastatic tumors to the soft tissues; the sixth was a skeletal metastasis. The intensity of tumor activity has been characterized as mild in the few cases of leukocyte uptake reported in the literature, suggesting that the degree of uptake is helpful in distinguishing tumor from abscess. In this study, however, variable degrees of tumor-associated activity were seen ranging from mild to very intense. These findings indicate that tumor accumulates labeled leukocytes more frequently than has been previously appreciated, that primary and metastatic neoplasms involving both the soft tissues and skeleton are involved, and that the intensity of uptake is not a reliable criterion to distinguish tumor from abscess.

  3. Gold coated ZnO nanorod biosensor for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anuradha; Jain, Chhavi; Rao, V. Padmanapan; Banerjee, S.

    2012-06-01

    Gold coated ZnO nanorod based biosensor has been fabricated for its glucose detecting abilities and compared with that of ZnO nanorod based biosensor. SEM images of electrochemically grown ZnO nanorods show hexagonally grown ZnO nanorods on an ITO substrate. Electrochemical analysis show that gold coated ZnO based biosensors have higher sensitivity, lower limit of detection and a wider linear range for glucose detection. The results demonstrate that gold coated ZnO nanorod based biosensors are a promising material for biosensor applications over single component ZnO nanorod based biosensor.

  4. [Preparation of two poor water soluble drugs - nanoporous ZnO solid dispersions and the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement].

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Sun, Chang-shan; Zhi, Zhuang-zhi; Wang, Yan; Chang, Di; Wang, Si-ling; Jiang, Tong-ying

    2011-11-01

    Nanoporous ZnO was used as a carrier to prepare drug solid dispersion, the mechanism of which to improve the drug dissolution was also studied. Nanoporous ZnO, obtained through chemical deposition method, was used as a carrier to prepare indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions by melt-quenching method, separately. The results of scanning electron microscope, surface area analyzer, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimeter and X-ray diffraction showed that drugs were implanted into nanopores of ZnO by physical adsorption effect and highly dispersed into nanopores of ZnO in amorphous form, moreover, these nanopores strongly inhibited amorphous recrystallization in the condition of 45 degrees C and 75% RH. In addition, the results of the dissolution tested in vitro exhibited that the accumulated dissolutions of indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions achieved about 90% within 5 min and approximately 80% within 30 min. It was indicated in this study that the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement was associated with the effects of nanoporous ZnO carrier on increasing drug dispersion, controlling drug in nanopores as amorphous form and inhibiting amorphous recrystallization. PMID:22260037

  5. DFT study of the hyperfine parameters and magnetic properties of ZnO doped with 57Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Piñera, I.; Leyva, A.; Cabal, A. E.; Van Espen, P.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic state of 57Fe implanted and doped ZnO samples have been reported and studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy at different temperatures. The Mössbauer spectra mainly showed four doublets and three sextets, but some ambiguous identification remains regarding the probe site location and influence of defects in the hyperfine and magnetic parameters. In the present work some possible implantation configurations are suggested and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation and electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Various implantation environments were proposed and studied considering the presence of defects. The obtained 57Fe hyperfine parameters show a good agreement with the reported experimental values for some of these configurations. The possibility of Fe pair formation, as well as a Zn site vacancy stabilization between the second and third neighborhood of the implantation site, is supported.

  6. N Doping to ZnO Nanorods for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting under Visible Light: Engineered Impurity Distribution and Terraced Band Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Ren, Feng; Zhou, Jigang; Cai, Guangxu; Cai, Li; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Dongniu; Liu, Yichao; Guo, Liejin; Shen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) were modified with controlled N doping by an advanced ion implantation method, and were subsequently utilized as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting under visible light irradiation. A gradient distribution of N dopants along the vertical direction of ZnO nanorods was realized. N doped ZnO NRAs displayed a markedly enhanced visible-light-driven PEC photocurrent density of ~160 μA/cm2 at 1.1 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE), which was about 2 orders of magnitude higher than pristine ZnO NRAs. The gradiently distributed N dopants not only extended the optical absorption edges to visible light region, but also introduced terraced band structure. As a consequence, N gradient-doped ZnO NRAs can not only utilize the visible light irradiation but also efficiently drive photo-induced electron and hole transfer via the terraced band structure. The superior potential of ion implantation technique for creating gradient dopants distribution in host semiconductors will provide novel insights into doped photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting. PMID:26262752

  7. N Doping to ZnO Nanorods for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting under Visible Light: Engineered Impurity Distribution and Terraced Band Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Ren, Feng; Zhou, Jigang; Cai, Guangxu; Cai, Li; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Dongniu; Liu, Yichao; Guo, Liejin; Shen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) were modified with controlled N doping by an advanced ion implantation method, and were subsequently utilized as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting under visible light irradiation. A gradient distribution of N dopants along the vertical direction of ZnO nanorods was realized. N doped ZnO NRAs displayed a markedly enhanced visible-light-driven PEC photocurrent density of ~160 μA/cm(2) at 1.1 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE), which was about 2 orders of magnitude higher than pristine ZnO NRAs. The gradiently distributed N dopants not only extended the optical absorption edges to visible light region, but also introduced terraced band structure. As a consequence, N gradient-doped ZnO NRAs can not only utilize the visible light irradiation but also efficiently drive photo-induced electron and hole transfer via the terraced band structure. The superior potential of ion implantation technique for creating gradient dopants distribution in host semiconductors will provide novel insights into doped photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting. PMID:26262752

  8. Rocksalt ZnO nanocrystal formation by beam irradiation of wurtzite ZnO in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Bo

    2016-10-01

    Under ambient conditions, ZnO crystallizes in a hexagonal wurtzite structure, but undergoes a phase transformation into a rocksalt structure with increasing hydrostatic pressure. However, in the present study, I have successfully demonstrated that intense beam irradiation of a wurtzite ZnO specimen in a transmission electron microscope produces nanoparticles of rocksalt ZnO as well as wurtzite ZnO, suggesting that the application of pressures is not a necessary condition for the formation of rocksalt ZnO.

  9. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  10. Optimizing stem cell functions and antibacterial properties of TiO2 nanotubes incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Su, Penglei; Gonzales, Arthur; Chen, Su; Wang, Na; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Zhang, Zhenting; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    To optimize mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties of titanium (Ti), nano-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles with tunable concentrations were incorporated into TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) using a facile hydrothermal strategy. It is revealed here for the first time that the TNTs incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles exhibited better biocompatibility compared with pure Ti samples (controls) and that the amount of ZnO (tailored by the concentration of Zn(NO3)2 in the precursor) introduced into TNTs played a crucial role on their osteogenic properties. Not only was the alkaline phosphatase activity improved to about 13.8 U/g protein, but the osterix, collagen-I, and osteocalcin gene expressions was improved from mesenchymal stem cells compared to controls. To further explore the mechanism of TNTs decorated with ZnO on cell functions, a response surface mathematical model was used to optimize the concentration of ZnO incorporation into the Ti nanotubes for stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties for the first time. Both experimental and modeling results confirmed (R (2) values of 0.8873-0.9138 and 0.9596-0.9941, respectively) that Ti incorporated with appropriate concentrations (with an initial concentration of Zn(NO3)2 at 0.015 M) of ZnO can provide exceptional osteogenic properties for stem cell differentiation in bone cells with strong antibacterial effects, properties important for improving dental and orthopedic implant efficacy. PMID:25792833

  11. Evaluation in a Dog Model of Three Antimicrobial Glassy Coatings: Prevention of Bone Loss around Implants and Microbial Assessments

    PubMed Central

    López-Píriz, Roberto; Solá-Linares, Eva; Rodriguez-Portugal, Mercedes; Malpica, Beatriz; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Enciso, Silvia; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Granizo, Juan José; Moya, José Serafín; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study is to evaluate, in a ligature-induced peri-implantitis model, the efficacy of three antimicrobial glassy coatings in the prevention of biofilm formation, intrasulcular bacterial growth and the resulting peri-implant bone loss. Methods Mandibular premolars were bilaterally extracted from five beagle dogs. Four dental implants were inserted on each hemiarch. Eight weeks after, one control zirconia abutment and three with different bactericidal coatings (G1n-Ag, ZnO35, G3) were connected. After a plaque control period, bacterial accumulation was allowed and biofilm formation on abutments was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Peri-implantitis was induced by cotton ligatures. Microbial samples and peri-implant crestal bone levels of all implant sites were obtained before, during and after the breakdown period. Results During experimental induce peri-implantitis: colony forming units counts from intrasulcular microbial samples at implants with G1n-Ag coated abutment remained close to the basal inoculum; G3 and ZnO35 coatings showed similar low counts; and anaerobic bacterias counts at control abutments exhibited a logarithmic increase by more than 2. Bone loss during passive breakdown period was no statistically significant. Additional bone loss occurred during ligature-induce breakdown: 0.71 (SD 0.48) at G3 coating, 0.57 (SD 0.36) at ZnO35 coating, 0.74 (SD 0.47) at G1n-Ag coating, and 1.29 (SD 0.45) at control abutments; and statistically significant differences (p<0.001) were found. The lowest bone loss at the end of the experiment was exhibited by implants dressing G3 coated abutments (mean 2.1; SD 0.42). Significance Antimicrobial glassy coatings could be a useful tool to ward off, diminish or delay peri-implantitis progression. PMID:26489088

  12. Spinel ferrite nanocrystals embedded inside ZnO: magnetic, electronic andmagneto-transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Potzger, K.; Xu, Qingyu; Kuepper, K.; Talut, G.; Marko, D.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-08-21

    In this paper we show that spinel ferrite nanocrystals (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) can be texturally embedded inside a ZnO matrix by ion implantation and post-annealing. The two kinds of ferrites show different magnetic properties, e.g. coercivity and magnetization. Anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance have been observed. Our study suggests a ferrimagnet/semiconductor hybrid system for potential applications in magneto-electronics. This hybrid system can be tuned by selecting different transition metal ions (from Mn to Zn) to obtain various magnetic and electronic properties.

  13. Multifunctional transparent ZnO nanorod films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Geunjae; Jung, Sungmook; Yong, Kijung

    2011-03-01

    Transparent ZnO nanorod (NR) films that exhibit extreme wetting states (either superhydrophilicity or superhydrophobicity through surface chemical modification), high transmittance, UV protection and antireflection have been prepared via the facile ammonia hydrothermal method. The periodic 1D ZnO NR arrays showed extreme wetting states as well as antireflection properties due to their unique surface structure and prevented the UVA region from penetrating the substrate due to the unique material property of ZnO. Because of the simple, time-efficient and low temperature preparation process, ZnO NR films with useful functionalities are promising for fabrication of highly light transmissive, antireflective, UV protective, antifogging and self-cleaning optical materials to be used for optical devices and photovoltaic energy devices.

  14. Persistent photoconductivity of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiho, R.; Stepanov, Yu. P.; Vlasenko, M. P.; Vlasenko, L. S.

    2009-12-01

    Persistent photoconductivity is observed in ZnO single crystals and ceramics together with persistence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of defects and impurity centers. It is shown that when the light is switched on and off the microwave conductivity detected from absorption of the microwave field is well correlated with the dc-conductivity measured with electrical contacts applied to the sample. The microwave photoconductivity arises together with light-induced EPR spectra and persists after switching off the light. Coexistence of the conductivity and EPR spectra shows that the photoexcited electrons cannot return back to paramagnetic centers. The persistent photoconductivity in ZnO ceramics is large in comparison with the effect observed in powders prepared from the same material and in ZnO single crystals. This suggests that surface conductivity is the dominant mechanism of persistent photoconductivity in ZnO.

  15. Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods using textured ZnO films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A hydrothermal method to grow vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays on ZnO films obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. The growth of ZnO nanorods is studied as function of the crystallographic orientation of the ZnO films deposited on silicon (100) substrates. Different thicknesses of ZnO films around 40 to 180 nm were obtained and characterized before carrying out the growth process by hydrothermal methods. A textured ZnO layer with preferential direction in the normal c-axes is formed on substrates by the decomposition of diethylzinc to provide nucleation sites for vertical nanorod growth. Crystallographic orientation of the ZnO nanorods and ZnO-ALD films was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Composition, morphologies, length, size, and diameter of the nanorods were studied using a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy analyses. In this work, it is demonstrated that crystallinity of the ZnO-ALD films plays an important role in the vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod growth. The nanorod arrays synthesized in solution had a diameter, length, density, and orientation desirable for a potential application as photosensitive materials in the manufacture of semiconductor-polymer solar cells. PACS 61.46.Hk, Nanocrystals; 61.46.Km, Structure of nanowires and nanorods; 81.07.Gf, Nanowires; 81.15.Gh, Chemical vapor deposition (including plasma-enhanced CVD, MOCVD, ALD, etc.) PMID:21899743

  16. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  17. Polymer assisted preparation and characterization of ZnO and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh Kumar, A.; Nagaraja, K. K.; Nagaraja, H. S.

    2015-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and tin doped ZnO are wide band gap semiconducting materials with excellent optoelectronic properties. In the present study ZnO and Sn: ZnO films are prepared using polymer assisted sol gel process. The thermal behaviour of the dried gel sample studied using DTA and TG analysis. TG-DTA result shown that most of the organic of PVA and CH3COO group of zinc acetate and other volatiles are removed below 500°C. The effect of Sn on the crystallinity, microstructral properties of the deposited films was investigated. XRD patterns of undoped and Sn doped ZnO films indicate enhanced intensities for the peak corresponding to (002) plane, resulting preferential orientation along the c-axis. The SEM images confirm that the grown films are composed of nanorods.

  18. Sensitivity of 57Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to Ar and C induced defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Mølholt, T. E.; Langouche, G.; Geburt, S.; Ronning, C.; Doyle, T. B.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Ncube, M.; Gislason, H.; Ólafsson, S.; Weyer, G.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (eMS) measurements, following low fluence (<1012 cm-2) implantation of 57Mn (t 1/2 = 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystals pre-implanted with Ar and C ions, has been utilized to test the sensitivity of the 57Fe eMS technique to the different types of defects generated by the different ion species. The dominant feature of the Mössbauer spectrum of the Ar implanted ZnO sample was a magnetic hyperfine field distribution component, attributed to paramagnetic Fe3+, while that of the C implanted sample was a doublet attributed to substitutional Fe2+ forming a complex with the C dopant ions in the 2- state at O vacancies. Magnetization measurements on the two samples, on the other hand, yield practically identical m(H) curves. The distinctly different eMS spectra of the two samples display the sensitivity of the probe nucleus to the defects produced by the different ion species.

  19. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  20. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  1. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  2. Diagnosis of arterial prosthetic graft infection by /sup 111/In oxine white blood cell scans

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, P.P.; Miller, D.C.; Jamieson, S.W.; Mitchell, R.S.; Reitz, B.A.; Olcott, C.; Mehigan, J.T.; Silberstein, R.J.; McDougall, I.R.

    1982-08-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infected prosthetic arterial grafts is difficult, despite the application of diverse diagnostic modalities. Delay in making the diagnosis is largely responsible for the high amputation and mortality rates associated with this complication. In nine patients with suspected graft infections, /sup 111/In white blood cell scanning was useful and accurate. Graft infection was proved in five cases and ruled out in three. One false-positive scan was due to a sigmoid diverticular abscess overlying the graft. /sup 111/In white blood cell scans may improve the accuracy of diagnosing infected prosthetic grafts, which may result in better limb and patient salvage rates.

  3. Great blue-shift of luminescence of ZnO nanoparticle array constructed from ZnO quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticle array has been fabricated on the Si substrate by a simple thermal chemical vapor transport and condensation without any metal catalysts. This ZnO nanoparticles array is constructed from ZnO quantum dots (QDs), and half-embedded in the amorphous silicon oxide layer on the surface of the Si substrate. The cathodoluminescence measurements showed that there is a pronounced blue-shift of luminescence comparable to those of the bulk counterpart, which is suggested to originate from ZnO QDs with small size where the quantum confinement effect can work well. The fabrication mechanism of the ZnO nanoparticle array constructed from ZnO QDs was proposed, in which the immiscible-like interaction between ZnO nuclei and Si surface play a key role in the ZnO QDs cluster formation. These investigations showed the fabricated nanostructure has potential applications in ultraviolet emitters. PMID:21711864

  4. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  5. Synthesis and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yilin; Weng, Yuan; Liang, Weiquan; Zhang, Wenfeng; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Haimei

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, ZnO with a novel hierarchical nanostructure has been synthesized by a new solution method. The novel hierarchical structure is named a ‘brush pen’. The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens have been evaluated. The results demonstrate that ZnO brush pens show good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

  6. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements.

  7. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  8. Complex and oriented ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhengrong R.; Voigt, James A.; Liu, Jun; McKenzie, Bonnie; McDermott, Matthew J.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang

    2003-12-01

    Extended and oriented nanostructures are desirable for many applications, but direct fabrication of complex nanostructures with controlled crystalline morphology, orientation and surface architectures remains a significant challenge. Here we report a low-temperature, environmentally benign, solution-based approach for the preparation of complex and oriented ZnO nanostructures, and the systematic modification of their crystal morphology. Using controlled seeded growth and citrate anions that selectively adsorb on ZnO basal planes as the structure-directing agent, we prepared large arrays of oriented ZnO nanorods with controlled aspect ratios, complex film morphologies made of oriented nanocolumns and nanoplates (remarkably similar to biomineral structures in red abalone shells) and complex bilayers showing in situ column-to-rod morphological transitions. The advantages of some of these ZnO structures for photocatalytic decompositions of volatile organic compounds were demonstrated. The novel ZnO nanostructures are expected to have great potential for sensing, catalysis, optical emission, piezoelectric transduction, and actuations.

  9. Implantation in IVF.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cristiano E; Melo, Marco A B; Fernandez, Manuel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simon, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The recent advances in assisted reproduction have made it possible to study and interfere in almost every step of the human reproductive process except for implantation. The most complex and important step remains in great part unknown. Implantation in human has proven to be less efficient compared with other species. However, in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, it has been evaluated to be even poorer. This paper highlights the factors related to infertile patients and IVF treatments that can affect implantation and implantation's clinical aspects related to these treatments: implantation failure and early pregnancy loss.

  10. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  11. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  12. ZnO nanolasers on graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyeonjun; Park, Jun Beom; Park, Jong-woo; Hyun, Jerome K.; Yoon, Hosang; Oh, Hongseok; Yoon, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    We grew and characterized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanolasers on graphene films. By using graphene as a growth medium, we were able to prepare position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube lasers. The ZnO nanolasers grown on graphene films showed good optical characteristics, evidenced by a low lasing threshold. Furthermore, the nanolaser/graphene system was easily lifted off the original substrate and transferred onto foreign substrates. The lasing performance was observed to be significantly enhanced by depositing a layer of silver on the back of the graphene film during this transfer process, which was quantitatively investigated using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Due to the wide selection of substrates enabled by the use of graphene films, our results suggest promising strategies for preparing practical nanolasers with improved performance.

  13. Dye-Sensitization Of Nanocrystalline ZnO Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ajimsha, R. S.; Tyagi, M.; Das, A. K.; Misra, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Nannocrystalline and nanoporus thin films of ZnO were synthesized on glass substrates by using wet chemical drop casting method. X-ray diffraction measurements on these samples confirmed the formation of ZnO nanocrystallites in hexagonal wurtzite phase with mean size of {approx}20 nm. Photo sensitization of these nanostructured ZnO thin films was carried out using three types of dyes Rhodamine 6 G, Chlorophyll and cocktail of Rhodamine 6 G and Chlorophyll in 1:1 ratio. Dye sensitized ZnO thin films showed enhanced optical absorption in visible spectral region compared to the pristine ZnO thin films.

  14. TiO2 nanotube composite layers as delivery system for ZnO and Ag nanoparticles - an unexpected overdose effect decreasing their antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Roguska, A; Belcarz, A; Pisarek, M; Ginalska, G; Lewandowska, M

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of implant materials is potentially beneficial for their practical value. Therefore, the use of metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles as antimicrobial coatings components which induce minimized antibacterial resistance receives currently particular attention. In this work, TiO2 nanotubes layers loaded with ZnO and Ag nanoparticles were designed for biomedical coatings and delivery systems and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. TiO2 nanotubes themselves exhibited considerable and diameter-dependent antibacterial activity against planktonic Staphylococcus epidermidis cells but favored bacterial adhesion. Loading of nanotubes with moderate amount of ZnO nanoparticles significantly diminished S. epidermidis cell adhesion and viability just after 1.5h contact with modified surfaces. However, an increase of loaded ZnO amount unexpectedly altered the structure of nanoparticle-nanolayer, caused partial closure of nanotube interior and significantly reduced ZnO solubility and antibacterial efficacy. Co-deposition of Ag nanoparticles enhanced the antibacterial properties of synthesized coatings. However, the increase of ZnO quantity on Ag nanoparticles co-deposited surfaces favored the adhesion of bacterial cells. Thus, ZnO/Ag/TiO2 nanotube composite layers may be promising delivery systems for combating post-operative infections in hard tissue replacement procedures. However, the amount of loaded antibacterial agents must be carefully balanced to avoid the overdose and reduced efficacy.

  15. TiO2 nanotube composite layers as delivery system for ZnO and Ag nanoparticles - an unexpected overdose effect decreasing their antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Roguska, A; Belcarz, A; Pisarek, M; Ginalska, G; Lewandowska, M

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of implant materials is potentially beneficial for their practical value. Therefore, the use of metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles as antimicrobial coatings components which induce minimized antibacterial resistance receives currently particular attention. In this work, TiO2 nanotubes layers loaded with ZnO and Ag nanoparticles were designed for biomedical coatings and delivery systems and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. TiO2 nanotubes themselves exhibited considerable and diameter-dependent antibacterial activity against planktonic Staphylococcus epidermidis cells but favored bacterial adhesion. Loading of nanotubes with moderate amount of ZnO nanoparticles significantly diminished S. epidermidis cell adhesion and viability just after 1.5h contact with modified surfaces. However, an increase of loaded ZnO amount unexpectedly altered the structure of nanoparticle-nanolayer, caused partial closure of nanotube interior and significantly reduced ZnO solubility and antibacterial efficacy. Co-deposition of Ag nanoparticles enhanced the antibacterial properties of synthesized coatings. However, the increase of ZnO quantity on Ag nanoparticles co-deposited surfaces favored the adhesion of bacterial cells. Thus, ZnO/Ag/TiO2 nanotube composite layers may be promising delivery systems for combating post-operative infections in hard tissue replacement procedures. However, the amount of loaded antibacterial agents must be carefully balanced to avoid the overdose and reduced efficacy. PMID:25842121

  16. Quantitative simultaneous 111In/99mTc SPECT-CT of osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cervo, Morgan; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A well-established approach for diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis (OM), a bone infection, is simultaneous SPECT-CT of 99mTc sulfur colloid (SC) and 111In white blood cells (WBC). This method provides essentially perfect spatial registration of the tracers within anatomic sites of interest. Currently, diagnosis is based purely on a visual assessment—where relative discordance between 99mTc and 111In uptake in bone, i.e., high 111In and low 99mTc, suggests OM. To achieve more quantitative images, noise, scatter, and crosstalk between radionuclides must be addressed through reconstruction. Here the authors compare their Monte Carlo-based joint OSEM (MC-JOSEM) algorithm, which reconstructs both radionuclides simultaneously, to a more conventional triple-energy window-based reconstruction (TEW-OSEM), and to iterative reconstruction with no compensation for scatter (NC-OSEM). Methods: The authors created numerical phantoms of the foot and torso. Multiple bone-infection sites were modeled using high-count Monte Carlo simulation. Counts per voxel were then scaled to values appropriate for 111In WBC and 99mTc SC imaging. Ten independent noisy projection image sets were generated by drawing random Poisson deviates from these very low-noise images. Data were reconstructed using the two iterative scatter-compensation methods, TEW-OSEM and MC-JOSEM, as well as the uncorrected method (NC-OSEM). Mean counts in volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to evaluate the bias and precision of each method. Data were also acquired using a phantom, approximately the size of an adult ankle, consisting of regions representing infected and normal bone marrow, within a bone-like attenuator and surrounding soft tissue; each compartment contained a mixture of 111In and 99mTc. Low-noise data were acquired during multiple short scans over 29 h on a Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT-CT with medium-energy collimators. Pure 99mTc and 111In projection datasets were derived by fitting the acquired

  17. Magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M A; Merino, J M; Fernández Pinel, E; Quesada, A; de la Venta, J; Ruíz González, M L; Castro, G R; Crespo, P; Llopis, J; González-Calbet, J M; Hernando, A

    2007-06-01

    We experimentally show that it is possible to induce room-temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior in ZnO nanoparticles without doping with magnetic impurities but simply inducing an alteration of their electronic configuration. Capping ZnO nanoparticles ( approximately 10 nm size) with different organic molecules produces an alteration of their electronic configuration that depends on the particular molecule, as evidenced by photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and altering their magnetic properties that varies from diamagnetic to ferromagnetic-like behavior.

  18. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  19. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  20. Intrinsic and extrinsic doping of ZnO and ZnO alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, Klaus; Bikowski, André

    2016-10-01

    In this article the doping of the oxidic compound semiconductor ZnO is reviewed with special emphasis on n-type doping. ZnO naturally exhibits n-type conductivity, which is used in the application of highly doped n-type ZnO as a transparent electrode, for instance in thin film solar cells. For prospective application of ZnO in other electronic devices (LEDs, UV photodetectors or power devices) p-type doping is required, which has been reported only minimally. Highly n-type doped ZnO can be prepared by doping with the group IIIB elements B, Al, Ga, and In, which act as shallow donors according to the simple hydrogen-like substitutional donor model of Bethe (1942 Theory of the Boundary Layer of Crystal Rectifiers (Boston, MA: MIT Rad Lab.)). Group IIIA elements (Sc, Y, La etc) are also known to act as shallow donors in ZnO, similarly explainable by the shallow donor model of Bethe. Some reports showed that even group IVA (Ti, Zr, Hf) and IVB (Si, Ge) elements can be used to prepare highly doped ZnO films—which, however, can no longer be explained by the simple hydrogen-like substitutional donor model. More probably, these elements form defect complexes that act as shallow donors in ZnO. On the other hand, group V elements on oxygen lattice sites (N, P, As, and Sb), which were viewed for a long time as typical shallow acceptors, behave instead as deep acceptors, preventing high hole concentrations in ZnO at room temperature. Also, ‘self’-compensation, i.e. the formation of a large number of intrinsic donors at high acceptor concentrations seems to counteract the p-type doping of ZnO. At donor concentrations above about 1020 cm-3, the electrical activation of the dopant elements is often less than 100%, especially in polycrystalline thin films. Reasons for the electrical deactivation of the dopant atoms are (i) the formation of dopant-defect complexes, (ii) the compensation of the electrons by acceptors (Oi, VZn) or (iii) the formation of secondary phases, for

  1. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15–40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles. PMID:26230940

  2. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  3. Evaluation of [111In]-Labeled Zinc-Dipicolylamine Tracers for SPECT Imaging of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Plaunt, Adam J.; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; Smith, Miles; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prepared three structurally related zinc-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) tracers with [111In] labels and conducted biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. Methods Two monovalent tracers, ZnDPA-[111In]DTPA and ZnDPA-[111In]DOTA, each with a single zinc-dipicolylamine targeting unit, and a divalent tracer, Bis(ZnDPA)-[111In]DTPA,with two zinc-dipicolylamine units were prepared. Organ biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on living mice with a leg infection created by injection of clinically relevant Gram positive Streptococcus pyogenes. Fluorescent and luminescent Eu3+-labeled versions of these tracers were also prepared and used to measure relative affinity for the exterior membrane surface of bacterial cells and mimics of healthy mammalian cells. Results All three 111In-labeled radiotracers were prepared with radiopurity > 90%. The biodistribution studies showed that the two monovalent tracers were cleared from the body through the liver and kidney, with retained % injected dose for all organs of < 8 % at 20 hours and infected leg T/NT ratio of ≤ 3.0. Clearance of the divalent tracer from the bloodstream was slower and primarily through the liver, with a retained % injected dose for all organs < 37% at 20 hours and T/NT ratio rising to 6.2 after 20 hours. The SPECT/CT imaging indicated the same large difference in tracer pharmacokinetics and higher accumulation of the divalent tracer at the site of infection. Conclusions All three [111In]-ZnDPA tracers selectively targeted the site of a clinically relevant mouse infection model that could not be discerned by visual external inspection of the living animal. The highest target selectivity, observed with a divalent tracer equipped with two zinc-dipicolylamine targeting units, compares quite favorably with the imaging selectivities previously reported for other nuclear tracers that target bacterial cell surfaces. The tracer pharmacokinetics depended

  4. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Baddour LM, Epstein AE, Erickson CC, et al. Update on cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections and their management: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation . ...

  5. Radioactivity measurements of 177Lu, 111In and 123I by different absolute methods.

    PubMed

    Rezende, E A; Correia, A R; Iwahara, A; da Silva, C J; Tauhata, L; Poledna, R; da Silva, R L; de Oliveira, E M; de Oliveira, A E

    2012-09-01

    The activities of (177)Lu, (111)In and (123)I solutions have been absolutely determined using three different measurement methods. (177)Lu solution was standardized using the 4πβ(PC)-γ(NaI) coincidence and 4πβ(LS)-γ(NaI) live-timed anticoincidence methods. For the (111)In and (123)I solutions, besides these two mentioned methods, the coincidence sum-peak method was also applied. The measured activities results using these different methods are consistent within the evaluated experimental uncertainties demonstrating the equivalence of these methods. As an additional contribution to nuclear data, the half-lives have been determined using a well type IG12 ionization chamber.

  6. Radioactivity measurements of 177Lu, 111In and 123I by different absolute methods.

    PubMed

    Rezende, E A; Correia, A R; Iwahara, A; da Silva, C J; Tauhata, L; Poledna, R; da Silva, R L; de Oliveira, E M; de Oliveira, A E

    2012-09-01

    The activities of (177)Lu, (111)In and (123)I solutions have been absolutely determined using three different measurement methods. (177)Lu solution was standardized using the 4πβ(PC)-γ(NaI) coincidence and 4πβ(LS)-γ(NaI) live-timed anticoincidence methods. For the (111)In and (123)I solutions, besides these two mentioned methods, the coincidence sum-peak method was also applied. The measured activities results using these different methods are consistent within the evaluated experimental uncertainties demonstrating the equivalence of these methods. As an additional contribution to nuclear data, the half-lives have been determined using a well type IG12 ionization chamber. PMID:22401938

  7. A case of bronchial carcinoid: diagnosis and follow-up with 111In-DTPA-octreotide.

    PubMed

    Orsolon, P; Bagni, B; Basadonna, P; Geatti, O; Talmassons, G; Guerra, U P

    1995-12-01

    Scintigraphy with radiolabelled analogue of somatostatin is highly sensitive in detecting carcinoid tumors especially if performed with Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT). In this report we describe our experience with 111In-DTPA-Octreotide in a female patient affected by a small asymptomatic intrabronchial carcinoid demonstrated by CT scan and bronchial endoscopy performed after recurrent left pneumonias. Planar views and SPECT images, using 111In-DTPA-Octreotide, were collected before and four hours after the first endoscopic laser resection. All groups of SPECT images were positive in the left parahilar region but at a different degree. Scans performed after resection showed a low degree of uptake which was considered to be probably secondary to local swelling; CT scan was negative. Follow up endoscopic biopsy repeated at six months, showed a relapse always in the same site; CT scan of the thorax was again negative. 111In-DTPA-Octreotide images obtained at twelve months were positive always in the left parahilar region, CT scan was negative but another biopsy was not possible. Therefore it was suspected a relapse of the carcinoid which was probably growing only through the bronchial wall without spreading towards the bronchial lumen and/or the lung parenchima. In this occasion, it was also thought that images collected four hours after resection could be positive not only for swelling but for a relapse as well. In every scintigraphic session, SPECT images presented higher quality than planar. This case suggests that 111In-DTPA-Octreotide SPECT is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which could be applied as a follow-up tool especially to patients with no-secreting carcinoid neoplasm and/or with negative or doubtful endoscopic and radiological investigations.

  8. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with sup 111 In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Planting, A.; Verweij, J.; Cox, P.; Pillay, M.; Stoter, G. )

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with {sup 111}In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma.

  9. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses with computed tomography, ultrasound, and /sup 111/In leukocyte scans

    SciTech Connect

    Knochel, J.Q.; Koehler, P.R.; Lee, T.G.; Welch, D.M.

    1980-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scans are all used in the evaluation of abdominal abscesses. In this study, 170 patients in whom one, two, or all three of these modalities were used were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic accuracy of 96% for CT, 90% for ultrasound, and 92% for /sup 111/In leukocyte scans was achieved. It was often necessary to use more than one modality to arrive at a correct diagnosis. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the causes for false positive or false negative interpretations of each of these modalities are reviewed. Analysis of the different examinations resulted in a suggested sequence by which patients can be examined, based upon their clinical condition. Patients who are not critically ill and/or who have no localizing signs should be studied first with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scans. If, however, localizing signs are present or the patient's condition necessitates prompt intervention, CT or ultrasound should be the first study performed.

  10. Evaluation of the viability of /sup 111/In-abeled DTPA coupled to fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, W.W.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Childs, R.L.; Lanteigne, D.; Ansell, J.

    1982-07-01

    In earlier work, DTPA has been covalently coupled to albumin via the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Using fibrinogen, we have studied the effect of such coupling on protein viability by both an in vitro and an in vivo assay. Clotting time remained identical to that of the native protein whether the anhydride-to-protein molar ratio was 1:1 or 5:1. In vivo studies were done in dogs, with human fibrinogen labeled with /sup 125/I and /sup 111/In. Throughout 130 hr, blood clearances for the two tracers agreed whether with 1:1 or 5:1 coupling. In a dog model with a thrombogenic catheter, the clot-to-blood ratios for the two radiotracers agreed within experimental error. Finally, 1:1-coupled canine fibrinogen, labeled with /sup 111/In, was administered to dogs with a catheter in a jugular vein, and scintigrams at 24 hr clearly showed clotting along the length of the catheter. We conclude that fibrinogen, coupled to DTPA, retains its viability, behaving like radioiodinated fibrinogen in vivo, and /sup 111/In labeled fibrinogen looks promising as a clinical diagnostic agent.

  11. Evaluation of 111In-labeled Anginex as Potential SPECT Tracer for Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Mourik, Tiemen R; Läppchen, Tilman; Rossin, Raffaella; Van Beijnum, Judy R; Macdonald, John R; Mayo, Kevin H; Griffioen, Arjan W; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumors to grow and metastasize, providing oxygen and nutrients to the tumor site. The protein galectin-1 has been identified to be overexpressed on tumor vasculature and represents an interesting target for anti-angiogenic therapy, as well as in molecular imaging. Therefore, the galectin-1-binding peptide Anginex was modified for radiolabeling using (111)In. In vitro, (111)In-Ax showed significantly more binding to galectin-1-positive EC-RF24 and MDA-MB-231-LITG cells than to galectin-1-negative LS174T cells and association with EC-RF24 cells was reduced in the presence of excess native Anginex. However, ex vivo biodistribution profiles showed little tumor uptake of (111)In-Ax and extensive accumulation in non-target organs. Although this study shows the ease of modification of the therapeutic peptide Anginex and favorable characteristics in vitro, in vivo assessment of the tracer revealed negligible tumor targeting. Hence, the strategy we employed lends little support for successful non-invasive imaging of tumor angiogenesis using this peptide. PMID:26504018

  12. /sup 111/In-platelet survival kinetics: Tropolone vs oxine method

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Machac, J.; Lipszyc, H.; Badimon, L.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1985-05-01

    /sup 111/In-tropolone (In-tr) is being evaluated because of its greater affinity for platelets in plasma than /sup 111/In-oxine (In-ox). Platelets separated from a 50 ml blood sample were labeled with In-tr in 2 ml autologous plasma and In-ox in 4 ml ACD-saline. 10 blood samples starting at 1 hr were obtained over a 8 day period. Platelet survival was calculated based on linear, exponential and multi hit analysis. The life-span of platelets measured by tropolone and oxine methods were compared in the same 8 normal human subjects and were performed 2 months apart. With In-tr, the platelet recovery is higher at 1 hr and throughout the 8-days and the gamma camera images showed less uptake in liver and spleen than In-ox. In addition, linear model is the best fit (63%) with a life-span equal or slightly longer than In-ox. Linear model is the best fit (100%) with In-ox and the multiple hit analysis also showed significantly higher number of hits (34) compared to In-tr (15). There is no correlation between in vivo recovery of /sup 111/In-platelets (tropolone or oxine) and the platelet life span. These results show that even though the platelet life span is not significantly altered by labeling method, they are better preserved in circulation when labeled with In-tr.

  13. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  14. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anilkumar T., S.; Girija M., L.; Venkatesh, J.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) Thin films were deposited on glass substrate using Spin coating method. Zinc acetate dehydrate, Carbinol and Mono-ethanolamine were used as the precursor, solvent and stabilizer respectively to prepare ZnO Thin-films. The molar ratio of Monoethanolamine to Zinc acetate was maintained as approximately 1. The thickness of the films was determined by Interference technique. The optical properties of the films were studied by UV Vis-Spectrophotometer. From transmittance and absorbance curve, the energy band gap of ZnO is found out. Electrical Conductivity measurements of ZnO are carried out by two probe method and Activation energy for the electrical conductivity of ZnO are found out. The crystal structure and orientation of the films were analyzed by XRD. The XRD patterns show that the ZnO films are polycrystalline with wurtzite hexagonal structure.

  16. Growing ZnO crystals on magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Rachel; Tirosh, Shay; Gedanken, Aharon

    2004-04-01

    We report herein on the oriented growth of ZnO crystals on magnetite nanoparticles. The ZnO crystals were grown by hydrolyzing a supersaturated aqueous solution of zinc nitrate. The seeds for the growth were magnetite nanoparticles with a diameter of 5.7 nm and a narrow size distribution. Hollowed ZnO hexagons of 0.15 microm width and 0.5 microm length filled with Fe(3)O(4) particles were obtained. HR-TEM (high-resolution transmission electron microscopy) and selected-area EDS (energy-dispersive spectroscopy) show that the nanoparticles are homogenously spread in the ZnO tubes. Zeta potential measurements were employed to understand the relationship between the nanoparticles and the oriented growth of the ZnO crystals. The results show that the surfactants induced the directional growth of the ZnO crystals.

  17. Homoepitaxial regrowth habits of ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic regrowth of ZnO nanowires [NWs] under a similar chemical vapor transport and condensation [CVTC] process can produce abundant ZnO nanostructures which are not possible by a single CVTC step. In this work, we report three different regrowth modes of ZnO NWs: axial growth, radial growth, and both directions. The different growth modes seem to be determined by the properties of initial ZnO NW templates. By varying the growth parameters in the first-step CVTC process, ZnO nanostructures (e.g., nanoantenna) with drastically different morphologies can be obtained with distinct photoluminescence properties. The results have implications in guiding the rational synthesis of various ZnO NW heterostructures. PMID:22151820

  18. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  19. Cu-doping induced ferromagnetism in ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Xu, Congkang; Yang, Kaikun; Huang, Liwei; Wang, Howard

    2009-03-28

    Cu-doped and undoped ZnO nanowires have been successfully fabricated at 600 degrees C using a vapor transport approach. Comprehensive structural analyses on as-fabricated nanowires reveal highly crystalline ZnO nanowires with 0.5 at. % of substitutional Cu doping. Ferromagnetism has been observed in Cu-doped ZnO nanowires but not in undoped ones, which is probably associated with defects involving both Cu dopants and Zn interstitials.

  20. Optimizing stem cell functions and antibacterial properties of TiO2 nanotubes incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles: experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenwen; Su, Penglei; Gonzales, Arthur; Chen, Su; Wang, Na; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Zhang, Zhenting; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    To optimize mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties of titanium (Ti), nano-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles with tunable concentrations were incorporated into TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) using a facile hydrothermal strategy. It is revealed here for the first time that the TNTs incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles exhibited better biocompatibility compared with pure Ti samples (controls) and that the amount of ZnO (tailored by the concentration of Zn(NO3)2 in the precursor) introduced into TNTs played a crucial role on their osteogenic properties. Not only was the alkaline phosphatase activity improved to about 13.8 U/g protein, but the osterix, collagen-I, and osteocalcin gene expressions was improved from mesenchymal stem cells compared to controls. To further explore the mechanism of TNTs decorated with ZnO on cell functions, a response surface mathematical model was used to optimize the concentration of ZnO incorporation into the Ti nanotubes for stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties for the first time. Both experimental and modeling results confirmed (R2 values of 0.8873–0.9138 and 0.9596–0.9941, respectively) that Ti incorporated with appropriate concentrations (with an initial concentration of Zn(NO3)2 at 0.015 M) of ZnO can provide exceptional osteogenic properties for stem cell differentiation in bone cells with strong antibacterial effects, properties important for improving dental and orthopedic implant efficacy. PMID:25792833

  1. UV response of cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Min, Seung-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    ZnO nanorods grown cellulose film is a fascinating inorganic-organic hybrid nanocomposite in terms of synergistic properties with semiconductive functionality of ZnO and renewability and flexibility of cellulose film. This paper reports the fabrication and evaluation of cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposite (CEZOHN). ZnO nanorod is well grown on a cellulose film by simple chemical reaction with direct seeding and hydrothermal growing. CEZOHN has unique electric, electro-mechanical and photo-electrical behaviors. The performance of CEZOHN is estimated by measuring induced photocurrent under UV exposure. Mechanism of UV sensing and its possible applications for flexible and wearable UV sensor are addressed.

  2. Photophysics and photochemistry of quantized ZnO colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Patrick, B.

    1992-08-06

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of quantized ZnO colloids in ethanol has been investigated by time-resolved transient absorption and emission measurements. Trapping of electrons at the ZnO surface resulted in broad absorption in the red region. The green emission of ZnO colloids was readily quenched by hole scavengers such as SCN{sup -} and I{sup -}. The photoinduced charge transfer to these hole scavengers was studied by laser flash photolysis. The yield of oxidized product increased considerably when ZnO colloids were coupled with ZnSe. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Development of latent fingerprint by ZnO deposition.

    PubMed

    Yu, I-Heng; Jou, Shyankay; Chen, Chin-Min; Wang, Kuang-Chuan; Pang, Lei-Jang; Liao, Jeh Shane

    2011-04-15

    Vacuum metal deposition (VMD) utilizing sequential Au and Zn depositions has been an effective technique to develop latent fingerprint on plastic surfaces. A simplified vacuum deposition process was conducted to develop fingerprint in this study. While pure ZnO was thermally evaporated in a vacuum system, ZnO could condense on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface. Direct deposition of ZnO, without applying Au seeding, yielded normal development of latent fingerprint. The development of aged fingerprint by ZnO deposition was more effective than that by Au/Zn VMD.

  4. Buffer layer effect on ZnO nanorods growth alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongxu; Andreazza, Caroline; Andreazza, Pascal; Ma, Jiangang; Liu, Yichun; Shen, Dezhen

    2005-06-01

    Vertical aligned ZnO nanorods array was fabricated on Si with introducing a ZnO thin film as a buffer layer. Two different nucleation mechanisms were found in growth process. With using Au catalyst, Zn vapor could diffuse into Au nanoclusters with forming a solid solution. Then the ZnO nucleation site is mainly on the catalyst by oxidation of Au/Zn alloy. Without catalyst, nucleation could occur directly on the surface of buffer layer by homoepitaxy. The density and the size of ZnO nanorods could be governed by morphological character of catalyst and buffer layer. The nanorods growth is followed by vapor-solid mechanism.

  5. Sodium doping in ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, N. S. Lynn, K. G.

    2015-01-12

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion. Positron annihilations spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies, to >6 μm deep in the bulk. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium up to 8 μm with concentration (1–3.5) × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}. Broad photoluminescence excitation peak at 3.1 eV, with onset appearance at 3.15 eV in Na:ZnO, is attributed to an electronic transition from a Na{sub Zn} level at ∼(220–270) meV to the conduction band. Resistivity in Na doped ZnO crystals increases up to (4–5) orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  6. Radiolabeling of equine platelets in plasma with /sup 111/In-(2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide) and their in vivo survival

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Kelly, A.B.; Hornof, W.J.; O'Brien, T.R.; Philp, M.S.; Lamb, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    A method is presented for the in vitro isolation and radiolabeling of equine platelets with the isotope indium /sup 111/ (/sup 111/In: half-life = 2.8 days, gamma = 173 keV, 89%; 247 keV, 94%). The technique described involves complexing /sup 111/In with the lipid-soluble chelating agent, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (merc), in an aqueous medium. /sup 111/In-merc platelet-labeling efficiencies in autologous plasma pretreated with or without ferric citrate reagent were 82 +/- 7% and 24 +/- 12%, respectively. Mean intravascular survivals of /sup 111/In-merc-radiolabeled platelets in 8 healthy horses according to simple linear, exponential, mean, weighted-mean residual sum of squares analysis, and multiple-hit model were 5.5 +/- 0.49, 3.5 +/- 0.53, 4.5 +/- 0.18, 4.3 +/- 0.65, and 3.6 +/- 0.97 days, respectively.

  7. Preparation, structural and optical characterization of ZnO, ZnO: Al nanopowder

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R. Raj; Rajendran, K.; Sambath, K.

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, ZnO and ZnO:Al nanopowders have been synthesized by low cost hydrothermal method. Zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and aluminium nitrate are used as precursors for ZnO and AZO with different molar ratios. The structural and optical characterization of doped and un-doped ZnO powders have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), photoluminescence (PL) and ultra violet visible (UV-Vis) absorption studies. The SEM results show that the hydrothermal synthesis can be used to obtain nanoparticles with different morphology. It is observed that the grain size of the AZO nanoparticles increased with increasing of Al concentration. The PL measurement of AZO shows that broad range of green emission around 550nm with high intensity. The green emission resulted mainly because of intrinsic defects.

  8. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation on the bioactivity of ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang; Yubao, Li; Yi, Zuo; Lan, Wu; Jansen, John A

    2010-04-01

    A ZnO containing nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan (n-HA/CS) cement was developed and its bone formation ability was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The physico-chemical properties of the cement were determined in terms of pH variation during and after setting, injectability and wettability. The results indicated that, the pH varied from 7.04 to 7.12 throughout the soaking of the cement in distilled water. The injectability was excellent during the first 4 min, but the cement became less injectable or even not injectable at all after 7 min setting. The static contact angle of the cement against water was 53.5 +/- 2.7 degrees . The results of immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) indicated that the cement exhibited excellent bone-like apatite forming ability. In vivo studies, involving the installation of the cement of tibial-bone defects in rabbit tibia revealed an inflammatory response around the cement at 3 days of implantation. After 4 weeks, the inflammation began to disappear and the cement had bound to the surrounding host bone. Radiological examination also confirmed that the ZnO containing n-HA/CS cement significantly induced new bone formation. These results suggest that the ZnO containing n-HA/CS cement may be beneficial to enhance bone regeneration in osseous defect sites.

  10. Microstructural properties at the interfaces of ZnO nanorods and ZnO homo-buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Changha; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Chang-In; Park, Sun-Hong; Seo, Soo-Young; Kim, Seon-Hyo; Han, Sang-Wook

    2010-02-01

    Uniformly and vertically well-aligned ZnO nanorods were fabricated in-situ and ex-situ on ZnO films using a catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapor process. Microstructural properties of the initial growth of ZnO nanorods on ZnO films with different surface roughnesses were investigated. We observed that the ZnO nanorods grown on ZnO films with surface roughness of less than 1.0 nm were well-aligned along the c-axis and in the ab-plane. When the nanorods grew on ZnO films with a large surface roughness, they had three different growth directions of 28 degrees, 62 degrees, and 90 degrees to the film surface. The slant angle of 62 degrees corresponds to the angle between the ZnO(001) and (101) planes. The initial growth direction difference caused structural disorder at the interface of the ZnO nanorod and film, and prevented epitaxial growth and the alignment of the nanorods. PMID:20352736

  11. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of PVP stabilized ZnO and modified ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandekar, Gauri; Rajurkar, N. S.; Mulla, I. S.; Mulik, U. P.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Adhyapak, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, ZnO nanostructures have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal, sonochemical and precipitation methods using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the capping agent. The ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-Visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The XRD results revealed the hexagonal wurtzite structure of the ZnO nanostructures for all the samples. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO particles was obtained from FESEM micrographs. Particles prepared by hydrothermal method were found to be rice grain shaped and that prepared by precipitation and sonochemical methods were spherical shaped. Sunlight driven photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) was studied for ZnO nanostructures synthesized by various methods. The ZnO nanostructures were further decorated with Ag nanoparticles to enhance its dye degradation efficiency. The Ag decorated ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a higher degradation rate as compared to pure ZnO nanoparticles which was independent of pH. Since this process of dye degradation relies on the degradation of dye due to oxidation by highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, there are many factors which affect the efficiency of this process. Hence a study was conducted on the effect of various parameters on ZnO viz amount of catalyst, reaction pH and concentration of MB dye.

  12. Mobility implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Danz, W

    1990-01-01

    We present a brief review of mobility implants, their contribution, and the experiences derived after almost 40 years since the new concepts of full mobility implants were introduced. In early 1940, experiments with a new material for the making of plastic artificial eyes was also being considered for the making of orbital implants. Methyl-methacrylate (MMA) had proven inert and satisfactory for dental products. The Surgeon Generals office of the Armed Services encouraged further research and experimental work in the development of plastic eyes. The success of the new material sponsored the beginning of great expansion with new concepts for orbital implants. Through a period of more than a decade, the design and types of implants went through three stages. First, the buried implant was introduced, then the exposed integrated followed, and the buried integrated subsequently followed. The path of progress was not smooth. Theoretically correct designs and surgical procedures met unexpected practical difficulties for the ophthalmic surgeon, the patient, and the eye maker. Surgical and technical efforts were carefully reviewed to eliminate the problems encountered, only to have further unforeseen complications arise. Infections, extrusions, and migration of the implant were not uncommon. The exposed integrated implant was eventually abandoned. However, there were some extraordinary successes of mobility. A new era introduced fully buried mobility implants that were more successful. However, this procedure also produced some problems, causing infection (or allergy), extrusion, and migration. Tantalum mesh and gauze gave great promise with the inception of their use. Orbital tissue grew into the material in an astonishing way, making it possible to secure the extraocular muscles and tenons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  14. Internal radiotherapy and dosimetric study for 111In/ 177Lu-pegylated liposomes conjugates in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Hung-Man; Lu, Yi-Ching; Heish, Ning-Ning; Tseng, Yun-Long; Huang, Kuang-Liang; Chuang, Kuo-Tang; Chen, Chin-Hsiung; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Deng, Win-Ping

    2006-12-01

    In vivo characterization and dosimetric analysis has been performed to evaluate the potential of pegylated liposomes as carriers of radionuclides in tumor internal radiotherapy. MethodsThe DTPA/PEG-liposomes were synthesized with a medium size of 110 nm, conjugated with 111In/ 177Lu-(oxine) 3 to afford 111In/ 177Lu-liposome. The stability of 111In/ 177Lu-liposome in serum was investigated. The biodistribution, scintigraphic imaging and pharmacokinetics of 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes after intravenous(i.v.) injection into C-26 tumor-bearing BALB/cByJ mice were studied. Radiation dose was estimated by MIRD-III program. ResultsThe incorporation efficiency of 111In/ 177Lu into liposomes was 95%. After incubation at 37 °C for 72 h in serum, more than 83% of radioactivity was still retained in the intact 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes. The biodistribution of 111In-liposomes showed that the radioactivity in the blood decreased from 23.14±8.16%ID/g at 1 h to 0.02±0.00%ID/g at 72 h post-injection (p.i.), while reaching its maximum accumulation in tumors at 48 h p.i., with half-life in blood of 10.2 h. The results were supported by that of 177Lu-liposomes. Scintigraphic imaging with 111In-liposomes showed unambiguous tumor images at 48 h p.i. Dose estimation showed that the absorbed dose in tumor from 177Lu-liposomes was 5.74×10 -5 Gy/MBq. ConclusionsThis study provides an in vivo characterization and dosimetric evaluation for the use of liposome systems as carriers in targeted radionuclide therapy. The results suggest that adequate tumor targeting as well as dose delivered to tumors could be achieved by the use of radionuclide targeted liposomes.

  15. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  16. Kinetics and sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns, A.D.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.; de Kock, F.; Pieters, H.; Herbst, C.; van Reenen, O.R.; Kotze, H.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    Kinetics and quantification of the sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled autologous platelets were investigated in eight patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The mean platelet count was 17 +/- 9 X 10(9)/liter; platelets were separated by differential centrifugation and labeled with 5.6 +/- 2.5 MBq /sup 111/In. Whole body and organ /sup 111/In-platelet distribution was quantitated with a scintillation camera and a computer-assisted imaging system acquisition matrix. Areas of interest were selected with the computer and organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity expressed as a percentage of whole body activity. Mean platelet survival was 49.5 +/- 29.6 hr and the survival curves were exponential. Equilibrium percentage organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity was (normal values in parentheses): spleen 33.7 +/- 8.8 (31.1 +/- 10.2); liver 16.1 +/- 9.5 (13.1 +/- 1.3); thorax 22.8 +/- 3.7 (28.2 +/- 5.6). Percentage organ /sup 111/In-activity at the time when labeled platelets had disappeared from the circulation was: spleen 44.5 +/- 16.4 (40 +/- 16); liver 16.0 +/- 11.5 (32.4 +/- 7.2); thorax 19.7 +/- 6.0 (17.7 +/- 10.3). Thorax activity corresponds to bone marrow radioactivity. Three patterns of platelet sequestration were evident. Three patients had mainly splenic sequestration, two mainly hepatic sequestration, and three diffuse reticuloendothelial system sequestration with a major component of platelets destroyed in the bone marrow. Splenectomy was performed in two patients. The pattern of /sup 111/In-platelet sequestration was not predictive of response of glucocorticoid therapy or indicative of the necessity for splenectomy. Quantitative /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelet kinetic studies provide a new tool for the investigation of platelet disorders.U

  17. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  18. Spectroscopy of implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.

    1994-01-01

    The spectral criteria of selection of soft intraocular lens (IOL) implants of long service in an organism have been defined for ophthalmology. The analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra provides the required and sufficient level of material polymerization for manufacturing non-toxic lenses for the eye. The spectral limits for determining the biocompatibility of samples can be related to the intensity ratio of two bands only in the FTIR spectra of siloxane. Siloxane-poly(urethane) block copolymers and other materials for implants have been studied. Passivated surfaces of implants have been obtained and registered by methods of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy.

  19. Mixed Zn and O substitution of Co and Mn in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Decoster, S.; Amorim, L. M.; Vantomme, A.; Silva, M. R. da; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-09-15

    The physical properties of an impurity atom in a semiconductor are primarily determined by the lattice site it occupies. In general, this occupancy can be correctly predicted based on chemical intuition, but not always. We report on one such exception in the dilute magnetic semiconductors Co- and Mn-doped ZnO, experimentally determining the lattice location of Co and Mn using {beta}{sup -}-emission channeling from the decay of radioactive {sup 61}Co and {sup 56}Mn implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Surprisingly, in addition to the majority substituting for Zn, we find up to 18% (27%) of the Co (Mn) atoms in O sites, which is virtually unaffected by thermal annealing up to 900 deg. C. We discuss how this anion site configuration, which had never been considered before for any transition metal in any metal oxide material, may in fact have a low formation energy. This suggests a change in paradigm regarding transition-metal incorporation in ZnO and possibly other oxides and wide-gap semiconductors.

  20. Root uptake and phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-08-01

    Increasing application of nanotechnology highlights the need to clarify nanotoxicity. However, few researches have focused on phytotoxicity of nanomaterials; it is unknown whether plants can uptake and transport nanoparticles. This study was to examine cell internalization and upward translocation of ZnO nanoparticles by Lolium perenne (ryegrass). The dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and its contribution to the toxicity on ryegrass were also investigated. Zn2+ ions were used to compare and verify the root uptake and phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in a hydroponic culture system. The root uptake and phytotoxicity were visualized by light scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopies. In the presence of ZnO nanoparticles, ryegrass biomass significantly reduced, root tips shrank, and root epidermal and cortical cells highly vacuolated or collapsed. Zn2+ ion concentrations in bulk nutrient solutions with ZnO nanoparticles were lower than the toxicity threshold of Zn2+ to the ryegrass; shoot Zn contents under ZnO nanoparticle treatments were much lower than that under Zn2+ treatments. Therefore, the phytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles was not directly from their limited dissolution in the bulk nutrient solution or rhizosphere. ZnO nanoparticles greatly adhered on to the rootsurface. Individual ZnO nanoparticles were observed present in apoplast and protoplast of the root endodermis and stele. However, translocation factors of Zn from root to shoot remained very low under ZnO nanoparticle treatments, and were much lower than that under Zn2+ treatments, implying that little (if any) ZnO nanoparticles could translocate up in the ryegrass in this study.

  1. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  2. Whole body and tomographic scan with 111In-pentetreotide: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Gregianin, M; Macrì, C; Bui, F; Varotto, L; Zucchetta, P

    1995-12-01

    Since December 1993, in the 1st Nuclear Medicine Service of the University of Padua, eleven somatostatin-receptor scintigraphic studies with 111In-labelled pentetreotide have been performed. The patients (6 men and 5 women, age 28-68, mean 45 years) were affected by a variety of tumors which supposedly express somatostatin receptors: 2 meningotheliomatous meningiomas post-surgery; 2 glucagonomas with liver metastases observed on CT; 2 patients with suspicion of insulinoma; 2 carcinoids, one after surgery; 1 ectopic-ACTH Cushing's syndrome; 1 intracranial germinoma, post-surgery, in whom the study was requested to evaluate a doubtful finding of pulmonary metastatic lesion on CT; and 1 acromegaly showing, on MRI, and empty sella turcica occupied by and extraflexion of the lower portion of the chiasmatic cisterna without signs of adenoma and the sphenoidal sinus occupied by tissue wit inflammmatory characteristics. Somatostatin-receptor whole body scintigraphy was performed 4 and 24 hours after intravenous injection of 110 MBq 111In-pentetreotide (Octreoscan 111); spot images were acquired when judged necessary. In one case of glucagonoma, a tomographic scan (SPECT) was also performed to better evaluate the spatial relationship between the primitive pancreatic tumor and surrounding tissues. Focal accumulation of 111In-pentetreotide was scintigraphically detected in 5 of the 11 cases. Intense uptake of the radiopharmaceutical was observed in the meningiomas, in the glucagonomas with liver metastases, and in the case of acromegaly, corresponding to a GH-secreting adenoma. The negative scans seem to be true negative scans with the possible exception of one patient with a still unconfirmed suspicion of insulinoma, still not confirmed.

  3. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  4. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  5. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  6. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  7. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  8. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with 111In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Planting, A; Verweij, J; Cox, P; Pillay, M; Stoter, G

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with 111In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:2297748

  9. Role of ZnO thin film in the vertically aligned growth of ZnO nanorods by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Nguyen Thanh; Noh, Jin-Seo; Park, Sungho

    2016-08-01

    The effect of ZnO thin film on the growth of ZnO nanorods was investigated. ZnO thin films were sputter-deposited on Si substrate with varying the thickness. ZnO nanorods were grown on the thin film using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at 90 °C. The ZnO thin films showed granular structure and vertical roughness on the surface, which facilitated the vertical growth of ZnO nanorods. The average grain size and the surface roughness of ZnO film increased with an increase in film thickness, and this led to the increase in both the average diameter and the average length of vertically grown ZnO nanorods. In particular, it was found that the average diameter of ZnO nanorods was very close to the average grain size of ZnO thin film, confirming the role of ZnO film as a seed layer for the vertical growth of ZnO nanorods. The CBD growth on ZnO seed layers may provide a facile route to engineering vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays.

  10. ZnO nanorods: growth mechanism and anisotropic functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacholski, Claudia; Kornowski, Andreas; Weller, Horst

    2004-10-01

    We report on the wet-chemical synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles and their functionalization with metal colloids by photocatalytic reduction of metal ions. Different morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by using different precursor concentrations and zinc sources such as zinc acetate, zinc propanoate and zinc decanoate. Spherical ZnO nanoparticles were produced at low concentrations and with zinc precursors having long alkylchains. The formation of elongated particles was achieved by using zinc acetate and high precursor concentrations. We found that ZnO nanorods were grown via oriented attachment of pre-formed quasi-spherical particles. This growth mechanism occurs at almost ambient temperature and in the first step, pearl chain like structures of 5 nm particles are formed, which coarse by condensation and finally grow - assisted by Ostwald ripening - to almost perfect single crystalline rods with length up to 300 nm. These nanorods were metallizied with silver and platinum by photocatalytic reduction of the appropriate metal ions on pre-formed ZnO nanorods. The deposition of metal took place at different locations of the ZnO nanorods and depended on the metal source. Positively charged silver ions were preferentially reduced to silver colloids at one end of the ZnO nanorods and led to anisotropic functionalized nanoparticles. Using a negatively charged platinum complex instead of silver ions generated a statistical coverage of the ZnO nanorods.

  11. Magnetism in dopant-free ZnO nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung-Il; Choi, Jiil; Jang, Seung Soon; Gu, Jiyeong; Chang, Yangling; Wortman, Gregory; Snyder, Robert L; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-02-01

    It is known that bulk ZnO is a nonmagnetic material. However, the electronic band structure of ZnO is severely distorted when the ZnO is in the shape of a very thin plate with its dimension along the c-axis reduced to a few nanometers while keeping the bulk scale sizes in the other two dimensions. We found that the chemically synthesized ZnO nanoplates exhibit magnetism even at room temperature. First-principles calculations show a growing asymmetry in the spin distribution within the distorted bands formed from Zn (3d) and O (2p) orbitals with the reduction of thickness of the ZnO nanoplates, which is suggested to be responsible for the observed magnetism. In contrast, reducing the dimension along the a- or b-axes of a ZnO crystal does not yield any magnetism for ZnO nanowires that grow along c-axis, suggesting that the internal electric field produced by the large {0001} polar surfaces of the nanoplates may be responsible for the distorted electronic band structures of thin ZnO nanoplates.

  12. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots.

  13. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  14. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  15. Dexamethasone: intravitreal implant.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Macular oedema is one of the complications of retinal vein occlusion. About half of the patients recover spontaneously within 3 to 6 months. There is currently no drug that improves outcome. An intravitreal implant delivering 0.7 mg of dexamethasone has been authorised for the treatment of macular oedema in this setting. Clinical assessment is based on two double-blind randomised trials including a total of 1267 patients, comparing treatment with intravitreal implants delivering about 0.7 mg or 0.35 mg of dexamethasone, versus a sham procedure. Despite a more rapid initial improvement with dexamethasone, the number of patients whose reading ability improved at 6 months did not significantly differ between the groups. A retrospective subgroup analysis raised the possibility that dexamethasone implants may be beneficial in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. The adverse effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implants are the same as those of intraocular steroid injections, including elevated intraocular pressure (25% of patients), cataracts (27%), conjunctival haemorrhage (20%), and ocular pain. In practice, dexamethasone intravitreal implants do not have a positive harm-benefit balance in most patients with macular oedema following retinal vein occlusion. More rapid recovery after central vein occlusion remains to be confirmed. Pending such studies, it is better to avoid using dexamethasone implants. Patients should instead receive ophthalmologic monitoring to detect and manage possible complications, and any risk factors should be treated.

  16. Ultrasonic synthesis of fern-like ZnO nanoleaves and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing Lan; Xiong, Rui; Zhai, Bao-gai; Huang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional fern-like ZnO nanoleaves were synthesized by ultrasonicating zinc microcrystals in water. The morphology, crystal structure, optical property and photocatalytic activity of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that one fern-like ZnO nanoleaf is composed of one ZnO nanorod as the central trunk and a number of ZnO nanoplates as the side branches in opposite pairs along the central ZnO nanorod. The central ZnO nanorod in the fern-like nanoleaves is about 1 μm long while the side-branching ZnO nanoplates are about 100 nm long and 20 nm wide. Further analysis has revealed that ZnO nanocrystals are the building blocks of the central ZnO nanorod and the side-branching ZnO nanoplates. Under identical conditions, fern-like ZnO nanoleaves exhibit higher photocatalytic activity in photodegrading methyl orange in aqueous solution than spherical ZnO nanocrystals. The first-order photocatalytic rate constant of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves is about four times as large as that of the ZnO nanoparticles. The branched architecture of the hierarchical nanoleaves is suggested be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves.

  17. Fabrication and photoluminescence studies of porous ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min Young; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Soaram; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Do Yeob; Kim, Sung-O.; Nam, Giwoong

    2012-07-01

    Zinc-oxide (ZnO) nanorods were grown using the hydrothermal method, and nanosized pores were formed on their surfaces by thermal annealing at 700 °C for 20 min under an argon atmosphere. The structural and the optical properties of the porous ZnO nanorods were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent photoluminescence. The average diameter and density of the nanosized pores were 32 nm and 7 × 1010 cm-2, respectively. The crystal quality, stoichiometry, and optical properties of the porous ZnO nanorods were enhanced in comparison with those of the as-prepared ZnO nanorods. The activation energies for the exciton with increasing temperature in the as-prepared and the porous ZnO nanorods were 27.0 and 37.8 meV, respectively. At temperatures of 50 K < T < 125 K, the free exciton emission peak energy of the porous ZnO nanorods exhibited an anomalous behavior. The values of the fitting parameters in Varshni's empirical formula were α = 1 × 10-3 eV/K and β = 720 K for the as-prepared ZnO nanorods and α = 1 × 10-3 eV/K and β = 710 K for the porous ZnO nanorods. With increasing temperature, the exciton radiative lifetime of the porous ZnO nanorods exhibited an inverted S-shape while that of the as-prepared ZnO nanorods increased linearly.

  18. Molecular Imaging, Pharmacokinetics, and Dosimetry of 111In-AMBA in Human Prostate Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Li; Liu, I-Hsiang; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lee, Wan-Chi; Chuang, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Te-Wei; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Shen, Lie-Hang; Chang, Chih-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging with promise of personalized medicine can provide patient-specific information noninvasively, thus enabling treatment to be tailored to the specific biological attributes of both the disease and the patient. This study was to investigate the characterization of DO3A-CH2CO-G-4-aminobenzoyl-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-NH2 (AMBA) in vitro, MicroSPECT/CT imaging, and biological activities of 111In-AMBA in PC-3 prostate tumor-bearing SCID mice. The uptake of 111In-AMBA reached highest with 3.87 ± 0.65% ID/g at 8 h. MicroSPECT/CT imaging studies suggested that the uptake of 111In-AMBA was clearly visualized between 8 and 48 h postinjection. The distribution half-life (t1/2α) and the elimination half-life (t1/2β) of 111In-AMBA in mice were 1.53 h and 30.7 h, respectively. The Cmax and AUC of 111In-AMBA were 7.57% ID/g and 66.39 h∗% ID/g, respectively. The effective dose appeared to be 0.11 mSv/MBq−1. We demonstrated a good uptake of 111In-AMBA in the GRPR-overexpressed PC-3 tumor-bearing SCID mice. 111In-AMBA is a safe, potential molecular image-guided diagnostic agent for human GRPR-positive tumors, ranging from simple and straightforward biodistribution studies to improve the efficacy of combined modality anticancer therapy. PMID:21660132

  19. Noninvasive detection of coronary thrombi with /sup 111/In platelets: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, S.R.; Lerch, R.A.; Mathias, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1983-02-01

    The need for rapid, definitive identification of coronary thrombosis has been intensified by the advent of thrombolytic therapy and by interest in the role of thrombosis in the etiology of coronary artery disease. To determine whether platelet thrombi can be detected noninvasively with /sup 111/In platelets, a method was developed in which /sup 99m/Tc-tagged red blood cells were used to correct for activity within the blood attributable to platelets circulating but not associated with thrombus. In 18 dogs coronary thrombi were induced closed-chest with a copper coil introduced into the coronary artery. /sup 111/In platelets and /sup 99m/Tc RBCs were administered either before or 1 hr after induction of thrombus, and serial scintigrams obtained. Coronary thrombus was identified readily in the processed scintigrams. In six dogs, thrombolysis was achieved with intracoronary streptokinase. In each case serial scintigraphy demonstrated resolution of the clot. The dual radiotracer technique should permit serial noninvasive delineation of the temporal relationship between platelet deposition and coronary heart disease in patients, and should facilitate the evaluation of interventions designed to prevent platelet aggregation or to lyse existing thrombi.

  20. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  1. Scuba diving with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kompis, Martin; Vibert, Dominique; Senn, Pascal; Vischer, Mattheus W; Häusler, Rudolf

    2003-05-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral cochlear implants (a Med-El Combi40 and a Med-El Combi40+), as well as considerable experience in scuba diving with both of his implants. After having been exposed to 68 and 89 dives, respectively, in depths of up to 43 m, both cochlear implants are in working order and the patient continues to receive excellent speech recognition scores with both cochlear implant systems. The presented data show that scuba diving after cochlear implantation is possible over a considerable number of dives without any major negative impact on the implants.

  2. [Subretinal visual implants].

    PubMed

    Stingl, K; Greppmaier, U; Wilhelm, B; Zrenner, E

    2010-12-01

    Visual implants are medical technologies that replace parts of the visual neuronal pathway. The subretinal implant developed by our group is being used in a human trials since 2005 and replaces the function of degenerated photoreceptors by an electronic device in blind patients. The subretinal implant consists of a 70-µm thin microchip with 1500 microphotodiodes each with an amplifier and an electrode with area of 3 mm × 3 mm. The power supply is provided by a subdermal power supply cable. The microchip is implanted under the macula and transforms the light signal into an electrical one, which is referred directly to the bipolar cells. Requirements for a good function of the implant are a preserved function of the inner retina, as well as clear optic media and a good visual acuity in the earlier life. The current technology can mediate a visual field of 10 - 12° and a computed resolution of up to 0.25° visual angle (corresponding to a visual acuity of 63 / 1000 - 80 / 1000) in blind patients. The so far best results from our studies reached a visual acuity of 21 / 1000 in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. This overview is intended to inform the ophthalmologist about the current state of the technology and help him/her to advise interested patients.

  3. H4octapa-Trastuzumab: Versatile Acyclic Chelate System for 111In and 177Lu Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Eric W.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Cawthray, Jacqueline F.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A bifunctional derivative of the versatile acyclic chelator H4octapa, p-SCNBn- H4octapa, has been synthesized for the first time. The chelator was conjugated to the HER2/neu-targeting antibody trastuzumab and labeled in high radiochemical purity and specific activity with the radioisotopes 111In and 177Lu. The in vivo behavior of the resulting radioimmunoconjugates was investigated in mice bearing ovarian cancer xenografts and compared to analogous radioimmunoconjugates employing the ubiquitous chelator DOTA. The H4octapa-trastuzumab conjugates displayed faster radiolabeling kinetics with more reproducible yields under milder conditions (15 min, RT, ~94–95%) than those based on DOTA-trastuzumab (60 min, 37 °C ~50–88%). Further, antibody integrity was better preserved in the 111In- and 177Lu-octapatrastuzumab constructs, with immunoreactive fractions of 0.99 for each compared to 0.93–0.95 for 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab. These results translated to improved in vivo biodistribution profiles and SPECT imaging results for 111In- and 177Lu-octapa-trastuzumab compared to 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab, with increased tumor uptake and higher tumor-to-tissue activity ratios. PMID:23901833

  4. Immunological aspects of implantation and implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E; Vince, G S

    1999-12-01

    The human endometrium contains a significant proportion of leukocytes (8-35% of all cells), the absolute numbers and proportions varying during both the menstrual cycle and early in pregnancy. T cells, macrophages and a population of phenotypically unusual large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are commonly present, although B cells are absent. Relative T cell numbers decrease significantly in first trimester decidua, and hence are unlikely to play an important role in maintenance of human pregnancy, but T cells could be important in implantation where their relative numbers are greater. In addition to producing cytokines, local tissue macrophages may provide an immediate antigen non-specific host defence to infection. Most attention has, nevertheless, focused on a role for LGL in implantation and maintenance of pregnancy since, at the time of implantation, LGL comprise 70-80% of the total endometrial leukocyte population. Although endometrial LGL have been shown to express natural killer (NK) cell-type cytotoxicity against classical NK cell targets, such cytotoxicity against trophoblast is induced only after activation by interleukin (IL)-2. Selective expression of the unusual class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, HLA-G, by extravillous cytotrophoblast may assist in protecting invasive cytotrophoblast from potential maternal NK cell attack, probably via interactions with killer inhibitory receptor molecules on LGL. Many cytokines have been demonstrated to be expressed at the maternal-fetal interface although, currently, in mice only two (IL-11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor) appear to be absolutely essential for successful pregnancy outcome. Immune effector cells and cytokines may also play a role in human pregnancy pathologies, such as recurrent early pregnancy loss.

  5. Gold as an intruder in ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Reyes, José M; Monroy, B Marel; Bizarro, Monserrat; Güell, Frank; Martínez, Ana; Ramos, Estrella

    2015-09-01

    Several techniques for obtaining ZnO nanowires (ZnO NWs) have been reported in the literature. In particular, vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) with Au as a catalyst is widely used. During this process, Au impurities in the ZnO NWs can be incorporated accidentally, and for this reason we named these impurities as intruders. It is thought that these intruders may produce interesting alterations in the electronic characteristics of nanowires. In the experiment, it is not easy to detect either Au atoms in these nanowires, or the modification that intruders produce in different electrical, optical and other properties. For this reason, in this density functional theory investigation, the effect of Au intruders on ZnO NWs is analysed. Au extended (thread) and point defects (atoms replacing Zn or O, or Au interstitials) are used to simulate the presence of gold atoms. Optimised geometries, band-gaps and density of states indicate that the presence of small amounts of Au drastically modifies the electronic states of ZnO NWs. The results reported here clearly indicate that small amounts of Au have a strong impact on the electronic properties of ZnO NWs, introducing states in the band edges that may promote transitions in the visible spectral region. The presence of Au as an intruder in ZnO NWs enhances the potential use of this system for photonic and photovoltaic applications. PMID:26219752

  6. Hugely enhanced electroluminescence from mesoporous ZnO particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guang-hui; Zhao, Xiao-peng; Li, Jia; Zhang, Chang-qing

    2006-03-01

    Using octadecylamine (ODA) and dodecylamine (DDA) as template, nanostructured porous ZnO particles were synthesized by sol-gel method. The results of experiments show that the density of ZnO processed with ODA, DDA and without template is 5.31, 5.37 and 5.42 cm2/g respectively. The surface analysis proves that the ZnO particles processed with ODA and DDA hold porous structure. Hugely enhanced electroluminescence (EL) was observed from the porous ZnO particles under direct current electric field from 2-4.66 V/μm. Comparing with the low emission intensity of the ZnO without porous structure, the emission intensity of the ZnO sample processed with DDA and DDA were enhanced 12 times and 20 times respectively at the voltage of 4.66 V/μm. The EL spectrum shows mainly broad peak emission feature with a peak at 556 nm. The threshold voltage is just 2 V/μm. The results indicate that the porous structure in ZnO particles can enhance EL intensity.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahran, H. Y.; Yahia, I. S.

    2015-06-01

    ZnO was prepared by direct combustion method of pure zinc metal at 1000 °C for 30 min. After combustion, ZnO was formed as a fumed powder. The as-synthesized ZnO was characterized by means of different techniques such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), diffused reflectance and the electrical conductivity measurements. XRD showed that ZnO has a nanocrystalline hexagonal phase with lattice constants a = 3.24982 Å and c = 5.20661 Å as compared to JCDPS card. From the analysis of the diffused reflectance spectra, the optical band gap was calculated and equals 3.2 eV which is in the same range for commercial ZnO and the reported ZnO prepared by other techniques. SEM micrographs showed the nanotetrapods structure of ZnO with highly uniform distribution of tetrapods. The DC electrical conductivity measurement was carried out in the temperature range 293-473 K, and it was found to be increased with increasing temperature forming three different conduction mechanisms associated with three activation energies.

  8. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, Michael A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guide, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices. Since the ZnO material has an energy gap of 3.3 eV at room temperature and an excitonic binding energy (60 meV) that is possible to make excitonic lasering at room temperature a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for electro-optical devices. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystals are grown by the hydrothermal method. Substrates are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before deposited films. The annealing temperature-dependence of ZnO substrates is studied. Films are synthesized by the off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. The films have very smooth surface with a roughness ZnO films grown of (0001) ZnO and (0001) sapphire substrates will be also compared and discussed in the presentation.

  9. Superhydrophobic ZnO networks with high water adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ZnO structures were deposited using a simple chemical bath deposition technique onto interdigitated electrodes fabricated by a conventional photolithography method on SiO2/Si substrates. The X-ray diffraction studies show that the ZnO samples have a hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure. The scanning electron microscopy observations prove that the substrates are uniformly covered by ZnO networks formed by monodisperse rods. The ZnO rod average diameter and length were tuned by controlling reactants' concentration and reaction time. Optical spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that all the samples display bandgap values and emission bands typical for ZnO. The electrical measurements reveal percolating networks which are highly sensitive when the samples are exposed to ammonia vapors, a variation in their resistance with the exposure time being evidenced. Other important characteristics are that the ZnO rod networks exhibit superhydrophobicity, with water contact angles exceeding 150° and a high water droplet adhesion. Reproducible, easily scalable, and low-cost chemical bath deposition and photolithography techniques could provide a facile approach to fabricate such ZnO networks and devices based on them for a wide range of applications where multifunctionality, i.e., sensing and superhydrophobicity, properties are required. PACS 81.07.-b; 81.05.Dz; 68.08.Bc PMID:25136286

  10. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  12. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  13. Multichannel extracochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L; Smith, J C; Lewis, M L; Hortmann, G

    1989-03-01

    The transcutaneous eight-channel extracochlear implant has undergone continuous revision to simplify the surgical technique, to minimize patient morbidity, and to improve performance. The extracochlear electrode array has been miniaturized so that it can be inserted through the facial recess without disturbing the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane, or malleus. The use of the remote antenna placed around the external auditory canal has greatly increased battery life and patient comfort. With its simplified incisions, the surgical procedure can be performed as out-patient surgery. Preoperative cochlear nerve testing and use of evoked response cochlear nerve testing allow preadjustment of the speech processor. Current features and performance of the implant are discussed.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  15. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  16. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  17. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  18. High pressure and high temperature behaviour of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Nilesh A.; Bhatt, Apoorva D.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2014-04-24

    The thermodynamic properties with the wurtzite (B4) and rocksalt (B1) phases of ZnO under high pressures and high temperatures have been investigated using Tait's Equation of state (EOS). The effects of pressures and temperatures on thermodynamic properties such as bulk modulus, thermal expansivity and thermal pressure are explored for both two structures. It is found that ZnO material gradually softens with increase of temperature while it hardens with the increment of the pressure. Our predicted results of thermodynamics properties for both the phases of ZnO are in overall agreement with the available data in the literature.

  19. Hierarchical structures of ZnO spherical particles synthesized solvothermally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Noriko; Haneda, Hajime

    2011-12-01

    We review the solvothermal synthesis, using a mixture of ethylene glycol (EG) and water as the solvent, of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles having spherical and flower-like shapes and hierarchical nanostructures. The preparation conditions of the ZnO particles and the microscopic characterization of the morphology are summarized. We found the following three effects of the ratio of EG to water on the formation of hierarchical structures: (i) EG restricts the growth of ZnO microcrystals, (ii) EG promotes the self-assembly of small crystallites into spheroidal particles and (iii) the high water content of EG results in hollow spheres.

  20. Experimental study of {Delta}I=1 bands in {sup 111}In

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, P.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ganguly, S.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2011-02-15

    The two {Delta}I=1 bands in {sup 111}In, built upon the 3461.0 and 4931.8 keV states, have been studied. The bands were populated in the reaction {sup 100}Mo({sup 19}F, {alpha}4n{gamma}) at a beam energy of 105 MeV. Mean lifetimes of nine states, four in the first and five in the second band, have been determined for the first time from Doppler shift attenuation data. The deduced B(M1) rates and their behavior as a function of level spin support the interpretation of these bands within the framework of the shears mechanism. The geometrical model of Machiavelli et al. has been used to derive the effective gyromagnetic ratios for the two bands.

  1. Comparison of quantification methods of 111In-labelled platelet deposition in peripheral bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, L; Verbruggen, A; De Bakker, C; Vandecruys, A; Joosten, J; Nevelsteen, A; Noyez, L; Verstraete, M; Vermylen, J; De Roo, M

    1987-04-01

    The action of antithrombotic drugs can be evaluated by measuring the deposition of 111In-labelled platelets on peripheral bypass grafts several days after injection. This evaluation can be performed qualitatively (visual interpretation on the daily images) or quantitatively. Four different methods which calculate the ratio of platelet uptake with a reference region are compared: two methods use a gamma camera and two a detector. A blood sample or the region under the sternal angle are used as reference. The daily ratio of the counts, recorded by a gamma camera in a region of interest covering the graft, and the blood radioactivity interpolated from a platelet survival curve appears to be the most reliable method. The information of all the ratios can be combined in a single thrombogenicity index which reflects the daily rise of a linear or exponential regression versus time. PMID:3588323

  2. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  3. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric behaviors of insulator/semiconductor (Al2O3/ZnO) nanolaminates with various ZnO thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2016-07-01

    Al2O3/ZnO nanolaminates (NLs) with various ZnO sublayer thicknesses were prepared by atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 sublayers are characterized as amorphous and the ZnO sublayers have an oriented polycrystalline structure. As the ZnO thickness decreases to a certain value, each NL exhibits a critical temperature at which its dielectric constant starts to rise quickly. Moreover, this temperature increases as the ZnO thickness is decreased further. On the other hand, the permittivity demonstrates a large value of several hundred at a frequency  ⩽1000 Hz, followed by a steplike decrease at a higher frequency. The change in the cut-off frequency with ZnO thickness is characterized by a hook function. It is revealed that the Coulomb confinement effect becomes predominant in the dielectric behaviors of the NLs with very thin ZnO. As the ZnO thickness decreases to about the same as or even smaller than the Bohr radius of ZnO, a great change in the carrier concentration and effective mass of ZnO is induced, which is shown to be responsible for the peculiar dielectric behaviors of Al2O3/ZnO with very thin ZnO. These findings provide insight into the prevailing mechanisms to optimize the dielectric properties of semiconductor/insulator laminates with nanoscale sublayer thickness.

  4. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  5. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  6. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  7. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  8. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  9. Peritoneal trophoblastic implant.

    PubMed

    Rachagan, S P; Kutty, K; Govindan, K S

    1997-09-01

    A case of persistent trophoblastic tissue on the pelvic peritoneum is presented. While most cases are secondary to conservative surgery for tubal ectopic pregnancy, primary implantation can also occur as highlighted by this case. A brief pathophysiology of the condition is presented. The importance of monitoring the serum for beta subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is emphasised.

  10. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  11. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  12. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  13. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  14. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  15. Spectroscopic studies on photoelectron transfer from 2-(furan-2-yl)-1-phenyl-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole to ZnO, Cu-doped ZnO and Ag-doped ZnO.

    PubMed

    Thanikachalam, V; Arunpandiyan, A; Jayabharathi, J; Karunakaran, C; Ramanathan, P

    2014-09-01

    The 2-(furan-2-yl)-1-phenyl-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole [FPI] has been designed and synthesized as fluorescent sensor for nanoparticulate ZnO. The present work investigates the photoelectron transfer (PET) from FPI to ZnO, Cu-doped ZnO and Ag- doped ZnO nanoparticles using electronic and life time spectral measurements. Broad absorption along with red shift indicates the formation of charge-transfer complex [FPI-Nanoparticles]. The photophysical studies indicate lowering of HOMO and LUMO energy levels of FPI on adsorption on ZnO due to FPI- ZnO interaction. The obtained binding constant implies that the binding of FPI with nanoparticles was influenced by the surface modification of ZnO nanoparticles with Cu and Ag.

  16. Nanowire Array Gratings with ZnO Combs

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Zhengwei; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are mainly manufactured by mechanical ruling, interference lithography, or resin replication, which generally require expensive equipment, complicated procedures, and a stable environment. We describe the controlled growth of self-organized microscale ZnO comb gratings by a simple one-step thermal evaporation and condensation method. The ZnO combs consist of an array of very uniform, perfectly aligned, evenly spaced and long single-crystalline ZnO nanowires or nanobelts with periods in the range of 0.2 to 2 {mu}m. Diffraction experiments show that the ZnO combs can function as a tiny three-beam divider that may find applications in miniaturized integrated optics such as three-beam optical pickup systems.

  17. Nanostructured ZnO Films for Room Temperature Ammonia Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya Ponnusamy; Sridharan Madanagurusamy

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited by a reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique onto a thoroughly cleaned glass substrate at room temperature. X-ray diffraction revealed that the deposited film was polycrystalline in nature. The field emission scanning electron micrograph (FE-SEM) showed the uniform formation of a rugby ball-shaped ZnO nanostructure. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed that the film was stoichiometric and the direct band gap of the film, determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy, was 3.29 eV. The ZnO nanostructured film exhibited better sensing towards ammonia (NH3) at room temperature (˜30°C). The fabricated ZnO film based sensor was capable of detecting NH3 at as low as 5 ppm, and its parameters, such as response, selectivity, stability, and response/recovery time, were also investigated.

  18. Solution synthesis and optimization of ZnO nanowindmills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lijie; Qu, Fengyu; Wu, Xiang

    2011-06-01

    In this work, novel windmill-like ZnO structures were fabricated through a solution route at low reaction temperature. The as-synthesized ZnO nanowindmill has a central trunk of nanorod and six symmetrical nanorods grown epitaxially on the surface of the ZnO trunk along [0 0 0 1] direction. Each nanorod forming the windmill with a smooth top is about 6 μm in length and about 700 nm in diameter. Several control experiments were conducted to study the formation of the nanowindmills of ZnO in detail. Cathodoluminescence (CL) property of the as-obtained product was investigated, which shows there are three emission peaks centered at 384, 616 and 753 nm in CL spectrum.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and green luminescence in ZnO nanocages.

    PubMed

    Snure, Michael; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization and observation of green luminescence in ZnO nanocages. A novel low temperature solution-based technique has been developed for growing highly porous ZnO nano-cages from coarse ZnO precursor powders. Various samples, prepared in this study, were characterized using several different characterization tools such as X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Raman, Photoluminescence and Optical Transmission Spectroscopy. It has been shown that ZnO nanocages exhibit green luminescence, with PL data showing a broad green peak at 510 nm. The shift and broadening in the luminescence peaks are understood to arise because of the onset of deep level defects in the system.

  20. Li doped ZnO thin films for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, K. M.; Bhat, Shreesha; Serrao, F. J.; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    We have prepared undoped (ZnO) and Li doped ZnO (LZO) thin films using cost effective sol gel spin coating method.The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and it showed that Li ions occupied interstitial positions in the LZO film. The optical properties like band bending effect, absorption length, band edge sharpness, which have direct impact on solar cell performance has been calculated. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the films showed dominant blue emission with CIE coordinate numbers (0.1384, 0.0836) for ZnO and (0.1356, 0.0910) for LZO. The dominating wavelength of the blue emission is present at 470.9 nm and 472.3 nm for ZnO and LZO films respectively. The structural and optical parameters determined in the present study could be used in LED applications.

  1. Hydrodynamic fabrication of structurally gradient ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Min; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2016-02-26

    We studied a new approach where structurally gradient nanostructures were fabricated by means of hydrodynamics. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized in a drag-driven rotational flow in a controlled manner. The structural characteristics of nanorods such as orientation and diameter were determined by momentum and mass transfer at the substrate surface. The nucleation of ZnO was induced by shear stress which plays a key role in determining the orientation of ZnO nanorods. The nucleation and growth of such nanostructures were modeled theoretically and analyzed numerically to understand the underlying physics of the fabrication of nanostructures controlled by hydrodynamics. The findings demonstrated that the precise control of momentum and mass transfer enabled the formation of ZnO nanorods with a structural gradient in diameter and orientation. PMID:26807679

  2. Colloidal transition-metal-doped ZnO quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Radovanovic, Pavle V; Norberg, Nick S; McNally, Kathryn E; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2002-12-25

    Methods for introducing new magnetic, optical, electronic, photophysical, or photochemical properties to semiconductor nanocrystals are attracting intense applications-oriented interest. In this communication, we report the preparation and electronic absorption spectroscopy of colloidal ZnO DMS-QDs. Our synthetic procedure involves modification of literature methods known to yield highly crystalline and relatively monodisperse nanocrystals of pure ZnO to allow introduction of transition-metal dopants. We use ligand-field electronic absorption spectroscopy as a dopant-specific optical probe to monitor dopant incorporation during nanocrystal growth and to verify internal substitutional doping in Co2+:ZnO and Ni2+:ZnO DMS-QDs. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first free-standing oxide DMS-QDs reported. The synthesis of colloidal oxide DMS-QDs introduces a new category of magnetic semiconductor materials available for detailed physical study and application in nanotechnology.

  3. What is atomic structures of (ZnO) 34 magic cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqiu; Wang, Baolin; Tang, Lingli; Sai, Linwei; Zhao, Jijun

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiment on the mass spectrum of ZnO clusters revealed a (ZnO) 34 magic cluster with enhanced stability [A. Dmytruk, et al., Microelect. J. 40 (2009) 218]. We have performed an extensive search for the most stable structure of (ZnO) 34 using gradient-corrected density-functional theory. Instead of the previously nominated onion-like nested cage of (ZnO) 6@(ZnO) 28, we found that the hollow cage structures satisfying the isolated six square rule constitute the most preferred structural motif for (ZnO) 34 cluster.

  4. Key Materials Aspects for Valence Control of ZnO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukazaki, Atsushi

    2006-03-01

    ZnO has significant advantages for light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers from the following reasons; 1) exciton binding energy in ZnO is 60 meV and can be enhanced over 100 meV in superlattices, 2) it is possible to tune the bandgap from 3 eV to 4.5 eV in Zn1-xCdxO and MgxZn1-xO alloy films having quite small lattice mismatch, and 3) large and high-quality single-crystal wafers are commercially available. In order to harvest these advantages in real devices, reliable technique for fabricating p-type ZnO has to be properly established. Recently we have reported on the improvements of undoped ZnO film quality with inserting a ZnO self-buffer layer onto lattice matched ScAlMgO4 substrate [1]. In view of point defect formation during the epitaxy, we have carefully optimized the growth conditions. We selected nitrogen as an acceptor, because the ionic radius is close to that of oxygen. Here we propose a repeated temperature modulation (RTM) technique for efficient nitrogen doping into ZnO with keeping high crystallinity [2]. By carefully optimizing the conditions, p-type ZnO with a hole concentration of 10^16 - 10^17 cm-3 can be reproducibly fabricated. We also demonstrated blue electroluminescence from p-i-n homojunction LED [3]. The details of thin film growth, characteristics of p-type ZnO and device performance will be presented. [1] A. Tsukazaki et al. Nature Mater. 4, 42 (2005). [2] A. Tsukazaki et al. Appl. Phys. Lett.83, 2784 (2003). [3]A. Tsukazaki et al. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.Lett.44, L643 (2005).

  5. High efficient ZnO nanowalnuts photocatalyst: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Feng; Zhang, Siwen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Hongfeng; Qu, Fengyu; Cai, Xue; Wu, Xiang

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. • Morphologies and microstructures of the as-obtained ZnO products were investigated. • The photocatalytic results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. - Abstract: Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are successfully synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The photocatalytic properties of ZnO nanowalnuts are investigated by photodegradating several organic dyes, such as Congo red (CR), methyl orange (MO) and eosin red aqueous solutions under UV irradiation, respectively. The results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. In addition, eosin red and Congo red (CR) aqueous solution degradation experiments are also conducted in the same condition, respectively. It showed that ZnO nanowalnuts represent high photocatalytic activities with a degradation efficiency of 87% for CR with 115 min of irradiation and 97% for eosin red with 55 min of irradiation. The reported ZnO products may be promising candidates as the photocatalysts in waste water treatment.

  6. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Janaki, A Chinnammal; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity. PMID:25748589

  7. Controlled modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with Zno nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuying; Xia Baiying; Zhu Xingfu; Chen Jiesheng; Qiu Shilun; Li Jixue

    2008-04-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been successfully modified with ZnO nanostructures by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds. Flower-like ZnO on the tips of MWNTs and ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs have been obtained, respectively, via adjusting the reaction time. The modified MWNTs have been characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures. Photoluminescence properties of the as-synthesized products have also been investigated. - Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)/flower-like ZnO heterojunctions and MWNT/ZnO nanoparticle composites were prepared by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds via adjusting the reaction time. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures.

  8. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki, A. Chinnammal; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity.

  9. Luminescence mechanisms of defective ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Camarda, Pietro; Messina, Fabrizio; Vaccaro, Lavinia; Agnello, Simonpietro; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Schneider, Reinhard; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Lorenzi, Roberto; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Cannas, Marco

    2016-06-28

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLAL) of a zinc plate in deionized water were investigated by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and complementary techniques (TEM, AFM, μRaman). HRTEM images show that PLAL produces crystalline ZnO NPs in wurtzite structure with a slightly distorted lattice parameter a. Consistently, optical spectra show the typical absorption edge of wurtzite ZnO (Eg = 3.38 eV) and the related excitonic PL peaked at 3.32 eV with a subnanosecond lifetime. ZnO NPs display a further PL peaking at 2.2 eV related to defects, which shows a power law decay kinetics. Thermal annealing in O2 and in a He atmosphere produces a reduction of the A1(LO) Raman mode at 565 cm(-1) associated with oxygen vacancies, accompanied by a decrease of defect-related emission at 2.2 eV. Based on our experimental results the emission at 2.2 eV is proposed to originate from a photo-generated hole in the valence band recombining with an electron deeply trapped in a singly ionized oxygen vacancy. This investigation clarifies important aspects of the photophysics of ZnO NPs and indicates that ZnO emission can be controlled by thermal annealing, which is important in view of optoelectronic applications. PMID:27251452

  10. Hierarchical ZnO Superstructures: Nanoflake-Decorated Nanonail Arrays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anzheng; Wang, Jingyang; Liang, Guiji; Wang, Song; Zhan, Dan; Yang, Han

    2016-01-01

    By using metallic Zn powders as zinc source, we synthesized unusual hierarchical ZnO superstructures, nanoflake-decorated nanonail arrays, on a large scale via a simple low-temperature thermal evaporation method. The hierarchical superstructures were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction. Studies found that both the ZnO nanonails and the decorated ZnO nanoflakes are single-crystals, with the preferred growth orientations along the (001) direction. The possible formation mechanism for the interesting hierarchical superstructures has been discussed. It was found that the deposition of indium films on a Si substrate and the heterogeneous nucleation of ZnO nanoflakes on the main ZnO nanonails play key roles in the fabrication of ZnO superstructures. Moreover, these special hierarchical superstructures showed much strong and complicated photoluminescent emissions in the visible region. PMID:27398581

  11. Stabilization principles for polar surfaces of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lauritsen, Jeppe V; Porsgaard, Soeren; Rasmussen, Morten K; Jensen, Mona C R; Bechstein, Ralf; Meinander, Kristoffer; Clausen, Bjerne S; Helveg, Stig; Wahl, Roman; Kresse, Georg; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2011-07-26

    ZnO is a wide band gap metal oxide with a very interesting combination of semiconducting, transparent optical and catalytic properties. Recently, an amplified interest in ZnO has appeared due to the impressive progress made in nanofabrication of tailored ZnO nanostructures and functional surfaces. However, the fundamental principles governing the structure of even the clean low-index ZnO surfaces have not been adequately explained. From an interplay of high-resolution scanning probe microscopy (SPM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we identify here a group of hitherto unresolved surface structures which stabilize the clean polar O-terminated ZnO(0001) surface. The found honeycomb structures are truly remarkable since their existence deviates from expectations using a conventional electrostatic model which applies to the opposite Zn-terminated (0001) surface. As a common principle, the differences for the clean polar ZnO surfaces are explained by a higher bonding flexibility of the exposed 3-fold coordinated surface Zn atoms as compared to O atoms. PMID:21671628

  12. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  13. The in vivo behavior of granulocytes labeled with indium-111 in a canine model of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.P.; Konopka, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.; Spragg, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    Use of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes in the study of pulmonary inflammation requires study of their in vivo behavior. To study the pulmonary deposition of these cells and their ability to migrate from the capillary to the alveolus, we injected (/sup 111/In)granulocytes into dogs 24 h after the induction of a right lower lobe pneumococcal pneumonia. Using external imaging, we found rapid clearance of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes from the uninvolved lung (with a residual radioactivity of 24.5 +/- 4.2% at 4 h). In contrast, 83 +/- 12.4% of the initial radioactivity was present in inflamed lung at 4 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the inflamed lung was more cellular than that from control lung, contained a greater fraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (82 +/- 4.1% versus 20 +/- 6.2%), and much greater cell-associated radioactivity (ratio of 423:1, inflamed to control). Autoradiography disclosed that this radioactivity was localized to consolidated alveoli and was not prominently distributed in arterioles or venules or in airways larger than 0.6 mm. We conclude that (/sup 111/In)granulocytes are biologically active in the setting of acute lung inflammation.

  14. Effect of Mg doping in ZnO buffer layer on ZnO thin film devices for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Pushpa; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films have been grown on p-silicon (Si) substrate using magnesium doped ZnO (Mg: ZnO) buffer layer by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering method. In this paper, we have optimized the concentration of Mg (0-5 atomic percent (at. %)) ZnO buffer layer to examine its effect on ZnO thin film based devices for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The crystalline nature, morphology and topography of the surface of the thin film have been characterized. The optical as well as electrical properties of the active ZnO film can be tailored by varying the concentration of Mg in the buffer layer. The crystallite size in the active ZnO thin film was found to increase with the Mg concentration in the buffer layer in the range of 0-3 at. % and subsequently decrease with increasing Mg atom concentration in the ZnO. The same was verified by the surface morphology and topography studies carried out with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic electron microscopy (AFM) respectively. The reflectance in the visible region was measured to be less than 80% and found to decrease with increase in Mg concentration from 0 to 3 at. % in the buffer region. The optical bandgap was initially found to increase from 3.02 eV to 3.74 eV by increasing the Mg content from 0 to 3 at. % but subsequently decreases and drops down to 3.43 eV for a concentration of 5 at. %. The study of an Au:Pd/ZnO Schottky diode reveals that for optimum doping of the buffer layer the device exhibits superior rectifying behavior. The barrier height, ideality factor, rectification ratio, reverse saturation current and series resistance of the Schottky diode were extracted from the measured current voltage (I-V) characteristics.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  16. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  17. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  18. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  19. Self-assembled ZnO nanoparticles on ZnO microsheet: ultrafast synthesis and tunable photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Khatei, Jayakrishna; Sunkara, S.; Lo, K.-Y.; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the tunable photoluminescence characteristics of porous ZnO microsheets fabricated within 1-5 min of microwave irradiation in the presence of a capping agent such as citric acid, and mixture of citric acid with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The UV emission intensity reduces to 60% and visible emission increases tenfold when the molar concentration of citric acid is doubled. Further diminution of the intensity of UV emission (25%) is observed when PVP is mixed with citric acid. The addition of nitrogen donor ligands to the parent precursor leads to a red shift in the visible luminescence. The deep level emission covers the entire visible spectrum and gives an impression of white light emission from these ZnO samples. The detailed luminescence mechanism of our ZnO samples is described with the help of a band diagram constructed by using the theoretical models that describe the formation energy of the defect energy levels within the energy band structure. Oxygen vacancies play the key role in the variation of the green luminescence in the ZnO microsheets. Our research findings provide an insight that it is possible to retain the microstructure and simultaneously introduce defects into ZnO. The growth of the ZnO microsheets may be due to the self assembly of the fine sheets formed during the initial stage of nucleation.

  20. Implants for cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, H B; McDermott, M W; Cooke, D D

    1995-04-01

    As long as there have been skull defects, there has been a recognized need to cover them in some way. Cranioplasty is the surgical correction of skull defects. The two major purposes of performing a cranioplasty are to protect the brain and to provide reasonable cosmesis. The two physical requirements of the implant are strength and malleability. Originally, foreign materials such as precious metals were used. Autogenous bone grafts have also achieved successful results. Over the past quarter-century, the popularization of acrylics and radiolucent metals has favored them over bone because of their ease of use, the absence of need to harvest donor bone, and, particularly, bone's tendency to resorb or scar. Yet foreign materials can cause excessive inflammation, producing a synovial membrane at the interface between the host bone and cranioplasty construct, increasing the risk of infection. Currently, hydroxyapatite-based ceramics, which may induce bone growth into the implant, are increasingly being used. Future applications will include antibiotic-impregnated implants and computer-generated models to improve the precision of cranioplasty fit and cosmesis.

  1. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  2. Piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled power generating process of a single ZnO belt/wire. A technology for harvesting electricity from the environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinhui; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental observation of piezoelectric generation from a single ZnO wire/belt for illustrating a fundamental process of converting mechanical energy into electricity at nanoscale. By deflecting a wire/belt using a conductive atomic force microscope tip in contact mode, the energy is first created by the deflection force and stored by piezoelectric potential, and later converts into piezoelectric energy. The mechanism of the generator is a result of coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of ZnO. A piezoelectric effect is required to create electric potential of ionic charges from elastic deformation; semiconducting property is necessary to separate and maintain the charges and then release the potential via the rectifying behavior of the Schottky barrier at the metal-ZnO interface, which serves as a switch in the entire process. The good conductivity of ZnO is rather unique because it makes the current flow possible. This paper demonstrates a principle for harvesting energy from the environment. The technology has the potential of converting mechanical movement energy (such as body movement, muscle stretching, blood pressure), vibration energy (such as acoustic/ultrasonic wave), and hydraulic energy (such as flow of body fluid, blood flow, contraction of blood vessels) into electric energy that may be sufficient for self-powering nanodevices and nanosystems in applications such as in situ, real-time, and implantable biosensing, biomedical monitoring, and biodetection. PMID:16895352

  3. Local transformation of ZIF-8 powders and coatings into ZnO nanorods for photocatalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Lik H.; Janssens, Nikki; Sree, Sreeprasanth P.; Wiktor, Christian; Gobechiya, Elena; Fischer, Roland A.; Kirschhock, Christine E. A.; Martens, Johan A.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nitrate induces spontaneous room temperature transformation of ZIF-8 into a composite of ZnO nanorods embedded in a ZIF-8 matrix. This first example of reverse transformation of ZIF-8 into ZnO is a convenient method for generating fixed ZnO nanoparticles in powders as well as films and coatings. The fabricated ZnO nanorod@ZIF-8 is photocatalytically active.Silver nitrate induces spontaneous room temperature transformation of ZIF-8 into a composite of ZnO nanorods embedded in a ZIF-8 matrix. This first example of reverse transformation of ZIF-8 into ZnO is a convenient method for generating fixed ZnO nanoparticles in powders as well as films and coatings. The fabricated ZnO nanorod@ZIF-8 is photocatalytically active. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, XRD patterns and XRD quantitative phase analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05289c

  4. Electrochemical Sensing, Photocatalytic and Biological Activities of ZnO Nanoparticles: Synthesis via Green Chemistry Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, L. S. Reddy; Archana, B.; Lingaraju, K.; Kavitha, C.; Suresh, D.; Nagabhushana, H.; Nagaraju, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have successfully synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (Nps) via solution combustion method using sugarcane juice as the novel fuel. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO Nps have been analyzed using various analytical tools. The synthesized ZnO Nps exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue dye, indicating that the ZnO Nps are potential photocatalytic semiconductor materials. The synthesized ZnO Nps also show good electrochemical sensing of dopamine. ZnO Nps exhibit significant bactericidal activity against Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschesichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, the ZnO Nps show good antioxidant activity by potentially scavenging 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals. The above studies clearly demonstrate versatile applications of ZnO synthesized by simple eco-friendly route.

  5. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability.

  6. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  7. Size dependent biodistribution and SPECT imaging of (111)In-labeled polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Brinkhuis, René P; Stojanov, Katica; Laverman, Peter; Eilander, Jos; Zuhorn, Inge S; Rutjes, Floris P J T; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-05-16

    Polymersomes, self-assembled from the block copolymer polybutadiene-block-poly(ethylene glycol), were prepared with well-defined diameters between 90 and 250 nm. The presence of ~1% of diethylene triamine penta acetic acid on the polymersome periphery allowed to chelate radioactive (111)In onto the surface and determine the biodistribution in mice as a function of both the polymersome size and poly(ethylene glycol) corona thickness (i.e., PEG molecular weight). Doubling the PEG molecular weight from 1 kg/mol to 2 kg/mol did not change the blood circulation half-life significantly. However, the size of the different polymersome samples did have a drastic effect on the blood circulation times. It was found that polymersomes of 120 nm and larger become mostly cleared from the blood within 4 h, presumably due to recognition by the reticuloendothelial system. In contrast, smaller polymersomes of around 90 nm circulated much longer. After 24 h more than 30% of the injected dose was still present in the blood pool. This sharp transition in blood circulation kinetics due to size is much more abrupt than observed for liposomes and was additionally visualized by SPECT/CT imaging. These findings should be considered in the formulation and design of polymersomes for biomedical applications. Size, much more than for liposomes, will influence the pharmacokinetics, and therefore, long circulating preparations should be well below 100 nm.

  8. Detection of thrombophlebitis with 111In-labeled anti-fibrin antibody: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Gupta, N.; Palevsky, H.I.; Kelley, M.A.; Jatlow, A.D.; Byar, A.A.; Berger, H.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis remains a major medical problem, affecting a large segment of the population and resulting in significant mortality and morbidity. Current techniques available for detecting deep venous thrombosis present limitations that may mitigate their potential benefit to the patient. Invasive techniques, such as ascending contrast venography, carry risks to the patient with regard to complications such as an allergic reaction to an iodine dye, adverse effects to renal functions, and clot formation in a normal vein. Noninvasive techniques, such as Doppler ultrasound and impedance plethysmography, evaluate only a limited segment of the venous bed. The need remains for a diagnostic technique that is safe, accurate, and widely accessible. A readily available noninvasive scintigraphic technique utilizing radiolabeled monoclonal anti-fibrin antibody may overcome some of these shortcomings. This imaging examination is quite effective in detecting clots in the lower extremities. Compared to contrast venography, {sup 111}In-labeled anti-fibrin antibody imaging appears to be as sensitive in identifying acute venous thrombosis. In addition, the preliminary data indicate that anticoagulation with heparin may interfere with adequate visualization of the clots with this technique.

  9. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature wide-band-gap (3.3 eV at room temperature) semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guides, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices, Since ZnO has a 60 meV excitonic binding energy that makes it possible to produce excitonic lasing at room temperature, a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for UV/blue/green laser diodes. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Thus, homoepitaxial film growth is the best choice. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystal substrates grown by the hydrothermal method are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before the films are deposited. The annealing temperature-dependence on ZnO substrate morphology and electrical properties is investigated. Films are synthesized by off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. This produces films that have very smooth surfaces with roughness less than or equal to 5 nm on a 5 microns x 5 microns area. The full width at half maximum of film theta rocking curves measured by the x-ray diffraction is slightly larger than that of the crystal substrate. Films are also characterized by measuring resistivity, optical transmittance, and photoluminescence. The properties of ZnO films grown on (0001) ZnO and (0001) sapphire substrates will also be compared and discussed.

  10. Photoluminescence characterization of ZnO nanowires functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, Jane; Gioffrè, Mariano; Rea, Ilaria; De Stefano, Luca; Rendina, Ivo

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured photoluminescent materials are optimal transducers for optical biosensors due to their capacity to convert molecular interactions in light signals without contamination or deterioration of the samples. In recent years, nanostructured biosensors with low cost and readily available properties have been developed for such applications as therapeutics, diagnostic and environmental. Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) is material with unique properties and due to these they were widely studied in many fields as electronics, optics, and photonics. ZnO NWs can be either grown independently or deposited on solid support, such as glass, gold substrates and crystalline silicon. Vertical aligned ZnO forest on a substrate shows specific advantages in photonic device fabrication. ZnO NWs are typically synthesized by such techniques classified as vapour phase and solution phase synthesis. In particular, hydrothermal methods have received a lot of attention and have been widely used for synthesis of ZnO NWs. This technique shows more crystalline defects than others due to oxygen vacancies, so as the material shows intense photoluminescence emission under laser irradiation. ZnO NWs surface is highly hydrolysed, so it is covered by OH reactive groups, and standard biomodification chemistry can be used in order to bind bioprobes on the surface. In this work, we present our newest results on synthetic nanostructured materials characterization for optical biosensors applications. In particular, we characterize the ZnO NWs structure grown on crystalline silicon by SEM images and the biomodification by photoluminesce technique, fluorescence microscopy, water contact angle and FT-IR measurements.

  11. Tuning magnetism by biaxial strain in native ZnO.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chengxiao; Wang, Yuanxu; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Yang, Gui

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic ZnO, one of the most important diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), has attracted great scientific interest because of its possible technological applications in optomagnetic devices. Magnetism in this material is usually delicately tuned by the doping level, dislocations, and local structures. The rational control of magnetism in ZnO is a highly attractive approach for practical applications. Here, the tuning effect of biaxial strain on the d(0) magnetism of native imperfect ZnO is demonstrated through first-principles calculations. Our calculation results show that strain conditions have little effect on the defect formation energy of Zn and O vacancies in ZnO, but they do affect the magnetism significantly. For a cation vacancy, increasing the compressive strain will obviously decrease its magnetic moment, while tensile strain cannot change the moment, which remains constant at 2 μB. For a singly charged anion vacancy, however, the dependence of the magnetic moment on strain is opposite to that of the Zn vacancy. Furthermore, the ferromagnetic state is always present, irrespective of the strain type, for ZnO with two zinc vacancies, 2VZns. A large tensile strain is favorable for improving the Curie temperature and realizing room temperature ferromagnetism for ZnO-based native semiconductors. For ZnO with two singly charged oxygen vacancies, 2Vs, no ferromagnetic ordering can be observed. Our work points the way to the rational design of materials beyond ZnO with novel non-intrinsic functionality by simply tuning the strain in a thin film form.

  12. Solution precursor plasma deposition of nanostructured ZnO coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tummala, Raghavender; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, Pravansu S.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} The solution precursor route employed is an inexpensive process with capability to produce large scale coatings at fast rates on mass scale production. {yields} It is highly capable of developing tailorable nanostructures. {yields} This technique can be employed to spray the coatings on any kind of substrates including polymers. {yields} The ZnO coatings developed via solution precursor plasma spray process have good electrical conductivity and reflectivity properties in spite of possessing large amount of particulate boundaries, porosity and nanostructured grains. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconducting material that has various applications including optical, electronic, biomedical and corrosion protection. It is usually synthesized via processing routes, such as vapor deposition techniques, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis and thermal spray of pre-synthesized ZnO powders. Cheaper and faster synthesis techniques are of technological importance due to increased demand in alternative energy applications. Here, we report synthesis of nanostructured ZnO coatings directly from a solution precursor in a single step using plasma spray technique. Nanostructured ZnO coatings were deposited from the solution precursor prepared using zinc acetate and water/isopropanol. An axial liquid atomizer was employed in a DC plasma spray torch to create fine droplets of precursor for faster thermal treatment in the plasma plume to form ZnO. Microstructures of coatings revealed ultrafine particulate agglomerates. X-ray diffraction confirmed polycrystalline nature and hexagonal Wurtzite crystal structure of the coatings. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed fine grains in the range of 10-40 nm. Observed optical transmittance ({approx}65-80%) and reflectivity ({approx}65-70%) in the visible spectrum, and electrical resistivity (48.5-50.1 m{Omega} cm) of ZnO coatings are attributed to ultrafine particulate morphology of the coatings.

  13. Determining the minimum number of detectable cardiac-transplanted 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells by SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuan; Kong, Huafu; Stodilka, Rob Z.; Wells, R. Glenn; Zabel, Pamela; Merrifield, Peter A.; Sykes, Jane; Prato, Frank S.

    2005-10-01

    In this work, we determined the minimum number of detectable 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived stem cells from the maximum activity per cell which did not affect viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 111In by SPECT. Canine bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated, cultured and expanded. A number of samples, each containing 5 × 106 cells, were labelled with 111In-tropolone from 0.1 to 18 MBq, and cell viability was measured afterwards for each sample for 2 weeks. To determine the MDA, the anthropomorphic torso phantom (DataSpectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC) was used. A point source of 202 kBq 111In was placed on the surface of the heart compartment, and the phantom and all compartments were then filled with water. Three 111In SPECT scans (duration: 16, 32 and 64 min; parameters: 128 × 128 matrix with 128 projections over 360°) were acquired every three days until the 111In radioactivity decayed to undetectable quantities. 111In SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with and without background, scatter or attenuation corrections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the reconstructed image was calculated, and MDA was set equal to the 111In activity corresponding to a CNR of 4. The cells had 100% viability when incubated with no more than 0.9 MBq of 111In (80% labelling efficiency), which corresponded to 0.14 Bq per cell. Background correction improved the detection limits for 111In-tropolone-labelled cells. The MDAs for 16, 32 and 64 min scans with background correction were observed to be 1.4 kBq, 700 Bq and 400 Bq, which implies that, in the case where the location of the transplantation is known and fixed, as few as 10 000, 5000 and 2900 cells respectively can be detected.

  14. [Professional occupation after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kós, Maria-Izabel; Degive, Colette; Boëx, Colette; Maire, Raphaël; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2006-10-01

    This study verifies whether cochlear implants helps deaf adults to maintain or develop their professional occupations. Sixty-seven patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. At the time of implantation 34 were professionally active. After the implantation 29 remained active, 4 of them reporting positive developments in their careers. Five patients became inactive. The previously inactive patients remained inactive. There was no difference in auditory performances between professionally active or inactive patients. Cochlear implants enable most implanted adults to maintain and even progress in their professions. However, deafness still represents an obstacle to social integration as inactive patients who searched for a job were rejected after the job interviews. PMID:17076153

  15. Search for ferromagnetic ordering in Pd doped wide band gap semiconductors GaN and ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, P.; Müller, K.; Geruschke, T.; Timmers, H.; Byrne, A. P.; Vianden, R.

    2010-04-01

    GaN and ZnO are possible candidates for dilute magnetic semiconductors with Curie temperatures above room temperature. Doping with transition metals like Co, Mn or Fe could be a simple way to create such systems. The perturbed angular correlation (PAC) probe 100Pd/100Rh is isoelectronic to cobalt and therefore a perfect tool to investigate the incorporation of transition metals into these compounds as well as the influence of other impurities on internal magnetic fields. The (0001) and (10bar{1}10) surfaces of ZnO single crystals, freestanding GaN films, and GaN thin films (6 μm) on sapphire substrates were recoil-implanted with the 100Pd/100Rh probe. The probe was produced using the fusion evaporation reaction 92Zr(12C, 4n)100Pd at a beam energy of 69 MeV. Subsequently, the incorporation of the probe was studied by PAC spectroscopy during an isochronal annealing program. First results without and with an applied external magnetic field are indicative of a strongly disturbed lattice vicinity of Pd impurities in both hosts. No signs of spontaneous ferromagnetic ordering were observed.

  16. Tuning of ZnO 1D nanostructures by atomic layer deposition and electrospinning for optical gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viter, Roman; Abou Chaaya, Adib; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kovalevskis, Kristaps; Erts, Donats; Miele, Philippe; Smyntyna, Valentyn; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2015-03-01

    We explored for the first time the ability of a three-dimensional polyacrylonitrile/ZnO material—prepared by a combination of electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a new material with a large surface area—to enhance the performance of optical sensors for volatile organic compound (VOC) detection. The photoluminescence (PL) peak intensity of these one-dimensional nanostructures has been enhanced by a factor of 2000 compared to a flat Si substrate. In addition, a phase transition of the ZnO ALD coating from amorphous to crystalline has been observed due to the properties of a polyacrylonitrile nanofiber template: surface strain, roughness, and an increased number of nucleation sites in comparison with a flat Si substrate. The greatly improved PL performance of these nanostructured surfaces could produce exciting materials for implantation in VOC optical sensor applications.

  17. The Evolution of Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, shape, feel, safety, and longevity of the implants remain important areas of research. The data provided by manufacturers show the safety and efficacy of these medical devices. Clinicians should strive to provide ongoing data and sound science to continue to improve clinical outcomes in the future. This article explores the evolution of breast implants with special emphasis on the advancement of silicone implants.

  18. In vitro evaluation of bioactivity of SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2-ZnO glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Bashir, Farooq; Hossain, Tousif; Kayani, Zohra

    2014-09-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that stimulates bone formation but it is also known as an inhibitor of apatite crystal growth. In this work addition of ZnO to SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2 glass-ceramic system was made by conventional melt-quenching technique. DSC curves showed that the addition of ZnO moved the endothermic and exothermic peaks to lower temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis did not reveal any additional phase caused by ZnO addition and showed the presence of wollastonite and hydroxyapatite crystalline phases only in all the glass-ceramic samples. As bio-implant apatite forming ability is an essential condition, the surface reactivity of the prepared glass-ceramic specimens was studied in vitro in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF) [1] with ion concentration nearly equal to human blood plasma for 30 days at 37 °C under static condition. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to study the changes in element concentrations in soaking solutions and XRD, FT-IR and SEM were used to elucidate surface properties of prepared glass-ceramics, which confirmed the formation of HCAp on the surface of all glass-ceramics. It was found that the addition of ZnO had a positive effect on bioactivity of glass-ceramics and made it a potential candidate for restoration of damaged bones.

  19. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  20. Professional occupation after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kos, M-I; Degive, C; Boex, C; Guyot, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The aims of this study were to verify whether cochlear implants helped profoundly deaf adults to maintain or even to develop their professional occupations, and to identify other elements that may contribute to or, on the contrary, impede such patients' professional success. All adult patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. Demographic data, health information, hearing performance and degree of satisfaction with the implant were also considered. Sixty-seven adults had been implanted, with three different devices, since 1985. At the time of implantation, 34 had been professionally active. After implantation, 29 had remained professionally active, four of whom reported positive developments in their careers. Five patients had become professionally inactive. Those patients who had previously been professionally inactive remained so. There had been no difference in performance, either between different types of cochlear implants or between professionally active or inactive patients. The implanted patients had kept their jobs and many of them had developed their professional skills. In spite of this, cochlear implants may still be perceived as proving insufficiently satisfactory hearing to enable professionally inactive patients to reintegrate and to facilitate further learning or career developments. PMID:17052367

  1. Influence of Al-, Co-, Cu-, and In-doped ZnO buffer layers on the structural and the optical properties of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younggyu; Choe, Jongyun; Nam, Giwoong; Kim, Ikhyun; Leem, Jae-Young; Lee, Sang-heon; Kim, Soaram; Kim, Do Yeob; Kim, Sung-O.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films without a buffer layer and with Al-, Co-, Cu-, and In-doped ZnO buffer layers were prepared by using the sol-gel spin-coating method. For the first time, the effects of the ZnO buffer layers doped with different metal materials on the structural and the optical properties of the ZnO thin films are investigated. The surface morphologies of the ZnO thin films having wrinkle structures significantly depended on the type of buffer layer. The largest crystallite size and the highest c-axis orientation were observed for the ZnO thin film with a Co-doped ZnO buffer layer. However, the transmittance for the ZnO thin films with metal-doped buffer layers was slightly decreased compared to that without the buffer layer, and metal-doped ZnO buffer layers hardly affected the optical band gap of the ZnO thin films.

  2. One-pot synthesis of ZnO2/ZnO composite with enhanced photocatalytic performance for organic dye removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Mingliang; Xu, Chunxiang; Chen, Shifu; Fu, Xianliang

    2013-01-01

    The ZnO2/ZnO photocatalysts with various ZnO2 contents were prepared by one-pot synthesis method using ZnO and H2O2 as raw materials. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, UV-vis DRS, SEM, EDS, FT-IR spectra, fluorescence emission spectra, and BET specific area. The photocatalytic performance of the photocatalyst was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) and rhodamine B (RhB). The results showed that the photocatalytic activity of the ZnO2/ZnO was much higher than that of single-phase ZnO or ZnO2. The optimum ZnO2 content was 1.0 wt.%. The maximal degradation rate constant of MO and RhB was 4.1 times and 2.2 times that observed for pure ZnO, respectively. The stability of the prepared photocatalyst in the photocatalytic process was also investigated. The active species in dye degradation were examined by adding a series of scavengers. The possible mechanisms involved in the photocatalytic degradation of dye were also discussed.

  3. ZnO Thin Film Electronics for More than Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Jose Israel

    Zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated in this work for large-area electronic applications outside of display technology. A constant pressure, constant flow, showerhead, plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process has been developed to fabricate high mobility TFTs and circuits on rigid and flexible substrates at 200 °C. ZnO films and resulting devices prepared by PEALD and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have been compared. Both PEALD and PLD ZnO films result in densely packed, polycrystalline ZnO thin films that were used to make high performance devices. PEALD ZnO TFTs deposited at 300 °C have a field-effect mobility of ˜ 40 cm2/V-s (and > 20 cm2/V-S deposited at 200 °C). PLD ZnO TFTs, annealed at 400 °C, have a field-effect mobility of > 60 cm2/V-s (and up to 100 cm2/V-s). Devices, prepared by either technique, show high gamma-ray radiation tolerance of up to 100 Mrad(SiO2) with only a small radiation-induced threshold voltage shift (VT ˜ -1.5 V). Electrical biasing during irradiation showed no enhanced radiation-induced effects. The study of the radiation effects as a function of material stack thicknesses revealed the majority of the radiation-induced charge collection happens at the semiconductor-passivation interface. A simple sheet-charge model at that interface can describe the radiation-induced charge in ZnO TFTs. By taking advantage of the substrate-agnostic process provided by PEALD, due to its low-temperature and excellent conformal coatings, ZnO electronics were monolithically integrated with thin-film complex oxides. Application-based examples where ZnO electronics provide added functionality to complex oxide-based devices are presented. In particular, the integration of arrayed lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 or PZT) thin films with ZnO electronics for microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) and deformable mirrors is demonstrated. ZnO switches can provide voltage to PZT capacitors with fast charging and slow

  4. Formation energy of oxygen vacancies in ZnO determined by investigating thermal behavior of Al and In impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsuda, S.; Sato, W.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-11-14

    Thermal behavior and interacting nature of 100-ppm Al and ∼100-ppt In impurities doped in zinc oxide (ZnO) were investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation method with the {sup 111}In(→{sup 111}Cd) probe. Contrasting interactions between Al and In impurities were observed depending on different atmospheric conditions: (1) in air, Al and In impurities irreversibly associate with each other in the process of their thermal diffusion, but (2) in vacuum, their bound state formed in air dissociates by heat treatment at temperatures higher than 873 K, and this process is enhanced with increasing temperature. Detailed investigation of the thermal behavior of the impurities has revealed that the dissociation reaction is triggered by the formation of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the locally associated In-Al structure. A unique method to determine the activation energy of the oxygen-vacancy formation is presented with the estimated experimental value of E{sub a} = 0.72(6) eV.

  5. Nanoporous structures on ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gür, Emre; Kılıç, Bayram; Coşkun, C.; Tüzemen, S.; Bayrakçeken, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    Porous structures were formed on ZnO thin films which were grown by an electrochemical deposition (ECD) method. The growth processes were carried out in a solution of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) zinc perchlorate, Zn(ClO 4) 2, at 120 ∘C on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. Optical and structural characterizations of electrochemically grown ZnO thin films have shown that the films possess high (0002) c-axis orientation, high nucleation, high intensity and low FWHM of UV emission at the band edge region and a sharp UV absorption edge. Nanoporous structures were formed via self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexanethiol (C 6SH) and dodecanethiol (C 12SH). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements showed that while a nanoporous structure (pore radius 20 nm) is formed on the ZnO thin films by hexanathiol solution, a macroporous structure (pore radius 360 nm) is formed by dodecanethiol solution. No significant variation is observed in X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements on the ZnO thin films after pore formation. However, photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed that green emission is observed as the dominant emission for the macroporous structures, while no variation is observed for the thin film nanoporous ZnO sample.

  6. Genomic DNA binding to ZnO microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Cardozo, M. Orrego; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, ZnO microrods were produced by hydrothermal synthesis. DNA was extracted from pork spleen cells by cellular lysis, deproteinization and precipitation. The analysis of the DNA binding to the ZnO was performed using Raman spectroscopy a technique that allowed for the evaluation of the effect that the presence of the ZnO in the complex has on the DNA structure. Vibrational spectral bands from the DNA molecule and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO were observed and classified as E2(M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO) and 2LO. The Raman signals from the vibrational bands corresponding to the phosphodiester bond 5‧-C-O-P-O-C-3‧ and bond stretching of the PO2- group, as well as ring vibrations of the nitrogenous bases of the DNA, were enhanced by the presence of the ZnO microrods. The bands from the modes corresponding to the C-O and Odbnd Psbnd O- molecules of the DNA backbone were observed to exhibit larger spectral shifts due to the compression and tensile stresses generated at the ZnO/DNA interface, respectively. In addition, the relative vibrational mode intensities of the nitrogenous bases increased.

  7. SiO2 and ZnO dopants in three-dimensionally printed tricalcium phosphate bone tissue engineering scaffolds enhance osteogenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three-dimensionally-interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (able to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (able to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated into three-dimensional printed β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common in bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties, from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. The addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introducing osteoinductive properties to CaPs.

  8. SiO2 and ZnO Dopants in 3D Printed TCP Scaffolds Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three dimensionally (3D) interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (ability to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (ability to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated in to 3D printed β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common to bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. Addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introduce osteoinductive properties to CaPs. PMID:23871941

  9. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  12. Computer implants and death.

    PubMed

    Gert, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Although a patient whose whole brain has ceased to function may have his heart, lungs, and other organs continue to function if they are connected to the appropriate machines, the patient is still dead and the machines can be disconnected. In the future, nanotechnology, or other technology, may allow putting implants in the brainstem that can keep a patient's heart, lungs and other organs functioning, even though the whole natural brain has ceased to function. It would be useful to consider how this technology might affect the criterion of death before it is actually available.

  13. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  14. ZnO films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on soda lime glass substrates for the ultraviolet inactivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosnier, Jean-Paul; O'Haire, Richard J.; McGlynn, Enda; Henry, Martin O.; McDonnell, Stephen J.; Boyle, Maria A.; McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2009-08-01

    We found that a ZnO film of 2 μm thickness which was laser-deposited at room temperature onto a plain soda lime glass substrate, exhibits notable antibacterial activity against a biofilm of Staphylococcus epidermidis when back-illuminated by a UVA light source with a peak emission wavelength of about 365 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the ZnO films before and after the interactions with the biofilm and the ultraviolet light, respectively. The as-deposited film was highly textured with the wurtzite (0002) in-plane orientation (c-axis perpendicular to ZnO surface) and had a surface rms roughness of 49.7 nm. In the as-deposited film, the Zn to O ratio was 1 to 0.95. After the UV and biofilm treatments, the ZnO film surface had become rougher (rms roughness 68.1 nm) and presented uniform micron-sized pitting randomly distributed, while the zinc to oxygen ratio had become 1 to 2.2. In this case, both the UV-visible and Raman spectra pointed to degradation of the structural quality of the material. On the strength of these data, we propose a model for the mediation of the bactericidal activity in which the photogeneration of highly oxidizing species and the presence of active surface defect sites both play an important role. This study is of particular interest for the acute problem of disinfection of pathogenic biofilms which form on medical device/implant surfaces.

  15. Technical considerations in the study of /sup 111/In-oxine labelled platelet survival patterns in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Sharefkin, J.; Rich, N.M.

    1982-04-01

    A detailed technique for labelling canine platelets with /sup 111/In-oxine for the study of platelet survival patterns in four to six dogs at a time was developed. Useful modifications of earlier methods included splitting of the platelet rich plasma into multiple aliquots to improve pelleting efficiency at low gravity forces, use of saved platelet poor plasma to flush out injection syringes, and prompt use of commercial /sup 111/In-oxine sources 3 to 5 minutes after mixing with Ringer's Citrate Dextrose. Avoidable pitfalls of the method included excessive lengths of incubation time in plasma free medium and loss of labelling efficacy by exposure of the chelate to iron or other metal contaminants in glassware. The method was used to study changes in platelet survival time in dogs with large synthetic arterial prostheses, and gave results in good agreement with earlier studies using /sup 51/Cr labelled platelets.

  16. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  17. Fabrication of ZnO and doped ZnO waveguides deposited by Spin Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; R, Neha P.; T, Shalu; C, Darshana K.; Sreelatha, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of ZnO and doped Zn1-xAgxO (where x=0.03) nanoparticles by co- precipitation is reported. The precursors used were Zinc Nitrate and Potassium hydroxide pellets. For doping, 3% AgNO3 in ZnNO3 was considered as a separate buffer solution. The prepared nanoparticles were subsequently spin coated onto silica glass substrates at a constant chuck rate of 3000 rpm. The substrate acts as the lower cladding of a waveguide structure. The upper cladding is assumed to be air in the present investigation. The nanostructures of the ZnO powders in the doped and undoped cases were studied using X-ray Diffraction patterns. There was a decrease in the grain size with doping which increase the tunability of the powders to be used as photoluminescent devices. The optical characteristics of the sample were also investigated using UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 200-900 nm wavelengths. The photoluminescence peaks also report a dramatic increase in intensity at the same wavelength for the doped case compared to the undoped one.

  18. A comparison of 111In-HIG scintigraphy and chest radiology in the identification of pulmonary infection in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Buscombe, J R; Oyen, W J; Corstens, F H; Ell, P J; Miller, R F

    1995-05-01

    Prospectively, we compared the results of chest radiology and functional imaging, using 111In-labelled polyclonal human IgG (111In-HIG), in the identification of pulmonary infection in patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Sixty-three studies were performed on 57 HIV-infected patients presenting with suspected chest infection or fever of unknown cause, in each of whom a planar chest radiograph was obtained within 24 h of the 111In-HIG study. The results of the two imaging modalities were compared with the final microbiological or cytological diagnosis. Forty patients were found to have pulmonary infection, 25 of whom were correctly identified with chest radiology (sensitivity 62%) and 39 with 111In-HIG (sensitivity 97%). In those patients without infection, chest radiology was abnormal in 13 cases (specificity 43%), while there was only one false-positive 111In-HIG study (specificity 95%). 111In-HIG correctly identified the presence or absence of active lung infection in 61 of 63 cases (accuracy 93%). This was significantly better (chi 2 = 8.25, upsilon = 1, P < 0.01) than chest radiology, which correctly identified the presence or absence of infection in 35 of 63 cases (accuracy 55%). In HIV antibody-positive patients, functional imaging with 111In-HIG is more accurate than chest X-ray in the identification of pulmonary infection.

  19. (111)In-trastuzumab scintigraphy in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients remains feasible during trastuzumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Gaykema, Sietske B M; de Jong, Johan R; Perik, Patrick J; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Bongaerts, Alphons H H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 imaging with radiolabeled trastuzumab might support HER2-targeted therapy. It is, however, frequently questioned whether HER2 imaging is also possible during trastuzumab treatment as the receptor might be saturated. We studied the effect of trastuzumab treatment on 111In-trastuzumab uptake. Patients received trastuzumab weekly and paclitaxel once every 3 weeks. 111In-trastuzumab was injected on day 1 of cycle 1 and day 15 of cycle 4. Whole-body planar scintigraphy was acquired at different time points postinjection. Tumor uptake and organ distribution between the first and repeated scan series were calculated via residence times. Twenty-five tumor lesions in 12 patients were visualized on both scintigraphy series. Tumor uptake decreased (19.6%; p  =  .03). The residence times of normal organs remained similar except for the cardiac blood pool (+ 16.3%; p  =  .014). Trastuzumab treatment decreases tumor 111In-trastuzumab uptake around 20%. HER2 imaging is feasible during trastuzumab treatment.

  20. High mobility ZnO nanowires for terahertz detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqiang; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Chu, Shijin

    2014-07-01

    An oxide nanowire material was utilized for terahertz detection purpose. High quality ZnO nanowires were synthesized and field-effect transistors were fabricated. Electrical transport measurements demonstrated the nanowire with good transfer characteristics and fairly high electron mobility. It is shown that ZnO nanowires can be used as building blocks for the realization of terahertz detectors based on a one-dimensional plasmon detection configuration. Clear terahertz wave (˜0.3 THz) induced photovoltages were obtained at room temperature with varying incidence intensities. Further analysis showed that the terahertz photoresponse is closely related to the high electron mobility of the ZnO nanowire sample, which suggests that oxide nanoelectronics may find useful terahertz applications.

  1. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGES

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  2. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods.

  3. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  4. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods.

  5. Electrical Property of Conventionally Sintered ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, S. K.; Shekhwat, M. S.; Mangal, R.

    ZnO powder was synthesized by solid state reaction method. The synthesized powder was granulated and pressed using uni-axial press for preparing the pallets. The prepared pellets were sintered in conventional furnace at different temperatures (900-1300° C). The phase study was done by powder X-ray diffraction and it was found that the there is no other phase present in the synthesized material but the peak intensity is increasing with temperature. The crystallite size of the synthesized ZnO powder was found to be increase with temperature. The effect of sintering on grain growth is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM revels that the average grain size is increases with increase in sintering temperature. AC impedance of these samples was decreased markedly with increased sintering temperature. In present work the effect of sintering temperatures and hold time on micro structural and electrical properties of ZnO ceramics is carried out.

  6. Excellent acetone sensing properties of porous ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Bai; Liu, Xing-Yi; Wang, Sheng-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Porous ZnO was obtained by hydrothermal method. The results of scanning electron microscope revealed the porous structure in the as-prepared materials. The acetone sensing test results of porous ZnO show that porous ZnO possesses excellent acetone gas sensing properties. The response is 35.5 at the optimum operating temperature of 320 °C to 100 ppm acetone. The response and recovery times to 50 ppm acetone are 2 s and 8 s, respectively. The lowest detecting limit to acetone is 0.25 ppm, and the response value is 3.8. Moreover, the sensors also exhibit excellent selectivity and long-time stability to acetone. Projected supported by the Project of Challenge Cup for College Students, China (Grant No. 450060497053).

  7. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Allen, M. W.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.

    2015-02-02

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ∼520 °C, with indium migrating from the (0001{sup ¯}) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar (11{sup ¯}00) and (112{sup ¯}0) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (∼20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  8. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods. PMID:27644239

  9. Optoelectronic properties of (ZnO)60 isomers.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Malloci, Giuliano; De Angelis, Filippo; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    We studied the optoelectronic properties of six possible structures of the (ZnO)(60) cluster using density functional theory (DFT). Vertical ionization energies and electron affinities are calculated through total energy differences, while the optical absorption spectra are obtained by using hybrid time-dependent DFT. The (ZnO)(60) cluster has been proven to be particularly stable and it is of potential interest for future applications in nanoelectronics, but its ground-state configuration has been unknown to date. Since the relative stability inferred from total energy calculations suffers from a strong dependence on the computational scheme adopted, we combined it with optical spectroscopy to identify the most abundant geometrical structure of this cluster. The calculated optical spectra are different for each isomer and they could be thus used in comparison with experimental data to explain the ground state of (ZnO)(60). PMID:23000945

  10. ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécz, B.; Baji, Zs; Lábadi, Z.; Kovács, A.

    2013-11-01

    The structure of 40 nm thick epitaxial ZnO layers grown on single crystalline sapphire and GaN substrates by atomic layer deposition has been studied using transmission electron microscopy. The growth is carried out between 150°C and 300°C without any buffer layer using di-ethyl zinc and water precursors. The ZnO layer on sapphire is found to be polycrystalline, which is probably due to the large misfit (~15 %) and the relatively low deposition temperature. However, the small misfit (~1.8 %) between the ZnO layer that is deposited on GaN at 300°C resulted in a high quality single crystalline layer.

  11. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  13. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  14. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  15. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  16. Photonic technologies for visual implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Ruediger; Praemassing, F.; Puettjer, D.; Stawski, N.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    In this paper two applications of photonic technologies for visual implants in the field of medicine are presented. Both are technical systems working as vision aid for people suffering from blindness due to damages in their visual system. The first system is a retinal implant (RI), the second an intraocular vision aid (IoVA) for people with opaque cornea.

  17. Design of Shallow p-type Dopants in ZnO (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.H.; Li, J.; Yan. Y.

    2008-05-01

    ZnO is a promising material for short wave-length opto-electronic devices such as UV lasers and LEDs due to its large exciton binding energy and low material cost. ZnO can be doped easily n-type, but the realization of stable p-type ZnO is rather difficult. Using first-principles band structure methods the authors address what causes the p-type doping difficulty in ZnO and how to overcome the p-type doping difficulty in ZnO.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on DC electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Swaroop, K.; Somashekarappa, H. M.; Naveen, C. S.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    The temperature dependent dc electrical conductivity of gamma irradiated Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles is presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms Zn-O stretching vibrations. UV-Visible spectroscopy studies show that the energy band gap (E{sub g}) of the prepared ZnO nanoparticles increases with respect to gamma irradiation dose, which can be related to room temperature dc electrical conductivity. The result shows significant variation in the high temperature dc electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles due to gamma irradiation.

  19. Growth and characterization of periodically polarity-inverted ZnO structures on sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsub; Yao, Takafumi

    2012-10-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of periodically polarity inverted (PPI) ZnO heterostructures on (0 0 0 1) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. For the periodically inverted array of ZnO polarity, CrN and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} polarity selection buffer layers are used for the Zn- and O-polar ZnO films, respectively. The change of polarity and period in fabricated ZnO structures is evaluated by diffraction patterns and polarity sensitive piezo-response microscopy. Finally, PPI ZnO structures with subnanometer scale period are demonstrated by using holographic lithography and regrowth techniques.

  20. Structural and electrical properties of electric field assisted spray deposited pea structured ZnO film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-05-01

    Spray deposition of ZnO film was carried out. The uneven growth of ZnO nanostructures is resulted for spray deposited ZnO film. Application of DC voltage (1000V) during spray deposition provides formation of pea like structures with uniform coverage over the substrate. Electric field assisted spray deposition provides increased crystallinity with reduced resistivity and improved mobility of the ZnO film as compared to spray deposited ZnO film without electric field. This with large area deposition makes the process more efficient than other techniques.

  1. Resistive switching characteristics of a compact ZnO nanorod array grown directly on an Al-doped ZnO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, E. J.; Shin, J. Y.; Yoon, T. S.; Kang, C. J.; Choi, Y. J.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO’s resistive switching properties have drawn much attention because ZnO has a simple chemical composition and is easy to manipulate. The propulsion mechanism for resistive switching in ZnO is based on a conducting filament that consists of oxygen vacancies. In the case of film structure, the random formation of the conducting filaments occasionally leads to unstable switching characteristics. Limiting the direction in which the conducting filaments are formed is one way to solve this problem. In this study, we demonstrate reliable resistive switching behavior in a device with an Au/compact ZnO nanorod array/Al-doped ZnO structure with stable resistive switching over 105 cycles and a long retention time of 104 s by confining conducting filaments along the boundaries between ZnO nanorods. The restrictive formation of conducting filaments along the boundaries between ZnO nanorods is observed directly using conductive atomic force microscopy.

  2. Assembly of ordered ZnO porous thin films by cooperative assembly method using polystyrene spheres and ultrafine ZnO particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhifeng; Jin Zhengguo . E-mail: zhgjin@tju.edu.cn; Li Wei; Qiu Jijun

    2006-01-05

    Ordered ZnO porous thin films were fabricated by cooperative assembly method using polystyrene sphere (PS) and ultrafine ZnO particles, in which ultrafine ZnO particles were directly assembled in the voids of PS while the template was being assembled by capillary forces. The influence of experimental parameters, such as evaporation temperature, ZnO concentration and the concentration ratio of PS/ZnO on morphology of the porous structure was mainly studied. The results showed that an ordered porous structure could be obtained by this method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra indicated the porous ZnO thin film was wurtzite structure. The transmissivity decreased with the decrease of wavelength, but still kept above 80% beyond the wavelength of 550 nm. Optical band gap of the ZnO thin film was 3.13 eV.

  3. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  4. A high power ZnO thin film piezoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Weiwei; Li, Tao; Li, Yutong; Qiu, Junwen; Ma, Xianjun; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A highly efficient and large area piezoelectric ZnO thin film nanogenerator (NG) was fabricated. The ZnO thin film was deposited onto a Si substrate by pulsed laser ablation at a substrate temperature of 500 °C. The deposited ZnO film exhibited a preferred c-axis orientation and a high piezoelectric value of 49.7 pm/V characterized using Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM). Thin films of ZnO were patterned into rectangular power sources with dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 with metallic top and bottom electrodes constructed via conventional semiconductor lithographic patterning processes. The NG units were subjected to periodic bending/unbending motions produced by mechanical impingement at a fixed frequency of 100 Hz at a pressure of 0.4 kg/cm2. The output electrical voltage, current density, and power density generated by one ZnO NG were recorded. Values of ∼95 mV, 35 μA cm-2 and 5.1 mW cm-2 were recorded. The level of power density is typical to that produced by a PZT NG on a flexible substrate. Higher energy NG sources can be easily created by adding more power units either in parallel or in series. The thin film ZnO NG technique is highly adaptable with current semiconductor processes, and as such, is easily integrated with signal collecting circuits that are compatible with mass production. A typical application would be using the power harvested from irregular human foot motions to either to operate blue LEDs directly or to drive a sensor network node in mille-power level without any external electric source and circuits.

  5. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  6. Comparative study of ZnO nanorods and thin films for chemical and biosensing applications and the development of ZnO nanorods based potentiometric strontium ion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Chey, C. O.; Lu, Jun.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the comparative study of ZnO nanorods and ZnO thin films were performed regarding the chemical and biosensing properties and also ZnO nanorods based strontium ion sensor is proposed. ZnO nanorods were grown on gold coated glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth method and the ZnO thin films were deposited by electro deposition technique. ZnO nanorods and thin films were characterised by field emission electron microscopy [FESEM] and X-ray diffraction [XRD] techniques and this study has shown that the grown nanostructures are highly dense, uniform and exhibited good crystal quality. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy [TEM] was used to investigate the quality of ZnO thin film and we observed that ZnO thin film was comprised of nano clusters. ZnO nanorods and thin films were functionalised with selective strontium ionophore salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone [ST] membrane, galactose oxidase, and lactate oxidase for the detection of strontium ion, galactose and L-lactic acid, respectively. The electrochemical response of both ZnO nanorods and thin films sensor devices was measured by using the potentiometric method. The strontium ion sensor has exhibited good characteristics with a sensitivity of 28.65 ± 0.52 mV/decade, for a wide range of concentrations from 1.00 × 10-6 to 5.00 × 10-2 M, selectivity, reproducibility, stability and fast response time of 10.00 s. The proposed strontium ion sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of strontium ion versus ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid [EDTA]. This comparative study has shown that ZnO nanorods possessed better performance with high sensitivity and low limit of detection due to high surface area to volume ratio as compared to the flat surface of ZnO thin films.

  7. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Rishikesh Pandey, Devendra K.; Khare, P. S.

    2014-10-15

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8μm to 0.41μm.

  8. Kinetics of Congruent Vaporization of ZnO Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.J.; Stach, E.; Garcia, R.E.

    2011-09-28

    We examine the congruent vaporization of ZnO islands using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Correlating quantitative measurements with a theoretical model offers a comprehensive understanding of the equilibrium conditions of the system, including equilibrium vapor pressure and surface free energy. Interestingly, the surface energy depends on temperature, presumably due to a charged surface at our specific condition of low P and high T. We find that the vaporization temperature decreases with decreasing system size, a trend that is more pronounced at higher T. Applying our results of island decay towards the growth of the ZnO provides new insights into the cooperative facet growth of anisotropic nanocrystals.

  9. Optical characterization of ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Pal, Sudha; Goyal, Priyanka; Bind, Umesh Chandra

    2016-05-01

    ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions was prepared by chemical synthesis method. The ZnO nanomaterial was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Their absorption in UV-VIS/NIR regions was measured at room temperature. The experimental oscillator strengths were calculated from the areas under the absorption bands. Eight absorption bands have been observed. From these spectral data various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon, Lande, Racah, Nephelauxetic ratio and bonding parameters have been computed. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out using the absorption spectra to evaluate the radiative properties for luminescent levels of the praseodymium ion and discussed. The observed nano particle size is 2nm.

  10. Hopping conduction in single ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Ze; Zhou, Feng; Lu, Li; Jin, Aizi; Gu, Changzhi

    2005-06-01

    ZnO nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The dc electrical conductivity of a single ZnO nanowire was investigated over a wide temperature range from 300 to 6 K. It is found that the temperature dependence of conductivity follows the relation \\ln \\rho \\sim T^{-1/2} . The conductivity data suggest that the dominant conduction mechanism is Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping conduction. The strong electron-electron interaction in the nanowire is also proved by the I-V and d I/d V curves, on which there emerges a Coulomb gap-like structure at low temperatures.

  11. Reducing ZnO nanoparticle cytotoxicity by surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingdeng; Shen, Cenchao; Feltis, Bryce N.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Hughes, Anthony E.; Wright, Paul F. A.; Turney, Terence W.

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most widely used engineered nanomaterials and its toxicology has gained considerable recent attention. A key aspect for controlling biological interactions at the nanoscale is understanding the relevant nanoparticle surface chemistry. In this study, we have determined the disposition of ZnO nanoparticles within human immune cells by measurement of total Zn, as well as the proportions of extra- and intracellular dissolved Zn as a function of dose and surface coating. From this mass balance, the intracellular soluble Zn levels showed little difference in regard to dose above a certain minimal level or to different surface coatings. PEGylation of ZnO NPs reduced their cytotoxicity as a result of decreased cellular uptake arising from a minimal protein corona. We conclude that the key role of the surface properties of ZnO NPs in controlling cytotoxicity is to regulate cellular nanoparticle uptake rather than altering either intracellular or extracellular Zn dissolution.Nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most widely used engineered nanomaterials and its toxicology has gained considerable recent attention. A key aspect for controlling biological interactions at the nanoscale is understanding the relevant nanoparticle surface chemistry. In this study, we have determined the disposition of ZnO nanoparticles within human immune cells by measurement of total Zn, as well as the proportions of extra- and intracellular dissolved Zn as a function of dose and surface coating. From this mass balance, the intracellular soluble Zn levels showed little difference in regard to dose above a certain minimal level or to different surface coatings. PEGylation of ZnO NPs reduced their cytotoxicity as a result of decreased cellular uptake arising from a minimal protein corona. We conclude that the key role of the surface properties of ZnO NPs in controlling cytotoxicity is to regulate cellular nanoparticle uptake rather than

  12. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Lerose, Damiana; Bochmann, Arne; Christiansen, Silke H; Nietzsche, Sandor; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    Ion beams can be used to permanently bend and re-align nanowires after growth. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with energetic ions, achieving bending and alignment in different directions. Not only the bending of single nanowires is studied in detail, but also the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires. Computer simulations reveal how the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Detailed structural characterization identifies dislocations to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent, even surviving annealing procedures.

  13. Electron-hole quantum physics in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, M. A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This dissertation describes several new aspects of the quantum physics of electrons and holes in zinc oxide (ZnO), including a few possible applications. Zinc oxide is a II-VI semiconductor with a direct band gap in the ultraviolet. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed, both on bulk ZnO and on ZnO nanowires. Chapter 2 presents a new technique for an ultrafast all-optical shutter, based on two-photon absorption in a ZnO crystal. This shutter can be used for luminescence experiments requiring extremely high time-resolution. Chapter 3 describes a time-resolved study on the electron-hole many-body effects in highly excited ZnO at room temperature, in particular band-filling, band-gap renormalization, and the disappearance of the exciton resonance due to screening. In Chapter 4, the quantum many-body theory developed and experimentally verified in Chapter 3, is used to explain laser action in ZnO nanowires, and compared with experimental results. In contrast to current opinion, the results indicate that excitons are not involved in the laser action. The measured emission wavelength, the laser threshold, and the spectral distance between the laser modes are shown to be excellently explained by our quantum many-body theory. Multiple scattering of light in a forest of nanowires can be employed to enhance light absorption in solar cells. Optimization of this technique requires better understanding of light diffusion in such a nanowire forest. In Chapter 5 we demonstrate a method, based on two-photon absorption, to directly measure the residence time of light in a nanowire forest, and we show that scanning electron microscope (SEM) images can be used to predict the photon mean free path. In Chapter 6 we present a new ultrafast all-optical transistor, consisting of a forest of ZnO nanowires. After excitation, laser action in this forest causes rapid recombination of the majority of the electrons and holes, limiting the amplification to 1.2 picoseconds only

  14. Single photon emission from ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sumin; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R.; Aharonovich, Igor; Johnson, Brett C.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2014-06-30

    Room temperature single photon emitters are very important resources for photonics and emerging quantum technologies. In this work, we study single photon emission from defect centers in 20 nm zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. The emitters exhibit bright broadband fluorescence in the red spectral range centered at 640 nm with polarized excitation and emission. The studied emitters showed continuous blinking; however, bleaching can be suppressed using a polymethyl methacrylate coating. Furthermore, hydrogen termination increased the density of single photon emitters. Our results will contribute to the identification of quantum systems in ZnO.

  15. Improved Response of ZnO Films for Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the temperature variation rate is a useful method for enhancing the response of pyroelectric devices. A three-dimensional ZnO film was fabricated by the aerosol deposition (AD) rapid process using the shadow mask method, which induces lateral temperature gradients on the sidewalls of the responsive element, thereby increasing the temperature variation rate. To enhance the quality of the film and reduce the concentration of defects, the film was further treated by laser annealing, and the integration of a comb-like top electrode enhanced the voltage response and reduced the response time of the resulting ZnO pyroelectric devices. PMID:23235444

  16. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of ZnO nanowire structure on flexible substrate with different solution molarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Hang; Hur, Shin; Kim, Wan-Doo; Choi, Hongsoo

    2010-08-01

    Zinc Oxide nanostructures are capable of applying numerous applications such as optoelectronics, sensors, varistors, and electronic devices. There are several techniques to gorw ZnO nanostructures, including vapor-liquid-solid method, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, metal organic chemical vapor deposition and solution process. Recently reported solution method is a simple way to grow ZnO nanowires at a low temperature. One distinctive advantage with the solution method is low processing temperature so that flexible polymer materials can be used as a substrate to grow ZnO nanowires. In this study, ZnO nanowires have been fabricated on PET film by solution method with various molarities to see the effect of different molarities on ZnO nanowire growth. The solution temperature was 80°C and ZnO nanowires were grown for 6 hours for each case. The ZnO seed layer was sputtered at room temperature for 33 min. prior to ZnO nanowire growth. These ZnO nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) measurements at room temperature using a He-Cd 325-nm laser as the excitation source. We also measured the current using current Atomic Force Microscopy (I-AFM) and presented the possibility to use ZnO nanowires as a power source for micro/nano scale devices. As a result, we found that the characterization of ZnO nanowires changes according to the solution molarity.

  18. Morphology dependent photocatalytic and magnetic properties of ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Jagriti; Bhargava, Parag; Bahadur, D.

    2014-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures of different morphology are synthesized by simple soft-chemical approaches. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra reveal the formation of highly crystalline single-phase hexagonal wurtzite nanostructures of ZnO. TEM micrographs indicate that ZnO nanoparticles are spherical in shape having a size of about 8 nm whereas the length of ZnO nanorods are about 30-40 nm. SEM micrographs show that ZnO nanoassembly is spherical and porous and is about 100-400 nm in size whereas the length of the ZnO microrods are about 4-5 μm having a diameter of about 150 nm. The ZnO microdiscs are 2-3 μm in size. Photoluminescence spectra of the various ZnO nanostructures show that the near band edge emission of ZnO is strongly dependent on their size and shape. Furthermore, the sharp decrease in the intensity of green emission as shape and size changes from nano to microstructures undoubtedly indicates the suppression of oxygen vacancies due to change in the surface to volume ratio i.e. decrease in the surface area from nano to microstructures. Thus, photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanostructures strongly depends on the presence of oxygen vacancies as well as higher surface area. ZnO nanostructures show size, shape and defect concentration dependent ferromagnetic behavior and photocatalytic activity.

  19. Tunable Lattice Constant and Band Gap of Single- and Few-Layer ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C; Deng, Xingyi

    2016-04-01

    Single and few-layer ZnO(0001) (ZnO(nL), n = 1-4) grown on Au(111) have been characterized via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that the in-plane lattice constants of the ZnO(nL, n ≤ 3) are expanded compared to that of the bulk wurtzite ZnO(0001). The lattice constant reaches a maximum expansion of 3% in the ZnO(2L) and decreases to the bulk wurtzite ZnO value in the ZnO(4L). The band gap decreases monotonically with increasing number of ZnO layers from 4.48 eV (ZnO(1L)) to 3.42 eV (ZnO(4L)). These results suggest that a transition from a planar to the bulk-like ZnO structure occurs around the thickness of ZnO(4L). The work also demonstrates that the lattice constant and the band gap in ultrathin ZnO can be tuned by controlling the number of layers, providing a basis for further investigation of this material. PMID:27003692

  20. Melanoma Imaging using 111In, 86Y and 68Ga labeled CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lihui; Zhang, Xiuli; Gallazzi, Fabio; Miao, Yubin; Jin, Xiaofang; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Xu, Heng; Clifford, Thomas; Welch, Michael J.; Lewis, Jason S.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A novel alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analog CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, that targeted the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R) over-expressed on melanoma cells, was investigated for its biodistribution and tumor imaging properties. Methods The metal bifunctional chelator CHX-A” was conjugated to the melanoma targeting peptide (Arg11)CCMSH and cyclized by Re incorporation to yield CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 111In, 86Y and 68Ga and the radiolabeled peptides were examined in B16/F1 melanoma bearing mice for their pharmacokinetic as well as their tumor targeting properties using small animal SPECT and PET. Results The radiolabeling efficiencies of the 111In, 86Y and 68Ga labeled CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH peptides were > 95%, resulting in specific activities of 4.44 GBq/μg, 3.7 GBq/μg and 1.85 GBq/μg, respectively. Tumor uptake of the 111In, 86Y and 68Ga labeled peptides was rapid with 4.17±0.94 % ID/g, 4.68±1.02 % ID/g and 2.68±0.69 % ID/g present in the tumors 2 h post injection, respectively. Disappearance of radioactivity from the normal organs and tissues was rapid with the exception of the kidneys. Melanoma tumors were imaged with all three radiolabeled peptides 2 h post injection. MC1-R specific uptake was confirmed by competitive receptor blocking studies. Conclusions Melanoma tumor uptake and imaging was exhibited by the 111In, 86Y and 68Ga labeled -Re(Arg11)CCMSH peptides, although the tumor uptake was moderated by low specific activity. The facile radiolabeling properties of CHX-A”-Re(Arg11)CCMSH allow it to be employed as a melanoma imaging agent with little or no purification after 111In, 86Y and 68Ga labeling. PMID:19423001

  1. ZnO hierarchical nanostructures: simple solvothermal synthesis and growth mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dev, Apurba; Kar, Soumitra; Chaudhuri, Subhadra

    2008-09-01

    Hierarchical nano/micro structures of ZnO have been fabricated by solvothermal approach on sol-gel derived ZnO thin films. Paintbrush like nano/micro rod assembly, double-sided brush and windmill type architectures of ZnO are obtained when the ZnO thin film coated substrates were treated solvothermally in water at pH 10. Aligned nanorods are obtained at pH approximately 13.5 in water. In ethylenediamine-water solvent divergent micro/nanorod assemblies such as hemispherical dandelion, rice plant type bush of ZnO are obtained. Increase in the percentage of ethyelendiamine resulted in the formation of smaller assemblies of relatively thin nanorods. Initial slow reaction caused by the slow increase of the temperature inside the reaction medium and the different growth kinetics of the ZnO crystals are supposed to be the reason behind the architectural assemblies of the ZnO crystals.

  2. Transparent conductivity modulation of ZnO by group-IVA doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Fan, X. F.; Sun, C. Q.; Zhu, W.

    2016-04-01

    We examined the effect of group-IVA doping on the electronic structure and transmittance of ZnO using first-principle calculations. All these doped ZnO materials are found to perform n-type conductive behavior. Si-doped ZnO and Pb-doped ZnO are found to have larger optical band gap than those of Ge-doped ZnO and Sn-doped ZnO. The transmittance of Si-doped ZnO is found to be high in both UV and visible region. The enhancement of UV region transmittance can be attributed to the enhanced optical band gap, while the reduction of visible region transmittance is due to the intraband optical transition.

  3. Synthesis of ZnO nanosheets via electrodeposition method and their optical properties, growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Yongqian; Kong, Junhan; Jia, Hanxiang; Wang, Zhengshu

    2015-08-01

    ZnO nanosheets were prepared by electrochemical deposition method at 80 °C on seeded Indium Tin Oxide conducting glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on ITO by spin coating and annealed at 350 °C for 30 min prior to electrochemical deposition growth. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanosheets consist of polycrystalline structures. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra (PL) of the ZnO nanosheets exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue) indicating the ZnO nanosheets had excellent optical properties. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of ZnO nanosheets was shown a strong absorption at 300 nm. The ZnO nanosheets structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. Moreover, the growth mechanism of the ZnO nanosheets had been discussed.

  4. Speech Production Intelligibility of Early Implanted Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mirette G.; Waltzman, Susan B.; Tajudeen, Bobby; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the influence of age, and age at implantation, on speech production intelligibility in prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods Forty prelingually, profoundly deaf children who received cochlear implants between 8 and 40 months of age. Their age at testing ranged between 2.5 – 18 years. Children were recorded repeating the ten sentences in the Beginner’s Intelligibility Test. These recordings were played back to normal-hearing listeners who were unfamiliar with deaf speech and who were instructed to write down what they heard. They also rated each subject for the intelligibility of their speech production on a 5-point rating scale. The main outcome measures were the percentage of target words correctly transcribed, and the intelligibility ratings, in both cases averaged across three normal-hearing listeners. Results The data showed a strong effect of age at testing, with older children being more intelligible. This effect was particularly pronounced for children implanted in the first 24 months of life, all of whom had speech production intelligibility scores of 80% or higher when they were tested at age 5.5 years or older. This was true for only five out of nine children implanted at age 25 to 36 months. Conclusions Profoundly deaf children who receive cochlear implants in the first two years of life produce highly intelligible speech before age 6. This is also true for most, but not all children implanted in their third year. PMID:20472308

  5. Study of ZnO and Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles by sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Mohd Meenhaz Arshad, Mohd; Tripathi, Pushpendra

    2015-06-24

    Nano-crystalline undoped and Mg doped ZnO (Mg-ZnO) nanoparticles with compositional formula Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O (x=0,1,3,5,7,10 and 12 %) were synthesized using sol-gel process. The XRD diffraction peaks match with the pattern of the standard hexagonal structure of ZnO that reveals the formation of hexagonal wurtzite structure in all samples. SEM images demonstrates clearly the formation of spherical ZnO nanoparticles, and change of the morphology of the nanoparticles with the concentration of the magnesium, which is in close agreement with that estimated by Scherer formula based on the XRD pattern. To investigate the doping effect on optical properties, the UV–VIS absorption spectra was obtained and the band gap of the samples calculated.

  6. Dynamics of ZnO nanoparticles formed in the high-pressure phase during growth of ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Shimogaki, T.; Takao, S.; Nakao, S.; Harada, K.; Higashihata, M.; Okada, T.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles formed in Ar gas of 200 Torr by laser ablation are visualized by ultraviolet Rayleigh scattering imaging. The time-resolved imaging of the ZnO nanoparticles are presented for several conditions of single-pulse ablation and 10 Hz ablation at room temperature. Scattering light from the nanoparticles appeared at 1-2 ms after ablation, and the spatial distribution was a mushroom like swirling cloud. The cloud propagates forward about 2.6 m/s without lateral expansion. In addition, nanoparticle distribution at a substrate heating condition, which is growth condition of ZnO nanocrystals is investigated. The nanoparticles under heating condition formed almost the same spatial distribution as that of room temperature and their speed was increased to 3.2 m/s at 750 °C.

  7. Built-in electric field in ZnO based semipolar quantum wells grown on (1012) ZnO substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chauveau, J.-M.; Xia, Y.; Roland, B.; Vinter, B.; Ben Taazaet-Belgacem, I.; Teisseire, M.; Nemoz, M.; Brault, J.; Damilano, B.; Leroux, M.

    2013-12-23

    We report on the properties of semipolar (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO quantum wells homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (1012) R-plane ZnO substrates. We demonstrate that atomically flat interfaces can be achieved with fully relaxed quantum wells because the mismatch between (Zn,Mg)O and ZnO is minimal for this growth orientation. The photoluminescence properties evidence a quantum confined Stark effect with an internal electric field estimated to 430 kV/cm for a 17% Mg content in the barriers. The quantum well emission is strongly polarized along the 1210 direction and a comparison with the semipolar bulk ZnO luminescence polarization points to the effect of the confinement.

  8. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-01-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm(-1) for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls. PMID:27071382

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-04-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm‑1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls.

  10. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-01-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm−1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls. PMID:27071382

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  12. Correlation between defect and magnetism of low energy Ar+9 implanted and un-implanted Zn0.95Mn0.05O thin films suitable for electronic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, S. K.; Midya, N.; Pramanik, P.; Banerjee, A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Taki, G. S.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, morphological, optical and magnetic properties of Ar+9 implanted 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films have been investigated to detect the correlation between ferromagnetism (FM) and defect. Sol-gel derived films were implanted with fluences 0 (un-implanted), 5×1014 (low), 1015 (intermediate) and 1016 (high) ions/cm2. Rutherford back scattering (RBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM), UV-visible, photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID VSM) were employed for investigation. XRD indicated single phase nature of the films. Absence of impurity phase has been confirmed from several other measurements also. Ion implantation induces a large concentration of point defects into the films as identified from optical study. All films exhibit intrinsic FM at room temperature (RT). The magnetization attains the maximum for the film implanted with fluence 1016 ions/cm2 with saturation magnetization (MS) value 0.69 emu/gm at RT. Magnetic properties of the films were interpreted using bound magnetic polaron (BMP). BMP generated from the intrinsic exchange interaction of Mn2+ ions and VZn related defects actually controls the FM. The practical utility of these films in transparent spin electronic device has also been exhibited.

  13. Transformation of ZnO polycrystalline sheets into hexagon-like mesocrystalline ZnO rods (tubes) under ultrasonic vibration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jianning; Fang, Xiang; Yang, Rong; Kan, Biao; Li, Xiazhang; Yuan, Ningyi

    2014-01-01

    The mesoscale assembly process is sensitive to additives that can modify the interactions of the crystal nucleus and the developing crystals with solid surfaces and soluble molecules. However, the presence of additives is not a prerequisite for the mesoscale transformation process. In this study, ZnO sheet networks were synthesized on Al foils by a hydrothermal process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that under ultrasonic vibration, monolithic polycrystalline ZnO sheets transformed into hexagon-like mesocrystalline tubes or rods. The formation mechanism was discussed.

  14. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  16. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  17. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Siebert, Sean M; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J B; Brenckle, Mark A; Amsden, Jason J; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2012-11-27

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  18. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  19. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of [18F]-Fluorinated Carboplatin Derivative Encapsulated in [111In]-Labeled Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamichhane, Narottam

    -(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid as the labeling agent to coordinate with the cisplatin aqua complex. It was then used to treat various cell lines and compared with cisplatin and carboplatin at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 microM to 100 microM for 72 hrs and 96 hrs. IC50 values calculated from cell viability indicated that 19F-FCP is a more potent drug than Carboplatin. Manual radiosynthesis and characterization of [18F]-FCP was performed using [18F]-2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid with coordination with cisplatin aqua complex. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]-FCP was optimized using the manual synthetic procedures and using them as macros for the radiosynthesizer. [18F]-FCP was evaluated in vivo with detailed biodistribution studies and PET imaging in normal and KB 3-1 and KB 8-5 tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. The biodistribution studies and PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys which attributes to the renal clearance of radiotracer. In vivo plasma and urine stability demonstrated intact [18F]-FCP. [ 111In]-Labeled Liposomes was synthesized and physiochemical properties were assessed with DLS. [111In]-Labeled Liposome was evaluated in vivo with detailed pharmacokinetic studies and SPECT imaging. The biodistribution and ROI analysis from SPECT imaging showed the spleen and liver uptake of [111In]-Labeled Liposome and subsequent clearance of activity with time. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was developed and physiochemical properties were characterized with DLS. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was used for in vivo dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging from the same nanoconstruct in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice was performed. Naked [18F]-FCP and [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome showed different pharmacokinetic profiles. PET

  20. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  1. ZnO nanowire-based CO sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Chen, Wei-Hao; Chen, Yu-Lin; Chang, Meng-Fan

    This study applied ZnO nanowires to the fabrication of a CO gas sensor operable at room temperature. Following the deposition of a seed layer by spin coating, an aqueous solution method was used to grow ZnO nanowires. This was followed by the self-assembly of an electrode array via dielectrophoresis prior to the fabrication of the CO sensing device. The material characteristics were analyzed using FE-SEM, EDS, GIXRD, FE-TEM, and the measurement of photoluminescence (PL). Our results identified the ZnO nanowires as a single crystalline wurtzite structure. Extending the growth period from 30 min to 360 min led to an increase in the length and diameter of the nanowires. After two hours, the ZnO presented a preferred crystal orientation of [002]. Sensor chips were assembled using 60 pairs of electrodes with gaps of 2 μm, over which were lain nanowires to complete the sensing devices. The average sensing response was 48.37 s and the average recovery time was 65.61 s, with a sensing response magnitude of approximately 6.8% at room temperature.

  2. Field emission and photoluminescence of ZnO nanocombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Wu, H. Y.; Zheng, Z. Q.; Yang, Y. H.

    2013-11-01

    Three kinds of new comb-shape nanostructures of ZnO have been grown on single silicon substrates without catalyst-assisted thermal evaporation of Zn and active carbon powders. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanorods are determined on the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanocombs can be explained on the basis of the vapor-solid (VS) processes. In nanocombs 1 and nanocombs 2, the comb teeth grow along [0001] and the comb stem grows along [], while in nanocombs 3, nanoteeth grow along [] and stem grows along [0001]. The photoluminescence and field-emission properties of ZnO nanocombs 1-3 have been investigated. The turn-on electric field of ZnO nanocombs 1-3, which is defined as the field required to producing a current density of 10 μA/cm2, is 9, 7.7 and 7.1 V/μm, respectively. The field-emission performance relies not only on the tip’s radius of curvature and field enhancement factor, but also on the factor evaluating the degree of the screening effect.

  3. Aerogel tempelated ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, T. W.; Martinson , A. B. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition is employed to conformally coat low density, high surface area aerogel films with ZnO. The ZnO/aerogel membranes are incorporated as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, which exhibit excellent power efficiencies of up to 2.4% under 100 mW cm{sup -2} light intensity.

  4. Ecotoxicity of Manufactured ZnO Nanoparticles - A Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an exhaustive literature review on the toxicity of manufactured ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to ecological receptors across different phylum: bacteria, algae and plants, aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates and freshwater fish. Results show that the majority of s...

  5. Self-focused ZnO transducers for ultrasonic biomicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, J. M.; Williams, J. A.; Zhou, Q. F.; Sun, L.; Shung, K. K.; Yu, H.; Kim, E. S.

    2008-04-15

    A simple fabrication technique was developed to produce high frequency (100 MHz) self-focused single element transducers with sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) crystal films. This technique requires the sputtering of a ZnO film directly onto a curved backing substrate. Transducers were fabricated by sputtering an 18 {mu}m thick ZnO layer on 2 mm diameter aluminum rods with ends shaped and polished to produce a 2 mm focus or f-number equal to one. The aluminum rod served a dual purpose as the backing layer and positive electrode for the resultant transducers. A 4 {mu}m Parylene matching layer was deposited on the transducers after housing and interconnect. This matching layer was used to protect the substrate and condition the transfer of acoustic energy between the ZnO film and the load medium. The pulse-echo response for a representative transducer was centered at 101 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 49%. The measured two way insertion loss was 44 dB. A tungsten wire phantom and an adult zebrafish eye were imaged to show the capability of these transducers.

  6. ZnO for photocatalytic air purification applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, I. V.; Suchea, M.

    2016-06-01

    Nano and micro-structured ZnO coatings onto various substrates were grown by chemical methods and optimized with respect to their photocatalytic activity against in-doors common air pollutants. Excellent quality coatings with high stability and photocatalytic efficiency were obtained with the scope to be integrated in a novel air-purification system.

  7. Photoluminescence of spray pyrolysis deposited ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence of highly structured ZnO layers comprising well-shaped hexagonal rods is presented. The ZnO rods (length 500-1,000 nm, diameter 100-300 nm) were grown in air onto a preheated soda-lime glass (SGL) or ITO/SGL substrate by low-cost chemical spray pyrolysis method using zinc chloride precursor solutions and growth temperatures in the range of 450-550°C. We report the effect of the variation in deposition parameters (substrate type, growth temperature, spray rate, solvent type) on the photoluminescence properties of the spray-deposited ZnO nanorods. A dominant near band edge (NBE) emission is observed at 300 K and at 10 K. High-resolution photoluminescence measurements at 10 K reveal fine structure of the NBE band with the dominant peaks related to the bound exciton transitions. It is found that all studied technological parameters affect the excitonic photoluminescence in ZnO nanorods. PACS: 78.55.Et, 81.15.Rs, 61.46.Km PMID:21711895

  8. Synthesis of ZnO flowers and their photoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Changle; Qiao Xueliang Luo Langli; Li Haijun

    2008-07-01

    Flower-like ZnO nano/microstructures have been synthesized by thermal treatment of Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} precursor in aqueous solvent, using ammonia as the structure directing agent. A number of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, and photoluminescence (PL) were used to characterize the obtained ZnO structures. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO structures showed UV ({approx}375 nm), blue ({approx}465 nm), and yellow ({approx}585 nm) emission bands when they were excited by a He-Gd laser using 320 nm as the excitation source. Furthermore, it has been interestingly found that the intensity of light emission at {approx}585 nm remarkably decreased when the obtained ZnO nanocrystals were annealed at 600 deg. C for 3 h in air. The reason might be the possible oxygen vacancies and interstitials in the sample decreased at high temperature.

  9. Computer simulation of ZnO varistors failures

    SciTech Connect

    Bartkowiak, M.; Mahan, G.D. |; Comber, M.G.; Alim, M.A.

    1997-11-01

    Zinc oxide varistors are multi-component ceramic devices produced by sintering ZnO powder together with small amounts of other oxides. Highly nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of ZnO varistors are used in electrical surge arresters. They protect electrical equipment from damage by limiting overvoltages and dissipating the associated energy. Therefore, the energy handling capability is crucial. It is defined as the amount of energy that a varistor can absorb before it fails. Here, a simple thermo-mechanical model is applied to evaluate the influence of the nonuniformity of ZnO varistor disks used in surge arresters on their energy handling capability. By solving heat transfer equations for a varistor disk with nonuniform electrical properties, the authors compute the time dependence of the temperature profile and the distribution of thermal stresses. The model can identify the energy handling limitations of ZnO varistors imposed by three different failure modes: puncture, thermal runaway, and cracking. It conforms to the available failure data, and explains the observation that energy handling improves at high current densities.

  10. ZnO coated nanospring-based chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrokhotov, Vladimir; Oakes, Landon; Sowell, Dewayne; Larin, Alexander; Hall, Jessica; Kengne, Alex; Bakharev, Pavel; Corti, Giancarlo; Cantrell, Timothy; Prakash, Tej; Williams, Joseph; McIlroy, D. N.

    2012-02-01

    Chemiresistors were constructed using 3-D silica nanospring mats coated with a contiguous film of ZnO nanocrystals. Chemiresistors with an average ZnO nanocrystal radius <3 nm, or >20 nm, were found to exhibit a relative change in conductance of a factor of 50 upon exposure to a gas flow of 20% O2 and 80% N2 with ˜500 ppm of toluene and an operational temperature of 400 °C. Samples with an average ZnO nanocrystal radius of 15 nm were found to be the most responsive with a relative conductance change of a factor of 1000. The addition of metal nanoparticles (average radius equal to 2.4 nm) onto the surface of the ZnO nanocrystals (average radius equal to 15 nm) produced a relative change in conductance of a factor of 1500. For the optimum conditions (T = 400 °C, grain size ˜15 nm) well-defined spikes in conductance to explosive vapors (TNT, TATP) were obtained for 0.1 ms exposure time at ppb levels.

  11. Co doped ZnO nanowires as visible light photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutka, Andris; Käämbre, Tanel; Pärna, Rainer; Juhnevica, Inna; Maiorov, Mihael; Joost, Urmas; Kisand, Vambola

    2016-06-01

    High aspect ratio cobalt doped ZnO nanowires showing strong photocatalytic activity and moderate ferromagnetic behaviour were successfully synthesized using a solvothermal method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities evaluated for visible light driven degradation of an aqueous methylene orange (MO) solution were higher than for Co doped ZnO nanoparticles at the same doping level and synthesized by the same synthesis route. The rate constant for MO visible light photocatalytic degradation was 1.9·10-3 min-1 in case of nanoparticles and 4.2·10-3 min-1 in case of nanowires. We observe strongly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity for moderate Co doping levels, with an optimum at a composition of Zn0.95Co0.05O. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of Co doped ZnO nanowires were attributed to the combined effects of enhanced visible light absorption at the Co sites in ZnO nanowires, and improved separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers at optimal Co doping.

  12. Memristive switching of ZnO nanorod mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevgeniy, Puzyrev; Shen, Xiao; Ni, Kai; Zhang, Xuan; Hachtel, Jordan; Choi, Bo; Chisholm, Matthew; Fleetwood, Daniel; Schrimpf, Ronald; Pantelides, Sokrates

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of memristive switching in a self-assembled mesh of ZnO nanorods. A ZnO nanorod mesh spans the area between Ag contacts in a device that exhibits hysteresis with large ON/OFF ratio, reaching ION/IOFF values of 104. We show that switching behavior depends critically on the geometry of the nanorod mesh. We employ density functional theory (DFT) calculations to deduce the mechanism for resistive switching for the nanorod mesh. Redistribution of Ag atoms, driven by an electrical field, leads to the formation and evolution of a conducting path through nanorods. Field-induced migration of Ag atoms changes the doping level of nanorods and modulates their conductivity. Using static DFT and nudged-elastic-band calculations, we investigate the energy of interaction between Ag clusters and a ZnO surface, including migration barriers of Ag atoms. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics are modeled using percolation theory in a nanorod mesh. To describe the dynamics of SET/RESET phenomena, model parameters include the experimentally observed nanorod geometry and the energetics of Ag on ZnO surfaces, obtained from DFT calculations. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR-1207241, DOE Grant DE-FG02-09ER46554, and the McMinn Endowment at Vanderbilt University. Computational support was provided by the NSF XSEDE under Grant #DMR TG-DMR130121.

  13. ZnO doped sodium silicate preionize N2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Montaser; F, Sabry; S, A. Ibrahim

    1989-11-01

    An experimental study of the effect of ZnO doped sodium silicate thin film, used as a semiconductive preionizer on the output energy is presented. The output energy of the nitrogen laser increased by two folds. The performance of the preionizer can be controlled to match the discharge requirements.

  14. Hydrogen in Ag-doped ZnO: theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    He, H Y; Hu, J; Pan, B C

    2009-05-28

    Based on density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the behaviors of a H atom in Ag-doped ZnO involving the preference sites, diffusion behaviors, the electronic structures, and vibrational properties. We find that a H atom can migrate to the doped Ag to form a Ag-H complex by overcoming energy barriers of 0.3-1.0 eV. The lowest-energy site for H location is the bond center of a Ag-O in the basal plane. Moreover, H can migrate between this site and its equivalent sites with energy cost of less than 0.5 eV. In contrast, dissociation of such a Ag-H complex needs energy of about 1.1-1.3 eV. This implies that the Ag-H complexes can commonly exist in the Ag-doped ZnO, which have a negative effect on the desirable p-type carrier concentrations of Ag-doped ZnO. In addition, based on the frozen phonon calculation, the vibrational properties of ZnO with a Ag-H complex are predicted. Some new vibrational modes associated with the Ag-H complex present in the vibrational spectrum of the system.

  15. Growth Kinetics and Modeling of ZnO Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Penny S.; Maddox, Leone M.; Shapter, Joe G.; Voelcker, Nico H.; Ford, Michael J.; Waclawik, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The technique for producing quantum-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles is much safer than a technique that used hydrogen sulfide gas to produce cadmium sulfide and zinc sulfide nanoparticles. A further advantage of this method is the ability to sample the solution over time and hence determine the growth kinetics.

  16. Preparation and characteristics of ZnO varistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C. C.; Tsai, Y. L.; Huang, C. L.

    The nonohmic properties of ZnO varistors having additives of Bi, Sb, and several other three-valence metal oxides were investigated. It is determined that the very high nonlinearity of the electrical properties of these varistors is related to the additive content, sintering temperature, and ambient temperature. Results of scanning electron microscopy indicate that the characteristics of ZnO varistors can be attributed to the electrical barriers in the vicinity of the grain boundary within the ZnO grains, which are mostly found in direct contact with each other. The barrier height at zero bias was found to be 1.57 V and the donor concentration of ZnO grains was determined to equal 3 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm. The V-I characteristics in the prebreakdown region at very low voltage are shown to be temperature sensitive, which is consistent with thermionic emission. The breakdown field in the depletion layer is found to be above 10 to the 6th V/cm. In addition, it is determined that tunneling through the barrier dominates in the breakdown regions and can adequately account for values of alpha in excess of 60.

  17. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  18. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  19. Influence of homo buffer layer thickness on the quality of ZnO epilayers.

    PubMed

    Eid, E A; Fouda, A N

    2015-10-01

    ZnO buffer layers with different thicknesses were deposited on a-plane sapphire substrates at 300 °C. ZnO epilayers were grown on ZnO buffers at 600 °C by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and vacuum annealed at 900 °C for an hour. Influence of nucleation layer thickness on the structural and quality of ZnO thin films was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Raman spectroscopy. The best ZnO film quality was obtained with the ZnO buffer layer of 45 nm thick which provided the smoothest surface with RMS value of 0.3 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the films have a single phase wurtzite structure with (0001) preferred crystal orientation. As evident from narrow FWHM of ZnO (0002) rocking curve, ZnO buffer can serve as a good template for the growth of high-quality ZnO films with little tilt. In addition, the micro-Raman scattering measurements at room temperature revealed the existence of Raman active phonon modes of ZnO; A1(TO), A1(LO) and E2(high). The latter two modes were not observed in thin buffer layer beside the dis-appearance of E2(low) mode in all films. PMID:25950638

  20. Selective area growth of well-ordered ZnO nanowire arrays with controllable polarity.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Vincent; Sarigiannidou, Eirini; Appert, Estelle; Bocheux, Amandine; Guillemin, Sophie; Donatini, Fabrice; Robin, Ivan-Christophe; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Robaut, Florence

    2014-05-27

    Controlling the polarity of ZnO nanowires in addition to the uniformity of their structural morphology in terms of position, vertical alignment, length, diameter, and period is still a technological and fundamental challenge for real-world device integration. In order to tackle this issue, we specifically combine the selective area growth on prepatterned polar c-plane ZnO single crystals using electron-beam lithography, with the chemical bath deposition. The formation of ZnO nanowires with a highly controlled structural morphology and a high optical quality is demonstrated over large surface areas on both polar c-plane ZnO single crystals. Importantly, the polarity of ZnO nanowires can be switched from O- to Zn-polar, depending on the polarity of prepatterned ZnO single crystals. This indicates that no fundamental limitations prevent ZnO nanowires from being O- or Zn-polar. In contrast to their catalyst-free growth by vapor-phase deposition techniques, the possibility to control the polarity of ZnO nanowires grown in solution is remarkable, further showing the strong interest in the chemical bath deposition and hydrothermal techniques. The single O- and Zn-polar ZnO nanowires additionally exhibit distinctive cathodoluminescence spectra. To a broader extent, these findings open the way to the ultimate fabrication of well-organized heterostructures made from ZnO nanowires, which can act as building blocks in a large number of electronic, optoelectronic, and photovoltaic devices.

  1. Effect of nanocomposite packaging containing ZnO on growth of Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Esmailzadeh, Hakimeh; Sangpour, Parvaneh; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Hejazi, Jalal; Khaksar, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened new windows in active food packaging. Nano-sized ZnO is an inexpensive material with potential antimicrobial properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antibacterial effect of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) containing ZnO nanoparticles on Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by facil molten salt method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite films containing 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder. The growth of both microorganisms has decreased in the presence of ZnO containing nanocomposites compared with controls. Nanocomposites with 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles had stronger antibacterial effect against both bacteria in comparison with the 2 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites. B. subtilis as Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ZnO containing nanocomposite films compared with E. aerogenes as Gram-negative bacteria. There were no significant differences between the migration of Zn ions from 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites and the released Zn ions were not significantly increased in both groups after 14 days compared with the first. Regarding the considerable antibacterial effects of ZnO nanoparticles, their application in active food packaging can be a suitable solution for extending the shelf life of food.

  2. Radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and wet thermal oxidation of ZnO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. F.; Chua, S. J.; Hu, G. X.; Gong, H.; Xiang, N.

    2007-08-01

    The authors studied the growth and wet thermal oxidation (WTO) of ZnO thin films using a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. X-ray diffraction reveals a preferred orientation of [101¯0]ZnO(0002)//[112¯0]Al2O3(0002) coexisted with a small amount of ZnO (101¯1) and ZnO (101¯3) crystals on the Al2O3 (0001) substrate. The ZnO (101¯1) and ZnO (101¯3) crystals, as well as the in-plane preferred orientation, are absent from the growth of ZnO on the GaAs(001) substrate. WTO at 550 °C improves the crystalline and the photoluminescence more significantly than annealing in air, N2 and O2 ambient; it also tends to convert the crystal from ZnO (101¯1) and ZnO (101¯3) to ZnO (0002). The evolution of the photoluminescence upon WTO and annealing reveals that the green and orange emissions, centered at 520 and 650 nm, are likely originated from oxygen vacancies and oxygen interstitials, respectively; while the 420 nm emission, which is very sensitive to the postgrowth thermal processing regardless of the substrate and the ambient gas, is likely originated from the surface-state related defects.

  3. The Antibacterial Activity of Ta-doped ZnO Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bing-Lei; Han, Ping; Guo, Li-Chuan; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Li, Ai-Dong; Kong, Ji-Zhou; Zhai, Hai-Fa; Wu, Di

    2015-08-01

    A novel photocatalyst of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles was prepared by a modified Pechini-type method. The antimicrobial study of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles on several bacteria of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis ( B. subtilis) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) were performed using a standard microbial method. The Ta-doping concentration effect on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of various bacteria under dark ambient has been evaluated. The photocatalytical inactivation of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles under visible light irradiation was examined. The MIC results indicate that the incorporation of Ta5+ ions into ZnO significantly improve the bacteriostasis effect of ZnO nanoparticles on E. coli, S. aureus, and B. subtilis in the absence of light. Compared to MIC results without light irradiation, Ta-doped ZnO and pure ZnO nanoparticles show much stronger bactericidal efficacy on P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and S. aureus under visible light illumination. The possible antimicrobial mechanisms in Ta-doped ZnO systems under visible light and dark conditions were also proposed. Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles exhibit more effective bactericidal efficacy than pure ZnO in dark ambient, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of enhanced surface bioactivity and increased electrostatic force due to the incorporation of Ta5+ ions into ZnO. Based on the antibacterial tests, 5 % Ta-doped ZnO is a more effective antimicrobial agent than pure ZnO.

  4. Electronic structure of Co-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neffati, Ahmed; Souissi, Hajer; Kammoun, Souha

    2012-10-01

    The optical transmission spectra, the photoluminescence (PL), and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods Zn1-xCoxO (x = 0.01, 0.10) were measured by Loan et al. [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 065412 (2009)] in the region 1.5-4 eV. These spectra exhibit a group of ultraviolet narrow lines in the region of 3.0-3.4 eV related to the near-band-edge emission of the host ZnO materials and a group of emission lines in the red region of 1.8-1.9 eV assigned to the radiative transitions within the tetrahedral Co2+ ions in the ZnO host crystal. The group of lines in the visible region provides important information about the electronic structure of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the visible lines associated to the Co2+ ion transition occupying a Td site symmetry in ZnO host crystal. A satisfactory correlations were obtained between experimental and calculated energy levels. The electronic structure was compared with the reported for cobalt transition ion doped in ZnO nanoparticles and bulk crystals [Volbers et al., Appl. Phys. A 88, 153 (2007) and H. J. Schulz and M. Thiede, Phys. Rev. B 35, 18 (1987)]. In order to explain the existence of excitation peaks observed near the band edge of the ZnO host, an energy transfer mechanism is proposed.

  5. CMOS Alcohol Sensor Employing ZnO Nanowire Sensing Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, S.; Ali, S. Z.; Guha, P. K.; Hiralal, P.; Unalan, H. E.; Dalal, S. H.; Covington, J. A.; Milne, W. I.; Gardner, J. W.; Udrea, F.

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on the utilization of zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) on a silicon on insulator (SOI) CMOS micro-hotplate for use as an alcohol sensor. The device was designed in Cadence and fabricated in a 1.0 μm SOI CMOS process at XFAB (Germany). The basic resistive gas sensor comprises of a metal micro-heater (made of aluminum) embedded in an ultra-thin membrane. Gold plated aluminum electrodes, formed of the top metal, are used for contacting with the sensing material. This design allows high operating temperatures with low power consumption. The membrane was formed by using deep reactive ion etching. ZnO NWs were grown on SOI CMOS substrates by a simple and low-cost hydrothermal method. A few nanometer of ZnO seed layer was first sputtered on the chips, using a metal mask, and then the chips were dipped in a zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetramine solution at 90° C to grow ZnO NWs. The chemical sensitivity of the on-chip NWs were studied in the presence of ethanol (C2H5OH) vapour (with 10% relative humidity) at two different temperatures: 200 and 250° C (the corresponding power consumptions are only 18 and 22 mW). The concentrations of ethanol vapour were varied from 175-1484 ppm (pers per million) and the maximum response was observed 40% (change in resistance in %) at 786 ppm at 250° C. These preliminary measurements showed that the on-chip deposited ZnO NWs could be a promising material for a CMOS based ethanol sensor.

  6. Zn2NF and Related Analogues of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lingampalli, Srinivasa Rao; Manjunath, Krishnappa; Shenoy, Sandhya; Waghmare, Umesh V; Rao, C N R

    2016-07-01

    Substitution of aliovalent N(3-) and F(-) anions in place of O(2-) in ZnO brings about major changes in the electronic structure and properties, the composition, even with 10 atomic percent or less of the two anions, rendering the material yellow colored with a much smaller band gap. We have examined the variation of band gap of ZnO with progressive substitution of N and F and more importantly prepared Zn2NF which is the composition one obtains ultimately upon complete replacement of O(2-) ions. In this article, we present the results of a first complete study of the crystal and electronic structures as well as of properties of a stable metal nitride fluoride, Zn2NF. This material occurs in two crystal forms, tetragonal and orthorhombic, both with a band gap much smaller than that of ZnO. Electronic structures of Zn2NF as well as ZnO0.2N0.5F0.3 investigated by first-principles calculations show that the valence bands of these are dominated by the N (2p) states lying at the top. Interestingly, the latter is a p-type material, a property that has been anticipated for long time. The calculations predict conduction and valence band edges in Zn2NF to be favorable for water splitting. Zn2NF does indeed exhibit good visible-light-induced hydrogen evolution activity unlike ZnO. The present study demonstrates how aliovalent anion substitution can be employed for tuning band gaps of materials. PMID:27299368

  7. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  8. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  9. Early detection of rejection and assessment of cyclosporine therapy by 111In antimyosin imaging in mouse heart allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M.; Haber, E.; Khaw, B.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Mice (n = 58) with abdominal heterotopic heart transplants were studied to examine the effectiveness of 111In-labeled antimyosin scintigraphy in the detection of rejection and to determine the consequence of cyclosporine therapy on the results. Allografts from B10D2 donors were transplanted into B6AF1 recipients. Of the 49 allografted mice, 19 were treated with cyclosporine (15 mg/kg.day). Nine isografted mice served as controls. Scintigraphy was performed by injecting 100 muCi 111In antimyosin monoclonal antibody 2-15 days after transplantation. An increase in the ratio of percent dose of antimyosin injected per gram (% dose/g) of the grafted heart (G) to that of the autologous heart (A) (G/A) as well as the increasing percent dose per gram of antimyosin in the grafts reflected the severity of histopathological rejection regardless of the presence or absence of cyclosporine. Scintigraphic images demonstrated unequivocally intense accumulation of 111In in rejected allografts as confirmed by histologically demonstrable myocyte necrosis. The G/A ratio in allografted mice with mildly deteriorated mechanical activity (4.2 {plus minus} 1.0, mean {plus minus} SD) was greater than that in mice with normal contractility (1.8 {plus minus} 0.7) (p less than 0.001), and the necrosis correlated with this modest decline in mechanical function could be scintigraphically identified. Of mice with normally contracting allografts, the G/A ratio was greater in animals with demonstrated myocyte necrosis (2.6 {plus minus} 0.5) than in those without necrosis (1.5 {plus minus} 0.5) (p less than 0.001). In contrast, isografted mice or a subset of allografted mice treated with cyclosporine and not showing evidence of rejection did not manifest any significant change in G/A ratio, nor did they have scintigrams positive for rejection as late as 15 days after transplantation.

  10. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  11. Capped ZnO (3, 0) nanotubes as building blocks of bare and H passivated wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsattar, Mudar Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    In the present work we propose building blocks of hexagonal type crystals and nanocrystals of zinc oxide including wurtzite structure that are called wurtzoids. These molecules are ZnO (3, 0) nanotubes capped at their two terminals with Zn or O atoms. Hexagonal part of these molecules is included in the central part of these molecules. This part can be repeated to increase hexagonal structure ratio. Hydrogen passivated and bare ZnO wurtzoids are investigated. Results show bare wurtzoids have shorter and stronger surface sp2 bonds than H passivated sp3 bonded wurtzoids. The calculated energy gap of these molecules shows the expected trend of gaps. Calculated binding energy per atom shows that wurtzoids are tight and stable structures which are not the case of ZnO diamondoids. Vibrational frequencies manifest the expected trends of hexagonal type structures. Reduced mass and force constant of these vibrations are investigated to illustrate the sp2 and sp3 bonding effects of bare and H passivated ZnO nanocrystals respectively.

  12. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  13. Interaction of ethanol with 111In-labelled membranes: evaluation by the perturbed angular correlation-sum peak ratio method.

    PubMed

    Jay, M; Woodward, M A

    1985-08-01

    The interaction of ethanol with erythrocyte ghosts and vesicles composed of brain lipid extracts labelled with indium-111 was studied using the sum peak ratio method of perturbed angular correlation measurements. Membranes from animals that were fed diets containing ethanol for 10 days demonstrated resistance to the decrease in sum peak ratio values observed in control animals. Thus, repeated administration of ethanol induces changes in the properties of biological membranes, possibly by altering phospholipid composition, which is reflected in the anisotropy of membrane-associated 111In-labelled nuclei as measured by sum peak ratios.

  14. Effect of ZnO buffer layer on the cathodoluminescence of ZnGa 2O 4/ZnO phosphor screen for FED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Hsueh, Ting-Jen; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2006-01-01

    A ZnGa 2O 4/ZnO phosphor screen for FED was prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The ZnO buffer layer has a reasonable resistivity of about 5.2×10 3 Ω cm and a high transparency larger than 85%. The ZnGa 2O 4 phosphor was polycrystalline on ITO, yet it was amorphous on ZnO. If the ZnGa 2O 4/ZnO phosphor screen was annealed at temperatures above 300 °C, then ZnGa 2O 4 was crystallized. Owing to the lattice mismatch between ZnGa 2O 4 and ZnO, the grain size of ZnGa 2O 4 on ZnO was small. As a result, the effective emission area and luminescence of the ZnGa 2O 4/ZnO phosphor screen were enhanced. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) examination showed that atoms in ZnO did not diffuse into ZnGa 2O 4 film, and the ZnGa 2O 4 was Zn-deficient. For charge balance, oxygen vacancy defects in the phosphor film were formed to compensate Zn deficiencies; consequently, the probability for electrons transfer from 2E B to 4A 2 of Ga energy levels was improved and the luminescence of the phosphor was increased.

  15. Ohmic-Rectifying Conversion of Ni Contacts on ZnO and the Possible Determination of ZnO Thin Film Surface Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Kim Guan; Tneh, Sau Siong; Tan, Gaik Leng; Yam, Fong Kwong; Ng, Sha Shiong; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2014-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of Ni contacts with the surfaces of ZnO thin films as well as single crystal (0001) ZnO substrate are investigated. The ZnO thin film shows a conversion from Ohmic to rectifying behavior when annealed at 800°C. Similar findings are also found on the Zn-polar surface of (0001) ZnO. The O-polar surface, however, only shows Ohmic behavior before and after annealing. The rectifying behavior observed on the Zn-polar and ZnO thin film surfaces is associated with the formation of nickel zinc oxide (Ni1-xZnxO, where x = 0.1, 0.2). The current-voltage characteristics suggest that a p-n junction is formed by Ni1-xZnxO (which is believed to be p-type) and ZnO (which is intrinsically n-type). The rectifying behavior for the ZnO thin film as a result of annealing suggests that its surface is Zn-terminated. Current-voltage measurements could possibly be used to determine the surface polarity of ZnO thin films. PMID:24466144

  16. Effects of surface morphology of ZnO seed layers on growth of ZnO nanostructures prepared by hydrothermal method and annealing.

    PubMed

    Yim, Kwang Gug; Kim, Min Su; Leem, Jae-Young

    2013-05-01

    ZnO nanostructures were grown on Si (111) substrates by a hydrothermal method. Prior to growing the ZnO nanostructures, ZnO seed layers with different post-heat temperatures were prepared by a spin-coating process. Then, the ZnO nanostructures were annealed at 500 degrees C for 20 min under an Ar atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoluminescence (PL) were carried out at room temperature (RT) to investigate the structural and optical properties of the as-grown and annealed ZnO nanostructures. The surface morphologies of the seed layers changed from a smooth surface to a mountain chain-like structure as the post-heating temperatures increased. The as-grown and annealed ZnO nanostructures exhibited a strong (002) diffraction peak. Compared to the as-grown ZnO nanostructures, the annealed ZnO nanostructures exhibited significantly strong enhancement in the PL intensity ratio by almost a factor of 2.

  17. Effect of ZnO seed layer on the morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, R. Mohan, S. Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanorods were grown by chemical bath deposition on sputtered, polycrystalline GaN buffer layers with and without ZnO seed layer. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layers are not vertically well aligned. Photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layer, however exhibits a much stronger near-band-edge emission and negligible defect emission, compared to the nanorods grown on ZnO buffer layer. These features are attributed to gallium incorporation at the ZnO-GaN interface. The introduction of a thin (25 nm) ZnO seed layer on GaN buffer layer significantly improves the morphology and vertical alignment of ZnO-NRs without sacrificing the high optical quality of ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layer. The presence of a thick (200 nm) ZnO seed layer completely masks the effect of the underlying GaN buffer layer on the morphology and optical properties of nanorods.

  18. Synthesis, structural and optical properties of pure ZnO and Co doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, P. Geetha; Velu, A. Sakthi

    2016-09-01

    Pure ZnO and Cobalt (Co) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs showed Spherical and nanorod mixed phase and Spherical like morphology, respectively. The amount of dopant (Co2+) incorporated into ZnO sample was determined by EDAX. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 438 and 427 cm-1 for ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurements, the excitonic pecks were found around 376 and 370 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of seven different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Zeta potential measurements were used to find out the size and surface charges.

  19. Optimal Zn/O ratio in vapor phase for the synthesis of high quality ZnO tetrapod nanocrystals via thermal evaporation of Zn in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geun-Hyoung

    2012-10-01

    Tetrapod-shaped ZnO nanocrystals were synthezised via thermal evaporation of Zn powder in air. The Zn powder was oxidized at 930 °C for 60 min. To investigate the optimal Zn/O molar ratio in such vapor phase synthesis, the Zn content was varied in range of 0.1-0.75 g. When the Zn content was 0.1 g, no nanocrystals were formed. Above 0.25 g Zn, growth of ZnO nanocrystals started without clear tetrapod like morphology. Beyond Zn content of 0.50 g, clear tetrapod-shaped ZnO nanocrystals were detected. These results establish that there is a certain required ratio of zinc and oxygen in vapor phase for generation of tetrapod-shaped ZnO nanocrystals. Such Zn:O ratio is also calculated theoretically from the ideal gas law. Clear tetrapod type ZnO nanocrystals prepared with Zn content of 0.5 g exhibited the highest intensity of the ultraviolet emission centered at 380 nm which also confirms the high crystalline quality of such ZnO nanocrystals.

  20. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  1. Orbital implants: potential new directions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Celia R; Morrison, David; Lou, Xia; Crawford, Geoffrey J; Gadjatsy, Adam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews orbital implants used to replace an eye after enucleation or evisceration. Advantages of implant placement are described, with discussion of implant and wrap material, and design features that affect clinical outcomes. Implants may be porous or nonporous, pegged for linkage with a cosmetic shell or unpegged, and may be wrapped with a covering material or tissue or unwrapped. Device shape, volume and material qualities affect tissue tolerance and the risk of exposure or extrusion. Limitations of currently available devices are discussed, with factors affecting surgeon and patient choice. Ideally, a device should be easy to insert, avoid the need for wrapping or adjunctive tissues, be light, biointegratable, comfortable after implantation and provide satisfactory orbital volume replacement, movement and cosmesis without requiring further surgery or pegging. This review briefly discusses developments in implant design and aspects of design that affect function, but is not a detailed clinical review; rather, it aims to stimulate thought on optimal design and discusses recent developments. Novel technology in the form of a prototype device with a soft, biointegratable anterior surface is described as an example of newer approaches.

  2. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  3. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  4. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  5. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability. PMID:24403565

  6. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  7. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  8. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  9. Thermodynamic Study of Interactions Between ZnO and ZnO Binding Peptides Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Limo, Marion J; Perry, Carole C

    2015-06-23

    While material-specific peptide binding sequences have been identified using a combination of combinatorial methods and computational modeling tools, a deep molecular level understanding of the fundamental principles through which these interactions occur and in some instances modify the morphology of inorganic materials is far from being fully realized. Understanding the thermodynamic changes that occur during peptide-inorganic interactions and correlating these to structural modifications of the inorganic materials could be the key to achieving and mastering control over material formation processes. This study is a detailed investigation applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to directly probe thermodynamic changes that occur during interaction of ZnO binding peptides (ZnO-BPs) and ZnO. The ZnO-BPs used are reported sequences G-12 (GLHVMHKVAPPR), GT-16 (GLHVMHKVAPPR-GGGC), and alanine mutants of G-12 (G-12A6, G-12A11, and G-12A12) whose interaction with ZnO during solution synthesis studies have been extensively investigated. The interactions of the ZnO-BPs with ZnO yielded biphasic isotherms comprising both an endothermic and an exothermic event. Qualitative differences were observed in the isothermal profiles of the different peptides and ZnO particles studied. Measured ΔG values were between -6 and -8.5 kcal/mol, and high adsorption affinity values indicated the occurrence of favorable ZnO-BP-ZnO interactions. ITC has great potential in its use to understand peptide-inorganic interactions, and with continued development, the knowledge gained may be instrumental for simplification of selection processes of organic molecules for the advancement of material synthesis and design.

  10. Fundamental understanding of the growth, doping and characterization of aligned ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Gang

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a II-VI semiconductor whose wide direct bandgap (3.37 eV) and large exciton binding energy (60 meV) make it compelling for optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, solar cells, and mechanical energy harvesting devices. One dimensional structures of ZnO (nanowires) have become significant due to their unique physical properties arising from quantum confinement, and they are ideal for studying transport mechanisms in one-dimensional systems. In this doctoral research work, ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays were synthesized on sapphire substrates through carbo-thermal reduction of ZnO powders, and the effects of growth parameters on the properties of ZnO NW arrays were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Based on the phonon mode selection rules in wurtzite ZnO, confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the alignment of ZnO NWs in an array, thereby complementing X-ray diffraction. Al doped ZnO NW arrays were achieved by mixing Al powder into the ZnO and graphite source mixture, and the presence of Al was confirmed by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The incorporation of Al had the effects of lowering the electrical resistivity, slightly deteriorating crystal quality and suppressing defect related green emission. Two models of ZnO NW growth were developed by establishing the relationship between NW length and diameter for undoped and Al doped ZnO NWs separately. The growth of undoped ZnO NWs followed the diffusion-induced model which was characterized by thin wires being longer than thick wires, while the growth of Al doped ZnO was controlled by Gibbs-Thomson effect which was characterized by thin wires being shorter than thin wires. Local electrode atom probe analysis of ZnO NWs was carried out to study the crystal stoichiometry and Al incorporation. Undoped ZnO NWs were found to be high purity with no detectable impurities

  11. Investigations into the impact of various substrates and ZnO ultra thin seed layers prepared by atomic layer deposition on growth of ZnO nanowire array

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The impact of various substrates and zinc oxide (ZnO) ultra thin seed layers prepared by atomic layer deposition on the geometric morphology of subsequent ZnO nanowire arrays (NWs) fabricated by the hydrothermal method was investigated. The investigated substrates included B-doped ZnO films, indium tin oxide films, single crystal silicon (111), and glass sheets. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the geometry and aligment of the NWs were controlled by surface topography of the substrates and thickness of the ZnO seed layers, respectively. According to atomic force microscopy data, we suggest that the substrate, fluctuate amplitude and fluctuate frequency of roughness on ZnO seed layers have a great impact on the alignment of the resulting NWs, whereas the influence of the seed layers' texture was negligible. PMID:22759838

  12. Synthesis of nano-dimensional ZnO and Ga doped ZnO thin films by vapor phase transport and study as transparent conducting oxide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Saurav, M; Pandey, B; Srivastava, P

    2008-05-01

    We report synthesis of polycrystalline ZnO and Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) thin films (approximately 80 nm) on Si and quartz substrates in a non-vacuum muffle furnace, a simple and cost-effective route, without any catalyst/reactive carrier gases, at relatively low processing temperature of 550 degrees C. The crystalline phases of the films are identified by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). The growth of ZnO films is examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a function of deposition time. An optical transmission of approximately 90% is observed for pure ZnO film having a resistivity of approximately 2.1 Omega-cm as measured by van der Pauw technique. Doping with Ga results in single phase ZnO:Ga films, retaining an optical transmission of about 80% and three orders of magnitude decrease in resistivity as compared to pure ZnO film. PMID:18572702

  13. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol–gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol–gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:24521308

  15. Atomic layer deposition of ZnO on Cu-nanoclusters for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ziyu; Patterson, Matthew; Ren Maoming; Wang Ying; Flake, John C.; Sprunger, Phillip T.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2013-01-15

    The properties of ALD-grown ZnO thin films on Cu clusters supported on ZnO(1010) have been studied with scanning tunneling and scanning electron microscopy in combination with angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Deposition at room temperature of two monolayers of Cu on ZnO(1010) results in metallic Cu{sup 0} clusters {approx}8 nm wide by 1.4 nm high. Higher coverages of 15 ML results in a similar morphology, with slightly larger cluster sizes. Following air-exposure and ALD-growth of two cycles of ZnO, the Cu exhibits Cu{sup +} species characteristic of Cu{sub 2}O and the thin ZnO coating is hydroxylated. Electrochemical studies of ALD ZnO coatings on Cu suggest that they are more active for CO{sub 2} reduction.

  16. Ab inito study of Ag-related defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qixin; Xiong, Zhihua; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the structure and electronic properties of Ag-related defects in ZnO. The calculation results indicate that AgZn behaves as acceptor. Simultaneously, by comparing the formation energy and electronic structure of Ag-related defects in ZnO, Oi-AgZn behaves as acceptor in Ag-doped ZnO and it is better to gain p-type ZnO. However, Hi-AgZn complex has the lowest formation energy. Thus, the formation of the other point defects is greatly suppressed by the formation of Hi in Ag-doped ZnO. Moreover, the H atoms can be easily dissociated from hydrogen-passivated complexes by post-annealing at moderate temperatures, thus, codoping Ag with H may be a good method to achieve p-type in Ag-doped ZnO.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis and dielectric properties of chrysanthemum-like ZnO particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; You, Tian-Gui; Zhao, Wu; Yun, Jiang-Ni

    2009-09-01

    By orthogonal design theory, technological parameters of chrysanthemum-like ZnO particles prepared in a hydrothermal process are optimized. This paper reports a set of technological parameters for growing chrysanthemum-like ZnO particles on a large scale. It investigates the morphologies and crystalline structures of the as-synthesized three-dimensional ZnO particles with a scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer and transmission electron microscope, and the possible growth mechanism on the three-dimensional ZnO particles. The experimental results indicate that the values of in', in″ and tan δe gradually increase in the X band with the improvement of the developmental level of chrysanthemum-like ZnO particles, implying that the electromagnetic wave absorbing property depends on the morphologies of three-dimensional ZnO particles.

  18. Nanoantenna-like properties of sea-urchin shaped ZnO as a nanolight filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husn Su, Yen; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2012-09-01

    A light scattering peak of ZnO rods is presented at 543.2 nm. The radiation peaks of ZnO nanospines correspond to 496.6 nm and 630.6 nm due to the breaking of the symmetry of the ZnO rods. The radiation peaks of sea-urchin shaped ZnO was observed and confirmed by utilizing the dipole approximation. Sea-urchin shaped ZnO can tune and then filter different frequencies of light by utilizing incident light to illuminate at the different positions of sea-urchin shaped ZnO which works like a nanolight filter device and has potential applications in photonic computers, bio-light emission device, and solar cells.

  19. Fabrication and gas-sensing properties of hierarchical ZnO replica using down as template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zikui; Li, Songzhan; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Yingshan; Gu, Shaojin; Tao, Yongzhen; Liu, Li; Fang, Dong; Xu, Weilin

    2016-06-01

    Hierarchical ZnO replica using down as template fabricated by a combination of low-temperature plasma treatment and sonochemical method was used in gas sensor for the detection of ethanol and formaldehyde. The morphologies and crystal structures of the hierarchical ZnO replica were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Results showed that the hierarchical ZnO replica retained the initial down morphology and consisted of hexagonal wurtzite structure ZnO nanocrystals. The results of resistance-temperature characteristics and responses to ethanol and formaldehyde indicated that the hierarchical ZnO film had low activation energy (0.1118 eV) and a low optimum operating temperature and that the response time was longer than recovery time. These behaviors were well explained in relation to three-dimensional network structures and the high specific surface area of the hierarchical ZnO replica.

  20. Surface Defects Control for ZnO Nanorods Synthesized Through a Gas-Assisted Hydrothermal Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Limin; Shu, Changhua; Jia, Zhengfeng; Wang, Changzheng

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen vacancies in crystal have an important impact on the electronic properties of zinc oxide (ZnO). In this paper, ZnO nanorods with rich oxygen vacancies were prepared through a novel gas-assisted hydrothermal growth process. X-ray diffraction data showed that single-phase ZnO with the wurtzite crystal structure was obtained and the crystallite size decreased as the reaction atmosphere pressure increased. The oxygen vacancies of ZnO were confirmed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results showed that the concentration of oxygen vacancies could be regulated by both the atmosphere pressure and the atmosphere properties. The oxygen vacancies in ZnO samples were reduced when the pressure increase in the hydrogen reaction environment (reducing atmosphere) and the oxygen vacancies in ZnO samples were increased when the pressure increased in the oxygen reaction environment (oxidizing atmosphere).

  1. The effects of addition of citric acid on the morphologies of ZnO nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zao . E-mail: yangzao888@tom.com; Liu Quanhui; Yang Lei

    2007-02-15

    ZnO nanorods of 25-100 nm in diameter and 0.2-1 {mu}m in length were fabricated through citric acid assisted annealing process. The microstructure of ZnO nanorods was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. As a result, it was found that ZnO nanorods were single crystalline and pure. The effects of the growth conditions such as addition of citric acid, annealing temperature on the morphologies of ZnO nanostructures have also been investigated. At the given temperature the length decreased but the diameter increased with addition of the mass of citric acid. With the rising of the calcining heat, the shape of ZnO changed from rod to granule for a given amount of citric acid. Finally, the mechanism for citric acid assisted annealing synthesis of the ZnO nanostructure is discussed.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shou-Yi; Lin, Hsin-I.

    2014-02-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol-gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol-gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shou-Yi; Lin, Hsin-I

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol-gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol-gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:24521308

  4. Effect of the morphology on the optical properties of ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zao; Ye, Zhizhen; Xu, Zheng; zhao, Binghui

    2009-12-01

    ZnO nanostructures are fabricated by citric acid-assisted annealing process. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), FTIR spectrophotometer, ultraviolet-visible-near IR spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction pattern of these samples shows that ZnO nanostructures are single crystalline and pure. The effect of morphology of ZnO nanostructures on the optical properties of ZnO nanostructures is analyzed on the basis of these results. Our results clearly demonstrate that tunable optical properties of ZnO nanostructures can be attained by changing the morphology of ZnO nanostructures.

  5. Effect of Intrinsic Point Defect on the Magnetic Properties of ZnO Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jiangni; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yin, Tieen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of intrinsic point defect on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanowire is investigated by the first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results reveal that the pure ZnO nanowire without intrinsic point defect is nonmagnetic and ZnO nanowire with VO, Zni, Oi, OZn, or ZnO point defect also is nonmagnetic. However, a strong spin splitting phenomenon is observed in ZnO nanowire with VZn defect sitting on the surface site. The Mulliken population analysis reveals that the oxygen atoms which are close to the VZn defect do major contribution to the magnetic moment. Partial density states calculation further suggests that the appearance of the half-metallic ferromagnetism in ZnO nanorod with VZn originates from the hybridization of the O2p states with Zn 3d states. PMID:24396300

  6. Rapid synthesis of Co, Ni co-doped ZnO nanoparticles: Optical and electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeiro, Fernanda C.; Marinho, Juliane Z.; Lemos, Samantha C. S.; de Moura, Ana P.; Freire, Poliana G.; da Silva, Luis F.; Longo, Elson; Munoz, Rodrigo A. A.; Lima, Renata C.

    2015-10-01

    We report for the first time a rapid preparation of Zn1-2xCoxNixO nanoparticles via a versatile and environmentally friendly route, microwave-assisted hydrothermal (MAH) method. The Co, Ni co-doped ZnO nanoparticles present an effect on photoluminescence and electrochemical properties, exhibiting excellent electrocatalytic performance compared to undoped ZnO sample. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements indicated the reduction of the green-orange-red visible emission region after adding Co and Ni ions, revealing the formation of alternative pathways for the generated recombination. The presence of these metallic ions into ZnO creates different defects, contributing to a local structural disorder, as revealed by Raman spectra. Electrochemical experiments revealed that the electrocatalytic oxidation of dopamine on ZnO attached to multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved significantly in the Co, Ni co-doped ZnO samples when compared to pure ZnO.

  7. Application of ZnO nanopillars and nanoflowers to field-emission luminescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ye; Tailiang, Guo; Yadong, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanopillars on a ZnO seed layer and ZnO nanoflowers were synthesized by electrochemical deposition on linear wires. The morphologies and crystal orientation of the ZnO nanostructures were investigated by a scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray diffraction pattern, respectively. Detailed study on the field-emission properties of ZnO nanostructures indicates that nanopillars with a high aspect ratio show good performance with a low turn-on field of 0.16 V/μm and a high field enhancement factor of 2.86 × 104. A luminescent tube with ZnO nanopillars on a linear wire cathode and a transparent anode could reach a luminance of about 1.5 × 104 cd/m2 under an applied voltage of 4 kV.

  8. Effect of intrinsic point defect on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jiangni; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yin, Tieen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of intrinsic point defect on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanowire is investigated by the first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results reveal that the pure ZnO nanowire without intrinsic point defect is nonmagnetic and ZnO nanowire with V(O), Zn(i), O(i), O(Zn), or Zn(O) point defect also is nonmagnetic. However, a strong spin splitting phenomenon is observed in ZnO nanowire with V(Zn) defect sitting on the surface site. The Mulliken population analysis reveals that the oxygen atoms which are close to the V(Zn) defect do major contribution to the magnetic moment. Partial density states calculation further suggests that the appearance of the half-metallic ferromagnetism in ZnO nanorod with V(Zn) originates from the hybridization of the O2p states with Zn 3d states. PMID:24396300

  9. Theoretical prediction of low-density hexagonal ZnO hollow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Huan, Tran Doan; Thao, Nguyen Thi; Tuan, Le Manh

    2016-10-01

    Along with wurtzite and zinc blende, zinc oxide (ZnO) has been found in a large number of polymorphs with substantially different properties and, hence, applications. Therefore, predicting and synthesizing new classes of ZnO polymorphs are of great significance and have been gaining considerable interest. Herein, we perform a density functional theory based tight-binding study, predicting several new series of ZnO hollow structures using the bottom-up approach. The geometry of the building blocks allows for obtaining a variety of hexagonal, low-density nanoporous, and flexible ZnO hollow structures. Their stability is discussed by means of the free energy computed within the lattice-dynamics approach. Our calculations also indicate that all the reported hollow structures are wide band gap semiconductors in the same fashion with bulk ZnO. The electronic band structures of the ZnO hollow structures are finally examined in detail.

  10. Temperature dependence of the growth of ZnO nanorod arrays by electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunghoon; Moon, Jin Young; Lee, Ho Seong

    2011-03-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by the electrochemical deposition route on conductive Au/Si substrates. The effect of the bath temperature on the growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays was investigated. With an increase in bath temperature from 30°C to 80°C, the deposited ZnO changed from an amorphous structure to a hexagonal crystal structure. The ZnO nanorod arrays grown above 50°C were dense and vertically well-aligned. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy results showed that the diameter of the hexagon-shaped ZnO nanorod arrays ranged from 100 nm to 180 nm and the length was about 500 nm. On the basis of the characteristics of the ZnO crystal structure and the effect of the bath temperature, the growth mechanism is described.

  11. Application of Eu2O3/ZnO nanoparticles in dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manveen; Verma, N. K.

    2013-06-01

    The synthesis of ZnO, Eu2O3 coated ZnO nanoparticles and their application in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been reported. The synthesized samples have been characterized by XRD and the diffraction of crystal plane (222) of Eu2O3 was detected, demonstrating the existence of Eu2O3 on the surface of ZnO3, which has also been verified through EDAX. Compared to ZnO electrodes, Eu2O3 coated ZnO electrodes adsorbed more dye. Eu2O3 coating on ZnO forms an energy barrier, which suppresses the charge recombination. Consequently, the photoelectrochemical properties of the modified electrodes improved and the overall energy conversion efficiency η increased from 0.21% to 0.61% under the illumination of simulated light of 100mW/cm2.

  12. Growth of Pb nanowires on the Si(111)-In (4x1) a combined STM and SPALEED study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupalo, Myron; Yakes, Michael; Tringides, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Due to the combined effect of QSE and the anisotropic strain potential of the substrate, Pb deposited on Si(111)-In (4x1) at 180K grows in nanowires of uniform 4-layer height and controllable uniform width of 5w0 { (}where w0=1.33nm is the width of the reconstruction unit cell along [1&_slash;1&_slash;2] direction). SPA-LEED studies confirm this selected 4-layer height (from Intensity vs Kz variation) which is unusually stable because it is unchanged even after annealing to room temperature. The same selected 4-layer height is observed on a different interface Si(111)-In √ 31x√ 31 which independently confirms the unusual 4-layer stability. Differences in the observed corrugation on the tops of the nanowires due to the Moir'{e} pattern at the metal/semiconductor interface confirm the strain anisotropy on the reconstructed substrate. Further Pb deposition on top of the nanowires results in the completion of the Pb layer with unusually atomically flat film interfaces over mesoscopic distances.

  13. The effect of ibuprofen on accumulation of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and leukocytes in experimental myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Romson, J.L.; Hook, B.G.; Rigot, V.H.; Schork, M.A.; Swanson, D.P.; Lucchesi, B.R.

    1982-11-01

    To assess the ability of ibuprofen to influence the extent of platelet aggregation and leukocyte infiltration during acute myocardial infarction, autologous indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled platelets or leukocytes were injected before 60 minutes of left circumflex coronary artery (LCx) occlusion, followed by 24 hours of reperfusion in the canine heart. Myocardial infarct size, as a percent of the area at risk, was reduced in the ibuprofen-treated group (12.5 mg/kg i.v. every 4 hours beginning 30 minutes before LCx occlusion) by 40%, from 48 +/- 4% in control animals to 29 +/- 4% in ibuprofen-treated dogs (p . 0.005). Quantification of the platelet-associated /sup 111/In radioactivity in irreversibly injured myocardium indicated that ibuprofen did not alter the accumulation of platelets in infarcted myocardium. In contrast, leukocyte accumulation in infarcted tissue was reduced significantly. In tissue samples with 0.41-0.60 gram infarct, the infarcted/normal ratio of leukocyte radioactivity was 12 +/- 2 in control dogs and 4 +/- 1 in ibuprofen-treated dogs, which represents a 67% reduction in leukocyte accumulation in ibuprofen-treated compared with control dogs. Similar reductions were found in other gram-infarct-weight categories. Although both platelets and leukocytes accumulate in infarcted canine myocardium, ibuprofen may exert its beneficial effect on ischemic myocardium by suppressing the inflammatory response associated with myocardial ischemia and infarction.

  14. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  15. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load.

  16. Modeling of nanoscale morphology of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) on a ZnO (1010) surface.

    PubMed

    Dag, S; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-12-01

    We report detailed ab initio calculations of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on top of a ZnO (1010) surface. We studied different absorption sites and orientations. We found that the P3HT chain prefers to lay along the dimer row direction of the ZnO surface. We also found strong coupling between the P3HT molecule and the ZnO substrate in the conduction band states, while minimum coupling in the valence band states.

  17. Growth and characterization of Cl-doped ZnO hexagonal nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, Ramin; Zak, A.K.; Mahmoudian, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks were grown on a Si(111) substrate using a thermal evaporation method. The prepared nanodisks exhibited a hexagonal shape with an average thickness of 50 nm and average diagonal of 270 nm. In addition, undoped ZnO disks with hexagonal shape were grown under the same conditions, but the sizes of these undoped ZnO disks were on the micrometer order. A possible mechanism was proposed for the growth of the Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks, and it was shown that the Cl{sup 1-} anions play a crucial role in controlling the size. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy clearly showed an extension in the crystal lattice of ZnO because of the presence of chlorine. In addition, these nanodisks produced a strong photoluminescence emission peak in the ultraviolet (UV) region and a weak peak in the green region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Furthermore, the UV peak of the Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks was blueshifted with respect to that of the undoped ZnO disks. - Graphical abstract: Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks and undoped ZnO microdisks have been grown using a thermal evaporation method. Highlights: > Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks with hexagonal shape are grown using a thermal evaporation method. > It is shown that the Cl{sup 1-} anions play a crucial role in controlling the size of the nanodisks. > XRD and Raman results showed that the Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks structure is under a biaxial stress. > UV peak of the PL spectrum is blueshifted for the Cl-doped ZnO nanodisks.

  18. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on liver function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua-Qiao; Xu, Min; Rong, Qian; Jin, Ru-Wen; Liu, Qi-Ji; Li, Ying-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is widely incorporated as a food additive in animal diets. In order to optimize the beneficial effects of ZnO and minimize any resultant environmental pollution, ZnO nanoparticles are often used for delivery of the zinc. However, the possible toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles, including effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effect of ZnO nanoparticles, in doses used in animal feeds, on CYP450 enzymes, liver and intestinal enzymes, liver and kidney histopathology, and hematologic indices in rats. We found that liver and kidney injury occurred when the concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles in feed were 300-600 mg/kg. Also, liver mRNA expression for constitutive androstane receptor was suppressed and mRNA expression for pregnane X receptor was induced when feed containing ZnO nanoparticles was given at a concentration of 600 mg/kg. Although the expression of mRNA for CYP 2C11 and 3A2 enzymes was induced by ZnO nanoparticles, the activities of CYP 2C11 and 3A2 were suppressed. While liver CYP 1A2 mRNA expression was suppressed, CYP 1A2 activity remained unchanged at all ZnO nanoparticle doses. Therefore, it has been concluded that ZnO nanoparticles, in the doses customarily added to animal feed, changed the indices of hematology and blood chemistry, altered the expression and activity of hepatic CYP enzymes, and induced pathological changes in liver and kidney tissues of rats. These findings suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles in animal feed, with the possibility that the doses of ZnO should be reduced. PMID:27621621

  19. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Cu-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rajneesh; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2012-03-01

    Cu-doped ZnO nanorods with different Cu concentrations were synthesized through the vapor transport method. The synthesized nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The XRD results revealed that Cu was successfully doped into ZnO lattice. The FE-SEM images showed that the undoped ZnO has needle like morphology whereas Cu-doped ZnO samples have rod like morphology with an average diameter and length of 60-90 nm and 1.5-3 μm respectively. The red shift in band edge absorption peak in UV-vis absorbance spectrum with increasing Cu content also confirm the doping of Cu in ZnO nanorods. The photocatalytic activity of pure and Cu-doped ZnO samples was studied by the photodegradation of resazurin (Rz) dye. Both pure ZnO and the Cu-doped ZnO nanorods effectively removed the Rz in a short time. This photodegradation of Rz followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. ZnO nanorods with increasing Cu doping exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity. The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant for 15 % Cu-doped ZnO is equal to 10.17×10-2min-1 about double of that with pure ZnO. The increased photocatalytic activity of Cu-doped ZnO is attributed to intrinsic oxygen vacancies due to high surface to volume ratio in nanorods and extrinsic defect due to Cu doping.

  20. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on liver function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua-Qiao; Xu, Min; Rong, Qian; Jin, Ru-Wen; Liu, Qi-Ji; Li, Ying-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is widely incorporated as a food additive in animal diets. In order to optimize the beneficial effects of ZnO and minimize any resultant environmental pollution, ZnO nanoparticles are often used for delivery of the zinc. However, the possible toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles, including effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effect of ZnO nanoparticles, in doses used in animal feeds, on CYP450 enzymes, liver and intestinal enzymes, liver and kidney histopathology, and hematologic indices in rats. We found that liver and kidney injury occurred when the concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles in feed were 300–600 mg/kg. Also, liver mRNA expression for constitutive androstane receptor was suppressed and mRNA expression for pregnane X receptor was induced when feed containing ZnO nanoparticles was given at a concentration of 600 mg/kg. Although the expression of mRNA for CYP 2C11 and 3A2 enzymes was induced by ZnO nanoparticles, the activities of CYP 2C11 and 3A2 were suppressed. While liver CYP 1A2 mRNA expression was suppressed, CYP 1A2 activity remained unchanged at all ZnO nanoparticle doses. Therefore, it has been concluded that ZnO nanoparticles, in the doses customarily added to animal feed, changed the indices of hematology and blood chemistry, altered the expression and activity of hepatic CYP enzymes, and induced pathological changes in liver and kidney tissues of rats. These findings suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles in animal feed, with the possibility that the doses of ZnO should be reduced.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, UV and dielectric properties of hexagonal disklike ZnO particles embedded in polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Vural, Sema; Koeytepe, Sueleyman; Seckin, Turgay; Adiguezel, Ibrahim

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The hexagonal disklike ZnO particles with a diameter of 300-500 nm were synthesized from zinc acetate and NaOH in water with citric acid. ZnO/polyimide composite films with different ZnO contents was prepared. The prepared zinc oxide-polyimide composites were characterized for their structure, morphology and thermal behavior. Composites with ZnO particle contents from 1 to 5 wt% show good transparency in the visible region and luminescent properties. Highlights: {yields} A series of novel ZnO/polyimide composite films with different ZnO contents was prepared. {yields} The ZnO was homogeneously dispersed in the PI matrix. {yields} The composites showed the low dielectric constant of 50 at 10{sup 6} Hz. {yields} Homogenous dispersion and the amount of ZnO particles contributed to the dielectric properties of composites. -- Abstract: A series of novel ZnO/polyimide composite films with different ZnO contents was prepared through incorporation hexagonal disklike ZnO particles into poly(amic acid) of the pre polymer of the polyimide. The hexagonal disklike ZnO particles with a diameter of 300-500 nm were synthesized from zinc acetate and NaOH in water with citric acid. The prepared zinc oxide-polyimide composites were characterized for their structure, morphology, and thermal behavior employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron micrograph, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis techniques. Thermal analyses show that the ZnO particles were successfully incorporated into the polymer matrix and these ZnO/polymer composites have a good thermal stability. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicate the ZnO particles were uniformly dispersed in the polymer and they remained at the original size (300-500 nm) before immobilization. All composite films with ZnO particle contents from 1 to 5 wt% show good transparency in the visible region and luminescent properties.

  2. The effect of ZnO nanoparticles on liver function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua-Qiao; Xu, Min; Rong, Qian; Jin, Ru-Wen; Liu, Qi-Ji; Li, Ying-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is widely incorporated as a food additive in animal diets. In order to optimize the beneficial effects of ZnO and minimize any resultant environmental pollution, ZnO nanoparticles are often used for delivery of the zinc. However, the possible toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles, including effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effect of ZnO nanoparticles, in doses used in animal feeds, on CYP450 enzymes, liver and intestinal enzymes, liver and kidney histopathology, and hematologic indices in rats. We found that liver and kidney injury occurred when the concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles in feed were 300–600 mg/kg. Also, liver mRNA expression for constitutive androstane receptor was suppressed and mRNA expression for pregnane X receptor was induced when feed containing ZnO nanoparticles was given at a concentration of 600 mg/kg. Although the expression of mRNA for CYP 2C11 and 3A2 enzymes was induced by ZnO nanoparticles, the activities of CYP 2C11 and 3A2 were suppressed. While liver CYP 1A2 mRNA expression was suppressed, CYP 1A2 activity remained unchanged at all ZnO nanoparticle doses. Therefore, it has been concluded that ZnO nanoparticles, in the doses customarily added to animal feed, changed the indices of hematology and blood chemistry, altered the expression and activity of hepatic CYP enzymes, and induced pathological changes in liver and kidney tissues of rats. These findings suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles in animal feed, with the possibility that the doses of ZnO should be reduced. PMID:27621621

  3. Effect of ZnO nanoparticles on structural and mechanical properties of HPMC polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Lakshmeesha; Mahadeviah, Asha, S.; Somashekar, R.; Sangappa

    2013-02-01

    The Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nano-particles were synthesized by electrochemical method. The HPMC films were prepared by solution casting method and ZnO concentration was varied from 0.01 to 0.04%. The films were examined for structural and mechanical properties verifying how the addition of ZnO nano-particles affected the properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM).

  4. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  5. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications.

  6. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  7. Shape controlled Sn doped ZnO nanostructures for tunable optical emission and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rakshit, T.; Manna, I.; Ray, S. K.

    2013-11-15

    Pure and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures have been grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by vapor-solid technique without using any catalysts. It has been found that the morphology of the nanostructures depend strongly on the growth temperature and doping concentration. By proper tuning of the growth temperature, morphology of pure ZnO can be changed from tetrapods to multipods. On the other hand, by varying the doping concentration of Sn in ZnO, the morphology can be tuned from tetrapods to flower-like multipods to nanowires. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the nanostructures have a preferred (0002) growth orientation, and they are tensile strained with the increase of Sn doping in ZnO. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence characteristics of these nanostructures have been investigated in the range from 10 to 300 K. Pure ZnO tetrapods exhibited less defect state emissions than that of pure ZnO multipods. The defect emission is reduced with low concentration of Sn doping, but again increases at higher concentration of doping because of increased defects. Transport properties of pure and Sn doped ZnO tetrapods have been studied using complex-plane impedance spectroscopy. The contribution from the arms and junctions of a tetrapod could be distinguished. Sn doped ZnO samples showed lower conductivity but higher relaxation time than that of pure ZnO tetrapods.

  8. Improving the ethanol gas-sensing properties of porous ZnO microspheres by Co doping

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qi Wang, Tao

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Co-doped porous ZnO microspheres were synthesized. • 3 mol% Co-doped ZnO sensor showed the highest response to ethanol. • 3 mol% Co-doped ZnO sensor exhibited fast recovery property. • 3 mol% Co-doped ZnO sensor exhibited good selectivity and long-term stability. - Abstract: Porous Co-doped ZnO microspheres were prepared by a simple hydrothermal method combined with post-annealing. Co species existed as a form of divalent state in the sample and substituted Zn{sup 2+} sites in ZnO crystal lattice, which was affirmed by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The gas-sensing measurements demonstrated that the 3 mol% Co-doped ZnO sample showed the highest response value to 100 ppm ethanol at 350 °C, which were 5 folds higher than that of the pure ZnO sample. In addition, the 3 mol% Co-doped ZnO sensor exhibited fast recovery property, good quantitative determination, good selectivity and long-term stability. The superior sensing properties were contributed to high specific surface area combined with the large amount of oxygen vacancies originating from Co doping.

  9. Selective growth of ZnO thin film nanostructures: Structure, morphology and tunable optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakanth, Katturi Naga; Rajesh, Desapogu; Sunandana, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ZnO nanostructures (spherical, rod shape) have been successfully fabricated via a thermal evaporation followed by dip coating method. The pure, doped ZnO thin films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, respectively. A possible growth mechanism of the spherical, rod shape ZnO nanostructures are discussed. XRD patterns revealed that all films consist of pure ZnO phase and were well crystallized with preferential orientation towards (002) direction. Doping by PVA, PVA+Cu has effective role in the enhancement of the crystalline quality and increases in the band gap.

  10. Improved conversion efficiency of amorphous Si solar cells using a mesoporous ZnO pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Bit-Na; Kim, Yang Doo; suk Oh, Kyoung; Kim, Chaehyun; Choi, Hak-Jong; Lee, Heon

    2014-09-01

    To provide a front transparent electrode for use in highly efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film solar cells, porous flat layer and micro-patterns of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) layers were prepared through ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) and deposited on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layers. Through this, it was found that a porous micro-pattern of ZnO NPs dispersed in resin can optimize the light-trapping pattern, with the efficiency of solar cells based on patterned or flat mesoporous ZnO layers increased by 27% and 12%, respectively.

  11. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo; Mohamed, Azman Seeni; Saifuddin, Siti Nazmin; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-04-01

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shifted of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.

  12. Growth of Single- and Bilayer ZnO on Au(111) and Interaction with Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingyi; Yao, Kun; Sun, Keju; Li, Wei-Xue; Lee, Junseok; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-05-02

    The stoichiometric single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) have been prepared by reactive deposition of Zn on Au(111) and studied in detail with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Both single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) adopt a planar, graphite-like structure similar to freestanding ZnO(0001) due to the weak van der Waals interactions dominating their adhesion with the Au(111) substrate. At higher temperature, the single-layer ZnO(0001) converts gradually to bi-layer ZnO(0001) due to the twice stronger interaction between two ZnO layers than the interfacial adhesion of ZnO with Au substrate. It is found that Cu atoms on the surface of bi-layer ZnO(0001) are mobile with a diffusion barrier of 0.31 eV, and likely to agglomerate and form nanosized particles at low coverages; while Cu atoms tend to penetrate a single layer of ZnO(0001) with a barrier of 0.10 eV, resulting in a Cu free surface.

  13. Au-coated ZnO nanostructures for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dikovska, A O; Nedyalkov, N N; Imamova, S E; Atanasova, G B; Atanasov, P A

    2012-03-31

    Thin ZnO nanostructured films were produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies. The experimental conditions used for preparation of the samples were chosen to obtain different types of ZnO nanostructures. The Raman spectra of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm after coating the ZnO nanostructures with a thin Au layer. The influence of the surface morphology on the Raman signal obtained from the samples was investigated. High SERS signal enhancement was observed from all Au-coated ZnO nanostructures.

  14. Ag-doped ZnO nanorods synthesized by two-step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian-Mei; Ji, Yong; Gao, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Xian-Wei

    2012-11-01

    A two-step method is adopted to synthesize Ag-doped ZnO nanorods. A ZnO seed layer is first prepared on a glass substrate by thermal decomposition of zinc acetate. Ag-doped ZnO nanorods are then assembled on the ZnO seed layer using the hydrothermal method. The influences of the molar percentage of Ag ions to Zn ions (RAg/Zn) on the structural and optical properties of the ZnO nanorods obtained are carefully studied using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry. Results indicate that Ag ions enter into the crystal lattice through the substitution of Zn ions. The (002) c-axis-preferred orientation of the ZnO nanorods decreases as RAg/Zn increases. At RAg/Zn > 1.0%, ZnO nanorods lose their c-axis-preferred orientation and generate Ag precipitates from the ZnO crystal lattice. The average transmissivity in the visible region first increases and then decreases as RAg/Zn increases. The absorption edge is first blue shifted and then red shifted. The influence of Ag doping on the average head face, and axial dimensions of the ZnO nanorods may be optimized to improve the average transmissivity at RAg/Zn < 1.0%.

  15. Fabrication of nanopore YSZ from YSZ and ZnO mixture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Moon Jin; Han, Chong Soo

    2008-10-01

    Porous Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) with macropore and nanopore was fabricated from sintering and leaching the mixture of YSZ and different types of ZnO. When we used nano-sized crystalline particle, porous YSZ with submicron pores was obtained. In the case of the spherical 30 nm to 100 nm ZnO particles obtained from hydrolysis of zinc acetate in methanol, 2 approximately 10 nm sized pores was observed in the YSZ. From the results, it was suggested that crystalline ZnO particles grew up while the spherical noncrystalline ZnO particles were enclosed in YSZ matrix in the sintering process.

  16. Electrical property studies on chemically processed polypyrolle/aluminum doped ZnO based hybrid heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, G.; Ilanchezhiyan, P.; Madhan Kumar, A.; Yuldashev, Sh. U.; Kang, T. W.

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid structure based on p-type polypyrolle (PPy) and n-type aluminum (Al) doped ZnO nanorods was successfully constructed. The effect of Al doping on material properties of wurtzite structured ZnO were studied using several analytical techniques. To establish the desired hybrid structure, pyrrole monomers were polymerized on hydrothermally grown Al doped ZnO nanorods by chemical polymerization. The current-voltage characteristics on the fabricated PPy/Al doped ZnO heterostructures were found to exhibit excellent rectifying characteristics under dark and illumination conditions. The obtained results augment the prescribed architecture to be highly suitable for high-sensitivity optoelectronic applications.

  17. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo; Mohamed, Azman Seeni; Saifuddin, Siti Nazmin; Masudi, Sam’an Malik; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-04-24

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shifted of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.

  18. Organic photovoltaic solar cells with cathode modified by ZnO.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Pil; Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2013-07-01

    Solution processed cathode organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) utilizing thin layer of ZnO with 27% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) to control devices have been demonstrated. Devices without the presence of ZnO layer have much lower PCE than the ones with ZnO layer. Cathode modification layer can be used to reduce photogenerated excitions and finally improve the performance of the OPVs. The successful demonstrations of OPVs with an introduction of ZnO cathode layer give promise of further device progresses.

  19. Controllable growth of ZnO nanorods via electrodeposition technique: towards UV photo-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    An electro-chemical approach for controlled growth of seedless ZnO nanorods was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy confirms ZnO nanorod morphology can be controlled by varying the electrodeposition duration. Increased growth time enhances the crystallinity of ZnO nanorods and releases the strain on ZnO nanorods, as revealed by x-ray diffraction analysis. A significant change in the near band gap and the defect level luminescence were observed for different growth time ZnO nanorods. The variation in zone-centre E 2 (high) optical phonon mode of ZnO nanorods was studied using micro-Raman measurements. The I–V characteristics of the ZnO nanorods potentially enable applications in UV photodetection even at very low voltage range. Photodetectors based on ZnO nanorods have a faster response time (~29 s) and exhibited high photosensitivity, approximately 28 at 1 V forward bias, as compared to recent reported values. The results obtained are exciting in view of using a low cost electrodeposition technique at low temperature for achieving high-quality electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and its possible use in optoelectronic devices.

  20. Photoluminescence characteristics of ZnO clusters confined in the micropores of zeolite L

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fang; Song Hongwei Pan Guohui; Fan Libo; Dai Qilin; Dong Biao; Liu Huihui; Yu Jihong; Wang Xi; Li Li

    2009-03-05

    Sub-nanometric ZnO clusters were prepared in the micropores of zeolite L by the incipient wetness impregnation method. The X-ray patterns (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-vis absorption spectra (UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) were used to characterize the composite materials. The results indicate that a small amount of sub-nanometric ZnO clusters can be introduced into the channel of zeolite L, however, when the amount of ZnO loading exceeds 20 wt%, macrocrystalline ZnO appears on the external surface of zeolite L. Different from bulk ZnO materials, these sub-nanometric ZnO clusters exhibit their absorption onset below 255 nm and a blue luminescence band in the range of 404-422 nm. The temperature-dependent luminescence demonstrates that the amount of the ZnO loading significantly affects the exciton-phonon interaction between the ZnO clusters and the zeolite host. The ZnO clusters exhibit a picosecond scale emission lifetime at room temperature.

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Jun Bo; Li, Jian Zhang; Zeng, Jun; He, Xi Yang; Hu, Wei; Shen, Yue Cheng

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: In general, the strong SPS response corresponds to the high separation rate of photoinduced charge carriers on the basis of the SPS principle. The photovoltage of Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO is higher than that of ZnO, thus it can be confirmed that the Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO has a higher charge separation rate than the ZnO sample. Among these samples, 1%Ga has highest charge separation rate. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Ga{sup 3+} has been employed to dope ZnO photocatalyst. ► Ga{sup 3+} increases the BET surface area and changes the morphology of ZnO. ► The photoinduced charge separation rate has been enhanced. ► The photocatalytic activity has been greatly promoted. -- Abstract: ZnO and Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO with different molar ratio of Ga/Zn (1%, 2% and 3%) were prepared by a parallel flow precipitation method. The photocatalysts prepared were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS), respectively. The results show that doping Ga{sup 3+} into ZnO increases the BET surface area. The XRD spectra of the photocatalysts calcined at 573 K show only the characteristic peaks of wurtzite-type. Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO absorbs much more light than ZnO in the visible light region. Doping Ga{sup 3+} into ZnO greatly changes the morphology of ZnO and enhances the photoinduced charge separation rate. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO and Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO for decolorization of methyl orange (MO) solution was evaluated, of all the photocatalysts prepared, the Ga{sup 3+}-doped ZnO with 1% possesses the best photocatalytic activity and the possible reason was discussed.

  2. Effect of morphology on the non-ohmic conduction in ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, E.; Jayakumar, K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructures of ZnO is synthesized with nanoflower like morphology by simple wet chemical method. The structural, morphological and electrical characterization have been carried out. The temperature dependent electrical characterization of ZnO pellets of thickness 1150 µm is made by the application of 925MPa pressure. The morphological dependence of non-ohmic conduction beyond some arbitrary tunneling potential and grain boundary barrier thickness is compared with the commercially available bulk ZnO. Our results show the suitability of nano-flower like ZnO for the devices like sensors, rectifiers etc.

  3. Controllable growth of ZnO nanorods via electrodeposition technique: towards UV photo-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    An electro-chemical approach for controlled growth of seedless ZnO nanorods was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy confirms ZnO nanorod morphology can be controlled by varying the electrodeposition duration. Increased growth time enhances the crystallinity of ZnO nanorods and releases the strain on ZnO nanorods, as revealed by x-ray diffraction analysis. A significant change in the near band gap and the defect level luminescence were observed for different growth time ZnO nanorods. The variation in zone-centre E 2 (high) optical phonon mode of ZnO nanorods was studied using micro-Raman measurements. The I-V characteristics of the ZnO nanorods potentially enable applications in UV photodetection even at very low voltage range. Photodetectors based on ZnO nanorods have a faster response time (~29 s) and exhibited high photosensitivity, approximately 28 at 1 V forward bias, as compared to recent reported values. The results obtained are exciting in view of using a low cost electrodeposition technique at low temperature for achieving high-quality electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and its possible use in optoelectronic devices.

  4. Stable fluorescence conjugation of ZnO nanoparticles and their size dependent cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Min-Kyu; Paek, Hee-Jeong; Choi, Soo-Jin; Oh, Jae-Min

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated size dependent cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles utilizing stably introduced Cy5.5, which emits long-wavelength fluorescence. Through (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane modification, ZnO nanoparticles of different sizes (20 and 70nm) were functionalized with amine moiety, which was further reacted with Cy5.5-N-hydroxylsuccinimide ester to make covalently conjugated Cy5.5 dye on ZnO nanoparticles. Field emission-scanning electron microscopic images revealed that average particle size as well as particle morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were not altered by Cy5.5 conjugation. Zeta potential measurement confirmed that the positive surface charge of ZnO nanoparticles was well preserved after successive conjugation reactions. Based on infrared, ultraviolet-visible light and photoluminescence spectroscopies, we verify that the Cy5.5 was stably introduced to ZnO nanoparticles without serious aggregation. Surface conjugated Cy5.5 showed high stability in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline and cell culture medium, showing less than 2% of release during 85h. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis demonstrated that smaller ZnO nanoparticles were more taken up in greater quantities by HaCaT cells. Moreover, systematic study on cellular uptake pathway showed that smaller ZnO nanoparticles were internalized into cells mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while larger ZnO nanoparticles entered cells via several pathways. PMID:27323344

  5. LED-controlled tuning of ZnO nanowires’ wettability for biosensing applications

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Kaushalkumar; Ross, Duncan; Prabhu, Radhakrishna; Pollard, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Background Wettability is an important property of solid materials which can be controlled by surface energy. Dynamic control over the surface wettability is of great importance for biosensing applications. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a biocompatible material suitable for biosensors and microfluidic devices. Nanowires of ZnO tend to show a hydrophobic nature which decelerates the adhesion or adsorption of biomolecules on the surface and, therefore, limits their application. Methods Surface wettability of the ZnO nanowires can be tuned using light irradiation. However, the control over wettability using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and the role of wavelength in controlling the wettability of ZnO nanowires are unclear. This is the first report on LED-based wettability control of nanowires, and it includes investigations on tuning the desired wettability of ZnO nanowires using LEDs as a controlling tool. Results The investigations on spectral properties of the LED emission on ZnO nanowires’ wettability have shown strong dependency on the spectral overlap of LED emission on ZnO absorption spectra. Results indicate that LEDs offer an advanced control on dynamically tuning the wettability of ZnO nanowires. Conclusion The spectral investigations have provided significant insight into the role of irradiating wavelength of light and irradiation time on the surface wettability of ZnO nanowires. This process is suitable to realize on chip based integrated sensors and has huge potential for eco-friendly biosensing and environmental sensing applications. PMID:25855065

  6. Noble metal nanodisks epitaxially formed on ZnO nanorods and their effect on photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Sheng; Ren, Jingjian; Yan, Dong; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jianlin

    2012-07-01

    Triangular and hexagonal shaped noble metal (Au, Ag, Pt, Pd) nanodisks were synthesized on the top facets of ZnO nanorods via simple deposition-annealing method. Other metals (Ni, Cu, Cr, Pb, Al) only formed irregular shaped nanostructures on ZnO nanorods. The morphology, elemental composition, as well as growth mechanism of the metal nanodisks/ZnO nanorod composite materials were studied. The localized surface plasmon resonant effects from different metal nanodisks on the photoluminescence of ZnO nanorods were investigated. It was demonstrated that the carriers transfer between the metal nanodisks and ZnO can efficiently manipulate the photoluminescence intensities from the nanorods.

  7. Effects of Au on the Growth of ZnO Nanostructures on Si by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chen; Fan, Lu Yang; Ping, He Hai; Wei, Wu Ke; Zhen, Ye Zhi

    2013-08-01

    The effects of Au on the growth of ZnO nanostructures on Si by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at a relatively low temperature (450°C) were investigated. The experimental results showed that Au nanoparticles played a critical role during the growth of the ZnO nanostructures and affected their morphology and optical properties. It was found that Au nanoparticles particularly affected the nucleation of ZnO nanostructures during the growth process and the Au-assisted growth mechanism of ZnO nanostructures should be ascribed to the vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. The formation of a nanoneedle may be attributed to a more reactive interface between Au and ZnO, which leads to more zinc gaseous species absorbed near the interface. Different nucleation sites on ZnO nuclei resulted in the disorder of ZnO nanoneedles. Moreover, the crystalline quality of nano-ZnO was improved due to the presence of Au, according to the smaller full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the low-temperature exciton emission. We confirmed that ZnO nanoneedles showed better crystalline quality than ZnO nanorods through the HRTEM images and the SAED patterns. The reason for the improvement of the crystalline quality of nano-ZnO may be due to the less lattice mismatch.

  8. Synthesis and properties of novel liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Huizhao; Xu, Peng; Li, Junlin

    2013-06-01

    Liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures have been synthesized on Al2O3-coated Si (111) substrates by chemical vapor deposition method (CVD) at 1050 °C. Every liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructure is made up of one nanorod and two nanowires at the ends. The liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) photoluminescence (PL). The results indicate that the liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures are wurtzite hexagonal structure and the growth direction is [0001]. The liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures became the new member of ZnO nanostructures for the novel configuration. PL reveals ultraviolet (UV) emission at 384 nm and a broad emission peak at 540 nm. These novel liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures will provide an improvement for electronic and optical devices. The pre-prepared Al2O3 film on the Si (111) substrate solves the troublesome lattice mismatch problem between the Si substrate and ZnO, and makes the growth of liquid-medicine-filter shaped ZnO nanostructures more effective. In addition, the effect of screw dislocation and polar surfaces in understanding crystal growth mechanisms in nanometer scale were also provided.

  9. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  10. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  11. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into

  12. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  13. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  14. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  15. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  16. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  17. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  18. (111)In-exendin uptake in the pancreas correlates with the β-cell mass and not with the α-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto; Gotthardt, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Targeting of the GLP-1 receptor with (111)In-labeled exendin is an attractive approach to determine the β-cell mass (BCM). Preclinical studies as well as a proof-of-concept study in type 1 diabetic patients and healthy subjects showed a direct correlation between BCM and radiotracer uptake. Despite these promising initial results, the influence of α-cells on the uptake of the radiotracer remains a matter of debate. In this study, we determined the correlation between pancreatic tracer uptake and β- and α-cell mass in a rat model for β-cell loss. The uptake of (111)In-exendin (% ID/g) showed a strong positive linear correlation with the BCM (Pearson r = 0.82). The fraction of glucagon-positive cells in the total endocrine mass was increased after alloxan treatment (26% ± 4%, 43% ± 8%, and 69% ± 21% for 0, 45, and 60 mg/kg alloxan, respectively). The uptake of (111)In-exendin showed a negative linear correlation with the α-cell fraction (Pearson r = -0.76). These data clearly indicate toward specificity of (111)In-exendin for β-cells and that the influence of the α-cells on (111)In-exendin uptake is negligible. PMID:25409700

  19. Stability, characterization, and kinetics of /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies in normal animals and nude mouse-human tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Garver, P.R.; Koziol, J.A.; Chen, A.W.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Adams, T.H.

    1983-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen were successfully radiolabeled with /sup 111/In, and the radiopharmaceutical was characterized in vitro and in normal and tumor-bearing mice. The /sup 111/In-MoAb proved to be stable in vitro and in vivo under normal conditions, although instability could be induced in vitro with large quantities of iron-free transferrin. Animal distribution studies with /sup 111/In-MoAb demonstrated tumor localization superior to /sup 67/Ga and pharmacokinetics that were highly similar to those of endogenously labeled /sup 75/Se-MoAb. The /sup 111/In-MoAb followed first-order kinetics and fit a two-compartmental model when studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumors known to express carcinoembryonic antigen. Significant quantities of radiolabel appeared in tissues other than tumor, with liver and skin having the highest concentrations. Sufficient tumor/background ratios were formed for scanning purposes. The data indicate that /sup 111/In-MoAb may prove to be effective as a radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  20. An experimental comparison of the K- and L-Auger electron spectra generated in the decays of 140Nd and 111In.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E A; Kovalík, A; Filosofov, D V; Korolev, N A; Lebedev, N A; Lubashevski, A V; Rösch, F; Novgorodov, A F

    2005-03-01

    The low-energy electron spectra generated in the decay of 140Nd have been measured using a combined electrostatic spectrometer adjusted to the 4, 7, and 35 eV instrumental resolution. In order to estimate the therapeutic potential of low-energy electrons associated with the decay of 140Nd, similar experiments have been performed with 111In. Relative Auger electron intensity ratios per decay are: 111In(K-Auger)/140Nd(K-Auger)=1.47(12), 111In(L-Auger) /140Nd(L-Auger)=1.1(4), and 111In(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])/140Nd(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])=0.24(11). The obtained K-Auger group intensity ratios have been compared with results of calculations. The good agreement found for the experimental and estimated values indicates that such information can be also derived using available nuclear and atomic data. The relative intensity of L-Auger electrons emitted within the 2.8-7 keV interval is higher for 140Nd by a factor of about 4 compared to 111In. As the L-Auger emission is dominating relative to that of the K-Auger group, this implicates that any potential endotherapeutic strategy using 140Nd-labelled targeting vectors requires a maximum accumulation of the endoradiotherapeutical close to the cell nucleus or the DNA of the tumour cell. PMID:15607923

  1. Atomic force microscopy using ZnO whisker tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Tohda, T.

    1992-06-01

    We have developed an atomic force microscope (AFM) using a zinc oxide (ZnO) whisker crystal as a probing tip. The ZnO whisker crystal is tetrapodal in shape, with each leg having a length of 5-30 μm, a radius of curvature less than 10 nm, and a cone half angle of 1°-2°. Polyimide thin films rubbed with cloths as liquid-crystal aligning films were employed for AFM imaging. Due to the needle shape of the probing tip, the AFM was able to resolve the tiny grooves (3-5 nm deep, 60-80 nm apart) on these films more clearly than that using a conventional pyramidal tip. The new AFM will be available for precise evaluation of surfaces on which fine structures are microfabricated in nanometer scale.

  2. Enhanced electromechanical behaviors of cellulose ZnO hybrid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Seongchoel; Min, Seung-Ki; Kim, Hyun Chan; Im, Jongbeom; Geddis, Demetris L.; Kim, Jaehwan

    2015-04-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid composite has attracted as its combined synergistic properties. Cellulose based inorganicorganic hybrid composite was fabricated with semiconductive nanomaterials which has functionality of nanomaterial and biocompatibility piezoelectricity, high transparency and flexibility of cellulose electro active paper namely EAPap. ZnO is providing semiconductive functionality to EAPap for hybrid nanocomposite by simple chemical reaction. Cellulose- ZnO hybrid nanocomposite (CEZOHN) demonstrates novel electrical, photoelectrical and electromechanical behaviors. This paper deals with methods to improve electromechanical property of CEZOHN. The fabrication process is introduced briefly, charging mechanism and evaluation is studied with measured piezoelectric constant. And its candidate application will be discussed such as artificial muscle, energy harvester, strain sensor, flexible electrical device.

  3. Evidence for photogenerated intermediate hole polarons in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, Hikmet; Shang, Honghui; Bebensee, Fabian; Yang, Chengwu; Buchholz, Maria; Nefedov, Alexei; Heissler, Stefan; Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick; Wöll, Christof

    2015-04-01

    Despite their pronounced importance for oxide-based photochemistry, optoelectronics and photovoltaics, only fairly little is known about the polaron lifetimes and binding energies. Polarons represent a crucial intermediate step populated immediately after dissociation of the excitons formed in the primary photoabsorption process. Here we present a novel approach to studying photoexcited polarons in an important photoactive oxide, ZnO, using infrared (IR) reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) with a time resolution of 100 ms. For well-defined (10-10) oriented ZnO single-crystal substrates, we observe intense IR absorption bands at around 200 meV exhibiting a pronounced temperature dependence. On the basis of first-principles-based electronic structure calculations, we assign these features to hole polarons of intermediate coupling strength.

  4. Evidence for photogenerated intermediate hole polarons in ZnO.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Hikmet; Shang, Honghui; Bebensee, Fabian; Yang, Chengwu; Buchholz, Maria; Nefedov, Alexei; Heissler, Stefan; Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick; Wöll, Christof

    2015-04-22

    Despite their pronounced importance for oxide-based photochemistry, optoelectronics and photovoltaics, only fairly little is known about the polaron lifetimes and binding energies. Polarons represent a crucial intermediate step populated immediately after dissociation of the excitons formed in the primary photoabsorption process. Here we present a novel approach to studying photoexcited polarons in an important photoactive oxide, ZnO, using infrared (IR) reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) with a time resolution of 100 ms. For well-defined (10-10) oriented ZnO single-crystal substrates, we observe intense IR absorption bands at around 200 meV exhibiting a pronounced temperature dependence. On the basis of first-principles-based electronic structure calculations, we assign these features to hole polarons of intermediate coupling strength.

  5. Electrochemical deposition of ZnO nanostructures. mechanism of growth.

    PubMed

    Rayón, E; Ferrer, C

    2010-02-01

    The growth kinetics of ZnO nanorods were studied by means of an electrochemical deposition process on ITO electrodes submerged in an aqueous solution of 5 mM ZCl+0.1 M KCl at 80 degrees C. The stages of the growth kinetics showed a mechanism of formation of nano-spheres which with time were transformed into hexagonal crystals of ZnO. Cathodic current densities of 0.1 to 1 mAcm2 formed hexagonal columns of 800 nm thickness while stronger currents formed a high-density layer of cylindrical nanorods 80 nm in diameter. An amorphous barrier layer was found between the surface of the electrode and the base of the nano-columns. The conditions assayed showed the possibility of adjusting the morphological characteristics of the layer in order to obtain different properties in different applications.

  6. Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors from Electrodeposited ZnO Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Athavan, Nadarajah; Konenkamp, R.

    2011-02-02

    We present experimental results on the magnetic properties of doped ZnO nanowires grown at 80 8C in electrodeposition. We show that impurities such as Al, Mn, Co, and Cu can be incorporated in the nanowires by adding the corresponding metal salts to the electrolyte solution. At concentration levels of a few atomic percent we find the impurity concentration in the solid to be approximately proportional to the precursor concentration in solution. ZnO nanowrires doped with Cu, Co, and Mn show superparamagnetic response at room temperature, while undoped and Al-doped wires show no discernible magnetic response. The results indicate that with Cu, Mn, and Co doping dilute magnetic semiconductors can be prepared.

  7. ZnO nanoparticles based fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimman, S.; Balakrishnan, L.; Meher, S. R.; Sivacoumar, R.; Alex, Z. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by simple aqueous chemical route method. The synthesized ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction andscanning electron microscope. The sensitivity of the nanoparticles was studied for different gases like acetone, ammonia andethanol in terms of variation in spectral light intensity. The XRD and SEM analysis confirms the formation of hexagonal wurtzite structure with the grain size of 11.2 nm. The small cladding region of the optical fiber was replaced with the synthesized nanoparticles. The light spectrum was recorded for different gas concentrations. The synthesized nanoparticles showed high sensitivity towards ammonia in low ppm level and acetone in high ppm level.

  8. ZnO Transistor Interfaces Sensitized with Photo Donor Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalenka, Josef; Zhang, Lushuai; Gopalan, Padma; Evans, Paul

    2013-03-01

    A better understanding of the physics at interfaces between semiconducting oxides and monolayers of covalently bonded organic molecules is relevant to important applications such as inexpensive chemical sensors and improved dye-sensitized solar cells. We use field-effect transistor (FET) structures in which electrical measurements are made before and after functionalizing the surface of ZnO nanocrystalline films, which form the channel of the FET, with organic dye molecules based on rhenium-bipyridine complexes that act as electron donors during illumination with monochromatic light. Measurements of the charge transfer as a function of light intensity and dye coverage give the ratio between the rates of charge transfer and recombination between the dyes and the ZnO, an important parameter to maximize to further improve the efficiency of solar cells based on donor functionalized oxides. This work supported by the National Science Foundation through the University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center under Grant No. DMR-1121288

  9. Nanostructured hybrid ZnO thin films for energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report on hybrid films based on ZnO/organic dye prepared by electrodeposition using tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanines (TS-CuPc) and Eosin-Y (EoY). Both the morphology and porosity of hybrid ZnO films are highly dependent on the type of dyes used in the synthesis. High photosensitivity was observed for ZnO/EoY films, while a very weak photoresponse was obtained for ZnO/TS-CuPc films. Despite a higher absorption coefficient of TS-CuPc than EoY, in ZnO/EoY hybrid films, the excited photoelectrons between the EoY levels can be extracted through ZnO, and the porosity of ZnO/EoY can also be controlled. PMID:21711909

  10. Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanorods: Effect of Synthesis Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Zeeshan Ur; Heo, Si-Nae; Cho, Hyeon Ji; Koo, Bon Heun

    2016-06-01

    This report is devoted to the synthesis of high quality nanorods using spin coating technique for seed layer growth. Effect of different parameter i.e., spins coating counts, spin coating speed, and the effect of temperature during the drying process was analyzed. Hot plate and furnace technique was used for heating purpose and the difference in the morphology was carefully observed. It is worthy to mention here that there is a substantial effect of all the above mentioned parameters on the growth and morphology of the ZnO nanostructure. The ZnO nanorods were finally synthesized using wet chemical method. The morphological properties of the obtained nanostructures were analyzed by using FESEM technique. PMID:27427752

  11. Neurotoxic potential of ingested ZnO nanomaterials on bees.

    PubMed

    Milivojević, Tamara; Glavan, Gordana; Božič, Janko; Sepčić, Kristina; Mesarič, Tina; Drobne, Damjana

    2015-02-01

    The honey bee is among most important pollinators threatened by environmental pollution, pest control and potentially, by products of nanotechnologies. The aim of the current study was an analysis of the neurotoxic potential of ingested zinc oxide nanomaterials (ZnO NMs) or zinc ions (Zn(2+)) on honey bees. We analysed a variety of biomarkers, including metabolic impairment, feeding rate, and survival, as well as the activities of a stress-related enzyme glutathione S-transferase, and the neurotoxicity biomarker acetylcholinesterase. Acetylcholinesterase activity was found to be elevated in bees exposed to either of the tested substances. In addition, we observed increased feeding rate in the group treated with Zn(2+) but not with ZnO NMs or control group. The observed effects we relate primarily to Zn(2+) ions. Here we provide evidence that zinc ions either originating from Zn salt or Zn-based NPs have a neurotoxic potential and thus might contribute to colony survival.

  12. ZnO Coated Nanospring-Based Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakharev, Pavel Viktorovich

    The current research demonstrates new techniques for characterization of electrical transport properties of the metal oxide polycrystalline structures, gas and vapor phase kinetics, surface processes such as gas-surface, vapor-surface interactions and redox processes by applying novel gas sensing devices. Real-time sensor electrical response characteristics obtained under highly controlled laboratory conditions have been used to characterize corresponding surface interactions and electrical properties of the gas sensitive structures. Novel redox chemical sensors (chemiresistors) have been fabricated with 3-D and 1-D ZnO coated nanospring (NS) structures. Silica NSs served as insulating scaffolding for a ZnO gas sensitive layer and has been grown via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism by using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. The NSs have been coated with polycrystalline ZnO by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The chemiresistor devices have been thoroughly characterized in terms of their crystal structures (by XRD, FESEM, TEM, and ellipsometry) and their electrical response properties. A 3-D gas sensor has been constructed from a xenon light bulb by coating it with a 3-D zinc oxide coated silica nanospring mat, where the xenon light bulb served as a sensor heater. This inexpensive sensor platform has been used to characterize gas-solid, vapor-solid, and redox processes. The optimal temperature of the gas sensitive ZnO layer, the temperature of the vapor-gas mixture and the crystal structure of the gas sensitive layer have been determined to reach the highest sensitivity of the gas sensors. The activation energy of toluene oxidation (Ed) on the ZnO surface and the activation energy of oxidation (Ea) of the depleted ZnO surface have been determined and analyzed. A 1-D chemiresistor has been fabricated with a single ZnO coated silica nanospring by photolithography. The question of sensor sensitivity of MOS nanomaterials and MOS thin films has been addressed

  13. Natural dye -sensitized mesoporous ZnO solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qishuang; Shen, Yue; Wu, Guizhi; Li, Linyu; Cao, Meng; Gu, Feng

    2011-02-01

    Natural dye-sensitized solar cells (N-DSSCs) were assembled using chlorophyll sensitized mesoporous ZnO (based on FTO) as the photoanode and platinum plate as the cathode. The natural dyes (chlorophyll) were extracted from spinach by simple procedure. The absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of chlorophyll were studied. Mesoporous ZnO (m-ZnO) applied to the N-DSSCs was synthesized through hydrothermal method. The structures and morphologies were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and diffuse reflection. The results indicated that the samples had an average pore size of 17 nm and the m-ZnO was hexagonal wurtzite structure. The performances of the N-DSSCs were investigated under AM 1.5G illumination. The Voc of the N-DSSCs was about 480mv, and the Isc was about 470μA. The performance of the N-DSSCs could be further improved by adjusting its structure.

  14. Natural dye -sensitized mesoporous ZnO solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qishuang; Shen, Yue; Wu, Guizhi; Li, Linyu; Cao, Meng; Gu, Feng

    2010-10-01

    Natural dye-sensitized solar cells (N-DSSCs) were assembled using chlorophyll sensitized mesoporous ZnO (based on FTO) as the photoanode and platinum plate as the cathode. The natural dyes (chlorophyll) were extracted from spinach by simple procedure. The absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of chlorophyll were studied. Mesoporous ZnO (m-ZnO) applied to the N-DSSCs was synthesized through hydrothermal method. The structures and morphologies were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and diffuse reflection. The results indicated that the samples had an average pore size of 17 nm and the m-ZnO was hexagonal wurtzite structure. The performances of the N-DSSCs were investigated under AM 1.5G illumination. The Voc of the N-DSSCs was about 480mv, and the Isc was about 470μA. The performance of the N-DSSCs could be further improved by adjusting its structure.

  15. Evidence for photogenerated intermediate hole polarons in ZnO.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Hikmet; Shang, Honghui; Bebensee, Fabian; Yang, Chengwu; Buchholz, Maria; Nefedov, Alexei; Heissler, Stefan; Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick; Wöll, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Despite their pronounced importance for oxide-based photochemistry, optoelectronics and photovoltaics, only fairly little is known about the polaron lifetimes and binding energies. Polarons represent a crucial intermediate step populated immediately after dissociation of the excitons formed in the primary photoabsorption process. Here we present a novel approach to studying photoexcited polarons in an important photoactive oxide, ZnO, using infrared (IR) reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) with a time resolution of 100 ms. For well-defined (10-10) oriented ZnO single-crystal substrates, we observe intense IR absorption bands at around 200 meV exhibiting a pronounced temperature dependence. On the basis of first-principles-based electronic structure calculations, we assign these features to hole polarons of intermediate coupling strength. PMID:25902307

  16. Structural, morphological and electroluminescence studies of Zno:Co nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anju; Vishwakarma, H. L.

    2016-09-01

    The nanoparticles of zinc oxide (ZnO) doped with various concentrations of cobalt (Co) were synthesized by chemical precipitation method in the presence of capping agent polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effect of doping concentration on structural and morphological properties has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cell volume, bond length, texture coefficient, lattice constants and dislocation density are also studied. Here, we also compared the interplaner spacing and relative peak intensities from their standard values with different angles. Crystallite sizes have been calculated by Debye-Scherrer's formula whose values are decreasing with increase in cobalt content up to 3 %. It has been seen that the growth orientation of the prepared ZnO nanorods was (101). The XRD analysis also ensures that ZnO has a hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure. The electroluminescence (EL) cells were prepared by placing pure and cobalt-doped ZnO nanoparticles between ITO-coated conducting glass plate and aluminium foil. Alternating voltage of various frequencies was applied, and EL brightness at different voltages was measured and corresponding current was also recorded. The voltage dependence of electroluminescence (EL) brightness of the ZnO:Co shows exponential increase. The linear voltage-current characteristic indicates ohmic nature. The EL brightness at a particular voltage is found to increase by increasing Co doping, but for higher percentage of Co the EL brightness is reduced. It is also seen that Co does not influence the threshold voltage. The brightness is also affected by increasing the frequency of AC signal.

  17. Structure of grain boundaries in nanostructured ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Zhou, Yingxue; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Shiqiang; Chen, Dongliang

    2004-05-01

    The grain boundary (GB) of nanocrystalline ZnO films is investigated using the x-ray absorption fine structure technique. With the advantage of the dominant GB volume fraction in our samples, the GB structure is found to be neither simply "gas-like" nor "similar to that of coarse-grained phase," but experiences a transition from the modestly ordered innermost coordination shell around centered atoms to partly disordered second coordination shell and then to completely disordered higher coordination shells.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO and Ni doped ZnO nanorods by thermal decomposition method for spintronics application

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, R.; Santhi, Kalavathy; Sivakumar, N.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2012-05-15

    Zinc oxide nanorods and diluted magnetic semiconducting Ni doped ZnO nanorods were prepared by thermal decomposition method. This method is simple and cost effective. The decomposition temperature of acetate and formation of oxide were determined by TGA before the actual synthesis process. The X-ray diffraction result indicates the single phase hexagonal structure of zinc oxide. The transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images show rod like structure of ZnO and Ni doped ZnO samples with the diameter {approx} 35 nm and the length in few micrometers. The surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The Ni doped ZnO exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism. This diluted magnetic semiconducting Ni doped ZnO nanorods finds its application in spintronics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method used is very simple and cost effective compared to all other methods for the preparation DMS materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO and Ni doped ZnO nanorods Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetism at room temperature.

  19. Well-integrated ZnO nanorod arrays on conductive textiles by electrochemical synthesis and their physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Kim, Myung Sub; Park, Wook; Yu, Jae Su

    2013-01-01

    We reported well-integrated zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays (NRAs) on conductive textiles (CTs) and their structural and optical properties. The integrated ZnO NRAs were synthesized by cathodic electrochemical deposition on the ZnO seed layer-coated CT substrate in ultrasonic bath. The ZnO NRAs were regularly and densely grown as well as vertically aligned on the overall surface of CT substrate, in comparison with the grown ZnO NRAs without ZnO seed layer or ultrasonication. Additionally, their morphologies and sizes can be efficiently controlled by changing the external cathodic voltage between the ZnO seed-coated CT substrate and the counter electrode. At an external cathodic voltage of -2 V, the photoluminescence property of ZnO NRAs was optimized with good crystallinity and high density.

  20. Spatially controlled growth of highly crystalline ZnO nanowires by an inkjet-printing catalyst-free method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güell, Frank; Martínez-Alanis, Paulina R.; Khachadorian, Sevak; Zamani, Reza R.; Franke, Alexander; Hoffmann, Axel; Wagner, Markus R.; Santana, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    High-density arrays of uniform ZnO nanowires with a high-crystal quality have been synthesized by a catalyst-free vapor-transport method. First, a thin ZnO film was deposited on a Si substrate as nucleation layer for the ZnO nanowires. Second, spatially selective and mask-less growth of ZnO nanowires was achieved using inkjet-printed patterned islands as the nucleation sites on a SiO2/Si substrate. Raman scattering and low temperature photoluminescence measurements were applied to characterize the structural and optical properties of the ZnO nanowires. The results reveal negligible amounts of strain and defects in the mask-less ZnO nanowires as compared to the ones grown on the ZnO thin film, which underlines the potential of the inkjet-printing approach for the growth of high-crystal quality ZnO nanowires.